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Is Copernicus Racist?
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“You are the proud nation of Copernicus …”

Donald Trump, Warsaw, July 6, 2017

Commenter martin2 writes:

A lot of people don’t appreciate the extent to which intellectual jealousy affects non-white attitudes. I didn’t…

I was teaching an almost entirely non-white class many years ago on “Research Methods”, – elementary statistics mainly. But I included an essay type question that had to do with the scientific method and the notion of “falsifiability” according to Professor Popper.

I spoke at length about Copernicus and his refutation of the earth centred Universe and how the earlier astronomers had tried to keep the Earth at the centre, despite the anomalous motions of the planets, by postulating epicycles and deferents and God knows what else. It is a fascinating story, one of the greatest ever told, and of course all the names I mentioned were those of white European men: Copernicus, Galileo, Brahe, Kepler, and Newton.

I was surprised that the students did not share the same enthusiasm for the material as I did. They seemed impatient and restless. In my other lectures with the same class, covering routine statistical concepts such as correlation and regression and hypothesis testing, they had been docile in comparison. Then one of the black students spoke up: “I am sure that there were scientists from Africa or other parts of the world that made the same discoveries, why don’t you mention them?” I cannot remember what I said in response.

So the Copernican Revolution was not their history, and they did not want to hear about it, since I suppose it was another reminder of superior white accomplishment. Yet at the time it never crossed my mind that the students would take umbrage at the background of the main protagonists. If Copernicus had been black I would have told the story no differently.

Of course non-whites will want to disparage white achievements in the arts and sciences. Of course they will play up Islamic science during the European Dark Ages, or the Indians coming up with place value as if that’s the whole of mathematics, or will try to make out that the British or French Empires were unmitigated evil. It is all explained by the twin concepts of envy and humiliation.

 
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170 Comments to "Is Copernicus Racist?"
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  1. The folly of civic-nationalism laid bare. Thanks, boomers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Marty
    Earl Warren, Robert Kennedy, Bill Moyers, David Halberstam, Norbert Schlei, Donald Kennedy, Howell Raines, Sandra Day O'Connor - not a boomer among them.
    , @Desiderius
    Civic-nationalism is the spoonful of sugar to help the (largely) Euronationalism go down.
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  2. I had a (white) professor in a philosophy of science class claim that Ptolemy was black, and that it was important to note that. This was before Wikipedia, so you’d have to trudge to a library to prove it wrong.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    The whole "X was black" is the new "X was part Jewish" game.

    I think the proper response is to tell American blacks that they should stop trying to culturally appropriate the accomplishments of Europeans, Egyptians, Moors, Arabs, etc.

    A big map of the world, with the parts of Sub Saharan Africa circled where black American slaves came from, and distances to various places that blacks try to culturally appropriate is a good start.

    Another is to laugh at them when they claim something was stolen: "Nope. Prove they took it from there and that they broke the law."

    Then lock the door when they start the angry chimpout.
    , @Peripatetic commenter
    He probably identified as black, which is surely good enough.
  3. Almost all Whites:

    Plato – systematic philosophy
    Aristotle – early science
    Euclid – geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio – classical architecture
    Wright – modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek – microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo – structure of solar system
    Kepler – planetary orbits
    Newton – calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe – Rotary printing press
    James Watt – Steam Engine
    Stephenson – Railroad
    Otto – gasoline engine
    Benz – automobile
    Mendel – genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus – biology systematics
    Darwin – evolution
    Joseph Priestly – carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes – theory of government
    Locke – theory of government
    Washington – stepping down
    William Wilberforce – abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith – economics
    Pasteur – germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister – surgical sterile technique
    Faraday – experimental EM
    Maxwell – theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng – Movable Type
    Gutenberg – Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe – high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright – airplane
    Whittle – Jet Plane
    Goddard – Rockets
    John Dalton – Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev – Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs – Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch – nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg – QM
    Erwin Schrodinger – QM
    Dirac – QM
    Everett – ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein – Special & General Relativity
    Hubble – size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg – Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison – electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris – AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden – radio
    Bell – Telephone
    Aristotle – Logic
    Boole – Mathematical Logic
    Shannon – Logic Circuits
    Turing – computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse – first programmable digital computer
    Wegener – continental drift
    Fermi – nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs – citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson – DNA
    William Martin – Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell – biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug – Green Revolution
    Shannon – Information Theory
    Shockley – transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce – Integrated Circuit
    Hopper – compiler
    Backus – Fortran
    Ritchie – C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson – UNIX
    Codd – Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn – Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee – WWW, Browsers

    Read More
    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I met Vint Cerf in an airport once. He was so gracious and humble. He was genuinely surprised that I recognized him.

    Btw, you can also list the founders of higher mathematics: Laplace, Lagrange, Cauchy, Pascal, Fourier, Descartes, Gauss, Fermat, Galois, Poincare, ... (all gentiles btw).

    , @Dave Pinsen
    I think it was the Columbia U. Mattress Girl, in defending her post-college S&M themed performance art, who dismissed Jackson Pollock's art as an example of white privilege.

    It's an interesting point, even if she's a hack.

    If an African splashed paint on a canvass in the same way, would he have been similarly feted as an artist?
    , @Sarah Toga
    Sure.
    All of that is nice.
    But can they dance? (Waltz doesn't count)
    Play basketball?
    Find the crease and take it to the house?
    Lock down that receiver, take home a pick six?
    Anything that really matters?
    , @Judah Benjamin Hur
    I'm not sure I'd put Warhol or Pollock (or Picasso honestly) in the inner circle of GREATNESS.

    You might also want to read

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_science_and_technology_in_China
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    Pre-Bach music: Tomas Luis Vittoria.
    Other than that, you've pretty much covered it.
    , @Stan d Mute
    All stuff and nonsense. Kids today are taught that every name on your list was a fraud claiming credit for inventions of poor oppressed Africans with IQs under 70.
    , @Pachyderm Pachyderma
    Mr. Hume, did you peruse the article? It speaks negatively of India, let alone any meaningful contributions. And Persia is not even worthy of mention. Also, Egypt is not part of the whiteness. Of course, you are right in noting the de rigueur Jew or two in your wonderful list, lest Sailer's paymaster, Akiva Unz, read him the riot act. Thanks for the thought!
    , @James Richard
    Surely you didn't mean to leave out David Hume - The Last Philosopher (of everything.)
    , @anonymous
    You forgot Philo Farnsworth and Descartes' opposite number, Blaise Pascal. Nevertheless, point taken.
    , @Lex Corvus
    In Human Accomplishment, Charles Murray finds that, whether measured by events or significant figures, 97% of accomplishment in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics was due to Europeans. 98% of the significant figures were men.
  4. Read More
    • Agree: CK
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    When we lost Joe Sobran, we lost a true GIANT of a man. And we might only hope to see another of his caliber in our lifetime. Sam Francis was another.

    Ron should just re-run on continuous loop their greatest essays.
    , @Jake
    One of the many TRUE and absolutely essential statements penned by Joe Sobran.
  5. Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It’s not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.

    Sadly, envy is no longer considered a bad thing these days, despite its destructive force. I would venture to say that of all the Seven Deadly Sins— pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth—-envy is probably considered the least dangerous. Although the modern world tends to celebrate all seven sins, there at least some cultural disapproval still left; e.g. “pride goeth before the fall” is still a popular theme in film.

    Yet envy is very hurtful. It blinds you to being happy for someone else. Most lefties are very envious, while non-lefties tend not to be. One reason (out of many) that the Left couldn’t fathom Trump’s rise was because they felt a knee-jerk envy of him: here he was, rich, handsome, successful, beautiful family, hot wife, and not apologetic of it at all. They were (and are) deeply jealous of his success and gifts, which is why they tried very hard to smear him as having his fortune “given to him by his father” and being a “failed businessman.”

    Meanwhile, those not of the Left merely saw his success and were not envious. All want it on some level, but they don’t hate Trump for achieving it or having it. There’s no “he doesn’t deserve that!” hatred of success in them.

    Thus envy this goes to one of the root drives of communism, as Ayn Rand would agree: the hatred of the success of others purely for being more successful than you.

    So these darkie kids being upset by white achievement is not frowned upon in our current Cult Marx world, but encouraged, when, really, under the hand of some strict- 11th Century Catholic tutors they’d be schooled on their sin and forced to abjure it and make penance for it. One wonders if those folks really did have better ideas all around about making societies harmonious.

    N.B. It’s also important to distinguish envy from righteous anger that someone got something via cheating or injustice. Envy, properly, is being upset at the gifts/rewards someone else has gotten where they got them through no wrong. Anger at unjust enrichment isn’t envy, it is a desire for fairness and right.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Sloth ain't celebrated in my world. I am speaking from extensive personal experience.
    , @AndrewR
    Virtually no leftist would admit to being motivated by envy. Although it's hard to deny that envy is more common among leftists than non-leftists, many times many leftists are motivated by "anger at unjust enrichment." The tale of the architect allegedly screwed over by Donald Trump was arguably the most devastating allegation made against Trump, although admittedly it didn't really stick, and I'd like to think that if there were real substance to the allegations that they would have doomed Trump's campaign.
    , @dr kill
    I believe envy is the worst of all these.
    , @Hibernian
    "Envy, properly, is being upset at the gifts/rewards someone else has gotten where they got them through no wrong. Anger at unjust enrichment isn’t envy, it is a desire for fairness and right."

    We very often see the latter masquerading as the former, i.e., Fauxcahontas' "Youu didn't build that!" rant. The phrase "income inequality" seems to drop the pretense.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Most lefties are very envious, while non-lefties tend not to be.
     
    I don't know about most, but very many. It has been my observation that a lot of left-wing belief, on the part of those for whom it is visceral, does indeed seem to be rooted in envy and a sense of inferiority.
    , @Tracy

    Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It’s not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.
     
    Sorry to sound naggy, but this is a pet peeve of mine, and one that actually has serious consequences: a lot of writers refer to Catholic phenomena as being in the past. This is wrong. The "seven deadlies" are still Catholic teaching, and are still just as deadly as ever.

    Seriously, watch for this phenomenon. You'll see it a lot, esp. when the Middle Ages are discussed (e.g., "it was once believed that the bread became the actual Body of Christ"). It's so aggravating.

    And as to the so-called "Dark Ages," for the cause, see the video at the bottom of this page: http://www.fisheaters.com/crusades.html, and note that Christians, esp. the Benedictines, were doing all sorts of stuff to preserve and hand down culture in those times.
  6. Of course non-whites will want to disparage white achievements in the arts and sciences.

    They didn’t much when whites were confident/making those achievements instead of coasting on them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    They didn’t much when whites were confident/making those achievements instead of coasting on them.
     
    I wonder about this. Due to some cleaning/moving for friends, I've been perusing some books and pamphlets circa 1920. Lots of fussing and disparaging of modern society regarding ecosystem damage and treatment of the usual minorities. And today almost all the new advances that are keeping the wheels on civilization (well drilling; ag; robotics; electricity) plus space exploration/discoveries come from those centered in Europe/America/Japan.
  7. @Dave Pinsen
    I had a (white) professor in a philosophy of science class claim that Ptolemy was black, and that it was important to note that. This was before Wikipedia, so you'd have to trudge to a library to prove it wrong.

    The whole “X was black” is the new “X was part Jewish” game.

    I think the proper response is to tell American blacks that they should stop trying to culturally appropriate the accomplishments of Europeans, Egyptians, Moors, Arabs, etc.

    A big map of the world, with the parts of Sub Saharan Africa circled where black American slaves came from, and distances to various places that blacks try to culturally appropriate is a good start.

    Another is to laugh at them when they claim something was stolen: “Nope. Prove they took it from there and that they broke the law.”

    Then lock the door when they start the angry chimpout.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    I think the proper response is to tell American blacks that they should stop trying to culturally appropriate the accomplishments of Europeans, Egyptians, Moors, Arabs, etc
     
    Indeed - and to include cultural appropriation of reading, math, science, and western dress including things like weaves to hide their real hair texture. No more electricity, clean water, indoor plumbing, air conditioning, petroleum products, etc. It's all culturally appropriated.
  8. Well, of course, the real problem is that women discovered all that shit before those stale pale males any way, but they never get any credit.

    I mean, Ada Lovelace’s great-great-great Grandmother surely must have figured it all out.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dahlia
    OT, but Hillary Clinton's "Ada" doesn't get enough attention for sabotaging her, lol!

    Here's an example of the blackout, memory-holing of something fiercely dumb: Nobody ever asked why Hillary Clinton campaigned in Dade City, Florida one week out from election day (November 1). Pasco County went for Trump by over 21 points and Dade City is one of the more conservative parts (!)
    http://prntly.com/2016/11/01/confirmed-hillarys-tiny-dade-city-fl-event-draws-more-pro-trump-protesters-than-clinton-fans/
    (exaggerated, but not by much)

    I was asking and searching for why at the time. A few journos mumbled amongst each other that there must have been some confusion with "Dade County" down in South Florida; they seemed embarrassed for Hillary on her behalf and didn't want to discuss it. So, it was reported very straight as if this was totally done on purpose, but for those of us who knew the place well knew this could not be possible.

    Much laughter and mirth was had.

    I always joke that Ada hated Hillary and pulled a Hal on her thus sending her to Redneck Trump Country in the homestretch.

    https://patch.com/florida/landolakes/donald-trump-hillary-clinton-how-pasco-county-voted

    My guess is that examples of Clinton campaign stupidity (and Trump's Brad Parscale's genius), are too painful for most of the press to visit.
  9. @Dave Pinsen
    I had a (white) professor in a philosophy of science class claim that Ptolemy was black, and that it was important to note that. This was before Wikipedia, so you'd have to trudge to a library to prove it wrong.

    He probably identified as black, which is surely good enough.

    Read More
  10. Then one of the black students spoke up: “I am sure that there were scientists from Africa or other parts of the world that made the same discoveries, why don’t you mention them?” I cannot remember what I said in response.

    Presumably if you’d responded: “because an astronomer in most of sub-Saharan Africa in the 15th century would probably have been eaten by the locals, who would most likely have used his telescope as a tool for stirring the pot”, you’d have been dismissed on the spot, and quite rightly.

    After all, what kind of history of science teacher doesn’t know that Copernicus’ observations were made with instruments based upon Graeco-Roman designs and that telescopes weren’t invented until many decades later?

    Read More
  11. Karl Popper wrote in The Logic of Scientific Discovery:

    “The wrong view of science betrays itself in the craving to be right; for it is not his possession of knowledge, of irrefutable truth, that makes the man of science, but his persistent and recklessly critical quest for truth.”

    Per this classroom example, the wrong view of science is asking “Hey! Why ain’t ya’ll teachin’ ’bout black science and stuff!? What? You sayin’ that they’s all whiteys? Then I ain’t interested!”

    In other words it appears as though these students aren’t even asking the pertinent questions regarding science.

    A question for the second part of the Popper quote: What happens when the man of science, after persistently questing for the truth, finally at long last attains knowledge of the accurate truth? Then what? Doesn’t it then appear as though he has the correct view of science, or at least in this instance?

    Barring that, Popper’s first part would appear to be correct, and that the late Stephen Jay Gould would fit that bill (e.g. Mismeasure of Man).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein

    Karl Popper wrote in The Logic of Scientific Discovery:

    “The wrong view of science betrays itself in the craving to be right; for it is not his possession of knowledge, of irrefutable truth, that makes the man of science, but his persistent and recklessly critical quest for truth.”
     
    Karl Popper is wrong about that.

    There seems to have been a rather pronounced 20th century fad in which scientists (and their apostolic retinue) felt the need to style themselves as Byronic heroes, ripping the bodice off quivering "truth." Every effort was made to portray scientists as blissfully free from conventions and rules, as answerable only to the cracklings of their own beautiful minds. Hence the appearance of adverbial phrases like "recklessly critical."

    The day will come when this is all going to seem rather pathetic in retrospect. It is no coincidence that it was during this same period that science ceased to be a respectable contemplative path and became more of an adjunct to business and politics.

    The right view of science is that it is mysticism. It seeks to deepen its contemplative vision of the world and to conjure its powers by means of arcane formulae. Every true man of science has felt thus. Everything else is "mammon."
    , @Mr. Anon
    “The wrong view of science betrays itself in the craving to be right."

    I've never read Popper, but if he wrote that, then he clearly doesn't know much about real science. Unsurprising - philosophers of science never seem to have anything of interest to say about science. They seem unconcerned that real scientists don't care what they think. Popper has influenced his disciple, George Soros, more than he probably did any scientist.

    In James Gleick's biography of Richard Feynman, he describes how Feynman was asked to review some educational material at his child's school. This being the 60s or 70s, the textbook stressed that it was more important to use the right method rather than get the right answer. Feynman objected to that. He told them (I quote only from memory) "In science, getting the right answer is the only thing that matters."
    , @Negrolphin Pool

    In other words it appears as though these students aren’t even asking the pertinent questions regarding science.
     
    Like the absent water pipes in a thatch and mud hut, they're not even wrong.
  12. The phenomenon shows up in some of the weaker European ethnys as well. In one of his books on the exploration of the Americas, Samuel Eliot Morison complained of having to waste so much time rebutting half-baked claims Portuguese historians had made that one of their sea captains had really been the first to be here, there, everywhere in the Western Hemisphere.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jaakko Raipala
    To consider Portuguese a "weak" group when it comes to the Age of Exploration is impressively deluded. You might as well claim that the the weaker Anglo-Saxons are producing half-baked claims trying to cover up their inferiority to Portuguese and Spanish achievements in exploration.

    For a good period of time it discovering something before other European powers was considered the basis for a territorial claim which is why whenever there was any uncertainty all the colonial powers made sure to bake a claim of one of their sea captains that had traveled a route nearby probably sighting the land first. I'm sure that in Portuguese there are books debunking flimsy English claims but then, the Englishmen turned out to be the best at taking over what others had claimed first and in the end that's all that matters...
    , @oddsbodkins
    I've heard otherwise sensible Yugoslavs tell me with a completely straight face about how Nicola Tesla invented free energy but the CIA suppresses it for the benefit of the oil companies. Envy has an amazing potency for shutting down rational thought... almost as much as anger.
    , @Anonymous
    The Portuguese probably did discover Australia before the Dutch because it's very close to the Spice Islands, which Portuguese vessels were routinely visiting by the early 16th century. The problem is any records of such voyages were destroyed in the earthquake of 1755.

    It's far less likely that they reached America before the Spanish because the experts all knew the ocean was too wide to be safely crossed, and no experienced captain would have been foolish enough to undertake such a voyage.
  13. The only reason we don’t think the French Empire was unmitigated evil is because the Belgians were worse.

    Read More
  14. We’re damn lucky it was a white guy who discovered what goes around what, sun and planet wise. If an African had done it, any advantage we might take of the earth’s movement would amount to cultural appropriation. And Newton snatched gravity for us before the Africans had a chance.

    Read More
  15. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Robert Hume
    Almost all Whites:

    Plato - systematic philosophy
    Aristotle - early science
    Euclid - geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio - classical architecture
    Wright - modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek - microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo - structure of solar system
    Kepler - planetary orbits
    Newton - calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe - Rotary printing press
    James Watt - Steam Engine
    Stephenson - Railroad
    Otto - gasoline engine
    Benz - automobile
    Mendel - genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus - biology systematics
    Darwin - evolution
    Joseph Priestly - carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes - theory of government
    Locke - theory of government
    Washington - stepping down
    William Wilberforce - abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith - economics
    Pasteur - germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister - surgical sterile technique
    Faraday - experimental EM
    Maxwell - theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng - Movable Type
    Gutenberg - Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe - high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright - airplane
    Whittle - Jet Plane
    Goddard - Rockets
    John Dalton - Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev - Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs - Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch - nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg - QM
    Erwin Schrodinger - QM
    Dirac - QM
    Everett - ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein - Special & General Relativity
    Hubble - size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg - Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison - electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris - AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden - radio
    Bell - Telephone
    Aristotle - Logic
    Boole - Mathematical Logic
    Shannon - Logic Circuits
    Turing - computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse - first programmable digital computer
    Wegener - continental drift
    Fermi - nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs - citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson - DNA
    William Martin - Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell - biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug - Green Revolution
    Shannon - Information Theory
    Shockley - transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce - Integrated Circuit
    Hopper - compiler
    Backus - Fortran
    Ritchie - C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson - UNIX
    Codd - Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn - Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee - WWW, Browsers

    I met Vint Cerf in an airport once. He was so gracious and humble. He was genuinely surprised that I recognized him.

    Btw, you can also list the founders of higher mathematics: Laplace, Lagrange, Cauchy, Pascal, Fourier, Descartes, Gauss, Fermat, Galois, Poincare, … (all gentiles btw).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    No Cantor?
    , @AndrewR
    I doubt one in ten thousand Americans would even recognize his name, let alone be able to put a face to the name. I'm not sure who would outside of computer science historians.
    , @PiltdownMan
    Jacobi and Cantor come immediately to mind, but yes, the titans of mathematics were mostly gentile from the Renaissance to about 1850 or so. There have been several Jewish mathematicians of first rank since then.
    , @scrivener3
    I was an early ISP owner. Everything was new and people shared help freely over mailing lists and USENET newsgroups. Once I posted a question and Paul Vixie answered.

    It was like throwing out a question about law and having Antonin Scalia answer.
    , @scrivener3
    I read that when internet governance was being turned piecemeal over to international agencies (such as ICANN) Paul Vixie was participating and he had a white shoe wall st law firm representing him.

    Then Paul died and the next meeting, the lawyer arrived and tried to participate. Someone asked "who are you representing here?" Unfortunately, the firm kept its fingers in the process, apparently a principleless agent. More likely the other clients of the firm all had great interest in the future of net governance. Such decadence in USA.
  16. @Anonymous
    I met Vint Cerf in an airport once. He was so gracious and humble. He was genuinely surprised that I recognized him.

    Btw, you can also list the founders of higher mathematics: Laplace, Lagrange, Cauchy, Pascal, Fourier, Descartes, Gauss, Fermat, Galois, Poincare, ... (all gentiles btw).

    No Cantor?

    Read More
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIyZCIBCJh8&feature=youtu.be&t=686
  17. @Robert Hume
    Almost all Whites:

    Plato - systematic philosophy
    Aristotle - early science
    Euclid - geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio - classical architecture
    Wright - modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek - microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo - structure of solar system
    Kepler - planetary orbits
    Newton - calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe - Rotary printing press
    James Watt - Steam Engine
    Stephenson - Railroad
    Otto - gasoline engine
    Benz - automobile
    Mendel - genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus - biology systematics
    Darwin - evolution
    Joseph Priestly - carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes - theory of government
    Locke - theory of government
    Washington - stepping down
    William Wilberforce - abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith - economics
    Pasteur - germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister - surgical sterile technique
    Faraday - experimental EM
    Maxwell - theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng - Movable Type
    Gutenberg - Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe - high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright - airplane
    Whittle - Jet Plane
    Goddard - Rockets
    John Dalton - Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev - Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs - Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch - nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg - QM
    Erwin Schrodinger - QM
    Dirac - QM
    Everett - ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein - Special & General Relativity
    Hubble - size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg - Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison - electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris - AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden - radio
    Bell - Telephone
    Aristotle - Logic
    Boole - Mathematical Logic
    Shannon - Logic Circuits
    Turing - computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse - first programmable digital computer
    Wegener - continental drift
    Fermi - nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs - citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson - DNA
    William Martin - Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell - biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug - Green Revolution
    Shannon - Information Theory
    Shockley - transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce - Integrated Circuit
    Hopper - compiler
    Backus - Fortran
    Ritchie - C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson - UNIX
    Codd - Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn - Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee - WWW, Browsers

    I think it was the Columbia U. Mattress Girl, in defending her post-college S&M themed performance art, who dismissed Jackson Pollock’s art as an example of white privilege.

    It’s an interesting point, even if she’s a hack.

    If an African splashed paint on a canvass in the same way, would he have been similarly feted as an artist?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    As I read that list, I once again heard the call of the rather large bird, and I was jarred by that name, "Pollock," spontaneously thinking "why in Hell is that name in this list?!"
    , @Desiderius
    Did the African have an in with the CIA?
    , @Robert Hume
    Pollock. Art is difficult to verbalize. I read that his art has a greater fractal degree than any other. But, if true, so what? You see it or you don't. I think he's the only truly great abstract expressionist. The end of "art". Warhol is great but something else.
    , @snorlax
    Yes.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/18/arts/jean-michel-basquiat-painting-is-sold-for-110-million-at-auction.html
  18. @Robert Hume
    Almost all Whites:

    Plato - systematic philosophy
    Aristotle - early science
    Euclid - geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio - classical architecture
    Wright - modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek - microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo - structure of solar system
    Kepler - planetary orbits
    Newton - calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe - Rotary printing press
    James Watt - Steam Engine
    Stephenson - Railroad
    Otto - gasoline engine
    Benz - automobile
    Mendel - genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus - biology systematics
    Darwin - evolution
    Joseph Priestly - carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes - theory of government
    Locke - theory of government
    Washington - stepping down
    William Wilberforce - abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith - economics
    Pasteur - germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister - surgical sterile technique
    Faraday - experimental EM
    Maxwell - theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng - Movable Type
    Gutenberg - Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe - high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright - airplane
    Whittle - Jet Plane
    Goddard - Rockets
    John Dalton - Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev - Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs - Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch - nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg - QM
    Erwin Schrodinger - QM
    Dirac - QM
    Everett - ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein - Special & General Relativity
    Hubble - size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg - Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison - electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris - AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden - radio
    Bell - Telephone
    Aristotle - Logic
    Boole - Mathematical Logic
    Shannon - Logic Circuits
    Turing - computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse - first programmable digital computer
    Wegener - continental drift
    Fermi - nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs - citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson - DNA
    William Martin - Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell - biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug - Green Revolution
    Shannon - Information Theory
    Shockley - transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce - Integrated Circuit
    Hopper - compiler
    Backus - Fortran
    Ritchie - C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson - UNIX
    Codd - Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn - Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee - WWW, Browsers

    Sure.
    All of that is nice.
    But can they dance? (Waltz doesn’t count)
    Play basketball?
    Find the crease and take it to the house?
    Lock down that receiver, take home a pick six?
    Anything that really matters?

    Read More
    • Replies: @jamie b.
    "Find the crease and take it to the house?
    Lock down that receiver, take home a pick six?"

    I've no idea of what that means, and I'm guessing that I should be pleased with the fact.
  19. I’ll see your Copernicus, and raise you a Hamilton.

    Conversation I overheard barely a few days ago while getting doughnuts downtown. Person A: “America’s first President was a Black man.” Alexander Hamilton, get it? Person B: “No, that ain’t right.” Well, why not? Person B: “America was still colonies then when Hamilton was President.”

    Read More
  20. @L Woods
    The folly of civic-nationalism laid bare. Thanks, boomers.

    Earl Warren, Robert Kennedy, Bill Moyers, David Halberstam, Norbert Schlei, Donald Kennedy, Howell Raines, Sandra Day O’Connor – not a boomer among them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ANON
    Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Hubert Humphrey, Darth Vader Ginsburg, Chief Justice Brennan, Judge Garrity, Betty Freidan, Gloria Steinheim, Barbara Boxer, Dianne Feinstein and her multi billionaire husband Richard Blum

    Not a boomer among these unspeakable obscenities who spent their careers destroying Whites through school integregation and affirmative action.
    , @Hibernian
    We boomers applauded those people, at least a lot of us when we were young.
    , @MBlanc46
    Thank you. I don't get this hostility toward Boomers.
  21. @L Woods
    The folly of civic-nationalism laid bare. Thanks, boomers.

    Civic-nationalism is the spoonful of sugar to help the (largely) Euronationalism go down.

    Read More
  22. @Dave Pinsen
    I think it was the Columbia U. Mattress Girl, in defending her post-college S&M themed performance art, who dismissed Jackson Pollock's art as an example of white privilege.

    It's an interesting point, even if she's a hack.

    If an African splashed paint on a canvass in the same way, would he have been similarly feted as an artist?

    As I read that list, I once again heard the call of the rather large bird, and I was jarred by that name, “Pollock,” spontaneously thinking “why in Hell is that name in this list?!”

    Read More
  23. @Dave Pinsen
    I think it was the Columbia U. Mattress Girl, in defending her post-college S&M themed performance art, who dismissed Jackson Pollock's art as an example of white privilege.

    It's an interesting point, even if she's a hack.

    If an African splashed paint on a canvass in the same way, would he have been similarly feted as an artist?

    Did the African have an in with the CIA?

    Read More
  24. @whorefinder
    Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It's not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.

    Sadly, envy is no longer considered a bad thing these days, despite its destructive force. I would venture to say that of all the Seven Deadly Sins--- pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth----envy is probably considered the least dangerous. Although the modern world tends to celebrate all seven sins, there at least some cultural disapproval still left; e.g. "pride goeth before the fall" is still a popular theme in film.

    Yet envy is very hurtful. It blinds you to being happy for someone else. Most lefties are very envious, while non-lefties tend not to be. One reason (out of many) that the Left couldn't fathom Trump's rise was because they felt a knee-jerk envy of him: here he was, rich, handsome, successful, beautiful family, hot wife, and not apologetic of it at all. They were (and are) deeply jealous of his success and gifts, which is why they tried very hard to smear him as having his fortune "given to him by his father" and being a "failed businessman."

    Meanwhile, those not of the Left merely saw his success and were not envious. All want it on some level, but they don't hate Trump for achieving it or having it. There's no "he doesn't deserve that!" hatred of success in them.

    Thus envy this goes to one of the root drives of communism, as Ayn Rand would agree: the hatred of the success of others purely for being more successful than you.

    So these darkie kids being upset by white achievement is not frowned upon in our current Cult Marx world, but encouraged, when, really, under the hand of some strict- 11th Century Catholic tutors they'd be schooled on their sin and forced to abjure it and make penance for it. One wonders if those folks really did have better ideas all around about making societies harmonious.

    N.B. It's also important to distinguish envy from righteous anger that someone got something via cheating or injustice. Envy, properly, is being upset at the gifts/rewards someone else has gotten where they got them through no wrong. Anger at unjust enrichment isn't envy, it is a desire for fairness and right.

    Sloth ain’t celebrated in my world. I am speaking from extensive personal experience.

    Read More
  25. By the way, it was a year ago today (or yesterday, July 6th), that Steve predicted that Trump would win the presidency, due in large part to BLM’s role in the shooting of Dallas police officers.

    Read More
  26. @whorefinder
    Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It's not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.

    Sadly, envy is no longer considered a bad thing these days, despite its destructive force. I would venture to say that of all the Seven Deadly Sins--- pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth----envy is probably considered the least dangerous. Although the modern world tends to celebrate all seven sins, there at least some cultural disapproval still left; e.g. "pride goeth before the fall" is still a popular theme in film.

    Yet envy is very hurtful. It blinds you to being happy for someone else. Most lefties are very envious, while non-lefties tend not to be. One reason (out of many) that the Left couldn't fathom Trump's rise was because they felt a knee-jerk envy of him: here he was, rich, handsome, successful, beautiful family, hot wife, and not apologetic of it at all. They were (and are) deeply jealous of his success and gifts, which is why they tried very hard to smear him as having his fortune "given to him by his father" and being a "failed businessman."

    Meanwhile, those not of the Left merely saw his success and were not envious. All want it on some level, but they don't hate Trump for achieving it or having it. There's no "he doesn't deserve that!" hatred of success in them.

    Thus envy this goes to one of the root drives of communism, as Ayn Rand would agree: the hatred of the success of others purely for being more successful than you.

    So these darkie kids being upset by white achievement is not frowned upon in our current Cult Marx world, but encouraged, when, really, under the hand of some strict- 11th Century Catholic tutors they'd be schooled on their sin and forced to abjure it and make penance for it. One wonders if those folks really did have better ideas all around about making societies harmonious.

    N.B. It's also important to distinguish envy from righteous anger that someone got something via cheating or injustice. Envy, properly, is being upset at the gifts/rewards someone else has gotten where they got them through no wrong. Anger at unjust enrichment isn't envy, it is a desire for fairness and right.

    Virtually no leftist would admit to being motivated by envy. Although it’s hard to deny that envy is more common among leftists than non-leftists, many times many leftists are motivated by “anger at unjust enrichment.” The tale of the architect allegedly screwed over by Donald Trump was arguably the most devastating allegation made against Trump, although admittedly it didn’t really stick, and I’d like to think that if there were real substance to the allegations that they would have doomed Trump’s campaign.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    “anger at unjust enrichment" is, quite frankly, to Leftists any enrichment at all. To the Left, any achievement is something stolen, hence the leveling/tear down influence among them.
  27. Re Copernicus … as Thomas Kuhn noted in his ‘Structure of Scientific Revolutions’, you can keep jumping thru hoops to prop up your old theory almost indefinitely if you wish … it’s often a matter of old fogies dying off, rather than the ‘scholarly establishment’ being convinced of a more elegant & thus ‘true’ framework … and very clearly we have been bullshited about many things over the centuries

    Speaking of which … For many of us, the alleged USA ‘moon landings’ of 1969-72 are clearly, laughably fake … leading to doubts about some of the rest of space travel, ‘International Fake Station’ some say … and then of course you can go really extreme & glance at the flat earth material, which can be very entertaining … Here’s a charming 2min flat earth video using an old David Bowie tune

    Read More
    • Replies: @Flip
    "For many of us, the alleged USA ‘moon landings’ of 1969-72 are clearly, laughably fake"

    I have to agree with that. I read Dave McGowan's "Wagging the Moon Doggie" and it is almost silly to think that could be true. So much of it is logistically impossible.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Speaking of which … For many of us,.......
     
    You mean "stupid people"?

    .........the alleged USA ‘moon landings’ of 1969-72 are clearly, laughably fake …
     
    That's probably because you are stupid (1).

    (1) see: the rest of your post.

  28. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Were they “impatient and restless” because they were envious of European achievement, or because they were wasting time learning something that wasn’t going to come up in any tests?

    Read More
    • Replies: @martin2
    No. It was I that prepared the exam paper and in order to get as many students to pass as possible - this was another issue actually - there needed to be a very close correspondence between the topics I lectured on and the questions I set. They had been duly informed that there was to be one essay type question, on the topic of scientific method and falsifiability.

    One other memorable experience teaching that year's class was that, marking their scripts, an African girl had written a superb essay - in exam conditions - on the topic, demonstrating a perfect knowledge and clearly a keen interest in all that I had said in class. She certainly shattered any stereotypical beliefs I previously might have held of female students from Africa.
  29. @Anonymous
    I met Vint Cerf in an airport once. He was so gracious and humble. He was genuinely surprised that I recognized him.

    Btw, you can also list the founders of higher mathematics: Laplace, Lagrange, Cauchy, Pascal, Fourier, Descartes, Gauss, Fermat, Galois, Poincare, ... (all gentiles btw).

    I doubt one in ten thousand Americans would even recognize his name, let alone be able to put a face to the name. I’m not sure who would outside of computer science historians.

    Read More
    • Replies: @El Dato
    He looks like the architect guy in the Matrix.

    Also, where's Frege, Peirce, Hilbert, Boole, Gödel, Church and Turing?
  30. @whorefinder
    Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It's not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.

    Sadly, envy is no longer considered a bad thing these days, despite its destructive force. I would venture to say that of all the Seven Deadly Sins--- pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth----envy is probably considered the least dangerous. Although the modern world tends to celebrate all seven sins, there at least some cultural disapproval still left; e.g. "pride goeth before the fall" is still a popular theme in film.

    Yet envy is very hurtful. It blinds you to being happy for someone else. Most lefties are very envious, while non-lefties tend not to be. One reason (out of many) that the Left couldn't fathom Trump's rise was because they felt a knee-jerk envy of him: here he was, rich, handsome, successful, beautiful family, hot wife, and not apologetic of it at all. They were (and are) deeply jealous of his success and gifts, which is why they tried very hard to smear him as having his fortune "given to him by his father" and being a "failed businessman."

    Meanwhile, those not of the Left merely saw his success and were not envious. All want it on some level, but they don't hate Trump for achieving it or having it. There's no "he doesn't deserve that!" hatred of success in them.

    Thus envy this goes to one of the root drives of communism, as Ayn Rand would agree: the hatred of the success of others purely for being more successful than you.

    So these darkie kids being upset by white achievement is not frowned upon in our current Cult Marx world, but encouraged, when, really, under the hand of some strict- 11th Century Catholic tutors they'd be schooled on their sin and forced to abjure it and make penance for it. One wonders if those folks really did have better ideas all around about making societies harmonious.

    N.B. It's also important to distinguish envy from righteous anger that someone got something via cheating or injustice. Envy, properly, is being upset at the gifts/rewards someone else has gotten where they got them through no wrong. Anger at unjust enrichment isn't envy, it is a desire for fairness and right.

    I believe envy is the worst of all these.

    Read More
  31. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    If an African splashed paint on a canvass in the same way, would he have been similarly feted as an artist?

    1. Jean-Michel Basquiat sorta kinda answers that question.
    2. Pollock’s art was declared kosher by ((((Clement Greenberg)))) … part of the thrill for ((((Greenberg)))) was that Jack was a rugged american from the mythic “west” … in other words he “othered” him.
    3. Of interest here, Jack Pollock was … Scots-Irish, really.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Pollock's success was much like Mark Twain's: he was a talented boy from the provinces who absolutely hated the provinces and their culture, had been coddled too much as a child (e.g. protected and doted upon by his mother), and was thus resentful that the other "hicks" around him didn't celebrate his genius like he wanted them to. They left as soon as they could, and learned how to con the critics into thinking they were true-blue-hard-bitten-masculine-tough-guys. Very SJW-esque, come to think of it.

    Twain's distaste for the provinces comes through in almost all of his writing: usually, it's those dumb hillbilly hicks falling for a huckster's plan, whether it be Tom Sawyer tricking the kids into painting the fence or the con men in Huck Finn fooling the yokels. Tom Sawyer, in particular, has a lot of hate in it, with Tom being in many cases a stand-in for Twain himself, except Tom's tomfoolery works to make him popular, while in Twain's world it probably rarely fooled anyone and got him beat up. (This is like how in SJW-type movies the hero-wuss-beta dude's plans always trick the dumber-than-rocks bullies, who then embarrass themselves out of coolness as a result.)

    Huck Finn starts the same way---e.g. Huck attacking his Bible reading at the beginning---but Huck emerges as a better character as they move onto the river. That's probably because Twain portrays him as a dumber-than-Tom simpleton, so Twain can't get all smarmy and self-righteously clever through Huck, but instead is forced to get inside another point of view.
  32. @Richard
    The phenomenon shows up in some of the weaker European ethnys as well. In one of his books on the exploration of the Americas, Samuel Eliot Morison complained of having to waste so much time rebutting half-baked claims Portuguese historians had made that one of their sea captains had really been the first to be here, there, everywhere in the Western Hemisphere.

    To consider Portuguese a “weak” group when it comes to the Age of Exploration is impressively deluded. You might as well claim that the the weaker Anglo-Saxons are producing half-baked claims trying to cover up their inferiority to Portuguese and Spanish achievements in exploration.

    For a good period of time it discovering something before other European powers was considered the basis for a territorial claim which is why whenever there was any uncertainty all the colonial powers made sure to bake a claim of one of their sea captains that had traveled a route nearby probably sighting the land first. I’m sure that in Portuguese there are books debunking flimsy English claims but then, the Englishmen turned out to be the best at taking over what others had claimed first and in the end that’s all that matters…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Richard

    To consider Portuguese a “weak” group when it comes to the Age of Exploration is impressively deluded.
     
    It would be, if anyone had said that. But in the range of human accomplishment Portugal is very weak compared to its neighbors, impressive only in the field of exploration during the 1400-1600 period. But because that's all Portugal really has, some of their more nationalist historians have made fools of themselves trying to exaggerate their country's accomplishments by making claim to discoveries that the facts do not support. Portuguese historians, and Portuguese historians alone, are notorious for this.

    Spanish, Dutch, French and Scandinavian historians are much more level-headed, so this is not some Portugal vs. England thing as you childishly imagine. They think the Portuguese are nuts too.

    , @rbbarner
    'The Portuguese sea-borne Empire' by C R Boxer, is a standard text on the Age of Exploration. The Portuguese, like the Spanish but unlike the British, did not contribute much to any field after the mid-17th century. I assume this was because of the Inquisition.


    Goya!!!!
  33. @Dave Pinsen
    I think it was the Columbia U. Mattress Girl, in defending her post-college S&M themed performance art, who dismissed Jackson Pollock's art as an example of white privilege.

    It's an interesting point, even if she's a hack.

    If an African splashed paint on a canvass in the same way, would he have been similarly feted as an artist?

    Pollock. Art is difficult to verbalize. I read that his art has a greater fractal degree than any other. But, if true, so what? You see it or you don’t. I think he’s the only truly great abstract expressionist. The end of “art”. Warhol is great but something else.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM

    Pollock. Art is difficult to verbalize. I read that his art has a greater fractal degree than any other. But, if true, so what? You see it or you don’t. I think he’s the only truly great abstract expressionist
     
    .

    Seeing art, as in the stuff of the Sistine chapel, in Jackson Pollock is really a sign of our decline. "Fractal degree?" It's random paint platters. Mythbusters does the same thing with explosives. I guess I should post my kids stuff as the height emotive family art. Sorry folks, it doesn't get bet of than this. It's the end of art. Behold, the glory of my 6 year old's mind.

    How out of touch with the amount of work great art really takes does one have to be to pretend to see "fractal degree" in paint splatters? Georges Seurat had least had to plan his work and work at it. We are so screwed.
    , @utu
    Art is difficult to verbalize.

    W/o Clement Greenberg and Harold Rosenberg there would be no American Abstract Expressionism. These two guys "verbalized" it for everybody else. They taught everybody how to think and talk about it.

    Harold Rosenberg's essay "The American Action Painters," first appeared in Art News in 1952, and was republished in his 1959 collection of essays, The Tradition of the New.

    Clement Greenberg's essay "'American-Type' Painting" was first published in Partisan Review in 1955. It reappeared in his 1961 collection of essays, Art and Culture.
     
    And then there is a question how much in the initial stages it was all funded by CIA and its friends?

    Modern art was CIA 'weapon'
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/modern-art-was-cia-weapon-1578808.html

    In 1947 the State Department organised and paid for a touring international exhibition entitled "Advancing American Art", with the aim of rebutting Soviet suggestions that America was a cultural desert. But the show caused outrage at home, prompting Truman to make his Hottentot remark and one bitter congressman to declare: "I am just a dumb American who pays taxes for this kind of trash." The tour had to be cancelled.

     


    Yes, he says, the agency saw Abstract Expressionism as an opportunity, and yes, it ran with it.

    "Regarding Abstract Expressionism, I'd love to be able to say that the CIA invented it just to see what happens in New York and downtown SoHo tomorrow!" he joked. "But I think that what we did really was to recognise the difference. It was recognised that Abstract Expression- ism was the kind of art that made Socialist Realism look even more stylised and more rigid and confined than it was. And that relationship was exploited in some of the exhibitions.
     

    Mr Jameson explained, "so that there wouldn't be any question of having to clear Jackson Pollock, for example, or do anything that would involve these people in the organisation. And it couldn't have been any closer, because most of them were people who had very little respect for the government, in particular, and certainly none for the CIA. If you had to use people who considered themselves one way or another to be closer to Moscow than to Washington, well, so much the better perhaps."
     

    He confirmed that his division had acted secretly because of the public hostility to the avant-garde: "It was very difficult to get Congress to go along with some of the things we wanted to do - send art abroad, send symphonies abroad, publish magazines abroad. That's one of the reasons it had to be done covertly. It had to be a secret. In order to encourage openness we had to be secret."
     

    In 1958 the touring exhibition "The New American Painting", including works by Pollock, de Kooning, Motherwell and others, was on show in Paris. The Tate Gallery was keen to have it next, but could not afford to bring it over. Late in the day, an American millionaire and art lover, Julius Fleischmann, stepped in with the cash and the show was brought to London.

    The money that Fleischmann provided, however, was not his but the CIA's. It came through a body called the Farfield Foundation, of which Fleischmann was president, but far from being a millionaire's charitable arm, the foundation was a secret conduit for CIA funds.
     
  34. As V.S. Naipaul wrote more than 50 years ago – and surely the passage of time has only verified the truth of his observation (‘The Middle Passage’ 1962)

    “The American Negro’s subject is his own blackness. This cannot be the basis of any serious literature, and it has happened again and again that once the American Negro has made his statement, his profitable protest, he has nothing to say”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    The collected opinions of Justice Clarence Thomas are a serious literature indeed.
    , @Jason Liu
    A great and accurate statement, pity the literary establishment holds Naipaul to be some kind of white imperialist.
    , @Art Deco
    Alan, tell me:

    If a black author in the United States writes fiction derived from his daily life or travels, how is that distinct from A Bend in the River or A House for Mr. Biswas?
  35. @Richard
    The phenomenon shows up in some of the weaker European ethnys as well. In one of his books on the exploration of the Americas, Samuel Eliot Morison complained of having to waste so much time rebutting half-baked claims Portuguese historians had made that one of their sea captains had really been the first to be here, there, everywhere in the Western Hemisphere.

    I’ve heard otherwise sensible Yugoslavs tell me with a completely straight face about how Nicola Tesla invented free energy but the CIA suppresses it for the benefit of the oil companies. Envy has an amazing potency for shutting down rational thought… almost as much as anger.

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    • Replies: @27 year old
    >Nicola Tesla invented free energy but the CIA suppresses it for the benefit of the oil companies


    He didn't invent free energy but he was a socialist and wanted to give electricity away for free, which annoyed his backers (JP Morgan ?) who then more or less shut him down.
    , @3g4me
    @36 oddsbodkins: A number of Bulgarians told my husband and I that, if not for the damned Turkish occupation, Bulgaria would have been the cradle of the Renaissance.
  36. @Robert Hume
    Pollock. Art is difficult to verbalize. I read that his art has a greater fractal degree than any other. But, if true, so what? You see it or you don't. I think he's the only truly great abstract expressionist. The end of "art". Warhol is great but something else.

    Pollock. Art is difficult to verbalize. I read that his art has a greater fractal degree than any other. But, if true, so what? You see it or you don’t. I think he’s the only truly great abstract expressionist

    .

    Seeing art, as in the stuff of the Sistine chapel, in Jackson Pollock is really a sign of our decline. “Fractal degree?” It’s random paint platters. Mythbusters does the same thing with explosives. I guess I should post my kids stuff as the height emotive family art. Sorry folks, it doesn’t get bet of than this. It’s the end of art. Behold, the glory of my 6 year old’s mind.

    How out of touch with the amount of work great art really takes does one have to be to pretend to see “fractal degree” in paint splatters? Georges Seurat had least had to plan his work and work at it. We are so screwed.

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  37. Copernicus had to use epicircles as well because he didn’t see what Kepler saw later that it’s ellipses rather than perfect circles. With circles you always need epicircles. That’s one of the reasons (I suppose) he (Copernicus) later on wasn’t as forceful pushing his theory.

    I as a non-white never had any problem admiring Copernicus and even Columbus (or, at least for awhile, some of the other Conquistodors). I do believe this kind of thing is an invention of Good Whites (vs Bad Whites) cf Derbyshire. I do not even remotely recall that growing up any of my classmates or teachers back in non-white land had any serious negative feelings towards Newton.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    There is an argument that Newton took Calculus from the Indians.
  38. @Anonymous
    I met Vint Cerf in an airport once. He was so gracious and humble. He was genuinely surprised that I recognized him.

    Btw, you can also list the founders of higher mathematics: Laplace, Lagrange, Cauchy, Pascal, Fourier, Descartes, Gauss, Fermat, Galois, Poincare, ... (all gentiles btw).

    Jacobi and Cantor come immediately to mind, but yes, the titans of mathematics were mostly gentile from the Renaissance to about 1850 or so. There have been several Jewish mathematicians of first rank since then.

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    • Replies: @utu
    Both Jacobi and Cantor had mental breakdowns that ended their careers as mathematicians. Too ambitious? Too much anti-semitism? Or the combination of both?
  39. People aren’t interested in history that isn’t theirs. I know I definitely tuned out for most of “world” history class in high school because it was all about various nonWhites.

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  40. @AndrewR
    Virtually no leftist would admit to being motivated by envy. Although it's hard to deny that envy is more common among leftists than non-leftists, many times many leftists are motivated by "anger at unjust enrichment." The tale of the architect allegedly screwed over by Donald Trump was arguably the most devastating allegation made against Trump, although admittedly it didn't really stick, and I'd like to think that if there were real substance to the allegations that they would have doomed Trump's campaign.

    “anger at unjust enrichment” is, quite frankly, to Leftists any enrichment at all. To the Left, any achievement is something stolen, hence the leveling/tear down influence among them.

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    • Replies: @Cheetah
    This is a dubious claim.white liberals who are considered leftist by alright has IQ advantage over white conservatives.
    , @Autochthon
    "You didn't build that."

    N.B. His implication those who succeed are not smarter than others, more hard working than others. He speaks of public infrastructure and the rule of law, but fails to acknowledge these things are available equally to the homeless children who paid attention in school and worked full-time jobs during undergraduate studies as they are to people who spend their time smoking marihuana and bedding slatterns.

    I especially like his invocation of the Internet: it did not indeed come about on its own; it was developed by brilliant white Americans, people who persevered through military and scientific careers, not by lazy Negroes drinking malt liquor all day or indolent Arabs memorising hoodoo written by a marauding savage bent on global conquest. Does the man even contemplate such things?

    Envy indeed.

    I knew a guy who always made sullen allusions to how he couldn't afford a house and he didn't make nearly as much money as I did. Well, I grew up with this guy; we met in the eighth grade. By his own admission, the only reason he even graduated high school was because his indulgent homeroom teacher marked him "present" each day even though the guy showed up on time maybe five times a year. I joined the navy and went to Kosovo. He joined the army, whined a lot during basic training, and finally obtained some kind of nebulous medical discharge before he even made it out of Fort Benning. He wound up with a govermental job which entailed driving around patrolling and responding to calls from a dispatcher, and he bragged about how he reported to the depot each day, then drove the government's truck back to his flat and played video games unless and unil he got a call from the dispatcher. He later quit a string of managerial jobs in retail because his bosses were mean to him. Last I knew, the guy was living in his mother-in-law's finished basement. To this day, he probably thinks from time to time how unfair it is that I magically "got rich" and he did not.

    Am I probably a lot more intelligent than him? Sure, and that's an accident of birth. However, I work with plenty of people comparable to him in intelligence. The thing is, they show up to the office on time, work all day, and put up with the corporate bullshit like everyone else, because they realise that's what we get paid to do.

  41. @Jaakko Raipala
    To consider Portuguese a "weak" group when it comes to the Age of Exploration is impressively deluded. You might as well claim that the the weaker Anglo-Saxons are producing half-baked claims trying to cover up their inferiority to Portuguese and Spanish achievements in exploration.

    For a good period of time it discovering something before other European powers was considered the basis for a territorial claim which is why whenever there was any uncertainty all the colonial powers made sure to bake a claim of one of their sea captains that had traveled a route nearby probably sighting the land first. I'm sure that in Portuguese there are books debunking flimsy English claims but then, the Englishmen turned out to be the best at taking over what others had claimed first and in the end that's all that matters...

    To consider Portuguese a “weak” group when it comes to the Age of Exploration is impressively deluded.

    It would be, if anyone had said that. But in the range of human accomplishment Portugal is very weak compared to its neighbors, impressive only in the field of exploration during the 1400-1600 period. But because that’s all Portugal really has, some of their more nationalist historians have made fools of themselves trying to exaggerate their country’s accomplishments by making claim to discoveries that the facts do not support. Portuguese historians, and Portuguese historians alone, are notorious for this.

    Spanish, Dutch, French and Scandinavian historians are much more level-headed, so this is not some Portugal vs. England thing as you childishly imagine. They think the Portuguese are nuts too.

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  42. @oddsbodkins
    I've heard otherwise sensible Yugoslavs tell me with a completely straight face about how Nicola Tesla invented free energy but the CIA suppresses it for the benefit of the oil companies. Envy has an amazing potency for shutting down rational thought... almost as much as anger.

    >Nicola Tesla invented free energy but the CIA suppresses it for the benefit of the oil companies

    He didn’t invent free energy but he was a socialist and wanted to give electricity away for free, which annoyed his backers (JP Morgan ?) who then more or less shut him down.

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  43. @Alan from Perth W.A.
    As V.S. Naipaul wrote more than 50 years ago - and surely the passage of time has only verified the truth of his observation ('The Middle Passage' 1962)

    "The American Negro's subject is his own blackness. This cannot be the basis of any serious literature, and it has happened again and again that once the American Negro has made his statement, his profitable protest, he has nothing to say".

    The collected opinions of Justice Clarence Thomas are a serious literature indeed.

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  44. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Karl Popper wrote in The Logic of Scientific Discovery:

    "The wrong view of science betrays itself in the craving to be right; for it is not his possession of knowledge, of irrefutable truth, that makes the man of science, but his persistent and recklessly critical quest for truth."

    Per this classroom example, the wrong view of science is asking "Hey! Why ain't ya'll teachin' 'bout black science and stuff!? What? You sayin' that they's all whiteys? Then I ain't interested!"

    In other words it appears as though these students aren't even asking the pertinent questions regarding science.

    A question for the second part of the Popper quote: What happens when the man of science, after persistently questing for the truth, finally at long last attains knowledge of the accurate truth? Then what? Doesn't it then appear as though he has the correct view of science, or at least in this instance?

    Barring that, Popper's first part would appear to be correct, and that the late Stephen Jay Gould would fit that bill (e.g. Mismeasure of Man).

    Karl Popper wrote in The Logic of Scientific Discovery:

    “The wrong view of science betrays itself in the craving to be right; for it is not his possession of knowledge, of irrefutable truth, that makes the man of science, but his persistent and recklessly critical quest for truth.”

    Karl Popper is wrong about that.

    There seems to have been a rather pronounced 20th century fad in which scientists (and their apostolic retinue) felt the need to style themselves as Byronic heroes, ripping the bodice off quivering “truth.” Every effort was made to portray scientists as blissfully free from conventions and rules, as answerable only to the cracklings of their own beautiful minds. Hence the appearance of adverbial phrases like “recklessly critical.”

    The day will come when this is all going to seem rather pathetic in retrospect. It is no coincidence that it was during this same period that science ceased to be a respectable contemplative path and became more of an adjunct to business and politics.

    The right view of science is that it is mysticism. It seeks to deepen its contemplative vision of the world and to conjure its powers by means of arcane formulae. Every true man of science has felt thus. Everything else is “mammon.”

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  45. @Robert Hume
    Pollock. Art is difficult to verbalize. I read that his art has a greater fractal degree than any other. But, if true, so what? You see it or you don't. I think he's the only truly great abstract expressionist. The end of "art". Warhol is great but something else.

    Art is difficult to verbalize.

    W/o Clement Greenberg and Harold Rosenberg there would be no American Abstract Expressionism. These two guys “verbalized” it for everybody else. They taught everybody how to think and talk about it.

    Harold Rosenberg’s essay “The American Action Painters,” first appeared in Art News in 1952, and was republished in his 1959 collection of essays, The Tradition of the New.

    Clement Greenberg’s essay “‘American-Type’ Painting” was first published in Partisan Review in 1955. It reappeared in his 1961 collection of essays, Art and Culture.

    And then there is a question how much in the initial stages it was all funded by CIA and its friends?

    Modern art was CIA ‘weapon’

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/modern-art-was-cia-weapon-1578808.html

    In 1947 the State Department organised and paid for a touring international exhibition entitled “Advancing American Art”, with the aim of rebutting Soviet suggestions that America was a cultural desert. But the show caused outrage at home, prompting Truman to make his Hottentot remark and one bitter congressman to declare: “I am just a dumb American who pays taxes for this kind of trash.” The tour had to be cancelled.

    Yes, he says, the agency saw Abstract Expressionism as an opportunity, and yes, it ran with it.

    “Regarding Abstract Expressionism, I’d love to be able to say that the CIA invented it just to see what happens in New York and downtown SoHo tomorrow!” he joked. “But I think that what we did really was to recognise the difference. It was recognised that Abstract Expression- ism was the kind of art that made Socialist Realism look even more stylised and more rigid and confined than it was. And that relationship was exploited in some of the exhibitions.

    Mr Jameson explained, “so that there wouldn’t be any question of having to clear Jackson Pollock, for example, or do anything that would involve these people in the organisation. And it couldn’t have been any closer, because most of them were people who had very little respect for the government, in particular, and certainly none for the CIA. If you had to use people who considered themselves one way or another to be closer to Moscow than to Washington, well, so much the better perhaps.”

    He confirmed that his division had acted secretly because of the public hostility to the avant-garde: “It was very difficult to get Congress to go along with some of the things we wanted to do – send art abroad, send symphonies abroad, publish magazines abroad. That’s one of the reasons it had to be done covertly. It had to be a secret. In order to encourage openness we had to be secret.”

    In 1958 the touring exhibition “The New American Painting”, including works by Pollock, de Kooning, Motherwell and others, was on show in Paris. The Tate Gallery was keen to have it next, but could not afford to bring it over. Late in the day, an American millionaire and art lover, Julius Fleischmann, stepped in with the cash and the show was brought to London.

    The money that Fleischmann provided, however, was not his but the CIA’s. It came through a body called the Farfield Foundation, of which Fleischmann was president, but far from being a millionaire’s charitable arm, the foundation was a secret conduit for CIA funds.

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    • Replies: @Robert Hume
    I've read a bit of criticism of abstract expressionism; didn't enlighten me at all.

    I think I knew a bit about the CIA supporting abstract expressionism; but never really put two and two together before. I now see that my distaste for all but one of those artists and of their apologists is probably justified. Somehow Pollock's talent showed up by accident and he was grouped with the others.
  46. @Anonymous
    I met Vint Cerf in an airport once. He was so gracious and humble. He was genuinely surprised that I recognized him.

    Btw, you can also list the founders of higher mathematics: Laplace, Lagrange, Cauchy, Pascal, Fourier, Descartes, Gauss, Fermat, Galois, Poincare, ... (all gentiles btw).

    I was an early ISP owner. Everything was new and people shared help freely over mailing lists and USENET newsgroups. Once I posted a question and Paul Vixie answered.

    It was like throwing out a question about law and having Antonin Scalia answer.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Hell, I think it's crazy Steve Sailer and John Derbyshire interact with us. I've met super duper famous, ostensible titans of Sili Valley most people would probably be impressed by meeting, but they are decidedly pedestrian, uninteresting, and uninspired people; transparently smug and flashy salesmen at best. Increasingly, the truly impressive people are unassuming and unacknowledged by society at large;
    I expect it is yet another indicator of civilisational waning.
  47. @anonymous

    If an African splashed paint on a canvass in the same way, would he have been similarly feted as an artist?
     
    1. Jean-Michel Basquiat sorta kinda answers that question.
    2. Pollock's art was declared kosher by ((((Clement Greenberg)))) … part of the thrill for ((((Greenberg)))) was that Jack was a rugged american from the mythic "west" … in other words he "othered" him.
    3. Of interest here, Jack Pollock was … Scots-Irish, really.

    Pollock’s success was much like Mark Twain’s: he was a talented boy from the provinces who absolutely hated the provinces and their culture, had been coddled too much as a child (e.g. protected and doted upon by his mother), and was thus resentful that the other “hicks” around him didn’t celebrate his genius like he wanted them to. They left as soon as they could, and learned how to con the critics into thinking they were true-blue-hard-bitten-masculine-tough-guys. Very SJW-esque, come to think of it.

    Twain’s distaste for the provinces comes through in almost all of his writing: usually, it’s those dumb hillbilly hicks falling for a huckster’s plan, whether it be Tom Sawyer tricking the kids into painting the fence or the con men in Huck Finn fooling the yokels. Tom Sawyer, in particular, has a lot of hate in it, with Tom being in many cases a stand-in for Twain himself, except Tom’s tomfoolery works to make him popular, while in Twain’s world it probably rarely fooled anyone and got him beat up. (This is like how in SJW-type movies the hero-wuss-beta dude’s plans always trick the dumber-than-rocks bullies, who then embarrass themselves out of coolness as a result.)

    Huck Finn starts the same way—e.g. Huck attacking his Bible reading at the beginning—but Huck emerges as a better character as they move onto the river. That’s probably because Twain portrays him as a dumber-than-Tom simpleton, so Twain can’t get all smarmy and self-righteously clever through Huck, but instead is forced to get inside another point of view.

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    • Replies: @Saint Louis
    Agreed re: Twain. I've long thought of him as sort of an arrogant, self-righteous jerk; a proto-SJW. Perhaps the best (or worst) example might be "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court". Except, rather than dumb hicks in the midwest, the butt of all the jokes is those backwards, credulous peasants with their superstitions and religious beliefs. Twain's contempt for them is palpable. The story is supposed to be comedic, but in fact, it's so heavy handed that it isn't funny.
    , @celt darnell
    I haven't seen anyone shred Mark Twain so completely since Ignatius J. Rilley.
    , @Art Deco
    Twain made good coin as an author and lecturer, and died a wealthy man in spite of a spell in bankruptcy. Pollock was able to support himself with junk work due to the oddities of the art market, wherein a narrow social sliver purchase certified experiences of art (as well as cachet) so certified by touts employed as art critics.

    However much he may have hated the provinces, that is where he spent his life prior to age 60 (when he was not touring).
  48. @PiltdownMan
    Jacobi and Cantor come immediately to mind, but yes, the titans of mathematics were mostly gentile from the Renaissance to about 1850 or so. There have been several Jewish mathematicians of first rank since then.

    Both Jacobi and Cantor had mental breakdowns that ended their careers as mathematicians. Too ambitious? Too much anti-semitism? Or the combination of both?

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  49. @Alan from Perth W.A.
    As V.S. Naipaul wrote more than 50 years ago - and surely the passage of time has only verified the truth of his observation ('The Middle Passage' 1962)

    "The American Negro's subject is his own blackness. This cannot be the basis of any serious literature, and it has happened again and again that once the American Negro has made his statement, his profitable protest, he has nothing to say".

    A great and accurate statement, pity the literary establishment holds Naipaul to be some kind of white imperialist.

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  50. @oddsbodkins
    I've heard otherwise sensible Yugoslavs tell me with a completely straight face about how Nicola Tesla invented free energy but the CIA suppresses it for the benefit of the oil companies. Envy has an amazing potency for shutting down rational thought... almost as much as anger.

    @36 oddsbodkins: A number of Bulgarians told my husband and I that, if not for the damned Turkish occupation, Bulgaria would have been the cradle of the Renaissance.

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    • Replies: @oddsbodkins
    I've heard Greeks say essentially the same thing. David Sedaris said it well: "The Greeks invented democracy, built the acropolis, and then called it a day."
    , @Escher
    Who's to know?
    It is a fact though that Islam did stunt the intellectual growth of many countries where it spread or ruled over. A religion that imposes a straitjacket on people's thinking cannot but have that effect.
    , @Pachyderm Pachyderma
    Not surprisingly, Indians make a similar claim in that had the Arabs and Turks not imposed the tyrannical, medieval and backward to boot Islam on them, there was no telling where tbeir lot would have been.
  51. And yet, so greatly did the rest of the world envy our superior civilization, that we had to force it on them by gunboat, and the barrel of a gun.

    Of course, the greatest proof that our unique racial brilliance has allowed us to invent the greatest life possible for man, is that we have become suicidal.

    Greatest. Race. Ever.

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  52. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @a non-white
    Copernicus had to use epicircles as well because he didn't see what Kepler saw later that it's ellipses rather than perfect circles. With circles you always need epicircles. That's one of the reasons (I suppose) he (Copernicus) later on wasn't as forceful pushing his theory.

    I as a non-white never had any problem admiring Copernicus and even Columbus (or, at least for awhile, some of the other Conquistodors). I do believe this kind of thing is an invention of Good Whites (vs Bad Whites) cf Derbyshire. I do not even remotely recall that growing up any of my classmates or teachers back in non-white land had any serious negative feelings towards Newton.

    There is an argument that Newton took Calculus from the Indians.

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    • Replies: @ANON
    Didn't Pascal invent Calculas? At least that was what my calculus book claimed.
    , @a non-white
    Russian mathematicians left and right complained about the lack of acknowledgement in the west. And the German and the French mathematicians of 19th century were pretty serious about their national competitions. There is an argument that the English fell behind the continental mathematicians around 1800 because the English did not like Leibniz and his students (because of Newton and his followers).

    The old fault lines were quite different you see. These new white vs non-white and men vs women thing are very much like say Pepsi vs Coke --- a very American invention of recent years. And then all kinds of people want to exploit it. Envy & humiliation of some people of non-white land are hardly responsible.

    I would say that the smart kids everywhere want to learn engineering and great literature. Only in America you got kids dissing Newton and Shakespeare because of their being old white male.
  53. @Anonymous
    I met Vint Cerf in an airport once. He was so gracious and humble. He was genuinely surprised that I recognized him.

    Btw, you can also list the founders of higher mathematics: Laplace, Lagrange, Cauchy, Pascal, Fourier, Descartes, Gauss, Fermat, Galois, Poincare, ... (all gentiles btw).

    I read that when internet governance was being turned piecemeal over to international agencies (such as ICANN) Paul Vixie was participating and he had a white shoe wall st law firm representing him.

    Then Paul died and the next meeting, the lawyer arrived and tried to participate. Someone asked “who are you representing here?” Unfortunately, the firm kept its fingers in the process, apparently a principleless agent. More likely the other clients of the firm all had great interest in the future of net governance. Such decadence in USA.

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  54. @3g4me
    @36 oddsbodkins: A number of Bulgarians told my husband and I that, if not for the damned Turkish occupation, Bulgaria would have been the cradle of the Renaissance.

    I’ve heard Greeks say essentially the same thing. David Sedaris said it well: “The Greeks invented democracy, built the acropolis, and then called it a day.”

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    • Replies: @patrick
    Greek scholars fleeing the Ottoman conquest of Byzantium did play a role in the Italian Renaissance, if only by reacquainting Western Europe with the Greek language and ancient Greek texts (including mathematical/astronomical texts).
    Sicily (my ancestral home) had high points- the Greek period when Archimedes and company flourished, and the Norman period when you had a lot of cultural mixing between Arab, Byzantine and Latin, but it was almost a nonentity during the Renaissance. Leonardo, Galileo, Michelangelo, etc. were Florentines.
  55. The times they are a changing.

    As some DB recently told whites, “This isn’t your country anymore.” And you know what? He’s right.

    We whites are a bunch of arrogant saps. We simply assume that everyone wants to be like us. We can’t fathom that other people might not want to ape us. No kidding other races don’t want to hear about our accomplishments. Granted, those races are short-sided, but, hey, that’s their choice. They’re not whites. Stop expecting them to act like whites.

    The Japanese have it right. Respect what others have accomplished. Take what works for your society. Leave the rest. The Japanese were never missionaries. In our hearts, whites still are. Until that is beaten out of us, whites will continue to act the fool.

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    • Replies: @AM

    We whites are a bunch of arrogant saps. We simply assume that everyone wants to be like us. We can’t fathom that other people might not want to ape us. No kidding other races don’t want to hear about our accomplishments. .
     
    This attitude is narcissism. Every race has it, but whites seem to be really prone to it. I don't think it's quite the wonder that we've been successful as Christians, which is a big huge heaping of anti-narcissism every Sunday. And why we've become so stupid when we decided we were smarter than a 1500 years of culture.
  56. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I wonder how many Polish/Danish astronomical savants are coming along from the UC Davis & Irvine conveyor belt (see graph):

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/education/article160029439.html

    In comparison the int’l admit rate at Westwood is sharply lower– U C Lotsa Asians but they’re all from exotic Alhambra more likely

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  57. On some level whites get it. That is why they hype film like Hidden Figures which vastly overrated the contribution of those women. Maybe, they surmise, if they say “see your people can do math too” minorities do better in school. See also Stand and Deliver.

    Humiliation is a driving force behind feminism as well.

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  58. @whorefinder
    “anger at unjust enrichment" is, quite frankly, to Leftists any enrichment at all. To the Left, any achievement is something stolen, hence the leveling/tear down influence among them.

    This is a dubious claim.white liberals who are considered leftist by alright has IQ advantage over white conservatives.

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    • Replies: @whorefinder

    This is a dubious claim.white liberals who are considered leftist by alright has IQ advantage over white conservatives.
     
    lmao. perhaps one day you'll learn to write complete and grammatically correct sentences and then we'll all start to believe your dubious and nonsensical claims.
  59. @whorefinder
    Pollock's success was much like Mark Twain's: he was a talented boy from the provinces who absolutely hated the provinces and their culture, had been coddled too much as a child (e.g. protected and doted upon by his mother), and was thus resentful that the other "hicks" around him didn't celebrate his genius like he wanted them to. They left as soon as they could, and learned how to con the critics into thinking they were true-blue-hard-bitten-masculine-tough-guys. Very SJW-esque, come to think of it.

    Twain's distaste for the provinces comes through in almost all of his writing: usually, it's those dumb hillbilly hicks falling for a huckster's plan, whether it be Tom Sawyer tricking the kids into painting the fence or the con men in Huck Finn fooling the yokels. Tom Sawyer, in particular, has a lot of hate in it, with Tom being in many cases a stand-in for Twain himself, except Tom's tomfoolery works to make him popular, while in Twain's world it probably rarely fooled anyone and got him beat up. (This is like how in SJW-type movies the hero-wuss-beta dude's plans always trick the dumber-than-rocks bullies, who then embarrass themselves out of coolness as a result.)

    Huck Finn starts the same way---e.g. Huck attacking his Bible reading at the beginning---but Huck emerges as a better character as they move onto the river. That's probably because Twain portrays him as a dumber-than-Tom simpleton, so Twain can't get all smarmy and self-righteously clever through Huck, but instead is forced to get inside another point of view.

    Agreed re: Twain. I’ve long thought of him as sort of an arrogant, self-righteous jerk; a proto-SJW. Perhaps the best (or worst) example might be “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court”. Except, rather than dumb hicks in the midwest, the butt of all the jokes is those backwards, credulous peasants with their superstitions and religious beliefs. Twain’s contempt for them is palpable. The story is supposed to be comedic, but in fact, it’s so heavy handed that it isn’t funny.

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    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    I doubt you've ever read the book. It is just as full of comparisons favoring the "yokels" as it is of comparisons favoring the Connecticut Yankee. Although these are peppered throughout the book, they culminate in the battle where electricity and other modern "marvels" are used to slaughter the army opposing the Yankee and his allies. The Yankee is depicted as somewhat reveling in this and Twain makes clear that this is as disgusting as any medieval barbarity. It's almost a presage of WW I. Twain's message is that human stupidity and arrogance are all too common throughout humanity and human history as are human decency and understanding. Neither is the special province of any particular time, place, class, religion, or race. The Duke and the King in Huckleberry Finn are just as, if not more, contemptible than the yokels they unsuccessfully attempt to swindle. Twain did see himself as above this and the evidence suggests that he mostly was.
  60. @Busby
    The only reason we don't think the French Empire was unmitigated evil is because the Belgians were worse.

    Also, French wine and food is better.

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  61. It is unfair to Twain to compare him to a SJW. It ignores his real pain, discussed here and there, that formed his main objection to his own culture that he both loved (read Life on the Mississippi to see that) and hated: folk Superstition.

    Twain really did think as a boy that thunder was God trying to kill him for swearing and being lazy, again and again in his books he attacks superstition as the main evil in humanity: Connecticut Yankee and Innocents Abroad particularly. He’s pretty brutal on the con-men, none of whom were down-home types in Innocents (mostly Arab/Turkish conmen). That’s because he was tormented as a boy and seemed to be continued to be tormented by all sorts of nonsense superstitions as an adult. If you read things like Letters From Earth.

    And for all his supposed hatred of the South; he ended up volunteering as a Confederate soldier; and then deserting with the rest of the men in the aftermath of the battle. He was before the War a Riverboat pilot, not too many coddled men make that journey; it required tremendous local knowledge and the ability to manuever the ship close the bank making better time without hitting snags or sandbars.

    Twain is a pre-modern figure; he loved science, hated superstition; and felt Blacks deserved decent treatment but were in no way equal to Whites (the main objection to Huck Finn). Huck was the leader, Jim the child-like follower; Twain was no stranger to violence and while making his way in the world was in the fairly violent West; as soon as he made money he sensibly retired to the healthier confines of New England.

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  62. @whorefinder
    Pollock's success was much like Mark Twain's: he was a talented boy from the provinces who absolutely hated the provinces and their culture, had been coddled too much as a child (e.g. protected and doted upon by his mother), and was thus resentful that the other "hicks" around him didn't celebrate his genius like he wanted them to. They left as soon as they could, and learned how to con the critics into thinking they were true-blue-hard-bitten-masculine-tough-guys. Very SJW-esque, come to think of it.

    Twain's distaste for the provinces comes through in almost all of his writing: usually, it's those dumb hillbilly hicks falling for a huckster's plan, whether it be Tom Sawyer tricking the kids into painting the fence or the con men in Huck Finn fooling the yokels. Tom Sawyer, in particular, has a lot of hate in it, with Tom being in many cases a stand-in for Twain himself, except Tom's tomfoolery works to make him popular, while in Twain's world it probably rarely fooled anyone and got him beat up. (This is like how in SJW-type movies the hero-wuss-beta dude's plans always trick the dumber-than-rocks bullies, who then embarrass themselves out of coolness as a result.)

    Huck Finn starts the same way---e.g. Huck attacking his Bible reading at the beginning---but Huck emerges as a better character as they move onto the river. That's probably because Twain portrays him as a dumber-than-Tom simpleton, so Twain can't get all smarmy and self-righteously clever through Huck, but instead is forced to get inside another point of view.

    I haven’t seen anyone shred Mark Twain so completely since Ignatius J. Rilley.

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    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Speaking of shredding, Twain attacked James Fenimore Cooper not only because he wanted to boost his own style of writing over Cooper's, but also because Cooper celebrated the country folk/pioneers of America, while Twain hated them and made fun of them. And of course Cooper was quite religious, while Twain detested religious folk.

    Cooper, BTW, was a huge hit with many foreign dudes. Balzac, Victor Hugo, , and musician Franz Schubert were all big fans. Closer to home, Washington Irving, Daniel Webster, and Thoreau were high on him. Its not hard to see that Twain's attacks on Cooper were motivated by usurping hsi fame rather than genuine criticism.
  63. I guess I did not read the same book, Connecticut Yankee was hardly funny, it was filled with horrible death. Much like Twain’s life — his adored younger brother died after days of burns from an exploding boiler aboard a steamship that Twain got him the job on; his kids all died, many of his riverboat friends died in the War. He was as I said pre-modern.

    Yankee was all about Twain’s favorite and darkest theme — superstition vs. science. The Yankee tries to use science including in the end electric fences, landmines, and poison gas to transform feudalism; gets young men to buy in but no one else; and is sent back into the future by the villainous Merlin who wants to keep Feudalism and prevent the modern age. And the book is ambivalent — Twain paints the Yankee as a man who unleashed literally modern warfare hell (Twain had many friends in the War and had a small taste of it himself) with dead men on electric fences foreshadowing the barbed wire draped with the dead about twenty years later.

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    • Replies: @prosa123
    "Much like Twain’s life — his adored younger brother died after days of burns from an exploding boiler aboard a steamship that Twain got him the job on; his kids all died"

    His daughter Clara lived until her late 80's, outliving her father by many decades.
    , @whorefinder
    Twain hated religion and country folk because he hated his hometown growing up, and Connecticut Yankee was just another excuse to go after those "dumb religious hicks" who didn't see his genius as a boy. His theme of superstition v. science was rooted in this hatred---it was Twain's SJW-style, delusional Secret King ego coming back to crush those foolish folks who extolled upstanding religious men over hm.
    , @whoever
    I think I read the same book you did.
    These literature discussions reveal so much more about the reader than the writer, don't they?
  64. @3g4me
    @36 oddsbodkins: A number of Bulgarians told my husband and I that, if not for the damned Turkish occupation, Bulgaria would have been the cradle of the Renaissance.

    Who’s to know?
    It is a fact though that Islam did stunt the intellectual growth of many countries where it spread or ruled over. A religion that imposes a straitjacket on people’s thinking cannot but have that effect.

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  65. I tend to believe this is generally a black America phenomenon — the Asian students I’ve known don’t have this sort of resentment. Although I dealt primarily with Indian students who learned about Indian scientists like Bose and Chandrashekar along with Faraday and Newton. The black students generally don’t have models like that.

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    • Replies: @Pachyderm Pachyderma
    You good sir are absolutely correct in stating that Indians do admire and respect the brilliance of the Western scientists but that is neither here nor there, for this article is about how the poor white man is taking up the tuchus!
  66. @Robert Hume
    Almost all Whites:

    Plato - systematic philosophy
    Aristotle - early science
    Euclid - geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio - classical architecture
    Wright - modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek - microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo - structure of solar system
    Kepler - planetary orbits
    Newton - calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe - Rotary printing press
    James Watt - Steam Engine
    Stephenson - Railroad
    Otto - gasoline engine
    Benz - automobile
    Mendel - genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus - biology systematics
    Darwin - evolution
    Joseph Priestly - carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes - theory of government
    Locke - theory of government
    Washington - stepping down
    William Wilberforce - abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith - economics
    Pasteur - germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister - surgical sterile technique
    Faraday - experimental EM
    Maxwell - theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng - Movable Type
    Gutenberg - Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe - high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright - airplane
    Whittle - Jet Plane
    Goddard - Rockets
    John Dalton - Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev - Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs - Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch - nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg - QM
    Erwin Schrodinger - QM
    Dirac - QM
    Everett - ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein - Special & General Relativity
    Hubble - size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg - Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison - electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris - AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden - radio
    Bell - Telephone
    Aristotle - Logic
    Boole - Mathematical Logic
    Shannon - Logic Circuits
    Turing - computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse - first programmable digital computer
    Wegener - continental drift
    Fermi - nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs - citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson - DNA
    William Martin - Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell - biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug - Green Revolution
    Shannon - Information Theory
    Shockley - transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce - Integrated Circuit
    Hopper - compiler
    Backus - Fortran
    Ritchie - C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson - UNIX
    Codd - Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn - Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee - WWW, Browsers

    I’m not sure I’d put Warhol or Pollock (or Picasso honestly) in the inner circle of GREATNESS.

    You might also want to read

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_science_and_technology_in_China

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    • Replies: @schmenz
    I agree. Though Picasso started out as a serious artist creating beautiful paintings. A pity he abandoned all that and followed the money and the clueless art critics.
  67. @Robert Hume
    Almost all Whites:

    Plato - systematic philosophy
    Aristotle - early science
    Euclid - geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio - classical architecture
    Wright - modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek - microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo - structure of solar system
    Kepler - planetary orbits
    Newton - calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe - Rotary printing press
    James Watt - Steam Engine
    Stephenson - Railroad
    Otto - gasoline engine
    Benz - automobile
    Mendel - genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus - biology systematics
    Darwin - evolution
    Joseph Priestly - carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes - theory of government
    Locke - theory of government
    Washington - stepping down
    William Wilberforce - abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith - economics
    Pasteur - germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister - surgical sterile technique
    Faraday - experimental EM
    Maxwell - theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng - Movable Type
    Gutenberg - Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe - high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright - airplane
    Whittle - Jet Plane
    Goddard - Rockets
    John Dalton - Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev - Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs - Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch - nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg - QM
    Erwin Schrodinger - QM
    Dirac - QM
    Everett - ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein - Special & General Relativity
    Hubble - size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg - Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison - electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris - AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden - radio
    Bell - Telephone
    Aristotle - Logic
    Boole - Mathematical Logic
    Shannon - Logic Circuits
    Turing - computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse - first programmable digital computer
    Wegener - continental drift
    Fermi - nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs - citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson - DNA
    William Martin - Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell - biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug - Green Revolution
    Shannon - Information Theory
    Shockley - transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce - Integrated Circuit
    Hopper - compiler
    Backus - Fortran
    Ritchie - C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson - UNIX
    Codd - Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn - Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee - WWW, Browsers

    Pre-Bach music: Tomas Luis Vittoria.
    Other than that, you’ve pretty much covered it.

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  68. @Whiskey
    I guess I did not read the same book, Connecticut Yankee was hardly funny, it was filled with horrible death. Much like Twain's life -- his adored younger brother died after days of burns from an exploding boiler aboard a steamship that Twain got him the job on; his kids all died, many of his riverboat friends died in the War. He was as I said pre-modern.

    Yankee was all about Twain's favorite and darkest theme -- superstition vs. science. The Yankee tries to use science including in the end electric fences, landmines, and poison gas to transform feudalism; gets young men to buy in but no one else; and is sent back into the future by the villainous Merlin who wants to keep Feudalism and prevent the modern age. And the book is ambivalent -- Twain paints the Yankee as a man who unleashed literally modern warfare hell (Twain had many friends in the War and had a small taste of it himself) with dead men on electric fences foreshadowing the barbed wire draped with the dead about twenty years later.

    “Much like Twain’s life — his adored younger brother died after days of burns from an exploding boiler aboard a steamship that Twain got him the job on; his kids all died”

    His daughter Clara lived until her late 80′s, outliving her father by many decades.

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  69. @oddsbodkins
    I've heard Greeks say essentially the same thing. David Sedaris said it well: "The Greeks invented democracy, built the acropolis, and then called it a day."

    Greek scholars fleeing the Ottoman conquest of Byzantium did play a role in the Italian Renaissance, if only by reacquainting Western Europe with the Greek language and ancient Greek texts (including mathematical/astronomical texts).
    Sicily (my ancestral home) had high points- the Greek period when Archimedes and company flourished, and the Norman period when you had a lot of cultural mixing between Arab, Byzantine and Latin, but it was almost a nonentity during the Renaissance. Leonardo, Galileo, Michelangelo, etc. were Florentines.

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    • Replies: @whorefinder
    The Renaissance was caused by the Ottoman hegemony.

    The Ottomans took control of the Silk Road as it fed into Europe, culminating in the conquest of Constantinople, while also gradually taking control of the Mediterranean Sea as well, supplanting the Venetians, who had long been the European traders acting as a go-between between East and West. (The Venetians had been a Republic during most of the middle ages, but the republic died off once they could no longer be the traders to Europe).

    The result was that Southern, Eastern, and Central Europe began serious study of how to repel this new Muslim force, culminating in a lot of organized, large-scale military action and military innovation.

    Further west, England, Spain, Portugal, etc., being the furthest from the Silk Road, were the ones who were the most hurt, trade-wise, as the Ottoman control choked off a lot of goods that previously had flowed to them through the Silk Road. So they looked to improving travel technology to see if they could get around the Ottoman monopoly, resulting in Portuguese travels around Africa and English/Spanish travels West, allowing them to find the new world.

    All the other stuff---new art, new music, new religious ideas---flowed from these two sources: military innovation from those fearing Ottoman invasion and travel/trade innovations/new routes from those cut off from Silk Road goods. Any other rationale was just icing on the cake, not the actual cake.

  70. @Peripatetic commenter
    Well, of course, the real problem is that women discovered all that shit before those stale pale males any way, but they never get any credit.

    I mean, Ada Lovelace's great-great-great Grandmother surely must have figured it all out.

    OT, but Hillary Clinton’s “Ada” doesn’t get enough attention for sabotaging her, lol!

    Here’s an example of the blackout, memory-holing of something fiercely dumb: Nobody ever asked why Hillary Clinton campaigned in Dade City, Florida one week out from election day (November 1). Pasco County went for Trump by over 21 points and Dade City is one of the more conservative parts (!)

    http://prntly.com/2016/11/01/confirmed-hillarys-tiny-dade-city-fl-event-draws-more-pro-trump-protesters-than-clinton-fans/

    (exaggerated, but not by much)

    I was asking and searching for why at the time. A few journos mumbled amongst each other that there must have been some confusion with “Dade County” down in South Florida; they seemed embarrassed for Hillary on her behalf and didn’t want to discuss it. So, it was reported very straight as if this was totally done on purpose, but for those of us who knew the place well knew this could not be possible.

    Much laughter and mirth was had.

    I always joke that Ada hated Hillary and pulled a Hal on her thus sending her to Redneck Trump Country in the homestretch.

    https://patch.com/florida/landolakes/donald-trump-hillary-clinton-how-pasco-county-voted

    My guess is that examples of Clinton campaign stupidity (and Trump’s Brad Parscale’s genius), are too painful for most of the press to visit.

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  71. @Cheetah
    This is a dubious claim.white liberals who are considered leftist by alright has IQ advantage over white conservatives.

    This is a dubious claim.white liberals who are considered leftist by alright has IQ advantage over white conservatives.

    lmao. perhaps one day you’ll learn to write complete and grammatically correct sentences and then we’ll all start to believe your dubious and nonsensical claims.

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  72. @celt darnell
    I haven't seen anyone shred Mark Twain so completely since Ignatius J. Rilley.

    Speaking of shredding, Twain attacked James Fenimore Cooper not only because he wanted to boost his own style of writing over Cooper’s, but also because Cooper celebrated the country folk/pioneers of America, while Twain hated them and made fun of them. And of course Cooper was quite religious, while Twain detested religious folk.

    Cooper, BTW, was a huge hit with many foreign dudes. Balzac, Victor Hugo, , and musician Franz Schubert were all big fans. Closer to home, Washington Irving, Daniel Webster, and Thoreau were high on him. Its not hard to see that Twain’s attacks on Cooper were motivated by usurping hsi fame rather than genuine criticism.

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    • Replies: @David
    I read Deerslayer and it seems to me that Twain is perfectly right in his take-down. When I first read Twain's essay about Deerslayer-Hawkeye-Long-Rifle-Leatherstocking-Pathfinder-Bumppo, it was a shock of recognition. People must like the ambiance of the Leatherstocking tails because great literature they certainly aren't.

    What part of what Twain has written here do you disagree with?http://twain.lib.virginia.edu/projects/rissetto/offense.html

    And I would say that Life on the Mississippi is a love song to America. When Europeans look down on Americans, Twain champions us like a god. When he's down on America, he's down on his own family among family, he's talking to people that he considers unequivocally to be his people. He's not ridiculing us from the outside.

    When the matron interrogates Finn who claims he's just come from a wrecked riverboat, she proves herself to be no rube. This is Twain's America. The Connecticut Yankee was a can-do American who had put some old-world hierarchy and mysticism behind, like most Americans are proud to have done. If there was any doubt that Tom Sawyer isn't meant to be emulated or admired, remember his shenanigans in the early stages of Jim's escape. We're glad when he finally leaves the story.

    Twain was pivotal (at least by his own account) in Grant's Memoirs being other than a few poorly compensated magazine articles. Keegan says Grant's Memoirs is the best personal account of war-time command ever written.

    Walter Scott, my favorite novelist, once (and only once) praised Fenimore Cooper, while Twain holds Scott largely responsible for the Civil War by his greatly increasing the appeal of chivalry and honor-culture in the south.


    It was Sir Walter that made every gentleman in the South a Major or a Colonel, or a General or a Judge, before the war; and it was he, also, that made these gentlemen value these bogus decorations. For it was he that created rank and caste down there, and also reverence for rank and caste, and pride and pleasure in them. Enough is laid on slavery, without fathering upon it these creations and contributions of Sir Walter.

    Sir Walter had so large a hand in making Southern character, as it existed before the war, that he is in great measure responsible for the war.
     

    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    You either have a tin ear for humor or never read Twain's humorous take on Cooper. Twain's essay on Cooper is a parody. Twain in reality was quite a fan of Cooper and read all his works in his youth. I'm curious about what gave rise to the odd combination of your obvious dislike of Twain combined with your lack of contact with or misunderstanding of his works.
    , @Charles Pewitt
    Cooper's book about his people pioneering the area around Cooperstown, New York is a lot of fun. The best part is that there were big cats still on the prowl in the hills around Cooperstown. Imagine a big cat in an oak tree that weighs a hundred pounds or more jumping down on you.

    California people will laugh and say joggers and hikers get bit and chewed on all the time by big cats in the hills. We in the Northeast don't have that anymore. Except in Connecticut, where a big cat got hit by a car. They said the big cat was from out West. Western New York?
  73. @Whiskey
    I guess I did not read the same book, Connecticut Yankee was hardly funny, it was filled with horrible death. Much like Twain's life -- his adored younger brother died after days of burns from an exploding boiler aboard a steamship that Twain got him the job on; his kids all died, many of his riverboat friends died in the War. He was as I said pre-modern.

    Yankee was all about Twain's favorite and darkest theme -- superstition vs. science. The Yankee tries to use science including in the end electric fences, landmines, and poison gas to transform feudalism; gets young men to buy in but no one else; and is sent back into the future by the villainous Merlin who wants to keep Feudalism and prevent the modern age. And the book is ambivalent -- Twain paints the Yankee as a man who unleashed literally modern warfare hell (Twain had many friends in the War and had a small taste of it himself) with dead men on electric fences foreshadowing the barbed wire draped with the dead about twenty years later.

    Twain hated religion and country folk because he hated his hometown growing up, and Connecticut Yankee was just another excuse to go after those “dumb religious hicks” who didn’t see his genius as a boy. His theme of superstition v. science was rooted in this hatred—it was Twain’s SJW-style, delusional Secret King ego coming back to crush those foolish folks who extolled upstanding religious men over hm.

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    • Replies: @Rob McX
    His efforts have not cut any ice with posterity. His works are frowned upon by many in the educational system and Huckleberry Finn is published with the N-word removed.
  74. @JackOH
    I'll see your Copernicus, and raise you a Hamilton.

    Conversation I overheard barely a few days ago while getting doughnuts downtown. Person A: "America's first President was a Black man." Alexander Hamilton, get it? Person B: "No, that ain't right." Well, why not? Person B: "America was still colonies then when Hamilton was President."
    Read More
    • Replies: @JackOH
    Yeah. Some enterprising writer with a strong stomach and good financial backing ought to put together a burlesque of Blackland, Feministland, and the other alternate/parallel Americas many of our fellow citizens are living in. Animal Farm or Flatland may be models. Those 20th century guys (absurdists? semanticians?) who talked about the impossibility of debate/communication may have nailed something. Thanks for that clip. It's always worth watching again.
  75. @patrick
    Greek scholars fleeing the Ottoman conquest of Byzantium did play a role in the Italian Renaissance, if only by reacquainting Western Europe with the Greek language and ancient Greek texts (including mathematical/astronomical texts).
    Sicily (my ancestral home) had high points- the Greek period when Archimedes and company flourished, and the Norman period when you had a lot of cultural mixing between Arab, Byzantine and Latin, but it was almost a nonentity during the Renaissance. Leonardo, Galileo, Michelangelo, etc. were Florentines.

    The Renaissance was caused by the Ottoman hegemony.

    The Ottomans took control of the Silk Road as it fed into Europe, culminating in the conquest of Constantinople, while also gradually taking control of the Mediterranean Sea as well, supplanting the Venetians, who had long been the European traders acting as a go-between between East and West. (The Venetians had been a Republic during most of the middle ages, but the republic died off once they could no longer be the traders to Europe).

    The result was that Southern, Eastern, and Central Europe began serious study of how to repel this new Muslim force, culminating in a lot of organized, large-scale military action and military innovation.

    Further west, England, Spain, Portugal, etc., being the furthest from the Silk Road, were the ones who were the most hurt, trade-wise, as the Ottoman control choked off a lot of goods that previously had flowed to them through the Silk Road. So they looked to improving travel technology to see if they could get around the Ottoman monopoly, resulting in Portuguese travels around Africa and English/Spanish travels West, allowing them to find the new world.

    All the other stuff—new art, new music, new religious ideas—flowed from these two sources: military innovation from those fearing Ottoman invasion and travel/trade innovations/new routes from those cut off from Silk Road goods. Any other rationale was just icing on the cake, not the actual cake.

    Read More
  76. ANON says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Marty
    Earl Warren, Robert Kennedy, Bill Moyers, David Halberstam, Norbert Schlei, Donald Kennedy, Howell Raines, Sandra Day O'Connor - not a boomer among them.

    Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Hubert Humphrey, Darth Vader Ginsburg, Chief Justice Brennan, Judge Garrity, Betty Freidan, Gloria Steinheim, Barbara Boxer, Dianne Feinstein and her multi billionaire husband Richard Blum

    Not a boomer among these unspeakable obscenities who spent their careers destroying Whites through school integregation and affirmative action.

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  77. ANON says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Anonymous
    There is an argument that Newton took Calculus from the Indians.

    Didn’t Pascal invent Calculas? At least that was what my calculus book claimed.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I believe the consensus is that Leibniz and Newton invented calculus independently; Pascal and Cavalieri made important foundational contributions enabling the work of Newton and Leibniz. (It is universally agreed no one named Azikiwe, Wang, or Chowdhry contributed.)
    , @anonymous
    In addition to being a great philosopher--arguably the forerunner of what would be termed in the 20th century "existentialism"--Pascal was a brilliant mathematician and it seems to me that he may have been credited with having invented a rudimentary form of what we would call a calculator though I could be wrong.
  78. @WGG
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=sPbjPOgRtyA

    Yeah. Some enterprising writer with a strong stomach and good financial backing ought to put together a burlesque of Blackland, Feministland, and the other alternate/parallel Americas many of our fellow citizens are living in. Animal Farm or Flatland may be models. Those 20th century guys (absurdists? semanticians?) who talked about the impossibility of debate/communication may have nailed something. Thanks for that clip. It’s always worth watching again.

    Read More
  79. @Anonymous
    There is an argument that Newton took Calculus from the Indians.

    Russian mathematicians left and right complained about the lack of acknowledgement in the west. And the German and the French mathematicians of 19th century were pretty serious about their national competitions. There is an argument that the English fell behind the continental mathematicians around 1800 because the English did not like Leibniz and his students (because of Newton and his followers).

    The old fault lines were quite different you see. These new white vs non-white and men vs women thing are very much like say Pepsi vs Coke — a very American invention of recent years. And then all kinds of people want to exploit it. Envy & humiliation of some people of non-white land are hardly responsible.

    I would say that the smart kids everywhere want to learn engineering and great literature. Only in America you got kids dissing Newton and Shakespeare because of their being old white male.

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  80. Here’s a thought exercise that occurred to me when I was trying to understand non-White envy. Imagine there is a race/ethnic group whose men on average are 6-6, perfectly muscled with 160 IQs and as handsome as the Hemsworth brothers. It would be pretty hard to deal with.

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    • Replies: @a non-white
    The way to deal with it is to for example imagine you are married to a loving and caring woman. And then maybe think of Napoleon for a few seconds. The point being --- the envy thing works against your neighbor but does it really works against people across the border in far away lands? Remember the commandment? Thou shall not covet people of other country having magnificent grand great great fathers. It being a commandment because guys are very prone to commit this sin.
    , @Art Deco
    Imagine there is a race/ethnic group whose men on average are 6-6, perfectly muscled with 160 IQs and as handsome as the Hemsworth brothers. It would be pretty hard to deal with.

    It might be, but American blacks are not contending with anything resembling that. They're contending with this chap:

    http://www.thecelebworth.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/General-Construction-Worker.jpg


    Who is not a Scandinavian demigod, doesn't claim to be, and doesn't aspire to be.
  81. @whorefinder
    “anger at unjust enrichment" is, quite frankly, to Leftists any enrichment at all. To the Left, any achievement is something stolen, hence the leveling/tear down influence among them.

    “You didn’t build that.”

    N.B. His implication those who succeed are not smarter than others, more hard working than others. He speaks of public infrastructure and the rule of law, but fails to acknowledge these things are available equally to the homeless children who paid attention in school and worked full-time jobs during undergraduate studies as they are to people who spend their time smoking marihuana and bedding slatterns.

    I especially like his invocation of the Internet: it did not indeed come about on its own; it was developed by brilliant white Americans, people who persevered through military and scientific careers, not by lazy Negroes drinking malt liquor all day or indolent Arabs memorising hoodoo written by a marauding savage bent on global conquest. Does the man even contemplate such things?

    Envy indeed.

    I knew a guy who always made sullen allusions to how he couldn’t afford a house and he didn’t make nearly as much money as I did. Well, I grew up with this guy; we met in the eighth grade. By his own admission, the only reason he even graduated high school was because his indulgent homeroom teacher marked him “present” each day even though the guy showed up on time maybe five times a year. I joined the navy and went to Kosovo. He joined the army, whined a lot during basic training, and finally obtained some kind of nebulous medical discharge before he even made it out of Fort Benning. He wound up with a govermental job which entailed driving around patrolling and responding to calls from a dispatcher, and he bragged about how he reported to the depot each day, then drove the government’s truck back to his flat and played video games unless and unil he got a call from the dispatcher. He later quit a string of managerial jobs in retail because his bosses were mean to him. Last I knew, the guy was living in his mother-in-law’s finished basement. To this day, he probably thinks from time to time how unfair it is that I magically “got rich” and he did not.

    Am I probably a lot more intelligent than him? Sure, and that’s an accident of birth. However, I work with plenty of people comparable to him in intelligence. The thing is, they show up to the office on time, work all day, and put up with the corporate bullshit like everyone else, because they realise that’s what we get paid to do.

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    • Replies: @Pericles

    Am I probably a lot more intelligent than him? Sure, and that’s an accident of birth.

     

    Conscientiousness is heritable too ("49%" according to wikipedia).
  82. @ANON
    Didn't Pascal invent Calculas? At least that was what my calculus book claimed.

    I believe the consensus is that Leibniz and Newton invented calculus independently; Pascal and Cavalieri made important foundational contributions enabling the work of Newton and Leibniz. (It is universally agreed no one named Azikiwe, Wang, or Chowdhry contributed.)

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    • Replies: @Pachyderm Pachyderma
    What about Gomez or Aziz? How 'bout Tanaka San? Nobody... dang!
  83. @Amasius
    Here's a thought exercise that occurred to me when I was trying to understand non-White envy. Imagine there is a race/ethnic group whose men on average are 6-6, perfectly muscled with 160 IQs and as handsome as the Hemsworth brothers. It would be pretty hard to deal with.

    The way to deal with it is to for example imagine you are married to a loving and caring woman. And then maybe think of Napoleon for a few seconds. The point being — the envy thing works against your neighbor but does it really works against people across the border in far away lands? Remember the commandment? Thou shall not covet people of other country having magnificent grand great great fathers. It being a commandment because guys are very prone to commit this sin.

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  84. @scrivener3
    I read that when internet governance was being turned piecemeal over to international agencies (such as ICANN) Paul Vixie was participating and he had a white shoe wall st law firm representing him.

    Then Paul died and the next meeting, the lawyer arrived and tried to participate. Someone asked "who are you representing here?" Unfortunately, the firm kept its fingers in the process, apparently a principleless agent. More likely the other clients of the firm all had great interest in the future of net governance. Such decadence in USA.

    Paul Vixie seems to be alive though?

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    • Replies: @scrivener3
    Sorry, John Postel. His attorney continued participating in the meetings restructuring governance of the Internet even though his client died.

    I cannot find the article. My memory may be all wrong, in which case I am due for a formal retraction.
  85. @Jaakko Raipala
    To consider Portuguese a "weak" group when it comes to the Age of Exploration is impressively deluded. You might as well claim that the the weaker Anglo-Saxons are producing half-baked claims trying to cover up their inferiority to Portuguese and Spanish achievements in exploration.

    For a good period of time it discovering something before other European powers was considered the basis for a territorial claim which is why whenever there was any uncertainty all the colonial powers made sure to bake a claim of one of their sea captains that had traveled a route nearby probably sighting the land first. I'm sure that in Portuguese there are books debunking flimsy English claims but then, the Englishmen turned out to be the best at taking over what others had claimed first and in the end that's all that matters...

    ‘The Portuguese sea-borne Empire’ by C R Boxer, is a standard text on the Age of Exploration. The Portuguese, like the Spanish but unlike the British, did not contribute much to any field after the mid-17th century. I assume this was because of the Inquisition.

    Goya!!!!

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  86. @Autochthon
    "You didn't build that."

    N.B. His implication those who succeed are not smarter than others, more hard working than others. He speaks of public infrastructure and the rule of law, but fails to acknowledge these things are available equally to the homeless children who paid attention in school and worked full-time jobs during undergraduate studies as they are to people who spend their time smoking marihuana and bedding slatterns.

    I especially like his invocation of the Internet: it did not indeed come about on its own; it was developed by brilliant white Americans, people who persevered through military and scientific careers, not by lazy Negroes drinking malt liquor all day or indolent Arabs memorising hoodoo written by a marauding savage bent on global conquest. Does the man even contemplate such things?

    Envy indeed.

    I knew a guy who always made sullen allusions to how he couldn't afford a house and he didn't make nearly as much money as I did. Well, I grew up with this guy; we met in the eighth grade. By his own admission, the only reason he even graduated high school was because his indulgent homeroom teacher marked him "present" each day even though the guy showed up on time maybe five times a year. I joined the navy and went to Kosovo. He joined the army, whined a lot during basic training, and finally obtained some kind of nebulous medical discharge before he even made it out of Fort Benning. He wound up with a govermental job which entailed driving around patrolling and responding to calls from a dispatcher, and he bragged about how he reported to the depot each day, then drove the government's truck back to his flat and played video games unless and unil he got a call from the dispatcher. He later quit a string of managerial jobs in retail because his bosses were mean to him. Last I knew, the guy was living in his mother-in-law's finished basement. To this day, he probably thinks from time to time how unfair it is that I magically "got rich" and he did not.

    Am I probably a lot more intelligent than him? Sure, and that's an accident of birth. However, I work with plenty of people comparable to him in intelligence. The thing is, they show up to the office on time, work all day, and put up with the corporate bullshit like everyone else, because they realise that's what we get paid to do.

    Am I probably a lot more intelligent than him? Sure, and that’s an accident of birth.

    Conscientiousness is heritable too (“49%” according to wikipedia).

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  87. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Richard
    The phenomenon shows up in some of the weaker European ethnys as well. In one of his books on the exploration of the Americas, Samuel Eliot Morison complained of having to waste so much time rebutting half-baked claims Portuguese historians had made that one of their sea captains had really been the first to be here, there, everywhere in the Western Hemisphere.

    The Portuguese probably did discover Australia before the Dutch because it’s very close to the Spice Islands, which Portuguese vessels were routinely visiting by the early 16th century. The problem is any records of such voyages were destroyed in the earthquake of 1755.

    It’s far less likely that they reached America before the Spanish because the experts all knew the ocean was too wide to be safely crossed, and no experienced captain would have been foolish enough to undertake such a voyage.

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  88. @scrivener3
    I was an early ISP owner. Everything was new and people shared help freely over mailing lists and USENET newsgroups. Once I posted a question and Paul Vixie answered.

    It was like throwing out a question about law and having Antonin Scalia answer.

    Hell, I think it’s crazy Steve Sailer and John Derbyshire interact with us. I’ve met super duper famous, ostensible titans of Sili Valley most people would probably be impressed by meeting, but they are decidedly pedestrian, uninteresting, and uninspired people; transparently smug and flashy salesmen at best. Increasingly, the truly impressive people are unassuming and unacknowledged by society at large;
    I expect it is yet another indicator of civilisational waning.

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  89. Dollars to doughnuts, the person who made this comment was African-American. People here often make the error of compounding unique American pathologies and thinking them global.

    Weird how so many of you spend so much time laying claim to the achievements of other men, why not have yours?

    The irony is many here will be consigned to history’s dustbin. Their achievements are theirs alone, as is yours.

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  90. “It is all explained by the twin concepts of envy and humiliation. ”

    The role of humiliation, and thus of shame, is the key to American race relations.

    Unlike the Haitians, the American slaves failed to liberate themselves by the sword, wreaking the vengeance in fire and blood that would serve to ease the shame of subjugation and enslavement. They were liberated by, who else, white men– like my great-great grandfather for who I am named, a cavalry officer whose Army Colt sixgun I have over my desk.

    The unbearable toxic shame of men who allowed themselves to be reduced to chattels, families destroyed and language and culture obliterated, was passed to their descendants and everywhere poisons American life. There is no solution to this problem. Not even when we have, as Philip Roth once said “a black Mount Rushmore with the heads of Michael Jordan, Michael Jackson and Magic Johnson”, will the shame be abated, because it can be expunged only in battle.

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  91. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Leibniz vs. Newton. I believe the consensus is that Newton was first, but Leibniz is given prime credit for making the discovery public. It’s not in the interest of society to honor scientists who keep their discoveries private for personal professional advantage.

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  92. @Brabantian
    Re Copernicus ... as Thomas Kuhn noted in his 'Structure of Scientific Revolutions', you can keep jumping thru hoops to prop up your old theory almost indefinitely if you wish ... it's often a matter of old fogies dying off, rather than the 'scholarly establishment' being convinced of a more elegant & thus 'true' framework ... and very clearly we have been bullshited about many things over the centuries

    Speaking of which ... For many of us, the alleged USA 'moon landings' of 1969-72 are clearly, laughably fake ... leading to doubts about some of the rest of space travel, 'International Fake Station' some say ... and then of course you can go really extreme & glance at the flat earth material, which can be very entertaining ... Here's a charming 2min flat earth video using an old David Bowie tune
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=164YdQvRDgE&t=0m07s

    “For many of us, the alleged USA ‘moon landings’ of 1969-72 are clearly, laughably fake”

    I have to agree with that. I read Dave McGowan’s “Wagging the Moon Doggie” and it is almost silly to think that could be true. So much of it is logistically impossible.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I have to agree with that. I read Dave McGowan’s “Wagging the Moon Doggie” and it is almost silly to think that could be true. So much of it is logistically impossible.
     
    And what did Dave McGowan know about any of it? He was a know-nothing nitwit. Nothing about going to the Moon was "logistically impossible". But stupid people seem to think that anything they personally don't understand must be impossible.
  93. This teacher lacks imagination. Here’s how he could have aroused his students’ enthusiasm:

    “Dear students. There was this guy Copernicus that got blasted because he defied the notion that the Earth was the center of the Universe and every other heavenly body revolves around it. Much like brave black activists in our own age defy the notion that White Culture is the center of Civilization…”

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  94. @AndrewR
    I doubt one in ten thousand Americans would even recognize his name, let alone be able to put a face to the name. I'm not sure who would outside of computer science historians.

    He looks like the architect guy in the Matrix.

    Also, where’s Frege, Peirce, Hilbert, Boole, Gödel, Church and Turing?

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    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    I didn't see the Main Man, John Von Neumann, on the list either, although many of his colleagues were mentioned.
  95. Racial envy extends beyond scientific and other human achievements.

    Some years ago, I attended a meeting at a federal agency. Someone used the expression “white hot”, referring of course to extreme enthusiasm. Whereupon he was asked why he didn’t say “black hot”. Yes, it was a black official who asked this and, no, there was no indication that he was joking.

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  96. @whorefinder
    Speaking of shredding, Twain attacked James Fenimore Cooper not only because he wanted to boost his own style of writing over Cooper's, but also because Cooper celebrated the country folk/pioneers of America, while Twain hated them and made fun of them. And of course Cooper was quite religious, while Twain detested religious folk.

    Cooper, BTW, was a huge hit with many foreign dudes. Balzac, Victor Hugo, , and musician Franz Schubert were all big fans. Closer to home, Washington Irving, Daniel Webster, and Thoreau were high on him. Its not hard to see that Twain's attacks on Cooper were motivated by usurping hsi fame rather than genuine criticism.

    I read Deerslayer and it seems to me that Twain is perfectly right in his take-down. When I first read Twain’s essay about Deerslayer-Hawkeye-Long-Rifle-Leatherstocking-Pathfinder-Bumppo, it was a shock of recognition. People must like the ambiance of the Leatherstocking tails because great literature they certainly aren’t.

    What part of what Twain has written here do you disagree with?http://twain.lib.virginia.edu/projects/rissetto/offense.html

    And I would say that Life on the Mississippi is a love song to America. When Europeans look down on Americans, Twain champions us like a god. When he’s down on America, he’s down on his own family among family, he’s talking to people that he considers unequivocally to be his people. He’s not ridiculing us from the outside.

    When the matron interrogates Finn who claims he’s just come from a wrecked riverboat, she proves herself to be no rube. This is Twain’s America. The Connecticut Yankee was a can-do American who had put some old-world hierarchy and mysticism behind, like most Americans are proud to have done. If there was any doubt that Tom Sawyer isn’t meant to be emulated or admired, remember his shenanigans in the early stages of Jim’s escape. We’re glad when he finally leaves the story.

    Twain was pivotal (at least by his own account) in Grant’s Memoirs being other than a few poorly compensated magazine articles. Keegan says Grant’s Memoirs is the best personal account of war-time command ever written.

    Walter Scott, my favorite novelist, once (and only once) praised Fenimore Cooper, while Twain holds Scott largely responsible for the Civil War by his greatly increasing the appeal of chivalry and honor-culture in the south.

    It was Sir Walter that made every gentleman in the South a Major or a Colonel, or a General or a Judge, before the war; and it was he, also, that made these gentlemen value these bogus decorations. For it was he that created rank and caste down there, and also reverence for rank and caste, and pride and pleasure in them. Enough is laid on slavery, without fathering upon it these creations and contributions of Sir Walter.

    Sir Walter had so large a hand in making Southern character, as it existed before the war, that he is in great measure responsible for the war.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    When Europeans look down on Americans, Twain champions us like a god. When he’s down on America, he’s down on his own family among family, he’s talking to people that he considers unequivocally to be his people. He’s not ridiculing us from the outside.
     
    Can somebody tell Colbert?
    , @Felix M
    David quotes Mark Twain as saying, "Sir Walter had so large a hand in making Southern character, as it existed before the war, that he is in great measure responsible for the war".

    This is another instance of Twain exercising the satirist's trope of exaggeration to make a point. But, on the other hand, Scott almost single handedly created the romantic image of Bonny Scotland, an image then legitimised by Queen Victoria.

    But, then, in contrast to the myth of the Old South, the Caledonian myth, like the Arthurian legends, was not used to oppress a minority or to be taken quite seriously.
    , @whorefinder
    Tom Sawyer inTom Sawyer is meant to be the clever hero.

    Tom Sawyer in Huckleberry Finn isn't meant to be the hero, he's a secondary character.

    And the vast majority of country folk Twain depicts in his work are dumb rubes. The occasional smart one is only the exception that proves the rule---i.e. the reason you notice them is that everyone else is easily duped.

    Twain was a proto-SJW because whatever love he had for the country, it was for "nature" (in the modern environmentalist sense, e.g. pristine with little human contact), the "downtrodden" (i.e. blacks, or morally questionable folk serving as outcasts), and the occasional swindler who "rightfully" hustled those ignorant rubes. He had a bitterness that seldom enjoyed warmth. His best analogue as a personality type today would be David Letterman, a very bitter, self-hating man.
  97. @utu
    Art is difficult to verbalize.

    W/o Clement Greenberg and Harold Rosenberg there would be no American Abstract Expressionism. These two guys "verbalized" it for everybody else. They taught everybody how to think and talk about it.

    Harold Rosenberg's essay "The American Action Painters," first appeared in Art News in 1952, and was republished in his 1959 collection of essays, The Tradition of the New.

    Clement Greenberg's essay "'American-Type' Painting" was first published in Partisan Review in 1955. It reappeared in his 1961 collection of essays, Art and Culture.
     
    And then there is a question how much in the initial stages it was all funded by CIA and its friends?

    Modern art was CIA 'weapon'
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/modern-art-was-cia-weapon-1578808.html

    In 1947 the State Department organised and paid for a touring international exhibition entitled "Advancing American Art", with the aim of rebutting Soviet suggestions that America was a cultural desert. But the show caused outrage at home, prompting Truman to make his Hottentot remark and one bitter congressman to declare: "I am just a dumb American who pays taxes for this kind of trash." The tour had to be cancelled.

     


    Yes, he says, the agency saw Abstract Expressionism as an opportunity, and yes, it ran with it.

    "Regarding Abstract Expressionism, I'd love to be able to say that the CIA invented it just to see what happens in New York and downtown SoHo tomorrow!" he joked. "But I think that what we did really was to recognise the difference. It was recognised that Abstract Expression- ism was the kind of art that made Socialist Realism look even more stylised and more rigid and confined than it was. And that relationship was exploited in some of the exhibitions.
     

    Mr Jameson explained, "so that there wouldn't be any question of having to clear Jackson Pollock, for example, or do anything that would involve these people in the organisation. And it couldn't have been any closer, because most of them were people who had very little respect for the government, in particular, and certainly none for the CIA. If you had to use people who considered themselves one way or another to be closer to Moscow than to Washington, well, so much the better perhaps."
     

    He confirmed that his division had acted secretly because of the public hostility to the avant-garde: "It was very difficult to get Congress to go along with some of the things we wanted to do - send art abroad, send symphonies abroad, publish magazines abroad. That's one of the reasons it had to be done covertly. It had to be a secret. In order to encourage openness we had to be secret."
     

    In 1958 the touring exhibition "The New American Painting", including works by Pollock, de Kooning, Motherwell and others, was on show in Paris. The Tate Gallery was keen to have it next, but could not afford to bring it over. Late in the day, an American millionaire and art lover, Julius Fleischmann, stepped in with the cash and the show was brought to London.

    The money that Fleischmann provided, however, was not his but the CIA's. It came through a body called the Farfield Foundation, of which Fleischmann was president, but far from being a millionaire's charitable arm, the foundation was a secret conduit for CIA funds.
     

    I’ve read a bit of criticism of abstract expressionism; didn’t enlighten me at all.

    I think I knew a bit about the CIA supporting abstract expressionism; but never really put two and two together before. I now see that my distaste for all but one of those artists and of their apologists is probably justified. Somehow Pollock’s talent showed up by accident and he was grouped with the others.

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  98. @Robert Hume
    Almost all Whites:

    Plato - systematic philosophy
    Aristotle - early science
    Euclid - geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio - classical architecture
    Wright - modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek - microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo - structure of solar system
    Kepler - planetary orbits
    Newton - calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe - Rotary printing press
    James Watt - Steam Engine
    Stephenson - Railroad
    Otto - gasoline engine
    Benz - automobile
    Mendel - genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus - biology systematics
    Darwin - evolution
    Joseph Priestly - carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes - theory of government
    Locke - theory of government
    Washington - stepping down
    William Wilberforce - abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith - economics
    Pasteur - germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister - surgical sterile technique
    Faraday - experimental EM
    Maxwell - theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng - Movable Type
    Gutenberg - Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe - high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright - airplane
    Whittle - Jet Plane
    Goddard - Rockets
    John Dalton - Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev - Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs - Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch - nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg - QM
    Erwin Schrodinger - QM
    Dirac - QM
    Everett - ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein - Special & General Relativity
    Hubble - size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg - Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison - electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris - AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden - radio
    Bell - Telephone
    Aristotle - Logic
    Boole - Mathematical Logic
    Shannon - Logic Circuits
    Turing - computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse - first programmable digital computer
    Wegener - continental drift
    Fermi - nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs - citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson - DNA
    William Martin - Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell - biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug - Green Revolution
    Shannon - Information Theory
    Shockley - transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce - Integrated Circuit
    Hopper - compiler
    Backus - Fortran
    Ritchie - C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson - UNIX
    Codd - Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn - Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee - WWW, Browsers

    All stuff and nonsense. Kids today are taught that every name on your list was a fraud claiming credit for inventions of poor oppressed Africans with IQs under 70.

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  99. @whoever
    http://i.imgur.com/OW3qSzo.jpg

    When we lost Joe Sobran, we lost a true GIANT of a man. And we might only hope to see another of his caliber in our lifetime. Sam Francis was another.

    Ron should just re-run on continuous loop their greatest essays.

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    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    I know some of them are available on Amren. Is there a source you recommend for their career highlights?
  100. @Saint Louis
    Agreed re: Twain. I've long thought of him as sort of an arrogant, self-righteous jerk; a proto-SJW. Perhaps the best (or worst) example might be "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court". Except, rather than dumb hicks in the midwest, the butt of all the jokes is those backwards, credulous peasants with their superstitions and religious beliefs. Twain's contempt for them is palpable. The story is supposed to be comedic, but in fact, it's so heavy handed that it isn't funny.

    I doubt you’ve ever read the book. It is just as full of comparisons favoring the “yokels” as it is of comparisons favoring the Connecticut Yankee. Although these are peppered throughout the book, they culminate in the battle where electricity and other modern “marvels” are used to slaughter the army opposing the Yankee and his allies. The Yankee is depicted as somewhat reveling in this and Twain makes clear that this is as disgusting as any medieval barbarity. It’s almost a presage of WW I. Twain’s message is that human stupidity and arrogance are all too common throughout humanity and human history as are human decency and understanding. Neither is the special province of any particular time, place, class, religion, or race. The Duke and the King in Huckleberry Finn are just as, if not more, contemptible than the yokels they unsuccessfully attempt to swindle. Twain did see himself as above this and the evidence suggests that he mostly was.

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  101. @whorefinder
    The whole "X was black" is the new "X was part Jewish" game.

    I think the proper response is to tell American blacks that they should stop trying to culturally appropriate the accomplishments of Europeans, Egyptians, Moors, Arabs, etc.

    A big map of the world, with the parts of Sub Saharan Africa circled where black American slaves came from, and distances to various places that blacks try to culturally appropriate is a good start.

    Another is to laugh at them when they claim something was stolen: "Nope. Prove they took it from there and that they broke the law."

    Then lock the door when they start the angry chimpout.

    I think the proper response is to tell American blacks that they should stop trying to culturally appropriate the accomplishments of Europeans, Egyptians, Moors, Arabs, etc

    Indeed – and to include cultural appropriation of reading, math, science, and western dress including things like weaves to hide their real hair texture. No more electricity, clean water, indoor plumbing, air conditioning, petroleum products, etc. It’s all culturally appropriated.

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  102. @whorefinder
    Speaking of shredding, Twain attacked James Fenimore Cooper not only because he wanted to boost his own style of writing over Cooper's, but also because Cooper celebrated the country folk/pioneers of America, while Twain hated them and made fun of them. And of course Cooper was quite religious, while Twain detested religious folk.

    Cooper, BTW, was a huge hit with many foreign dudes. Balzac, Victor Hugo, , and musician Franz Schubert were all big fans. Closer to home, Washington Irving, Daniel Webster, and Thoreau were high on him. Its not hard to see that Twain's attacks on Cooper were motivated by usurping hsi fame rather than genuine criticism.

    You either have a tin ear for humor or never read Twain’s humorous take on Cooper. Twain’s essay on Cooper is a parody. Twain in reality was quite a fan of Cooper and read all his works in his youth. I’m curious about what gave rise to the odd combination of your obvious dislike of Twain combined with your lack of contact with or misunderstanding of his works.

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    • Replies: @whorefinder

    Twain’s essay on Cooper is a parody.
     
    LMAO> I'm sorry your brain power is so low that that is your (bad) defense: it's all parody!

    Twain's essay was done in earnestness and wasn't ironic; he really tore into Cooper's work, and both contemporaries and later scholars have taken it as such. If Twain had been being parodic in his attack---which makes no sense if you've actually read Cooper, Twain, and Twain's essay---he would have immediately notified people taking him seriously that , "Hey, whoa, I actually really like Cooper, this was just a bad joke!"

    I'm curious at what gave rise to your odd combination of Twain apologetics with your lack of contact and misunderstanding of his works, especially his criticism.
  103. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    I'm not sure I'd put Warhol or Pollock (or Picasso honestly) in the inner circle of GREATNESS.

    You might also want to read

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_science_and_technology_in_China

    I agree. Though Picasso started out as a serious artist creating beautiful paintings. A pity he abandoned all that and followed the money and the clueless art critics.

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  104. @whorefinder
    Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It's not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.

    Sadly, envy is no longer considered a bad thing these days, despite its destructive force. I would venture to say that of all the Seven Deadly Sins--- pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth----envy is probably considered the least dangerous. Although the modern world tends to celebrate all seven sins, there at least some cultural disapproval still left; e.g. "pride goeth before the fall" is still a popular theme in film.

    Yet envy is very hurtful. It blinds you to being happy for someone else. Most lefties are very envious, while non-lefties tend not to be. One reason (out of many) that the Left couldn't fathom Trump's rise was because they felt a knee-jerk envy of him: here he was, rich, handsome, successful, beautiful family, hot wife, and not apologetic of it at all. They were (and are) deeply jealous of his success and gifts, which is why they tried very hard to smear him as having his fortune "given to him by his father" and being a "failed businessman."

    Meanwhile, those not of the Left merely saw his success and were not envious. All want it on some level, but they don't hate Trump for achieving it or having it. There's no "he doesn't deserve that!" hatred of success in them.

    Thus envy this goes to one of the root drives of communism, as Ayn Rand would agree: the hatred of the success of others purely for being more successful than you.

    So these darkie kids being upset by white achievement is not frowned upon in our current Cult Marx world, but encouraged, when, really, under the hand of some strict- 11th Century Catholic tutors they'd be schooled on their sin and forced to abjure it and make penance for it. One wonders if those folks really did have better ideas all around about making societies harmonious.

    N.B. It's also important to distinguish envy from righteous anger that someone got something via cheating or injustice. Envy, properly, is being upset at the gifts/rewards someone else has gotten where they got them through no wrong. Anger at unjust enrichment isn't envy, it is a desire for fairness and right.

    “Envy, properly, is being upset at the gifts/rewards someone else has gotten where they got them through no wrong. Anger at unjust enrichment isn’t envy, it is a desire for fairness and right.”

    We very often see the latter masquerading as the former, i.e., Fauxcahontas’ “Youu didn’t build that!” rant. The phrase “income inequality” seems to drop the pretense.

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  105. @Marty
    Earl Warren, Robert Kennedy, Bill Moyers, David Halberstam, Norbert Schlei, Donald Kennedy, Howell Raines, Sandra Day O'Connor - not a boomer among them.

    We boomers applauded those people, at least a lot of us when we were young.

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    • Replies: @James Richard
    Speak for yourself, I and many others can't stand any of them.
  106. @whorefinder
    Speaking of shredding, Twain attacked James Fenimore Cooper not only because he wanted to boost his own style of writing over Cooper's, but also because Cooper celebrated the country folk/pioneers of America, while Twain hated them and made fun of them. And of course Cooper was quite religious, while Twain detested religious folk.

    Cooper, BTW, was a huge hit with many foreign dudes. Balzac, Victor Hugo, , and musician Franz Schubert were all big fans. Closer to home, Washington Irving, Daniel Webster, and Thoreau were high on him. Its not hard to see that Twain's attacks on Cooper were motivated by usurping hsi fame rather than genuine criticism.

    Cooper’s book about his people pioneering the area around Cooperstown, New York is a lot of fun. The best part is that there were big cats still on the prowl in the hills around Cooperstown. Imagine a big cat in an oak tree that weighs a hundred pounds or more jumping down on you.

    California people will laugh and say joggers and hikers get bit and chewed on all the time by big cats in the hills. We in the Northeast don’t have that anymore. Except in Connecticut, where a big cat got hit by a car. They said the big cat was from out West. Western New York?

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  107. @Alan from Perth W.A.
    As V.S. Naipaul wrote more than 50 years ago - and surely the passage of time has only verified the truth of his observation ('The Middle Passage' 1962)

    "The American Negro's subject is his own blackness. This cannot be the basis of any serious literature, and it has happened again and again that once the American Negro has made his statement, his profitable protest, he has nothing to say".

    Alan, tell me:

    If a black author in the United States writes fiction derived from his daily life or travels, how is that distinct from A Bend in the River or A House for Mr. Biswas?

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    • Replies: @Alan from Perth W.A.
    Neither of those books is solely about race, nor do they represent all that Mr Naipaul has had to say.
    , @Nicholas Stix
    If memory serves, Biswas was not a race book. In the movie version of The Mystic Masseur, Ismail Merchant tried to turn Naipaul into a lefty, Hindu nationalist, but the enterprise was ludicrous.
  108. Of course non-whites will want to disparage white achievements in the arts and sciences.

    I suspect for the author’s ego that this is a more congenial conclusion than the more mundane explanation that he’s not a particularly engaging lecturer and he had a lunkhead in his class.

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  109. @Amasius
    Here's a thought exercise that occurred to me when I was trying to understand non-White envy. Imagine there is a race/ethnic group whose men on average are 6-6, perfectly muscled with 160 IQs and as handsome as the Hemsworth brothers. It would be pretty hard to deal with.

    Imagine there is a race/ethnic group whose men on average are 6-6, perfectly muscled with 160 IQs and as handsome as the Hemsworth brothers. It would be pretty hard to deal with.

    It might be, but American blacks are not contending with anything resembling that. They’re contending with this chap:

    http://www.thecelebworth.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/General-Construction-Worker.jpg

    Who is not a Scandinavian demigod, doesn’t claim to be, and doesn’t aspire to be.

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  110. @Robert Hume
    Almost all Whites:

    Plato - systematic philosophy
    Aristotle - early science
    Euclid - geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio - classical architecture
    Wright - modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek - microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo - structure of solar system
    Kepler - planetary orbits
    Newton - calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe - Rotary printing press
    James Watt - Steam Engine
    Stephenson - Railroad
    Otto - gasoline engine
    Benz - automobile
    Mendel - genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus - biology systematics
    Darwin - evolution
    Joseph Priestly - carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes - theory of government
    Locke - theory of government
    Washington - stepping down
    William Wilberforce - abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith - economics
    Pasteur - germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister - surgical sterile technique
    Faraday - experimental EM
    Maxwell - theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng - Movable Type
    Gutenberg - Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe - high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright - airplane
    Whittle - Jet Plane
    Goddard - Rockets
    John Dalton - Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev - Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs - Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch - nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg - QM
    Erwin Schrodinger - QM
    Dirac - QM
    Everett - ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein - Special & General Relativity
    Hubble - size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg - Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison - electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris - AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden - radio
    Bell - Telephone
    Aristotle - Logic
    Boole - Mathematical Logic
    Shannon - Logic Circuits
    Turing - computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse - first programmable digital computer
    Wegener - continental drift
    Fermi - nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs - citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson - DNA
    William Martin - Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell - biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug - Green Revolution
    Shannon - Information Theory
    Shockley - transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce - Integrated Circuit
    Hopper - compiler
    Backus - Fortran
    Ritchie - C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson - UNIX
    Codd - Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn - Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee - WWW, Browsers

    Mr. Hume, did you peruse the article? It speaks negatively of India, let alone any meaningful contributions. And Persia is not even worthy of mention. Also, Egypt is not part of the whiteness. Of course, you are right in noting the de rigueur Jew or two in your wonderful list, lest Sailer’s paymaster, Akiva Unz, read him the riot act. Thanks for the thought!

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  111. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    The times they are a changing.

    As some DB recently told whites, "This isn't your country anymore." And you know what? He's right.

    We whites are a bunch of arrogant saps. We simply assume that everyone wants to be like us. We can't fathom that other people might not want to ape us. No kidding other races don't want to hear about our accomplishments. Granted, those races are short-sided, but, hey, that's their choice. They're not whites. Stop expecting them to act like whites.

    The Japanese have it right. Respect what others have accomplished. Take what works for your society. Leave the rest. The Japanese were never missionaries. In our hearts, whites still are. Until that is beaten out of us, whites will continue to act the fool.

    We whites are a bunch of arrogant saps. We simply assume that everyone wants to be like us. We can’t fathom that other people might not want to ape us. No kidding other races don’t want to hear about our accomplishments. .

    This attitude is narcissism. Every race has it, but whites seem to be really prone to it. I don’t think it’s quite the wonder that we’ve been successful as Christians, which is a big huge heaping of anti-narcissism every Sunday. And why we’ve become so stupid when we decided we were smarter than a 1500 years of culture.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Aye, now we get gay pride shoved down our throats 24/7.

    It's not the gay so much that wrankles, but the incessant pride.
  112. @whorefinder
    Twain hated religion and country folk because he hated his hometown growing up, and Connecticut Yankee was just another excuse to go after those "dumb religious hicks" who didn't see his genius as a boy. His theme of superstition v. science was rooted in this hatred---it was Twain's SJW-style, delusional Secret King ego coming back to crush those foolish folks who extolled upstanding religious men over hm.

    His efforts have not cut any ice with posterity. His works are frowned upon by many in the educational system and Huckleberry Finn is published with the N-word removed.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Complaints about Twain are uneven and, something you didn't see much of until about 30 years ago. He was a part of what you might call the suburban elementary canon for at least 60 years after his death. I had a 4th grade teacher devoted to Twain and MLK in equal measure.
    , @Flip
    "All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.”

    -Ernest Hemingway
  113. @whorefinder
    Pollock's success was much like Mark Twain's: he was a talented boy from the provinces who absolutely hated the provinces and their culture, had been coddled too much as a child (e.g. protected and doted upon by his mother), and was thus resentful that the other "hicks" around him didn't celebrate his genius like he wanted them to. They left as soon as they could, and learned how to con the critics into thinking they were true-blue-hard-bitten-masculine-tough-guys. Very SJW-esque, come to think of it.

    Twain's distaste for the provinces comes through in almost all of his writing: usually, it's those dumb hillbilly hicks falling for a huckster's plan, whether it be Tom Sawyer tricking the kids into painting the fence or the con men in Huck Finn fooling the yokels. Tom Sawyer, in particular, has a lot of hate in it, with Tom being in many cases a stand-in for Twain himself, except Tom's tomfoolery works to make him popular, while in Twain's world it probably rarely fooled anyone and got him beat up. (This is like how in SJW-type movies the hero-wuss-beta dude's plans always trick the dumber-than-rocks bullies, who then embarrass themselves out of coolness as a result.)

    Huck Finn starts the same way---e.g. Huck attacking his Bible reading at the beginning---but Huck emerges as a better character as they move onto the river. That's probably because Twain portrays him as a dumber-than-Tom simpleton, so Twain can't get all smarmy and self-righteously clever through Huck, but instead is forced to get inside another point of view.

    Twain made good coin as an author and lecturer, and died a wealthy man in spite of a spell in bankruptcy. Pollock was able to support himself with junk work due to the oddities of the art market, wherein a narrow social sliver purchase certified experiences of art (as well as cachet) so certified by touts employed as art critics.

    However much he may have hated the provinces, that is where he spent his life prior to age 60 (when he was not touring).

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  114. @whorefinder
    Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It's not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.

    Sadly, envy is no longer considered a bad thing these days, despite its destructive force. I would venture to say that of all the Seven Deadly Sins--- pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth----envy is probably considered the least dangerous. Although the modern world tends to celebrate all seven sins, there at least some cultural disapproval still left; e.g. "pride goeth before the fall" is still a popular theme in film.

    Yet envy is very hurtful. It blinds you to being happy for someone else. Most lefties are very envious, while non-lefties tend not to be. One reason (out of many) that the Left couldn't fathom Trump's rise was because they felt a knee-jerk envy of him: here he was, rich, handsome, successful, beautiful family, hot wife, and not apologetic of it at all. They were (and are) deeply jealous of his success and gifts, which is why they tried very hard to smear him as having his fortune "given to him by his father" and being a "failed businessman."

    Meanwhile, those not of the Left merely saw his success and were not envious. All want it on some level, but they don't hate Trump for achieving it or having it. There's no "he doesn't deserve that!" hatred of success in them.

    Thus envy this goes to one of the root drives of communism, as Ayn Rand would agree: the hatred of the success of others purely for being more successful than you.

    So these darkie kids being upset by white achievement is not frowned upon in our current Cult Marx world, but encouraged, when, really, under the hand of some strict- 11th Century Catholic tutors they'd be schooled on their sin and forced to abjure it and make penance for it. One wonders if those folks really did have better ideas all around about making societies harmonious.

    N.B. It's also important to distinguish envy from righteous anger that someone got something via cheating or injustice. Envy, properly, is being upset at the gifts/rewards someone else has gotten where they got them through no wrong. Anger at unjust enrichment isn't envy, it is a desire for fairness and right.

    Most lefties are very envious, while non-lefties tend not to be.

    I don’t know about most, but very many. It has been my observation that a lot of left-wing belief, on the part of those for whom it is visceral, does indeed seem to be rooted in envy and a sense of inferiority.

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    • Replies: @whorefinder
    After all, what is Communism but a belief that the haves have something unfairly, with no proof to that belief but your own hatred of them for having it?
  115. @Rob McX
    His efforts have not cut any ice with posterity. His works are frowned upon by many in the educational system and Huckleberry Finn is published with the N-word removed.

    Complaints about Twain are uneven and, something you didn’t see much of until about 30 years ago. He was a part of what you might call the suburban elementary canon for at least 60 years after his death. I had a 4th grade teacher devoted to Twain and MLK in equal measure.

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  116. @Sarah Toga
    Sure.
    All of that is nice.
    But can they dance? (Waltz doesn't count)
    Play basketball?
    Find the crease and take it to the house?
    Lock down that receiver, take home a pick six?
    Anything that really matters?

    “Find the crease and take it to the house?
    Lock down that receiver, take home a pick six?”

    I’ve no idea of what that means, and I’m guessing that I should be pleased with the fact.

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    • Replies: @Sarah Toga
    You guessed properly, you are in good stead.

    "...crease..." when the running back slips through a gap between the defensive players and runs for a touchdown.
    "...pick six" an interception returned for a touchdown.

    Universities spend untold millions in pursuit of such things. What a waste.
  117. @3g4me
    @36 oddsbodkins: A number of Bulgarians told my husband and I that, if not for the damned Turkish occupation, Bulgaria would have been the cradle of the Renaissance.

    Not surprisingly, Indians make a similar claim in that had the Arabs and Turks not imposed the tyrannical, medieval and backward to boot Islam on them, there was no telling where tbeir lot would have been.

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  118. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Karl Popper wrote in The Logic of Scientific Discovery:

    "The wrong view of science betrays itself in the craving to be right; for it is not his possession of knowledge, of irrefutable truth, that makes the man of science, but his persistent and recklessly critical quest for truth."

    Per this classroom example, the wrong view of science is asking "Hey! Why ain't ya'll teachin' 'bout black science and stuff!? What? You sayin' that they's all whiteys? Then I ain't interested!"

    In other words it appears as though these students aren't even asking the pertinent questions regarding science.

    A question for the second part of the Popper quote: What happens when the man of science, after persistently questing for the truth, finally at long last attains knowledge of the accurate truth? Then what? Doesn't it then appear as though he has the correct view of science, or at least in this instance?

    Barring that, Popper's first part would appear to be correct, and that the late Stephen Jay Gould would fit that bill (e.g. Mismeasure of Man).

    “The wrong view of science betrays itself in the craving to be right.”

    I’ve never read Popper, but if he wrote that, then he clearly doesn’t know much about real science. Unsurprising – philosophers of science never seem to have anything of interest to say about science. They seem unconcerned that real scientists don’t care what they think. Popper has influenced his disciple, George Soros, more than he probably did any scientist.

    In James Gleick’s biography of Richard Feynman, he describes how Feynman was asked to review some educational material at his child’s school. This being the 60s or 70s, the textbook stressed that it was more important to use the right method rather than get the right answer. Feynman objected to that. He told them (I quote only from memory) “In science, getting the right answer is the only thing that matters.”

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  119. @Brabantian
    Re Copernicus ... as Thomas Kuhn noted in his 'Structure of Scientific Revolutions', you can keep jumping thru hoops to prop up your old theory almost indefinitely if you wish ... it's often a matter of old fogies dying off, rather than the 'scholarly establishment' being convinced of a more elegant & thus 'true' framework ... and very clearly we have been bullshited about many things over the centuries

    Speaking of which ... For many of us, the alleged USA 'moon landings' of 1969-72 are clearly, laughably fake ... leading to doubts about some of the rest of space travel, 'International Fake Station' some say ... and then of course you can go really extreme & glance at the flat earth material, which can be very entertaining ... Here's a charming 2min flat earth video using an old David Bowie tune
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=164YdQvRDgE&t=0m07s

    Speaking of which … For many of us,…….

    You mean “stupid people”?

    ………the alleged USA ‘moon landings’ of 1969-72 are clearly, laughably fake …

    That’s probably because you are stupid (1).

    (1) see: the rest of your post.

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  120. @Rob McX
    His efforts have not cut any ice with posterity. His works are frowned upon by many in the educational system and Huckleberry Finn is published with the N-word removed.

    “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.”

    -Ernest Hemingway

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    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Sadly, and in contrast to what Hemingway probably meant it as---i.e. Hemingway meant to praise Twain---that largely explains how high American literature has degraded into esoteric SJW-posturing works only read by the people who review for the New York Review of Books.
  121. @whoever
    http://i.imgur.com/OW3qSzo.jpg

    One of the many TRUE and absolutely essential statements penned by Joe Sobran.

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  122. @whorefinder
    Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It's not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.

    Sadly, envy is no longer considered a bad thing these days, despite its destructive force. I would venture to say that of all the Seven Deadly Sins--- pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth----envy is probably considered the least dangerous. Although the modern world tends to celebrate all seven sins, there at least some cultural disapproval still left; e.g. "pride goeth before the fall" is still a popular theme in film.

    Yet envy is very hurtful. It blinds you to being happy for someone else. Most lefties are very envious, while non-lefties tend not to be. One reason (out of many) that the Left couldn't fathom Trump's rise was because they felt a knee-jerk envy of him: here he was, rich, handsome, successful, beautiful family, hot wife, and not apologetic of it at all. They were (and are) deeply jealous of his success and gifts, which is why they tried very hard to smear him as having his fortune "given to him by his father" and being a "failed businessman."

    Meanwhile, those not of the Left merely saw his success and were not envious. All want it on some level, but they don't hate Trump for achieving it or having it. There's no "he doesn't deserve that!" hatred of success in them.

    Thus envy this goes to one of the root drives of communism, as Ayn Rand would agree: the hatred of the success of others purely for being more successful than you.

    So these darkie kids being upset by white achievement is not frowned upon in our current Cult Marx world, but encouraged, when, really, under the hand of some strict- 11th Century Catholic tutors they'd be schooled on their sin and forced to abjure it and make penance for it. One wonders if those folks really did have better ideas all around about making societies harmonious.

    N.B. It's also important to distinguish envy from righteous anger that someone got something via cheating or injustice. Envy, properly, is being upset at the gifts/rewards someone else has gotten where they got them through no wrong. Anger at unjust enrichment isn't envy, it is a desire for fairness and right.

    Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It’s not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.

    Sorry to sound naggy, but this is a pet peeve of mine, and one that actually has serious consequences: a lot of writers refer to Catholic phenomena as being in the past. This is wrong. The “seven deadlies” are still Catholic teaching, and are still just as deadly as ever.

    Seriously, watch for this phenomenon. You’ll see it a lot, esp. when the Middle Ages are discussed (e.g., “it was once believed that the bread became the actual Body of Christ”). It’s so aggravating.

    And as to the so-called “Dark Ages,” for the cause, see the video at the bottom of this page: http://www.fisheaters.com/crusades.html, and note that Christians, esp. the Benedictines, were doing all sorts of stuff to preserve and hand down culture in those times.

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    • Agree: Autochthon, AM
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    I agree with you, I'm just placing it in context. While the Traditionalist sect of the Church is still pushing the Seven Deadlies, the Church of Nice and the gays have long abandoned it in the catechism. In my own Catholic instruction, I never heard of such a thing; it was, sadly the movie Seven which first alerted me to it.

    It is aggravating that much of the pure doctrine is not taught these days. Its a problem of the post-Vatican-II homosexual-and-Marxist clergy causing much of the ruination; a purging must be done.

    And I'm using the Dark Ages in the old sense of the term: the period from the fall of the Western Empire (400s A.D.) to the crowning of Charlemagne in 800 A.D, when the pax Romana of the West was lost and a lot of records either were destroyed or not made due to the barbarian invasions.

    Yes, various monks were doing their best to keep records and communication going, but the barbarian invasions of that period was very harmful. This was what was meant by "Dark Ages"---the period had very few records, and the few records that came were from the Church. It is deeply insulting and a sick twist of history that many Leftists think Dark Ages means the entire period from 400 A.D. t0 1500 A.D., and that it came from the idea that the Church was keeping everyone stupid and in the dark (!). In contrast, it was actually the Church who was the light against the Dark Ages and barbarism, and was desperately seeking to keep civilization and scholarship alive.

    , @Pericles
    It was once believed that pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth were 'deadly sins'.
  123. @Srebenica
    I tend to believe this is generally a black America phenomenon --- the Asian students I've known don't have this sort of resentment. Although I dealt primarily with Indian students who learned about Indian scientists like Bose and Chandrashekar along with Faraday and Newton. The black students generally don't have models like that.

    You good sir are absolutely correct in stating that Indians do admire and respect the brilliance of the Western scientists but that is neither here nor there, for this article is about how the poor white man is taking up the tuchus!

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  124. envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins

    This is the only sin (out of seven) that does not give you any pleasure in exchange for committing it.

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  125. @Whiskey
    I guess I did not read the same book, Connecticut Yankee was hardly funny, it was filled with horrible death. Much like Twain's life -- his adored younger brother died after days of burns from an exploding boiler aboard a steamship that Twain got him the job on; his kids all died, many of his riverboat friends died in the War. He was as I said pre-modern.

    Yankee was all about Twain's favorite and darkest theme -- superstition vs. science. The Yankee tries to use science including in the end electric fences, landmines, and poison gas to transform feudalism; gets young men to buy in but no one else; and is sent back into the future by the villainous Merlin who wants to keep Feudalism and prevent the modern age. And the book is ambivalent -- Twain paints the Yankee as a man who unleashed literally modern warfare hell (Twain had many friends in the War and had a small taste of it himself) with dead men on electric fences foreshadowing the barbed wire draped with the dead about twenty years later.

    I think I read the same book you did.
    These literature discussions reveal so much more about the reader than the writer, don’t they?

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  126. @Desiderius

    Of course non-whites will want to disparage white achievements in the arts and sciences.
     
    They didn't much when whites were confident/making those achievements instead of coasting on them.

    They didn’t much when whites were confident/making those achievements instead of coasting on them.

    I wonder about this. Due to some cleaning/moving for friends, I’ve been perusing some books and pamphlets circa 1920. Lots of fussing and disparaging of modern society regarding ecosystem damage and treatment of the usual minorities. And today almost all the new advances that are keeping the wheels on civilization (well drilling; ag; robotics; electricity) plus space exploration/discoveries come from those centered in Europe/America/Japan.

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  127. @Hibernian
    We boomers applauded those people, at least a lot of us when we were young.

    Speak for yourself, I and many others can’t stand any of them.

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  128. @Robert Hume
    Almost all Whites:

    Plato - systematic philosophy
    Aristotle - early science
    Euclid - geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio - classical architecture
    Wright - modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek - microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo - structure of solar system
    Kepler - planetary orbits
    Newton - calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe - Rotary printing press
    James Watt - Steam Engine
    Stephenson - Railroad
    Otto - gasoline engine
    Benz - automobile
    Mendel - genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus - biology systematics
    Darwin - evolution
    Joseph Priestly - carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes - theory of government
    Locke - theory of government
    Washington - stepping down
    William Wilberforce - abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith - economics
    Pasteur - germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister - surgical sterile technique
    Faraday - experimental EM
    Maxwell - theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng - Movable Type
    Gutenberg - Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe - high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright - airplane
    Whittle - Jet Plane
    Goddard - Rockets
    John Dalton - Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev - Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs - Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch - nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg - QM
    Erwin Schrodinger - QM
    Dirac - QM
    Everett - ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein - Special & General Relativity
    Hubble - size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg - Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison - electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris - AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden - radio
    Bell - Telephone
    Aristotle - Logic
    Boole - Mathematical Logic
    Shannon - Logic Circuits
    Turing - computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse - first programmable digital computer
    Wegener - continental drift
    Fermi - nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs - citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson - DNA
    William Martin - Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell - biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug - Green Revolution
    Shannon - Information Theory
    Shockley - transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce - Integrated Circuit
    Hopper - compiler
    Backus - Fortran
    Ritchie - C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson - UNIX
    Codd - Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn - Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee - WWW, Browsers

    Surely you didn’t mean to leave out David Hume – The Last Philosopher (of everything.)

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  129. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Robert Hume
    Almost all Whites:

    Plato - systematic philosophy
    Aristotle - early science
    Euclid - geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio - classical architecture
    Wright - modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek - microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo - structure of solar system
    Kepler - planetary orbits
    Newton - calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe - Rotary printing press
    James Watt - Steam Engine
    Stephenson - Railroad
    Otto - gasoline engine
    Benz - automobile
    Mendel - genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus - biology systematics
    Darwin - evolution
    Joseph Priestly - carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes - theory of government
    Locke - theory of government
    Washington - stepping down
    William Wilberforce - abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith - economics
    Pasteur - germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister - surgical sterile technique
    Faraday - experimental EM
    Maxwell - theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng - Movable Type
    Gutenberg - Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe - high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright - airplane
    Whittle - Jet Plane
    Goddard - Rockets
    John Dalton - Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev - Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs - Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch - nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg - QM
    Erwin Schrodinger - QM
    Dirac - QM
    Everett - ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein - Special & General Relativity
    Hubble - size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg - Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison - electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris - AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden - radio
    Bell - Telephone
    Aristotle - Logic
    Boole - Mathematical Logic
    Shannon - Logic Circuits
    Turing - computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse - first programmable digital computer
    Wegener - continental drift
    Fermi - nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs - citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson - DNA
    William Martin - Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell - biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug - Green Revolution
    Shannon - Information Theory
    Shockley - transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce - Integrated Circuit
    Hopper - compiler
    Backus - Fortran
    Ritchie - C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson - UNIX
    Codd - Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn - Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee - WWW, Browsers

    You forgot Philo Farnsworth and Descartes’ opposite number, Blaise Pascal. Nevertheless, point taken.

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  130. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @ANON
    Didn't Pascal invent Calculas? At least that was what my calculus book claimed.

    In addition to being a great philosopher–arguably the forerunner of what would be termed in the 20th century “existentialism”–Pascal was a brilliant mathematician and it seems to me that he may have been credited with having invented a rudimentary form of what we would call a calculator though I could be wrong.

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    • Replies: @Jim
    Pascal did invent an adding machine. Later Leibniz invented a calculating machine which could also do multiplication.

    Pascal was indeed a great mathematician. Calculus was not so much invented but developed as a result of the work of many individuals of whom Newton and Leibniz were undoubtably the greatest. The first individual to formally state the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus was James Gregory.
  131. @Art Deco
    Alan, tell me:

    If a black author in the United States writes fiction derived from his daily life or travels, how is that distinct from A Bend in the River or A House for Mr. Biswas?

    Neither of those books is solely about race, nor do they represent all that Mr Naipaul has had to say.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    So what? Who writes a novel or a poem 'solely about race'?

    Do you honestly think Naipaul is comprehensively familiar with the oeuvre of American blacks who compose imaginative literature? When would he have time to do anything else?

    I heard of an American literary scholar who wanted to pick a year and do a comprehensive survey of all the work published in that year. He picked 1922 and discovered that there were 16,000 books published in the Anglosphere during that year, so he abandoned the project. Making categorical statements like Naipaul did is pretty stupid.
  132. Place value in the Old World goes back to the Babylonians who had a positional sexagesimal system. Hellenistic astronomers adopted this system for the measurement of angles and developed a decimal system for the measurement of chords. They were well acquainted with positional notation. It was from Greek sources that Indian astronomy was derived. The present shape of “Arabic numerals” though did come from India via the Arabs.

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  133. @anonymous
    In addition to being a great philosopher--arguably the forerunner of what would be termed in the 20th century "existentialism"--Pascal was a brilliant mathematician and it seems to me that he may have been credited with having invented a rudimentary form of what we would call a calculator though I could be wrong.

    Pascal did invent an adding machine. Later Leibniz invented a calculating machine which could also do multiplication.

    Pascal was indeed a great mathematician. Calculus was not so much invented but developed as a result of the work of many individuals of whom Newton and Leibniz were undoubtably the greatest. The first individual to formally state the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus was James Gregory.

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  134. @Anonymous
    Were they "impatient and restless" because they were envious of European achievement, or because they were wasting time learning something that wasn't going to come up in any tests?

    No. It was I that prepared the exam paper and in order to get as many students to pass as possible – this was another issue actually – there needed to be a very close correspondence between the topics I lectured on and the questions I set. They had been duly informed that there was to be one essay type question, on the topic of scientific method and falsifiability.

    One other memorable experience teaching that year’s class was that, marking their scripts, an African girl had written a superb essay – in exam conditions – on the topic, demonstrating a perfect knowledge and clearly a keen interest in all that I had said in class. She certainly shattered any stereotypical beliefs I previously might have held of female students from Africa.

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  135. @Pericles
    Paul Vixie seems to be alive though?

    Sorry, John Postel. His attorney continued participating in the meetings restructuring governance of the Internet even though his client died.

    I cannot find the article. My memory may be all wrong, in which case I am due for a formal retraction.

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  136. @Marty
    Earl Warren, Robert Kennedy, Bill Moyers, David Halberstam, Norbert Schlei, Donald Kennedy, Howell Raines, Sandra Day O'Connor - not a boomer among them.

    Thank you. I don’t get this hostility toward Boomers.

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  137. @Autochthon
    I believe the consensus is that Leibniz and Newton invented calculus independently; Pascal and Cavalieri made important foundational contributions enabling the work of Newton and Leibniz. (It is universally agreed no one named Azikiwe, Wang, or Chowdhry contributed.)

    What about Gomez or Aziz? How ’bout Tanaka San? Nobody… dang!

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  138. @David
    I read Deerslayer and it seems to me that Twain is perfectly right in his take-down. When I first read Twain's essay about Deerslayer-Hawkeye-Long-Rifle-Leatherstocking-Pathfinder-Bumppo, it was a shock of recognition. People must like the ambiance of the Leatherstocking tails because great literature they certainly aren't.

    What part of what Twain has written here do you disagree with?http://twain.lib.virginia.edu/projects/rissetto/offense.html

    And I would say that Life on the Mississippi is a love song to America. When Europeans look down on Americans, Twain champions us like a god. When he's down on America, he's down on his own family among family, he's talking to people that he considers unequivocally to be his people. He's not ridiculing us from the outside.

    When the matron interrogates Finn who claims he's just come from a wrecked riverboat, she proves herself to be no rube. This is Twain's America. The Connecticut Yankee was a can-do American who had put some old-world hierarchy and mysticism behind, like most Americans are proud to have done. If there was any doubt that Tom Sawyer isn't meant to be emulated or admired, remember his shenanigans in the early stages of Jim's escape. We're glad when he finally leaves the story.

    Twain was pivotal (at least by his own account) in Grant's Memoirs being other than a few poorly compensated magazine articles. Keegan says Grant's Memoirs is the best personal account of war-time command ever written.

    Walter Scott, my favorite novelist, once (and only once) praised Fenimore Cooper, while Twain holds Scott largely responsible for the Civil War by his greatly increasing the appeal of chivalry and honor-culture in the south.


    It was Sir Walter that made every gentleman in the South a Major or a Colonel, or a General or a Judge, before the war; and it was he, also, that made these gentlemen value these bogus decorations. For it was he that created rank and caste down there, and also reverence for rank and caste, and pride and pleasure in them. Enough is laid on slavery, without fathering upon it these creations and contributions of Sir Walter.

    Sir Walter had so large a hand in making Southern character, as it existed before the war, that he is in great measure responsible for the war.
     

    When Europeans look down on Americans, Twain champions us like a god. When he’s down on America, he’s down on his own family among family, he’s talking to people that he considers unequivocally to be his people. He’s not ridiculing us from the outside.

    Can somebody tell Colbert?

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  139. Envy and humiliation are key reasons for not accepting white male accomplishments but so is enthusiasm for the endgame. We are told paradise on earth will be achieved when whites lose control of their societies and become a persecuted minority. Even the most virtue signalling white female might lose some of her enthusiasm for that turn of events if she was to be educated about the dominant role white men played in creating almost everything in the modern world that is beneficial to her. Even worse for the endgame is if whites were taught honestly about why those evil white male devils played such a dominate role including that it mainly wasn’t due to racism or sexism.

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  140. @AM

    We whites are a bunch of arrogant saps. We simply assume that everyone wants to be like us. We can’t fathom that other people might not want to ape us. No kidding other races don’t want to hear about our accomplishments. .
     
    This attitude is narcissism. Every race has it, but whites seem to be really prone to it. I don't think it's quite the wonder that we've been successful as Christians, which is a big huge heaping of anti-narcissism every Sunday. And why we've become so stupid when we decided we were smarter than a 1500 years of culture.

    Aye, now we get gay pride shoved down our throats 24/7.

    It’s not the gay so much that wrankles, but the incessant pride.

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  141. @Flip
    "For many of us, the alleged USA ‘moon landings’ of 1969-72 are clearly, laughably fake"

    I have to agree with that. I read Dave McGowan's "Wagging the Moon Doggie" and it is almost silly to think that could be true. So much of it is logistically impossible.

    I have to agree with that. I read Dave McGowan’s “Wagging the Moon Doggie” and it is almost silly to think that could be true. So much of it is logistically impossible.

    And what did Dave McGowan know about any of it? He was a know-nothing nitwit. Nothing about going to the Moon was “logistically impossible”. But stupid people seem to think that anything they personally don’t understand must be impossible.

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  142. @Dave Pinsen
    I think it was the Columbia U. Mattress Girl, in defending her post-college S&M themed performance art, who dismissed Jackson Pollock's art as an example of white privilege.

    It's an interesting point, even if she's a hack.

    If an African splashed paint on a canvass in the same way, would he have been similarly feted as an artist?
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  143. @Stan d Mute
    When we lost Joe Sobran, we lost a true GIANT of a man. And we might only hope to see another of his caliber in our lifetime. Sam Francis was another.

    Ron should just re-run on continuous loop their greatest essays.

    I know some of them are available on Amren. Is there a source you recommend for their career highlights?

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  144. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Karl Popper wrote in The Logic of Scientific Discovery:

    "The wrong view of science betrays itself in the craving to be right; for it is not his possession of knowledge, of irrefutable truth, that makes the man of science, but his persistent and recklessly critical quest for truth."

    Per this classroom example, the wrong view of science is asking "Hey! Why ain't ya'll teachin' 'bout black science and stuff!? What? You sayin' that they's all whiteys? Then I ain't interested!"

    In other words it appears as though these students aren't even asking the pertinent questions regarding science.

    A question for the second part of the Popper quote: What happens when the man of science, after persistently questing for the truth, finally at long last attains knowledge of the accurate truth? Then what? Doesn't it then appear as though he has the correct view of science, or at least in this instance?

    Barring that, Popper's first part would appear to be correct, and that the late Stephen Jay Gould would fit that bill (e.g. Mismeasure of Man).

    In other words it appears as though these students aren’t even asking the pertinent questions regarding science.

    Like the absent water pipes in a thatch and mud hut, they’re not even wrong.

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  145. @El Dato
    He looks like the architect guy in the Matrix.

    Also, where's Frege, Peirce, Hilbert, Boole, Gödel, Church and Turing?

    I didn’t see the Main Man, John Von Neumann, on the list either, although many of his colleagues were mentioned.

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  146. @David
    I read Deerslayer and it seems to me that Twain is perfectly right in his take-down. When I first read Twain's essay about Deerslayer-Hawkeye-Long-Rifle-Leatherstocking-Pathfinder-Bumppo, it was a shock of recognition. People must like the ambiance of the Leatherstocking tails because great literature they certainly aren't.

    What part of what Twain has written here do you disagree with?http://twain.lib.virginia.edu/projects/rissetto/offense.html

    And I would say that Life on the Mississippi is a love song to America. When Europeans look down on Americans, Twain champions us like a god. When he's down on America, he's down on his own family among family, he's talking to people that he considers unequivocally to be his people. He's not ridiculing us from the outside.

    When the matron interrogates Finn who claims he's just come from a wrecked riverboat, she proves herself to be no rube. This is Twain's America. The Connecticut Yankee was a can-do American who had put some old-world hierarchy and mysticism behind, like most Americans are proud to have done. If there was any doubt that Tom Sawyer isn't meant to be emulated or admired, remember his shenanigans in the early stages of Jim's escape. We're glad when he finally leaves the story.

    Twain was pivotal (at least by his own account) in Grant's Memoirs being other than a few poorly compensated magazine articles. Keegan says Grant's Memoirs is the best personal account of war-time command ever written.

    Walter Scott, my favorite novelist, once (and only once) praised Fenimore Cooper, while Twain holds Scott largely responsible for the Civil War by his greatly increasing the appeal of chivalry and honor-culture in the south.


    It was Sir Walter that made every gentleman in the South a Major or a Colonel, or a General or a Judge, before the war; and it was he, also, that made these gentlemen value these bogus decorations. For it was he that created rank and caste down there, and also reverence for rank and caste, and pride and pleasure in them. Enough is laid on slavery, without fathering upon it these creations and contributions of Sir Walter.

    Sir Walter had so large a hand in making Southern character, as it existed before the war, that he is in great measure responsible for the war.
     

    David quotes Mark Twain as saying, “Sir Walter had so large a hand in making Southern character, as it existed before the war, that he is in great measure responsible for the war”.

    This is another instance of Twain exercising the satirist’s trope of exaggeration to make a point. But, on the other hand, Scott almost single handedly created the romantic image of Bonny Scotland, an image then legitimised by Queen Victoria.

    But, then, in contrast to the myth of the Old South, the Caledonian myth, like the Arthurian legends, was not used to oppress a minority or to be taken quite seriously.

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  147. My local science museum had a simple solution to this- draw Copernicus in the auditorium mural as if he were from Guatemala!

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    • Replies: @snorlax
    Not that far-off — the mural might have yellowed with age and/or not being cleaned.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f2/Nikolaus_Kopernikus.jpg
  148. @Alan from Perth W.A.
    Neither of those books is solely about race, nor do they represent all that Mr Naipaul has had to say.

    So what? Who writes a novel or a poem ‘solely about race’?

    Do you honestly think Naipaul is comprehensively familiar with the oeuvre of American blacks who compose imaginative literature? When would he have time to do anything else?

    I heard of an American literary scholar who wanted to pick a year and do a comprehensive survey of all the work published in that year. He picked 1922 and discovered that there were 16,000 books published in the Anglosphere during that year, so he abandoned the project. Making categorical statements like Naipaul did is pretty stupid.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Making categorical statements like Naipaul did is pretty stupid.
     
    Making categorical statements is all you do here.

    Come to think of it.............you do sound pretty stupid.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Who writes a novel or a poem ‘solely about race’?
     
    A lot of people do. Perhaps you are just too dull-witted to notice it.
    , @Pericles
    You didn't listen to Corvinus so now you get Art Deco. Let that be a lesson.
    , @Nicholas Stix
    If you imposed on everyone the criterion you imposed on Naipaul, no one would count as a scholar about anything.
  149. @Art Deco
    So what? Who writes a novel or a poem 'solely about race'?

    Do you honestly think Naipaul is comprehensively familiar with the oeuvre of American blacks who compose imaginative literature? When would he have time to do anything else?

    I heard of an American literary scholar who wanted to pick a year and do a comprehensive survey of all the work published in that year. He picked 1922 and discovered that there were 16,000 books published in the Anglosphere during that year, so he abandoned the project. Making categorical statements like Naipaul did is pretty stupid.

    Making categorical statements like Naipaul did is pretty stupid.

    Making categorical statements is all you do here.

    Come to think of it………….you do sound pretty stupid.

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  150. @Jus' Sayin'...
    You either have a tin ear for humor or never read Twain's humorous take on Cooper. Twain's essay on Cooper is a parody. Twain in reality was quite a fan of Cooper and read all his works in his youth. I'm curious about what gave rise to the odd combination of your obvious dislike of Twain combined with your lack of contact with or misunderstanding of his works.

    Twain’s essay on Cooper is a parody.

    LMAO> I’m sorry your brain power is so low that that is your (bad) defense: it’s all parody!

    Twain’s essay was done in earnestness and wasn’t ironic; he really tore into Cooper’s work, and both contemporaries and later scholars have taken it as such. If Twain had been being parodic in his attack—which makes no sense if you’ve actually read Cooper, Twain, and Twain’s essay—he would have immediately notified people taking him seriously that , “Hey, whoa, I actually really like Cooper, this was just a bad joke!”

    I’m curious at what gave rise to your odd combination of Twain apologetics with your lack of contact and misunderstanding of his works, especially his criticism.

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  151. @Art Deco
    So what? Who writes a novel or a poem 'solely about race'?

    Do you honestly think Naipaul is comprehensively familiar with the oeuvre of American blacks who compose imaginative literature? When would he have time to do anything else?

    I heard of an American literary scholar who wanted to pick a year and do a comprehensive survey of all the work published in that year. He picked 1922 and discovered that there were 16,000 books published in the Anglosphere during that year, so he abandoned the project. Making categorical statements like Naipaul did is pretty stupid.

    Who writes a novel or a poem ‘solely about race’?

    A lot of people do. Perhaps you are just too dull-witted to notice it.

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  152. @David
    I read Deerslayer and it seems to me that Twain is perfectly right in his take-down. When I first read Twain's essay about Deerslayer-Hawkeye-Long-Rifle-Leatherstocking-Pathfinder-Bumppo, it was a shock of recognition. People must like the ambiance of the Leatherstocking tails because great literature they certainly aren't.

    What part of what Twain has written here do you disagree with?http://twain.lib.virginia.edu/projects/rissetto/offense.html

    And I would say that Life on the Mississippi is a love song to America. When Europeans look down on Americans, Twain champions us like a god. When he's down on America, he's down on his own family among family, he's talking to people that he considers unequivocally to be his people. He's not ridiculing us from the outside.

    When the matron interrogates Finn who claims he's just come from a wrecked riverboat, she proves herself to be no rube. This is Twain's America. The Connecticut Yankee was a can-do American who had put some old-world hierarchy and mysticism behind, like most Americans are proud to have done. If there was any doubt that Tom Sawyer isn't meant to be emulated or admired, remember his shenanigans in the early stages of Jim's escape. We're glad when he finally leaves the story.

    Twain was pivotal (at least by his own account) in Grant's Memoirs being other than a few poorly compensated magazine articles. Keegan says Grant's Memoirs is the best personal account of war-time command ever written.

    Walter Scott, my favorite novelist, once (and only once) praised Fenimore Cooper, while Twain holds Scott largely responsible for the Civil War by his greatly increasing the appeal of chivalry and honor-culture in the south.


    It was Sir Walter that made every gentleman in the South a Major or a Colonel, or a General or a Judge, before the war; and it was he, also, that made these gentlemen value these bogus decorations. For it was he that created rank and caste down there, and also reverence for rank and caste, and pride and pleasure in them. Enough is laid on slavery, without fathering upon it these creations and contributions of Sir Walter.

    Sir Walter had so large a hand in making Southern character, as it existed before the war, that he is in great measure responsible for the war.
     

    Tom Sawyer inTom Sawyer is meant to be the clever hero.

    Tom Sawyer in Huckleberry Finn isn’t meant to be the hero, he’s a secondary character.

    And the vast majority of country folk Twain depicts in his work are dumb rubes. The occasional smart one is only the exception that proves the rule—i.e. the reason you notice them is that everyone else is easily duped.

    Twain was a proto-SJW because whatever love he had for the country, it was for “nature” (in the modern environmentalist sense, e.g. pristine with little human contact), the “downtrodden” (i.e. blacks, or morally questionable folk serving as outcasts), and the occasional swindler who “rightfully” hustled those ignorant rubes. He had a bitterness that seldom enjoyed warmth. His best analogue as a personality type today would be David Letterman, a very bitter, self-hating man.

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  153. @Flip
    "All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.”

    -Ernest Hemingway

    Sadly, and in contrast to what Hemingway probably meant it as—i.e. Hemingway meant to praise Twain—that largely explains how high American literature has degraded into esoteric SJW-posturing works only read by the people who review for the New York Review of Books.

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  154. @Tracy

    Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It’s not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.
     
    Sorry to sound naggy, but this is a pet peeve of mine, and one that actually has serious consequences: a lot of writers refer to Catholic phenomena as being in the past. This is wrong. The "seven deadlies" are still Catholic teaching, and are still just as deadly as ever.

    Seriously, watch for this phenomenon. You'll see it a lot, esp. when the Middle Ages are discussed (e.g., "it was once believed that the bread became the actual Body of Christ"). It's so aggravating.

    And as to the so-called "Dark Ages," for the cause, see the video at the bottom of this page: http://www.fisheaters.com/crusades.html, and note that Christians, esp. the Benedictines, were doing all sorts of stuff to preserve and hand down culture in those times.

    I agree with you, I’m just placing it in context. While the Traditionalist sect of the Church is still pushing the Seven Deadlies, the Church of Nice and the gays have long abandoned it in the catechism. In my own Catholic instruction, I never heard of such a thing; it was, sadly the movie Seven which first alerted me to it.

    It is aggravating that much of the pure doctrine is not taught these days. Its a problem of the post-Vatican-II homosexual-and-Marxist clergy causing much of the ruination; a purging must be done.

    And I’m using the Dark Ages in the old sense of the term: the period from the fall of the Western Empire (400s A.D.) to the crowning of Charlemagne in 800 A.D, when the pax Romana of the West was lost and a lot of records either were destroyed or not made due to the barbarian invasions.

    Yes, various monks were doing their best to keep records and communication going, but the barbarian invasions of that period was very harmful. This was what was meant by “Dark Ages”—the period had very few records, and the few records that came were from the Church. It is deeply insulting and a sick twist of history that many Leftists think Dark Ages means the entire period from 400 A.D. t0 1500 A.D., and that it came from the idea that the Church was keeping everyone stupid and in the dark (!). In contrast, it was actually the Church who was the light against the Dark Ages and barbarism, and was desperately seeking to keep civilization and scholarship alive.

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    • Agree: AM
    • Replies: @AM

    It is aggravating that much of the pure doctrine is not taught these days. Its a problem of the post-Vatican-II homosexual-and-Marxist clergy causing much of the ruination; a purging must be done
     
    According to Micheal Voris, the US Catholic church has about 5-10 years before beginning it's collapse in earnest. The stalwart elderly who make up the bulk of donors and mass attendance have begun to die off. The Boomer Priests are now headed into retirement. Most young people walk out and never return. Only 1 in 5 of those Baptisized in the faith even go to church. About 40% of those regular church goers believe gay marriage is okay, an excellent marker of their overall orthodoxy (median age of regular church goer: 40)

    Parishes will close and need to be sold off to pay pensions of staff and clergy. (Clergy at least a not getting what firemen in Chicago/CA make, so that's something.)

    And all the conservative Protestants were quite right to object to the Catholic churches conflict of interest with immigration. Encouraging illegal immigration has avoided some of the hard decisions about empty pews and dwindling funds. It filled the coffers with taxpayer money and pews for a little while until their children found no church more appealing (most) or evangelicals at least speaking to them about real issues in their lives. With Trump I hope closing the borders and reversing the trend, I'm glad the money is finally getting cut off. It's long overdue.

    So we don't need to force purge in the US, at least. It's coming and maybe sooner than we think if Mr. Voris is correct. It sounds like orthodox laity mostly need to just stand in place and try to figure out what comes next.

  155. @Mr. Anon

    Most lefties are very envious, while non-lefties tend not to be.
     
    I don't know about most, but very many. It has been my observation that a lot of left-wing belief, on the part of those for whom it is visceral, does indeed seem to be rooted in envy and a sense of inferiority.

    After all, what is Communism but a belief that the haves have something unfairly, with no proof to that belief but your own hatred of them for having it?

    Read More
  156. @Tracy

    Jealousy is a green-eyed beast. It’s not for nothing that envy was considered one of the Seven Deadly Sins by Catholic theologians of the Dark and Medieval Ages.
     
    Sorry to sound naggy, but this is a pet peeve of mine, and one that actually has serious consequences: a lot of writers refer to Catholic phenomena as being in the past. This is wrong. The "seven deadlies" are still Catholic teaching, and are still just as deadly as ever.

    Seriously, watch for this phenomenon. You'll see it a lot, esp. when the Middle Ages are discussed (e.g., "it was once believed that the bread became the actual Body of Christ"). It's so aggravating.

    And as to the so-called "Dark Ages," for the cause, see the video at the bottom of this page: http://www.fisheaters.com/crusades.html, and note that Christians, esp. the Benedictines, were doing all sorts of stuff to preserve and hand down culture in those times.

    It was once believed that pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth were ‘deadly sins’.

    Read More
  157. @Art Deco
    So what? Who writes a novel or a poem 'solely about race'?

    Do you honestly think Naipaul is comprehensively familiar with the oeuvre of American blacks who compose imaginative literature? When would he have time to do anything else?

    I heard of an American literary scholar who wanted to pick a year and do a comprehensive survey of all the work published in that year. He picked 1922 and discovered that there were 16,000 books published in the Anglosphere during that year, so he abandoned the project. Making categorical statements like Naipaul did is pretty stupid.

    You didn’t listen to Corvinus so now you get Art Deco. Let that be a lesson.

    Read More
  158. @Spotted Toad
    My local science museum had a simple solution to this- draw Copernicus in the auditorium mural as if he were from Guatemala!

    https://twitter.com/toad_spotted/status/696129845491855361

    Not that far-off — the mural might have yellowed with age and/or not being cleaned.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f2/Nikolaus_Kopernikus.jpg

    Read More
  159. @Art Deco
    Alan, tell me:

    If a black author in the United States writes fiction derived from his daily life or travels, how is that distinct from A Bend in the River or A House for Mr. Biswas?

    If memory serves, Biswas was not a race book. In the movie version of The Mystic Masseur, Ismail Merchant tried to turn Naipaul into a lefty, Hindu nationalist, but the enterprise was ludicrous.

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  160. @Art Deco
    So what? Who writes a novel or a poem 'solely about race'?

    Do you honestly think Naipaul is comprehensively familiar with the oeuvre of American blacks who compose imaginative literature? When would he have time to do anything else?

    I heard of an American literary scholar who wanted to pick a year and do a comprehensive survey of all the work published in that year. He picked 1922 and discovered that there were 16,000 books published in the Anglosphere during that year, so he abandoned the project. Making categorical statements like Naipaul did is pretty stupid.

    If you imposed on everyone the criterion you imposed on Naipaul, no one would count as a scholar about anything.

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  161. @whorefinder
    I agree with you, I'm just placing it in context. While the Traditionalist sect of the Church is still pushing the Seven Deadlies, the Church of Nice and the gays have long abandoned it in the catechism. In my own Catholic instruction, I never heard of such a thing; it was, sadly the movie Seven which first alerted me to it.

    It is aggravating that much of the pure doctrine is not taught these days. Its a problem of the post-Vatican-II homosexual-and-Marxist clergy causing much of the ruination; a purging must be done.

    And I'm using the Dark Ages in the old sense of the term: the period from the fall of the Western Empire (400s A.D.) to the crowning of Charlemagne in 800 A.D, when the pax Romana of the West was lost and a lot of records either were destroyed or not made due to the barbarian invasions.

    Yes, various monks were doing their best to keep records and communication going, but the barbarian invasions of that period was very harmful. This was what was meant by "Dark Ages"---the period had very few records, and the few records that came were from the Church. It is deeply insulting and a sick twist of history that many Leftists think Dark Ages means the entire period from 400 A.D. t0 1500 A.D., and that it came from the idea that the Church was keeping everyone stupid and in the dark (!). In contrast, it was actually the Church who was the light against the Dark Ages and barbarism, and was desperately seeking to keep civilization and scholarship alive.

    It is aggravating that much of the pure doctrine is not taught these days. Its a problem of the post-Vatican-II homosexual-and-Marxist clergy causing much of the ruination; a purging must be done

    According to Micheal Voris, the US Catholic church has about 5-10 years before beginning it’s collapse in earnest. The stalwart elderly who make up the bulk of donors and mass attendance have begun to die off. The Boomer Priests are now headed into retirement. Most young people walk out and never return. Only 1 in 5 of those Baptisized in the faith even go to church. About 40% of those regular church goers believe gay marriage is okay, an excellent marker of their overall orthodoxy (median age of regular church goer: 40)

    Parishes will close and need to be sold off to pay pensions of staff and clergy. (Clergy at least a not getting what firemen in Chicago/CA make, so that’s something.)

    And all the conservative Protestants were quite right to object to the Catholic churches conflict of interest with immigration. Encouraging illegal immigration has avoided some of the hard decisions about empty pews and dwindling funds. It filled the coffers with taxpayer money and pews for a little while until their children found no church more appealing (most) or evangelicals at least speaking to them about real issues in their lives. With Trump I hope closing the borders and reversing the trend, I’m glad the money is finally getting cut off. It’s long overdue.

    So we don’t need to force purge in the US, at least. It’s coming and maybe sooner than we think if Mr. Voris is correct. It sounds like orthodox laity mostly need to just stand in place and try to figure out what comes next.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    No, purge I'm talking about is of the homosexual clergy. There needs to be a one-fell-swoop, overnight defrocking of the more than half (according to studies) homosexual clergy. According to strict dogma, anyone who is homosexual is not allowed to be a priest or bishop. By virtue of their disorder, homosexuals are too tainted to properly administer the sacraments; this is probably why Voris, who is a reformed homosexual, decided not to become a priest after his awakening.

    The problems such homosexuals create are legion. But the largest one is how it drives straight men away from the priesthood and church. Straight men don't like hanging out with homos, and homosexuals, as has long been noted in history, practice a form of extreme affirmative action: they strongly promote other homos, exclude straights (especially those who want to rock the boat), and are exceedingly corrupt in office due to their sexual disorder (e.g. rewarding rent boys and lovers with sinecure church positions, using church money to pay for sex and parties---like what just happened allegedly in the Vatican).

    But homosexuals are, like most SJWs, exceedingly good at playing politics and using a bureaucracy against opponents. They are parasites, after all. A full-scale, rapid purge of them is the only way to ensure they are kicked out. A slow moving inquisition will only allow them time to formulate complicated legal and political counter-attacks that will keep them entrenched (think the weaselly civil servant in Yes, Minister, whose main objective was keeping the civil service from losing power and in increasing his own power).

    No, it must be fast. And the doors must be locked tight. I would say the clergy should institute new rules where any wanna-be priest has to undergo sex-offender-like psychological tests to see their sexual proclivity. No gays, and no one who even might be gay.

    "But then we'll lose half our priests in this purge!" you say. Yes, in the short term; but thousands of straight men will then head straight for the seminaries, no longer seeing them as full of fairies and corruption and Church of Nice. Within 5-10 years a quarter of those parishes will have a full time pastor again, and within 20 they will be all refilled again, and probably with more opening.

    The Churches will double or triple their flocks. Straight men avoid churches because gays run them, and many women avoid them because, in truth, the Church of Nice isn't fun, but the Church of Laying Down the Law by a Strong Man is actually spiritually attractive. The only young women going now are those who are excitedly await the reboot of Will & Grace.

  162. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Of course non-whites will want to disparage white achievements in the arts and sciences. Of course they will play up Islamic science during the European Dark Ages, or the Indians coming up with place value as if that’s the whole of mathematics, or will try to make out that the British or French Empires were unmitigated evil. It is all explained by the twin concepts of envy and humiliation.

    It makes sense for Muslims and Indians to play up their own intellectual traditions in their societies. As far as multicultural histories of science and disparagement of “white achievements in the arts and sciences”, they’ve been written and driven by white intellectuals, thinkers, and historians, so obviously they haven’t been motivated by envy and humiliation. You can discover what they have been motivated by by studying Continental philosophy in depth, which is generally going to be unfamiliar to a stats professor who’s into Popper.

    This view that it can all be explained by envy and humiliation seems to be held by white nationalists, their sympathizers, and others who are demoralized by multicultural intellectual histories and disparagement of white achievements and understandably wish to build up their self-esteem in such a climate.

    Read More
  163. @Robert Hume
    Almost all Whites:

    Plato - systematic philosophy
    Aristotle - early science
    Euclid - geometry
    India?-Persia?-Greece?-Egypt? Decimals, Algebra
    Palladio - classical architecture
    Wright - modern architecture
    Leeuwenhoek - microscope
    Jansen & Metius -Telescope
    Galileo - structure of solar system
    Kepler - planetary orbits
    Newton - calculus, mechanics, planetary dynamics, tides, optics
    Gutenberg – mass production of printed books
    Nicholson, Koenig, Hoe - Rotary printing press
    James Watt - Steam Engine
    Stephenson - Railroad
    Otto - gasoline engine
    Benz - automobile
    Mendel - genetics
    Smith & Hutton & Lyell -geology
    Linnaeus - biology systematics
    Darwin - evolution
    Joseph Priestly - carbon oxygen cycle
    Hobbes - theory of government
    Locke - theory of government
    Washington - stepping down
    William Wilberforce - abolition of the Atlantic slave trade and of slavery in the British Empire
    Adam Smith - economics
    Pasteur - germ theory of disease, vaccination, disproof of spontaneous generation
    Lister - surgical sterile technique
    Faraday - experimental EM
    Maxwell - theoretical EM, kinetic theory of gases
    Shakespeare
    (pre Bach)?
    Bach
    Beethoven
    Brahms
    Monteverdi-opera
    Verdi
    Puccini
    Mozart
    Leonardo da Vinci
    Michelangelo
    Rembrandt
    Van Gogh
    Picasso
    Pollock
    Warhol
    Sheng - Movable Type
    Gutenberg - Printing Press
    Koenig, Nicholson, Hoe - high speed rotary printing presses
    Wilbur & Orville Wright - airplane
    Whittle - Jet Plane
    Goddard - Rockets
    John Dalton - Chemistry
    Lavoisier- quantitative chemistry
    Mendeleev - Periodic Table
    J Willard Gibbs - Physical Chemistry
    Haber & Bosch - nitrogen fertilizer
    Werner Heisenberg - QM
    Erwin Schrodinger - QM
    Dirac - QM
    Everett - ?QM Entanglement
    Einstein - Special & General Relativity
    Hubble - size of universe, Big Bang
    Glashow, Salam, Weinberg - Standard Model of Particle Physics
    Edison - electric light, recording
    Sprague, Tesla,
    Dolivo-Dobrovolsky, Ferraris - AC generators & motors, long distance AC transmission, electromagnetic wave transmission
    Fessenden - radio
    Bell - Telephone
    Aristotle - Logic
    Boole - Mathematical Logic
    Shannon - Logic Circuits
    Turing - computer theory
    John Atanasoff- first digital computer
    Tom Flowers, Zuse - first programmable digital computer
    Wegener - continental drift
    Fermi - nuclear fission
    Pauling -quantum chemistry
    Szent Gyorgyi and Krebs - citric acid/Krebs cycle
    Crick & Watson - DNA
    William Martin - Origin of complex life.
    Peter Mitchell - biological cell power by proton gradient.
    Borlaug - Green Revolution
    Shannon - Information Theory
    Shockley - transistor
    Dummer, Kilby, Noyce - Integrated Circuit
    Hopper - compiler
    Backus - Fortran
    Ritchie - C
    Ritchie, Kernigan, Thompson - UNIX
    Codd - Relational Database
    Vint Cerf, Bob Kahn - Internet-TCP
    Tim Berners Lee - WWW, Browsers

    In Human Accomplishment, Charles Murray finds that, whether measured by events or significant figures, 97% of accomplishment in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics was due to Europeans. 98% of the significant figures were men.

    Read More
  164. @AM

    It is aggravating that much of the pure doctrine is not taught these days. Its a problem of the post-Vatican-II homosexual-and-Marxist clergy causing much of the ruination; a purging must be done
     
    According to Micheal Voris, the US Catholic church has about 5-10 years before beginning it's collapse in earnest. The stalwart elderly who make up the bulk of donors and mass attendance have begun to die off. The Boomer Priests are now headed into retirement. Most young people walk out and never return. Only 1 in 5 of those Baptisized in the faith even go to church. About 40% of those regular church goers believe gay marriage is okay, an excellent marker of their overall orthodoxy (median age of regular church goer: 40)

    Parishes will close and need to be sold off to pay pensions of staff and clergy. (Clergy at least a not getting what firemen in Chicago/CA make, so that's something.)

    And all the conservative Protestants were quite right to object to the Catholic churches conflict of interest with immigration. Encouraging illegal immigration has avoided some of the hard decisions about empty pews and dwindling funds. It filled the coffers with taxpayer money and pews for a little while until their children found no church more appealing (most) or evangelicals at least speaking to them about real issues in their lives. With Trump I hope closing the borders and reversing the trend, I'm glad the money is finally getting cut off. It's long overdue.

    So we don't need to force purge in the US, at least. It's coming and maybe sooner than we think if Mr. Voris is correct. It sounds like orthodox laity mostly need to just stand in place and try to figure out what comes next.

    No, purge I’m talking about is of the homosexual clergy. There needs to be a one-fell-swoop, overnight defrocking of the more than half (according to studies) homosexual clergy. According to strict dogma, anyone who is homosexual is not allowed to be a priest or bishop. By virtue of their disorder, homosexuals are too tainted to properly administer the sacraments; this is probably why Voris, who is a reformed homosexual, decided not to become a priest after his awakening.

    The problems such homosexuals create are legion. But the largest one is how it drives straight men away from the priesthood and church. Straight men don’t like hanging out with homos, and homosexuals, as has long been noted in history, practice a form of extreme affirmative action: they strongly promote other homos, exclude straights (especially those who want to rock the boat), and are exceedingly corrupt in office due to their sexual disorder (e.g. rewarding rent boys and lovers with sinecure church positions, using church money to pay for sex and parties—like what just happened allegedly in the Vatican).

    But homosexuals are, like most SJWs, exceedingly good at playing politics and using a bureaucracy against opponents. They are parasites, after all. A full-scale, rapid purge of them is the only way to ensure they are kicked out. A slow moving inquisition will only allow them time to formulate complicated legal and political counter-attacks that will keep them entrenched (think the weaselly civil servant in Yes, Minister, whose main objective was keeping the civil service from losing power and in increasing his own power).

    No, it must be fast. And the doors must be locked tight. I would say the clergy should institute new rules where any wanna-be priest has to undergo sex-offender-like psychological tests to see their sexual proclivity. No gays, and no one who even might be gay.

    “But then we’ll lose half our priests in this purge!” you say. Yes, in the short term; but thousands of straight men will then head straight for the seminaries, no longer seeing them as full of fairies and corruption and Church of Nice. Within 5-10 years a quarter of those parishes will have a full time pastor again, and within 20 they will be all refilled again, and probably with more opening.

    The Churches will double or triple their flocks. Straight men avoid churches because gays run them, and many women avoid them because, in truth, the Church of Nice isn’t fun, but the Church of Laying Down the Law by a Strong Man is actually spiritually attractive. The only young women going now are those who are excitedly await the reboot of Will & Grace.

    Read More
  165. @jamie b.
    "Find the crease and take it to the house?
    Lock down that receiver, take home a pick six?"

    I've no idea of what that means, and I'm guessing that I should be pleased with the fact.

    You guessed properly, you are in good stead.

    “…crease…” when the running back slips through a gap between the defensive players and runs for a touchdown.
    “…pick six” an interception returned for a touchdown.

    Universities spend untold millions in pursuit of such things. What a waste.

    Read More
  166. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I think it’s a little too facile to write that kid off as a product of envy and humiliation. If you are African-American, your culture is pop culture, not high culture. You grow up knowing that you and your community have made outsized contributions to American pop culture, especially in the realm of music. You also grow up knowing that the European-Americans have a long history of appropriating, borrowing, blandifying and bastardizing those cultural contributions and marginalizing African-American cultural creators. So if that’s your cultural background and if you don’t know shit about the history of science or about European culture, the temptation is there to assume that the same processes that have been at work in popular culture also obtain in the sciences and high culture. If the Beatles, the Stones and Led Zeppelin made gazillions from old, uncredited blues riffs, it stands to reason that there must have been some African astronomer somewhere out there who was doing the same work as Copernicus but who never got the same recognition.

    Read More
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