The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Is There a Connection Between These Two Headlines?
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From Outside:

Why Do Rich People Love Endurance Sports?

Cycling, running, and obstacle course racing are dominated by white-collar workers. And while disposable income makes competing more feasible, researchers are also starting to discover a psychological pull that draws these people to masochistic events.

By: Brad Stulberg Aug 3, 2017

From RunRepeat:

American Runners Have Never Been Slower (Mega Study)

For this Mega Study, we have analyzed 34,680,750 results from 28,732 different races.

American race runners are steadily getting slower across all four major race distances – 5 Kilometer, 10 Kilometer, Half Marathon, and Marathon.

In this study, we analyze how Americans’ health influences their running performance.

The jogging boom that started in the early 1970s appears to have been the product of a huge number of prosperous, well-educated Baby Boomers. Today, road races continue to be popular in terms of number of participants, but the number of serious runners appears to be well down.

 
Hide 105 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. guest says:

    I don’t know about the competitive side, but skinniness is an obsession of the upper class, and is one of the major ways they separate themselves from middle and lower classes. “Masochistic events” help you be skinny.

    The men don’t go for weightlifting or blood sports because a disproportionate share are homos, obviously. But also because they want to be skinny, too. (Aren’t we all homos now, really?)

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    Deer hunting is homosexual? You are deranged.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/is-there-a-connection-between-these-two-headlines/#comment-1965407
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. O'Really says:

    Why are cyclists such douchebags?

    Read More
    • LOL: E. Rekshun
    • Replies: @bomag

    Why are cyclists such douchebags?
     
    The comic "Pearls Before Swine" gets hilarious mileage out of this observation.
    , @David
    I think it's the adrenaline. Makes them prone to rage.

    Traffic is dangerous in a way most athletic activities don't expose you to.

    , @Forbes
    Probably because people step out in front of cyclists--whether looking or not. Something they wouldn't do with a car.
    , @JimB
    I dunno, but it seems to be the case. In the Bay Area, cyclists have a holier than thou attitude because they think they are saving the planet by using pedal power instead of fossil fuels. Of course, all the extra carbon from unnecessary auto braking caused by bicycles randomly swinging out into traffic should be taken into account. Then there is the methane spewing out of cyclists tailpipes, resulting from their arugula based diet, expanding the hole in the ozone layer.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. Anonym says:

    The once-20yo baby boomers of the early 1970s are now around 65 and due for their first knee replacements. Generation X+ see what the baby boomer generation have done to their knees and think “No Chariots of Fire for me, thankyouverymuch.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    If they've been doing endurance running since the '70s, they've probably already had joint replacements. I've known of running addicts in their 30s with knee or hip replacements. It doesn't seem that healthy for an average person to run more than 20 or so miles per week. If you weigh 90 pounds, you could run more than that, I suppose.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Most of the endurance activities and exercise done by white collar workers is a form of “lazy exercise.” Back in the 70s when the jogging boom started, we were told that the ideal exercise regimen was an hour of cardio several times a week. This sort of cardio is boring but not particularly hard, which is why you can do it watching TV screens or listening to podcasts. It’s “lazy exercise” because it’s not intense at all; it’s just long in duration. White collar workers are just more disciplined and good at showing up on time and sticking to schedules, which is why they follow the regimen they were told to by experts. Intense activity and exercise are anaerobic and involve lactic acid buildup and release of growth hormone, which makes you nauseous and throw up and can’t be done at a continuous pace for long periods of time. Intense exercise is concentrated in short durations during which one can feel physically ill and as if they were going to die. That’s the really masochistic exercise. Most of the cardio “lazy exercise” people do is not particularly hard in its performance. Its chronic nature is what damages joints and organs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Jogging isn't a "lazy exercise". It's hard for most people. They sweat, they breathe hard, and there's lots of pounding.

    The man most responsible for the whole jogging/running trend is probably Kenneth Cooper, who coined the term "aerobics" if memory serves. He came up with the running component of the Air Force and Army physical fitness test.

    Mark Rippetoe has several acolytes who are military officers, and they've been trying to pushback in favor of a more strength-oriented test.
    , @Wilkey
    "Intense exercise is concentrated in short durations during which one can feel physically ill and as if they were going to die. That’s the really masochistic exercise. Most of the cardio “lazy exercise” people do is not particularly hard in its performance."

    Yep. HIIT is also the best way to make real improvements in performance.

    A lot of those race times are from people with zero interest in speed who just run in them because they set a goal to run in a race or because everyone else is doing it. I'll bet if you looked only at serious runners the times would be the same or better.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    After 30 minutes on the mill at 6.5 mph I'm soaked in sweat and when I stop I'm sat with my head down for a minute or two recovering - it's not that lazy. Mind, I'm nearly 60 and could lose twenty pounds.

    If you have the time, walking up steep hills is the thing. Do the same walk week after week and you can feel the improvement (and you get up quicker).
    , @unpc downunder
    The two main characteristics of endurance athletes are high conscientiousness and mediocre athleticism. It doesn't require a lot of athletic skill to be good at long-distance running, hence it's a great sport for uncoordinated high IQ people with strong work ethics. Another popular sport for successful high IQ people is rowing. In contrast short-duration sports that require a high degree of athleticism appeal to athletically talented people with low levels of conscientiousness.This is one of the reasons why black people are over-represented in sprinting, football and basketball.
    , @E. Rekshun
    @#3: Re "lazy exercise" - Yes! Aside from the joint damage from jogging, I guess it's better than sitting on the couch. An hour at a non-intense pace on the elliptical machine probably burns, maybe, 400 calories. And I think, over time, doing these routine, mindless "lazy exercises," your body just gets used to it and treats the effort as normal, status quo, and practically no extra calories are burned. A good friend did what he needed to do to pass the regular PT tests for 20 years in the Army. After getting out, he took up long slow distance running and cycling. Very little to no weightlifting. Ten years and two knee replacements later, he's added sprint triathlons. But he carries 20 lbs of extra fat. The long, slow, "lazy exercising" isn't doing anything for his physique.

    I've never run farther than 5K and have never run more than ten miles per week. Twenty years ago, at age 30, I could run run a 5K in 17 minutes; now 20 minutes. Race times are getting slower because the older boomers and younger boomers, like myself, are getting older; and the Gen-Xers and Millennials aren't participating in road races in the same numbers.

    About a year ago, I changed my runs to a fast-paced one-mile, followed by four 100-yard wind sprints, every third day. Forty-five minutes of stretching and weights every day. Feel great; lean; no joint pain!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonym
    The once-20yo baby boomers of the early 1970s are now around 65 and due for their first knee replacements. Generation X+ see what the baby boomer generation have done to their knees and think "No Chariots of Fire for me, thankyouverymuch."

    If they’ve been doing endurance running since the ’70s, they’ve probably already had joint replacements. I’ve known of running addicts in their 30s with knee or hip replacements. It doesn’t seem that healthy for an average person to run more than 20 or so miles per week. If you weigh 90 pounds, you could run more than that, I suppose.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TheJester
    Yes, as I've aged, I've seen many of my colleagues and friends who religiously jogged or ran get early knee replacements. Fortunately, I was too lazy during the Baby Boomer jogging craze to take it seriously. To me, jogging was an animated walk through the forest.

    At the end of the day, that didn't save my knees. Lyme's Disease (that nasty tick) got me last summer. The knee pain immobilized me for a month. I'm still in recovery and hopeful my knee replacements are still years into the future. (A warning: If you walk, jog, or cycle in Lyme's Country, do yourself a favor and armor yourself against ticks. You DON'T want that experience.)

    How privileged we are! Joint replacement technology had its birthing pains in the 1950s and has only been perfected in the last few decades. (My wife is recovering from her second hip replacement ... now a routine commodity operation.) Before that, as people aged and got the (joint) pains, they had no choice but to take to their chairs or beds and wait for the end of their lives.
    , @Richard
    It surprises me how we, as a culture, seem not to see any problem with running on concrete. I was a kid in the '80s when every baseball fan knew that Andre Dawson had wrecked his knees running on Astroturf, which was basically carpet laid over concrete flooring. That childhood life lesson has never left my mind. When I've run on concrete myself, it's uncomfortable --- there's no "give" like there is on earth and grass, and you can feel joint pressure more intensely. It never feels anywhere near as bad sprinting on grass. Yet every morning there's a series of haggard-looking joggers going down my hard-surface sidewalk in what must be steady discomfort.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. Great natural co-ordination is still a God given talent. One can with diligent practice become a good golfer, tennis player, or what have you but even if you start early on if you don’t have the right genes you will never be a champion. Frankly I don’t know why most duffers don’t just play with seven clubs off the shortest tee and enjoy the nice walk in the countryside that golf provides.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  7. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    It’s impressive that Jeff Bezos has been lifting weights, despite the endurance bias among his class. Fellow Seattle billionaire Howard Shultz being a hard core cyclist, for example.

    Speaking of which: other than accidents, which can be pretty dangerous, endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact, and the lack of an eccentric component means less soreness.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Endurance cycling has its own dangers, like hemorrhoids and prostate enlargement.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Dave:

    … endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact …
     
    Anonymous:

    Endurance cycling has its own dangers, like hemorrhoids and prostate enlargement.
     
    This device prevents both running impact and crotch compression. Best if used in a designated SWPL safe zone:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUpd2AfsFU4
    , @Triumph104
    Howard Schultz is a jock. He grew up playing baseball, basketball, and football, and attended Northern Michigan University on a football scholarship.

    Schultz grew up blue collar and lived in public housing. His father was a truck driver.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. They’re just tired, that’s all.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  9. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Speaking of which: other than accidents, which can be pretty dangerous, endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact, and the lack of an eccentric component means less soreness.

    That is a knowledgable insight.

    btw, as a boomer, I’ve noticed the slow but sure physical feminization of male millennials, and I don’t quite understand it. They don’t seem to know how to fight well, and they tend to be skinny from just not eating much, and not working out much, while mil women tend to be overweight. Just these big women. They wear these black spandex things that highlight the fact that their butts are tremendously wide, but still flat! In their twenties! What the hell?

    Whatsmore, I notice these smaller, thin young men walking with their arms around these big, heavy women with no shame whatsoever. I mean some of these women are almost beyond Vespa women! I think some of these young men turn feminist out of fear of literally getting their asses kicked.

    I don’t get what exactly is going on, but it smacks of the decline of Rome, and it’s not good.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Travis
    so true...seeing it now spreading to Chile. First time I net to Chile was 2001 , saw almost no fat girls under the age of 30. during my 2017 visit it was quite different, with half the girls under 30 being overweight , each year there are less kids playing soccer in the playgrounds , more fast food joints
    , @Anonymous

    I’ve noticed the slow but sure physical feminization of male millennials,
     
    I've noticed this. What I've also noticed is that a heck of a lot of them talk like gays, they have that gay sounding voice and manner of speaking. They can't all be gay so what's with the faggy sound? Weird.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    High fructose corn syrup for one possible answer.
    , @Lurker
    Vespa women - your mileage may vary.
    , @E. Rekshun
    I’ve noticed the slow but sure physical feminization of male millennials

    Yep. The ones I know and work with don't know anything about auto repair or fixing things, or have any interest in outdoor activities.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Dave Pinsen
    It's impressive that Jeff Bezos has been lifting weights, despite the endurance bias among his class. Fellow Seattle billionaire Howard Shultz being a hard core cyclist, for example.

    Speaking of which: other than accidents, which can be pretty dangerous, endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don't have the impact, and the lack of an eccentric component means less soreness.

    Endurance cycling has its own dangers, like hemorrhoids and prostate enlargement.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    That makes sense.
    , @Bugg
    The heat from the cycling motion knocks down sperm counts. Every form of exercise has it's drawbacks. One friend was a championship powertlifter. But now in his 60s spinal stenosis is doing a number on his back. Your muscles can take a lot , but your joints and spinal cord can only take so much. A friend who was competitive Division I runner and marathoner required a knee replacement in his 40s.
    , @Kyle
    Or testicular cancer.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. eded says:

    Why do rich people love endurance sports? That’s a great question, on the other hand why are strength sports so working class? Powerlifting (squat, deadlift, bench press) appears to be extremely working class. see Louie simmons and his West Side Barbell gym.

    Are certain somatotypes found more frequently in different classes and as a result different classes gravitate to towards different sports?

    I believe it was Paul Fussell that said that the modern suit flattered the thin physique of upper class men who don’t do physical labour, while making more heavily muscled working class men look ridiculous.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Soccer stars David Beckham and Wayne Rooney are pretty similar in class background, but Beckham looks upper class while Rooney looks prole:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/facial-width-and-class/

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.

    , @Wilkey
    "Why do rich people love endurance sports? That’s a great question, on the other hand why are strength sports so working class? Powerlifting (squat, deadlift, bench press) appears to be extremely working class."

    Endurance sports are associated with increased energy, improved cardiovascular health, and weight reduction - those tend to be concerns of educated people, who also have the self-control to stick with the program. White collar workers also live in nice neighnrohoods where it's safe to jog. Blue collar jobs have traditionally required physical strength, so lifting was valued. Even if your job doesnt require it they tend to hang around a lot of people who do.

    The barriers are breaking down, though. Plenty of guys in my office are now lifting. There's a greater emphasis these days on the value of strength training and its importance in retaining muscle mass as you age. It also just plain damn makes you look better, even if you aren't going for the ripped look. Deadlifts and squats? Hands down two of the most efficient exercises for increasing strength.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. @eded
    Why do rich people love endurance sports? That's a great question, on the other hand why are strength sports so working class? Powerlifting (squat, deadlift, bench press) appears to be extremely working class. see Louie simmons and his West Side Barbell gym.

    Are certain somatotypes found more frequently in different classes and as a result different classes gravitate to towards different sports?

    I believe it was Paul Fussell that said that the modern suit flattered the thin physique of upper class men who don't do physical labour, while making more heavily muscled working class men look ridiculous.

    Soccer stars David Beckham and Wayne Rooney are pretty similar in class background, but Beckham looks upper class while Rooney looks prole:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/facial-width-and-class/

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Probably because Rooney is and looks very Irish, and the Irish have historically been lower class in England.
    , @Karl
    > Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not

    before a suit needs anything else - it needs to be made to measure
    , @NickG

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.
     
    Until he opens his mouth. Then there are his tas, Beckham's done as much as anybody to promulgate and popularise this godawful prol practice.
    , @Anon
    You are american. Beckham is handsome, in a very lower class way.
    , @SonOfStrom
    Rooney's problem is he looks like a fattened-up versions of Red hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    Soccer stars David Beckham and Wayne Rooney are pretty similar in class background, but Beckham looks upper class while Rooney looks prole:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/facial-width-and-class/

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.

    Probably because Rooney is and looks very Irish, and the Irish have historically been lower class in England.

    Read More
    • Agree: PV van der Byl
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous
    Most of the endurance activities and exercise done by white collar workers is a form of "lazy exercise." Back in the 70s when the jogging boom started, we were told that the ideal exercise regimen was an hour of cardio several times a week. This sort of cardio is boring but not particularly hard, which is why you can do it watching TV screens or listening to podcasts. It's "lazy exercise" because it's not intense at all; it's just long in duration. White collar workers are just more disciplined and good at showing up on time and sticking to schedules, which is why they follow the regimen they were told to by experts. Intense activity and exercise are anaerobic and involve lactic acid buildup and release of growth hormone, which makes you nauseous and throw up and can't be done at a continuous pace for long periods of time. Intense exercise is concentrated in short durations during which one can feel physically ill and as if they were going to die. That's the really masochistic exercise. Most of the cardio "lazy exercise" people do is not particularly hard in its performance. Its chronic nature is what damages joints and organs.

    Jogging isn’t a “lazy exercise”. It’s hard for most people. They sweat, they breathe hard, and there’s lots of pounding.

    The man most responsible for the whole jogging/running trend is probably Kenneth Cooper, who coined the term “aerobics” if memory serves. He came up with the running component of the Air Force and Army physical fitness test.

    Mark Rippetoe has several acolytes who are military officers, and they’ve been trying to pushback in favor of a more strength-oriented test.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Karl
    12 Dave Pinsen > He came up with the running component of the Air Force and Army physical fitness test


    man oh manoshevitz, just THINK what those Roman Legions could have done to us if the Roman drill-instructors had only known about forced-runs for BootCamp maggots

    i've still got my copy of the US Army Technical Manual for handling Pack Mules
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous
    Endurance cycling has its own dangers, like hemorrhoids and prostate enlargement.

    That makes sense.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. Bill P says:

    Older and fatter. ‘Nuff said.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  17. Wilkey says:
    @Anonymous
    Most of the endurance activities and exercise done by white collar workers is a form of "lazy exercise." Back in the 70s when the jogging boom started, we were told that the ideal exercise regimen was an hour of cardio several times a week. This sort of cardio is boring but not particularly hard, which is why you can do it watching TV screens or listening to podcasts. It's "lazy exercise" because it's not intense at all; it's just long in duration. White collar workers are just more disciplined and good at showing up on time and sticking to schedules, which is why they follow the regimen they were told to by experts. Intense activity and exercise are anaerobic and involve lactic acid buildup and release of growth hormone, which makes you nauseous and throw up and can't be done at a continuous pace for long periods of time. Intense exercise is concentrated in short durations during which one can feel physically ill and as if they were going to die. That's the really masochistic exercise. Most of the cardio "lazy exercise" people do is not particularly hard in its performance. Its chronic nature is what damages joints and organs.

    “Intense exercise is concentrated in short durations during which one can feel physically ill and as if they were going to die. That’s the really masochistic exercise. Most of the cardio “lazy exercise” people do is not particularly hard in its performance.”

    Yep. HIIT is also the best way to make real improvements in performance.

    A lot of those race times are from people with zero interest in speed who just run in them because they set a goal to run in a race or because everyone else is doing it. I’ll bet if you looked only at serious runners the times would be the same or better.

    Read More
    • Agree: Travis, Triumph104
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  18. dearieme says:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Deckin
    What the hell?!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. Wilkey says:
    @eded
    Why do rich people love endurance sports? That's a great question, on the other hand why are strength sports so working class? Powerlifting (squat, deadlift, bench press) appears to be extremely working class. see Louie simmons and his West Side Barbell gym.

    Are certain somatotypes found more frequently in different classes and as a result different classes gravitate to towards different sports?

    I believe it was Paul Fussell that said that the modern suit flattered the thin physique of upper class men who don't do physical labour, while making more heavily muscled working class men look ridiculous.

    “Why do rich people love endurance sports? That’s a great question, on the other hand why are strength sports so working class? Powerlifting (squat, deadlift, bench press) appears to be extremely working class.”

    Endurance sports are associated with increased energy, improved cardiovascular health, and weight reduction – those tend to be concerns of educated people, who also have the self-control to stick with the program. White collar workers also live in nice neighnrohoods where it’s safe to jog. Blue collar jobs have traditionally required physical strength, so lifting was valued. Even if your job doesnt require it they tend to hang around a lot of people who do.

    The barriers are breaking down, though. Plenty of guys in my office are now lifting. There’s a greater emphasis these days on the value of strength training and its importance in retaining muscle mass as you age. It also just plain damn makes you look better, even if you aren’t going for the ripped look. Deadlifts and squats? Hands down two of the most efficient exercises for increasing strength.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Arclight
    Agree - Crossfit and lifting seem more popular, although that might just be my perspective from the inside looking out. We have a pretty nice cross-section of people at my gym doing Crossfit or Olympic lifting in terms of income, although I would say the largest group are people in their late 20s-early 30s who are probably in the $30-$60k a year range. Seems like half of the women are nurses for some reason.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. Karl says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Soccer stars David Beckham and Wayne Rooney are pretty similar in class background, but Beckham looks upper class while Rooney looks prole:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/facial-width-and-class/

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.

    > Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not

    before a suit needs anything else – it needs to be made to measure

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. NickG says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Soccer stars David Beckham and Wayne Rooney are pretty similar in class background, but Beckham looks upper class while Rooney looks prole:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/facial-width-and-class/

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.

    Until he opens his mouth. Then there are his tas, Beckham’s done as much as anybody to promulgate and popularise this godawful prol practice.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Taki went to a dinner with Beckham and Posh. He recounted that Becks was well-dressed, polite, and quiet.

    The idea that Beckham wants his four children to grow up to be members of the English upper class, and to help accomplish that he'll dress nice and keep his mouth shut at dinners with people who are much more articulate than him seems rather endearing.

    , @Glaivester

    Then there are his tas
     
    Please explain what you mean. I have no idea what a "ta" is.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. OT but related to previous discussion about Googling e.g. “american mathematicians”

    Try this one: Google “european people history”

    https://www.google.se/search?q=european+people+history&client=firefox-b&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjkm7evsNHVAhUHSJoKHS04AF4Q_AUICigB&biw=1920&bih=947

    Holy crap! Maybe some smart person here can explain this? I got similar results with every other search engine I tried. This is even more extreme than the “american” results, even though “african european” is not an idiom. This really looks to me like complete insanity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TheJester

    OT but related to previous discussion about Googling e.g. “american mathematicians”

    Try this one: Google “european people history”
     

    You've got to be kidding! There is no question that Google is now "fixing" its search results to support the Leftist social agenda. QED

    It seems that Google is now an unabashed arm of the radical Left and its narrative projection schemes. As James Damore said in his recent WSJ editorial:


    "Echo chambers (such as Google) maintain themselves by creating a shared spirit and keeping discussion confined within certain limits. As Noam Chomsky once observed, “The smart way to keep people passive and obedient is to strictly limit the spectrum of acceptable opinion, but allow very lively debate within that spectrum.”
     
    I've been experimenting with the DuckDuckGo search engine to replace Google. It did not generate the tainted results that you found with other search engines when querying European-People-History. It works as a Chrome extension. My experience is that DuckDuckGo gives me cleaner results than Google without tracking and without forthright attempts to propagandize the Cultural Marxist narratives.
    , @res

    Try this one: Google “european people history”
     
    That's a strange one. Duckduckgo gives similar results so it is not just Google. I looked at Google trends and there were not enough searches for it to give related searches (which is what makes the "American Scientists" etc. explanations obvious). There has been a large increase over the 13 year baseline in the last few weeks. Did this go viral somewhere?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. Karl says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Jogging isn't a "lazy exercise". It's hard for most people. They sweat, they breathe hard, and there's lots of pounding.

    The man most responsible for the whole jogging/running trend is probably Kenneth Cooper, who coined the term "aerobics" if memory serves. He came up with the running component of the Air Force and Army physical fitness test.

    Mark Rippetoe has several acolytes who are military officers, and they've been trying to pushback in favor of a more strength-oriented test.

    12 Dave Pinsen > He came up with the running component of the Air Force and Army physical fitness test

    man oh manoshevitz, just THINK what those Roman Legions could have done to us if the Roman drill-instructors had only known about forced-runs for BootCamp maggots

    i’ve still got my copy of the US Army Technical Manual for handling Pack Mules

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. @Dave Pinsen
    It's impressive that Jeff Bezos has been lifting weights, despite the endurance bias among his class. Fellow Seattle billionaire Howard Shultz being a hard core cyclist, for example.

    Speaking of which: other than accidents, which can be pretty dangerous, endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don't have the impact, and the lack of an eccentric component means less soreness.

    Dave:

    … endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact …

    Anonymous:

    Endurance cycling has its own dangers, like hemorrhoids and prostate enlargement.

    This device prevents both running impact and crotch compression. Best if used in a designated SWPL safe zone:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sparkon
    Those things are dangerous. I recall encountering several of these contraptions on Boulder, Colorado's superb "multi-use paths."

    What is the danger? They swerve from side to side, and hog the whole path.

    Whereas bicyclists, runners, and walkers follow a generally straight track, these fool things are all over the path as a matter of routine, because they follow a wavy, or sine-curve type path reacting to the force applied, Isaac Newton, and all.

    With a bicycle, the force is being applied up and down with the rotation of the pedals on the crank, so a bicycle follows a narrow, precise path when moving fast. Yes, when he is fighting his way up a steep hill, the rider is pounding the pedals, and the very slowly moving bicycle wants to move side to side, but the rider compensates with the handlebars so that the motion is pretty much straight ahead, except for the guys figuratively dying out there, who may be doing virtual switchbacks to get up the hill, when it's probably time to get off, and push, humiliation or not..

    But on a flat surface or gentle inclines at moderate speed, a bicycle is on the straight and narrow, which makes it much easier, and a whole lot safer, to share the driveway-wide path with others.

    Not so with these contraptions; they hog the whole path. Like reinventing the wheel, reinventing the bicycle is an exercise in futility, but there are always nitwits who fall for the latest thing, all inconvenience -- and danger -- to others be dammed!

    Another danger on a bike is something getting in the way of your front wheel. It doesn't take much to knock the front wheel off balance, or stop it -- even a water bottle can do it -- so the rider may be launched over the handlebars, or just crash, and fall down.

    I was talking to a med tech in Boulder once who related how head-on collisions between bicyclists on the multi-use paths were not uncommon, and "help keep us in business," she added.

    So I hasten to add, there are plenty of lunatics on bicycles. Because I ride slowly, and very alertly, I have been able to avoid several head-ons there myself.

    Once, a fool on a road bike going fast came around a big bend -- screened by vegetation -- on my side of the path, only 20 ft. ahead. He was riding no hands and fiddling with his iPod. I yelled at him, and got as far right as possible, millimeters from the edge, and he reacted instantly, young fool that he was, so that we merely brushed by each other within inches, instead of banging noggins -- I was going into the bushes before that happened anyway -- and it was all over in milliseconds.

    Dogs too are very dangerous to 'cyclists around bike paths because they are stupid -- no comment on the people walking them -- and it is not unusual for a dog to suddenly bolt this way or that, in front of cars -- too bad for the dog -- or in front of a bicyclist -- too bad for the rider. but yeah, spend your time walking a dog, and count on the Dog Poop Fairy to clean up your toy wolf's mess, as you bitch and moan about all the bicycle riders whizzing by you.

    Without exception, I will slow down, and/or steer clear around dogs and/or people walking them, leash or not, providing myself a wide margin of safety, a concept that seems to have been lost on our younger generations. Of course, they have "no fear," so there you are.

    Another gripe from this long-time bicycle-riding Baby Boomer is the electric, or motorized bicycle on multi-use paths. That's a motorbike, not a bicycle, and they should not be allowed in bike lanes, and belong in the street.

    The oldest Baby Boomers are turning 71 this year. My waist size is the same as it was when I was 17, and it was a very good year.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    This is what I do instead.

    On bench and overhead press days, after I do those barbell exercises I alternate sets of assistance work (chin-up grip lat pulldowns; dumbbell incline or military presses) with Prowler sled round trips and medicine ball slams.

    https://youtu.be/m3tEvuFkelI
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. @NickG

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.
     
    Until he opens his mouth. Then there are his tas, Beckham's done as much as anybody to promulgate and popularise this godawful prol practice.

    Taki went to a dinner with Beckham and Posh. He recounted that Becks was well-dressed, polite, and quiet.

    The idea that Beckham wants his four children to grow up to be members of the English upper class, and to help accomplish that he’ll dress nice and keep his mouth shut at dinners with people who are much more articulate than him seems rather endearing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sue D.Nim
    Have you heard Beckham speak?

    He's got a whiney, nasal voice.
    , @Veritatis
    But notice what he kindly didn't say, and which is glaringly obvious. A tailor just lets one meet the dress code.
    , @JimB
    Beckham should also prevent his kids from getting tattoos if he wants them to be upper class.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  26. @Anonymous
    Most of the endurance activities and exercise done by white collar workers is a form of "lazy exercise." Back in the 70s when the jogging boom started, we were told that the ideal exercise regimen was an hour of cardio several times a week. This sort of cardio is boring but not particularly hard, which is why you can do it watching TV screens or listening to podcasts. It's "lazy exercise" because it's not intense at all; it's just long in duration. White collar workers are just more disciplined and good at showing up on time and sticking to schedules, which is why they follow the regimen they were told to by experts. Intense activity and exercise are anaerobic and involve lactic acid buildup and release of growth hormone, which makes you nauseous and throw up and can't be done at a continuous pace for long periods of time. Intense exercise is concentrated in short durations during which one can feel physically ill and as if they were going to die. That's the really masochistic exercise. Most of the cardio "lazy exercise" people do is not particularly hard in its performance. Its chronic nature is what damages joints and organs.

    After 30 minutes on the mill at 6.5 mph I’m soaked in sweat and when I stop I’m sat with my head down for a minute or two recovering – it’s not that lazy. Mind, I’m nearly 60 and could lose twenty pounds.

    If you have the time, walking up steep hills is the thing. Do the same walk week after week and you can feel the improvement (and you get up quicker).

    Read More
    • Agree: James Richard
    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    I’m a 62 year old man, and I like to time myself running short distances. I run a half mile in 3:48, 1 mile in 8:30, 2 miles in 19:30, and 3 miles in 33:25. I used to walk for 2 to 3 hours at a time up and down hills. I find that short-distance running on the flat is much easier on my legs than long-distance walking in the hills. Also, running seems to have brought down my blood pressure, which walking never did.
    , @anonguy

    If you have the time, walking up steep hills is the thing
     
    Agree. Personally, I think one's body adapts to frequently/consistently working against gravity by developing a metabolic bias against putting on weight.

    That is, running up real stairs is better for you in this regard than a stair stepper or walking up real hills is better than an incline treadmill.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  27. Dilemna says:

    I notice nearly all of the “runners” I encounter start with a marathon or half marathon. This may give them a sense of accomplishment but it’s a recipe for never learning to run fast or pace yourself properly. My intuition is in the earlier years of running 5k and 10k races were much more popular.

    I always suggest runners learn to race a 5k fast and then move up to 10k and so on. They never do this.

    Another dynamic is unlike the 70s and 80s, there are East African runners all over the US and Canada dominate the prize spots for prestige races. If you are a talented US athlete and you want to be champion of something or other you are probably going into triathlons.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sunbeam

    If you are a talented US athlete and you want to be champion of something or other you are probably going into triathlons.
     
    Out of idle curiousity, I take it there is a relative lack of East Africans triathloning. Is it because of the swimming?

    Looking at that body type I'd expect them to be pretty good cyclists (or are they too tall?). Maybe not though.

    Come to think of it, neither here nor there, but I've actually seen Navy Seals. I did not talk to them or anything, but they all had this same body type: Short, skinny legs, barrel chests. And by short I mean shorter than 5'9." Actually they kind of looked like the Mexican/Indian bodytype people dump on all the time here. Only with white skin, because all those guys were white.

    And they love those reversible blue and gold shirts. Never wore anything else.
    , @Triumph104
    Agree. Lots of one and done. I have watched a handful of documentaries on running and noticed that a significant number of overweight people participate. I'm not talking about local races -- I mean overweight people are running in the Boston, Chicago, and New York marathons. Before the Chicago marathon, a woman rubbed KY jelly between her legs to prevent her thighs from chafing.

    NOVA's documentary trained 12 or 13 non-runners for the Boston marathon. Although most of the women appeared to be normal in size, all of the female participants were overweight and remained overweight despite the training. An obese woman, 70 pounds over, did lose 45 pounds with diet and additional exercise. (LINK)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  28. It’s amazing how boomers were wrong about EVERYTHING.

    jogging is probably the absolute worst way to exercise.

    I’d expect races to continue to suffer because nobody who cares about fitness or competition today is going to be a jogger. Culturally it’s become something annoying, shrewish women do as some kind astroturfed accomplishment.

    It requires neither talent nor victory over motivated peers to say you “did” a half marathon. 5ks and such are less associated with annoying women bragging about nothing but they do bring to mind the most boring kind of charity event.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Right on target. "Runners" are mostly annoying people. They say things like, "I ran the marathon in 8 1/2 hours!".

    Running is the perfect SWPL activity for our participation-medal age.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    Soccer stars David Beckham and Wayne Rooney are pretty similar in class background, but Beckham looks upper class while Rooney looks prole:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/facial-width-and-class/

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.

    You are american. Beckham is handsome, in a very lower class way.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  30. Sue D.Nim says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Taki went to a dinner with Beckham and Posh. He recounted that Becks was well-dressed, polite, and quiet.

    The idea that Beckham wants his four children to grow up to be members of the English upper class, and to help accomplish that he'll dress nice and keep his mouth shut at dinners with people who are much more articulate than him seems rather endearing.

    Have you heard Beckham speak?

    He’s got a whiney, nasal voice.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. bomag says:
    @O'Really
    Why are cyclists such douchebags?

    Why are cyclists such douchebags?

    The comic “Pearls Before Swine” gets hilarious mileage out of this observation.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  32. Forget the Seinfeld kerfluffle–is this a generational gap joke?

    Like are boomers hanging on to their precious Prefontaine or something? Because to millennials endurance sports only bring to mind effete, smarmy dorks (David Brooks should write THAT book) claiming stolen valor.

    The idea of a heroic distance runner is absurd because we hear about jogging “accomplishments” all the time in real life from people we rightfully suspect couldn’t play real sports in high school. Nobody wants to hear about that crap from their boss or the office suckup.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Marty
    This morning on the GGB there were a bunch of late 30-ish, white guys jogging wearing backpacks, which I've never noticed before. New sport of jogging with rocks?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  33. Veritatis says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Taki went to a dinner with Beckham and Posh. He recounted that Becks was well-dressed, polite, and quiet.

    The idea that Beckham wants his four children to grow up to be members of the English upper class, and to help accomplish that he'll dress nice and keep his mouth shut at dinners with people who are much more articulate than him seems rather endearing.

    But notice what he kindly didn’t say, and which is glaringly obvious. A tailor just lets one meet the dress code.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. TheJester says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    If they've been doing endurance running since the '70s, they've probably already had joint replacements. I've known of running addicts in their 30s with knee or hip replacements. It doesn't seem that healthy for an average person to run more than 20 or so miles per week. If you weigh 90 pounds, you could run more than that, I suppose.

    Yes, as I’ve aged, I’ve seen many of my colleagues and friends who religiously jogged or ran get early knee replacements. Fortunately, I was too lazy during the Baby Boomer jogging craze to take it seriously. To me, jogging was an animated walk through the forest.

    At the end of the day, that didn’t save my knees. Lyme’s Disease (that nasty tick) got me last summer. The knee pain immobilized me for a month. I’m still in recovery and hopeful my knee replacements are still years into the future. (A warning: If you walk, jog, or cycle in Lyme’s Country, do yourself a favor and armor yourself against ticks. You DON’T want that experience.)

    How privileged we are! Joint replacement technology had its birthing pains in the 1950s and has only been perfected in the last few decades. (My wife is recovering from her second hip replacement … now a routine commodity operation.) Before that, as people aged and got the (joint) pains, they had no choice but to take to their chairs or beds and wait for the end of their lives.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  35. Robard says:

    Haven’t Americans grown taller during that period? Tall people are necessarily heavier than short ones at a given BMI and over long distances gravity can be a drag. Besides, it is implausible that numbers of unhealthy people are participating in marathons to begin with and that doesn’t even begin to explain why the top runners have slowed down even more than the lower tier ones.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  36. Slightly OT

    “Is There a Connection Between Fab 1 and Fab 44? ” :

    Civil Rights Activist DeRay Mckesson to Join New Baltimore City Schools Cabinet

    http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/bs-md-ci-deray-mckesson-appointment-20160628-story.html

    “At its core, this role is about finding great people, matching them to the right role, and helping them to develop and experience careers in the service of our kids,” Mckesson said.

    “I am excited to return to city schools … and to continue doing the work to ensure that every child in Baltimore City receives a world-class education.”

    How Can a High School with Zero Students Proficient in Math, Have One of the Highest Graduation Rates in Baltimore City?

    http://foxbaltimore.com/news/project-baltimore

    “…Project Baltimore has spoken with four employees of this school.

    Their identities are being protected due to the nature of the allegations and because they fear retaliation.

    These educators had serious concerns about how students are graduating and what they describe as a pressure to pass seniors at any cost – a 2017 graduating class referred to at NACA II as the “Fabulous 44”.

    “The focus was to have the fabulous 44 graduate,” one educator told Fox45.

    “No matter what. We were told that in January.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Such an achievement, graduating from high school!!!!! Put them all on the front page of the NYSlimes, Wash Post and on the covers of all the magazines!!!!

    What's normal and expected of Whites is an award winning major accomplishment for blacks.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. Travis says:
    @anonymous

    Speaking of which: other than accidents, which can be pretty dangerous, endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact, and the lack of an eccentric component means less soreness.
     
    That is a knowledgable insight.

    btw, as a boomer, I've noticed the slow but sure physical feminization of male millennials, and I don't quite understand it. They don't seem to know how to fight well, and they tend to be skinny from just not eating much, and not working out much, while mil women tend to be overweight. Just these big women. They wear these black spandex things that highlight the fact that their butts are tremendously wide, but still flat! In their twenties! What the hell?

    Whatsmore, I notice these smaller, thin young men walking with their arms around these big, heavy women with no shame whatsoever. I mean some of these women are almost beyond Vespa women! I think some of these young men turn feminist out of fear of literally getting their asses kicked.

    I don't get what exactly is going on, but it smacks of the decline of Rome, and it's not good.

    so true…seeing it now spreading to Chile. First time I net to Chile was 2001 , saw almost no fat girls under the age of 30. during my 2017 visit it was quite different, with half the girls under 30 being overweight , each year there are less kids playing soccer in the playgrounds , more fast food joints

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  38. Glaivester says: • Website
    @NickG

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.
     
    Until he opens his mouth. Then there are his tas, Beckham's done as much as anybody to promulgate and popularise this godawful prol practice.

    Then there are his tas

    Please explain what you mean. I have no idea what a “ta” is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker
    I think that's tats - tattoos.
    , @NickG
    I mis-typed 'tats', as in tatoos.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  39. Robard says:

    Haven’t Americans grown taller during that period? Tall people are necessarily heavier than short ones at a given BMI and over long distances gravity can be a drag. Besides, it is implausible that numbers of unhealthy people are participating in marathons to begin with and that doesn’t even begin to explain why the top runners have slowed down even more than the lower tier ones.

    Steve pointed out many years ago that Hispanic immigrants were dragging down the average height of Americans, hence any diachronic correlation between height and running times will have to be teased out on a sub-population level. A synchronic analysis of current runners would be very informative if not predictive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    I don't think it's just Mexicans. When you meet Europeans, they seem to be much taller than Americans. I'm 6' so not so short in the US, but the times I've been around European groups, I feel positively short.
    , @E. Rekshun
    Hispanic immigrants were dragging down the average height of Americans,

    And Hispanic immigrants don't run road races. And neither do blacks.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  40. TheJester says:
    @Tim Howells
    OT but related to previous discussion about Googling e.g. "american mathematicians"

    Try this one: Google "european people history"

    https://www.google.se/search?q=european+people+history&client=firefox-b&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjkm7evsNHVAhUHSJoKHS04AF4Q_AUICigB&biw=1920&bih=947

    Holy crap! Maybe some smart person here can explain this? I got similar results with every other search engine I tried. This is even more extreme than the "american" results, even though "african european" is not an idiom. This really looks to me like complete insanity.

    OT but related to previous discussion about Googling e.g. “american mathematicians”

    Try this one: Google “european people history”

    You’ve got to be kidding! There is no question that Google is now “fixing” its search results to support the Leftist social agenda. QED

    It seems that Google is now an unabashed arm of the radical Left and its narrative projection schemes. As James Damore said in his recent WSJ editorial:

    “Echo chambers (such as Google) maintain themselves by creating a shared spirit and keeping discussion confined within certain limits. As Noam Chomsky once observed, “The smart way to keep people passive and obedient is to strictly limit the spectrum of acceptable opinion, but allow very lively debate within that spectrum.”

    I’ve been experimenting with the DuckDuckGo search engine to replace Google. It did not generate the tainted results that you found with other search engines when querying European-People-History. It works as a Chrome extension. My experience is that DuckDuckGo gives me cleaner results than Google without tracking and without forthright attempts to propagandize the Cultural Marxist narratives.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  41. Arclight says:
    @Wilkey
    "Why do rich people love endurance sports? That’s a great question, on the other hand why are strength sports so working class? Powerlifting (squat, deadlift, bench press) appears to be extremely working class."

    Endurance sports are associated with increased energy, improved cardiovascular health, and weight reduction - those tend to be concerns of educated people, who also have the self-control to stick with the program. White collar workers also live in nice neighnrohoods where it's safe to jog. Blue collar jobs have traditionally required physical strength, so lifting was valued. Even if your job doesnt require it they tend to hang around a lot of people who do.

    The barriers are breaking down, though. Plenty of guys in my office are now lifting. There's a greater emphasis these days on the value of strength training and its importance in retaining muscle mass as you age. It also just plain damn makes you look better, even if you aren't going for the ripped look. Deadlifts and squats? Hands down two of the most efficient exercises for increasing strength.

    Agree – Crossfit and lifting seem more popular, although that might just be my perspective from the inside looking out. We have a pretty nice cross-section of people at my gym doing Crossfit or Olympic lifting in terms of income, although I would say the largest group are people in their late 20s-early 30s who are probably in the $30-$60k a year range. Seems like half of the women are nurses for some reason.

    Read More
    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @prosa123
    An interesting thing about Crossfit is that its followers are almost evenly divided between men and women.
    , @Bastion
    I will confirm this observation. I started working out at a Crossfit gym about 9 months ago and most people are middling income, teachers, nurses. But the membership runs the gamut. We have guys who load trucks working out with lawyers and obstetricians. I've tried many fitness routines over the years, but I'm finding that doing the classic Olympic lifts is hard to beat for intensity and results. Many of my workouts are in the 10-12 minute range and I am smoked.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  42. Travis says:

    I recall attending 10K races in the late 70s and early 80s to watch my mother and her friends race….very few were older than 40 , the average age was closer to 30. Today it seems the average age of participants is over 40. Not surprised that the times have fallen as the average age of participants must be 15-20 older than in 1980.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  43. 8ER says:

    This post struck a chord. My background: raised *very* blue collar (midwest farm boy and construction work) and now *very* white collar (suburban metro Denver attorney). Competitive distance runner in HS. Competitive road racer (always top 5% to 10% finisher) throughout 20s in college and law school. Time off for kids in 30s. Triathlons and mountain biking in 40s and added Spartan races in 50s.

    Top tier competitive runners are not slowing down in any material fashion. The statistical evidence in the article is due almost entirely to: (1) the increase in participation of recreational athletes in the sport, especially in “non-competitive” events (i.e., Race for The Cure, etc.); (2) the disproportionate number of women who comprise the increase in participation in these non-competitive events (these “Race for the XXX” events are heavily skewed toward *very* recreational female participants); (3) aging of the bell curve of participants (we slow down as we age), especially for men. In a nutshell, the speedy young people, and especially young men, are an increasingly smaller proportion of the participants.

    And endurance sports are skewed toward white collar workers precisely because we sit on our asses at a desk all day, while blue collar workers are physically spent by the end of a day. Getting up at 4:30 to milk cows and then working on the farm all day leaves little time or energy for an evening run. That article was just plain silly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Apparently, you didn't read the second article. The authors investigated some of your theories, and they don't pan out.

    Also, the first article acknowledges the structural lifestyle differences that come into play, but they don't answer a question like, "why is triathlon the white collar sport now instead of tennis?" The article wasn't silly at all. It's actually very sensible and makes an interesting critique of all the changes that have taken place in society since about 1980.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  44. prosa123 says: • Website
    @Arclight
    Agree - Crossfit and lifting seem more popular, although that might just be my perspective from the inside looking out. We have a pretty nice cross-section of people at my gym doing Crossfit or Olympic lifting in terms of income, although I would say the largest group are people in their late 20s-early 30s who are probably in the $30-$60k a year range. Seems like half of the women are nurses for some reason.

    An interesting thing about Crossfit is that its followers are almost evenly divided between men and women.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Benjamin I. Espen
    I also find it interesting how popular CrossFit is with women. It is precisely the kind of thing you would expect to be completely dominated by bros, and it just...isn't.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  45. Fairly simple. It’s like the relationship of powerlifting and Olympic weightlifting.

    There are a number of people who are into powerlifting and crossfit that are perhaps stronger than Olympic weightlifters, but consider that sort of lifting either wimpy (powerlifters) or “boring” (crossfitters)

    While all these “superendurance” athletes may or may not be really good athletes, they can’t be bothered with “just” a 10k/marathon.

    (Also, most “major” marathons are fairly flat, which may not appeal to the ultramarathon-types, who would probably prefer a hilly (more challenging) course.)

    The class issues are obviously different, but I think the impulse is the same.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Benjamin I. Espen
    I was wondering something along the same lines. There are tons of endurance athletes who live in my hometown because it is 7000' feet elevation, which makes for a great training ground, and it is pretty. Very few of them run in standard 5k/10k/marathons because there are harder options available for the ambitious. For example, the TransRockies Run, a 120-mile race up and down mountains, is far more interesting to the elite athlete, or the Leadville 100.

    I am intensely curious about the dataset used in that study Steve referenced, but the website doesn't make it available.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  46. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @anonymous

    Speaking of which: other than accidents, which can be pretty dangerous, endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact, and the lack of an eccentric component means less soreness.
     
    That is a knowledgable insight.

    btw, as a boomer, I've noticed the slow but sure physical feminization of male millennials, and I don't quite understand it. They don't seem to know how to fight well, and they tend to be skinny from just not eating much, and not working out much, while mil women tend to be overweight. Just these big women. They wear these black spandex things that highlight the fact that their butts are tremendously wide, but still flat! In their twenties! What the hell?

    Whatsmore, I notice these smaller, thin young men walking with their arms around these big, heavy women with no shame whatsoever. I mean some of these women are almost beyond Vespa women! I think some of these young men turn feminist out of fear of literally getting their asses kicked.

    I don't get what exactly is going on, but it smacks of the decline of Rome, and it's not good.

    I’ve noticed the slow but sure physical feminization of male millennials,

    I’ve noticed this. What I’ve also noticed is that a heck of a lot of them talk like gays, they have that gay sounding voice and manner of speaking. They can’t all be gay so what’s with the faggy sound? Weird.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  47. David says:
    @O'Really
    Why are cyclists such douchebags?

    I think it’s the adrenaline. Makes them prone to rage.

    Traffic is dangerous in a way most athletic activities don’t expose you to.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  48. @anonymous

    Speaking of which: other than accidents, which can be pretty dangerous, endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact, and the lack of an eccentric component means less soreness.
     
    That is a knowledgable insight.

    btw, as a boomer, I've noticed the slow but sure physical feminization of male millennials, and I don't quite understand it. They don't seem to know how to fight well, and they tend to be skinny from just not eating much, and not working out much, while mil women tend to be overweight. Just these big women. They wear these black spandex things that highlight the fact that their butts are tremendously wide, but still flat! In their twenties! What the hell?

    Whatsmore, I notice these smaller, thin young men walking with their arms around these big, heavy women with no shame whatsoever. I mean some of these women are almost beyond Vespa women! I think some of these young men turn feminist out of fear of literally getting their asses kicked.

    I don't get what exactly is going on, but it smacks of the decline of Rome, and it's not good.

    High fructose corn syrup for one possible answer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    Also endocrine disruption from the estrogen compounds the modern world pumps into the environment.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  49. How bout this one? Interesting no men have ever swam this far without current assistance or wearing a wetsuit. This may be the only sport genre where “White women” may be superior to all. http://www.9news.com/mobile/article/news/local/next/woman-from-conifer-breaks-her-own-record-by-completing-104-mile-nonstop-swim/463500631

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  50. “It works as a Chrome extension.”

    True, but… Chrome is Google. Google is Chrome. Google has its claws into you in more ways than you know.

    Complete separation may not be possible, but you might want to look into a different browser.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  51. Zoodles says:

    Theory:

    Upper middle class whites dont have much of an ethnic identity. What they do have is their status symbols, and its around these status symbols that they construct an identity. The single biggest threat to their identity is to be associated with lower class whites who have low status. That’s why they signal so hard against the deplorables. Contamination by lower class whites is a direct threat to this status, and hence their very sense of self. The entirety of white eloi politics is driven by the fear of this contamination.

    The lower class traditionally values masculinity, and physical strength is one of the signifiers of masculinity. Thus the higher class whites, fearing contamination must signal against strength. So cardio and endurance are emphasized and glamourised, while strength and power training are devalued as vulgar.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  52. res says:
    @Tim Howells
    OT but related to previous discussion about Googling e.g. "american mathematicians"

    Try this one: Google "european people history"

    https://www.google.se/search?q=european+people+history&client=firefox-b&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjkm7evsNHVAhUHSJoKHS04AF4Q_AUICigB&biw=1920&bih=947

    Holy crap! Maybe some smart person here can explain this? I got similar results with every other search engine I tried. This is even more extreme than the "american" results, even though "african european" is not an idiom. This really looks to me like complete insanity.

    Try this one: Google “european people history”

    That’s a strange one. Duckduckgo gives similar results so it is not just Google. I looked at Google trends and there were not enough searches for it to give related searches (which is what makes the “American Scientists” etc. explanations obvious). There has been a large increase over the 13 year baseline in the last few weeks. Did this go viral somewhere?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Triumph104
    It is not strange at all. The English-speaking world does not refer to whites, noted or otherwise,
    as "Europeans". It is assumed that accomplished figures are white unless noted otherwise. We don't say European Wernher von Braun. Sometimes noted figures are referred to by nationality, Russian Igor Stravinsky, but often not. I have a devil of a time remembering what was Albert Einstein's nationality.

    The search results produced by Google and DuckDuckGo are due to a long history of whites from European countries such as Spain, Portugual, The Netherlands, France, Great Britain, Belgium, etc. screwing over black people.

    "Did this go viral somewhere?" It was mentioned on reddit in February.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/milliondollarextreme/comments/5urfbp/google_european_people_history_and_look_at_images/

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  53. Sparkon says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Dave:

    … endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact …
     
    Anonymous:

    Endurance cycling has its own dangers, like hemorrhoids and prostate enlargement.
     
    This device prevents both running impact and crotch compression. Best if used in a designated SWPL safe zone:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUpd2AfsFU4

    Those things are dangerous. I recall encountering several of these contraptions on Boulder, Colorado’s superb “multi-use paths.”

    What is the danger? They swerve from side to side, and hog the whole path.

    Whereas bicyclists, runners, and walkers follow a generally straight track, these fool things are all over the path as a matter of routine, because they follow a wavy, or sine-curve type path reacting to the force applied, Isaac Newton, and all.

    With a bicycle, the force is being applied up and down with the rotation of the pedals on the crank, so a bicycle follows a narrow, precise path when moving fast. Yes, when he is fighting his way up a steep hill, the rider is pounding the pedals, and the very slowly moving bicycle wants to move side to side, but the rider compensates with the handlebars so that the motion is pretty much straight ahead, except for the guys figuratively dying out there, who may be doing virtual switchbacks to get up the hill, when it’s probably time to get off, and push, humiliation or not..

    But on a flat surface or gentle inclines at moderate speed, a bicycle is on the straight and narrow, which makes it much easier, and a whole lot safer, to share the driveway-wide path with others.

    Not so with these contraptions; they hog the whole path. Like reinventing the wheel, reinventing the bicycle is an exercise in futility, but there are always nitwits who fall for the latest thing, all inconvenience — and danger — to others be dammed!

    Another danger on a bike is something getting in the way of your front wheel. It doesn’t take much to knock the front wheel off balance, or stop it — even a water bottle can do it — so the rider may be launched over the handlebars, or just crash, and fall down.

    I was talking to a med tech in Boulder once who related how head-on collisions between bicyclists on the multi-use paths were not uncommon, and “help keep us in business,” she added.

    So I hasten to add, there are plenty of lunatics on bicycles. Because I ride slowly, and very alertly, I have been able to avoid several head-ons there myself.

    Once, a fool on a road bike going fast came around a big bend — screened by vegetation — on my side of the path, only 20 ft. ahead. He was riding no hands and fiddling with his iPod. I yelled at him, and got as far right as possible, millimeters from the edge, and he reacted instantly, young fool that he was, so that we merely brushed by each other within inches, instead of banging noggins — I was going into the bushes before that happened anyway — and it was all over in milliseconds.

    Dogs too are very dangerous to ‘cyclists around bike paths because they are stupid — no comment on the people walking them — and it is not unusual for a dog to suddenly bolt this way or that, in front of cars — too bad for the dog — or in front of a bicyclist — too bad for the rider. but yeah, spend your time walking a dog, and count on the Dog Poop Fairy to clean up your toy wolf’s mess, as you bitch and moan about all the bicycle riders whizzing by you.

    Without exception, I will slow down, and/or steer clear around dogs and/or people walking them, leash or not, providing myself a wide margin of safety, a concept that seems to have been lost on our younger generations. Of course, they have “no fear,” so there you are.

    Another gripe from this long-time bicycle-riding Baby Boomer is the electric, or motorized bicycle on multi-use paths. That’s a motorbike, not a bicycle, and they should not be allowed in bike lanes, and belong in the street.

    The oldest Baby Boomers are turning 71 this year. My waist size is the same as it was when I was 17, and it was a very good year.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  54. Richard says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    If they've been doing endurance running since the '70s, they've probably already had joint replacements. I've known of running addicts in their 30s with knee or hip replacements. It doesn't seem that healthy for an average person to run more than 20 or so miles per week. If you weigh 90 pounds, you could run more than that, I suppose.

    It surprises me how we, as a culture, seem not to see any problem with running on concrete. I was a kid in the ’80s when every baseball fan knew that Andre Dawson had wrecked his knees running on Astroturf, which was basically carpet laid over concrete flooring. That childhood life lesson has never left my mind. When I’ve run on concrete myself, it’s uncomfortable — there’s no “give” like there is on earth and grass, and you can feel joint pressure more intensely. It never feels anywhere near as bad sprinting on grass. Yet every morning there’s a series of haggard-looking joggers going down my hard-surface sidewalk in what must be steady discomfort.

    Read More
    • Agree: Anonym
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  55. It’s simply that people are fatter. And older -young people don’t do road races anymore, save for overweight college girls wearing tutus to “run” the Disney Princess half marathon or whatever.

    High school distance running times are also down from about 10-15 years ago. The top kids are still fast, but the average one is much slower. Sometimes I watch high school soccer at the park up the street and for some reason there is a lot less running in the game than I remember.

    Most millennials don’t exercise. Their idea of exercise is to go walk their dog or play frisbee golf. Fun sure, but exercise- no. Some lift but they are still fairly overweight and won’t really reap the health benefits of exercise. It will be even worse once the under 18 crowd ages up. They are fat half-autistic nerds who don’t like going outside.

    And jogging shouldn’t cause knee pain unless you are overdoing it (more than 35 miles a week) or are overweight. People with BMI over 25 for women, 27 for men should probably not run longer than a mile or two until they get their weight down through walking first.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  56. Marty says:
    @anonymouslee
    Forget the Seinfeld kerfluffle--is this a generational gap joke?

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=De7rbB2bteE

    Like are boomers hanging on to their precious Prefontaine or something? Because to millennials endurance sports only bring to mind effete, smarmy dorks (David Brooks should write THAT book) claiming stolen valor.

    The idea of a heroic distance runner is absurd because we hear about jogging "accomplishments" all the time in real life from people we rightfully suspect couldn't play real sports in high school. Nobody wants to hear about that crap from their boss or the office suckup.

    This morning on the GGB there were a bunch of late 30-ish, white guys jogging wearing backpacks, which I’ve never noticed before. New sport of jogging with rocks?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  57. Bugg says:
    @Anonymous
    Endurance cycling has its own dangers, like hemorrhoids and prostate enlargement.

    The heat from the cycling motion knocks down sperm counts. Every form of exercise has it’s drawbacks. One friend was a championship powertlifter. But now in his 60s spinal stenosis is doing a number on his back. Your muscles can take a lot , but your joints and spinal cord can only take so much. A friend who was competitive Division I runner and marathoner required a knee replacement in his 40s.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  58. Sunbeam says:
    @Dilemna
    I notice nearly all of the "runners" I encounter start with a marathon or half marathon. This may give them a sense of accomplishment but it's a recipe for never learning to run fast or pace yourself properly. My intuition is in the earlier years of running 5k and 10k races were much more popular.

    I always suggest runners learn to race a 5k fast and then move up to 10k and so on. They never do this.

    Another dynamic is unlike the 70s and 80s, there are East African runners all over the US and Canada dominate the prize spots for prestige races. If you are a talented US athlete and you want to be champion of something or other you are probably going into triathlons.

    If you are a talented US athlete and you want to be champion of something or other you are probably going into triathlons.

    Out of idle curiousity, I take it there is a relative lack of East Africans triathloning. Is it because of the swimming?

    Looking at that body type I’d expect them to be pretty good cyclists (or are they too tall?). Maybe not though.

    Come to think of it, neither here nor there, but I’ve actually seen Navy Seals. I did not talk to them or anything, but they all had this same body type: Short, skinny legs, barrel chests. And by short I mean shorter than 5’9.” Actually they kind of looked like the Mexican/Indian bodytype people dump on all the time here. Only with white skin, because all those guys were white.

    And they love those reversible blue and gold shirts. Never wore anything else.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    I'm guessing that body type is good for running military obstacle courses and for not getting overuse injuries like shin splints.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  59. Deckin says:
    @dearieme
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuuHrVhykD4

    What the hell?!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  60. Hosswire says:

    1. Participation in a sport that requires expensive equipment or training areas — golf, cycling, lacrosse or swimming — is a form of white flight from more naturally talented blacks in “real” sports.
    2. The kind of introverted, self-motivated grinder-type of mentality that can swim endless laps alone in a pool without conversation, music or even a change of scenery is better suited to those who thrive in our information worker economy.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  61. JimB says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Taki went to a dinner with Beckham and Posh. He recounted that Becks was well-dressed, polite, and quiet.

    The idea that Beckham wants his four children to grow up to be members of the English upper class, and to help accomplish that he'll dress nice and keep his mouth shut at dinners with people who are much more articulate than him seems rather endearing.

    Beckham should also prevent his kids from getting tattoos if he wants them to be upper class.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  62. bomag says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    High fructose corn syrup for one possible answer.

    Also endocrine disruption from the estrogen compounds the modern world pumps into the environment.

    Read More
    • Agree: Alden
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  63. JimB says:

    What you are seeing at least in part is the final echo of the Baby Boom. Check the age distribution of marathon runners, and you will see that it is climbing steadily. Baby Boomers (and Gen X-ers) want to live forever, and they believe endurance sports are a shield against cancer and aging.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  64. @YetAnotherAnon
    After 30 minutes on the mill at 6.5 mph I'm soaked in sweat and when I stop I'm sat with my head down for a minute or two recovering - it's not that lazy. Mind, I'm nearly 60 and could lose twenty pounds.

    If you have the time, walking up steep hills is the thing. Do the same walk week after week and you can feel the improvement (and you get up quicker).

    I’m a 62 year old man, and I like to time myself running short distances. I run a half mile in 3:48, 1 mile in 8:30, 2 miles in 19:30, and 3 miles in 33:25. I used to walk for 2 to 3 hours at a time up and down hills. I find that short-distance running on the flat is much easier on my legs than long-distance walking in the hills. Also, running seems to have brought down my blood pressure, which walking never did.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    I find that the exact opposite is true for me as I find hiking hill and mountain trails to be great for my cardiovascular health and endurance.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  65. @Dave Pinsen
    It's impressive that Jeff Bezos has been lifting weights, despite the endurance bias among his class. Fellow Seattle billionaire Howard Shultz being a hard core cyclist, for example.

    Speaking of which: other than accidents, which can be pretty dangerous, endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don't have the impact, and the lack of an eccentric component means less soreness.

    Howard Schultz is a jock. He grew up playing baseball, basketball, and football, and attended Northern Michigan University on a football scholarship.

    Schultz grew up blue collar and lived in public housing. His father was a truck driver.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    He's an endurance guy now though.

    There's a former NFL lineman who became a marathon runner. Looks like someone poured salt on him: https://www.runnersworld.com/newswire/former-300-pound-nfl-lineman-runs-356-marathon
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  66. Lurker says:
    @anonymous

    Speaking of which: other than accidents, which can be pretty dangerous, endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact, and the lack of an eccentric component means less soreness.
     
    That is a knowledgable insight.

    btw, as a boomer, I've noticed the slow but sure physical feminization of male millennials, and I don't quite understand it. They don't seem to know how to fight well, and they tend to be skinny from just not eating much, and not working out much, while mil women tend to be overweight. Just these big women. They wear these black spandex things that highlight the fact that their butts are tremendously wide, but still flat! In their twenties! What the hell?

    Whatsmore, I notice these smaller, thin young men walking with their arms around these big, heavy women with no shame whatsoever. I mean some of these women are almost beyond Vespa women! I think some of these young men turn feminist out of fear of literally getting their asses kicked.

    I don't get what exactly is going on, but it smacks of the decline of Rome, and it's not good.

    Vespa women – your mileage may vary.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  67. Lurker says:
    @Glaivester

    Then there are his tas
     
    Please explain what you mean. I have no idea what a "ta" is.

    I think that’s tats – tattoos.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  68. Kyle says:
    @Anonymous
    Endurance cycling has its own dangers, like hemorrhoids and prostate enlargement.

    Or testicular cancer.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  69. @Dilemna
    I notice nearly all of the "runners" I encounter start with a marathon or half marathon. This may give them a sense of accomplishment but it's a recipe for never learning to run fast or pace yourself properly. My intuition is in the earlier years of running 5k and 10k races were much more popular.

    I always suggest runners learn to race a 5k fast and then move up to 10k and so on. They never do this.

    Another dynamic is unlike the 70s and 80s, there are East African runners all over the US and Canada dominate the prize spots for prestige races. If you are a talented US athlete and you want to be champion of something or other you are probably going into triathlons.

    Agree. Lots of one and done. I have watched a handful of documentaries on running and noticed that a significant number of overweight people participate. I’m not talking about local races — I mean overweight people are running in the Boston, Chicago, and New York marathons. Before the Chicago marathon, a woman rubbed KY jelly between her legs to prevent her thighs from chafing.

    NOVA’s documentary trained 12 or 13 non-runners for the Boston marathon. Although most of the women appeared to be normal in size, all of the female participants were overweight and remained overweight despite the training. An obese woman, 70 pounds over, did lose 45 pounds with diet and additional exercise. (LINK)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  70. Alden says:
    @bored identity
    Slightly OT

    "Is There a Connection Between Fab 1 and Fab 44? " :



    Civil Rights Activist DeRay Mckesson to Join New Baltimore City Schools Cabinet

    http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/bs-md-ci-deray-mckesson-appointment-20160628-story.html

    "At its core, this role is about finding great people, matching them to the right role, and helping them to develop and experience careers in the service of our kids," Mckesson said.

    "I am excited to return to city schools … and to continue doing the work to ensure that every child in Baltimore City receives a world-class education."

     




    How Can a High School with Zero Students Proficient in Math, Have One of the Highest Graduation Rates in Baltimore City?

    http://foxbaltimore.com/news/project-baltimore

    "...Project Baltimore has spoken with four employees of this school.

    Their identities are being protected due to the nature of the allegations and because they fear retaliation.

    These educators had serious concerns about how students are graduating and what they describe as a pressure to pass seniors at any cost – a 2017 graduating class referred to at NACA II as the “Fabulous 44”.

    “The focus was to have the fabulous 44 graduate,” one educator told Fox45.

    “No matter what. We were told that in January.”

     

    https://youtu.be/ZG-XW3M9ARM

    Such an achievement, graduating from high school!!!!! Put them all on the front page of the NYSlimes, Wash Post and on the covers of all the magazines!!!!

    What’s normal and expected of Whites is an award winning major accomplishment for blacks.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  71. @the one they call Desanex
    I’m a 62 year old man, and I like to time myself running short distances. I run a half mile in 3:48, 1 mile in 8:30, 2 miles in 19:30, and 3 miles in 33:25. I used to walk for 2 to 3 hours at a time up and down hills. I find that short-distance running on the flat is much easier on my legs than long-distance walking in the hills. Also, running seems to have brought down my blood pressure, which walking never did.

    I find that the exact opposite is true for me as I find hiking hill and mountain trails to be great for my cardiovascular health and endurance.

    Read More
    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    I was a pretty fast short-distance runner as a kid, so maybe my body is better suited for it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  72. @res

    Try this one: Google “european people history”
     
    That's a strange one. Duckduckgo gives similar results so it is not just Google. I looked at Google trends and there were not enough searches for it to give related searches (which is what makes the "American Scientists" etc. explanations obvious). There has been a large increase over the 13 year baseline in the last few weeks. Did this go viral somewhere?

    It is not strange at all. The English-speaking world does not refer to whites, noted or otherwise,
    as “Europeans”. It is assumed that accomplished figures are white unless noted otherwise. We don’t say European Wernher von Braun. Sometimes noted figures are referred to by nationality, Russian Igor Stravinsky, but often not. I have a devil of a time remembering what was Albert Einstein’s nationality.

    The search results produced by Google and DuckDuckGo are due to a long history of whites from European countries such as Spain, Portugual, The Netherlands, France, Great Britain, Belgium, etc. screwing over black people.

    “Did this go viral somewhere?” It was mentioned on reddit in February.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/milliondollarextreme/comments/5urfbp/google_european_people_history_and_look_at_images/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  73. Forbes says:
    @O'Really
    Why are cyclists such douchebags?

    Probably because people step out in front of cyclists–whether looking or not. Something they wouldn’t do with a car.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  74. @James Richard
    I find that the exact opposite is true for me as I find hiking hill and mountain trails to be great for my cardiovascular health and endurance.

    I was a pretty fast short-distance runner as a kid, so maybe my body is better suited for it.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  75. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Dave:

    … endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact …
     
    Anonymous:

    Endurance cycling has its own dangers, like hemorrhoids and prostate enlargement.
     
    This device prevents both running impact and crotch compression. Best if used in a designated SWPL safe zone:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUpd2AfsFU4

    This is what I do instead.

    On bench and overhead press days, after I do those barbell exercises I alternate sets of assistance work (chin-up grip lat pulldowns; dumbbell incline or military presses) with Prowler sled round trips and medicine ball slams.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Impressive! What got you into strength training? (sorry for the late response)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  76. @Steve Sailer
    Soccer stars David Beckham and Wayne Rooney are pretty similar in class background, but Beckham looks upper class while Rooney looks prole:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/facial-width-and-class/

    Beckham looks good in all sorts of classy suits while Rooney does not.

    Rooney’s problem is he looks like a fattened-up versions of Red hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  77. JimB says:
    @O'Really
    Why are cyclists such douchebags?

    I dunno, but it seems to be the case. In the Bay Area, cyclists have a holier than thou attitude because they think they are saving the planet by using pedal power instead of fossil fuels. Of course, all the extra carbon from unnecessary auto braking caused by bicycles randomly swinging out into traffic should be taken into account. Then there is the methane spewing out of cyclists tailpipes, resulting from their arugula based diet, expanding the hole in the ozone layer.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  78. @Anonymous
    Most of the endurance activities and exercise done by white collar workers is a form of "lazy exercise." Back in the 70s when the jogging boom started, we were told that the ideal exercise regimen was an hour of cardio several times a week. This sort of cardio is boring but not particularly hard, which is why you can do it watching TV screens or listening to podcasts. It's "lazy exercise" because it's not intense at all; it's just long in duration. White collar workers are just more disciplined and good at showing up on time and sticking to schedules, which is why they follow the regimen they were told to by experts. Intense activity and exercise are anaerobic and involve lactic acid buildup and release of growth hormone, which makes you nauseous and throw up and can't be done at a continuous pace for long periods of time. Intense exercise is concentrated in short durations during which one can feel physically ill and as if they were going to die. That's the really masochistic exercise. Most of the cardio "lazy exercise" people do is not particularly hard in its performance. Its chronic nature is what damages joints and organs.

    The two main characteristics of endurance athletes are high conscientiousness and mediocre athleticism. It doesn’t require a lot of athletic skill to be good at long-distance running, hence it’s a great sport for uncoordinated high IQ people with strong work ethics. Another popular sport for successful high IQ people is rowing. In contrast short-duration sports that require a high degree of athleticism appeal to athletically talented people with low levels of conscientiousness.This is one of the reasons why black people are over-represented in sprinting, football and basketball.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  79. Kyle says:
    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  80. anonguy says:
    @YetAnotherAnon
    After 30 minutes on the mill at 6.5 mph I'm soaked in sweat and when I stop I'm sat with my head down for a minute or two recovering - it's not that lazy. Mind, I'm nearly 60 and could lose twenty pounds.

    If you have the time, walking up steep hills is the thing. Do the same walk week after week and you can feel the improvement (and you get up quicker).

    If you have the time, walking up steep hills is the thing

    Agree. Personally, I think one’s body adapts to frequently/consistently working against gravity by developing a metabolic bias against putting on weight.

    That is, running up real stairs is better for you in this regard than a stair stepper or walking up real hills is better than an incline treadmill.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    Hiking on wooded mountain trails requires an order of magnitude more agility than using a stair stepper. It also involves a lot more varied work by more muscles and tendons including those of your torso.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    When I started walking long distance UK trails like the Pembrokeshire Coast Path I kept having to stop on the steep cliff climbs to get my breath, and at the end of each day my hips were painful enough to make sleep difficult despite the day's 15 miles (did the walk in sections, one weekend at a time). But after a month or two of 2 hours weekly or twice weekly walks up local hills, the hips stopped hurting and I could get up long steep sections without stopping.

    (Not knocking weights btw. But if you want to walk hills or coasts for pleasure and enjoyment and are unfit, walking up smaller hills regularly does improve your performance on bigger walks)

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  81. @Anonymous
    Most of the endurance activities and exercise done by white collar workers is a form of "lazy exercise." Back in the 70s when the jogging boom started, we were told that the ideal exercise regimen was an hour of cardio several times a week. This sort of cardio is boring but not particularly hard, which is why you can do it watching TV screens or listening to podcasts. It's "lazy exercise" because it's not intense at all; it's just long in duration. White collar workers are just more disciplined and good at showing up on time and sticking to schedules, which is why they follow the regimen they were told to by experts. Intense activity and exercise are anaerobic and involve lactic acid buildup and release of growth hormone, which makes you nauseous and throw up and can't be done at a continuous pace for long periods of time. Intense exercise is concentrated in short durations during which one can feel physically ill and as if they were going to die. That's the really masochistic exercise. Most of the cardio "lazy exercise" people do is not particularly hard in its performance. Its chronic nature is what damages joints and organs.

    @#3: Re “lazy exercise” – Yes! Aside from the joint damage from jogging, I guess it’s better than sitting on the couch. An hour at a non-intense pace on the elliptical machine probably burns, maybe, 400 calories. And I think, over time, doing these routine, mindless “lazy exercises,” your body just gets used to it and treats the effort as normal, status quo, and practically no extra calories are burned. A good friend did what he needed to do to pass the regular PT tests for 20 years in the Army. After getting out, he took up long slow distance running and cycling. Very little to no weightlifting. Ten years and two knee replacements later, he’s added sprint triathlons. But he carries 20 lbs of extra fat. The long, slow, “lazy exercising” isn’t doing anything for his physique.

    I’ve never run farther than 5K and have never run more than ten miles per week. Twenty years ago, at age 30, I could run run a 5K in 17 minutes; now 20 minutes. Race times are getting slower because the older boomers and younger boomers, like myself, are getting older; and the Gen-Xers and Millennials aren’t participating in road races in the same numbers.

    About a year ago, I changed my runs to a fast-paced one-mile, followed by four 100-yard wind sprints, every third day. Forty-five minutes of stretching and weights every day. Feel great; lean; no joint pain!

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard

    he carries 20 lbs of extra fat. The long, slow, “lazy exercising” isn’t doing anything for his physique.
     
    The only thing that will keep off the fat is a caloric reduction and what helps your physique is strength training. So unless you want to eat like a girl on salads and dry toast to stay slim then you ought to do cardio to burn fat and lift weights to get good muscle tone.
    , @Brutusale
    I see the same thing in the gym. Twenty years ago I would see a few guys at whichever gym I was attending benching 405 or squating over 500. Nowadays they are few and far between.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  82. @Robard

    Haven't Americans grown taller during that period? Tall people are necessarily heavier than short ones at a given BMI and over long distances gravity can be a drag. Besides, it is implausible that numbers of unhealthy people are participating in marathons to begin with and that doesn't even begin to explain why the top runners have slowed down even more than the lower tier ones.
     
    Steve pointed out many years ago that Hispanic immigrants were dragging down the average height of Americans, hence any diachronic correlation between height and running times will have to be teased out on a sub-population level. A synchronic analysis of current runners would be very informative if not predictive.

    I don’t think it’s just Mexicans. When you meet Europeans, they seem to be much taller than Americans. I’m 6′ so not so short in the US, but the times I’ve been around European groups, I feel positively short.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  83. @anonymous

    Speaking of which: other than accidents, which can be pretty dangerous, endurance cycling seems smarter than running. You don’t have the impact, and the lack of an eccentric component means less soreness.
     
    That is a knowledgable insight.

    btw, as a boomer, I've noticed the slow but sure physical feminization of male millennials, and I don't quite understand it. They don't seem to know how to fight well, and they tend to be skinny from just not eating much, and not working out much, while mil women tend to be overweight. Just these big women. They wear these black spandex things that highlight the fact that their butts are tremendously wide, but still flat! In their twenties! What the hell?

    Whatsmore, I notice these smaller, thin young men walking with their arms around these big, heavy women with no shame whatsoever. I mean some of these women are almost beyond Vespa women! I think some of these young men turn feminist out of fear of literally getting their asses kicked.

    I don't get what exactly is going on, but it smacks of the decline of Rome, and it's not good.

    I’ve noticed the slow but sure physical feminization of male millennials

    Yep. The ones I know and work with don’t know anything about auto repair or fixing things, or have any interest in outdoor activities.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  84. @8ER
    This post struck a chord. My background: raised *very* blue collar (midwest farm boy and construction work) and now *very* white collar (suburban metro Denver attorney). Competitive distance runner in HS. Competitive road racer (always top 5% to 10% finisher) throughout 20s in college and law school. Time off for kids in 30s. Triathlons and mountain biking in 40s and added Spartan races in 50s.

    Top tier competitive runners are not slowing down in any material fashion. The statistical evidence in the article is due almost entirely to: (1) the increase in participation of recreational athletes in the sport, especially in "non-competitive" events (i.e., Race for The Cure, etc.); (2) the disproportionate number of women who comprise the increase in participation in these non-competitive events (these "Race for the XXX" events are heavily skewed toward *very* recreational female participants); (3) aging of the bell curve of participants (we slow down as we age), especially for men. In a nutshell, the speedy young people, and especially young men, are an increasingly smaller proportion of the participants.

    And endurance sports are skewed toward white collar workers precisely because we sit on our asses at a desk all day, while blue collar workers are physically spent by the end of a day. Getting up at 4:30 to milk cows and then working on the farm all day leaves little time or energy for an evening run. That article was just plain silly.

    Apparently, you didn’t read the second article. The authors investigated some of your theories, and they don’t pan out.

    Also, the first article acknowledges the structural lifestyle differences that come into play, but they don’t answer a question like, “why is triathlon the white collar sport now instead of tennis?” The article wasn’t silly at all. It’s actually very sensible and makes an interesting critique of all the changes that have taken place in society since about 1980.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  85. @Robard

    Haven't Americans grown taller during that period? Tall people are necessarily heavier than short ones at a given BMI and over long distances gravity can be a drag. Besides, it is implausible that numbers of unhealthy people are participating in marathons to begin with and that doesn't even begin to explain why the top runners have slowed down even more than the lower tier ones.
     
    Steve pointed out many years ago that Hispanic immigrants were dragging down the average height of Americans, hence any diachronic correlation between height and running times will have to be teased out on a sub-population level. A synchronic analysis of current runners would be very informative if not predictive.

    Hispanic immigrants were dragging down the average height of Americans,

    And Hispanic immigrants don’t run road races. And neither do blacks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Robard
    That's why I pointed it out. Even though the US population on average may not have grown taller, the ethnicities that contribute most to the running population probably have.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  86. @Sunbeam

    If you are a talented US athlete and you want to be champion of something or other you are probably going into triathlons.
     
    Out of idle curiousity, I take it there is a relative lack of East Africans triathloning. Is it because of the swimming?

    Looking at that body type I'd expect them to be pretty good cyclists (or are they too tall?). Maybe not though.

    Come to think of it, neither here nor there, but I've actually seen Navy Seals. I did not talk to them or anything, but they all had this same body type: Short, skinny legs, barrel chests. And by short I mean shorter than 5'9." Actually they kind of looked like the Mexican/Indian bodytype people dump on all the time here. Only with white skin, because all those guys were white.

    And they love those reversible blue and gold shirts. Never wore anything else.

    I’m guessing that body type is good for running military obstacle courses and for not getting overuse injuries like shin splints.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  87. @anonguy

    If you have the time, walking up steep hills is the thing
     
    Agree. Personally, I think one's body adapts to frequently/consistently working against gravity by developing a metabolic bias against putting on weight.

    That is, running up real stairs is better for you in this regard than a stair stepper or walking up real hills is better than an incline treadmill.

    Hiking on wooded mountain trails requires an order of magnitude more agility than using a stair stepper. It also involves a lot more varied work by more muscles and tendons including those of your torso.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  88. My two nephews are late “Generation Z.” They’ve dropped out of little league, basketball, and wrestling. They found their niche in swimming and are dedicated, quite fast, competitive. I’m a little disappointed though. I think more time in team sports would have been better for their development. Swimming seems a bit solitary and non-masculine as compared to other sports.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  89. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Triumph104
    Howard Schultz is a jock. He grew up playing baseball, basketball, and football, and attended Northern Michigan University on a football scholarship.

    Schultz grew up blue collar and lived in public housing. His father was a truck driver.

    He’s an endurance guy now though.

    There’s a former NFL lineman who became a marathon runner. Looks like someone poured salt on him: https://www.runnersworld.com/newswire/former-300-pound-nfl-lineman-runs-356-marathon

    Read More
    • Replies: @Triumph104
    Howard Shultz is 64 years old, too old to play team sports at a high level. At his age strenuous activities that he could do on his own timetable would be cycling, running, swimming, or workouts with gym equipment.

    That lineman did what a lot of men and women do after losing weight, run a marathon. He had lost 100lbs. The Nova documentary on the Boston Marathon showed another former NFL lineman, 6-3 290lbs, who finished in 5 hours 24 min. After the marathon he trained and rode a bicycle in a 192-mile charity event.

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/marathon/team-steve.html
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  90. Bastion says:
    @Arclight
    Agree - Crossfit and lifting seem more popular, although that might just be my perspective from the inside looking out. We have a pretty nice cross-section of people at my gym doing Crossfit or Olympic lifting in terms of income, although I would say the largest group are people in their late 20s-early 30s who are probably in the $30-$60k a year range. Seems like half of the women are nurses for some reason.

    I will confirm this observation. I started working out at a Crossfit gym about 9 months ago and most people are middling income, teachers, nurses. But the membership runs the gamut. We have guys who load trucks working out with lawyers and obstetricians. I’ve tried many fitness routines over the years, but I’m finding that doing the classic Olympic lifts is hard to beat for intensity and results. Many of my workouts are in the 10-12 minute range and I am smoked.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  91. @Dave Pinsen
    He's an endurance guy now though.

    There's a former NFL lineman who became a marathon runner. Looks like someone poured salt on him: https://www.runnersworld.com/newswire/former-300-pound-nfl-lineman-runs-356-marathon

    Howard Shultz is 64 years old, too old to play team sports at a high level. At his age strenuous activities that he could do on his own timetable would be cycling, running, swimming, or workouts with gym equipment.

    That lineman did what a lot of men and women do after losing weight, run a marathon. He had lost 100lbs. The Nova documentary on the Boston Marathon showed another former NFL lineman, 6-3 290lbs, who finished in 5 hours 24 min. After the marathon he trained and rode a bicycle in a 192-mile charity event.

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/marathon/team-steve.html

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  92. @E. Rekshun
    @#3: Re "lazy exercise" - Yes! Aside from the joint damage from jogging, I guess it's better than sitting on the couch. An hour at a non-intense pace on the elliptical machine probably burns, maybe, 400 calories. And I think, over time, doing these routine, mindless "lazy exercises," your body just gets used to it and treats the effort as normal, status quo, and practically no extra calories are burned. A good friend did what he needed to do to pass the regular PT tests for 20 years in the Army. After getting out, he took up long slow distance running and cycling. Very little to no weightlifting. Ten years and two knee replacements later, he's added sprint triathlons. But he carries 20 lbs of extra fat. The long, slow, "lazy exercising" isn't doing anything for his physique.

    I've never run farther than 5K and have never run more than ten miles per week. Twenty years ago, at age 30, I could run run a 5K in 17 minutes; now 20 minutes. Race times are getting slower because the older boomers and younger boomers, like myself, are getting older; and the Gen-Xers and Millennials aren't participating in road races in the same numbers.

    About a year ago, I changed my runs to a fast-paced one-mile, followed by four 100-yard wind sprints, every third day. Forty-five minutes of stretching and weights every day. Feel great; lean; no joint pain!

    he carries 20 lbs of extra fat. The long, slow, “lazy exercising” isn’t doing anything for his physique.

    The only thing that will keep off the fat is a caloric reduction and what helps your physique is strength training. So unless you want to eat like a girl on salads and dry toast to stay slim then you ought to do cardio to burn fat and lift weights to get good muscle tone.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM

    So unless you want to eat like a girl on salads and dry toast to stay slim then you ought to do cardio to burn fat and lift weights to get good muscle tone.
     
    A lot of cardio tends to put on weight, because it triggers over eating. A friend of mine uses her endurance sports as a cover for gluttony. She's got the physique of someone who hardly exercises at all.

    If you're serious about losing weight, you put yourself in an environment where eating sounds awful while burning calories all day. Turn off your air conditioner and do as much low intensity work as you can: moving stuff, landscaping, walking. It's possible to lose a mind boggling amount of weight in the summer, simply because like fish, overheated humans don't want to eat.

    Our modern era does not allow much excess calorie consumption. What calories that are consumed ideally should be in the form of meat and veggies, mostly meat and eggs. If someone can't work off calories, the 2nd best choice is to pour all their will power into calorie restriction/low carb dieting and a sedentary lifestyle. Bag the cardio to avoid triggering appetites.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  93. NickG says:
    @Glaivester

    Then there are his tas
     
    Please explain what you mean. I have no idea what a "ta" is.

    I mis-typed ‘tats’, as in tatoos.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  94. Robard says:
    @E. Rekshun
    Hispanic immigrants were dragging down the average height of Americans,

    And Hispanic immigrants don't run road races. And neither do blacks.

    That’s why I pointed it out. Even though the US population on average may not have grown taller, the ethnicities that contribute most to the running population probably have.

    Read More
    • Agree: E. Rekshun
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  95. AM says:
    @James Richard

    he carries 20 lbs of extra fat. The long, slow, “lazy exercising” isn’t doing anything for his physique.
     
    The only thing that will keep off the fat is a caloric reduction and what helps your physique is strength training. So unless you want to eat like a girl on salads and dry toast to stay slim then you ought to do cardio to burn fat and lift weights to get good muscle tone.

    So unless you want to eat like a girl on salads and dry toast to stay slim then you ought to do cardio to burn fat and lift weights to get good muscle tone.

    A lot of cardio tends to put on weight, because it triggers over eating. A friend of mine uses her endurance sports as a cover for gluttony. She’s got the physique of someone who hardly exercises at all.

    If you’re serious about losing weight, you put yourself in an environment where eating sounds awful while burning calories all day. Turn off your air conditioner and do as much low intensity work as you can: moving stuff, landscaping, walking. It’s possible to lose a mind boggling amount of weight in the summer, simply because like fish, overheated humans don’t want to eat.

    Our modern era does not allow much excess calorie consumption. What calories that are consumed ideally should be in the form of meat and veggies, mostly meat and eggs. If someone can’t work off calories, the 2nd best choice is to pour all their will power into calorie restriction/low carb dieting and a sedentary lifestyle. Bag the cardio to avoid triggering appetites.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    Perhaps I wasn't clear. The chores you describe are mildly cardiovascular in nature and require calories above and beyond your basic resting metabolic rate of calorie burn. To lose fat weight you have to achieve an ongoing caloric deficit. If all you do is diet and not exercise then you will will lose some lean muscle mass in addition to fat. This actually makes it harder to lose further weight as since losing muscle mass reduces your basic metabolic rate. If you exercise using both cardio and weight lifting you will maintain muscle mass and also lose weight if you still maintain a caloric deficit.

    I find hiking hills ***a lot easier*** to do than exercising will power by starving myself like some fashion model. Lifting weights can be as simple as using barbells and a couple of sets of dumb bells for 30 minutes 3 times a week. The cardio can be high intensity for shorter periods like running or low intensity like hiking but what matters is the caloric deficit. As long as calories burned exceeds caloric intake then weight loss will occur.

    If you don't have a job, wife, and children the most fun way to achieve all of this is by going surfing for a few hours every day whether the waves are any good or not. I'd still do some lifting even then.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  96. @anonguy

    If you have the time, walking up steep hills is the thing
     
    Agree. Personally, I think one's body adapts to frequently/consistently working against gravity by developing a metabolic bias against putting on weight.

    That is, running up real stairs is better for you in this regard than a stair stepper or walking up real hills is better than an incline treadmill.

    When I started walking long distance UK trails like the Pembrokeshire Coast Path I kept having to stop on the steep cliff climbs to get my breath, and at the end of each day my hips were painful enough to make sleep difficult despite the day’s 15 miles (did the walk in sections, one weekend at a time). But after a month or two of 2 hours weekly or twice weekly walks up local hills, the hips stopped hurting and I could get up long steep sections without stopping.

    (Not knocking weights btw. But if you want to walk hills or coasts for pleasure and enjoyment and are unfit, walking up smaller hills regularly does improve your performance on bigger walks)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  97. @prosa123
    An interesting thing about Crossfit is that its followers are almost evenly divided between men and women.

    I also find it interesting how popular CrossFit is with women. It is precisely the kind of thing you would expect to be completely dominated by bros, and it just…isn’t.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  98. @The Only Catholic Unionist
    Fairly simple. It's like the relationship of powerlifting and Olympic weightlifting.

    There are a number of people who are into powerlifting and crossfit that are perhaps stronger than Olympic weightlifters, but consider that sort of lifting either wimpy (powerlifters) or "boring" (crossfitters)

    While all these "superendurance" athletes may or may not be really good athletes, they can't be bothered with "just" a 10k/marathon.

    (Also, most "major" marathons are fairly flat, which may not appeal to the ultramarathon-types, who would probably prefer a hilly (more challenging) course.)

    The class issues are obviously different, but I think the impulse is the same.

    I was wondering something along the same lines. There are tons of endurance athletes who live in my hometown because it is 7000′ feet elevation, which makes for a great training ground, and it is pretty. Very few of them run in standard 5k/10k/marathons because there are harder options available for the ambitious. For example, the TransRockies Run, a 120-mile race up and down mountains, is far more interesting to the elite athlete, or the Leadville 100.

    I am intensely curious about the dataset used in that study Steve referenced, but the website doesn’t make it available.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  99. @Dave Pinsen
    This is what I do instead.

    On bench and overhead press days, after I do those barbell exercises I alternate sets of assistance work (chin-up grip lat pulldowns; dumbbell incline or military presses) with Prowler sled round trips and medicine ball slams.

    https://youtu.be/m3tEvuFkelI

    Impressive! What got you into strength training? (sorry for the late response)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  100. @AM

    So unless you want to eat like a girl on salads and dry toast to stay slim then you ought to do cardio to burn fat and lift weights to get good muscle tone.
     
    A lot of cardio tends to put on weight, because it triggers over eating. A friend of mine uses her endurance sports as a cover for gluttony. She's got the physique of someone who hardly exercises at all.

    If you're serious about losing weight, you put yourself in an environment where eating sounds awful while burning calories all day. Turn off your air conditioner and do as much low intensity work as you can: moving stuff, landscaping, walking. It's possible to lose a mind boggling amount of weight in the summer, simply because like fish, overheated humans don't want to eat.

    Our modern era does not allow much excess calorie consumption. What calories that are consumed ideally should be in the form of meat and veggies, mostly meat and eggs. If someone can't work off calories, the 2nd best choice is to pour all their will power into calorie restriction/low carb dieting and a sedentary lifestyle. Bag the cardio to avoid triggering appetites.

    Perhaps I wasn’t clear. The chores you describe are mildly cardiovascular in nature and require calories above and beyond your basic resting metabolic rate of calorie burn. To lose fat weight you have to achieve an ongoing caloric deficit. If all you do is diet and not exercise then you will will lose some lean muscle mass in addition to fat. This actually makes it harder to lose further weight as since losing muscle mass reduces your basic metabolic rate. If you exercise using both cardio and weight lifting you will maintain muscle mass and also lose weight if you still maintain a caloric deficit.

    I find hiking hills ***a lot easier*** to do than exercising will power by starving myself like some fashion model. Lifting weights can be as simple as using barbells and a couple of sets of dumb bells for 30 minutes 3 times a week. The cardio can be high intensity for shorter periods like running or low intensity like hiking but what matters is the caloric deficit. As long as calories burned exceeds caloric intake then weight loss will occur.

    If you don’t have a job, wife, and children the most fun way to achieve all of this is by going surfing for a few hours every day whether the waves are any good or not. I’d still do some lifting even then.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM

    If you exercise using both cardio and weight lifting you will maintain muscle mass and also lose weight if you still maintain a caloric deficit.
     
    It works if you're reasonably in shape already. The vast majority of highly overweight Americans are out of shape as well. The best long term results seem to be a focus on diet with very moderate exercise like walking. Going to the gym 3 times a week for 45 minutes would only stimulate someone's appetite, be hard on their joints, and generally encourage misery of failure at many levels. Gym after losing the weight is better, although all day walking/landscaping in the heat is by far the best in terms of muscle tone and weight loss.

    Most of the "hit the gym" advise is from moderately in shape individuals who don't always seem to appreciate what a mountain being very overweight is. I'd throw all available will power at diet first, with exercise being what someone does after making it comfortable and easy to do so.


    I find hiking hills ***a lot easier*** to do than exercising will power by starving myself like some fashion model.
     
    You missed my point. :) If you eat meat/eggs with fat being your energy source you won't starve. You're satiated most of the time. If you've never tried it, you would be shocked at what the lack of carbs does to your appetite. Nobody ever walked away from steak and eggs complaining about rabbit food.

    Quite often all that extra work of exercise is in fact to do exactly what you want to do: eat more, just like my friend.


    If you don’t have a job, wife, and children the most fun way to achieve all of this is by going surfing for a few hours every day whether the waves are any good or not.
     
    That is way more fun than landscaping. But this is the iSteve blog. Golf and carry your own bag. ;)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  101. AM says:
    @James Richard
    Perhaps I wasn't clear. The chores you describe are mildly cardiovascular in nature and require calories above and beyond your basic resting metabolic rate of calorie burn. To lose fat weight you have to achieve an ongoing caloric deficit. If all you do is diet and not exercise then you will will lose some lean muscle mass in addition to fat. This actually makes it harder to lose further weight as since losing muscle mass reduces your basic metabolic rate. If you exercise using both cardio and weight lifting you will maintain muscle mass and also lose weight if you still maintain a caloric deficit.

    I find hiking hills ***a lot easier*** to do than exercising will power by starving myself like some fashion model. Lifting weights can be as simple as using barbells and a couple of sets of dumb bells for 30 minutes 3 times a week. The cardio can be high intensity for shorter periods like running or low intensity like hiking but what matters is the caloric deficit. As long as calories burned exceeds caloric intake then weight loss will occur.

    If you don't have a job, wife, and children the most fun way to achieve all of this is by going surfing for a few hours every day whether the waves are any good or not. I'd still do some lifting even then.

    If you exercise using both cardio and weight lifting you will maintain muscle mass and also lose weight if you still maintain a caloric deficit.

    It works if you’re reasonably in shape already. The vast majority of highly overweight Americans are out of shape as well. The best long term results seem to be a focus on diet with very moderate exercise like walking. Going to the gym 3 times a week for 45 minutes would only stimulate someone’s appetite, be hard on their joints, and generally encourage misery of failure at many levels. Gym after losing the weight is better, although all day walking/landscaping in the heat is by far the best in terms of muscle tone and weight loss.

    Most of the “hit the gym” advise is from moderately in shape individuals who don’t always seem to appreciate what a mountain being very overweight is. I’d throw all available will power at diet first, with exercise being what someone does after making it comfortable and easy to do so.

    I find hiking hills ***a lot easier*** to do than exercising will power by starving myself like some fashion model.

    You missed my point. :) If you eat meat/eggs with fat being your energy source you won’t starve. You’re satiated most of the time. If you’ve never tried it, you would be shocked at what the lack of carbs does to your appetite. Nobody ever walked away from steak and eggs complaining about rabbit food.

    Quite often all that extra work of exercise is in fact to do exactly what you want to do: eat more, just like my friend.

    If you don’t have a job, wife, and children the most fun way to achieve all of this is by going surfing for a few hours every day whether the waves are any good or not.

    That is way more fun than landscaping. But this is the iSteve blog. Golf and carry your own bag. ;)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  102. Brutusale says:
    @anonymouslee
    It's amazing how boomers were wrong about EVERYTHING.


    jogging is probably the absolute worst way to exercise.


    I'd expect races to continue to suffer because nobody who cares about fitness or competition today is going to be a jogger. Culturally it's become something annoying, shrewish women do as some kind astroturfed accomplishment.

    It requires neither talent nor victory over motivated peers to say you "did" a half marathon. 5ks and such are less associated with annoying women bragging about nothing but they do bring to mind the most boring kind of charity event.

    Right on target. “Runners” are mostly annoying people. They say things like, “I ran the marathon in 8 1/2 hours!”.

    Running is the perfect SWPL activity for our participation-medal age.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  103. Brutusale says:
    @E. Rekshun
    @#3: Re "lazy exercise" - Yes! Aside from the joint damage from jogging, I guess it's better than sitting on the couch. An hour at a non-intense pace on the elliptical machine probably burns, maybe, 400 calories. And I think, over time, doing these routine, mindless "lazy exercises," your body just gets used to it and treats the effort as normal, status quo, and practically no extra calories are burned. A good friend did what he needed to do to pass the regular PT tests for 20 years in the Army. After getting out, he took up long slow distance running and cycling. Very little to no weightlifting. Ten years and two knee replacements later, he's added sprint triathlons. But he carries 20 lbs of extra fat. The long, slow, "lazy exercising" isn't doing anything for his physique.

    I've never run farther than 5K and have never run more than ten miles per week. Twenty years ago, at age 30, I could run run a 5K in 17 minutes; now 20 minutes. Race times are getting slower because the older boomers and younger boomers, like myself, are getting older; and the Gen-Xers and Millennials aren't participating in road races in the same numbers.

    About a year ago, I changed my runs to a fast-paced one-mile, followed by four 100-yard wind sprints, every third day. Forty-five minutes of stretching and weights every day. Feel great; lean; no joint pain!

    I see the same thing in the gym. Twenty years ago I would see a few guys at whichever gym I was attending benching 405 or squating over 500. Nowadays they are few and far between.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  104. @guest
    I don't know about the competitive side, but skinniness is an obsession of the upper class, and is one of the major ways they separate themselves from middle and lower classes. "Masochistic events" help you be skinny.

    The men don't go for weightlifting or blood sports because a disproportionate share are homos, obviously. But also because they want to be skinny, too. (Aren't we all homos now, really?)

    Deer hunting is homosexual? You are deranged.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    What on earth are you talking about?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  105. guest says:
    @James Richard
    Deer hunting is homosexual? You are deranged.

    What on earth are you talking about?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
The major media overlooked Communist spies and Madoff’s fraud. What are they missing today?
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?