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Screenshot 2017-12-30 23.32.54

The New York Times Upshot section has a number of graphs showing various team sports leagues and the native countries of their players over time. For example, 75-80% of players in the English soccer league were from England or Wales (gray section of graph), and most of the rest from other parts of the British Isles, until the mid-1990s. Now only 34% of the players in the English Premier League are English.

One EPL team, Burnley, currently in 7th place out of 20 teams in the first division, stands out. From the Independent:

Burnley, Brexit and Britishness: The Premier League’s most interesting club and how it represents society’s split
Burnley are a demographic outlier, an enclave of footballing ‘Britishness’ in a sport where national borders can seem largely fluid

Jonathan Liew Chief Sports Writer @jonathanliew Friday 22 December 2017 12:44 GMT

And this is not simply a matter of culture but personnel: in a Premier League that stands as a monument to sporting globalism, the squad currently in sixth place is drawn almost exclusively from the British Isles. A smattering from Scandinavia and the English-speaking Commonwealth. Belgium’s Steven Defour. Austria’s Ashley Barnes, actually born and raised in Bath. That’s everyone.

… For example, the club has never signed a player from Asia or north Africa. Their only Latin American (goalkeeper Diego Penny) made just one league start a decade ago. Meanwhile, not a single Premier League minute this season has been played by a non-white footballer.

Internationalization of team sports has gotten dull. Nationalization, too. Perhaps the future belongs to the entrepreneur who figures out how to make regionalization work.

As a Southern Californian, for example, I appreciated that this year UCLA’s and USC’s star quarterbacks were SoCal kids. Similarly, I follow baseball slugger Giancarlo Stanton’s career because he went to my old high school.

I’d much rather root for professional teams of players who grew up in my part of the country, not to mention in other countries.

One problem is that it is so useful to recruit across country. For example, when UCLA coach John Wooden was asked wasn’t it a criticism of his coaching skills that he had gone 3,000 miles to recruit 7’2″ Lew Alcindor away from New York, he said, “You can’t coach quickness.”

Of course, players want the largest market for their skills imaginable.

Another problem is designing regions that have roughly equal amounts of talent so that leagues are competitive. For example, the soccer World Cup is immensely popular because it’s nationalistic, but the same limited number of countries always win.

 
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  1. A few years back my team were in the Premier League, like Burnley our squad was predominantly British and Irish, indeed I think we were the first team in a while to field an all British Isles XI for a Premier League game. We lacked ability but made up for it in team spirit and togetherness. Great fun to support.

    Now we are owned by the Chinese, who have a questionable relationship with Portuguese super agent Jorge Mendes. We are in the league below the Premier with a bunch of Portuguese players who should be playing at a higher level, so we win every week, but there is no heart and my interest has gone. We have some very talented young local players, but they never play. There is a balance, and hopefully with Brexit leading to restrictions on foreign players, perhaps that can be found.

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    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    And that, along with sell-a-kidney season ticket prices, is why us plebs are bailing en masse and going to the Championship and non-league.
    Proper old-time (tedious cloggers in a potato field, sometimes, I grant you) football, warm-ish pies and Bovril. At least you can take the kids.
    Loads of people round here have ditched football entirely and switched to Rugby League. Great game, fast and tough. And again, the players are people like you and me, local, from their town, (although a heck of a lot fitter) and young lads can dream of one day following them onto the pitch.
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  2. The most entertaining sport over the Christmas period has been the PDC World Darts championship, which over the last 20 years has become a brilliantly marketed event for TV, and which flourishes despite its lack of coverage in traditional sporting media. All the top players are white men, and that’s its core TV audience.

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  3. Read More
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  4. Ryan Faulk made a very good video on this subject

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  5. I suspect that the “quickness” referred to is primarily in game awareness, which in old football money was the cliche that “the first five yards is in your head.” Sedentary lifestyles and the proliferation of computers and gadgets in western countries means that, increasingly, scouts are looking to unearth gems in places where unregulated street play is the norm. The mining vocabulary is deliberate: the original giants of Spanish football, Athletic Bilbao, was famed for the size and quality of its “cantera” or quarry where it could find the next cohort of star players.

    For this reason most clubs have now established links with “feeder” clubs in developing countries or built up “academies” to try to nurture local talent.

    Finally, the graph accompanying the article doesn’t tell the whole story about Scottish players in the top English league in the period up to about 1990. Almost invariably the best and biggest teams lifting silverware had a Scottish core including key “superstars” in today’s terms. Possibly the most famous example was the stellar Liverpool of the late 1970s-mid 1980s for whom Dalglish was “King Kenny”, Souness was club captain and Hansen the classiest defender. The fall off in talent being brought through in Scotland was shameful; the principal culprits were, in my opinion, short-termist morons focused on their own individual career stats than on the healthy progression of the organisation and sport. Thankfully many more youngsters are coming through since about 2010 and are being given a decent amount of game time.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    teams lifting silverware
     
    Why do the last hours of the Clinton Administration 17 years ago suddenly come to mind?
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  6. But consider the NFL: the world’s richest and most successful sports league, with an effective worldwide monopoly, yet it has very few international players.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    How many other countries play American football?
    , @Rod1963
    The NFL is distinctly a American game and truly reflective of who we are as a people. They've tried to export it, but it doesn't take. First off you need a massive support infrastructure that goes all the way back to grade school to guide and filter prospective players.

    Then encourage a culture of violence and drug abuse in schools, make sure coaches have access to lots of PEDs to build up the players when they hit high school.

    Turn colleges into training centers for these low IQ thugs and let them run about and do as they please.

    Basically wreck the education system.

    Almost forgot, you need state buy in. Since these players are hyper violent and loaded to the gills on PED's, they tend to commit acts of rape and mayhem all out of proportion to their numbers. So the legal and judicial system has to protect the players.
    , @Barnard
    That is because of the limited success the NFL has had in promoting American football in other countries. As their brand declines in the United States, I don't see them becoming more successful in other countries. Who wants to start a youth football league and give yourself instant exposure to lawsuits from the long term impact of concussions.
    , @biz
    Isn't that because gridiron football is only played in the US and Canada? Nobody from another country will grow up playing it.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    I think they've handled the international side poorly, using the old NFL Europe mainly as a development league for American players. They should have recruited athletic European teens (maybe big but not first rate soccer or basketball players) and paid for them to go to high school and college in the U.S. and play football there, and then send them back to Europe to play for local teams.
    , @Phil
    I'm of the opinion that a Boise State type school could develope a recruiting pipeline in a place like Nigeria and become a college football powerhouse.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_African-American_population

    FL, GA, TX, and CA have a combined African American population of about 11 million. How good would a college football team that got first pick from that population?


    Christian Okoye who played for the Chiefs in the early 90s came from the Igbo population in southern Nigeria.

    There are 33 million Igbo in a space a little bit larger than Maryland

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Igbo_people

    Seems like out of 33 million you might be able to find 4 guys to make up a pretty dominating defensive line, maybe a few guys with the potential to be good left tackles too, if we're really getting greedy, maybe someone we can train to be a decent corner.

    Some interesting relevant links

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/theundefeated.com/features/from-africa-to-the-nfl-native-born-and-first-generation-players/amp/

    http://www.unz.com/article/the-iq-gap-is-no-longer-a-black-and-white-issue/
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  7. Sportsball really has been a devastating corrosive to white populations globally, especially the men, turning them into slavish Negro lovers.

    My second act as Dictator of America will be to segregate sportsball and eliminate much of it entirely. My first act, of course, is removing the Zeroth Amendment Poem from the Statue of Liberty. My third act is dynamiting the Lincoln Memorial. Then I’ll get around to some other stuff.

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    • Replies: @Sports Fan
    For the love of all that's holy Steve would you please adopt the Vox Day football rule and spam/ban/emulsify commenters who feel the need to tell us how much they hate sports WHILE COMMENTING ON SPORTS THREADS! For God's sake man, I don't care for golf course design or any of the swarthy minority groups that inhabit LA, thus, I stay off those threads. Take your gamma secret kingship elsewhere and let us proles have our football!!!!!
    , @Karl
    7 peterike > Sportsball really has been a devastating corrosive to white populations globally, especially the men, turning them into slavish Negro lovers.


    you can't turn a moth into afreethinker, peterike

    And of course, the moths always blame the Jews for having noticed how profitable it is to turn on a light
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  8. Oh look, the MSM discovered another pocket of “whiteness” somewhere on the planet. Search and Destroy, the universal response to white people –yet they continue to pretend there’s no war going on. Unfortunately most white people continue to believe them.

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  9. @prosa123
    But consider the NFL: the world's richest and most successful sports league, with an effective worldwide monopoly, yet it has very few international players.

    How many other countries play American football?

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  10. I never thought to see the day when Steve Sailer would be posting something about Burnley, having myself grown up not far from that old mill town on the borders of Lancashire and Yorkshire, and having myself attended a number of matches at the town’s Turf Moor stadium in the 1960′s, although I was more of a fan of Leeds United, another prominent club a little further down the Leeds-Liverpool canal that goes through Burnley.

    Burnley was one of the original founding members of the professional Football League in 1888, so there is a strong soccer tradition in the area.

    I have no idea why they have never had a black player. Most soccer teams in England find it hard to compete without using black players, who are valued for their speed and explosiveness. Nearby Leeds United had a black player in the early 1960′s, Albert Johanneson, a left winger whom they had found on a tour of South Africa, and apparently adopted. Another Leeds stalwart. Paul Reaney, is now widely regarded as being the first black player to play for England, though he was not perceived as black during his playing career. In the clip below he talks about his career, but there is no mention of race.

    However soccer is one of those sports where there is no particular racial advantage, and in the world game black and hispanic players are very prominent as top stars in the sport, and yet Germany are the reigning world champions with a team mainly of, well, Germans, although these days they do have some players of African and Turkish descent eligible to play for Germany.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Paul Reaney, is now widely regarded as being the first black player to play for England, though he was not perceived as black during his playing career.
     

    Reaney's appearance for England has assumed greater importance in recent years as even though he was regarded as "white" during his playing career, he is viewed by many as "black" or mixed race now.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Reaney

    Leaving aside the Black schnozz, not a very Black-looking Black man...



    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/0e/a8/0a/0ea80a5294a9345698ebaed065241cf4.png
    , @Old Palo Altan
    When I lived in Yorkshire (near Skipton) in the 1980s I often drove through Burnley. I was immediately attracted by its down-at-heel but defiant charm. The North Lancastrians are a splendidly independent and cussed bunch, and have held to their ways and their mores better than, say, the South Lancastrians around Manchester, not to mention the poor abandoned Londoners. The countryside is beautiful and largely unknown to those who live even a mere fifty miles away.
    But my real point of interest here is Paul Reaney. I find nothing online which describes the roots of his purported "blackness". If I had to guess I would say that he might have a bit of Australian aborigine in him rather than African blood.
    Can anyone help?
    , @Henry's Cat

    I have no idea why they have never had a black player.
     
    They have had, and do have black players. Here's the current squad: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burnley_F.C.#First-team_squad

    Note that Liew only writes: 'For example, the club has never signed a player from Asia or north Africa. '

    What surprised me about the piece is that Liew (who's Chinese by origin) didn't mention that Burnley's ownership is almost wholly in the hands of its directors, who are British to a man:

    https://www.burnleyfootballclub.com/club/contact/#collapse98037_98038
    , @Pat Boyle
    I had a 23andme DNA test done years ago. Now this test and others like it are ubiquitous. We should no longer speak of racial appearances or 'features'. We can now deal with alleles and SNPs.

    Blacks seem to prosper in many sports because of their 'fast twitch' muscle fibers. Surely we should regulate the genes that code for these desirable traits. We only allow so many individuals on a team. We should only allow so many 'fast twitchers' per team.
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  11. My interest in college football pretty much cratered with the demise of the SWC. As the Wik says, “For most of its history, the core members of the conference were Texas-based schools plus one in Arkansas, Rice University, Southern Methodist University, Texas A&M University, Texas Christian University, the University of Arkansas, and the University of Texas.”

    The great thing about it was that most of the recruiting was in Texas, with occasional raids into Oklahoma (which is, of course, right next door). There was a sense of locality, of regionalism, that mattered to me. Sure, maybe it didn’t exactly make sense to have Rice playing in the same conference as UT-Austin . . . if you looked at it from a competitive standpoint, but it did from a regional standpoint.

    Bud Adams opened my eyes to the “local” nature of NFL teams when he yanked the Oilers up and moved them to Tennessee, and with the death of the SWC (also in 1996, although you could point to Arkansas leaving in ’91) any sense of regionalism just died. There was no longer (pardon my dialect) any sense of “our’n versus their’n” to be had. Was that just the sense of the times, a triumph of the neoliberal borderless world that Strobe Talbot had dreamed of for so long?

    I don’t know.

    But it’s harder to really give a crap about “local” teams if the only thing local about them is the stadium they play in.

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    • Agree: Simply Simon
    • Replies: @anonymous-antimarxist
    Hudson,

    On a happier note you should be proud that TCU came back strong and beat Stanford in the 4th quarter. Perhaps because the Stanford band insisted in engaging in some lame SJW trolling of the fans.

    Stanford Band Mocks Border Wall, Whataburger During Alamo Bowl Halftime Show
    http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2017/12/30/stanford-band-mocks-border-wall-whataburger-alamo-bowl-halftime-show/

    The band opened the show, entitled “Texas: Too Big to Fail?” by claiming the show was sponsored by the White House Press Office. After swarming onto the field, the band quickly assembled the words “Fake” and “News.”

    As the show’s announcer read some “fun facts” claiming that Texans rank last in state pride and that “Texas is really, really, small,” the band formed the word “TEX.”

    The announcer then said, “If you tried to build a fifty-foot wall along the entire southern border, the cost of it could only pay for the tuition of about 20 million college students.” The boos quickly began.
     
    , @Roger Sweeny
    But it’s harder to really give a crap about “local” teams if the only thing local about them is the stadium they play in.

    You probably paid for that stadium with your taxes. You have to root for them to get your money's worth.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    This was good, on the irrationality of NFL football fandom.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/446778330532937728
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  12. @prosa123
    But consider the NFL: the world's richest and most successful sports league, with an effective worldwide monopoly, yet it has very few international players.

    The NFL is distinctly a American game and truly reflective of who we are as a people. They’ve tried to export it, but it doesn’t take. First off you need a massive support infrastructure that goes all the way back to grade school to guide and filter prospective players.

    Then encourage a culture of violence and drug abuse in schools, make sure coaches have access to lots of PEDs to build up the players when they hit high school.

    Turn colleges into training centers for these low IQ thugs and let them run about and do as they please.

    Basically wreck the education system.

    Almost forgot, you need state buy in. Since these players are hyper violent and loaded to the gills on PED’s, they tend to commit acts of rape and mayhem all out of proportion to their numbers. So the legal and judicial system has to protect the players.

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    • Agree: Escher
    • LOL: Anonym
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The NFL is distinctly a American game and truly reflective of who we are as a people. They've tried to export it, but it doesn't take.
     
    For a few decades, hockey was more violent than was football. There was little problem exporting that.

    Though brawls are probably less common in Europe, and in the US, for that matter. Anyone got stats on that?
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  13. @Hunsdon
    My interest in college football pretty much cratered with the demise of the SWC. As the Wik says, "For most of its history, the core members of the conference were Texas-based schools plus one in Arkansas, Rice University, Southern Methodist University, Texas A&M University, Texas Christian University, the University of Arkansas, and the University of Texas."

    The great thing about it was that most of the recruiting was in Texas, with occasional raids into Oklahoma (which is, of course, right next door). There was a sense of locality, of regionalism, that mattered to me. Sure, maybe it didn't exactly make sense to have Rice playing in the same conference as UT-Austin . . . if you looked at it from a competitive standpoint, but it did from a regional standpoint.

    Bud Adams opened my eyes to the "local" nature of NFL teams when he yanked the Oilers up and moved them to Tennessee, and with the death of the SWC (also in 1996, although you could point to Arkansas leaving in '91) any sense of regionalism just died. There was no longer (pardon my dialect) any sense of "our'n versus their'n" to be had. Was that just the sense of the times, a triumph of the neoliberal borderless world that Strobe Talbot had dreamed of for so long?

    I don't know.

    But it's harder to really give a crap about "local" teams if the only thing local about them is the stadium they play in.

    Hudson,

    On a happier note you should be proud that TCU came back strong and beat Stanford in the 4th quarter. Perhaps because the Stanford band insisted in engaging in some lame SJW trolling of the fans.

    Stanford Band Mocks Border Wall, Whataburger During Alamo Bowl Halftime Show

    http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2017/12/30/stanford-band-mocks-border-wall-whataburger-alamo-bowl-halftime-show/

    The band opened the show, entitled “Texas: Too Big to Fail?” by claiming the show was sponsored by the White House Press Office. After swarming onto the field, the band quickly assembled the words “Fake” and “News.”

    As the show’s announcer read some “fun facts” claiming that Texans rank last in state pride and that “Texas is really, really, small,” the band formed the word “TEX.”

    The announcer then said, “If you tried to build a fifty-foot wall along the entire southern border, the cost of it could only pay for the tuition of about 20 million college students.” The boos quickly began.

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    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    Mockery can be a dangerous tool.
    , @Anon
    "The announcer then said, “If you tried to build a fifty-foot wall along the entire southern border, the cost of it could only pay for the tuition of about 20 million college students.” The boos quickly began."

    Imagine the savings if we didn't have a space program or cancelled the interstate highway system! Rainbows for everyone.

    Some things are worth spending money on.

    Imagine the racial harmony that would break out if the kinds of private schools these Stanford guys went to as kids so they wouldn't have to be around blacks and Hispanics were banned.

    Imagine a world where Stanford guys could spend thousands of dollars on test prep and be awarded their rightful place at Harvard instead of being stuck at Stanford.
    , @Alden
    I apologize for my Alma Mater. Proud to say i’ve never given it a dime
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  14. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Mr. Sailer is a great thinker and superb writer. But so much that is wrong with America is reflected in spectator sports.

    Your consumption of any athletic competition of broad enough interest to be commercially televised not only feeds the Establishment financially, but sustains the dumbing down of our nation through bogus, militaristic “patriotism” and preachy, racialized political commentary. Jeepers, the uniforms are often camouflaged!

    Even the contests themselves have been rigged and degraded, the latest example being the alteration of the baseball to replace steroids in the HR/W/K travesty that is turning a great pastime into just another game of one-on-one. #BoycottBa$hball

    Sportsmanship is dead and buried. What self-respecting person spends his time and money to watch showboating goons celebrate their touchdowns, sacks, slam dunks, and home runs?

    Big time athletics degrade educational institutions, too. Doesn’t it embarrass people when the schools from which they graduated pay the ringmasters far more than the faculty?

    This CircusBread needs to be spat out.

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  15. It’s easy to see the MultiKultiKult as a suicide death pact or whatever, because that’s where we now stand, but in its beginnings it was popular because it *worked*.
    In the mid 90s, Man-U, then the very top of the pile, committed the particularly British heresey of hiring a Frenchman. The particular guy, Gaza, was the real deal. Amazing pitch presence, showmanship etc, he put butts in the seats. His coup de grace was when a rowdy fan with pitchside seats talked shit, and so gaza performed a flawlessly executed karate jump kick right into the guy. English soccer went wild.
    And others tagged on. Thierry Henry playing at arsenal etc. suddenly hide-bound English teams realized French players added value.
    And, of course, these initial French players were *french*. Zidane, perhaps a once in a century player, was Arab/barber by blood was was extremely outspoken about his proud French identity. Rumors that his father fought as a pro-French soldier (harki$ during the Algerian civil war made him acceptable even to the le pen wing of French society.
    Of course, all hinge can be taken too far. We got French guys who add value? Let’s get Mauritanian and tongolese guys, too! And the fight to find further reaches and further (cheaper) guys led to the madness were now in where no one is local and identity is dead

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    • Replies: @Dmitry

    The particular guy, Gaza, was the real deal. Amazing pitch presence, showmanship etc, The particular guy, Gaza, was the real deal. Amazing pitch presence, showmanship etc, he put butts in the seats. His coup de grace was when a rowdy fan with pitchside seats talked shit, and so gaza performed a flawlessly executed karate jump kick right into the guy.
     
    This you mean - Eric Cantona?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TiOIZ9AfGs

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  16. For example, the soccer World Cup is immensely popular because it’s nationalistic, but the same limited number of countries always win.

    True, and yet in many respects the whole world is rooting for competitive minnows like the USA to upset the applecart, because it would be good for the sport overall. Why should Brazil, Germany, Italy, Spain get to win every time, with Argentina, France, and England only winning with home advantage, and the rest of the world never getting beyond a semifinal?

    It is a bit like health care. The whole world would like Americans to join the nations that have affordable health care, but Americans are so firm in their belief that the poor must make sacrifices to help the rich that it will never happen.

    However, USA are out of the next World Cup after their defeat by Trinidad and Tobago in the final qualification match, and even with a fearless President promising to have everyone beautifully covered with affordable health insurance, the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting sicker.

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    • Replies: @27 year old

    Americans are so firm in their belief that the poor must make sacrifices to help the rich that it will never happen.
     
    Truly thoughtful commentary, its like you have your finger right on our national pulse... ...

    Americans are sick of making sacrifices to provide stuff for non-Whites. Americans are firm on the belief that "affordable health care" means "affordable for blacks and mexicans" but even worse for us. And, Obama's healthcare law proved to many people that belief was correct. I think this analysis is wrong and openly paying into a socialist system would be better for Whites than what we have now. But I can't blame my countrymen for being dubious and I'm not going to use some semester-at-sea tier psychoanalysis to look down my nose at them.
    , @mts1
    Americans learned that there was nothing affordable or caring about this healthcare. Either nationalize it or not, don't force purchase of "insurance" that should no longer be necessary. Plus they know it'll turn into yet another social experimentation branch for leftists to use against them. So I have to wait for that freak to get a sex change or reattached foreskin to make it more fun at the bath house before I get my kidney care? And half of us don't want to have our money paying for killing in the womb already, but the leftists will be strangling 6 month olds and having health care pay for it just to spite the conservative half of the country (i.e. bake the damned cake!). And if my politics aren't proper, I get a mark and get last in line? Americans also know innovation will die and freeze the country in the year it all got nationalized, as other countries only advance as the USA makes innovations. Don't get me started about the VA. Seeing my veteran older relatives getting Blue Cross and using private health care instead of the VA (as I also do), that tells me all I need to know. Americans also see how countries with gov't health care have that become a political football that skews elections and marks a fiscally responsible party as heartless and the Santa Claus party as caring and compassionate. The poor already have Medicaid and the right to treatment regardless of ability to pay, so nice try but that dog won't hunt.
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  17. Major league baseball suffered a lot from an increase among non-English-speaking foreign players over the last several decades. The NBA has become quite internationalized as well, but their imports tend to learn English quickly if they dont already know it. The key difference being that international NBAers come from all over, without the Latin American concentration of baseball that created balkanized clubhouses divided along an English-Spanish faultline.

    Jan Stephenson got herself into politically correct hot water several years ago when she complained about the legion of interchangeable (my word, not hers) Korean imports who showed up on the LPGA tour just to break par and cash paychecks, without being able to relate to the fans, the media or the sponsors. Of course the sponsorship money started drying up and TV ratings tumbled.

    I would assume that at this point most of the imports to the EPL do speak or try to learn English because they’re still relatively few and of variegated native tongues. But if the proportions of imports specifically from Latin America and/or French West Africa reaches a certain level, English soccer will probably experience the same balkanization that baseball suffered from in the 1990s.

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  18. @Jonathan Mason
    I never thought to see the day when Steve Sailer would be posting something about Burnley, having myself grown up not far from that old mill town on the borders of Lancashire and Yorkshire, and having myself attended a number of matches at the town's Turf Moor stadium in the 1960's, although I was more of a fan of Leeds United, another prominent club a little further down the Leeds-Liverpool canal that goes through Burnley.

    Burnley was one of the original founding members of the professional Football League in 1888, so there is a strong soccer tradition in the area.

    I have no idea why they have never had a black player. Most soccer teams in England find it hard to compete without using black players, who are valued for their speed and explosiveness. Nearby Leeds United had a black player in the early 1960's, Albert Johanneson, a left winger whom they had found on a tour of South Africa, and apparently adopted. Another Leeds stalwart. Paul Reaney, is now widely regarded as being the first black player to play for England, though he was not perceived as black during his playing career. In the clip below he talks about his career, but there is no mention of race.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxREpcgDaPI

    However soccer is one of those sports where there is no particular racial advantage, and in the world game black and hispanic players are very prominent as top stars in the sport, and yet Germany are the reigning world champions with a team mainly of, well, Germans, although these days they do have some players of African and Turkish descent eligible to play for Germany.

    Paul Reaney, is now widely regarded as being the first black player to play for England, though he was not perceived as black during his playing career.

    Reaney’s appearance for England has assumed greater importance in recent years as even though he was regarded as “white” during his playing career, he is viewed by many as “black” or mixed race now.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Reaney

    Leaving aside the Black schnozz, not a very Black-looking Black man…

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    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    As far as I know Reaney has never spoken about his parentage, but the biographies say (and I knew this 50 years ago, so they have been consistent) that Reaney was born in Fulham, London in 1944 and moved to Leeds as a baby, presumably accompanied by his mother.

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.

    https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/the-story-of-african-american-troops-in-wwii-britain.html
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  19. @prosa123
    But consider the NFL: the world's richest and most successful sports league, with an effective worldwide monopoly, yet it has very few international players.

    That is because of the limited success the NFL has had in promoting American football in other countries. As their brand declines in the United States, I don’t see them becoming more successful in other countries. Who wants to start a youth football league and give yourself instant exposure to lawsuits from the long term impact of concussions.

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  20. @prosa123
    But consider the NFL: the world's richest and most successful sports league, with an effective worldwide monopoly, yet it has very few international players.

    Isn’t that because gridiron football is only played in the US and Canada? Nobody from another country will grow up playing it.

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  21. But it’s harder to really give a crap about “local” teams if the only thing local about them is the stadium they play in.

    I think when you are young, there is a natural tendency to want to identify oneself with something bigger and more powerful away from the family, and to idolize athletes who have perfected their skills in a sport that you like to play for recreation, but could never play professionally.

    But when you grow up this fades away, though even if you move to a different part of the world you may still follow the results and match reports and get a little rush of adrenaline if the team is successful.

    But, yes, the connection between the team and the fans is less if they are not part of the same community.

    The English Premier League is now marketing itself more with worldwide TV audiences in mind than to local communities. A small number of about half a dozen super teams from London and Manchester dominate all the competitions and have the money to bring in some of the best players in the world.

    Local teams like Burnley do get a share of the TV money, but they are mainly there to play the role of the Washington Generals, and are not supposed to win trophies like Leicester City did two years ago in one of the biggest upsets in sporting history.

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    • Replies: @Altai
    American hipsters talk about Liverpool like it's the 1970s, they don't get that everything 'authentic' they associate with Liverpool was built by people they'd call 'racist' in a second and that the modern team is as much an amorous global corporation as Starbucks.
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  22. Honourable mention must go to the Basque football teams:

    Athletic Bilbao have never been relegated from La Liga, and they boast to have never used a non-Basque player. Of course, the definition of “Basque” has been diluted, given the changing Zeitgeist and the increasing wealth bestowed by footballing success, from being genetically Basque, through being born in the Basque country, to having had the majority of one’s footballing education there. Interestingly, they now have a black player, Iñaki Williams, the son of African immigrants. They gave him a Basque first name, so can’t really fault their social integration.

    Real Sociedad: Also only played with Basque players until the late 80s, I believe, when they caved, claiming that Athletic’s greater financial clout made continuing with the policy impossible. Amusingly, they accepted foreign players, but no Spaniards, until 2004 or so. Now, they achieve respectable top-half finishes in La Liga, usually with 8-9 of their first team players being from their youth system, or from within half an hour of the stadium.

    Eibar: From a town of about 5,000 (nope, didn’t miss out an 0), with all the financial limitations that implies, Eibar won promotion to La Liga a few years ago, largely based on homegrown talent, and haven’t been relegated yet. Several times, they had done enough to be promoted to La Liga from B division, but were denied due to their hilariously small and ill-equipped stadium, among other reasons.

    In general, Spanish teams do a great job of producing local talent. Linguistic and cultural similarities with South America mean that La Liga can absorb quite a lot of Latino talent; such players rarely tend to do as well in England, for example. France, as could be expected, has a couple of centrally governed football academies, which generally work quite well, but the high taxes have prevented the French league from ever really taking off. Netherlands and Scotland have traditionally punched way above their weight, with the latter not having done so for a generation. The Germans do well at whatever they put their mind too, while the Italians benefit from a universal footballing playing style that all teams conform to more or less. The English should just give up on the game altogether, and focus on rugby and cricket, both of which suit them better.

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    • Replies: @oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang
    Basques also have a strong presence in cycling. Every Tour de France, there is a Basque cycling team, composed of all Basques. No one really ever thinks they'll win the entire tour, but a great many win stages and they can threaten the mountain jersey pretty reliably. And they are universally adored for keeping things very interesting and attacking with tons of heart.
    And, as you say, we're talking about being "also-ran" top 20% finishes on a massive, world stage hiring only "themselves" and drawing from a population of less that 2.5 million
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  23. @Jonathan Mason

    For example, the soccer World Cup is immensely popular because it’s nationalistic, but the same limited number of countries always win.
     
    True, and yet in many respects the whole world is rooting for competitive minnows like the USA to upset the applecart, because it would be good for the sport overall. Why should Brazil, Germany, Italy, Spain get to win every time, with Argentina, France, and England only winning with home advantage, and the rest of the world never getting beyond a semifinal?

    It is a bit like health care. The whole world would like Americans to join the nations that have affordable health care, but Americans are so firm in their belief that the poor must make sacrifices to help the rich that it will never happen.

    However, USA are out of the next World Cup after their defeat by Trinidad and Tobago in the final qualification match, and even with a fearless President promising to have everyone beautifully covered with affordable health insurance, the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting sicker.

    Americans are so firm in their belief that the poor must make sacrifices to help the rich that it will never happen.

    Truly thoughtful commentary, its like you have your finger right on our national pulse… …

    Americans are sick of making sacrifices to provide stuff for non-Whites. Americans are firm on the belief that “affordable health care” means “affordable for blacks and mexicans” but even worse for us. And, Obama’s healthcare law proved to many people that belief was correct. I think this analysis is wrong and openly paying into a socialist system would be better for Whites than what we have now. But I can’t blame my countrymen for being dubious and I’m not going to use some semester-at-sea tier psychoanalysis to look down my nose at them.

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    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Thanks for stepping up. I’m sure Jonathan Mason will not be moved by your argument, even if he understands it, but it should be made all the same.
    , @Jonathan Mason

    Americans are sick of making sacrifices to provide stuff for non-Whites. Americans are firm on the belief that “affordable health care” means “affordable for blacks and mexicans” but even worse for us. And, Obama’s healthcare law proved to many people that belief was correct. I think this analysis is wrong and openly paying into a socialist system would be better for Whites than what we have now.
     
    You have certainly put your finger on the ineluctable truth that all of American politics is about race, even though this elephant in the room is hardly every openly discussed, although perhaps it is worth noting that the elephant is a symbol of the Republican party. I was not truly aware of this until some years ago when a Filipino coworker told me there was no way he would vote Democrat to enable blacks to get more benefits! And then the penny dropped.

    Really every federal and some state level political issues, whether it be healthcare, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, law enforcement and sentencing, the death penalty, abortion, voting rights for felons, immigration, terrorism, guns is a race issue or has a marked racial component, usually along the lines of white people pay more of the taxes, but people of color get more of the government benefits.

    A single payer health financing system would benefit many white people and save them money that goes in profits to the health insurance companies, but a majority would rather pay more so that people of color do not get the same savings.

    [By the way, when we come to health insurance and Obamacare, we are really talking about the working population in jobs that do not have health care provided by and subsidized by employers, or for the self employed. People like civil servants or corporate employees above entry level jobs are usually not fully aware of how crippling health care costs are for families that do not have these benefits. The Obama solution of high insurance premiums, high deductibles, and high profits for the health insurance companies should be called the Unaffordable Health Care Act and for that reason I totally support(ed) Trumps plans for a health care that would be affordable, effective, and with lower premiums, lower deductibles, and cheaper drugs, which he has notably so far failed to deliver. I have no particular preference if health care is financed through for profit insurance companies, or by a single payer--I would just like us all to have the best possible access to health care at the best possible price. Incidentally I do not personally have a dog in the fight as I have Medicare, but I have three dependents who do not.]

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  24. The reason for the hugely disproportionate number of Scots for decades was that modern football – i.e. based on passing rather than dribbling – was invented in Scotland. So the Scots players were raised on those tactics and the development of suitable skills in boyhood. There therefore eventually developed a disproportionate number of Scots managers/coaches too.

    That the proportion would fall was inevitable with imports of huge numbers of players from the Continent, South America and Africa. But within the British players the proportion of Scots has declined markedly too. Something – perhaps something awful – must have happened in Scottish schools or Scottish society. I don’t know what it is but it’s no doubt true that we should blame socialism.

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  25. 9% African. Plus, British-born blacks and mulattos. Junglo-Saxonization via Afro-Colinization of White Wombs as blacks have displaced whites as icons of manhood in the UK.

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  26. I’d be inclined to combine this story and the previous one, since it appears that 57% of jobs requiring a bachelors degree or better in Silicon Valley is held by other than US citizens.

    Instead of talent, though, they’re looking for cheap labor. Do Brit soccer teams recruit from Asia and Africa to save money at a given level of talent? Are there enough good Brit soccer players to fill out their league?

    Will a Silicon Valley “Burnley” firm ever stand up and say it only hires American citizens? Are there enough Americans to fill out the valley “leagues”? Time will tell.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Will a Silicon Valley “Burnley” firm ever stand up and say it only hires American citizens?

    Would that be legal?
    , @Fredrik

    Instead of talent, though, they’re looking for cheap labor. Do Brit soccer teams recruit from Asia and Africa to save money at a given level of talent? Are there enough good Brit soccer players to fill out their league?
     
    No, they're recruiting superior foreigners.

    As been mentioned already the league has moved in the direction of being truly global.

    England has lots of good players but there are two problems for the league.

    1. The players aren't good enough to sell a globalized product.
    2. The players aren't as good as the English think. See all the failures of the national team.
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  27. Fantasy sports allows people to have hyper local (individual) competitive experiences.

    Example – anonymized names in my fantasy football league include:

    [Players Neighborhood] Thugs
    [Players Home State] Wrecking Crew
    [Players Ethnicity] #WINNING
    Etc.

    Fantasy sports now allows people to punch a bunch of the same buttons pro sports used to punch but dont anymore.

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  28. @syonredux

    Paul Reaney, is now widely regarded as being the first black player to play for England, though he was not perceived as black during his playing career.
     

    Reaney's appearance for England has assumed greater importance in recent years as even though he was regarded as "white" during his playing career, he is viewed by many as "black" or mixed race now.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Reaney

    Leaving aside the Black schnozz, not a very Black-looking Black man...



    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/0e/a8/0a/0ea80a5294a9345698ebaed065241cf4.png

    As far as I know Reaney has never spoken about his parentage, but the biographies say (and I knew this 50 years ago, so they have been consistent) that Reaney was born in Fulham, London in 1944 and moved to Leeds as a baby, presumably accompanied by his mother.

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.

    https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/the-story-of-african-american-troops-in-wwii-britain.html

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.
     
    In that case, his African-American Dad probably wasn't very African.
    , @syonredux

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.
     
    There's also the possibility of rape by a Black GI. Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.
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  29. @Hunsdon
    My interest in college football pretty much cratered with the demise of the SWC. As the Wik says, "For most of its history, the core members of the conference were Texas-based schools plus one in Arkansas, Rice University, Southern Methodist University, Texas A&M University, Texas Christian University, the University of Arkansas, and the University of Texas."

    The great thing about it was that most of the recruiting was in Texas, with occasional raids into Oklahoma (which is, of course, right next door). There was a sense of locality, of regionalism, that mattered to me. Sure, maybe it didn't exactly make sense to have Rice playing in the same conference as UT-Austin . . . if you looked at it from a competitive standpoint, but it did from a regional standpoint.

    Bud Adams opened my eyes to the "local" nature of NFL teams when he yanked the Oilers up and moved them to Tennessee, and with the death of the SWC (also in 1996, although you could point to Arkansas leaving in '91) any sense of regionalism just died. There was no longer (pardon my dialect) any sense of "our'n versus their'n" to be had. Was that just the sense of the times, a triumph of the neoliberal borderless world that Strobe Talbot had dreamed of for so long?

    I don't know.

    But it's harder to really give a crap about "local" teams if the only thing local about them is the stadium they play in.

    But it’s harder to really give a crap about “local” teams if the only thing local about them is the stadium they play in.

    You probably paid for that stadium with your taxes. You have to root for them to get your money’s worth.

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  30. In the Indian Premier League, the most popular global cricket league, I believe there are rules for the composition of the team to effect some “regional-ness”. For example, the number of foreign players for each team is capped, and even among the domestic players a certain number of that have to be from that city or state that’s being represented.

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  31. @Jonathan Mason
    I never thought to see the day when Steve Sailer would be posting something about Burnley, having myself grown up not far from that old mill town on the borders of Lancashire and Yorkshire, and having myself attended a number of matches at the town's Turf Moor stadium in the 1960's, although I was more of a fan of Leeds United, another prominent club a little further down the Leeds-Liverpool canal that goes through Burnley.

    Burnley was one of the original founding members of the professional Football League in 1888, so there is a strong soccer tradition in the area.

    I have no idea why they have never had a black player. Most soccer teams in England find it hard to compete without using black players, who are valued for their speed and explosiveness. Nearby Leeds United had a black player in the early 1960's, Albert Johanneson, a left winger whom they had found on a tour of South Africa, and apparently adopted. Another Leeds stalwart. Paul Reaney, is now widely regarded as being the first black player to play for England, though he was not perceived as black during his playing career. In the clip below he talks about his career, but there is no mention of race.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxREpcgDaPI

    However soccer is one of those sports where there is no particular racial advantage, and in the world game black and hispanic players are very prominent as top stars in the sport, and yet Germany are the reigning world champions with a team mainly of, well, Germans, although these days they do have some players of African and Turkish descent eligible to play for Germany.

    When I lived in Yorkshire (near Skipton) in the 1980s I often drove through Burnley. I was immediately attracted by its down-at-heel but defiant charm. The North Lancastrians are a splendidly independent and cussed bunch, and have held to their ways and their mores better than, say, the South Lancastrians around Manchester, not to mention the poor abandoned Londoners. The countryside is beautiful and largely unknown to those who live even a mere fifty miles away.
    But my real point of interest here is Paul Reaney. I find nothing online which describes the roots of his purported “blackness”. If I had to guess I would say that he might have a bit of Australian aborigine in him rather than African blood.
    Can anyone help?

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    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    But my real point of interest here is Paul Reaney. I find nothing online which describes the roots of his purported “blackness”. If I had to guess I would say that he might have a bit of Australian aborigine in him rather than African blood.
    Can anyone help?
     
    Here is the definite proof that Paul Reaney has some African blood. At the age of 68 he is on stage tap dancing. What more do you want?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ksSWPZ-ilgM
    , @anon
    Part Australian Aborigine with some Torres Straits admixture, likely North Queensland.
    The giveaway is the length of his fingers, and the length and shape of the last finger joints compared to the size of his hand.
    Paul comes across as calm, relaxed, and alert, generally traits of Qld Aborigines.

    He wouldn't be the only one, plenty of Aborigines served in the AIF in the 14/18 War and WW2 and were stationed in the UK.

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  32. @Jonathan Mason
    I never thought to see the day when Steve Sailer would be posting something about Burnley, having myself grown up not far from that old mill town on the borders of Lancashire and Yorkshire, and having myself attended a number of matches at the town's Turf Moor stadium in the 1960's, although I was more of a fan of Leeds United, another prominent club a little further down the Leeds-Liverpool canal that goes through Burnley.

    Burnley was one of the original founding members of the professional Football League in 1888, so there is a strong soccer tradition in the area.

    I have no idea why they have never had a black player. Most soccer teams in England find it hard to compete without using black players, who are valued for their speed and explosiveness. Nearby Leeds United had a black player in the early 1960's, Albert Johanneson, a left winger whom they had found on a tour of South Africa, and apparently adopted. Another Leeds stalwart. Paul Reaney, is now widely regarded as being the first black player to play for England, though he was not perceived as black during his playing career. In the clip below he talks about his career, but there is no mention of race.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxREpcgDaPI

    However soccer is one of those sports where there is no particular racial advantage, and in the world game black and hispanic players are very prominent as top stars in the sport, and yet Germany are the reigning world champions with a team mainly of, well, Germans, although these days they do have some players of African and Turkish descent eligible to play for Germany.

    I have no idea why they have never had a black player.

    They have had, and do have black players. Here’s the current squad: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burnley_F.C.#First-team_squad

    Note that Liew only writes: ‘For example, the club has never signed a player from Asia or north Africa. ‘

    What surprised me about the piece is that Liew (who’s Chinese by origin) didn’t mention that Burnley’s ownership is almost wholly in the hands of its directors, who are British to a man:

    https://www.burnleyfootballclub.com/club/contact/#collapse98037_98038

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    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    Soccer has become wealthier due to TV rights, and the Premier League is shown all over the world, hence British teams with Chinese slogans on their shirts. How long English supporters will pay good money to watch non-English players remains to be seen, though pay-TV audiences are falling in the UK, helped by apps like Kodi and Ace Player which provide free streams of games.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_owners_of_English_football_clubs

    In the Premier League I counted Brighton, Chelsea, Palace, Man Utd, Swansea, Spurs and West Ham with significant Jewish ownership (US/UK/Russian), two Chinese owned clubs, another Russian (Arsenal), UAE, Thai and Indian, two Chinese, two other American.

    Some cultural imperialism - red is a lucky colour in the Far East, and Cardiff's Chinese/Malaysian owner changed the club's strip from blue to red, sparking huge fan protests and an eventual change back.

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  33. I’ve wondered for a while now how European soccer fans can claim any sense of pride while watching a bunch of black guys from Nigeria run around with their team colors on.

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    • Replies: @Dmitry
    For the football connoisseurs that grow up in countries with under-performing national teams, domestic football league is often a lot more interesting.

    Really you just want to see good matches and the more skilled players.

    Since Roberto Mancini takes over, my team Zenit is becoming full of Argentinians (although we used to even have famous player 'Hulk' from Brazil before then). Now more Argentinian team than Russian team. It often plays a lot better to watch football than the national team.

    , @Cortes
    An excellent point and one reason why clubs are now investing heavily in trying to bring through local talent.

    The counterpoint is about off-field commercial exploitation. One way for savvy clubs unlikely to challenge for silverware in England, or from countries with tiny TV markets, to boost earnings is to sign players from particular places. A good example might be Shunsuke Nakamura. The Wikipedia entry includes

    “ The deal with Celtic was completed on 29 July 2005 for a reported transfer fee of £2.5 million,[45] although Strachan has claimed the actual fee was far lower.[48] In welcoming Nakamura to the club, Strachan stated that Nakamura "has got imagination and he sees passes other people can't see."[45] Part of the deal also involved Celtic securing the player's image rights, with a view to enhancing the club's profile and merchandising sales in the Far East.”

    Note that Nakamura was a great player and Celtic is a massive club caught in a small league but with fairly regular exposure to European competition. Signings of Far Eastern footballers by some English clubs may have less to do with their ability than their appeal in unlocking access to markets for merchandise.
    , @Brutusale
    The same way a Boston Red $ox fan has pride in his team having a 25-man roster with 14 Dominicans on it.
    , @SteveRogers42
    Same way a white college football fan can watch their alma mater play with only a couple white players in the starting 22.
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  34. @Jonathan Mason
    I never thought to see the day when Steve Sailer would be posting something about Burnley, having myself grown up not far from that old mill town on the borders of Lancashire and Yorkshire, and having myself attended a number of matches at the town's Turf Moor stadium in the 1960's, although I was more of a fan of Leeds United, another prominent club a little further down the Leeds-Liverpool canal that goes through Burnley.

    Burnley was one of the original founding members of the professional Football League in 1888, so there is a strong soccer tradition in the area.

    I have no idea why they have never had a black player. Most soccer teams in England find it hard to compete without using black players, who are valued for their speed and explosiveness. Nearby Leeds United had a black player in the early 1960's, Albert Johanneson, a left winger whom they had found on a tour of South Africa, and apparently adopted. Another Leeds stalwart. Paul Reaney, is now widely regarded as being the first black player to play for England, though he was not perceived as black during his playing career. In the clip below he talks about his career, but there is no mention of race.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxREpcgDaPI

    However soccer is one of those sports where there is no particular racial advantage, and in the world game black and hispanic players are very prominent as top stars in the sport, and yet Germany are the reigning world champions with a team mainly of, well, Germans, although these days they do have some players of African and Turkish descent eligible to play for Germany.

    I had a 23andme DNA test done years ago. Now this test and others like it are ubiquitous. We should no longer speak of racial appearances or ‘features’. We can now deal with alleles and SNPs.

    Blacks seem to prosper in many sports because of their ‘fast twitch’ muscle fibers. Surely we should regulate the genes that code for these desirable traits. We only allow so many individuals on a team. We should only allow so many ‘fast twitchers’ per team.

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  35. Internationalization of team sports has gotten dull. Nationalization, too. Perhaps the future belongs to the entrepreneur who figures out how to make regionalization work.

    The problem with regionalization in a borderless world is that every region gets internationalized sooner or later so your region isn’t particularly distinct. Sure a Wyoming-only team will be pretty damn white and even within whites probably somewhat ethnically distinct. But a California-only basketball team vs Virginia-only basketball team will still just be a bunch of black guys.

    I’d much rather root for professional teams of players who grew up in my part of the country, not to mention in other countries.

    I’m not so sure of that. If a professional football team from Minnesota filled with a bunch of whites (except DBs and RB, of course, even MN will use blacks from Mpls) went up against a pro team from Virginia (my area) with almost all blacks from Richmond and the Virginia Beach area, I (and many, if not most, whites) would route for the Minnesota team. (The opposite would likely be true for many blacks living in MN. It’s not about hating other races; it’s about supporting your own.)

    The same would be true for other sports. In the Olympics, I know a lot of whites who route for European basketball teams because they’re a bunch of white guys. Certainly Mexican-Americans route for the Mexican team in soccer.

    This is one of the weaknesses of Steve’s Citizen-state idea vs a Nationstate. Under Citizenism theory, I should feel more of a connection to my fellow black Virginian than a white Califorian. But I don’t. I have far more in common (culturally, genetically, etc.) with an average white guy from L.A. than I do with an average black guy from Richmond. The same is true if we move to the international level. I have more in common with the average white German or Scotsman than I do with the average black or Mestizo American. (And, yeah, I’ve lived in Germany so I know of what I speak. And, btw, language isn’t even an issue because Germans all speak english though they do appreciate it when you speak some german.)

    Of course, I have much more in common with the average white American than I do the average white German, so location and history matter, just not as much genetics and culture.

    The label of “American” or “Virginian” doesn’t magically make people of different races, cultures and religions feel like they’re part of the same team. Sure, living in the same area means that you have some things in common, but dealing with DC traffic or having eaten at the same restaurant doesn’t compare to have a shared family and culture.

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    • Replies: @Ossettian
    I got banned from commenting on the UK Telegraph site when I said that, if there was a sporting competition between someone born in England to Somali parents and someone born in Australia to English parents, I'd support the Aussie, because shared ancestry and culture is far, far more important than shared citizenship.
    , @Anonymous
    Certain people have probably been watching how the man on the street can be made to cheer for imported ringers he has nothing in common with -- in fact the ringer is antagonistic towards him when it comes down to it -- by paying the ringer to wear "his" sports team's shirt. And taking notes.
    , @MBlanc46
    Hear, hear!
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  36. @Jonathan Mason
    As far as I know Reaney has never spoken about his parentage, but the biographies say (and I knew this 50 years ago, so they have been consistent) that Reaney was born in Fulham, London in 1944 and moved to Leeds as a baby, presumably accompanied by his mother.

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.

    https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/the-story-of-african-american-troops-in-wwii-britain.html

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.

    In that case, his African-American Dad probably wasn’t very African.

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    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    In that case, his African-American Dad probably wasn’t very African.
     
    Hard to say. How African is Meghan Merkle's mother? Enough to be called African-American, surely.

    http://media.tmz.com/2016/12/27/1227-meghan-markle-and-her-mom-go-to-yoga-class-together-launch-7.jpg
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  37. @anonymous-antimarxist
    Hudson,

    On a happier note you should be proud that TCU came back strong and beat Stanford in the 4th quarter. Perhaps because the Stanford band insisted in engaging in some lame SJW trolling of the fans.

    Stanford Band Mocks Border Wall, Whataburger During Alamo Bowl Halftime Show
    http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2017/12/30/stanford-band-mocks-border-wall-whataburger-alamo-bowl-halftime-show/

    The band opened the show, entitled “Texas: Too Big to Fail?” by claiming the show was sponsored by the White House Press Office. After swarming onto the field, the band quickly assembled the words “Fake” and “News.”

    As the show’s announcer read some “fun facts” claiming that Texans rank last in state pride and that “Texas is really, really, small,” the band formed the word “TEX.”

    The announcer then said, “If you tried to build a fifty-foot wall along the entire southern border, the cost of it could only pay for the tuition of about 20 million college students.” The boos quickly began.
     

    Mockery can be a dangerous tool.

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  38. @Jonathan Mason
    As far as I know Reaney has never spoken about his parentage, but the biographies say (and I knew this 50 years ago, so they have been consistent) that Reaney was born in Fulham, London in 1944 and moved to Leeds as a baby, presumably accompanied by his mother.

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.

    https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/the-story-of-african-american-troops-in-wwii-britain.html

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.

    There’s also the possibility of rape by a Black GI. Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.

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    • Replies: @Numinous

    Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.
     
    It would have been rather easy in those days to pin any crime (including rape) on a black and have everyone believe you. Numbers are believable only in a system that isn't rigged.
    , @Henry's Cat
    What's the source for that? Not doubting you, of course, but I'm wondering whether it comes from one of David Irving's books.
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  39. @Anon7
    I'd be inclined to combine this story and the previous one, since it appears that 57% of jobs requiring a bachelors degree or better in Silicon Valley is held by other than US citizens.

    Instead of talent, though, they're looking for cheap labor. Do Brit soccer teams recruit from Asia and Africa to save money at a given level of talent? Are there enough good Brit soccer players to fill out their league?

    Will a Silicon Valley "Burnley" firm ever stand up and say it only hires American citizens? Are there enough Americans to fill out the valley "leagues"? Time will tell.

    Will a Silicon Valley “Burnley” firm ever stand up and say it only hires American citizens?

    Would that be legal?

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Well you can't force a company to apply for an H1B visa.
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  40. @Spud Boy
    I've wondered for a while now how European soccer fans can claim any sense of pride while watching a bunch of black guys from Nigeria run around with their team colors on.

    For the football connoisseurs that grow up in countries with under-performing national teams, domestic football league is often a lot more interesting.

    Really you just want to see good matches and the more skilled players.

    Since Roberto Mancini takes over, my team Zenit is becoming full of Argentinians (although we used to even have famous player ‘Hulk’ from Brazil before then). Now more Argentinian team than Russian team. It often plays a lot better to watch football than the national team.

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  41. Don’t know about this myself. At least regarding professional sports I think free agency has been the bigger issue. When Joe Montana came to the 49ers as a rookie it was easy to build a legend around him. It was more between the fans and their collective experience than his relationship to the fans. I am sure the people in NE feel the same about Tom Brady despite him growing up in the Bay Area. The Bay Area loves Steph Curry and Buster Posey.

    Regarding international players once they become common from a country it gets boring but some players for me were fascinating like Ichiro in MLB and Petrovic in the NBA. I’m interested in this new Japanese kid going to the Angeles too. It is all about the novelty.

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  42. @Anonsgt
    It's easy to see the MultiKultiKult as a suicide death pact or whatever, because that's where we now stand, but in its beginnings it was popular because it *worked*.
    In the mid 90s, Man-U, then the very top of the pile, committed the particularly British heresey of hiring a Frenchman. The particular guy, Gaza, was the real deal. Amazing pitch presence, showmanship etc, he put butts in the seats. His coup de grace was when a rowdy fan with pitchside seats talked shit, and so gaza performed a flawlessly executed karate jump kick right into the guy. English soccer went wild.
    And others tagged on. Thierry Henry playing at arsenal etc. suddenly hide-bound English teams realized French players added value.
    And, of course, these initial French players were *french*. Zidane, perhaps a once in a century player, was Arab/barber by blood was was extremely outspoken about his proud French identity. Rumors that his father fought as a pro-French soldier (harki$ during the Algerian civil war made him acceptable even to the le pen wing of French society.
    Of course, all hinge can be taken too far. We got French guys who add value? Let's get Mauritanian and tongolese guys, too! And the fight to find further reaches and further (cheaper) guys led to the madness were now in where no one is local and identity is dead

    The particular guy, Gaza, was the real deal. Amazing pitch presence, showmanship etc, The particular guy, Gaza, was the real deal. Amazing pitch presence, showmanship etc, he put butts in the seats. His coup de grace was when a rowdy fan with pitchside seats talked shit, and so gaza performed a flawlessly executed karate jump kick right into the guy.

    This you mean – Eric Cantona?

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    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
    Yes, a strange conflation of Cantona with Paul 'Gazza' Gascoigne who was as English as fish and chips. Cantona was bought from Premiership rival Leeds (with whom he'd just won the title, although he wasn't yet a star player).

    One striking feature of watching footage of football before the Premiership league exploded in international popularity and became saturated with money from satellite/cable TV rights is the hairstyles of the players. With some exceptions, they didn't look much different from the man in the street. Professional stylists really do earn their corn!

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  43. @Spud Boy
    I've wondered for a while now how European soccer fans can claim any sense of pride while watching a bunch of black guys from Nigeria run around with their team colors on.

    An excellent point and one reason why clubs are now investing heavily in trying to bring through local talent.

    The counterpoint is about off-field commercial exploitation. One way for savvy clubs unlikely to challenge for silverware in England, or from countries with tiny TV markets, to boost earnings is to sign players from particular places. A good example might be Shunsuke Nakamura. The Wikipedia entry includes

    “ The deal with Celtic was completed on 29 July 2005 for a reported transfer fee of £2.5 million,[45] although Strachan has claimed the actual fee was far lower.[48] In welcoming Nakamura to the club, Strachan stated that Nakamura “has got imagination and he sees passes other people can’t see.”[45] Part of the deal also involved Celtic securing the player’s image rights, with a view to enhancing the club’s profile and merchandising sales in the Far East.”

    Note that Nakamura was a great player and Celtic is a massive club caught in a small league but with fairly regular exposure to European competition. Signings of Far Eastern footballers by some English clubs may have less to do with their ability than their appeal in unlocking access to markets for merchandise.

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    • Replies: @Brutusale
    The friend of a friend is one of the principals (a "family" business in both senses) in Twins Enterprises, the official cap supplier to MLB.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%2747_(brand)

    When the Red $ox signed Daisuke Matsuzaka in 2007, my buddy's friend said that they had a contract kick in to ship 75,000 Red $ox caps to Japan!
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  44. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous-antimarxist
    Hudson,

    On a happier note you should be proud that TCU came back strong and beat Stanford in the 4th quarter. Perhaps because the Stanford band insisted in engaging in some lame SJW trolling of the fans.

    Stanford Band Mocks Border Wall, Whataburger During Alamo Bowl Halftime Show
    http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2017/12/30/stanford-band-mocks-border-wall-whataburger-alamo-bowl-halftime-show/

    The band opened the show, entitled “Texas: Too Big to Fail?” by claiming the show was sponsored by the White House Press Office. After swarming onto the field, the band quickly assembled the words “Fake” and “News.”

    As the show’s announcer read some “fun facts” claiming that Texans rank last in state pride and that “Texas is really, really, small,” the band formed the word “TEX.”

    The announcer then said, “If you tried to build a fifty-foot wall along the entire southern border, the cost of it could only pay for the tuition of about 20 million college students.” The boos quickly began.
     

    “The announcer then said, “If you tried to build a fifty-foot wall along the entire southern border, the cost of it could only pay for the tuition of about 20 million college students.” The boos quickly began.”

    Imagine the savings if we didn’t have a space program or cancelled the interstate highway system! Rainbows for everyone.

    Some things are worth spending money on.

    Imagine the racial harmony that would break out if the kinds of private schools these Stanford guys went to as kids so they wouldn’t have to be around blacks and Hispanics were banned.

    Imagine a world where Stanford guys could spend thousands of dollars on test prep and be awarded their rightful place at Harvard instead of being stuck at Stanford.

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  45. I’ve never been interested in team sports, but I do have regional loyalty. I tend to root for Alabamians in showbiz and the arts, like Hank Williams in music, and actors like Wayne Rogers, Dean Jones, R. G. Armstrong, Kate Jackson, Michael Rooker, and George Goober “Goob” Lindsey. A disproportionate number of famous Alabamians are/were homosexuals, like Jim Nabors, Truman Capote, Fanny Flagg, and cartoonist Howard Cruse. (Tallulah Bankhead described herself as “ambisextrous”.)

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    • Replies: @Cortes
    And the most famous person from Alabama was called “Scout.”
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  46. @Jonathan Mason

    For example, the soccer World Cup is immensely popular because it’s nationalistic, but the same limited number of countries always win.
     
    True, and yet in many respects the whole world is rooting for competitive minnows like the USA to upset the applecart, because it would be good for the sport overall. Why should Brazil, Germany, Italy, Spain get to win every time, with Argentina, France, and England only winning with home advantage, and the rest of the world never getting beyond a semifinal?

    It is a bit like health care. The whole world would like Americans to join the nations that have affordable health care, but Americans are so firm in their belief that the poor must make sacrifices to help the rich that it will never happen.

    However, USA are out of the next World Cup after their defeat by Trinidad and Tobago in the final qualification match, and even with a fearless President promising to have everyone beautifully covered with affordable health insurance, the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting sicker.

    Americans learned that there was nothing affordable or caring about this healthcare. Either nationalize it or not, don’t force purchase of “insurance” that should no longer be necessary. Plus they know it’ll turn into yet another social experimentation branch for leftists to use against them. So I have to wait for that freak to get a sex change or reattached foreskin to make it more fun at the bath house before I get my kidney care? And half of us don’t want to have our money paying for killing in the womb already, but the leftists will be strangling 6 month olds and having health care pay for it just to spite the conservative half of the country (i.e. bake the damned cake!). And if my politics aren’t proper, I get a mark and get last in line? Americans also know innovation will die and freeze the country in the year it all got nationalized, as other countries only advance as the USA makes innovations. Don’t get me started about the VA. Seeing my veteran older relatives getting Blue Cross and using private health care instead of the VA (as I also do), that tells me all I need to know. Americans also see how countries with gov’t health care have that become a political football that skews elections and marks a fiscally responsible party as heartless and the Santa Claus party as caring and compassionate. The poor already have Medicaid and the right to treatment regardless of ability to pay, so nice try but that dog won’t hunt.

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    • Agree: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Anon
    "The poor already have Medicaid and the right to treatment regardless of ability to pay, so nice try but that dog won’t hunt."

    That's not correct. It's a common GOPe talking point, but it ignores real world conditions. Medicaid doesn't include everyone who is poor, and I would hardly call ER treatment adequate medical treatment. Try it sometime if you disagree; they will do the bare minimum, often foregoing diagnostic tests to save money - not to mention that ERs aren't set up to provide many kinds of treatments. Further, before the ACA, private doctors absolutely could turn you down for not having health insurance (I wouldn't doubt they still could).

    We should just nationalize the system as Japan has and be done with it. If you're worried about the cost, work on lowering immigration and raise the minimum wage, then divert social spending savings to healthcare + have the government negotiate costs down; works fine for the world's highest IQ country.

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  47. @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Internationalization of team sports has gotten dull. Nationalization, too. Perhaps the future belongs to the entrepreneur who figures out how to make regionalization work.
     
    The problem with regionalization in a borderless world is that every region gets internationalized sooner or later so your region isn't particularly distinct. Sure a Wyoming-only team will be pretty damn white and even within whites probably somewhat ethnically distinct. But a California-only basketball team vs Virginia-only basketball team will still just be a bunch of black guys.

    I’d much rather root for professional teams of players who grew up in my part of the country, not to mention in other countries.
     
    I'm not so sure of that. If a professional football team from Minnesota filled with a bunch of whites (except DBs and RB, of course, even MN will use blacks from Mpls) went up against a pro team from Virginia (my area) with almost all blacks from Richmond and the Virginia Beach area, I (and many, if not most, whites) would route for the Minnesota team. (The opposite would likely be true for many blacks living in MN. It's not about hating other races; it's about supporting your own.)

    The same would be true for other sports. In the Olympics, I know a lot of whites who route for European basketball teams because they're a bunch of white guys. Certainly Mexican-Americans route for the Mexican team in soccer.

    This is one of the weaknesses of Steve's Citizen-state idea vs a Nationstate. Under Citizenism theory, I should feel more of a connection to my fellow black Virginian than a white Califorian. But I don't. I have far more in common (culturally, genetically, etc.) with an average white guy from L.A. than I do with an average black guy from Richmond. The same is true if we move to the international level. I have more in common with the average white German or Scotsman than I do with the average black or Mestizo American. (And, yeah, I've lived in Germany so I know of what I speak. And, btw, language isn't even an issue because Germans all speak english though they do appreciate it when you speak some german.)

    Of course, I have much more in common with the average white American than I do the average white German, so location and history matter, just not as much genetics and culture.

    The label of "American" or "Virginian" doesn't magically make people of different races, cultures and religions feel like they're part of the same team. Sure, living in the same area means that you have some things in common, but dealing with DC traffic or having eaten at the same restaurant doesn't compare to have a shared family and culture.

    I got banned from commenting on the UK Telegraph site when I said that, if there was a sporting competition between someone born in England to Somali parents and someone born in Australia to English parents, I’d support the Aussie, because shared ancestry and culture is far, far more important than shared citizenship.

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    • Replies: @sb
    I've seen an example of what you are talking about in the womens sprint hurdles track event with the Aussie born daughter of Brits Sally Pearson vs the African American who they gave UK passport to Tiffany Porter

    Most Brits - but I think not all - cheer for Porter simply because she has GB after her name
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  48. Related, an interesting article in the FT last week on China’s attempt to build a national ice hockey team for the winter Olympics they’ll be hosting in the future.

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  49. For example, the soccer World Cup is immensely popular because it’s nationalistic, but the same limited number of countries always win.

    I’m not sure what lesson you think you got from this, but as a soccer follower, what I see is that the countries that keep winning the World Cup either have rich, professional, (and globalized,) leagues (Germany, Spain, Italy) OR all of their best players play in these (to them) foreign leagues (Brazil and Argentina.) At first glance, England may seem like an exception to this rule, given that the quality of their league is at par with the Spanish, Italian, and German leagues. But then one notices that the quality of the English players is lower than that of these other countries. The best German or Spanish players also happen to be among the best in their respective leagues, while foreigners easily dominate natives in the EPL, and have been doing so for at least a couple of decades.

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  50. @syonredux

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.
     
    There's also the possibility of rape by a Black GI. Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.

    Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.

    It would have been rather easy in those days to pin any crime (including rape) on a black and have everyone believe you. Numbers are believable only in a system that isn’t rigged.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.

    It would have been rather easy in those days to pin any crime (including rape) on a black and have everyone believe you. Numbers are believable only in a system that isn’t rigged.
     
    Dunno. Blacks are quite violent:

    There are dramatic race differences in crime rates. Asians have the lowest rates, followed by whites, and then Hispanics. Blacks have notably high crime rates. This pattern holds true for virtually all crime categories and for virtually all age groups.
    In 2013, a black was six times more likely than a non-black to commit murder, and 12 times more likely to murder someone of another race than to be murdered by someone of another race..

    In 2013, of the approximately 660,000 crimes of interracial violence that involved blacks and whites, blacks were the perpetrators 85 percent of the time. This meant a black person was 27 times more likely to attack a white person than vice versa. A Hispanic was eight times more likely to attack a white person than vice versa.
    In 2014 in New York City, a black was 31 times more likely than a white to be arrested for murder, and a Hispanic was 12.4 times more likely. For the crime of “shooting” — defined as firing a bullet that hits someone — a black was 98.4 times more likely than a white to be arrested, and a Hispanic was 23.6 times more likely.
    If New York City were all white, the murder rate would drop by 91 percent, the robbery rate by 81 percent, and the shootings rate by 97 percent.
    In an all-white Chicago, murder would decline 90 percent, rape by 81 percent, and robbery by 90 percent.

     
    https://www.amren.com/archives/reports/the-color-of-crime-2016-revised-edition/

    And then there's the Black fondness for sexually assaulting White women:

    In Table 42, entitled "Personal crimes of violence, 2005, percent distribution of single-offender victimizations, based on race of victims, by type of crime and perceived race of offender," we learn that there were 111,590 white victims and 36,620 black victims of rape or sexual assault in 2005. (The number of rapes is not distinguished from those of sexual assaults; it is maddening that sexual assault, an ill-defined category that covers various types of criminal acts ranging from penetration to inappropriate touching, is conflated with the more specific crime of rape.) In the 111,590 cases in which the victim of rape or sexual assault was white, 44.5 percent of the offenders were white, and 33.6 percent of the offenders were black. In the 36,620 cases in which the victim of rape or sexual assault was black, 100 percent of the offenders were black, and 0.0 percent of the offenders were white. The table explains that 0.0 percent means that there were under 10 incidents nationally.

    The table does not gives statistics for Hispanic victims and offenders. But the bottom line on interracial white/black and black/white rape is clear:

    In the United States in 2005, 37,460 white females were sexually assaulted or raped by a black man, while between zero and ten black females were sexually assaulted or raped by a white man.

    What this means is that every day in the United States, over one hundred white women are raped or sexually assaulted by a black man.

     

    http://archive.frontpagemag.com/readArticle.aspx?ARTID=26368



    So, maybe the stats for WW2 were puffed-up a tad, but probably not by much...
    , @Alden
    Surely the women raped noticed whether the rapists were White or Black?

    And if there were a pregnancy resulting from the rape it’s obvious.

    Anthony Burgess’s wife was horrifically raped by American soldiers during the war. She had medical problems the rest of her life because of that rape.

    unlike car theft or burglary. Rape is a crime where the victim can definitively describe the criminal.

    Of all the dumb, dumber and dumbest liberal ways to deny black crime, claiming rape victims don’t describe the rapists is the dumbest I have ever heard.
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  51. @peterike
    Sportsball really has been a devastating corrosive to white populations globally, especially the men, turning them into slavish Negro lovers.

    My second act as Dictator of America will be to segregate sportsball and eliminate much of it entirely. My first act, of course, is removing the Zeroth Amendment Poem from the Statue of Liberty. My third act is dynamiting the Lincoln Memorial. Then I'll get around to some other stuff.

    For the love of all that’s holy Steve would you please adopt the Vox Day football rule and spam/ban/emulsify commenters who feel the need to tell us how much they hate sports WHILE COMMENTING ON SPORTS THREADS! For God’s sake man, I don’t care for golf course design or any of the swarthy minority groups that inhabit LA, thus, I stay off those threads. Take your gamma secret kingship elsewhere and let us proles have our football!!!!!

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  52. In Siena Italy they have a bareback horserace dating back to at least 17th century where city districts compete against each other. It’s enormously passionate even though neither the horses or the jockeys have anything to do with the districts. Horses are drawn at random lottery, jockeys are paid outsiders and are widely distrusted and called assasins. Hitting other horses and jockeys with a stick made of ox penis is allowed and so is bribery. Same jockeys compete for different district each race so do the horses. Still they root for their district, their colors, their symbol with passion that is hard to believe if you have not seen it. It’s the logical endpoint of all commercial sports, though Palio doesn’t make money for the winners, only glory. Rather it’s very expensive to win because you need to bribe other jockeys, it’s essential part of the play. If your jockey is does poorly he may be suspected of being on the pay of others and might be attacked by a mob

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/italy/1405644/Six-arrested-for-attacking-Palio-jockey-who-defected.html

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/palio-clip-losing-jockeys-are-787724

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  53. @peterike
    Sportsball really has been a devastating corrosive to white populations globally, especially the men, turning them into slavish Negro lovers.

    My second act as Dictator of America will be to segregate sportsball and eliminate much of it entirely. My first act, of course, is removing the Zeroth Amendment Poem from the Statue of Liberty. My third act is dynamiting the Lincoln Memorial. Then I'll get around to some other stuff.

    7 peterike > Sportsball really has been a devastating corrosive to white populations globally, especially the men, turning them into slavish Negro lovers.

    you can’t turn a moth into afreethinker, peterike

    And of course, the moths always blame the Jews for having noticed how profitable it is to turn on a light

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  54. @Cortes
    I suspect that the “quickness” referred to is primarily in game awareness, which in old football money was the cliche that “the first five yards is in your head.” Sedentary lifestyles and the proliferation of computers and gadgets in western countries means that, increasingly, scouts are looking to unearth gems in places where unregulated street play is the norm. The mining vocabulary is deliberate: the original giants of Spanish football, Athletic Bilbao, was famed for the size and quality of its “cantera” or quarry where it could find the next cohort of star players.

    For this reason most clubs have now established links with “feeder” clubs in developing countries or built up “academies” to try to nurture local talent.

    Finally, the graph accompanying the article doesn’t tell the whole story about Scottish players in the top English league in the period up to about 1990. Almost invariably the best and biggest teams lifting silverware had a Scottish core including key “superstars” in today’s terms. Possibly the most famous example was the stellar Liverpool of the late 1970s-mid 1980s for whom Dalglish was “King Kenny”, Souness was club captain and Hansen the classiest defender. The fall off in talent being brought through in Scotland was shameful; the principal culprits were, in my opinion, short-termist morons focused on their own individual career stats than on the healthy progression of the organisation and sport. Thankfully many more youngsters are coming through since about 2010 and are being given a decent amount of game time.

    teams lifting silverware

    Why do the last hours of the Clinton Administration 17 years ago suddenly come to mind?

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  55. There was one season in the mid-1950s in which every goal in the NHL was scored by a Canadian. It was the only such season in the league’s history. I don’t remember if the records went by birthplace or citizenship. I think one non-Canadian got an assist that year,

    This was almost 40 years after the first club outside Canada won the Stanley Cup, in 1917. Did anyone celebrate the centennial of this? I ask people I meet from that city about it, and they invariably have had no clue.

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Well considering that city has never had an NHL team, I'm not surprised no one cares.
    , @flyingtiger
    My Strat-O-Matic hockey team was named after them. At least I care.
    , @ganderson
    Reg- the NHL was unofficially closed to Americans in the 50's and 60's. Of course, with only six teams there weren't many jobs.

    The 1960 US Olympic team had a number of great players; John Mayasich, Billy Cleary, Jack Kirrane, Jack McCartan, Dick Meredith just to name a few- only Tommy Williams had any kind of career in the bigs. Cleary and Mayasich didn't even try- they knew the game was rigged.

    Even US college hockey had a LOT of Canucks- the Cornell team that won in 1970 was 100% Canadian. Denver and North Dakota were notorious for their rosters full of 28 year olds from Alberta and Saskatchewan. Three things changed all that: the Great Expansion of the NHL in 1967- suddenly there was a need for a LOT more players; the creation of the WHA in 1972- same thing, with the addition of foreign players like Ulf Nilsson and Anders Hedberg; and the U of Minnesota winning a national championship in 1974 with a roster of not just all Americans, but 100% Minnesotans.

    Many give the 1980 team credit for the opening up of big league hockey to Americans, but they were the beneficiaries of that process rather than the creators. Lots of guys from that team had good NHL careers- Broten, Ramsey, Christian, Johnson, had pretty long careers (doing this from memory) and a number of others had some significant minutes. Jack O'Callahan might have been a star if not for injuries.

    After that Olympics the NHL became internationalized- including eventually, the Eastern Bloc countries. I've long been an opponent of open borders, but I'd make an exception for hockey players (and their hot wives and girlfriends! )
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  56. Of all 15 leagues listed, the NHL had both the worst performing “nationals” (Canadians went from 97% to 46% of players from 1960-2017), and the best performing”foreigners” (Americans went from 2% to 27%).

    The remaining 27% were all Europeans (mostly Swedes, Czechs, Finns and Russians), making the NHL the whitest of any of the leagues listed by a wide margin.

    More than half of all Americans in the NHL have been from just 3 states: Minnesota, Michigan and Massachusetts. It’s a bit surprising that Mass. would beat neighboring New York State, considering NY has almost triple the population and 3 NHL teams.

    In Canada, Ontario has by far the most NHL players; Quebec is somewhat underrepresented, and Saskatchewan has the most per capita.

    There’s some evidence that grassroots hockey in the US is breaking out of its Upper Midwest/New England ghetto though, with the advent of post-Gretzky Sunbelt phenoms like Auston Matthews.

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  57. @syonredux

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.
     
    There's also the possibility of rape by a Black GI. Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.

    What’s the source for that? Not doubting you, of course, but I’m wondering whether it comes from one of David Irving’s books.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    What’s the source for that? Not doubting you, of course, but I’m wondering whether it comes from one of David Irving’s books.
     
    The data come from Robert J Lilly

    There were about 700,000 black soldiers in the United States forces in World War II out of a total of more than 10 million men and women who served. Mr. Lilly said about 160,000 black soldiers passed through England to the European theater, compared with several million whites.
     

    Black soldiers made up more than 40 percent of the total accused of sex crimes, and they were convicted in two-thirds of the cases; white soldiers were convicted at a 40 percent rate.
     
    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/07/us/when-black-soldiers-were-hanged-a-war-s-footnote.html


    Lilly, being a good liberal, blames racism. I'm much less certain. For example, Black servicemen account for a disproportionate percentage of the of the rapes committed by US troops in Okinawa. And then there are inter-racial rape stats in the USA:


    In the United States in 2005, 37,460 white females were sexually assaulted or raped by a black man, while between zero and ten black females were sexually assaulted or raped by a white man.

    What this means is that every day in the United States, over one hundred white women are raped or sexually assaulted by a black man.
     

    http://archive.frontpagemag.com/readArticle.aspx?ARTID=26368
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  58. From 1950 through 1965 the NBA used a territorial draft system. A team could select a player from any school within a 50 mile radius of its city in lieu of its first round pick. Players selected this way included Wilt Chamberlain, Oscar Robertson, and Jerry Lucas.

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    The NBA bent its own rule so the Warriors could choose Wilt, since Kansas is obviously more than 50 miles from Philadelphia. However, they allowed it because he went to HS in Philly.

    Another player chosen this way was Bill Bradley. He was eligible for both the Knicks and 76ers, but the Knicks had first rights because they had the higher draft pick. The 76ers had to "settle" for Billy Cunningham.

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  59. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @mts1
    Americans learned that there was nothing affordable or caring about this healthcare. Either nationalize it or not, don't force purchase of "insurance" that should no longer be necessary. Plus they know it'll turn into yet another social experimentation branch for leftists to use against them. So I have to wait for that freak to get a sex change or reattached foreskin to make it more fun at the bath house before I get my kidney care? And half of us don't want to have our money paying for killing in the womb already, but the leftists will be strangling 6 month olds and having health care pay for it just to spite the conservative half of the country (i.e. bake the damned cake!). And if my politics aren't proper, I get a mark and get last in line? Americans also know innovation will die and freeze the country in the year it all got nationalized, as other countries only advance as the USA makes innovations. Don't get me started about the VA. Seeing my veteran older relatives getting Blue Cross and using private health care instead of the VA (as I also do), that tells me all I need to know. Americans also see how countries with gov't health care have that become a political football that skews elections and marks a fiscally responsible party as heartless and the Santa Claus party as caring and compassionate. The poor already have Medicaid and the right to treatment regardless of ability to pay, so nice try but that dog won't hunt.

    “The poor already have Medicaid and the right to treatment regardless of ability to pay, so nice try but that dog won’t hunt.”

    That’s not correct. It’s a common GOPe talking point, but it ignores real world conditions. Medicaid doesn’t include everyone who is poor, and I would hardly call ER treatment adequate medical treatment. Try it sometime if you disagree; they will do the bare minimum, often foregoing diagnostic tests to save money – not to mention that ERs aren’t set up to provide many kinds of treatments. Further, before the ACA, private doctors absolutely could turn you down for not having health insurance (I wouldn’t doubt they still could).

    We should just nationalize the system as Japan has and be done with it. If you’re worried about the cost, work on lowering immigration and raise the minimum wage, then divert social spending savings to healthcare + have the government negotiate costs down; works fine for the world’s highest IQ country.

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    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    You clearly know very little about minority use if the healthcare system in the US.
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  60. Larger recruitment catchments are most useful when natural talent is most valuable and rare genetic prodigies from all over can be concentrated, displacing more average local players. Increasingly sports science has been closing the gap between the most talented by physical differences between players and making it more about physicality and endurance over skill. Theoretically this should open up opportunities for teams to recruit cheaper local players with less competitive consequence.

    This is, at least, the situation in soccer. Thus why Iceland were able to produce a team that was able to take on countries with populations orders of magnitude their size. They engaged in a decade long project to get every boy playing to identify talent and used sports science to it’s fullest to make them as fit as any of their opponents.

    It doesn’t mean that talent or supreme players on another level don’t matter, just they matter less than they once did.

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  61. “a sport where national borders can seem largely fluid”

    As if it was a fact of nature. The reason is the Bosman ruling.

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  62. @Jonathan Mason

    But it’s harder to really give a crap about “local” teams if the only thing local about them is the stadium they play in.
     
    I think when you are young, there is a natural tendency to want to identify oneself with something bigger and more powerful away from the family, and to idolize athletes who have perfected their skills in a sport that you like to play for recreation, but could never play professionally.

    But when you grow up this fades away, though even if you move to a different part of the world you may still follow the results and match reports and get a little rush of adrenaline if the team is successful.

    But, yes, the connection between the team and the fans is less if they are not part of the same community.

    The English Premier League is now marketing itself more with worldwide TV audiences in mind than to local communities. A small number of about half a dozen super teams from London and Manchester dominate all the competitions and have the money to bring in some of the best players in the world.

    Local teams like Burnley do get a share of the TV money, but they are mainly there to play the role of the Washington Generals, and are not supposed to win trophies like Leicester City did two years ago in one of the biggest upsets in sporting history.

    American hipsters talk about Liverpool like it’s the 1970s, they don’t get that everything ‘authentic’ they associate with Liverpool was built by people they’d call ‘racist’ in a second and that the modern team is as much an amorous global corporation as Starbucks.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    American hipsters talk about Liverpool like it’s the 1970s, they don’t get that everything ‘authentic’ they associate with Liverpool was built by people they’d call ‘racist’ in a second
     
    The Seventies, or much earlier?

    America's infatuation with Liverpool was a Merseybeat era thing as far as I know.

    At any rate, that's true of everything hipsters like.
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  63. @Numinous

    Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.
     
    It would have been rather easy in those days to pin any crime (including rape) on a black and have everyone believe you. Numbers are believable only in a system that isn't rigged.

    Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.

    It would have been rather easy in those days to pin any crime (including rape) on a black and have everyone believe you. Numbers are believable only in a system that isn’t rigged.

    Dunno. Blacks are quite violent:

    There are dramatic race differences in crime rates. Asians have the lowest rates, followed by whites, and then Hispanics. Blacks have notably high crime rates. This pattern holds true for virtually all crime categories and for virtually all age groups.
    In 2013, a black was six times more likely than a non-black to commit murder, and 12 times more likely to murder someone of another race than to be murdered by someone of another race..

    In 2013, of the approximately 660,000 crimes of interracial violence that involved blacks and whites, blacks were the perpetrators 85 percent of the time. This meant a black person was 27 times more likely to attack a white person than vice versa. A Hispanic was eight times more likely to attack a white person than vice versa.
    In 2014 in New York City, a black was 31 times more likely than a white to be arrested for murder, and a Hispanic was 12.4 times more likely. For the crime of “shooting” — defined as firing a bullet that hits someone — a black was 98.4 times more likely than a white to be arrested, and a Hispanic was 23.6 times more likely.
    If New York City were all white, the murder rate would drop by 91 percent, the robbery rate by 81 percent, and the shootings rate by 97 percent.
    In an all-white Chicago, murder would decline 90 percent, rape by 81 percent, and robbery by 90 percent.

    https://www.amren.com/archives/reports/the-color-of-crime-2016-revised-edition/

    And then there’s the Black fondness for sexually assaulting White women:

    In Table 42, entitled “Personal crimes of violence, 2005, percent distribution of single-offender victimizations, based on race of victims, by type of crime and perceived race of offender,” we learn that there were 111,590 white victims and 36,620 black victims of rape or sexual assault in 2005. (The number of rapes is not distinguished from those of sexual assaults; it is maddening that sexual assault, an ill-defined category that covers various types of criminal acts ranging from penetration to inappropriate touching, is conflated with the more specific crime of rape.) In the 111,590 cases in which the victim of rape or sexual assault was white, 44.5 percent of the offenders were white, and 33.6 percent of the offenders were black. In the 36,620 cases in which the victim of rape or sexual assault was black, 100 percent of the offenders were black, and 0.0 percent of the offenders were white. The table explains that 0.0 percent means that there were under 10 incidents nationally.

    The table does not gives statistics for Hispanic victims and offenders. But the bottom line on interracial white/black and black/white rape is clear:

    In the United States in 2005, 37,460 white females were sexually assaulted or raped by a black man, while between zero and ten black females were sexually assaulted or raped by a white man.

    What this means is that every day in the United States, over one hundred white women are raped or sexually assaulted by a black man.

    http://archive.frontpagemag.com/readArticle.aspx?ARTID=26368

    So, maybe the stats for WW2 were puffed-up a tad, but probably not by much…

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    • Replies: @Alden
    Numinous is just another brainwashed liberal. He is so brainwashed that blacks don’t really commit the crimes for which they are convicted that he denies that a crime victim who can actually see the criminal reports the wrong race in the description

    As if a woman couldn’t see the man who raped her.
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  64. @Henry's Cat
    What's the source for that? Not doubting you, of course, but I'm wondering whether it comes from one of David Irving's books.

    What’s the source for that? Not doubting you, of course, but I’m wondering whether it comes from one of David Irving’s books.

    The data come from Robert J Lilly

    There were about 700,000 black soldiers in the United States forces in World War II out of a total of more than 10 million men and women who served. Mr. Lilly said about 160,000 black soldiers passed through England to the European theater, compared with several million whites.

    Black soldiers made up more than 40 percent of the total accused of sex crimes, and they were convicted in two-thirds of the cases; white soldiers were convicted at a 40 percent rate.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/07/us/when-black-soldiers-were-hanged-a-war-s-footnote.html

    Lilly, being a good liberal, blames racism. I’m much less certain. For example, Black servicemen account for a disproportionate percentage of the of the rapes committed by US troops in Okinawa. And then there are inter-racial rape stats in the USA:

    In the United States in 2005, 37,460 white females were sexually assaulted or raped by a black man, while between zero and ten black females were sexually assaulted or raped by a white man.

    What this means is that every day in the United States, over one hundred white women are raped or sexually assaulted by a black man.

    http://archive.frontpagemag.com/readArticle.aspx?ARTID=26368

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    The 1995 Okinawa rape incident took place on September 4, 1995, when three American U.S. servicemen – U.S. Navy Seaman Marcus Gill and U.S. Marines Rodrico Harp and Kendrick Ledet, who were all serving at Camp Hansen on Okinawa – rented a van and kidnapped a 12-year-old Japanese girl. They beat her, duct-taped her eyes and mouth shut, and bound her hands. Gill and Harp then raped her, while Ledet claimed he only pretended to do so out of fear of Gill.

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1995_Okinawa_rape_incident

    The servicemen:


    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/04/27/article-2136025-12CBD1A0000005DC-41_458x175.jpg
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  65. @syonredux

    That being the case, it is quite possible that he is actually an African-American, as there were quite a few in England at that time serving in World War II.
     
    In that case, his African-American Dad probably wasn't very African.

    In that case, his African-American Dad probably wasn’t very African.

    Hard to say. How African is Meghan Merkle’s mother? Enough to be called African-American, surely.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Hard to say. How African is Meghan Merkle’s mother? Enough to be called African-American, surely.
     
    Miss Markle's had a wee bit of plastic surgery.....plus the standard hair weave + straightening combo

    https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/130/590x/Meghan-Markle-plastic-surgery-832933.jpg

    And we can probably assume that her mother is probably somewhere in the 20% range in terms of European ancestry (approx 20% being roughly average for Black Americans)
    , @ben tillman
    Wow. The one on the right looks like Lane Kiffin.
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  66. @syonredux

    What’s the source for that? Not doubting you, of course, but I’m wondering whether it comes from one of David Irving’s books.
     
    The data come from Robert J Lilly

    There were about 700,000 black soldiers in the United States forces in World War II out of a total of more than 10 million men and women who served. Mr. Lilly said about 160,000 black soldiers passed through England to the European theater, compared with several million whites.
     

    Black soldiers made up more than 40 percent of the total accused of sex crimes, and they were convicted in two-thirds of the cases; white soldiers were convicted at a 40 percent rate.
     
    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/07/us/when-black-soldiers-were-hanged-a-war-s-footnote.html


    Lilly, being a good liberal, blames racism. I'm much less certain. For example, Black servicemen account for a disproportionate percentage of the of the rapes committed by US troops in Okinawa. And then there are inter-racial rape stats in the USA:


    In the United States in 2005, 37,460 white females were sexually assaulted or raped by a black man, while between zero and ten black females were sexually assaulted or raped by a white man.

    What this means is that every day in the United States, over one hundred white women are raped or sexually assaulted by a black man.
     

    http://archive.frontpagemag.com/readArticle.aspx?ARTID=26368

    The 1995 Okinawa rape incident took place on September 4, 1995, when three American U.S. servicemen – U.S. Navy Seaman Marcus Gill and U.S. Marines Rodrico Harp and Kendrick Ledet, who were all serving at Camp Hansen on Okinawa – rented a van and kidnapped a 12-year-old Japanese girl. They beat her, duct-taped her eyes and mouth shut, and bound her hands. Gill and Harp then raped her, while Ledet claimed he only pretended to do so out of fear of Gill.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1995_Okinawa_rape_incident

    The servicemen:

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    The Katsuyama killing incident in 1945 was a killing of three African American Marines by Okinawans from the Katsuyama village near Nago, Okinawa, after the Battle of Okinawa, shortly before the end of the war in the Pacific. Many years later some of the villagers confessed that every weekend three black United States Marines had allegedly been visiting the village around that time and every time they violently took the village women into the hills with them and raped them. When the Marines started to confidently carry out their weekly ritual unarmed, the villagers reportedly overwhelmed the men one time and killed all three.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1945_Katsuyama_killing_incident
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  67. @syonredux

    The 1995 Okinawa rape incident took place on September 4, 1995, when three American U.S. servicemen – U.S. Navy Seaman Marcus Gill and U.S. Marines Rodrico Harp and Kendrick Ledet, who were all serving at Camp Hansen on Okinawa – rented a van and kidnapped a 12-year-old Japanese girl. They beat her, duct-taped her eyes and mouth shut, and bound her hands. Gill and Harp then raped her, while Ledet claimed he only pretended to do so out of fear of Gill.

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1995_Okinawa_rape_incident

    The servicemen:


    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/04/27/article-2136025-12CBD1A0000005DC-41_458x175.jpg

    The Katsuyama killing incident in 1945 was a killing of three African American Marines by Okinawans from the Katsuyama village near Nago, Okinawa, after the Battle of Okinawa, shortly before the end of the war in the Pacific. Many years later some of the villagers confessed that every weekend three black United States Marines had allegedly been visiting the village around that time and every time they violently took the village women into the hills with them and raped them. When the Marines started to confidently carry out their weekly ritual unarmed, the villagers reportedly overwhelmed the men one time and killed all three.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1945_Katsuyama_killing_incident

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    • Replies: @Alden
    Good for them. Strange isn’t it? Just a year after blacks landed in Japan, the Japanese had to defend their women in the exact same way American southern Whites did.
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  68. @prosa123
    But consider the NFL: the world's richest and most successful sports league, with an effective worldwide monopoly, yet it has very few international players.

    I think they’ve handled the international side poorly, using the old NFL Europe mainly as a development league for American players. They should have recruited athletic European teens (maybe big but not first rate soccer or basketball players) and paid for them to go to high school and college in the U.S. and play football there, and then send them back to Europe to play for local teams.

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  69. @Hunsdon
    My interest in college football pretty much cratered with the demise of the SWC. As the Wik says, "For most of its history, the core members of the conference were Texas-based schools plus one in Arkansas, Rice University, Southern Methodist University, Texas A&M University, Texas Christian University, the University of Arkansas, and the University of Texas."

    The great thing about it was that most of the recruiting was in Texas, with occasional raids into Oklahoma (which is, of course, right next door). There was a sense of locality, of regionalism, that mattered to me. Sure, maybe it didn't exactly make sense to have Rice playing in the same conference as UT-Austin . . . if you looked at it from a competitive standpoint, but it did from a regional standpoint.

    Bud Adams opened my eyes to the "local" nature of NFL teams when he yanked the Oilers up and moved them to Tennessee, and with the death of the SWC (also in 1996, although you could point to Arkansas leaving in '91) any sense of regionalism just died. There was no longer (pardon my dialect) any sense of "our'n versus their'n" to be had. Was that just the sense of the times, a triumph of the neoliberal borderless world that Strobe Talbot had dreamed of for so long?

    I don't know.

    But it's harder to really give a crap about "local" teams if the only thing local about them is the stadium they play in.

    This was good, on the irrationality of NFL football fandom.

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  70. @Jonathan Mason

    In that case, his African-American Dad probably wasn’t very African.
     
    Hard to say. How African is Meghan Merkle's mother? Enough to be called African-American, surely.

    http://media.tmz.com/2016/12/27/1227-meghan-markle-and-her-mom-go-to-yoga-class-together-launch-7.jpg

    Hard to say. How African is Meghan Merkle’s mother? Enough to be called African-American, surely.

    Miss Markle’s had a wee bit of plastic surgery…..plus the standard hair weave + straightening combo

    And we can probably assume that her mother is probably somewhere in the 20% range in terms of European ancestry (approx 20% being roughly average for Black Americans)

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  71. @Opinionator
    Will a Silicon Valley “Burnley” firm ever stand up and say it only hires American citizens?

    Would that be legal?

    Well you can’t force a company to apply for an H1B visa.

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  72. @Old Palo Altan
    When I lived in Yorkshire (near Skipton) in the 1980s I often drove through Burnley. I was immediately attracted by its down-at-heel but defiant charm. The North Lancastrians are a splendidly independent and cussed bunch, and have held to their ways and their mores better than, say, the South Lancastrians around Manchester, not to mention the poor abandoned Londoners. The countryside is beautiful and largely unknown to those who live even a mere fifty miles away.
    But my real point of interest here is Paul Reaney. I find nothing online which describes the roots of his purported "blackness". If I had to guess I would say that he might have a bit of Australian aborigine in him rather than African blood.
    Can anyone help?

    But my real point of interest here is Paul Reaney. I find nothing online which describes the roots of his purported “blackness”. If I had to guess I would say that he might have a bit of Australian aborigine in him rather than African blood.
    Can anyone help?

    Here is the definite proof that Paul Reaney has some African blood. At the age of 68 he is on stage tap dancing. What more do you want?

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  73. @Reg Cæsar
    There was one season in the mid-1950s in which every goal in the NHL was scored by a Canadian. It was the only such season in the league's history. I don't remember if the records went by birthplace or citizenship. I think one non-Canadian got an assist that year,

    This was almost 40 years after the first club outside Canada won the Stanley Cup, in 1917. Did anyone celebrate the centennial of this? I ask people I meet from that city about it, and they invariably have had no clue.

    Well considering that city has never had an NHL team, I’m not surprised no one cares.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Well considering that city has never had an NHL team, I’m not surprised no one cares.
     
    Enough care about returning a certain ghetto pastime to town.

    What's so special about the NHL? What was wrong with the Pacific Coast Hockey Association?

    And who in the NHL can top this for fashion?:

    http://whl.uploads.s3.amazonaws.com/app/uploads/seattle_thunderbirds/2016/01/10141434/seattlemetro_NR015.jpg
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  74. Internationalization of team sports has gotten dull. Nationalization, too. Perhaps the future belongs to the entrepreneur who figures out how to make regionalization work.

    You’ll see “regionalization” on TV from 2 pm to 10 pm tomorrow.

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  75. Burnley has a new fan.

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    • Replies: @Cortes
    As long as he doesn’t end up being invited to the White House...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alastair_Campbell

    See also...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_Tucker

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  76. @FPD72
    From 1950 through 1965 the NBA used a territorial draft system. A team could select a player from any school within a 50 mile radius of its city in lieu of its first round pick. Players selected this way included Wilt Chamberlain, Oscar Robertson, and Jerry Lucas.

    The NBA bent its own rule so the Warriors could choose Wilt, since Kansas is obviously more than 50 miles from Philadelphia. However, they allowed it because he went to HS in Philly.

    Another player chosen this way was Bill Bradley. He was eligible for both the Knicks and 76ers, but the Knicks had first rights because they had the higher draft pick. The 76ers had to “settle” for Billy Cunningham.

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    • Replies: @FPD72
    Did they use a work around because Wilt didn’t use up his eligibility at KU, opting instead to perform for the Harlem Globetrotters for a year?
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  77. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Rumors are flying around that Trump is planning to detain domestic enemies at Guantanamo because of increased activity there. I don’t give these much credence, mainly because it doesn’t seem to have occurred to people we have unfinished business there. We still keep detainees in legal limbo at the base, and I suspect Trump wants to actually try whoever is there on charges and either give them regular prison time or release them.

    If anyone new is going to be detained at Guantanamo, it’s a lot more likely that military planners have figured that if we’re going to topple the Norks, their old mafioso government has to go somewhere–we can’t give every dictator and his cronies a peaceful retirement in Miami–so we’re going to locking them up at Guantanamo in preparation for trying them for crimes against humanity. If we let the Chinese capture them, they’ll just bribe the Chinese and be allowed to escape.

    Additionally, there’s a distinct chance we may be getting a bunch of formerly-rich Saudis. ‘Our pal’ MBS has to do something with these people after he’s tortured the shekels out of them, but he may be hesitant to just execute them all en masse, a move that will alarm the rest of his many wealthy relations. He can’t let them go free or they’ll try to assassinate him. One way to cut this complicated knot is to make a deal to send any Saudis to Guantanamo if he’s been able to gather any evidence that they’ve committed crimes of terrorism against the US, donating money, etc. That way they’re off his hands, and Trump has a lot of terrorist sponsors where he can try them for their crimes and lock them up.

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  78. @Jonathan Mason

    In that case, his African-American Dad probably wasn’t very African.
     
    Hard to say. How African is Meghan Merkle's mother? Enough to be called African-American, surely.

    http://media.tmz.com/2016/12/27/1227-meghan-markle-and-her-mom-go-to-yoga-class-together-launch-7.jpg

    Wow. The one on the right looks like Lane Kiffin.

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  79. @Anon7
    I'd be inclined to combine this story and the previous one, since it appears that 57% of jobs requiring a bachelors degree or better in Silicon Valley is held by other than US citizens.

    Instead of talent, though, they're looking for cheap labor. Do Brit soccer teams recruit from Asia and Africa to save money at a given level of talent? Are there enough good Brit soccer players to fill out their league?

    Will a Silicon Valley "Burnley" firm ever stand up and say it only hires American citizens? Are there enough Americans to fill out the valley "leagues"? Time will tell.

    Instead of talent, though, they’re looking for cheap labor. Do Brit soccer teams recruit from Asia and Africa to save money at a given level of talent? Are there enough good Brit soccer players to fill out their league?

    No, they’re recruiting superior foreigners.

    As been mentioned already the league has moved in the direction of being truly global.

    England has lots of good players but there are two problems for the league.

    1. The players aren’t good enough to sell a globalized product.
    2. The players aren’t as good as the English think. See all the failures of the national team.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Yeah, some people don't realize how popular the Premier League is in Asia. Teams have gone there to play friendlies in the off-season and played in front of huge crowds.
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  80. From 1968 to 1992 Yorkshire County Cricket club (The most successful in English First Class Cricket) insisted that all players be born within the County.

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    • Replies: @Jay r
    I thought that the Yorkshire born rule dated back to Lord Hawke in the 1800s? 1968 was the last year that Yorkshire won the championship until recruitment was expanded - so hardly a great advert for localism.
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  81. On the African American theme, I think a “Bones” McCoy-style

    “He’s African, Jim, but not as we know them” would have to apply to this prince among men:

    http://katu.com/news/offbeat/nigerian-prince-scammer-caught-in-slidell-la-not-who-youd-expect

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  82. @LondonBob
    A few years back my team were in the Premier League, like Burnley our squad was predominantly British and Irish, indeed I think we were the first team in a while to field an all British Isles XI for a Premier League game. We lacked ability but made up for it in team spirit and togetherness. Great fun to support.

    Now we are owned by the Chinese, who have a questionable relationship with Portuguese super agent Jorge Mendes. We are in the league below the Premier with a bunch of Portuguese players who should be playing at a higher level, so we win every week, but there is no heart and my interest has gone. We have some very talented young local players, but they never play. There is a balance, and hopefully with Brexit leading to restrictions on foreign players, perhaps that can be found.

    And that, along with sell-a-kidney season ticket prices, is why us plebs are bailing en masse and going to the Championship and non-league.
    Proper old-time (tedious cloggers in a potato field, sometimes, I grant you) football, warm-ish pies and Bovril. At least you can take the kids.
    Loads of people round here have ditched football entirely and switched to Rugby League. Great game, fast and tough. And again, the players are people like you and me, local, from their town, (although a heck of a lot fitter) and young lads can dream of one day following them onto the pitch.

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  83. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Old Palo Altan
    When I lived in Yorkshire (near Skipton) in the 1980s I often drove through Burnley. I was immediately attracted by its down-at-heel but defiant charm. The North Lancastrians are a splendidly independent and cussed bunch, and have held to their ways and their mores better than, say, the South Lancastrians around Manchester, not to mention the poor abandoned Londoners. The countryside is beautiful and largely unknown to those who live even a mere fifty miles away.
    But my real point of interest here is Paul Reaney. I find nothing online which describes the roots of his purported "blackness". If I had to guess I would say that he might have a bit of Australian aborigine in him rather than African blood.
    Can anyone help?

    Part Australian Aborigine with some Torres Straits admixture, likely North Queensland.
    The giveaway is the length of his fingers, and the length and shape of the last finger joints compared to the size of his hand.
    Paul comes across as calm, relaxed, and alert, generally traits of Qld Aborigines.

    He wouldn’t be the only one, plenty of Aborigines served in the AIF in the 14/18 War and WW2 and were stationed in the UK.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Thanks for the reply; nice to have my hunch ratified.
    I was going entirely on looks, but I had also noticed the relaxed and, indeed, alert manner.
    Nothing African about him at all.
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  84. @Fredrik

    Instead of talent, though, they’re looking for cheap labor. Do Brit soccer teams recruit from Asia and Africa to save money at a given level of talent? Are there enough good Brit soccer players to fill out their league?
     
    No, they're recruiting superior foreigners.

    As been mentioned already the league has moved in the direction of being truly global.

    England has lots of good players but there are two problems for the league.

    1. The players aren't good enough to sell a globalized product.
    2. The players aren't as good as the English think. See all the failures of the national team.

    Yeah, some people don’t realize how popular the Premier League is in Asia. Teams have gone there to play friendlies in the off-season and played in front of huge crowds.

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  85. @ScarletNumber
    The NBA bent its own rule so the Warriors could choose Wilt, since Kansas is obviously more than 50 miles from Philadelphia. However, they allowed it because he went to HS in Philly.

    Another player chosen this way was Bill Bradley. He was eligible for both the Knicks and 76ers, but the Knicks had first rights because they had the higher draft pick. The 76ers had to "settle" for Billy Cunningham.

    Did they use a work around because Wilt didn’t use up his eligibility at KU, opting instead to perform for the Harlem Globetrotters for a year?

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    No, I think the league just thought that Wilt would make the league more money by playing in Philly rather than in Cincinnati, who held the first pick that year. The Warriors ended up moving to San Francisco three years later anyway.
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  86. Stanton’s departure from the Marlins is yet another middle finger in Miami’s face from our erstwhile baseball franchise.

    (Our designated golden local boy, Jose Fernandez, smashed his speedboat into a rock last year. Drunk and high at the time, he killed not only himself but two of his friends with his reckless behavior.)

    In other news, a Dolphins player freaked out on the field today:

    https://nypost.com/2017/12/31/dolphins-player-leaves-field-crying-after-wild-fight/

    The Dolphins lost, as did the Canes last night.

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    • Replies: @It's All Ball Bearings
    I wish NFL would allow players to fight like NHL used to do. So the Miami player throws his helmet at no one and gets tossed? Let guys scrap for awhile. Games would be far more interesting. Who would be the NFLs Bob Probert?
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  87. @FPD72
    Did they use a work around because Wilt didn’t use up his eligibility at KU, opting instead to perform for the Harlem Globetrotters for a year?

    No, I think the league just thought that Wilt would make the league more money by playing in Philly rather than in Cincinnati, who held the first pick that year. The Warriors ended up moving to San Francisco three years later anyway.

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  88. @anon
    Part Australian Aborigine with some Torres Straits admixture, likely North Queensland.
    The giveaway is the length of his fingers, and the length and shape of the last finger joints compared to the size of his hand.
    Paul comes across as calm, relaxed, and alert, generally traits of Qld Aborigines.

    He wouldn't be the only one, plenty of Aborigines served in the AIF in the 14/18 War and WW2 and were stationed in the UK.

    Thanks for the reply; nice to have my hunch ratified.
    I was going entirely on looks, but I had also noticed the relaxed and, indeed, alert manner.
    Nothing African about him at all.

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  89. @ben tillman
    Burnley has a new fan.

    As long as he doesn’t end up being invited to the White House…

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alastair_Campbell

    See also…

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_Tucker

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    • Replies: @Cortes
    A very long entry regarding Malcolm Tucker. Perhaps best to skip to the section on

    Character creation...
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  90. @ScarletNumber
    Well considering that city has never had an NHL team, I'm not surprised no one cares.

    Well considering that city has never had an NHL team, I’m not surprised no one cares.

    Enough care about returning a certain ghetto pastime to town.

    What’s so special about the NHL? What was wrong with the Pacific Coast Hockey Association?

    And who in the NHL can top this for fashion?:

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    • Agree: flyingtiger
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  91. @Bill Jones
    From 1968 to 1992 Yorkshire County Cricket club (The most successful in English First Class Cricket) insisted that all players be born within the County.

    I thought that the Yorkshire born rule dated back to Lord Hawke in the 1800s? 1968 was the last year that Yorkshire won the championship until recruitment was expanded – so hardly a great advert for localism.

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  92. @Cortes
    As long as he doesn’t end up being invited to the White House...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alastair_Campbell

    See also...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_Tucker

    A very long entry regarding Malcolm Tucker. Perhaps best to skip to the section on

    Character creation…

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  93. College football is probably the only “major” sport where a lot of the players are relatively local, from that state or neighboring states. Pro athletes have nothing to do with the city they play in, with rare exceptions (like LeBron playing an hour from where he grew up).

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    • Replies: @Polynikes
    Probably depends on if you consider college basketball major or not. At least in the Midwest, the teams can be pretty provincial. Especially in basketball crazy Indiana, which has used that advantage to hold the record for most teams in the tournament (March madness) from one state.
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  94. @Rod1963
    The NFL is distinctly a American game and truly reflective of who we are as a people. They've tried to export it, but it doesn't take. First off you need a massive support infrastructure that goes all the way back to grade school to guide and filter prospective players.

    Then encourage a culture of violence and drug abuse in schools, make sure coaches have access to lots of PEDs to build up the players when they hit high school.

    Turn colleges into training centers for these low IQ thugs and let them run about and do as they please.

    Basically wreck the education system.

    Almost forgot, you need state buy in. Since these players are hyper violent and loaded to the gills on PED's, they tend to commit acts of rape and mayhem all out of proportion to their numbers. So the legal and judicial system has to protect the players.

    The NFL is distinctly a American game and truly reflective of who we are as a people. They’ve tried to export it, but it doesn’t take.

    For a few decades, hockey was more violent than was football. There was little problem exporting that.

    Though brawls are probably less common in Europe, and in the US, for that matter. Anyone got stats on that?

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    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    "For a few decades, hockey was more violent than was football. There was little problem exporting that."

    That's because like pretty much all the global sports, it's British in origin later tuned in Canada for local conditions.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_hockey
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  95. Internationalization of team sports has gotten dull. Nationalization, too. Perhaps the future belongs to the entrepreneur who figures out how to make regionalization work.

    There is no better place and sport in which to try this than American soccer. We are more a continent than a country, and the ideal season in one section will be atrocious in another.

    We should have northern, southern, and western leagues, all with a schedule which fits the local climate. Winter in the south, summer in the north, whenever in the west.

    This might also encourage the introduction of relegation and promotion to the US. European leagues don’t regionalize until you go down about four or five divisions. But in America, the second division would have to regionalize (e.g., as AAA-level baseball did for a century) to be cost-effective. But that complicates promotion to the top league.

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  96. @Stan Adams
    Stanton's departure from the Marlins is yet another middle finger in Miami's face from our erstwhile baseball franchise.

    (Our designated golden local boy, Jose Fernandez, smashed his speedboat into a rock last year. Drunk and high at the time, he killed not only himself but two of his friends with his reckless behavior.)

    In other news, a Dolphins player freaked out on the field today:
    https://nypost.com/2017/12/31/dolphins-player-leaves-field-crying-after-wild-fight/

    The Dolphins lost, as did the Canes last night.

    I wish NFL would allow players to fight like NHL used to do. So the Miami player throws his helmet at no one and gets tossed? Let guys scrap for awhile. Games would be far more interesting. Who would be the NFLs Bob Probert?

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    • Replies: @Catholic Philly Prole
    Haha, the NFL players abiding by an honor code of controlled violence like hockey players do largely without cheapshots, thats good for a laugh. In hockey the combatants fraternally help one another up off the ice after a scrap and have respect for one another, the Feetsballers in the NFL would be bringing shanks and Taurus 9mms out on the field in their spandex pants. Repeat after me...white man obeys rule of law.
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  97. @the one they call Desanex
    I’ve never been interested in team sports, but I do have regional loyalty. I tend to root for Alabamians in showbiz and the arts, like Hank Williams in music, and actors like Wayne Rogers, Dean Jones, R. G. Armstrong, Kate Jackson, Michael Rooker, and George Goober “Goob” Lindsey. A disproportionate number of famous Alabamians are/were homosexuals, like Jim Nabors, Truman Capote, Fanny Flagg, and cartoonist Howard Cruse. (Tallulah Bankhead described herself as “ambisextrous”.)

    And the most famous person from Alabama was called “Scout.”

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  98. @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Internationalization of team sports has gotten dull. Nationalization, too. Perhaps the future belongs to the entrepreneur who figures out how to make regionalization work.
     
    The problem with regionalization in a borderless world is that every region gets internationalized sooner or later so your region isn't particularly distinct. Sure a Wyoming-only team will be pretty damn white and even within whites probably somewhat ethnically distinct. But a California-only basketball team vs Virginia-only basketball team will still just be a bunch of black guys.

    I’d much rather root for professional teams of players who grew up in my part of the country, not to mention in other countries.
     
    I'm not so sure of that. If a professional football team from Minnesota filled with a bunch of whites (except DBs and RB, of course, even MN will use blacks from Mpls) went up against a pro team from Virginia (my area) with almost all blacks from Richmond and the Virginia Beach area, I (and many, if not most, whites) would route for the Minnesota team. (The opposite would likely be true for many blacks living in MN. It's not about hating other races; it's about supporting your own.)

    The same would be true for other sports. In the Olympics, I know a lot of whites who route for European basketball teams because they're a bunch of white guys. Certainly Mexican-Americans route for the Mexican team in soccer.

    This is one of the weaknesses of Steve's Citizen-state idea vs a Nationstate. Under Citizenism theory, I should feel more of a connection to my fellow black Virginian than a white Califorian. But I don't. I have far more in common (culturally, genetically, etc.) with an average white guy from L.A. than I do with an average black guy from Richmond. The same is true if we move to the international level. I have more in common with the average white German or Scotsman than I do with the average black or Mestizo American. (And, yeah, I've lived in Germany so I know of what I speak. And, btw, language isn't even an issue because Germans all speak english though they do appreciate it when you speak some german.)

    Of course, I have much more in common with the average white American than I do the average white German, so location and history matter, just not as much genetics and culture.

    The label of "American" or "Virginian" doesn't magically make people of different races, cultures and religions feel like they're part of the same team. Sure, living in the same area means that you have some things in common, but dealing with DC traffic or having eaten at the same restaurant doesn't compare to have a shared family and culture.

    Certain people have probably been watching how the man on the street can be made to cheer for imported ringers he has nothing in common with — in fact the ringer is antagonistic towards him when it comes down to it — by paying the ringer to wear “his” sports team’s shirt. And taking notes.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    This would appear to be a rebuttal to the post you are replying to? Please elaborate.
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  99. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Altai
    American hipsters talk about Liverpool like it's the 1970s, they don't get that everything 'authentic' they associate with Liverpool was built by people they'd call 'racist' in a second and that the modern team is as much an amorous global corporation as Starbucks.

    American hipsters talk about Liverpool like it’s the 1970s, they don’t get that everything ‘authentic’ they associate with Liverpool was built by people they’d call ‘racist’ in a second

    The Seventies, or much earlier?

    America’s infatuation with Liverpool was a Merseybeat era thing as far as I know.

    At any rate, that’s true of everything hipsters like.

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  100. OT but wouldn’t this be a real target ?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Server_farm

    Jus sayin’ .

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  101. @It's All Ball Bearings
    I wish NFL would allow players to fight like NHL used to do. So the Miami player throws his helmet at no one and gets tossed? Let guys scrap for awhile. Games would be far more interesting. Who would be the NFLs Bob Probert?

    Haha, the NFL players abiding by an honor code of controlled violence like hockey players do largely without cheapshots, thats good for a laugh. In hockey the combatants fraternally help one another up off the ice after a scrap and have respect for one another, the Feetsballers in the NFL would be bringing shanks and Taurus 9mms out on the field in their spandex pants. Repeat after me…white man obeys rule of law.

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  102. @anonymous-antimarxist
    Hudson,

    On a happier note you should be proud that TCU came back strong and beat Stanford in the 4th quarter. Perhaps because the Stanford band insisted in engaging in some lame SJW trolling of the fans.

    Stanford Band Mocks Border Wall, Whataburger During Alamo Bowl Halftime Show
    http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2017/12/30/stanford-band-mocks-border-wall-whataburger-alamo-bowl-halftime-show/

    The band opened the show, entitled “Texas: Too Big to Fail?” by claiming the show was sponsored by the White House Press Office. After swarming onto the field, the band quickly assembled the words “Fake” and “News.”

    As the show’s announcer read some “fun facts” claiming that Texans rank last in state pride and that “Texas is really, really, small,” the band formed the word “TEX.”

    The announcer then said, “If you tried to build a fifty-foot wall along the entire southern border, the cost of it could only pay for the tuition of about 20 million college students.” The boos quickly began.
     

    I apologize for my Alma Mater. Proud to say i’ve never given it a dime

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  103. @Numinous

    Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.
     
    It would have been rather easy in those days to pin any crime (including rape) on a black and have everyone believe you. Numbers are believable only in a system that isn't rigged.

    Surely the women raped noticed whether the rapists were White or Black?

    And if there were a pregnancy resulting from the rape it’s obvious.

    Anthony Burgess’s wife was horrifically raped by American soldiers during the war. She had medical problems the rest of her life because of that rape.

    unlike car theft or burglary. Rape is a crime where the victim can definitively describe the criminal.

    Of all the dumb, dumber and dumbest liberal ways to deny black crime, claiming rape victims don’t describe the rapists is the dumbest I have ever heard.

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    • Replies: @prosa123
    "Anthony Burgess’s wife was horrifically raped by American soldiers during the war. She had medical problems the rest of her life because of that rape."

    It inspired him to write A Clockwork Orange.
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  104. @Ossettian
    I got banned from commenting on the UK Telegraph site when I said that, if there was a sporting competition between someone born in England to Somali parents and someone born in Australia to English parents, I'd support the Aussie, because shared ancestry and culture is far, far more important than shared citizenship.

    I’ve seen an example of what you are talking about in the womens sprint hurdles track event with the Aussie born daughter of Brits Sally Pearson vs the African American who they gave UK passport to Tiffany Porter

    Most Brits – but I think not all – cheer for Porter simply because she has GB after her name

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    • Replies: @Triumph104
    No one gave Tiffany Porter, née Ofili, a British passport. She and her sister have a British mother (of African descent). Their father is Nigerian. By being born in the US, the sisters had dual British and American nationality at birth. They are not the descendants of US slaves.
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  105. @syonredux

    Out of the roughly ten million people who served in the US Armed Forces during WW2, around 700,000 were Black, but Blacks accounted for approx 40% of the servicemen who were charged with committing sexual offenses.

    It would have been rather easy in those days to pin any crime (including rape) on a black and have everyone believe you. Numbers are believable only in a system that isn’t rigged.
     
    Dunno. Blacks are quite violent:

    There are dramatic race differences in crime rates. Asians have the lowest rates, followed by whites, and then Hispanics. Blacks have notably high crime rates. This pattern holds true for virtually all crime categories and for virtually all age groups.
    In 2013, a black was six times more likely than a non-black to commit murder, and 12 times more likely to murder someone of another race than to be murdered by someone of another race..

    In 2013, of the approximately 660,000 crimes of interracial violence that involved blacks and whites, blacks were the perpetrators 85 percent of the time. This meant a black person was 27 times more likely to attack a white person than vice versa. A Hispanic was eight times more likely to attack a white person than vice versa.
    In 2014 in New York City, a black was 31 times more likely than a white to be arrested for murder, and a Hispanic was 12.4 times more likely. For the crime of “shooting” — defined as firing a bullet that hits someone — a black was 98.4 times more likely than a white to be arrested, and a Hispanic was 23.6 times more likely.
    If New York City were all white, the murder rate would drop by 91 percent, the robbery rate by 81 percent, and the shootings rate by 97 percent.
    In an all-white Chicago, murder would decline 90 percent, rape by 81 percent, and robbery by 90 percent.

     
    https://www.amren.com/archives/reports/the-color-of-crime-2016-revised-edition/

    And then there's the Black fondness for sexually assaulting White women:

    In Table 42, entitled "Personal crimes of violence, 2005, percent distribution of single-offender victimizations, based on race of victims, by type of crime and perceived race of offender," we learn that there were 111,590 white victims and 36,620 black victims of rape or sexual assault in 2005. (The number of rapes is not distinguished from those of sexual assaults; it is maddening that sexual assault, an ill-defined category that covers various types of criminal acts ranging from penetration to inappropriate touching, is conflated with the more specific crime of rape.) In the 111,590 cases in which the victim of rape or sexual assault was white, 44.5 percent of the offenders were white, and 33.6 percent of the offenders were black. In the 36,620 cases in which the victim of rape or sexual assault was black, 100 percent of the offenders were black, and 0.0 percent of the offenders were white. The table explains that 0.0 percent means that there were under 10 incidents nationally.

    The table does not gives statistics for Hispanic victims and offenders. But the bottom line on interracial white/black and black/white rape is clear:

    In the United States in 2005, 37,460 white females were sexually assaulted or raped by a black man, while between zero and ten black females were sexually assaulted or raped by a white man.

    What this means is that every day in the United States, over one hundred white women are raped or sexually assaulted by a black man.

     

    http://archive.frontpagemag.com/readArticle.aspx?ARTID=26368



    So, maybe the stats for WW2 were puffed-up a tad, but probably not by much...

    Numinous is just another brainwashed liberal. He is so brainwashed that blacks don’t really commit the crimes for which they are convicted that he denies that a crime victim who can actually see the criminal reports the wrong race in the description

    As if a woman couldn’t see the man who raped her.

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  106. @syonredux

    The Katsuyama killing incident in 1945 was a killing of three African American Marines by Okinawans from the Katsuyama village near Nago, Okinawa, after the Battle of Okinawa, shortly before the end of the war in the Pacific. Many years later some of the villagers confessed that every weekend three black United States Marines had allegedly been visiting the village around that time and every time they violently took the village women into the hills with them and raped them. When the Marines started to confidently carry out their weekly ritual unarmed, the villagers reportedly overwhelmed the men one time and killed all three.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1945_Katsuyama_killing_incident

    Good for them. Strange isn’t it? Just a year after blacks landed in Japan, the Japanese had to defend their women in the exact same way American southern Whites did.

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  107. @Alden
    Surely the women raped noticed whether the rapists were White or Black?

    And if there were a pregnancy resulting from the rape it’s obvious.

    Anthony Burgess’s wife was horrifically raped by American soldiers during the war. She had medical problems the rest of her life because of that rape.

    unlike car theft or burglary. Rape is a crime where the victim can definitively describe the criminal.

    Of all the dumb, dumber and dumbest liberal ways to deny black crime, claiming rape victims don’t describe the rapists is the dumbest I have ever heard.

    “Anthony Burgess’s wife was horrifically raped by American soldiers during the war. She had medical problems the rest of her life because of that rape.”

    It inspired him to write A Clockwork Orange.

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  108. @Reg Cæsar
    There was one season in the mid-1950s in which every goal in the NHL was scored by a Canadian. It was the only such season in the league's history. I don't remember if the records went by birthplace or citizenship. I think one non-Canadian got an assist that year,

    This was almost 40 years after the first club outside Canada won the Stanley Cup, in 1917. Did anyone celebrate the centennial of this? I ask people I meet from that city about it, and they invariably have had no clue.

    My Strat-O-Matic hockey team was named after them. At least I care.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    My Strat-O-Matic hockey team was named after them. At least I care.
     
    I didn't know Strat-O-Matic did hockey. I have one year and eight teams from the baseball version. One of them is the Seattle Pilots!

    I don't think Jim Bouton was included, though.
    , @ScarletNumber
    Too bad Strat sucks compared to APBA
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  109. whoah

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  110. @Reg Cæsar

    The NFL is distinctly a American game and truly reflective of who we are as a people. They've tried to export it, but it doesn't take.
     
    For a few decades, hockey was more violent than was football. There was little problem exporting that.

    Though brawls are probably less common in Europe, and in the US, for that matter. Anyone got stats on that?

    “For a few decades, hockey was more violent than was football. There was little problem exporting that.”

    That’s because like pretty much all the global sports, it’s British in origin later tuned in Canada for local conditions.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_hockey

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  111. I’m not sure of the absolute criteria, but the State of Origin Rugby League series every year in Australia between New South Wales and Queensland has some strict rules about qualification based on where the players come from. Players can never switch sides. This was introduced as Queensland didn’t have a pro competition to compete with NSW so the series had become uneven. I think Queensland have now won 9 of the last 10, so it’s not working out so well for the bigger state right now.

    International rugby has an issue with players qualifying for residency after 3 years in the countries with the big pro comps – England and France – and then playing for those countries. It’s becoming a bit farcical and the qualification period is going to be increased to 5 years, but with French clubs hiding behind coconut trees in Fiji scouting teenaged players that period won’t be long enough for the poaching to desist.

    Kilkenny are the leading Irish hurling county and I think most of that is based on homegrown talent. Which is easier to maintain in a mostly amateur competition.

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    • Replies: @anon
    The criteria get stretched a fair bit to give Qld a chance.
    As long as Queensland is winning, the crowds keep paying.
    New South Wales has produced many times more good footballers than Queensland has, no surprise when you consider they've got 3x the population, let alone the quality of the average NSW ground, compared to the average Qld goat paddock.
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  112. @Anonymous
    Certain people have probably been watching how the man on the street can be made to cheer for imported ringers he has nothing in common with -- in fact the ringer is antagonistic towards him when it comes down to it -- by paying the ringer to wear "his" sports team's shirt. And taking notes.

    This would appear to be a rebuttal to the post you are replying to? Please elaborate.

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  113. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @cowboy shaw
    I'm not sure of the absolute criteria, but the State of Origin Rugby League series every year in Australia between New South Wales and Queensland has some strict rules about qualification based on where the players come from. Players can never switch sides. This was introduced as Queensland didn't have a pro competition to compete with NSW so the series had become uneven. I think Queensland have now won 9 of the last 10, so it's not working out so well for the bigger state right now.

    International rugby has an issue with players qualifying for residency after 3 years in the countries with the big pro comps - England and France - and then playing for those countries. It's becoming a bit farcical and the qualification period is going to be increased to 5 years, but with French clubs hiding behind coconut trees in Fiji scouting teenaged players that period won't be long enough for the poaching to desist.

    Kilkenny are the leading Irish hurling county and I think most of that is based on homegrown talent. Which is easier to maintain in a mostly amateur competition.

    The criteria get stretched a fair bit to give Qld a chance.
    As long as Queensland is winning, the crowds keep paying.
    New South Wales has produced many times more good footballers than Queensland has, no surprise when you consider they’ve got 3x the population, let alone the quality of the average NSW ground, compared to the average Qld goat paddock.

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    • Replies: @sb
    I'm sure no one here cares but for the record New South Wales is 1.6 times the population of Queensland
    Your other assertions have a similar degree of accuracy
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  114. @prosa123
    But consider the NFL: the world's richest and most successful sports league, with an effective worldwide monopoly, yet it has very few international players.

    I’m of the opinion that a Boise State type school could develope a recruiting pipeline in a place like Nigeria and become a college football powerhouse.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_African-American_population

    FL, GA, TX, and CA have a combined African American population of about 11 million. How good would a college football team that got first pick from that population?

    Christian Okoye who played for the Chiefs in the early 90s came from the Igbo population in southern Nigeria.

    There are 33 million Igbo in a space a little bit larger than Maryland

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Igbo_people

    Seems like out of 33 million you might be able to find 4 guys to make up a pretty dominating defensive line, maybe a few guys with the potential to be good left tackles too, if we’re really getting greedy, maybe someone we can train to be a decent corner.

    Some interesting relevant links

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/theundefeated.com/features/from-africa-to-the-nfl-native-born-and-first-generation-players/amp/

    http://www.unz.com/article/the-iq-gap-is-no-longer-a-black-and-white-issue/

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  115. @Henry's Cat

    I have no idea why they have never had a black player.
     
    They have had, and do have black players. Here's the current squad: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burnley_F.C.#First-team_squad

    Note that Liew only writes: 'For example, the club has never signed a player from Asia or north Africa. '

    What surprised me about the piece is that Liew (who's Chinese by origin) didn't mention that Burnley's ownership is almost wholly in the hands of its directors, who are British to a man:

    https://www.burnleyfootballclub.com/club/contact/#collapse98037_98038

    Soccer has become wealthier due to TV rights, and the Premier League is shown all over the world, hence British teams with Chinese slogans on their shirts. How long English supporters will pay good money to watch non-English players remains to be seen, though pay-TV audiences are falling in the UK, helped by apps like Kodi and Ace Player which provide free streams of games.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_owners_of_English_football_clubs

    In the Premier League I counted Brighton, Chelsea, Palace, Man Utd, Swansea, Spurs and West Ham with significant Jewish ownership (US/UK/Russian), two Chinese owned clubs, another Russian (Arsenal), UAE, Thai and Indian, two Chinese, two other American.

    Some cultural imperialism – red is a lucky colour in the Far East, and Cardiff’s Chinese/Malaysian owner changed the club’s strip from blue to red, sparking huge fan protests and an eventual change back.

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  116. @Englishman Abroad
    Honourable mention must go to the Basque football teams:

    Athletic Bilbao have never been relegated from La Liga, and they boast to have never used a non-Basque player. Of course, the definition of "Basque" has been diluted, given the changing Zeitgeist and the increasing wealth bestowed by footballing success, from being genetically Basque, through being born in the Basque country, to having had the majority of one's footballing education there. Interestingly, they now have a black player, Iñaki Williams, the son of African immigrants. They gave him a Basque first name, so can't really fault their social integration.

    Real Sociedad: Also only played with Basque players until the late 80s, I believe, when they caved, claiming that Athletic's greater financial clout made continuing with the policy impossible. Amusingly, they accepted foreign players, but no Spaniards, until 2004 or so. Now, they achieve respectable top-half finishes in La Liga, usually with 8-9 of their first team players being from their youth system, or from within half an hour of the stadium.

    Eibar: From a town of about 5,000 (nope, didn't miss out an 0), with all the financial limitations that implies, Eibar won promotion to La Liga a few years ago, largely based on homegrown talent, and haven't been relegated yet. Several times, they had done enough to be promoted to La Liga from B division, but were denied due to their hilariously small and ill-equipped stadium, among other reasons.

    In general, Spanish teams do a great job of producing local talent. Linguistic and cultural similarities with South America mean that La Liga can absorb quite a lot of Latino talent; such players rarely tend to do as well in England, for example. France, as could be expected, has a couple of centrally governed football academies, which generally work quite well, but the high taxes have prevented the French league from ever really taking off. Netherlands and Scotland have traditionally punched way above their weight, with the latter not having done so for a generation. The Germans do well at whatever they put their mind too, while the Italians benefit from a universal footballing playing style that all teams conform to more or less. The English should just give up on the game altogether, and focus on rugby and cricket, both of which suit them better.

    Basques also have a strong presence in cycling. Every Tour de France, there is a Basque cycling team, composed of all Basques. No one really ever thinks they’ll win the entire tour, but a great many win stages and they can threaten the mountain jersey pretty reliably. And they are universally adored for keeping things very interesting and attacking with tons of heart.
    And, as you say, we’re talking about being “also-ran” top 20% finishes on a massive, world stage hiring only “themselves” and drawing from a population of less that 2.5 million

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  117. @Marty T
    College football is probably the only "major" sport where a lot of the players are relatively local, from that state or neighboring states. Pro athletes have nothing to do with the city they play in, with rare exceptions (like LeBron playing an hour from where he grew up).

    Probably depends on if you consider college basketball major or not. At least in the Midwest, the teams can be pretty provincial. Especially in basketball crazy Indiana, which has used that advantage to hold the record for most teams in the tournament (March madness) from one state.

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  118. @Reg Cæsar
    There was one season in the mid-1950s in which every goal in the NHL was scored by a Canadian. It was the only such season in the league's history. I don't remember if the records went by birthplace or citizenship. I think one non-Canadian got an assist that year,

    This was almost 40 years after the first club outside Canada won the Stanley Cup, in 1917. Did anyone celebrate the centennial of this? I ask people I meet from that city about it, and they invariably have had no clue.

    Reg- the NHL was unofficially closed to Americans in the 50′s and 60′s. Of course, with only six teams there weren’t many jobs.

    The 1960 US Olympic team had a number of great players; John Mayasich, Billy Cleary, Jack Kirrane, Jack McCartan, Dick Meredith just to name a few- only Tommy Williams had any kind of career in the bigs. Cleary and Mayasich didn’t even try- they knew the game was rigged.

    Even US college hockey had a LOT of Canucks- the Cornell team that won in 1970 was 100% Canadian. Denver and North Dakota were notorious for their rosters full of 28 year olds from Alberta and Saskatchewan. Three things changed all that: the Great Expansion of the NHL in 1967- suddenly there was a need for a LOT more players; the creation of the WHA in 1972- same thing, with the addition of foreign players like Ulf Nilsson and Anders Hedberg; and the U of Minnesota winning a national championship in 1974 with a roster of not just all Americans, but 100% Minnesotans.

    Many give the 1980 team credit for the opening up of big league hockey to Americans, but they were the beneficiaries of that process rather than the creators. Lots of guys from that team had good NHL careers- Broten, Ramsey, Christian, Johnson, had pretty long careers (doing this from memory) and a number of others had some significant minutes. Jack O’Callahan might have been a star if not for injuries.

    After that Olympics the NHL became internationalized- including eventually, the Eastern Bloc countries. I’ve long been an opponent of open borders, but I’d make an exception for hockey players (and their hot wives and girlfriends! )

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Cleary had an impressive coaching career at Harvard, and was their AD for 11 years.

    As for the Miracle on Ice team I would say Ken Morrow had a solid NHL career, playing 10 seasons with the Islanders, including their 4 cup winners.
    , @It's All Ball Bearings
    Ken Morrow from the 80 Miracle team also won a Stanley Cup that season and the next 3 seasons with the Isles.
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  119. @Spud Boy
    I've wondered for a while now how European soccer fans can claim any sense of pride while watching a bunch of black guys from Nigeria run around with their team colors on.

    The same way a Boston Red $ox fan has pride in his team having a 25-man roster with 14 Dominicans on it.

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  120. “Another problem is designing regions that have roughly equal amounts of talent so that leagues are competitive. For example, the soccer World Cup is immensely popular because it’s nationalistic, but the same limited number of countries always win.”

    One way around that problem would be to subdivide national teams that win too often. For example, in football (soccer), the German national team could be subdivided into regional teams.

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  121. @Cortes
    An excellent point and one reason why clubs are now investing heavily in trying to bring through local talent.

    The counterpoint is about off-field commercial exploitation. One way for savvy clubs unlikely to challenge for silverware in England, or from countries with tiny TV markets, to boost earnings is to sign players from particular places. A good example might be Shunsuke Nakamura. The Wikipedia entry includes

    “ The deal with Celtic was completed on 29 July 2005 for a reported transfer fee of £2.5 million,[45] although Strachan has claimed the actual fee was far lower.[48] In welcoming Nakamura to the club, Strachan stated that Nakamura "has got imagination and he sees passes other people can't see."[45] Part of the deal also involved Celtic securing the player's image rights, with a view to enhancing the club's profile and merchandising sales in the Far East.”

    Note that Nakamura was a great player and Celtic is a massive club caught in a small league but with fairly regular exposure to European competition. Signings of Far Eastern footballers by some English clubs may have less to do with their ability than their appeal in unlocking access to markets for merchandise.

    The friend of a friend is one of the principals (a “family” business in both senses) in Twins Enterprises, the official cap supplier to MLB.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%2747_(brand)

    When the Red $ox signed Daisuke Matsuzaka in 2007, my buddy’s friend said that they had a contract kick in to ship 75,000 Red $ox caps to Japan!

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    • Replies: @ex-banker
    Good for the Twins Enterprises' business, but not relevant to the Red Sox’ coffers. All licensing revenue from merchandise sales is equally divided by all MLB clubs. Same with player jerseys — the union distributes all revenue according to a formula based on service time. Jeter would get the same time amount as the 25th man on the roster, assuming they were both on it for the whole season.
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  122. @flyingtiger
    My Strat-O-Matic hockey team was named after them. At least I care.

    My Strat-O-Matic hockey team was named after them. At least I care.

    I didn’t know Strat-O-Matic did hockey. I have one year and eight teams from the baseball version. One of them is the Seattle Pilots!

    I don’t think Jim Bouton was included, though.

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    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    They also do football and basketball. You should check it out. As we always say "Eat, sleep, Strat!" It is a harder habit to kick than heroin.
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  123. @Dmitry

    The particular guy, Gaza, was the real deal. Amazing pitch presence, showmanship etc, The particular guy, Gaza, was the real deal. Amazing pitch presence, showmanship etc, he put butts in the seats. His coup de grace was when a rowdy fan with pitchside seats talked shit, and so gaza performed a flawlessly executed karate jump kick right into the guy.
     
    This you mean - Eric Cantona?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TiOIZ9AfGs

    Yes, a strange conflation of Cantona with Paul ‘Gazza’ Gascoigne who was as English as fish and chips. Cantona was bought from Premiership rival Leeds (with whom he’d just won the title, although he wasn’t yet a star player).

    One striking feature of watching footage of football before the Premiership league exploded in international popularity and became saturated with money from satellite/cable TV rights is the hairstyles of the players. With some exceptions, they didn’t look much different from the man in the street. Professional stylists really do earn their corn!

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    • Replies: @Fredrik
    Lots of things were different back then.

    England team-mates Graeme Le Saux of Chelsea and Liverpool's Robbie Fowler have been charged with misconduct by the Football Association after an off-the-ball clash during Saturday's Premiership meeting between the two clubs.

    The extraordinary clash, which occurred when Le Saux knocked the striker to the ground by hitting him on the head with his elbow, could see the two millionaire players banned for weeks.

    However, another side to the incident emerged yesterday as friends of Le Saux insisted that he is the victim of a homosexual smear campaign by fellow players because of his middle-class background and hobbies, seen by some as alien to the prevailing football culture. Le Saux, aged 31, a regular Guardian reader who collects antiques, has been at the centre of vicious and unsubstantiated allegations about his sexuality for the past decade, which has led to him clashing with a number of players on and off the pitch.
     
    https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gay-taunts-led-to-le-saux-outburst-1.158910
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  124. @ganderson
    Reg- the NHL was unofficially closed to Americans in the 50's and 60's. Of course, with only six teams there weren't many jobs.

    The 1960 US Olympic team had a number of great players; John Mayasich, Billy Cleary, Jack Kirrane, Jack McCartan, Dick Meredith just to name a few- only Tommy Williams had any kind of career in the bigs. Cleary and Mayasich didn't even try- they knew the game was rigged.

    Even US college hockey had a LOT of Canucks- the Cornell team that won in 1970 was 100% Canadian. Denver and North Dakota were notorious for their rosters full of 28 year olds from Alberta and Saskatchewan. Three things changed all that: the Great Expansion of the NHL in 1967- suddenly there was a need for a LOT more players; the creation of the WHA in 1972- same thing, with the addition of foreign players like Ulf Nilsson and Anders Hedberg; and the U of Minnesota winning a national championship in 1974 with a roster of not just all Americans, but 100% Minnesotans.

    Many give the 1980 team credit for the opening up of big league hockey to Americans, but they were the beneficiaries of that process rather than the creators. Lots of guys from that team had good NHL careers- Broten, Ramsey, Christian, Johnson, had pretty long careers (doing this from memory) and a number of others had some significant minutes. Jack O'Callahan might have been a star if not for injuries.

    After that Olympics the NHL became internationalized- including eventually, the Eastern Bloc countries. I've long been an opponent of open borders, but I'd make an exception for hockey players (and their hot wives and girlfriends! )

    Cleary had an impressive coaching career at Harvard, and was their AD for 11 years.

    As for the Miracle on Ice team I would say Ken Morrow had a solid NHL career, playing 10 seasons with the Islanders, including their 4 cup winners.

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    • Replies: @Ganderson
    Forgot about Morrow and did not mean to slight him : he was a great player; and went from Lake Placid to a Cup with the Islanders.
    Billy Cleary’s Harvard team beat the all Minnesotan Golden Gophers in OT in the NCAA finals in ’89.
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  125. “As a Southern Californian, for example, I appreciated that this year UCLA’s and USC’s star quarterbacks were SoCal kids.”

    Yes and hopefully they won’t be drafted by CLE. Perhaps the Rams should consider drafting some SoCal kids.

    “Similarly, I follow baseball slugger Giancarlo Stanton’s career because he went to my old high school.”

    NY will make sure that Stanton is given a large share of driving in the runs. With Judge probably batting behind him, one would expect that Stanton’s RBI output will only increase over the previous season.

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  126. @sb
    I've seen an example of what you are talking about in the womens sprint hurdles track event with the Aussie born daughter of Brits Sally Pearson vs the African American who they gave UK passport to Tiffany Porter

    Most Brits - but I think not all - cheer for Porter simply because she has GB after her name

    No one gave Tiffany Porter, née Ofili, a British passport. She and her sister have a British mother (of African descent). Their father is Nigerian. By being born in the US, the sisters had dual British and American nationality at birth. They are not the descendants of US slaves.

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  127. @Brutusale
    The friend of a friend is one of the principals (a "family" business in both senses) in Twins Enterprises, the official cap supplier to MLB.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%2747_(brand)

    When the Red $ox signed Daisuke Matsuzaka in 2007, my buddy's friend said that they had a contract kick in to ship 75,000 Red $ox caps to Japan!

    Good for the Twins Enterprises’ business, but not relevant to the Red Sox’ coffers. All licensing revenue from merchandise sales is equally divided by all MLB clubs. Same with player jerseys — the union distributes all revenue according to a formula based on service time. Jeter would get the same time amount as the 25th man on the roster, assuming they were both on it for the whole season.

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    • Replies: @Brutusale
    The subject is expanding sports markets to foreign lands, not who pockets the gelt.
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  128. @ganderson
    Reg- the NHL was unofficially closed to Americans in the 50's and 60's. Of course, with only six teams there weren't many jobs.

    The 1960 US Olympic team had a number of great players; John Mayasich, Billy Cleary, Jack Kirrane, Jack McCartan, Dick Meredith just to name a few- only Tommy Williams had any kind of career in the bigs. Cleary and Mayasich didn't even try- they knew the game was rigged.

    Even US college hockey had a LOT of Canucks- the Cornell team that won in 1970 was 100% Canadian. Denver and North Dakota were notorious for their rosters full of 28 year olds from Alberta and Saskatchewan. Three things changed all that: the Great Expansion of the NHL in 1967- suddenly there was a need for a LOT more players; the creation of the WHA in 1972- same thing, with the addition of foreign players like Ulf Nilsson and Anders Hedberg; and the U of Minnesota winning a national championship in 1974 with a roster of not just all Americans, but 100% Minnesotans.

    Many give the 1980 team credit for the opening up of big league hockey to Americans, but they were the beneficiaries of that process rather than the creators. Lots of guys from that team had good NHL careers- Broten, Ramsey, Christian, Johnson, had pretty long careers (doing this from memory) and a number of others had some significant minutes. Jack O'Callahan might have been a star if not for injuries.

    After that Olympics the NHL became internationalized- including eventually, the Eastern Bloc countries. I've long been an opponent of open borders, but I'd make an exception for hockey players (and their hot wives and girlfriends! )

    Ken Morrow from the 80 Miracle team also won a Stanley Cup that season and the next 3 seasons with the Isles.

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  129. @Reg Cæsar

    My Strat-O-Matic hockey team was named after them. At least I care.
     
    I didn't know Strat-O-Matic did hockey. I have one year and eight teams from the baseball version. One of them is the Seattle Pilots!

    I don't think Jim Bouton was included, though.

    They also do football and basketball. You should check it out. As we always say “Eat, sleep, Strat!” It is a harder habit to kick than heroin.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    They also do football and basketball. You should check it out. As we always say “Eat, sleep, Strat!” It is a harder habit to kick than heroin.
     
    I haven't played it in over 45 years. What platform is it on now? Mine was paper, cardboard, and dice.
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  130. England football is an odd mixture of hyper-commercialization and quaint regional backwardness. On the one hand the Premier League generates a huge amount of money, but on the other it provides a very poor training ground for the England national side. However, there is no way the English would slash the number of teams in the Premiere League (and boot out the foreigners) with an eye to winning international trophies. That would be trampling on regional tradition. English rugby and cricket are even more quaintly regional. Foreign advisers are regulating telling the English they need to merge their top levels cricket and rugby teams into four or five “super” teams of an Australian standard but the English never listen.

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    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    England football is an odd mixture of hyper-commercialization and quaint regional backwardness. On the one hand the Premier League generates a huge amount of money, but on the other it provides a very poor training ground for the England national side.
     
    Maybe the national side does not matter very much. I was a teenager when England won the Word Cup on black and white television in the summer of 1966 with the help of a bit of favorable home advantage refereeing, and it was good to know that some of the local lads we saw playing every week were competitive with global stars like Pele and Eusebio.

    However the World Cup finals are often pretty dire due to usually being played out of season in the height of summer in the Northern hemisphere, whereas football is at its best with end-to-end action on a cold, rainy Wednesday night at Burnley under floodlights, not at midday under a baking summer sun at altitude in Mexico City. One of the best World Cups was in Argentina, as it was winter time there when most of the world was in summer.

    Actually some of the best World Cup matches are in the regional qualifying rounds the year before the competition when teams are playing against rivals from their own continent home and away.

    NFL Football seems to be pretty popular without international competition, but I suppose the advantage of international sports is that it is like a kind of symbolic United Nations jousting tournament in which the nations compete with sports teams instead of guns, and if the games end tied they have a "penalty-kick shoot out" that consists of kicking balls into nets instead of shooting actual people.

    The widespread televising of international sports is also useful to teach the world to drink soda, eat burgers, wear sneakers, and pay for them with a credit card.

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  131. @ScarletNumber
    Cleary had an impressive coaching career at Harvard, and was their AD for 11 years.

    As for the Miracle on Ice team I would say Ken Morrow had a solid NHL career, playing 10 seasons with the Islanders, including their 4 cup winners.

    Forgot about Morrow and did not mean to slight him : he was a great player; and went from Lake Placid to a Cup with the Islanders.
    Billy Cleary’s Harvard team beat the all Minnesotan Golden Gophers in OT in the NCAA finals in ’89.

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    It's all good. You were going off of memory so I didn't take it as a slight against Morrow. I just added his name for the sake of completeness.
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  132. @Ganderson
    Forgot about Morrow and did not mean to slight him : he was a great player; and went from Lake Placid to a Cup with the Islanders.
    Billy Cleary’s Harvard team beat the all Minnesotan Golden Gophers in OT in the NCAA finals in ’89.

    It’s all good. You were going off of memory so I didn’t take it as a slight against Morrow. I just added his name for the sake of completeness.

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    • Replies: @Ganderson
    Thanks. I saw that ‘80 team play many times. They played a home schedule at the old Met Sports Center in Bloomington, MN , and had tilts against a lot of International League opponents; the games counted in the standings for the IL teams. I always wondered if that team could have competed in the NHL. Probably would have needed a better goalie.
    Herb Brooks was handicapped in the NHL by both his American-ness and the fact that he’d never played in the league. Many of the Canadians that played for him in New York were not impressed by his Gold Medal. He was a decent NHL coach, though, probably ahead of his time.
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  133. @flyingtiger
    My Strat-O-Matic hockey team was named after them. At least I care.

    Too bad Strat sucks compared to APBA

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    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    I just looked up APBA. They do not look bad. I may come back to them . They have an interesting golf game. I never heard of them until a few days ago. Everybody I knew played Strat.
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  134. @27 year old

    Americans are so firm in their belief that the poor must make sacrifices to help the rich that it will never happen.
     
    Truly thoughtful commentary, its like you have your finger right on our national pulse... ...

    Americans are sick of making sacrifices to provide stuff for non-Whites. Americans are firm on the belief that "affordable health care" means "affordable for blacks and mexicans" but even worse for us. And, Obama's healthcare law proved to many people that belief was correct. I think this analysis is wrong and openly paying into a socialist system would be better for Whites than what we have now. But I can't blame my countrymen for being dubious and I'm not going to use some semester-at-sea tier psychoanalysis to look down my nose at them.

    Thanks for stepping up. I’m sure Jonathan Mason will not be moved by your argument, even if he understands it, but it should be made all the same.

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  135. @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Internationalization of team sports has gotten dull. Nationalization, too. Perhaps the future belongs to the entrepreneur who figures out how to make regionalization work.
     
    The problem with regionalization in a borderless world is that every region gets internationalized sooner or later so your region isn't particularly distinct. Sure a Wyoming-only team will be pretty damn white and even within whites probably somewhat ethnically distinct. But a California-only basketball team vs Virginia-only basketball team will still just be a bunch of black guys.

    I’d much rather root for professional teams of players who grew up in my part of the country, not to mention in other countries.
     
    I'm not so sure of that. If a professional football team from Minnesota filled with a bunch of whites (except DBs and RB, of course, even MN will use blacks from Mpls) went up against a pro team from Virginia (my area) with almost all blacks from Richmond and the Virginia Beach area, I (and many, if not most, whites) would route for the Minnesota team. (The opposite would likely be true for many blacks living in MN. It's not about hating other races; it's about supporting your own.)

    The same would be true for other sports. In the Olympics, I know a lot of whites who route for European basketball teams because they're a bunch of white guys. Certainly Mexican-Americans route for the Mexican team in soccer.

    This is one of the weaknesses of Steve's Citizen-state idea vs a Nationstate. Under Citizenism theory, I should feel more of a connection to my fellow black Virginian than a white Califorian. But I don't. I have far more in common (culturally, genetically, etc.) with an average white guy from L.A. than I do with an average black guy from Richmond. The same is true if we move to the international level. I have more in common with the average white German or Scotsman than I do with the average black or Mestizo American. (And, yeah, I've lived in Germany so I know of what I speak. And, btw, language isn't even an issue because Germans all speak english though they do appreciate it when you speak some german.)

    Of course, I have much more in common with the average white American than I do the average white German, so location and history matter, just not as much genetics and culture.

    The label of "American" or "Virginian" doesn't magically make people of different races, cultures and religions feel like they're part of the same team. Sure, living in the same area means that you have some things in common, but dealing with DC traffic or having eaten at the same restaurant doesn't compare to have a shared family and culture.

    Hear, hear!

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  136. @Anon
    "The poor already have Medicaid and the right to treatment regardless of ability to pay, so nice try but that dog won’t hunt."

    That's not correct. It's a common GOPe talking point, but it ignores real world conditions. Medicaid doesn't include everyone who is poor, and I would hardly call ER treatment adequate medical treatment. Try it sometime if you disagree; they will do the bare minimum, often foregoing diagnostic tests to save money - not to mention that ERs aren't set up to provide many kinds of treatments. Further, before the ACA, private doctors absolutely could turn you down for not having health insurance (I wouldn't doubt they still could).

    We should just nationalize the system as Japan has and be done with it. If you're worried about the cost, work on lowering immigration and raise the minimum wage, then divert social spending savings to healthcare + have the government negotiate costs down; works fine for the world's highest IQ country.

    You clearly know very little about minority use if the healthcare system in the US.

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  137. @ScarletNumber
    It's all good. You were going off of memory so I didn't take it as a slight against Morrow. I just added his name for the sake of completeness.

    Thanks. I saw that ‘80 team play many times. They played a home schedule at the old Met Sports Center in Bloomington, MN , and had tilts against a lot of International League opponents; the games counted in the standings for the IL teams. I always wondered if that team could have competed in the NHL. Probably would have needed a better goalie.
    Herb Brooks was handicapped in the NHL by both his American-ness and the fact that he’d never played in the league. Many of the Canadians that played for him in New York were not impressed by his Gold Medal. He was a decent NHL coach, though, probably ahead of his time.

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    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Mike McCarthy never even got a tryout in the NFL (if he even asked for one) and Mike Holmgren got a tryout and that's about it.
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  138. @flyingtiger
    They also do football and basketball. You should check it out. As we always say "Eat, sleep, Strat!" It is a harder habit to kick than heroin.

    They also do football and basketball. You should check it out. As we always say “Eat, sleep, Strat!” It is a harder habit to kick than heroin.

    I haven’t played it in over 45 years. What platform is it on now? Mine was paper, cardboard, and dice.

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    • Replies: @flyingtiger
    You can play on your computer. If you are like me, you prefer the board, cards, and dice
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  139. @anon
    The criteria get stretched a fair bit to give Qld a chance.
    As long as Queensland is winning, the crowds keep paying.
    New South Wales has produced many times more good footballers than Queensland has, no surprise when you consider they've got 3x the population, let alone the quality of the average NSW ground, compared to the average Qld goat paddock.

    I’m sure no one here cares but for the record New South Wales is 1.6 times the population of Queensland
    Your other assertions have a similar degree of accuracy

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  140. @ScarletNumber
    Too bad Strat sucks compared to APBA

    I just looked up APBA. They do not look bad. I may come back to them . They have an interesting golf game. I never heard of them until a few days ago. Everybody I knew played Strat.

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  141. @Reg Cæsar

    They also do football and basketball. You should check it out. As we always say “Eat, sleep, Strat!” It is a harder habit to kick than heroin.
     
    I haven't played it in over 45 years. What platform is it on now? Mine was paper, cardboard, and dice.

    You can play on your computer. If you are like me, you prefer the board, cards, and dice

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  142. @27 year old

    Americans are so firm in their belief that the poor must make sacrifices to help the rich that it will never happen.
     
    Truly thoughtful commentary, its like you have your finger right on our national pulse... ...

    Americans are sick of making sacrifices to provide stuff for non-Whites. Americans are firm on the belief that "affordable health care" means "affordable for blacks and mexicans" but even worse for us. And, Obama's healthcare law proved to many people that belief was correct. I think this analysis is wrong and openly paying into a socialist system would be better for Whites than what we have now. But I can't blame my countrymen for being dubious and I'm not going to use some semester-at-sea tier psychoanalysis to look down my nose at them.

    Americans are sick of making sacrifices to provide stuff for non-Whites. Americans are firm on the belief that “affordable health care” means “affordable for blacks and mexicans” but even worse for us. And, Obama’s healthcare law proved to many people that belief was correct. I think this analysis is wrong and openly paying into a socialist system would be better for Whites than what we have now.

    You have certainly put your finger on the ineluctable truth that all of American politics is about race, even though this elephant in the room is hardly every openly discussed, although perhaps it is worth noting that the elephant is a symbol of the Republican party. I was not truly aware of this until some years ago when a Filipino coworker told me there was no way he would vote Democrat to enable blacks to get more benefits! And then the penny dropped.

    Really every federal and some state level political issues, whether it be healthcare, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, law enforcement and sentencing, the death penalty, abortion, voting rights for felons, immigration, terrorism, guns is a race issue or has a marked racial component, usually along the lines of white people pay more of the taxes, but people of color get more of the government benefits.

    A single payer health financing system would benefit many white people and save them money that goes in profits to the health insurance companies, but a majority would rather pay more so that people of color do not get the same savings.

    [By the way, when we come to health insurance and Obamacare, we are really talking about the working population in jobs that do not have health care provided by and subsidized by employers, or for the self employed. People like civil servants or corporate employees above entry level jobs are usually not fully aware of how crippling health care costs are for families that do not have these benefits. The Obama solution of high insurance premiums, high deductibles, and high profits for the health insurance companies should be called the Unaffordable Health Care Act and for that reason I totally support(ed) Trumps plans for a health care that would be affordable, effective, and with lower premiums, lower deductibles, and cheaper drugs, which he has notably so far failed to deliver. I have no particular preference if health care is financed through for profit insurance companies, or by a single payer--I would just like us all to have the best possible access to health care at the best possible price. Incidentally I do not personally have a dog in the fight as I have Medicare, but I have three dependents who do not.]

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  143. @Ganderson
    Thanks. I saw that ‘80 team play many times. They played a home schedule at the old Met Sports Center in Bloomington, MN , and had tilts against a lot of International League opponents; the games counted in the standings for the IL teams. I always wondered if that team could have competed in the NHL. Probably would have needed a better goalie.
    Herb Brooks was handicapped in the NHL by both his American-ness and the fact that he’d never played in the league. Many of the Canadians that played for him in New York were not impressed by his Gold Medal. He was a decent NHL coach, though, probably ahead of his time.

    Mike McCarthy never even got a tryout in the NFL (if he even asked for one) and Mike Holmgren got a tryout and that’s about it.

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  144. @Henry's Cat
    Yes, a strange conflation of Cantona with Paul 'Gazza' Gascoigne who was as English as fish and chips. Cantona was bought from Premiership rival Leeds (with whom he'd just won the title, although he wasn't yet a star player).

    One striking feature of watching footage of football before the Premiership league exploded in international popularity and became saturated with money from satellite/cable TV rights is the hairstyles of the players. With some exceptions, they didn't look much different from the man in the street. Professional stylists really do earn their corn!

    Lots of things were different back then.

    England team-mates Graeme Le Saux of Chelsea and Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler have been charged with misconduct by the Football Association after an off-the-ball clash during Saturday’s Premiership meeting between the two clubs.

    The extraordinary clash, which occurred when Le Saux knocked the striker to the ground by hitting him on the head with his elbow, could see the two millionaire players banned for weeks.

    However, another side to the incident emerged yesterday as friends of Le Saux insisted that he is the victim of a homosexual smear campaign by fellow players because of his middle-class background and hobbies, seen by some as alien to the prevailing football culture. Le Saux, aged 31, a regular Guardian reader who collects antiques, has been at the centre of vicious and unsubstantiated allegations about his sexuality for the past decade, which has led to him clashing with a number of players on and off the pitch.

    https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gay-taunts-led-to-le-saux-outburst-1.158910

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Le Saux, aged 31, a regular Guardian reader who collects antiques, has been at the centre of vicious and unsubstantiated allegations about his sexuality for the past decade...
     
    Good heavens. Nobody gave Rosey Grier any grief for his embroidery.

    Worse, his nephew was a literal preppy and a hockey player. And his hometown? "The racial makeup of the town [in the 2010 Census] was 96.7% White, 0.9% African American..."

    The name Le Saux, though, is suspiciously froggy, like Gascoigne. But it may be Norman. And reading the Guardian for anything other than the crosswords is also questionable.
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  145. You can play on your computer. If you are like me, you prefer the board, cards, and dice

    Whenever I see someone playing solitaire on his workstation, I think, no way, I want the cards in my hands. Preferably the thick ones with some fabric in them.

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Bee FTW
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  146. @Fredrik
    Lots of things were different back then.

    England team-mates Graeme Le Saux of Chelsea and Liverpool's Robbie Fowler have been charged with misconduct by the Football Association after an off-the-ball clash during Saturday's Premiership meeting between the two clubs.

    The extraordinary clash, which occurred when Le Saux knocked the striker to the ground by hitting him on the head with his elbow, could see the two millionaire players banned for weeks.

    However, another side to the incident emerged yesterday as friends of Le Saux insisted that he is the victim of a homosexual smear campaign by fellow players because of his middle-class background and hobbies, seen by some as alien to the prevailing football culture. Le Saux, aged 31, a regular Guardian reader who collects antiques, has been at the centre of vicious and unsubstantiated allegations about his sexuality for the past decade, which has led to him clashing with a number of players on and off the pitch.
     
    https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gay-taunts-led-to-le-saux-outburst-1.158910

    Le Saux, aged 31, a regular Guardian reader who collects antiques, has been at the centre of vicious and unsubstantiated allegations about his sexuality for the past decade…

    Good heavens. Nobody gave Rosey Grier any grief for his embroidery.

    Worse, his nephew was a literal preppy and a hockey player. And his hometown? “The racial makeup of the town [in the 2010 Census] was 96.7% White, 0.9% African American…”

    The name Le Saux, though, is suspiciously froggy, like Gascoigne. But it may be Norman. And reading the Guardian for anything other than the crosswords is also questionable.

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    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    The name Le Saux, though, is suspiciously froggy, like Gascoigne. But it may be Norman.
     
    Well, the lad came from the Isle of Jersey, part of the Duchy of Normandy since 933, so he had form.
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  147. @Spud Boy
    I've wondered for a while now how European soccer fans can claim any sense of pride while watching a bunch of black guys from Nigeria run around with their team colors on.

    Same way a white college football fan can watch their alma mater play with only a couple white players in the starting 22.

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    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Same way a white college football fan can watch their alma mater play with only a couple white players in the starting 22.
     
    Yes, but spending the weekend away from home in old haunts and partying with old college buddies is all part of it too, perhaps more than the game.
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  148. @unpc downunder
    England football is an odd mixture of hyper-commercialization and quaint regional backwardness. On the one hand the Premier League generates a huge amount of money, but on the other it provides a very poor training ground for the England national side. However, there is no way the English would slash the number of teams in the Premiere League (and boot out the foreigners) with an eye to winning international trophies. That would be trampling on regional tradition. English rugby and cricket are even more quaintly regional. Foreign advisers are regulating telling the English they need to merge their top levels cricket and rugby teams into four or five "super" teams of an Australian standard but the English never listen.

    England football is an odd mixture of hyper-commercialization and quaint regional backwardness. On the one hand the Premier League generates a huge amount of money, but on the other it provides a very poor training ground for the England national side.

    Maybe the national side does not matter very much. I was a teenager when England won the Word Cup on black and white television in the summer of 1966 with the help of a bit of favorable home advantage refereeing, and it was good to know that some of the local lads we saw playing every week were competitive with global stars like Pele and Eusebio.

    However the World Cup finals are often pretty dire due to usually being played out of season in the height of summer in the Northern hemisphere, whereas football is at its best with end-to-end action on a cold, rainy Wednesday night at Burnley under floodlights, not at midday under a baking summer sun at altitude in Mexico City. One of the best World Cups was in Argentina, as it was winter time there when most of the world was in summer.

    Actually some of the best World Cup matches are in the regional qualifying rounds the year before the competition when teams are playing against rivals from their own continent home and away.

    NFL Football seems to be pretty popular without international competition, but I suppose the advantage of international sports is that it is like a kind of symbolic United Nations jousting tournament in which the nations compete with sports teams instead of guns, and if the games end tied they have a “penalty-kick shoot out” that consists of kicking balls into nets instead of shooting actual people.

    The widespread televising of international sports is also useful to teach the world to drink soda, eat burgers, wear sneakers, and pay for them with a credit card.

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  149. @SteveRogers42
    Same way a white college football fan can watch their alma mater play with only a couple white players in the starting 22.

    Same way a white college football fan can watch their alma mater play with only a couple white players in the starting 22.

    Yes, but spending the weekend away from home in old haunts and partying with old college buddies is all part of it too, perhaps more than the game.

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  150. @Reg Cæsar

    Le Saux, aged 31, a regular Guardian reader who collects antiques, has been at the centre of vicious and unsubstantiated allegations about his sexuality for the past decade...
     
    Good heavens. Nobody gave Rosey Grier any grief for his embroidery.

    Worse, his nephew was a literal preppy and a hockey player. And his hometown? "The racial makeup of the town [in the 2010 Census] was 96.7% White, 0.9% African American..."

    The name Le Saux, though, is suspiciously froggy, like Gascoigne. But it may be Norman. And reading the Guardian for anything other than the crosswords is also questionable.

    The name Le Saux, though, is suspiciously froggy, like Gascoigne. But it may be Norman.

    Well, the lad came from the Isle of Jersey, part of the Duchy of Normandy since 933, so he had form.

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  151. @Reg Cæsar

    You can play on your computer. If you are like me, you prefer the board, cards, and dice
     
    Whenever I see someone playing solitaire on his workstation, I think, no way, I want the cards in my hands. Preferably the thick ones with some fabric in them.

    Bee FTW

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  152. @ex-banker
    Good for the Twins Enterprises' business, but not relevant to the Red Sox’ coffers. All licensing revenue from merchandise sales is equally divided by all MLB clubs. Same with player jerseys — the union distributes all revenue according to a formula based on service time. Jeter would get the same time amount as the 25th man on the roster, assuming they were both on it for the whole season.

    The subject is expanding sports markets to foreign lands, not who pockets the gelt.

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