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In L.A. Vote, "Fancy Asians" Reject Sharing Their Koreatown with "Jungle Asians"
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Koreatown, west of Downtown Los Angeles on Wilshire Blvd., is a vastly prosperous highrise district. (Koreans were the favorite tenants of former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. While the glamorous Lakers usually had Jack Nicholson in their first row of courtside seats, Clipper games usually featured courtside a lot of Big Renters from Pusan as Sterling’s very special guests.)

It first got a freeway offramp sign calling it “Koreatown” around 1979 or so. Bangladeshi immigrants now want the city to designate part of Koreatown as “Bangladeshtown.”

That won’t be a problem, right? Because without evil white males to gum up the harmony of the Coalition of the Fringes, amity and cooperation will no doubt prevail …

But from KABC in Los Angeles:

Voters elect against dividing Koreatown to include Bangladesh Town By ABC7.com staff

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

KOREATOWN, LOS ANGELES (KABC) — Preliminary results of the vote on whether Koreatown would be divided to include Bangladesh Town overwhelmingly favored the status quo Wednesday.

Among the 19,126 votes counted, 18,884 of them elected against the official recognition of a Bangladesh Town….

Currently, Little Bangladesh is located within Koreatown – it’s four city blocks on 3rd Street between Vermont and Normandie avenues.

The Bangladeshi community is expanding in Los Angeles and they’ve wanted a designated area, like Koreatown, to express their identity.

Comedienne Ali Wong offers a useful distinction between what she calls Fancy Asians (Japanese, Korean, Chinese) and “Jungle Asians,” who are from Vietnam, Philippines, Laos, etc. (I don’t know where Bangladeshis would fit in for her, if at all. She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.)

 
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  1. Comedienne Ali Wong offers a useful distinction between what she calls Fancy Asians (Japanese, Korean, Chinese) with “Jungle Asians” like herself, who are from Vietnam, Philippines, Laos, etc. (I don’t know where Bangladeshis would fit in for her, if at all. She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.)

    Of course, Miss Wong is herself half-“Fancy Asian”:

    Birth Name: Alexandra Dawn Wong

    Place of Birth: San Francisco, California, United States

    Date of Birth: April 19, 1982

    Ethnicity:
    *Chinese (father)
    *Vietnamese (mother)

    Ali Wong is an American actress, stand-up comedian, and writer. Ali is married to Justin Hakuta, the son of inventor/television personality Ken Hakuta.

    Ali is the daughter of Tam “Tammy” T. (Nguyen) and Adolphus Alexander Wong. Ali’s father was an American anesthesiologist, of Chinese descent. Ali’s mother was born and raised in Huế, Vietnam.

    Ali has stated:

    Even though I am half-Vietnamese, I never grew up with any Vietnamese culture. Our house was always filled with Chinese art, Chinese food, Chinese people, Chinese music, and the idea that the Lunar New Year equaled Chinese New Year’s. My father was and still is a Chinese superiorist.

    http://ethnicelebs.com/ali-wong

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    My father was and still is a Chinese superiorist.
     
    I notice she uses a made up word there, but why not "Chinese Supremacist"? Oh, I know...
    , @Clyde

    Even though I am half-Vietnamese, I never grew up with any Vietnamese culture. Our house was always filled with Chinese art, Chinese food, Chinese people, Chinese music, and the idea that the Lunar New Year equaled Chinese New Year’s. My father was and still is a Chinese superiorist.
     
    Makes me think that her Vietnamese mother is of Chinese extraction. If true, then she has zero Jungle in her. Since when does this stop an educated SJW from identifying with authentic jungle Asians from Bangladesh?
    btw--- I deplore this inappropriate intra-Asian, status jockeying, racism, snobbery and one upsmanship. As a garden variety white man, count me out!
    , @syonredux
    Genetic ancestry test users 'cherry-pick' which races to identify with

    One study participant, "Eduardo," identified as a white Mexican-American before the test, but his genetic ancestry test results reported Native American, Celtic and Jewish ancestries. The researchers found that Eduardo disregarded his Celtic ancestry but embraced his Jewish identity, explaining: "I always looked up to the Jewish people... I thought of them as higher than me."
     

    Another participant, "Shannon," was adopted and always believed she had Native American lineage through her birth parents. When her test results revealed no Native American ancestry, she decided the test was incorrect and continued to identify as Native American.
     

    White respondents were more likely to embrace new racial identities, as long as they felt others would still accept them, the researchers found.
     

    "White identity is something that lots of people around them have, so it doesn't feel special," said Roth. "Part of it may be guilt about being white and feeling somewhat privileged. They want something that makes them feel unique, whereas for many people of colour, they've known all along that they have some racial mixture in their ancestry, and it's not as surprising."
     
    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/uobc-gat062818.php
  2. THis is just wishful evil thinking on your part

    People of Color get along great. Its white guys that screw everything up

    They voted against this because they didn’t want to have to expend funds renaming everything

    • Troll: IHTG
    • Replies: @tomv
    I'm not one of those people who think Tiny Duck is an intentional parody, but this comment is giving me a pause. Could it be...?

    Nah. Real parodies are fun -- like DemsRRealRacist and DPRK_News. Tiny is just dull.
    , @fish
    Ohs Tinys......


    They you'n go agin! Stickin you button in places it don'ts belongs!


    Lendsnerb "Teh voice of Rezun" Pits
  3. Harlan Ellison is dead. He was often wrong and sometimes visibly dishonest, but at all times a masterful writer and a joy to read. He was the textbook example of a writer you could disagree with but nonetheless fully enjoy. Hopefully his I, Robot script gets made — it didn’t because Harlan just had to be Harlan when confronted with some Weinstein.
    http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-harlan-ellison-20180628-story.html

    • Replies: @Enochian
    Now I'm curious - what was Ellison so dishonest about? Was all his stuff about joining gangs in the 1950s a lie?
    , @Kylie
    Oh, no. At his best, Harlan Ellison was very good, if not the best.

    Was just discussing him in the comments section of the YouTube video in which he appeared with some Star Trek cast members.

  4. She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.

    India is a subcontinent of one billion-plus with it’s own melange of ethnicities very distinct from Asia. The same goes for the Arab World and other Middle Eastern nations who have magically become part of Asia as of late. Ali Wong would be correct in denying their Asian-ness.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Your statement's willful – it can only be willful – ignorance of geography, geology, history, philology, demography, and any number of other fields is monumental.

    A continent's being vast and containing diverse peoples has no bearing on its being a continent. After all: it's a continent, for crying out loud....
    , @PiltdownMan

    The same goes for the Arab World and other Middle Eastern nations who have magically become part of Asia as of late.
     
    If, by "of late", you mean since the time of Herodotus (circa 440 BC), then yes.
    , @BB753
    Ok, can we go back to calling East Asians "Orientals" to avoid confusions? It used to work very well back in the day.
    , @gate666
    theyre in asian continent.
    , @AndrewR
    By second grade, I knew what Asia was and that India and the middle east are in Asia.

    Asia has many different racial and ethnic groups, and many different biomes, but they're all equally "Asian." In the US, people generally use "Asian" as shorthand for "East Asian", aka Mongoloid, but they're no more Asian than an Indian or a Saudi are.

    In Britain, "Asian" generally refers to Pakistanis and Indians, since they don't have many ethnic East Asians there.
  5. Google Maps already designates the ‘hood as Little Bangladesh.

  6. Comedienne Ali Wong offers a useful distinction between what she calls Fancy Asians (Japanese, Korean, Chinese) with “Jungle Asians” like herself, who are from Vietnam, Philippines, Laos, etc. (I don’t know where Bangladeshis would fit in for her, if at all. She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.)

    OH, COME ON! Peak Stupidity has given out guidance on this for FREE – see our handy pocket guide to the various new geography based terms for “Asians”.

    See also Oriental is the term and we’re done talkin’ about it.*. How about “Civilization Orientals” and “Jungle Orientals”?* I’d be OK with that.

    .
    .

    * Caution – one bikini picture NSFH.

  7. As syonredux notes, both Wong and her husband are half fancy, half jungle, which she makes a point of being one of the reasons it’s ok for her her audience to let her joke about the distinction.

  8. @syonredux

    Comedienne Ali Wong offers a useful distinction between what she calls Fancy Asians (Japanese, Korean, Chinese) with “Jungle Asians” like herself, who are from Vietnam, Philippines, Laos, etc. (I don’t know where Bangladeshis would fit in for her, if at all. She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.)
     
    Of course, Miss Wong is herself half-"Fancy Asian":

    Birth Name: Alexandra Dawn Wong

    Place of Birth: San Francisco, California, United States

    Date of Birth: April 19, 1982

    Ethnicity:
    *Chinese (father)
    *Vietnamese (mother)

    Ali Wong is an American actress, stand-up comedian, and writer. Ali is married to Justin Hakuta, the son of inventor/television personality Ken Hakuta.

    Ali is the daughter of Tam “Tammy” T. (Nguyen) and Adolphus Alexander Wong. Ali’s father was an American anesthesiologist, of Chinese descent. Ali’s mother was born and raised in Huế, Vietnam.

    Ali has stated:

    Even though I am half-Vietnamese, I never grew up with any Vietnamese culture. Our house was always filled with Chinese art, Chinese food, Chinese people, Chinese music, and the idea that the Lunar New Year equaled Chinese New Year’s. My father was and still is a Chinese superiorist.
     
    http://ethnicelebs.com/ali-wong

    My father was and still is a Chinese superiorist.

    I notice she uses a made up word there, but why not “Chinese Supremacist“? Oh, I know…

    • Agree: artichoke
  9. Koreatown “vastly prosperous”?! Koreatown is a fairly standard immigrant slum neighborhood. There are huge numbers of very successful Koreans in LA. They don’t live in Koreatown.

    The joke in Korean circles is that Korean minimum wage is $10k per month. Below that forget dating.

    • Replies: @Alden
    The prosperity comes from the thousands of medical offices and clinics in the high rises. It’s the dialysis headquarters of the city among other things. There are lots of homeless.

    There is another weirdly named neighborhood a mile or so south. It used to be a Greek neighborhood centered around the Cathederal.
    Hispanics moved in and it’s now the Latin/Byzantine district. Ethiopians are encroaching so there may be another name change soon.

    Occasionally the LA Times tries to whip up a scandal about Korean Korea Town landlords preferring White and Korean tenants and discriminating against blacks and Hispanics.
  10. The difference between Koreatown and “Bangladeshtown” is the difference between little Italy and little Bosnia.

  11. I’d never heard of Ali Wong but she’s pretty funny. White Americans and even 2nd-3rd generation Asian Americans are hopelessly confused about racial and ethnic divisions within Asia. Most people in Asia are confused by the weird pan-Asian fusion that exists in the West. And when you mix in Indians, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis acting like there’s some commonality due to being “Asian”… fuggedaboudit. That’s like calling Turks “European”.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    AGREED!

    I've been on about this for more than a year now, but some (few millions of) people ya just cain't reach ...
  12. “without evil white males to gum up the harmony of the Coalition of the Fringes, amity and cooperation will no doubt prevail”

    Maybe not:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandarin_Chinese_profanity#Against_South_Asians

    And that is just Mandarin. There are quite a few Cantonese and Hokkien words used in Hong Kong and Malaya – IIRC “mo la” and “klang”.

    Back in the early days of blogging there was a trollish site created by some Indian American dude with tables of stereotypes of Asian nationalities. The comment threads were hilarious. For example, he excluded Vietnamese, or Philippinos from the table of “are often doctors”, resulting in a massive flame war with 100s of comments. On the other hand he included them in the table “have small penises”, which produced no outrage at all.

  13. @a boy and his dog
    I’d never heard of Ali Wong but she’s pretty funny. White Americans and even 2nd-3rd generation Asian Americans are hopelessly confused about racial and ethnic divisions within Asia. Most people in Asia are confused by the weird pan-Asian fusion that exists in the West. And when you mix in Indians, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis acting like there’s some commonality due to being “Asian”... fuggedaboudit. That’s like calling Turks “European”.

    AGREED!

    I’ve been on about this for more than a year now, but some (few millions of) people ya just cain’t reach …

  14. Funny but Vietnamese regard themselves superior to jungle Cambodians.

    Vietnam is jungle nation but more East Asian than rest of SE Asia.

    • Replies: @Flip
    I had a Hong Kong Chinese colleague who looked down on women from the Philippines saying they were all maids or prostitutes.
    , @White Guy In Japan
    Although the Vietnamese hate the Chinese, I can see a strong cultural influence. Confucian merchant culture, etc. Test scores and economic growth exhibit more East Asian patterns.

    Oh, everyone looks down on Cambodia. Even the neighboring Thai. Have been there twice. Interesting but sad little country.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    The land now known as Vietnam was part of China for a significant portion of its history.
    , @Tyrion 2
    Cambodians are an older population that remains despite the waves of immigration that swept over SE Asia from Southern China. They are an ethnically distinct holdout with pockets in various surrounding countries too.
  15. @syonredux

    Comedienne Ali Wong offers a useful distinction between what she calls Fancy Asians (Japanese, Korean, Chinese) with “Jungle Asians” like herself, who are from Vietnam, Philippines, Laos, etc. (I don’t know where Bangladeshis would fit in for her, if at all. She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.)
     
    Of course, Miss Wong is herself half-"Fancy Asian":

    Birth Name: Alexandra Dawn Wong

    Place of Birth: San Francisco, California, United States

    Date of Birth: April 19, 1982

    Ethnicity:
    *Chinese (father)
    *Vietnamese (mother)

    Ali Wong is an American actress, stand-up comedian, and writer. Ali is married to Justin Hakuta, the son of inventor/television personality Ken Hakuta.

    Ali is the daughter of Tam “Tammy” T. (Nguyen) and Adolphus Alexander Wong. Ali’s father was an American anesthesiologist, of Chinese descent. Ali’s mother was born and raised in Huế, Vietnam.

    Ali has stated:

    Even though I am half-Vietnamese, I never grew up with any Vietnamese culture. Our house was always filled with Chinese art, Chinese food, Chinese people, Chinese music, and the idea that the Lunar New Year equaled Chinese New Year’s. My father was and still is a Chinese superiorist.
     
    http://ethnicelebs.com/ali-wong

    Even though I am half-Vietnamese, I never grew up with any Vietnamese culture. Our house was always filled with Chinese art, Chinese food, Chinese people, Chinese music, and the idea that the Lunar New Year equaled Chinese New Year’s. My father was and still is a Chinese superiorist.

    Makes me think that her Vietnamese mother is of Chinese extraction. If true, then she has zero Jungle in her. Since when does this stop an educated SJW from identifying with authentic jungle Asians from Bangladesh?
    btw— I deplore this inappropriate intra-Asian, status jockeying, racism, snobbery and one upsmanship. As a garden variety white man, count me out!

    • Replies: @Guy Lombardo
    >Makes me think that her Vietnamese mother is of Chinese extraction. If true, then she has zero Jungle in her.

    Um, over half of Chinese are from the southern part of the country and are Australoid admixed "jungle Asians".
  16. @Tiny Duck
    THis is just wishful evil thinking on your part

    People of Color get along great. Its white guys that screw everything up

    They voted against this because they didn't want to have to expend funds renaming everything

    I’m not one of those people who think Tiny Duck is an intentional parody, but this comment is giving me a pause. Could it be…?

    Nah. Real parodies are fun — like DemsRRealRacist and DPRK_News. Tiny is just dull.

    • Replies: @other joe_mama
    He's never seen the "Hurry up and Buy!" scene from 'Don't be a Menace' apparently.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Fb9M1e-cNc

    Full clip here:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIk0abbYgXQ

    , @MBlanc46
    TD has been off his game lately. Amusing us is his only reason for being. He’d better shape up.
    , @Prester John
    Could TD really be iSteve being mischievous?

    Avid readers breathlessly await.

  17. @Anon
    Funny but Vietnamese regard themselves superior to jungle Cambodians.

    Vietnam is jungle nation but more East Asian than rest of SE Asia.

    I had a Hong Kong Chinese colleague who looked down on women from the Philippines saying they were all maids or prostitutes.

    • Replies: @artichoke
    In Hong Kong, his statement is true. Never saw a Filipina in HK who was anything but.
  18. @tomv
    I'm not one of those people who think Tiny Duck is an intentional parody, but this comment is giving me a pause. Could it be...?

    Nah. Real parodies are fun -- like DemsRRealRacist and DPRK_News. Tiny is just dull.

    He’s never seen the “Hurry up and Buy!” scene from ‘Don’t be a Menace’ apparently.

    Full clip here:

    • Replies: @donut
    O'Bama's sons ?
  19. Somewhat on this topic, a good Wired article, from a progressive but a decent journalist, on how the Willie Brown Million Dollar Bonanza Schoolvaganza failed (both of them).
    https://www.wired.com/story/willie-brown-middle-school-startup-mentality-failed/

    Landake was later quoted in the San Francisco Examiner: “The first day of school there were, like, multiple incidents of physical violence.” After just a month, Principal Hobson quit, and an interim took charge. In mid-October, less than two months into the first school year, a third principal came on board. According to a local newspaper, in these first few months, six other faculty members resigned. (The district disputes this figure.) In a school survey, only 16 percent of the Brown staff described the campus as safe.

    • Replies: @Triumph104

    In the end, we sent our younger daughter back to private school—because Landake and Green told me not to send her to Brown and our efforts to place her in a different public school failed. Our private school discount was gone, and the cost was painful, but I was grateful to have the option. Still, I hated the way it felt. Our older daughter is getting a great education at a public high school, all public schools need community support, and I could not convince myself that I’d made the right decision. It is entirely possible that our daughter could have thrived at Brown.
     
    His older daughter attends Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts, a selective school that admits students based on auditions or portfolios. Asawa's demographics: 40% white, 27% Asian, 15% Hispanic, 10% two or more races, and 7% black.


    https://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/california/districts/san-francisco-unified-school-district/ruth-asawa-san-francisco-school-of-the-arts-3252/student-body
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruth_Asawa_San_Francisco_School_of_the_Arts
  20. I like the street names – Vermont, Normandie. Can you get more white than that? Reminds me of Indian place names in Eastern US where Indians had been cleared out centuries ago.

    • Replies: @Alden
    Westmoreland, St Andrews streets. There’s a wonderful Jewish Temple that’s an exact copy of one of the famous Roman buildings

    The Main Street, Wilshire in that area is lined with beautiful gray stone gothic style churches and parish schools.

    And the high rises only exist because of the genius of Msr Eiffel, Louis Sullivan and Daniel Burham

    All in all, it’s a glorious example of western civilization from the Roman Temple to the structural steel that enables the building of high rises. And modern medicine too. Also the buses cars subway and trucks, internal combustion engine, electricity, telephones, all the accomplishments of the White European people are displayed in Korea Town
  21. > from Vietnam, Philippines, Laos, etc.

    i myself wouldn’t put the Viets in the same bucket as the Filipinos…… every year, the Philippines buys approx half of its rice ration from the Vietnamese. And the Vietnamese don’t do ASEAN-solidarity-price-discount, shipmate. It’s all right there in the pages of the _Singapore Financial Times_

    > (I don’t know where Bangladeshis would fit in for her, if at all

    from what I can tell (it’s not easy to measure) Bangladeshi men have THE HIGHEST RATE in the world, of violence against women.

    Of course, Ali wouldn’t know about these things….. Koreatown is the closest she’s ever been to Asia.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    "from what I can tell (it’s not easy to measure) Bangladeshi men have THE HIGHEST RATE in the world, of violence against women"

    Certainly East London, heavily Bangladeshi, is the epicentre of the UK acid attack epidemic (which black gangs have quickly adopted). It seems to have started as a way of showing displeasure with one's wife, though it rapidly mutated into a general tool of thuggery. On the other hand Bangladeshis have traditionally not been as into Islamist terror as their Pakistani co-religionists, though there have been some recent (mostly failed) plots.

    Back on topic, the Koreatown boys are simply following the guidance of the late James Brown

    The way I like it
    Is the way it is
    I've got mine
    Don't worry 'bout his

     
  22. For all of China’s rich history and culture, I’ve never considered the Chinese “fancy” anything. They were, of course, very poor for most of the 20th century, but even now when they’re getting more prosperous by the day (and good for them), they’re not becoming proportionally fancier in my eyes for two reasons.

    1. Fancy doesn’t scale well, certainly not to a billion.
    2. The Chinese are a rather earthy people. This can actually be admirable, but fancy it isn’t. (Just Singaporeans, Hong Kongers, and Taiwanese.)

    Interestingly, the Chinese are rather similar to Americans in this regard. Does any European (even among legions of Americophiles) ever describe Americans in general as fancy?

    Sure, the distinction between East, South, and Southeast Asians is a useful one, but let’s not adopt this broad’s coinage as iStevism. It’s not even clever.

    (I’m sure iSteve commenters can come up with much better alternatives.)

    • Replies: @unpc downunder
    Maybe, but for a nation than hasn't even reached first world status yet, they sure exhibit a lot of snobbery towards manual labour. Chinese economic observers are already worried about a looming shortage of manual labour (skilled and unskilled):

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/china-suffers-from-shortage-blue-collar-workers-antonio-graceffo

    https://qz.com/148688/hong-kongs-labor-shortage-means-140-per-day-construction-workers-waiters-with-great-benefits/
  23. Even within Vietnam, there is a visible difference in the amount of chinese ancestry from individual to individual. The skin colour, most obviously, and also austronesian (malay) features which are stronger in some but almost completely lacking in others.

    I could never really tell the difference between most chinese-descended Vietnamese students from Chinese students, especially the girls, although my wife claims she can cos they have flatter facial features.

    In terms of academic achievement, they are usually very driven, much more than Pinoys and Indonesian Chinese, and usually opt for US tertiary education if they can.

    As for Pinoys, Singapore has accepted very few pinoys on our scholarship program (while we have lots of Malaysian chinese, Indonesian chinese, Vietnamese, and higher caste indians) due to their abysmal track record. The few who did well were usually actually ethnic chinese.

    In general terms, I usually group the Vietnamese together with East Asia, not the Austronesians, and apart from the other basket cases in the region such as Laos and Cambodia.

  24. @Anon
    Funny but Vietnamese regard themselves superior to jungle Cambodians.

    Vietnam is jungle nation but more East Asian than rest of SE Asia.

    Although the Vietnamese hate the Chinese, I can see a strong cultural influence. Confucian merchant culture, etc. Test scores and economic growth exhibit more East Asian patterns.

    Oh, everyone looks down on Cambodia. Even the neighboring Thai. Have been there twice. Interesting but sad little country.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Confucian merchant culture
     
    What?
  25. @syonredux

    Comedienne Ali Wong offers a useful distinction between what she calls Fancy Asians (Japanese, Korean, Chinese) with “Jungle Asians” like herself, who are from Vietnam, Philippines, Laos, etc. (I don’t know where Bangladeshis would fit in for her, if at all. She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.)
     
    Of course, Miss Wong is herself half-"Fancy Asian":

    Birth Name: Alexandra Dawn Wong

    Place of Birth: San Francisco, California, United States

    Date of Birth: April 19, 1982

    Ethnicity:
    *Chinese (father)
    *Vietnamese (mother)

    Ali Wong is an American actress, stand-up comedian, and writer. Ali is married to Justin Hakuta, the son of inventor/television personality Ken Hakuta.

    Ali is the daughter of Tam “Tammy” T. (Nguyen) and Adolphus Alexander Wong. Ali’s father was an American anesthesiologist, of Chinese descent. Ali’s mother was born and raised in Huế, Vietnam.

    Ali has stated:

    Even though I am half-Vietnamese, I never grew up with any Vietnamese culture. Our house was always filled with Chinese art, Chinese food, Chinese people, Chinese music, and the idea that the Lunar New Year equaled Chinese New Year’s. My father was and still is a Chinese superiorist.
     
    http://ethnicelebs.com/ali-wong

    Genetic ancestry test users ‘cherry-pick’ which races to identify with

    One study participant, “Eduardo,” identified as a white Mexican-American before the test, but his genetic ancestry test results reported Native American, Celtic and Jewish ancestries. The researchers found that Eduardo disregarded his Celtic ancestry but embraced his Jewish identity, explaining: “I always looked up to the Jewish people… I thought of them as higher than me.”

    Another participant, “Shannon,” was adopted and always believed she had Native American lineage through her birth parents. When her test results revealed no Native American ancestry, she decided the test was incorrect and continued to identify as Native American.

    White respondents were more likely to embrace new racial identities, as long as they felt others would still accept them, the researchers found.

    “White identity is something that lots of people around them have, so it doesn’t feel special,” said Roth. “Part of it may be guilt about being white and feeling somewhat privileged. They want something that makes them feel unique, whereas for many people of colour, they’ve known all along that they have some racial mixture in their ancestry, and it’s not as surprising.”

    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/uobc-gat062818.php

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    Maybe “Eduardo” and/or his spawn will casually mention his “Jewish ancestry” on a college admissions essay or two.
  26. Last yr I stayed at the Oasis Hostel, I don’t even know if it still exists but I got in lafe….it was North of Olympic and a bit off John Mead. The Koreans seemed to me to be okay folk who kept to themselves….

    The problem with koreatown isn’t the Bangladeshis…..its what the late Anthony Bourdain me tioned when he did an episode there in 2013….

    It’s 60% or more latino…..still I love koreatown….relatively safe and the ppl keep to themselves….

  27. @tomv
    I'm not one of those people who think Tiny Duck is an intentional parody, but this comment is giving me a pause. Could it be...?

    Nah. Real parodies are fun -- like DemsRRealRacist and DPRK_News. Tiny is just dull.

    TD has been off his game lately. Amusing us is his only reason for being. He’d better shape up.

  28. @Flip
    I had a Hong Kong Chinese colleague who looked down on women from the Philippines saying they were all maids or prostitutes.

    In Hong Kong, his statement is true. Never saw a Filipina in HK who was anything but.

  29. Obviously Koreans are just racists. Bangladeshis have been taught, in the last decade (if you believe their government), how to use toilets. Clearly they’re not Indians.

    https://thewire.in/health/open-defecation-ends-in-bangladesh-almost

    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Clearly they’re not Indians.

    Great punch-line.
    , @Carlos Cruz
    At least the Bangladeshi government is showing its people how to use toilets, the Indian government has no intention of doing that.
  30. @MarcB.

    She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.
     
    India is a subcontinent of one billion-plus with it's own melange of ethnicities very distinct from Asia. The same goes for the Arab World and other Middle Eastern nations who have magically become part of Asia as of late. Ali Wong would be correct in denying their Asian-ness.

    Your statement’s willful – it can only be willful – ignorance of geography, geology, history, philology, demography, and any number of other fields is monumental.

    A continent’s being vast and containing diverse peoples has no bearing on its being a continent. After all: it’s a continent, for crying out loud….

  31. @Mike1
    Koreatown "vastly prosperous"?! Koreatown is a fairly standard immigrant slum neighborhood. There are huge numbers of very successful Koreans in LA. They don't live in Koreatown.

    The joke in Korean circles is that Korean minimum wage is $10k per month. Below that forget dating.

    The prosperity comes from the thousands of medical offices and clinics in the high rises. It’s the dialysis headquarters of the city among other things. There are lots of homeless.

    There is another weirdly named neighborhood a mile or so south. It used to be a Greek neighborhood centered around the Cathederal.
    Hispanics moved in and it’s now the Latin/Byzantine district. Ethiopians are encroaching so there may be another name change soon.

    Occasionally the LA Times tries to whip up a scandal about Korean Korea Town landlords preferring White and Korean tenants and discriminating against blacks and Hispanics.

    • Replies: @Mike1
    There is a lot of business done there. Banking and finance are huge on Wilshire Blvd and nearby streets and some of the institutions are a lot bigger than people realize. Westlake is huge and almost everyone in LA would draw a blank if you asked them about it.

    Steve seemed to be talking about the residents though and I've yet to meet a well off resident of the area.
  32. @Anon
    Funny but Vietnamese regard themselves superior to jungle Cambodians.

    Vietnam is jungle nation but more East Asian than rest of SE Asia.

    The land now known as Vietnam was part of China for a significant portion of its history.

    • Replies: @Anon
    What would have happened if, upon invading China, the Mongols had Mongolized the Chinese instead of becoming Sinicized by the Chinese?

    China might have become a superpower.
    , @Random Smartaleck

    The land now known as Vietnam was part of China for a significant portion of its history.
     
    So when the CCP eventually wants to put the squeeze on Vietnam, we will be hearing "Vietnam part of China since ancient time" from the 50 Cent Army. (Sorry, I've spent way too much time with those online shills.)
    , @myself

    The land now known as Vietnam was part of China for a significant portion of its history.
     
    That's true, but it seems China has no use for Vietnam now, or in the foreseeable future.

    China doesn't need more people, and what resources Vietnam has are also found in the rest of mainland south-east Asia, or in China itself.

    As long as Vietnam is not used by an outside power as geographical springboard against China, they are considered no real threat - a bit like a hypothetical united Korea, actually - (not, of course, in any ethno-cultural sense, but in a geopolitical setting).

    Sidenote: It seems the Han never tried to erase Korean identity, only steer it in a more Sinic direction. Those who did try to erase the Korean identity, by which I mean, of course, Japan, have earned the lasting hatred of Koreans - which persists to this day, and likely beyond.
  33. @inertial
    I like the street names - Vermont, Normandie. Can you get more white than that? Reminds me of Indian place names in Eastern US where Indians had been cleared out centuries ago.

    Westmoreland, St Andrews streets. There’s a wonderful Jewish Temple that’s an exact copy of one of the famous Roman buildings

    The Main Street, Wilshire in that area is lined with beautiful gray stone gothic style churches and parish schools.

    And the high rises only exist because of the genius of Msr Eiffel, Louis Sullivan and Daniel Burham

    All in all, it’s a glorious example of western civilization from the Roman Temple to the structural steel that enables the building of high rises. And modern medicine too. Also the buses cars subway and trucks, internal combustion engine, electricity, telephones, all the accomplishments of the White European people are displayed in Korea Town

    • Replies: @Mike Zwick
    @Anon, don't forget William Le Baron Jenney.
  34. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    When US cities were white, non-white immigrants sought to assimilate with whiteness.

    The idea was US is essentially a white nation but open to others as well.
    The idea was that white people had the power, wealth, and good stuff. So, whiteness was the ideal, the standard. Quintessentially American. John Wayne stuff.
    After all, the immigrants left their own nations. And they didn’t want to go to non-white nations but to white majority nations, especially America.

    So, as long as whites had the numbers, prestige, and power, all non-white immigrant groups shared something in common: respect for whiteness and wish to merge with whiteness. Whiteness lessened non-white vs non-white tensions because all non-white groups could ignore one another and move toward whiteness.

    But over time in many cities, whites lost the numbers, the prestige, and the power. So, in a city like LA, there is a lot of non-white groups living alongside one another. But none of them represents something that all non-whites want to move to or merge with. Non-white groups once considered the movement-toward-whiteness as the process of ‘Americanization’, but the same cannot be said for movement-toward-non-whiteness(even though the official narrative is that ‘American’ is purely ideological and has nothing to do with race or even culture). (The exception is movement-toward-blackness in style and attitude, but it’s certainly not in jobs, schools, and residence.) It was once considered(and still is, albeit mutedly) prestigious for non-whites to merge with whiteness — synonymous with becoming ‘Americanized’ — , but the same cannot be said for merging with, say, Mexicans, Cambodians, Vietnamese, Hindus, and etc. Even though the official ideology says Mexican-Americanism and Vietnamese-Americanism are just as American as white-Americanism, no one really feels this way. Diversity really means the desire by non-whites to be included in the White or White-made world. Diversity without whiteness would be like building a model without glue. It wouldn’t hold together. It’s been said that Diversity means ‘no more whites’, but that is self-defeating because it’s like a model set without glue. Indeed, diversity without whiteness itself isn’t appealing to most people. Latin America and North Africa are very diverse, but neither has enough whites. India is very diverse, but Hindus prefer to move to a white nation.

    If an Asian-American moves to a white community, he or she feels ‘Americanized’. Indeed, he or she is(or was) willing to surrender his or her own identity to take up this new prestigious ersatz-white identity. But would Chinese-Americans want to give up their identity to merge with Mexican-Americanism, Hindu-Americanism, or even Korean-Americanism? I think not.
    Indeed, it’s interesting that Chinese have been in SE Asian nations for so long BUT they’ve mostly retain their Chinese pride and identity. In contrast, so many East Asians in white nations instantly surrender everything about their race, culture, and language to merge with whiteness or ‘westernness’. People will surrender their culture for something higher but not for something lower. Chinese will surrender Chineseness to become ‘white’ or ‘western’ but not to become ‘Filipino’ or ‘Indonesian’. Maybe Sephardic Jews mixed more with Muslims and Arabs cuz they weren’t all that smarter, whereas Ashkenazi Jews in Europe were less willing to merge with goyim because they were smarter. I dunno.

    If LA had lots of whites, this ‘fancy’ vs ‘jungle’ dichotomy wouldn’t matter. Both the fancies and junglies would focus on merging with whiteness as ideal. But since whiteness is becoming a more precious commodity in places like LA, the fancies and junglies are more ghettoized in their own identities. Vanishing of whiteness means less of something for which Asians(or other non-white groups) are willing to surrender their own identities in order to merge with something higher or more quintessentially American.

    • Replies: @Mike Hunt
    Here are some Koreans that are really wanting to merge with whiteness. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vK3-HCo9zeI
    , @rob
    I don’t know why no one replies to your comments, 425. You’re one of the more interesting voices here.
    , @Romanian
    It is a good explanation. It reminds me of Roger Scruton's explanations for national loyalty. The weaker identity can no longer absorb the incoming ones, so those people can revert to their prepolitical loyalties to tribe, religion, ethnicity etc.
  35. @Stan d Mute
    Obviously Koreans are just racists. Bangladeshis have been taught, in the last decade (if you believe their government), how to use toilets. Clearly they’re not Indians.

    https://thewire.in/health/open-defecation-ends-in-bangladesh-almost

    Clearly they’re not Indians.

    Great punch-line.

  36. @syonredux
    Genetic ancestry test users 'cherry-pick' which races to identify with

    One study participant, "Eduardo," identified as a white Mexican-American before the test, but his genetic ancestry test results reported Native American, Celtic and Jewish ancestries. The researchers found that Eduardo disregarded his Celtic ancestry but embraced his Jewish identity, explaining: "I always looked up to the Jewish people... I thought of them as higher than me."
     

    Another participant, "Shannon," was adopted and always believed she had Native American lineage through her birth parents. When her test results revealed no Native American ancestry, she decided the test was incorrect and continued to identify as Native American.
     

    White respondents were more likely to embrace new racial identities, as long as they felt others would still accept them, the researchers found.
     

    "White identity is something that lots of people around them have, so it doesn't feel special," said Roth. "Part of it may be guilt about being white and feeling somewhat privileged. They want something that makes them feel unique, whereas for many people of colour, they've known all along that they have some racial mixture in their ancestry, and it's not as surprising."
     
    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/uobc-gat062818.php

    Maybe “Eduardo” and/or his spawn will casually mention his “Jewish ancestry” on a college admissions essay or two.

  37. Many Japanese would probably object to being lumped in with Koreans and Chinese, who they wouldn’t consider fancy. Interestingly, they tend to identify with Mongolians, who they consider to be their forebears , more than any other Asians.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Many Japanese would probably object to being lumped in with Koreans and Chinese, who they wouldn’t consider fancy. Interestingly, they tend to identify with Mongolians, who they consider to be their forebears , more than any other Asians.
     
    That's a complete nonsense. Japanese don't consider Mongolians to be their forebears (indeed, the famed/infamous Kamikaze pilots of World War II derived their name - "Divine Wind" - from the storms that destroyed the Mongol-Korean invasion force in 1281).

    Most educated Japanese know that their Divine Emperor descends from Koreans as do a substantial fraction of their most illustrious noble families. Indeed, the Yamato people - the "founders" of Japan - themselves are considered to be invaders from the Korean Peninsula.

    Japanese and Korean genetics are quite similar (similar North Eurasian hunter-gatherer + southern rice grower proportions), and some ancestry testing sites such as DNA Land do not distinguish the two.

    In the post-modern era, many Japanese fancy Korean pop and drama stars. And, of course, despite the old enmities, Koreans are always trying to close the gap with the Japanese, whom they acknowledge as being economically more successful.
  38. “What we’re seeing is the rising of a community, an understanding of the strength of our collective voice and ultimately, the power of our vote,” Korean American Coalition Executive Director Joon Bang said. “This is just the beginning of the Korean American community’s political growth and civic involvement.”

    I imagine if a community of ordinary whites voted against something like this it would not be reported as a strength of our collective voice, and ultimately, the power of our vote. I am sure there would be several invectives about our racism, fear of losing our status, etc, etc.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Unobserved Spectator
    We did when we elected Trump. Your observations about invectives are spot on.
  39. @Daniel Chieh
    The land now known as Vietnam was part of China for a significant portion of its history.

    What would have happened if, upon invading China, the Mongols had Mongolized the Chinese instead of becoming Sinicized by the Chinese?

    China might have become a superpower.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Doubtful. The Mongols didn't seem to effectively adapt to siege warfare and their second invasion into Europe had miserable results; they also lost to Chinese castles such as Diaoyu, but China built very few of them unlike Europe which put up nearly a hundred.

    Despite their early setbacks and multiple warnings, the Mongols never seemed to learn how to deal with castles.

    A more Turkic China, on the other hand, such as during the Tang Dynasty appears to have been much more aggressive and effective and it was during that time that China reached its greatest territorial extent(including the conquest of Annam, which would include present-day Vietnam).
  40. Contrary to this narrative, Filipino Americans are considerably more prosperous than Korean Americans :

    is a vastly prosperous highrise district.

    Even Steve fell for it. Koreans are somehow assumed to be wealthy even among Asian-Americans, perhaps because of some TV shows in the 80s and 90s. The truth is quite different.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Even Steve fell for it. Koreans are somehow assumed to be wealthy even among Asian-Americans, perhaps because of some TV shows in the 80s and 90s. The truth is quite different.
     
    He may understand the situation more than you think (and know).

    Filipino immigration to the U.S., somewhat akin to Indian immigration (but to a lesser extent), is selective. Korean immigration is not. The latter is much more bifurcated than immigration from the former two countries. Quality of life South Korea today is orders of magnitude better than that in the Philippines or India. South Korea is a first world country with a high standard of living and human development. People who emigrate from there to the West these days are either very high IQ/drive people looking for a bigger stage (e.g. scientists) or those from the lower end who can't compete in their home countries. And Korean immigration overall has declined dramatically and will continue to do so, as did earlier waves of immigrants from Japan.
    , @Anonymous Jew
    Nurses can make good money. IIRC, Filipinos weren't always this successful, but the more recent immigrant waves have been more selective (correct me if I'm wrong). I also came across recent Filipino academic figures and the numbers are quite good and comparable to the Fancy Asians.

    Most of these groups are more successful and law abiding than the average American - even the average White American - so from a purely utilitarian perspective they're a net benefit. Unfortunately, even when you limit yourself to high-IQ immigrants diversity has other negative effects.

  41. @Daniel Chieh
    The land now known as Vietnam was part of China for a significant portion of its history.

    The land now known as Vietnam was part of China for a significant portion of its history.

    So when the CCP eventually wants to put the squeeze on Vietnam, we will be hearing “Vietnam part of China since ancient time” from the 50 Cent Army. (Sorry, I’ve spent way too much time with those online shills.)

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    You may well know this, since your sarcasm is kind of hard to fathom for me, but China tried to "put the squeeze" on Vietnam in a war in the late 1970's. I think the Vietnamese Army must have still been pretty hardened at that time.
  42. @White Guy In Japan
    Although the Vietnamese hate the Chinese, I can see a strong cultural influence. Confucian merchant culture, etc. Test scores and economic growth exhibit more East Asian patterns.

    Oh, everyone looks down on Cambodia. Even the neighboring Thai. Have been there twice. Interesting but sad little country.

    Confucian merchant culture

    What?

    • Replies: @unpc downunder
    He probably means 21st Century Confucian culture, as opposed to the anachronistic definition provided by Wikipedia.

    Classical Confucian culture: scholars on top, artisans and farmers in the middle, merchants bottom.

    Post-communist Confucian culture: white collar workers on top, blue collar workers bottom.
  43. There are jungle Asians, there are fancy Asians, and then there are rooftop Asians. You all can guess which I prefer.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Twinkie:

    Rooftop Asians, or rooftop Koreans?
    , @Anonymous
    The jungle Asians are pretty kick-ass. I recall reading a story from 2003 about an Army colonel who was overseeing a large operation and movement of military personnel in Al-Anbar Province as the U.S. military was seizing territory. This colonel, not a young guy, had served in Vietnam. The U.S. troops came under an hellacious attack by a huge number of enemy fighters. The U.S. troops were able to repel the attack and wipe them out killing thousands of enemy. The colonel said afterwards that if they had been Viet Cong fighters attacking them his men would’ve been overrun and totally wiped out.
    , @Stationary Feast
    Fancy rooftop Asians?
  44. @Twinkie
    There are jungle Asians, there are fancy Asians, and then there are rooftop Asians. You all can guess which I prefer.

    Twinkie:

    Rooftop Asians, or rooftop Koreans?

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    I think he means only one of these various types of rooftop Asians...

    https://ak6.picdn.net/shutterstock/videos/6724366/thumb/1.jpg

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-EaVkBGvkc4k/UgXF2YpROYI/AAAAAAAAASM/wP7Lwg_uqmg/s640/%D9%86%D9%854.jpg

    http://i3.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/001/175/667/7ad.jpg

    https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/assets.barcroft.tv/aaa280ac-1011-4b4c-8318-0eb238234600.jpg

  45. Long ago and far away I used to work in Washington State with many Jungle Asians making heads up displays for F-15s by hand. We all got along well on the face of it but when I was talking with my friends in my group— all who were Vietnamese, they’d occasionally say mildly demeaning things about the other ethnicities, Thais, Laos, Cambodians, Filipinos, and though we had no Chinese there they’d rag on the Chinese especially. I assumed they did the same about (we) Caucasians, and definitely thought so after they quickly stopped talking in Vietnamese when a certain ex-Vietnam vet boss who knew the language came by. Mostly they indicated to me that Chinese are never to be trusted and are very sly and cruel, that Cambodians are a mongrel and dishonest people, Thais are haughty, Filipinos are mixed and low class, Lao people dumb and eat “dirty rice” and — surprise— Vietnamese are superior, smart and of a pure race and are the only people to have fought the Chinese and won. They never said to me what they thought of Caucasians other than we were “child like” and amusingly large and clumsy.

  46. Anonymous[574] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie
    There are jungle Asians, there are fancy Asians, and then there are rooftop Asians. You all can guess which I prefer.

    The jungle Asians are pretty kick-ass. I recall reading a story from 2003 about an Army colonel who was overseeing a large operation and movement of military personnel in Al-Anbar Province as the U.S. military was seizing territory. This colonel, not a young guy, had served in Vietnam. The U.S. troops came under an hellacious attack by a huge number of enemy fighters. The U.S. troops were able to repel the attack and wipe them out killing thousands of enemy. The colonel said afterwards that if they had been Viet Cong fighters attacking them his men would’ve been overrun and totally wiped out.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    The jungle Asians are pretty kick-ass.
     
    Rooftop Asians, though, kicked jungle Asian ass in the Vietnam War.
  47. @MarcB.

    She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.
     
    India is a subcontinent of one billion-plus with it's own melange of ethnicities very distinct from Asia. The same goes for the Arab World and other Middle Eastern nations who have magically become part of Asia as of late. Ali Wong would be correct in denying their Asian-ness.

    The same goes for the Arab World and other Middle Eastern nations who have magically become part of Asia as of late.

    If, by “of late”, you mean since the time of Herodotus (circa 440 BC), then yes.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I reckon maybe he meant the late Iron Age...?
  48. To its credit, the New York Times noticed in 2009.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/07/us/07koreatown.html

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    Somewhat amusingly, one now sees South Asians and their various communities in South Korea, especially in Seoul. Supposedly there are around 10,000+ Indians there.
  49. @PiltdownMan

    The same goes for the Arab World and other Middle Eastern nations who have magically become part of Asia as of late.
     
    If, by "of late", you mean since the time of Herodotus (circa 440 BC), then yes.

    I reckon maybe he meant the late Iron Age…?

  50. @Dan Hayes
    Twinkie:

    Rooftop Asians, or rooftop Koreans?

    I think he means only one of these various types of rooftop Asians…

    • LOL: Twinkie
  51. @Anon
    What would have happened if, upon invading China, the Mongols had Mongolized the Chinese instead of becoming Sinicized by the Chinese?

    China might have become a superpower.

    Doubtful. The Mongols didn’t seem to effectively adapt to siege warfare and their second invasion into Europe had miserable results; they also lost to Chinese castles such as Diaoyu, but China built very few of them unlike Europe which put up nearly a hundred.

    Despite their early setbacks and multiple warnings, the Mongols never seemed to learn how to deal with castles.

    A more Turkic China, on the other hand, such as during the Tang Dynasty appears to have been much more aggressive and effective and it was during that time that China reached its greatest territorial extent(including the conquest of Annam, which would include present-day Vietnam).

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    The Mongols didn’t seem to effectively adapt to siege warfare
     
    You need re-learn your history, Mr. Chieh: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongol_military_tactics_and_organization#Catapults_and_machines

    The Mongols were rather good at using Chinese and Persian engineers to build siege engines to smash fortress and city walls. And when the occasion called it for it, they even used them on the battlefield such as at the Battle of Mohi in 1241. The Mongols attempted to secure a bridge across the Sajo River and suffered considerable casualties at the hands of the Hungarian crossbowmen who were stationed to guard it. Batu then used catapults to clear the crossbowmen on the opposite bank and completed the crossing and the Mongols went on to annihilate the Hungarians and their allies in the subsequent main battle.
    , @IBC
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Baghdad_%281258%29
  52. @J.Ross
    Somewhat on this topic, a good Wired article, from a progressive but a decent journalist, on how the Willie Brown Million Dollar Bonanza Schoolvaganza failed (both of them).
    https://www.wired.com/story/willie-brown-middle-school-startup-mentality-failed/

    Landake was later quoted in the San Francisco Examiner: “The first day of school there were, like, multiple incidents of physical violence.” After just a month, Principal Hobson quit, and an interim took charge. In mid-October, less than two months into the first school year, a third principal came on board. According to a local newspaper, in these first few months, six other faculty members resigned. (The district disputes this figure.) In a school survey, only 16 percent of the Brown staff described the campus as safe.
     

    In the end, we sent our younger daughter back to private school—because Landake and Green told me not to send her to Brown and our efforts to place her in a different public school failed. Our private school discount was gone, and the cost was painful, but I was grateful to have the option. Still, I hated the way it felt. Our older daughter is getting a great education at a public high school, all public schools need community support, and I could not convince myself that I’d made the right decision. It is entirely possible that our daughter could have thrived at Brown.

    His older daughter attends Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts, a selective school that admits students based on auditions or portfolios. Asawa’s demographics: 40% white, 27% Asian, 15% Hispanic, 10% two or more races, and 7% black.

    https://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/california/districts/san-francisco-unified-school-district/ruth-asawa-san-francisco-school-of-the-arts-3252/student-body
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruth_Asawa_San_Francisco_School_of_the_Arts

  53. @MarcB.

    She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.
     
    India is a subcontinent of one billion-plus with it's own melange of ethnicities very distinct from Asia. The same goes for the Arab World and other Middle Eastern nations who have magically become part of Asia as of late. Ali Wong would be correct in denying their Asian-ness.

    Ok, can we go back to calling East Asians “Orientals” to avoid confusions? It used to work very well back in the day.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    I like Celestials!
  54. @Anonymous
    The jungle Asians are pretty kick-ass. I recall reading a story from 2003 about an Army colonel who was overseeing a large operation and movement of military personnel in Al-Anbar Province as the U.S. military was seizing territory. This colonel, not a young guy, had served in Vietnam. The U.S. troops came under an hellacious attack by a huge number of enemy fighters. The U.S. troops were able to repel the attack and wipe them out killing thousands of enemy. The colonel said afterwards that if they had been Viet Cong fighters attacking them his men would’ve been overrun and totally wiped out.

    The jungle Asians are pretty kick-ass.

    Rooftop Asians, though, kicked jungle Asian ass in the Vietnam War.

    • Replies: @Corn
    I’ve read the VC greatly feared the ROK troops sent to Vietnam, especially because they conducted “active” interrogations of captured VC
  55. Do Korean men like White women?

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Do Korean men like White women?
     
    American-born Korean men have the highest rate of intermarriage with white women among all Asian males in America. What do you think?
    , @King Baeksu

    Do Korean men like White women?
     
    "Ride the white horse" is a common expression among South Korean menfolk.

    I'm sure it's perfectly innocent.
    , @IBC
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franziska_Donner
  56. @Daniel Chieh
    Doubtful. The Mongols didn't seem to effectively adapt to siege warfare and their second invasion into Europe had miserable results; they also lost to Chinese castles such as Diaoyu, but China built very few of them unlike Europe which put up nearly a hundred.

    Despite their early setbacks and multiple warnings, the Mongols never seemed to learn how to deal with castles.

    A more Turkic China, on the other hand, such as during the Tang Dynasty appears to have been much more aggressive and effective and it was during that time that China reached its greatest territorial extent(including the conquest of Annam, which would include present-day Vietnam).

    The Mongols didn’t seem to effectively adapt to siege warfare

    You need re-learn your history, Mr. Chieh: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongol_military_tactics_and_organization#Catapults_and_machines

    The Mongols were rather good at using Chinese and Persian engineers to build siege engines to smash fortress and city walls. And when the occasion called it for it, they even used them on the battlefield such as at the Battle of Mohi in 1241. The Mongols attempted to secure a bridge across the Sajo River and suffered considerable casualties at the hands of the Hungarian crossbowmen who were stationed to guard it. Batu then used catapults to clear the crossbowmen on the opposite bank and completed the crossing and the Mongols went on to annihilate the Hungarians and their allies in the subsequent main battle.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Mongol_invasion_of_Hungary


    The results of the invasion could not have contrasted more sharply with those of the 1241 invasion. The invasion was repelled handily, and the Mongols lost much of their invading force due to several months of starvation, numerous small raids, and two major military defeats. This was mostly thanks to the new fortification network and the military reforms. No major invasion of Hungary would be launched after the failure of the campaign of 1285, though small raids from the Golden Horde were frequent well into the 14th century. Less than two years later, the Third Mongol invasion of Poland occurred. This invasion was also repulsed, with the Poles using a similar strategy to the Hungarians in 1285.
     
  57. @foulkes
    Many Japanese would probably object to being lumped in with Koreans and Chinese, who they wouldn't consider fancy. Interestingly, they tend to identify with Mongolians, who they consider to be their forebears , more than any other Asians.

    Many Japanese would probably object to being lumped in with Koreans and Chinese, who they wouldn’t consider fancy. Interestingly, they tend to identify with Mongolians, who they consider to be their forebears , more than any other Asians.

    That’s a complete nonsense. Japanese don’t consider Mongolians to be their forebears (indeed, the famed/infamous Kamikaze pilots of World War II derived their name – “Divine Wind” – from the storms that destroyed the Mongol-Korean invasion force in 1281).

    Most educated Japanese know that their Divine Emperor descends from Koreans as do a substantial fraction of their most illustrious noble families. Indeed, the Yamato people – the “founders” of Japan – themselves are considered to be invaders from the Korean Peninsula.

    Japanese and Korean genetics are quite similar (similar North Eurasian hunter-gatherer + southern rice grower proportions), and some ancestry testing sites such as DNA Land do not distinguish the two.

    In the post-modern era, many Japanese fancy Korean pop and drama stars. And, of course, despite the old enmities, Koreans are always trying to close the gap with the Japanese, whom they acknowledge as being economically more successful.

    • Replies: @epochehusserl
    Im not sure about the Korean part, but I think he is right. Japanese dont want to be lumped in together with the Chinese or any other Asian.
    , @foulkes
    My view comes from several visits to Japan as well as having Japanese friends and acquaintances . They are quick to inform you there is a difference between them and Chinese and Koreans. They don't like it when you say you can't see the difference between them. Their history, language and culture has been largely separate form the continent since about 800AD. Something like Britain and Europe , only more so.

    I'm not up on all the recent DNA studies , but I have heard more than one Japanese say they 're descended from Mongolians and that Mongolians have the same facial features. Interestingly, it is only Chinese and Koreans that say they are Japan's forebears.

    As for the Mongol attempted invasions in the 13th century. Just because the Mongols settled your islands thousands of years before doesn't mean you let them invade you.
  58. @Karl
    > from Vietnam, Philippines, Laos, etc.


    i myself wouldn't put the Viets in the same bucket as the Filipinos...... every year, the Philippines buys approx half of its rice ration from the Vietnamese. And the Vietnamese don't do ASEAN-solidarity-price-discount, shipmate. It's all right there in the pages of the _Singapore Financial Times_


    > (I don’t know where Bangladeshis would fit in for her, if at all

    from what I can tell (it's not easy to measure) Bangladeshi men have THE HIGHEST RATE in the world, of violence against women.

    Of course, Ali wouldn't know about these things..... Koreatown is the closest she's ever been to Asia.

    “from what I can tell (it’s not easy to measure) Bangladeshi men have THE HIGHEST RATE in the world, of violence against women”

    Certainly East London, heavily Bangladeshi, is the epicentre of the UK acid attack epidemic (which black gangs have quickly adopted). It seems to have started as a way of showing displeasure with one’s wife, though it rapidly mutated into a general tool of thuggery. On the other hand Bangladeshis have traditionally not been as into Islamist terror as their Pakistani co-religionists, though there have been some recent (mostly failed) plots.

    Back on topic, the Koreatown boys are simply following the guidance of the late James Brown

    The way I like it
    Is the way it is
    I’ve got mine
    Don’t worry ’bout his

    • Replies: @Karl
    59 YetAnotheAnon > It seems to have started as a way of showing displeasure with one’s wife


    i think it mostly happens when a girl refuses the advances of a guy.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Certainly East London, heavily Bangladeshi, is the epicentre of the UK acid attack epidemic (which black gangs have quickly adopted). It seems to have started as a way of showing displeasure with one’s wife
     
    Whose "wife" was Victor Riesel?

    http://www.nydailynews.com/resizer/GPLcaNWbX5gZbBwvCse_eeQxEfg=/1400x0/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-tronc.s3.amazonaws.com/public/KKLRMOEL4BGECZGCLCQ7ZDR3IE.jpg
  59. @Thomm
    Contrary to this narrative, Filipino Americans are considerably more prosperous than Korean Americans :

    http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2017/09/08091819/FT_17.09.08_asian_income.png


    is a vastly prosperous highrise district.
     
    Even Steve fell for it. Koreans are somehow assumed to be wealthy even among Asian-Americans, perhaps because of some TV shows in the 80s and 90s. The truth is quite different.

    Even Steve fell for it. Koreans are somehow assumed to be wealthy even among Asian-Americans, perhaps because of some TV shows in the 80s and 90s. The truth is quite different.

    He may understand the situation more than you think (and know).

    Filipino immigration to the U.S., somewhat akin to Indian immigration (but to a lesser extent), is selective. Korean immigration is not. The latter is much more bifurcated than immigration from the former two countries. Quality of life South Korea today is orders of magnitude better than that in the Philippines or India. South Korea is a first world country with a high standard of living and human development. People who emigrate from there to the West these days are either very high IQ/drive people looking for a bigger stage (e.g. scientists) or those from the lower end who can’t compete in their home countries. And Korean immigration overall has declined dramatically and will continue to do so, as did earlier waves of immigrants from Japan.

    • Replies: @Thomm
    You completely missed the point.

    The point is, Koreans are not a high-achieving group in the US, contrary to the stereotype. The chart indicates it. If Koreans in the US think they are superior to Filipinos ('Jungle Asians'), they are sorely mistaken.

    Among Asians, there is no correlation between the per-capita GDP of the country of origin, and the success rate of that community in the US. Japanese Americans outperform Korean Americans by a lot too, which completely invalidates your convoluted and self-contradictory claim.

    http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2017/09/08091819/FT_17.09.08_asian_income.png
  60. @PiltdownMan
    To its credit, the New York Times noticed in 2009.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/07/us/07koreatown.html


    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2009/04/07/us/koreatown650.jpg

    Somewhat amusingly, one now sees South Asians and their various communities in South Korea, especially in Seoul. Supposedly there are around 10,000+ Indians there.

  61. @JohnnyWalker123
    Do Korean men like White women?

    Do Korean men like White women?

    American-born Korean men have the highest rate of intermarriage with white women among all Asian males in America. What do you think?

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    American-born Korean men have the highest rate of intermarriage with white women among all Asian males in America. What do you think?
     
    I think this is due to the extremely scrutinizing nature of Korean mothers toward potential/actual daughter-in-laws. The bar is set way too high and there will be decades of hyper-scrutinizing of their daughter-in-law for any transgression or perceived transgression. And fancy Asians, or God forbid jungle Asians, aren’t an option due to all other Asian groups being viewed as inferior, except for Japanese. And they are off limits due to being the mortal enemy. Thus many Korean-American males are left with one option, cognitive-elite white women.
  62. We have a “Banglatown” in London. Unfortunately, we have tended to be colonised by a more representative class of Bangladeshi than I suspect the US has. Our “Banglatown” is the acid attack hotspot of the UK and previously had an ultra-corrupt Islamist Mayor who ran politics in the corrupt, communal, vote-rigging South Asian style.

    The area, also known as Tower Hamlets, is literally in the shadow of the City of London. As in, adjacent to the “Square Mile” and co-financial capital of the world. The area has a lot of public housing, where the Bangladeshis live. This is not only mostly free for them but it comes with all sorts of welfare and fecundity. British hipster-types also live in the area, having moved in from the countryside and small towns, at substantial expense, while they delay marriage and put off childbirth.

    It actually makes for quite a fun place and has a good energy.

    As they say, London is the future of Britain.

    They forget though that when Britain is just like London, there’ll be no bright, young Brits to move in and jazz it all up.

    “Oh, well” they say “the young descendants of immigrants are just like us”; which is true for the children of the ones who fit in almost right away and who are the ones we socialise with. It is entirely false for the others. Strange how people take after their parents, I wonder if anyone has ever noticed that before…

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    How is it possible to have crimes like that with overwhelming camera surveilance in London?
    , @Holder Jenns
    "It actually makes for quite a fun place and has a good energy." You'd love the compost in my garden, lots of heat, energy with a good vibe knowing all will rot and break down some day.
  63. @Anon
    Funny but Vietnamese regard themselves superior to jungle Cambodians.

    Vietnam is jungle nation but more East Asian than rest of SE Asia.

    Cambodians are an older population that remains despite the waves of immigration that swept over SE Asia from Southern China. They are an ethnically distinct holdout with pockets in various surrounding countries too.

  64. @J.Ross
    Harlan Ellison is dead. He was often wrong and sometimes visibly dishonest, but at all times a masterful writer and a joy to read. He was the textbook example of a writer you could disagree with but nonetheless fully enjoy. Hopefully his I, Robot script gets made -- it didn't because Harlan just had to be Harlan when confronted with some Weinstein.
    http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-harlan-ellison-20180628-story.html

    Now I’m curious – what was Ellison so dishonest about? Was all his stuff about joining gangs in the 1950s a lie?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I am certain that many of his claims are not completely true.
    His Eisenstein-worthy characterization of the Kent State shootings was simply not true, and when he was informed, he waved facts away and insisted the discussion be refocused on What This Says About Us. This occupies his introduction to the collection that includes the story "Knox," which is literally explaining fascisifying ugliest-possible flyover country folk as a conspiracy by reptiloid aliens.
    Maybe dishonest is the wrong word because he often seemed to passionately believe in things that were not completely true, but he always made it into a legal matter, which means sincere belief is not enough.
    Harlan was famously litigious about intellectual property, but his stories (and notably the ones that were supposedly stolen from) are rarely unique. His presentation was always one of a kind, but plot, plot mechanisms, characters, twists, resolutions, and technology would normally look an awful lot like something done by a less famous, less talented guy, who had not seen grounds for a lawsuit. And sci-fi borrows so much it might be better to say it shares.
    There are notable comparisons between two Outer Limits episodes he wrote and James Cameron's Terminator concept, but there's another Outer Limits episode not by Ellison which is actually much closer, and that one wasn't the basis of a suit. (If I was Cameron I would have responded to the lawsuit with a public showing of Demon with a Glass Hand -- not totally free, Ellison would be paid a royalty -- so people could see the original terminator costume: a huge chest medallion necklace, a beanie, and swim goggles). His famous and uniquely hysterical nuclear holocaust classics were written at a time when everybody was doing that, using many of the same elements (but never Ellison's Symbolist-worthy drunken fugues).
    Maybe instead of dishonest I should have said he retained more youthful conviction than is healthy in a person of drinking and shooting age.
  65. @BB753
    Ok, can we go back to calling East Asians "Orientals" to avoid confusions? It used to work very well back in the day.

    I like Celestials!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    That one's specific to China.
  66. @MarcB.

    She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.
     
    India is a subcontinent of one billion-plus with it's own melange of ethnicities very distinct from Asia. The same goes for the Arab World and other Middle Eastern nations who have magically become part of Asia as of late. Ali Wong would be correct in denying their Asian-ness.

    theyre in asian continent.

  67. @Twinkie

    The Mongols didn’t seem to effectively adapt to siege warfare
     
    You need re-learn your history, Mr. Chieh: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongol_military_tactics_and_organization#Catapults_and_machines

    The Mongols were rather good at using Chinese and Persian engineers to build siege engines to smash fortress and city walls. And when the occasion called it for it, they even used them on the battlefield such as at the Battle of Mohi in 1241. The Mongols attempted to secure a bridge across the Sajo River and suffered considerable casualties at the hands of the Hungarian crossbowmen who were stationed to guard it. Batu then used catapults to clear the crossbowmen on the opposite bank and completed the crossing and the Mongols went on to annihilate the Hungarians and their allies in the subsequent main battle.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Mongol_invasion_of_Hungary

    The results of the invasion could not have contrasted more sharply with those of the 1241 invasion. The invasion was repelled handily, and the Mongols lost much of their invading force due to several months of starvation, numerous small raids, and two major military defeats. This was mostly thanks to the new fortification network and the military reforms. No major invasion of Hungary would be launched after the failure of the campaign of 1285, though small raids from the Golden Horde were frequent well into the 14th century. Less than two years later, the Third Mongol invasion of Poland occurred. This invasion was also repulsed, with the Poles using a similar strategy to the Hungarians in 1285.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Fortifications aid in defense against raiding expeditions, news at eleven.
    , @Unzerker
    That's really interesting. I thought the claim that the Mongols did not conquer Europe because of all the castles was a purely theoretical one.

    But now I see that both the Mongol invasions of Hungary in 1285 and the one in Poland two years later were thoroughly defeated because they fortified their cities and built more castles.
    , @Twinkie
    Hungarians reputedly built over 100 stone castles and fortresses prior to the second invasion. Even with the best siege engines of the day (counterweight trebuchet, which the Mongols possessed), overrunning that many stone fortresses was a tall order.

    Furthermore, remember that the first, highly successful, invasion of Hungary was headed by Batu and Subotai and their army was made up of imperial tumens (actual Mongol troops) who were fully backed by the entire Mongol Empire.

    The second invasion was a much smaller affair, led by a warlord of the Golden Horde (Nogai), long after there had been serious civil wars between the Golden Horde on the one hand and Il-Khanate and Chagatai Khanate on the other hand. It's highly likely that Nogai, therefore, did not have access to siege engineers from Persian or Chinese Mongol domains. In any case, Nogai's troops were likely Kipchak conscripts, who were of considerably lower quality than Mongol imperial tumens.
  68. @Tyrion 2
    We have a "Banglatown" in London. Unfortunately, we have tended to be colonised by a more representative class of Bangladeshi than I suspect the US has. Our "Banglatown" is the acid attack hotspot of the UK and previously had an ultra-corrupt Islamist Mayor who ran politics in the corrupt, communal, vote-rigging South Asian style.

    The area, also known as Tower Hamlets, is literally in the shadow of the City of London. As in, adjacent to the "Square Mile" and co-financial capital of the world. The area has a lot of public housing, where the Bangladeshis live. This is not only mostly free for them but it comes with all sorts of welfare and fecundity. British hipster-types also live in the area, having moved in from the countryside and small towns, at substantial expense, while they delay marriage and put off childbirth.

    It actually makes for quite a fun place and has a good energy.

    As they say, London is the future of Britain.

    They forget though that when Britain is just like London, there'll be no bright, young Brits to move in and jazz it all up.

    "Oh, well" they say "the young descendants of immigrants are just like us"; which is true for the children of the ones who fit in almost right away and who are the ones we socialise with. It is entirely false for the others. Strange how people take after their parents, I wonder if anyone has ever noticed that before...

    How is it possible to have crimes like that with overwhelming camera surveilance in London?

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    Charitably, I'd say preserving honour trumps getting caught.

    Pragmatically, it isn't impossible to avoid identification. You need only wear a hood or cap or something like that.

    Realistically, those who commit the crimes would probably not do well on the 'have one donut now or wait 20 minutes and have two' test.

    Likely, to be mostly a mixture between all three.
    , @Anonymous

    How is it possible to have crimes like that with overwhelming camera surveilance in London?
     
    "Police" are infested with females and prefer to go after more respectable (and less violent) older white men for non-PC Facebook posts and lucrative traffic infractions.

    Police shy away from confronting aggressive Muslim males with their clan support. Wouldn't be good for the Great God of "Community Cohesion."

    This goes double for female cops and the hyper-PC bosses.

  69. @Daniel Chieh
    How is it possible to have crimes like that with overwhelming camera surveilance in London?

    Charitably, I’d say preserving honour trumps getting caught.

    Pragmatically, it isn’t impossible to avoid identification. You need only wear a hood or cap or something like that.

    Realistically, those who commit the crimes would probably not do well on the ‘have one donut now or wait 20 minutes and have two’ test.

    Likely, to be mostly a mixture between all three.

  70. @JohnnyWalker123
    Do Korean men like White women?

    Do Korean men like White women?

    “Ride the white horse” is a common expression among South Korean menfolk.

    I’m sure it’s perfectly innocent.

  71. How do the tell each other apart?

  72. @Alden
    Westmoreland, St Andrews streets. There’s a wonderful Jewish Temple that’s an exact copy of one of the famous Roman buildings

    The Main Street, Wilshire in that area is lined with beautiful gray stone gothic style churches and parish schools.

    And the high rises only exist because of the genius of Msr Eiffel, Louis Sullivan and Daniel Burham

    All in all, it’s a glorious example of western civilization from the Roman Temple to the structural steel that enables the building of high rises. And modern medicine too. Also the buses cars subway and trucks, internal combustion engine, electricity, telephones, all the accomplishments of the White European people are displayed in Korea Town

    , don’t forget William Le Baron Jenney.

  73. Anonymous[266] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie

    Do Korean men like White women?
     
    American-born Korean men have the highest rate of intermarriage with white women among all Asian males in America. What do you think?

    American-born Korean men have the highest rate of intermarriage with white women among all Asian males in America. What do you think?

    I think this is due to the extremely scrutinizing nature of Korean mothers toward potential/actual daughter-in-laws. The bar is set way too high and there will be decades of hyper-scrutinizing of their daughter-in-law for any transgression or perceived transgression. And fancy Asians, or God forbid jungle Asians, aren’t an option due to all other Asian groups being viewed as inferior, except for Japanese. And they are off limits due to being the mortal enemy. Thus many Korean-American males are left with one option, cognitive-elite white women.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    [Correction: daughters-in-law, not daughter-in-laws]

    Daughters-in-Law 며느리 전성시대

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daughters-in-Law
  74. Anonymous[266] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    American-born Korean men have the highest rate of intermarriage with white women among all Asian males in America. What do you think?
     
    I think this is due to the extremely scrutinizing nature of Korean mothers toward potential/actual daughter-in-laws. The bar is set way too high and there will be decades of hyper-scrutinizing of their daughter-in-law for any transgression or perceived transgression. And fancy Asians, or God forbid jungle Asians, aren’t an option due to all other Asian groups being viewed as inferior, except for Japanese. And they are off limits due to being the mortal enemy. Thus many Korean-American males are left with one option, cognitive-elite white women.

    [Correction: daughters-in-law, not daughter-in-laws]

    Daughters-in-Law 며느리 전성시대

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daughters-in-Law

  75. The US got by and large the good Pakistanis, your anaesthesiologists etc. They were originally urban Indians who got kicked out. UK got the mountain, reaver types.

    I am not sure if there are good Bangladeshi. Burma sure seems to hate them. But why even take the chance?

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    I am not sure if there are good Bangladeshi.
     
    Last year, Steve wrote about a very savvy one.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/is-this-sjw-tiger-child-for-real-this-sounds-like-clickhole/
  76. @MarcB.

    She probably doesn’t consider them Asian.
     
    India is a subcontinent of one billion-plus with it's own melange of ethnicities very distinct from Asia. The same goes for the Arab World and other Middle Eastern nations who have magically become part of Asia as of late. Ali Wong would be correct in denying their Asian-ness.

    By second grade, I knew what Asia was and that India and the middle east are in Asia.

    Asia has many different racial and ethnic groups, and many different biomes, but they’re all equally “Asian.” In the US, people generally use “Asian” as shorthand for “East Asian”, aka Mongoloid, but they’re no more Asian than an Indian or a Saudi are.

    In Britain, “Asian” generally refers to Pakistanis and Indians, since they don’t have many ethnic East Asians there.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    "Asia" may have some utility as a purely geographic term though more accurately it's the gigantic land mass known as Eurasia. Anthropologically, calling everybody from Beirut to Tokyo "Asian" makes no sense. You may as well call them "Earthian."
  77. @Daniel Chieh
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Mongol_invasion_of_Hungary


    The results of the invasion could not have contrasted more sharply with those of the 1241 invasion. The invasion was repelled handily, and the Mongols lost much of their invading force due to several months of starvation, numerous small raids, and two major military defeats. This was mostly thanks to the new fortification network and the military reforms. No major invasion of Hungary would be launched after the failure of the campaign of 1285, though small raids from the Golden Horde were frequent well into the 14th century. Less than two years later, the Third Mongol invasion of Poland occurred. This invasion was also repulsed, with the Poles using a similar strategy to the Hungarians in 1285.
     

    Fortifications aid in defense against raiding expeditions, news at eleven.

  78. Makes me want to laugh, if I weren’t crying. I’m getting to understand how the Native American and Californio felt. Just down the road from Koreatown in Los Angeles is Westminster/Garden Grove, it used to be a relatively nice, middle-class area until the US lost Vietnam and the refugees from Vietnam came over and created ‘Little Saigon’. Now, this is the laughing/crying part, there is a ‘Koreatown of Little Saigon’ where Koreans are taking over from the Vietnamese. I guess what is good for the goose (Koreans) ain’t good for the gander (Bangladeshi) at least in Los Angeles. HAHAHA! I wish I could sit in my lawn chair with my cooler and watch the parade of idiocy except I’m in the middle of it!

  79. Anonymous[249] • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    How is it possible to have crimes like that with overwhelming camera surveilance in London?

    How is it possible to have crimes like that with overwhelming camera surveilance in London?

    “Police” are infested with females and prefer to go after more respectable (and less violent) older white men for non-PC Facebook posts and lucrative traffic infractions.

    Police shy away from confronting aggressive Muslim males with their clan support. Wouldn’t be good for the Great God of “Community Cohesion.”

    This goes double for female cops and the hyper-PC bosses.

  80. @Alden
    The prosperity comes from the thousands of medical offices and clinics in the high rises. It’s the dialysis headquarters of the city among other things. There are lots of homeless.

    There is another weirdly named neighborhood a mile or so south. It used to be a Greek neighborhood centered around the Cathederal.
    Hispanics moved in and it’s now the Latin/Byzantine district. Ethiopians are encroaching so there may be another name change soon.

    Occasionally the LA Times tries to whip up a scandal about Korean Korea Town landlords preferring White and Korean tenants and discriminating against blacks and Hispanics.

    There is a lot of business done there. Banking and finance are huge on Wilshire Blvd and nearby streets and some of the institutions are a lot bigger than people realize. Westlake is huge and almost everyone in LA would draw a blank if you asked them about it.

    Steve seemed to be talking about the residents though and I’ve yet to meet a well off resident of the area.

  81. @Daniel Chieh
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Mongol_invasion_of_Hungary


    The results of the invasion could not have contrasted more sharply with those of the 1241 invasion. The invasion was repelled handily, and the Mongols lost much of their invading force due to several months of starvation, numerous small raids, and two major military defeats. This was mostly thanks to the new fortification network and the military reforms. No major invasion of Hungary would be launched after the failure of the campaign of 1285, though small raids from the Golden Horde were frequent well into the 14th century. Less than two years later, the Third Mongol invasion of Poland occurred. This invasion was also repulsed, with the Poles using a similar strategy to the Hungarians in 1285.
     

    That’s really interesting. I thought the claim that the Mongols did not conquer Europe because of all the castles was a purely theoretical one.

    But now I see that both the Mongol invasions of Hungary in 1285 and the one in Poland two years later were thoroughly defeated because they fortified their cities and built more castles.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Strictly speaking, castles don't really stop raiders and brigands were widespread in Europe, they don't really stop a force from stealing what they can and leaving. Its not realistic to fortify everything.

    What they do is that they make it impossible for a large force to invade: each castle "bypassed" becomes a permanent source of harassment, threat to supply lines, and essentially gives the initiative to the defenders who can choose the time of their fights.

    European castlemaking is quite impressive, and it created demand for an entire profession of skilled engineers, arguably exceeding classical knowledge of stoneworking.
  82. @Random Smartaleck

    The land now known as Vietnam was part of China for a significant portion of its history.
     
    So when the CCP eventually wants to put the squeeze on Vietnam, we will be hearing "Vietnam part of China since ancient time" from the 50 Cent Army. (Sorry, I've spent way too much time with those online shills.)

    You may well know this, since your sarcasm is kind of hard to fathom for me, but China tried to “put the squeeze” on Vietnam in a war in the late 1970’s. I think the Vietnamese Army must have still been pretty hardened at that time.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    China later used them for target practice.

    http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/war-turned-china-military-superpower-23954

    They are, understandably, a bit miffed about it. Hard to say they didn't deserve it for going on a merry land grab in Cambodia, though.
  83. @Tiny Duck
    THis is just wishful evil thinking on your part

    People of Color get along great. Its white guys that screw everything up

    They voted against this because they didn't want to have to expend funds renaming everything

    Ohs Tinys……

    They you’n go agin! Stickin you button in places it don’ts belongs!

    Lendsnerb “Teh voice of Rezun” Pits

  84. @Twinkie

    The jungle Asians are pretty kick-ass.
     
    Rooftop Asians, though, kicked jungle Asian ass in the Vietnam War.

    I’ve read the VC greatly feared the ROK troops sent to Vietnam, especially because they conducted “active” interrogations of captured VC

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    I’ve read the VC greatly feared the ROK troops sent to Vietnam, especially because they conducted “active” interrogations of captured VC
     
    Hanoi advised VC to avoid contact with ROK troops as a rule, because combat with the latter usually incurred very high casualties, on a par with fighting against US Army Special Forces units (something like 20-to-1 kill ratio in infantry combat).

    ROK troops in Vietnam were extremely thorough in their sweeps and carefully prepared the battlefield, so much so that they were often able to ambush the VC in its own backyard. Also, unlike American troops who relied on air and artillery support, ROK troops liked to engage in close quarter combat with the Vietnamese.

    ROK AORs were usually very safe and well-pacified for these reasons. However, there were also persistent allegations of war crimes and atrocities committed by Korean troops.
  85. @Twinkie

    Many Japanese would probably object to being lumped in with Koreans and Chinese, who they wouldn’t consider fancy. Interestingly, they tend to identify with Mongolians, who they consider to be their forebears , more than any other Asians.
     
    That's a complete nonsense. Japanese don't consider Mongolians to be their forebears (indeed, the famed/infamous Kamikaze pilots of World War II derived their name - "Divine Wind" - from the storms that destroyed the Mongol-Korean invasion force in 1281).

    Most educated Japanese know that their Divine Emperor descends from Koreans as do a substantial fraction of their most illustrious noble families. Indeed, the Yamato people - the "founders" of Japan - themselves are considered to be invaders from the Korean Peninsula.

    Japanese and Korean genetics are quite similar (similar North Eurasian hunter-gatherer + southern rice grower proportions), and some ancestry testing sites such as DNA Land do not distinguish the two.

    In the post-modern era, many Japanese fancy Korean pop and drama stars. And, of course, despite the old enmities, Koreans are always trying to close the gap with the Japanese, whom they acknowledge as being economically more successful.

    Im not sure about the Korean part, but I think he is right. Japanese dont want to be lumped in together with the Chinese or any other Asian.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    The Japanese have a strange relationship to China as most of their culture originates from China. The basic argument that I've heard from Japanese friends is the perception that they esteem the China of antiquity but perceive the current descendants as a degraded shadow of their past. At its most extreme, some Japanese right-wing groups claim to bear "purer" Confucian teachings, etc.
  86. @Hodag
    The US got by and large the good Pakistanis, your anaesthesiologists etc. They were originally urban Indians who got kicked out. UK got the mountain, reaver types.

    I am not sure if there are good Bangladeshi. Burma sure seems to hate them. But why even take the chance?

    I am not sure if there are good Bangladeshi.

    Last year, Steve wrote about a very savvy one.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/is-this-sjw-tiger-child-for-real-this-sounds-like-clickhole/

  87. @Twinkie

    Even Steve fell for it. Koreans are somehow assumed to be wealthy even among Asian-Americans, perhaps because of some TV shows in the 80s and 90s. The truth is quite different.
     
    He may understand the situation more than you think (and know).

    Filipino immigration to the U.S., somewhat akin to Indian immigration (but to a lesser extent), is selective. Korean immigration is not. The latter is much more bifurcated than immigration from the former two countries. Quality of life South Korea today is orders of magnitude better than that in the Philippines or India. South Korea is a first world country with a high standard of living and human development. People who emigrate from there to the West these days are either very high IQ/drive people looking for a bigger stage (e.g. scientists) or those from the lower end who can't compete in their home countries. And Korean immigration overall has declined dramatically and will continue to do so, as did earlier waves of immigrants from Japan.

    You completely missed the point.

    The point is, Koreans are not a high-achieving group in the US, contrary to the stereotype. The chart indicates it. If Koreans in the US think they are superior to Filipinos (‘Jungle Asians’), they are sorely mistaken.

    Among Asians, there is no correlation between the per-capita GDP of the country of origin, and the success rate of that community in the US. Japanese Americans outperform Korean Americans by a lot too, which completely invalidates your convoluted and self-contradictory claim.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    You completely missed the point.
     
    No, YOU missed my point. More below.

    Filipino Americans are considerably more prosperous than Korean Americans...

    The point is, Koreans are not a high-achieving group in the US, contrary to the stereotype.
     
    I suggest you look up the definition of "median." Median income is a useful measure for comparison, but can hide different variances.*

    As I wrote before, Filipino immigration (as with Indian immigration) is likely more selective than Korean immigration (high achieving people from South Korea no longer emigrate since the quality of life there is very high unlike in India or the Philippines). On top of that, Filipinos (as with Indians) usually arrive in the U.S. much higher facility with English than Koreans do - which opens up much greater economic opportunities for them with the first generation. However, the real interesting (and meaningful) comparison should be with the American-born. I haven't seen the data, but given the proportions of Koreans (vs. Filipinos) at elite universities, medical schools, law schools, etc. I would think chances are good that the median income of American-born Koreans is likely much higher than that of American-born Filipinos.

    *If you don't understand what I mean by "hiding different variances," think of it this way: Let's consider 100 Filipinos (50 foreign-born, 50 American-born) who are all nurses. Now let's compare them to 100 Koreans (60 foreign-born, 40 American-born), among whom the 60 foreign-born run laundromats while their 40 children are lawyers. In this scenario, the median income of all Filipinos is going to be higher than that of Koreans, but not so with the American-born. Indeed, American-born Koreans would be much "fancier" than their Filipino equivalents.

    If you think a more complex version of this scenario is implausible, let's look at it another way. Can you name a prominent (or "fancy") Filipino-American for me?

    See if you can find a Filipino-American equivalent of this Korean-American guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Yong_Kim

    Jim Yong Kim (Hangul: 짐용김; born December 8, 1959), also known as Kim Yong (Hangul: 김용), is a South Korean-American physician and anthropologist serving as the 12th and current President of the World Bank since 2012.

    A global health leader, he was formerly the Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a co-founder and executive director of Partners In Health before serving as the President of Dartmouth College from 2009 to 2012, becoming the first Asian American president of an Ivy League institution.[1][2]

    Kim was named the world's 50th most powerful person by Forbes Magazine's List of The World's Most Powerful People in 2013.

    Born in Seoul, South Korea in 1959, Jim Yong Kim immigrated with his family to the U.S. at the age of five and grew up in Muscatine, Iowa. His father taught dentistry at the University of Iowa, while his mother received her PhD in philosophy.[4] Kim attended Muscatine High School, where he was valedictorian, president of his class, and played both quarterback for the football team and point guard on the basketball team. After a year and a half at the University of Iowa, he transferred to Brown University, where he graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in human biology in 1982. He was awarded an M.D. at Harvard Medical School in 1991, and a PhD in anthropology at Harvard University in 1993.[5] He was among the first enrollees of Harvard's experimental MD/PhD program in the social sciences.
     
    As for this:

    Among Asians, there is no correlation between the per-capita GDP of the country of origin, and the success rate of that community in the US. Japanese Americans outperform Korean Americans by a lot too, which completely invalidates your convoluted and self-contradictory claim.
     
    You seem not to understand that (self-)selection is very different from origin country to origin country.

    At one time (before the rise of massive Indian immigration), African-immigrants in the U.S. had the highest educational attainment among all immigrants (higher rates of both high school and college degrees). Why? Because the selection effect was stronger with them (likely because living conditions for the educated was comparatively much poorer in African than other source countries, with correspondingly higher brain drain). Did that make Africans in America "fancier" than poorer or less educated immigrants from Europe and East Asia?
  88. @Clyde

    Even though I am half-Vietnamese, I never grew up with any Vietnamese culture. Our house was always filled with Chinese art, Chinese food, Chinese people, Chinese music, and the idea that the Lunar New Year equaled Chinese New Year’s. My father was and still is a Chinese superiorist.
     
    Makes me think that her Vietnamese mother is of Chinese extraction. If true, then she has zero Jungle in her. Since when does this stop an educated SJW from identifying with authentic jungle Asians from Bangladesh?
    btw--- I deplore this inappropriate intra-Asian, status jockeying, racism, snobbery and one upsmanship. As a garden variety white man, count me out!

    >Makes me think that her Vietnamese mother is of Chinese extraction. If true, then she has zero Jungle in her.

    Um, over half of Chinese are from the southern part of the country and are Australoid admixed “jungle Asians”.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Um, over half of Chinese are from the southern part of the country and are Australoid admixed “jungle Asians”.
     
    You mean Austronesians.

    Australoids are the ancestors of Australians and Papua New Guinea people. Their influence is not noticeable in Southern China.

    Austronesians started out in Southern China. Some moved to Taiwan and from there on to the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia and all over Polynesia as far as Easter Island and Madagascar. Others moved to Indochina where they later mixed with Australasian speakers.

    Many Austronesians stayed in Southern China and mixed with Chinese who moved South and became today's Southern Chinese. Southern Chinese look and sound noticeably different from Northern Chinese.
  89. SJW forget how racist humans naturally are. See the Black-Mestizo riots in LA. Jared Taylor’s book does a great job of providing endless examples of minority-v-minority conflict, much of it violent.

    The great irony is that we’re making America inherently more racist by making it less White. It’s like Japan. A few Whites here and there and the Japanese generally don’t care, and will even welcome us. But if you imported 40 million blonde Swedes to Japan there would be riots (and rightfully so).

    Multiculturalism is much like Communism: the denial of human nature because of ideology with disastrous consequences.

    Racial utopia is just around the corner…

    • Replies: @Ole Jesperson
    If there were only 40 million blonde Swedes!
  90. “elected against” ?

    Is this what ESL’s say when they mean “voted?”

  91. @Unzerker
    That's really interesting. I thought the claim that the Mongols did not conquer Europe because of all the castles was a purely theoretical one.

    But now I see that both the Mongol invasions of Hungary in 1285 and the one in Poland two years later were thoroughly defeated because they fortified their cities and built more castles.

    Strictly speaking, castles don’t really stop raiders and brigands were widespread in Europe, they don’t really stop a force from stealing what they can and leaving. Its not realistic to fortify everything.

    What they do is that they make it impossible for a large force to invade: each castle “bypassed” becomes a permanent source of harassment, threat to supply lines, and essentially gives the initiative to the defenders who can choose the time of their fights.

    European castlemaking is quite impressive, and it created demand for an entire profession of skilled engineers, arguably exceeding classical knowledge of stoneworking.

  92. @epochehusserl
    Im not sure about the Korean part, but I think he is right. Japanese dont want to be lumped in together with the Chinese or any other Asian.

    The Japanese have a strange relationship to China as most of their culture originates from China. The basic argument that I’ve heard from Japanese friends is the perception that they esteem the China of antiquity but perceive the current descendants as a degraded shadow of their past. At its most extreme, some Japanese right-wing groups claim to bear “purer” Confucian teachings, etc.

  93. @Achmed E. Newman
    You may well know this, since your sarcasm is kind of hard to fathom for me, but China tried to "put the squeeze" on Vietnam in a war in the late 1970's. I think the Vietnamese Army must have still been pretty hardened at that time.

    China later used them for target practice.

    http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/war-turned-china-military-superpower-23954

    They are, understandably, a bit miffed about it. Hard to say they didn’t deserve it for going on a merry land grab in Cambodia, though.

    • Replies: @IBC
    Isn't that a little flippant considering how China continued to support the Khmer Rouge? Granted the history is complicated, but Vietnam's role in it would appear a lot more defensible than China's. And the Khmer Rouge also killed lots of ethnic Chinese.
  94. @tomv
    I'm not one of those people who think Tiny Duck is an intentional parody, but this comment is giving me a pause. Could it be...?

    Nah. Real parodies are fun -- like DemsRRealRacist and DPRK_News. Tiny is just dull.

    Could TD really be iSteve being mischievous?

    Avid readers breathlessly await.

    • Troll: Dan Hayes
  95. …problemo, problemo … moslemo, moslemo, … so many mosques and minarets so close to Koreatown – no, no, no …

  96. @J.Ross
    Harlan Ellison is dead. He was often wrong and sometimes visibly dishonest, but at all times a masterful writer and a joy to read. He was the textbook example of a writer you could disagree with but nonetheless fully enjoy. Hopefully his I, Robot script gets made -- it didn't because Harlan just had to be Harlan when confronted with some Weinstein.
    http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-harlan-ellison-20180628-story.html

    Oh, no. At his best, Harlan Ellison was very good, if not the best.

    Was just discussing him in the comments section of the YouTube video in which he appeared with some Star Trek cast members.

  97. @AndrewR
    By second grade, I knew what Asia was and that India and the middle east are in Asia.

    Asia has many different racial and ethnic groups, and many different biomes, but they're all equally "Asian." In the US, people generally use "Asian" as shorthand for "East Asian", aka Mongoloid, but they're no more Asian than an Indian or a Saudi are.

    In Britain, "Asian" generally refers to Pakistanis and Indians, since they don't have many ethnic East Asians there.

    “Asia” may have some utility as a purely geographic term though more accurately it’s the gigantic land mass known as Eurasia. Anthropologically, calling everybody from Beirut to Tokyo “Asian” makes no sense. You may as well call them “Earthian.”

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Obviously. That's why I try to avoid the term altogether.
  98. Anonymous[249] • Disclaimer says:
    @Guy Lombardo
    >Makes me think that her Vietnamese mother is of Chinese extraction. If true, then she has zero Jungle in her.

    Um, over half of Chinese are from the southern part of the country and are Australoid admixed "jungle Asians".

    Um, over half of Chinese are from the southern part of the country and are Australoid admixed “jungle Asians”.

    You mean Austronesians.

    Australoids are the ancestors of Australians and Papua New Guinea people. Their influence is not noticeable in Southern China.

    Austronesians started out in Southern China. Some moved to Taiwan and from there on to the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia and all over Polynesia as far as Easter Island and Madagascar. Others moved to Indochina where they later mixed with Australasian speakers.

    Many Austronesians stayed in Southern China and mixed with Chinese who moved South and became today’s Southern Chinese. Southern Chinese look and sound noticeably different from Northern Chinese.

  99. As a European I always thought that in the U.S., Chinatown and such ethnic places was organic — ebbing and flowing naturally. You actually get a vote about their existence? That’s cool.
    We don’t get it here.

  100. @Daniel Chieh
    Doubtful. The Mongols didn't seem to effectively adapt to siege warfare and their second invasion into Europe had miserable results; they also lost to Chinese castles such as Diaoyu, but China built very few of them unlike Europe which put up nearly a hundred.

    Despite their early setbacks and multiple warnings, the Mongols never seemed to learn how to deal with castles.

    A more Turkic China, on the other hand, such as during the Tang Dynasty appears to have been much more aggressive and effective and it was during that time that China reached its greatest territorial extent(including the conquest of Annam, which would include present-day Vietnam).
  101. @Stan d Mute
    Obviously Koreans are just racists. Bangladeshis have been taught, in the last decade (if you believe their government), how to use toilets. Clearly they’re not Indians.

    https://thewire.in/health/open-defecation-ends-in-bangladesh-almost

    At least the Bangladeshi government is showing its people how to use toilets, the Indian government has no intention of doing that.

  102. @Daniel Chieh
    China later used them for target practice.

    http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/war-turned-china-military-superpower-23954

    They are, understandably, a bit miffed about it. Hard to say they didn't deserve it for going on a merry land grab in Cambodia, though.

    Isn’t that a little flippant considering how China continued to support the Khmer Rouge? Granted the history is complicated, but Vietnam’s role in it would appear a lot more defensible than China’s. And the Khmer Rouge also killed lots of ethnic Chinese.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    The history is complicated, but Vietnam is generally seen as the aggressor/imperialist by their neighboring states for that specific war, including by Thailand, who sheltered the Khmer Rouge government and the Cambodian population, who certainly didn't like the Khmer Rouge, but rapidly perceived the Vietnamese army as occupiers.

    Certainly none of them seemed to raise much alarm as the Chinese proceeded to use the Vietnamese as target practice for about a decade afterward(and forced them to stay on war footing, impoverishing them further). Obviously the Vietnamese are, as I noted, often very angry about that.
  103. @Anon
    When US cities were white, non-white immigrants sought to assimilate with whiteness.

    The idea was US is essentially a white nation but open to others as well.
    The idea was that white people had the power, wealth, and good stuff. So, whiteness was the ideal, the standard. Quintessentially American. John Wayne stuff.
    After all, the immigrants left their own nations. And they didn't want to go to non-white nations but to white majority nations, especially America.

    So, as long as whites had the numbers, prestige, and power, all non-white immigrant groups shared something in common: respect for whiteness and wish to merge with whiteness. Whiteness lessened non-white vs non-white tensions because all non-white groups could ignore one another and move toward whiteness.

    But over time in many cities, whites lost the numbers, the prestige, and the power. So, in a city like LA, there is a lot of non-white groups living alongside one another. But none of them represents something that all non-whites want to move to or merge with. Non-white groups once considered the movement-toward-whiteness as the process of 'Americanization', but the same cannot be said for movement-toward-non-whiteness(even though the official narrative is that 'American' is purely ideological and has nothing to do with race or even culture). (The exception is movement-toward-blackness in style and attitude, but it's certainly not in jobs, schools, and residence.) It was once considered(and still is, albeit mutedly) prestigious for non-whites to merge with whiteness --- synonymous with becoming 'Americanized' --- , but the same cannot be said for merging with, say, Mexicans, Cambodians, Vietnamese, Hindus, and etc. Even though the official ideology says Mexican-Americanism and Vietnamese-Americanism are just as American as white-Americanism, no one really feels this way. Diversity really means the desire by non-whites to be included in the White or White-made world. Diversity without whiteness would be like building a model without glue. It wouldn't hold together. It's been said that Diversity means 'no more whites', but that is self-defeating because it's like a model set without glue. Indeed, diversity without whiteness itself isn't appealing to most people. Latin America and North Africa are very diverse, but neither has enough whites. India is very diverse, but Hindus prefer to move to a white nation.

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41HICBc0vZL._SL500_AC_SS350_.jpg

    If an Asian-American moves to a white community, he or she feels 'Americanized'. Indeed, he or she is(or was) willing to surrender his or her own identity to take up this new prestigious ersatz-white identity. But would Chinese-Americans want to give up their identity to merge with Mexican-Americanism, Hindu-Americanism, or even Korean-Americanism? I think not.
    Indeed, it's interesting that Chinese have been in SE Asian nations for so long BUT they've mostly retain their Chinese pride and identity. In contrast, so many East Asians in white nations instantly surrender everything about their race, culture, and language to merge with whiteness or 'westernness'. People will surrender their culture for something higher but not for something lower. Chinese will surrender Chineseness to become 'white' or 'western' but not to become 'Filipino' or 'Indonesian'. Maybe Sephardic Jews mixed more with Muslims and Arabs cuz they weren't all that smarter, whereas Ashkenazi Jews in Europe were less willing to merge with goyim because they were smarter. I dunno.

    If LA had lots of whites, this 'fancy' vs 'jungle' dichotomy wouldn't matter. Both the fancies and junglies would focus on merging with whiteness as ideal. But since whiteness is becoming a more precious commodity in places like LA, the fancies and junglies are more ghettoized in their own identities. Vanishing of whiteness means less of something for which Asians(or other non-white groups) are willing to surrender their own identities in order to merge with something higher or more quintessentially American.

    Here are some Koreans that are really wanting to merge with whiteness.

  104. @Anonymous Jew
    SJW forget how racist humans naturally are. See the Black-Mestizo riots in LA. Jared Taylor's book does a great job of providing endless examples of minority-v-minority conflict, much of it violent.

    The great irony is that we're making America inherently more racist by making it less White. It's like Japan. A few Whites here and there and the Japanese generally don't care, and will even welcome us. But if you imported 40 million blonde Swedes to Japan there would be riots (and rightfully so).

    Multiculturalism is much like Communism: the denial of human nature because of ideology with disastrous consequences.

    Racial utopia is just around the corner...

    If there were only 40 million blonde Swedes!

  105. @Tyrion 2
    We have a "Banglatown" in London. Unfortunately, we have tended to be colonised by a more representative class of Bangladeshi than I suspect the US has. Our "Banglatown" is the acid attack hotspot of the UK and previously had an ultra-corrupt Islamist Mayor who ran politics in the corrupt, communal, vote-rigging South Asian style.

    The area, also known as Tower Hamlets, is literally in the shadow of the City of London. As in, adjacent to the "Square Mile" and co-financial capital of the world. The area has a lot of public housing, where the Bangladeshis live. This is not only mostly free for them but it comes with all sorts of welfare and fecundity. British hipster-types also live in the area, having moved in from the countryside and small towns, at substantial expense, while they delay marriage and put off childbirth.

    It actually makes for quite a fun place and has a good energy.

    As they say, London is the future of Britain.

    They forget though that when Britain is just like London, there'll be no bright, young Brits to move in and jazz it all up.

    "Oh, well" they say "the young descendants of immigrants are just like us"; which is true for the children of the ones who fit in almost right away and who are the ones we socialise with. It is entirely false for the others. Strange how people take after their parents, I wonder if anyone has ever noticed that before...

    “It actually makes for quite a fun place and has a good energy.” You’d love the compost in my garden, lots of heat, energy with a good vibe knowing all will rot and break down some day.

  106. @istevefan

    "What we're seeing is the rising of a community, an understanding of the strength of our collective voice and ultimately, the power of our vote," Korean American Coalition Executive Director Joon Bang said. "This is just the beginning of the Korean American community's political growth and civic involvement."
     
    I imagine if a community of ordinary whites voted against something like this it would not be reported as a strength of our collective voice, and ultimately, the power of our vote. I am sure there would be several invectives about our racism, fear of losing our status, etc, etc.

    We did when we elected Trump. Your observations about invectives are spot on.

  107. @IBC
    Isn't that a little flippant considering how China continued to support the Khmer Rouge? Granted the history is complicated, but Vietnam's role in it would appear a lot more defensible than China's. And the Khmer Rouge also killed lots of ethnic Chinese.

    The history is complicated, but Vietnam is generally seen as the aggressor/imperialist by their neighboring states for that specific war, including by Thailand, who sheltered the Khmer Rouge government and the Cambodian population, who certainly didn’t like the Khmer Rouge, but rapidly perceived the Vietnamese army as occupiers.

    Certainly none of them seemed to raise much alarm as the Chinese proceeded to use the Vietnamese as target practice for about a decade afterward(and forced them to stay on war footing, impoverishing them further). Obviously the Vietnamese are, as I noted, often very angry about that.

  108. @other joe_mama
    He's never seen the "Hurry up and Buy!" scene from 'Don't be a Menace' apparently.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Fb9M1e-cNc

    Full clip here:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIk0abbYgXQ

    O’Bama’s sons ?

  109. The Sears Tower was designed by a native of Bangladesh. It was the first of the world’s tallest buildings since the 19th century not designed by an American.

    These Bengalis should pack up and leave Koreatown to the Koreans. They’ve got something to brag about in Chi-Town.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    By that convoluted logic, Koreans in America should be driving Shelby Cobras: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Chun
  110. @The Anti-Gnostic
    "Asia" may have some utility as a purely geographic term though more accurately it's the gigantic land mass known as Eurasia. Anthropologically, calling everybody from Beirut to Tokyo "Asian" makes no sense. You may as well call them "Earthian."

    Obviously. That’s why I try to avoid the term altogether.

  111. @Enochian
    Now I'm curious - what was Ellison so dishonest about? Was all his stuff about joining gangs in the 1950s a lie?

    I am certain that many of his claims are not completely true.
    His Eisenstein-worthy characterization of the Kent State shootings was simply not true, and when he was informed, he waved facts away and insisted the discussion be refocused on What This Says About Us. This occupies his introduction to the collection that includes the story “Knox,” which is literally explaining fascisifying ugliest-possible flyover country folk as a conspiracy by reptiloid aliens.
    Maybe dishonest is the wrong word because he often seemed to passionately believe in things that were not completely true, but he always made it into a legal matter, which means sincere belief is not enough.
    Harlan was famously litigious about intellectual property, but his stories (and notably the ones that were supposedly stolen from) are rarely unique. His presentation was always one of a kind, but plot, plot mechanisms, characters, twists, resolutions, and technology would normally look an awful lot like something done by a less famous, less talented guy, who had not seen grounds for a lawsuit. And sci-fi borrows so much it might be better to say it shares.
    There are notable comparisons between two Outer Limits episodes he wrote and James Cameron’s Terminator concept, but there’s another Outer Limits episode not by Ellison which is actually much closer, and that one wasn’t the basis of a suit. (If I was Cameron I would have responded to the lawsuit with a public showing of Demon with a Glass Hand — not totally free, Ellison would be paid a royalty — so people could see the original terminator costume: a huge chest medallion necklace, a beanie, and swim goggles). His famous and uniquely hysterical nuclear holocaust classics were written at a time when everybody was doing that, using many of the same elements (but never Ellison’s Symbolist-worthy drunken fugues).
    Maybe instead of dishonest I should have said he retained more youthful conviction than is healthy in a person of drinking and shooting age.

  112. @Anon
    When US cities were white, non-white immigrants sought to assimilate with whiteness.

    The idea was US is essentially a white nation but open to others as well.
    The idea was that white people had the power, wealth, and good stuff. So, whiteness was the ideal, the standard. Quintessentially American. John Wayne stuff.
    After all, the immigrants left their own nations. And they didn't want to go to non-white nations but to white majority nations, especially America.

    So, as long as whites had the numbers, prestige, and power, all non-white immigrant groups shared something in common: respect for whiteness and wish to merge with whiteness. Whiteness lessened non-white vs non-white tensions because all non-white groups could ignore one another and move toward whiteness.

    But over time in many cities, whites lost the numbers, the prestige, and the power. So, in a city like LA, there is a lot of non-white groups living alongside one another. But none of them represents something that all non-whites want to move to or merge with. Non-white groups once considered the movement-toward-whiteness as the process of 'Americanization', but the same cannot be said for movement-toward-non-whiteness(even though the official narrative is that 'American' is purely ideological and has nothing to do with race or even culture). (The exception is movement-toward-blackness in style and attitude, but it's certainly not in jobs, schools, and residence.) It was once considered(and still is, albeit mutedly) prestigious for non-whites to merge with whiteness --- synonymous with becoming 'Americanized' --- , but the same cannot be said for merging with, say, Mexicans, Cambodians, Vietnamese, Hindus, and etc. Even though the official ideology says Mexican-Americanism and Vietnamese-Americanism are just as American as white-Americanism, no one really feels this way. Diversity really means the desire by non-whites to be included in the White or White-made world. Diversity without whiteness would be like building a model without glue. It wouldn't hold together. It's been said that Diversity means 'no more whites', but that is self-defeating because it's like a model set without glue. Indeed, diversity without whiteness itself isn't appealing to most people. Latin America and North Africa are very diverse, but neither has enough whites. India is very diverse, but Hindus prefer to move to a white nation.

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41HICBc0vZL._SL500_AC_SS350_.jpg

    If an Asian-American moves to a white community, he or she feels 'Americanized'. Indeed, he or she is(or was) willing to surrender his or her own identity to take up this new prestigious ersatz-white identity. But would Chinese-Americans want to give up their identity to merge with Mexican-Americanism, Hindu-Americanism, or even Korean-Americanism? I think not.
    Indeed, it's interesting that Chinese have been in SE Asian nations for so long BUT they've mostly retain their Chinese pride and identity. In contrast, so many East Asians in white nations instantly surrender everything about their race, culture, and language to merge with whiteness or 'westernness'. People will surrender their culture for something higher but not for something lower. Chinese will surrender Chineseness to become 'white' or 'western' but not to become 'Filipino' or 'Indonesian'. Maybe Sephardic Jews mixed more with Muslims and Arabs cuz they weren't all that smarter, whereas Ashkenazi Jews in Europe were less willing to merge with goyim because they were smarter. I dunno.

    If LA had lots of whites, this 'fancy' vs 'jungle' dichotomy wouldn't matter. Both the fancies and junglies would focus on merging with whiteness as ideal. But since whiteness is becoming a more precious commodity in places like LA, the fancies and junglies are more ghettoized in their own identities. Vanishing of whiteness means less of something for which Asians(or other non-white groups) are willing to surrender their own identities in order to merge with something higher or more quintessentially American.

    I don’t know why no one replies to your comments, 425. You’re one of the more interesting voices here.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    He's the Priss Factor. Equal parts brilliant and nutcase. Ron Unz once noted that his comments are longer than many of the blogs themselves.
  113. @Romanian
    I like Celestials!

    That one’s specific to China.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    Pish-posh. Definitions widen, and we are talking about adding another 10% of fancy Asians to the list. The US does more than that with a stroke of the pen when deciding census categories.
  114. If Latinos are now Latinx, are Chinese now Chinx?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Please report immediately to Room 101.
  115. @J.Ross
    That one's specific to China.

    Pish-posh. Definitions widen, and we are talking about adding another 10% of fancy Asians to the list. The US does more than that with a stroke of the pen when deciding census categories.

  116. @Anon
    When US cities were white, non-white immigrants sought to assimilate with whiteness.

    The idea was US is essentially a white nation but open to others as well.
    The idea was that white people had the power, wealth, and good stuff. So, whiteness was the ideal, the standard. Quintessentially American. John Wayne stuff.
    After all, the immigrants left their own nations. And they didn't want to go to non-white nations but to white majority nations, especially America.

    So, as long as whites had the numbers, prestige, and power, all non-white immigrant groups shared something in common: respect for whiteness and wish to merge with whiteness. Whiteness lessened non-white vs non-white tensions because all non-white groups could ignore one another and move toward whiteness.

    But over time in many cities, whites lost the numbers, the prestige, and the power. So, in a city like LA, there is a lot of non-white groups living alongside one another. But none of them represents something that all non-whites want to move to or merge with. Non-white groups once considered the movement-toward-whiteness as the process of 'Americanization', but the same cannot be said for movement-toward-non-whiteness(even though the official narrative is that 'American' is purely ideological and has nothing to do with race or even culture). (The exception is movement-toward-blackness in style and attitude, but it's certainly not in jobs, schools, and residence.) It was once considered(and still is, albeit mutedly) prestigious for non-whites to merge with whiteness --- synonymous with becoming 'Americanized' --- , but the same cannot be said for merging with, say, Mexicans, Cambodians, Vietnamese, Hindus, and etc. Even though the official ideology says Mexican-Americanism and Vietnamese-Americanism are just as American as white-Americanism, no one really feels this way. Diversity really means the desire by non-whites to be included in the White or White-made world. Diversity without whiteness would be like building a model without glue. It wouldn't hold together. It's been said that Diversity means 'no more whites', but that is self-defeating because it's like a model set without glue. Indeed, diversity without whiteness itself isn't appealing to most people. Latin America and North Africa are very diverse, but neither has enough whites. India is very diverse, but Hindus prefer to move to a white nation.

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41HICBc0vZL._SL500_AC_SS350_.jpg

    If an Asian-American moves to a white community, he or she feels 'Americanized'. Indeed, he or she is(or was) willing to surrender his or her own identity to take up this new prestigious ersatz-white identity. But would Chinese-Americans want to give up their identity to merge with Mexican-Americanism, Hindu-Americanism, or even Korean-Americanism? I think not.
    Indeed, it's interesting that Chinese have been in SE Asian nations for so long BUT they've mostly retain their Chinese pride and identity. In contrast, so many East Asians in white nations instantly surrender everything about their race, culture, and language to merge with whiteness or 'westernness'. People will surrender their culture for something higher but not for something lower. Chinese will surrender Chineseness to become 'white' or 'western' but not to become 'Filipino' or 'Indonesian'. Maybe Sephardic Jews mixed more with Muslims and Arabs cuz they weren't all that smarter, whereas Ashkenazi Jews in Europe were less willing to merge with goyim because they were smarter. I dunno.

    If LA had lots of whites, this 'fancy' vs 'jungle' dichotomy wouldn't matter. Both the fancies and junglies would focus on merging with whiteness as ideal. But since whiteness is becoming a more precious commodity in places like LA, the fancies and junglies are more ghettoized in their own identities. Vanishing of whiteness means less of something for which Asians(or other non-white groups) are willing to surrender their own identities in order to merge with something higher or more quintessentially American.

    It is a good explanation. It reminds me of Roger Scruton’s explanations for national loyalty. The weaker identity can no longer absorb the incoming ones, so those people can revert to their prepolitical loyalties to tribe, religion, ethnicity etc.

  117. @Thomm
    You completely missed the point.

    The point is, Koreans are not a high-achieving group in the US, contrary to the stereotype. The chart indicates it. If Koreans in the US think they are superior to Filipinos ('Jungle Asians'), they are sorely mistaken.

    Among Asians, there is no correlation between the per-capita GDP of the country of origin, and the success rate of that community in the US. Japanese Americans outperform Korean Americans by a lot too, which completely invalidates your convoluted and self-contradictory claim.

    http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2017/09/08091819/FT_17.09.08_asian_income.png

    You completely missed the point.

    No, YOU missed my point. More below.

    Filipino Americans are considerably more prosperous than Korean Americans…

    The point is, Koreans are not a high-achieving group in the US, contrary to the stereotype.

    I suggest you look up the definition of “median.” Median income is a useful measure for comparison, but can hide different variances.*

    As I wrote before, Filipino immigration (as with Indian immigration) is likely more selective than Korean immigration (high achieving people from South Korea no longer emigrate since the quality of life there is very high unlike in India or the Philippines). On top of that, Filipinos (as with Indians) usually arrive in the U.S. much higher facility with English than Koreans do – which opens up much greater economic opportunities for them with the first generation. However, the real interesting (and meaningful) comparison should be with the American-born. I haven’t seen the data, but given the proportions of Koreans (vs. Filipinos) at elite universities, medical schools, law schools, etc. I would think chances are good that the median income of American-born Koreans is likely much higher than that of American-born Filipinos.

    *If you don’t understand what I mean by “hiding different variances,” think of it this way: Let’s consider 100 Filipinos (50 foreign-born, 50 American-born) who are all nurses. Now let’s compare them to 100 Koreans (60 foreign-born, 40 American-born), among whom the 60 foreign-born run laundromats while their 40 children are lawyers. In this scenario, the median income of all Filipinos is going to be higher than that of Koreans, but not so with the American-born. Indeed, American-born Koreans would be much “fancier” than their Filipino equivalents.

    If you think a more complex version of this scenario is implausible, let’s look at it another way. Can you name a prominent (or “fancy”) Filipino-American for me?

    See if you can find a Filipino-American equivalent of this Korean-American guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Yong_Kim

    Jim Yong Kim (Hangul: 짐용김; born December 8, 1959), also known as Kim Yong (Hangul: 김용), is a South Korean-American physician and anthropologist serving as the 12th and current President of the World Bank since 2012.

    A global health leader, he was formerly the Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a co-founder and executive director of Partners In Health before serving as the President of Dartmouth College from 2009 to 2012, becoming the first Asian American president of an Ivy League institution.[1][2]

    Kim was named the world’s 50th most powerful person by Forbes Magazine’s List of The World’s Most Powerful People in 2013.

    Born in Seoul, South Korea in 1959, Jim Yong Kim immigrated with his family to the U.S. at the age of five and grew up in Muscatine, Iowa. His father taught dentistry at the University of Iowa, while his mother received her PhD in philosophy.[4] Kim attended Muscatine High School, where he was valedictorian, president of his class, and played both quarterback for the football team and point guard on the basketball team. After a year and a half at the University of Iowa, he transferred to Brown University, where he graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in human biology in 1982. He was awarded an M.D. at Harvard Medical School in 1991, and a PhD in anthropology at Harvard University in 1993.[5] He was among the first enrollees of Harvard’s experimental MD/PhD program in the social sciences.

    As for this:

    Among Asians, there is no correlation between the per-capita GDP of the country of origin, and the success rate of that community in the US. Japanese Americans outperform Korean Americans by a lot too, which completely invalidates your convoluted and self-contradictory claim.

    You seem not to understand that (self-)selection is very different from origin country to origin country.

    At one time (before the rise of massive Indian immigration), African-immigrants in the U.S. had the highest educational attainment among all immigrants (higher rates of both high school and college degrees). Why? Because the selection effect was stronger with them (likely because living conditions for the educated was comparatively much poorer in African than other source countries, with correspondingly higher brain drain). Did that make Africans in America “fancier” than poorer or less educated immigrants from Europe and East Asia?

    • Replies: @Thomm
    Again, you don't get it.

    Your long-winded reply is completely invalidated by the fact that Japanese-Americans have higher median incomes than Korean Americans. Japan is richer than South Korea (and has been for ages), yet Japanese-Americans outperform in the US as well. I hope you know how to read graphs and charts :

    http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2017/09/08091819/FT_17.09.08_asian_income.png


    See if you can find a Filipino-American equivalent of this Korean-American guy:
     
    Anecdotes are not a suitable form of debate. I could point out Michelle Malkin as more accomplished than Jim Yong Kim, if anecdotes were a valid rebuttal.
    , @Thomm

    However, the real interesting (and meaningful) comparison should be with the American-born. I haven’t seen the data, but given the proportions of Koreans (vs. Filipinos) at elite universities, medical schools, law schools, etc. I would think chances are good that the median income of American-born Koreans is likely much higher than that of American-born Filipinos.
     
    Yes, this would be meaningful data. It would answer a lot of questions about assimilation, etc.

    There are still too few Asian-Americans who have reached adulthood (let alone the post-30 peak earning age). Quite a few second-gen Asian-Americans are half-white (say, 15-20%), which also blurs the data.
  118. @Reg Cæsar
    The Sears Tower was designed by a native of Bangladesh. It was the first of the world's tallest buildings since the 19th century not designed by an American.

    These Bengalis should pack up and leave Koreatown to the Koreans. They've got something to brag about in Chi-Town.

    By that convoluted logic, Koreans in America should be driving Shelby Cobras: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Chun

    • Replies: @IBC
    Well some Korean-Americans probably do drive them, at least on the weekends...

    But I looked at that link, and the AC Cobra just looks like an AC Ace that's been hitting the gym. So John Chun probably didn't have that much influence on it, though apparently he redesigned the Cobra badge. But he definitely was one of the designers of the Shelby Mustang; and later on, the Dodge Charger, another famous muscle car. So credit where credit is due and thanks for mentioning him because I hadn't heard of him before. Wikipedia cites the following article and it's actually a much better account of Chun's work:

    https://www.hemmings.com/blog/index.php/2013/07/09/former-shelby-american-designer-john-chun-dies-at-age-84/

    And it's also kind of interesting that one of the of the key designers of the Corvette Sting Ray was Japanese-American:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Shinoda

    So the Ford vs. Chevy thing is not just a white redneck thing. But personally, I'm a Citroën enthusiast and I try to use sunscreen...

  119. @Corn
    I’ve read the VC greatly feared the ROK troops sent to Vietnam, especially because they conducted “active” interrogations of captured VC

    I’ve read the VC greatly feared the ROK troops sent to Vietnam, especially because they conducted “active” interrogations of captured VC

    Hanoi advised VC to avoid contact with ROK troops as a rule, because combat with the latter usually incurred very high casualties, on a par with fighting against US Army Special Forces units (something like 20-to-1 kill ratio in infantry combat).

    ROK troops in Vietnam were extremely thorough in their sweeps and carefully prepared the battlefield, so much so that they were often able to ambush the VC in its own backyard. Also, unlike American troops who relied on air and artillery support, ROK troops liked to engage in close quarter combat with the Vietnamese.

    ROK AORs were usually very safe and well-pacified for these reasons. However, there were also persistent allegations of war crimes and atrocities committed by Korean troops.

  120. @Daniel Chieh
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Mongol_invasion_of_Hungary


    The results of the invasion could not have contrasted more sharply with those of the 1241 invasion. The invasion was repelled handily, and the Mongols lost much of their invading force due to several months of starvation, numerous small raids, and two major military defeats. This was mostly thanks to the new fortification network and the military reforms. No major invasion of Hungary would be launched after the failure of the campaign of 1285, though small raids from the Golden Horde were frequent well into the 14th century. Less than two years later, the Third Mongol invasion of Poland occurred. This invasion was also repulsed, with the Poles using a similar strategy to the Hungarians in 1285.
     

    Hungarians reputedly built over 100 stone castles and fortresses prior to the second invasion. Even with the best siege engines of the day (counterweight trebuchet, which the Mongols possessed), overrunning that many stone fortresses was a tall order.

    Furthermore, remember that the first, highly successful, invasion of Hungary was headed by Batu and Subotai and their army was made up of imperial tumens (actual Mongol troops) who were fully backed by the entire Mongol Empire.

    The second invasion was a much smaller affair, led by a warlord of the Golden Horde (Nogai), long after there had been serious civil wars between the Golden Horde on the one hand and Il-Khanate and Chagatai Khanate on the other hand. It’s highly likely that Nogai, therefore, did not have access to siege engineers from Persian or Chinese Mongol domains. In any case, Nogai’s troops were likely Kipchak conscripts, who were of considerably lower quality than Mongol imperial tumens.

    • Replies: @Unzerker

    The second invasion was a much smaller affair
     
    40,000 vs 30,000 according to wikipedia. Not that much smaller.
    , @Unzerker
    Even the first Mongol invasion was stopped by the Czechs, Croatians and Austrians respectively.
    Their big successes in Europe were on the plains of Russia, Poland and Hungary. Every else they seemed to struggle.
  121. @rob
    I don’t know why no one replies to your comments, 425. You’re one of the more interesting voices here.

    He’s the Priss Factor. Equal parts brilliant and nutcase. Ron Unz once noted that his comments are longer than many of the blogs themselves.

    • Replies: @Clyde

    He’s the Priss Factor. Equal parts brilliant and nutcase. Ron Unz once noted that his comments are longer than many of the blogs themselves.
     
    At Priss Factor's peak Mr Unz said he was posting under at least 300 identities. Yes anon # 425 is Priss. One of the Unz immortals.
  122. @Daniel Chieh
    He's the Priss Factor. Equal parts brilliant and nutcase. Ron Unz once noted that his comments are longer than many of the blogs themselves.

    He’s the Priss Factor. Equal parts brilliant and nutcase. Ron Unz once noted that his comments are longer than many of the blogs themselves.

    At Priss Factor’s peak Mr Unz said he was posting under at least 300 identities. Yes anon # 425 is Priss. One of the Unz immortals.

  123. @Twinkie
    Hungarians reputedly built over 100 stone castles and fortresses prior to the second invasion. Even with the best siege engines of the day (counterweight trebuchet, which the Mongols possessed), overrunning that many stone fortresses was a tall order.

    Furthermore, remember that the first, highly successful, invasion of Hungary was headed by Batu and Subotai and their army was made up of imperial tumens (actual Mongol troops) who were fully backed by the entire Mongol Empire.

    The second invasion was a much smaller affair, led by a warlord of the Golden Horde (Nogai), long after there had been serious civil wars between the Golden Horde on the one hand and Il-Khanate and Chagatai Khanate on the other hand. It's highly likely that Nogai, therefore, did not have access to siege engineers from Persian or Chinese Mongol domains. In any case, Nogai's troops were likely Kipchak conscripts, who were of considerably lower quality than Mongol imperial tumens.

    The second invasion was a much smaller affair

    40,000 vs 30,000 according to wikipedia. Not that much smaller.

  124. @Twinkie
    Hungarians reputedly built over 100 stone castles and fortresses prior to the second invasion. Even with the best siege engines of the day (counterweight trebuchet, which the Mongols possessed), overrunning that many stone fortresses was a tall order.

    Furthermore, remember that the first, highly successful, invasion of Hungary was headed by Batu and Subotai and their army was made up of imperial tumens (actual Mongol troops) who were fully backed by the entire Mongol Empire.

    The second invasion was a much smaller affair, led by a warlord of the Golden Horde (Nogai), long after there had been serious civil wars between the Golden Horde on the one hand and Il-Khanate and Chagatai Khanate on the other hand. It's highly likely that Nogai, therefore, did not have access to siege engineers from Persian or Chinese Mongol domains. In any case, Nogai's troops were likely Kipchak conscripts, who were of considerably lower quality than Mongol imperial tumens.

    Even the first Mongol invasion was stopped by the Czechs, Croatians and Austrians respectively.
    Their big successes in Europe were on the plains of Russia, Poland and Hungary. Every else they seemed to struggle.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Even the first Mongol invasion was stopped by the Czechs, Croatians and Austrians respectively.
    Their big successes in Europe were on the plains of Russia, Poland and Hungary. Every else they seemed to struggle.
     
    It's good to have mountains.
  125. /delete

  126. Fancy Asians (Japanese, Korean, Chinese) and “Jungle Asians”

    The dividing line is blurred but Fancy Asians are the Aryans of the Asian world. While Jungle Asians range from the more yellowish Chinese and other yellowish Asians, to brown Asians to black Asians meaning their skin is darker than many African Americans. Found in South India but some scattered all over India.

    Jungle Asians don’t come from the jungle. “Jungle” is an all purpose putdown by Asians of Asians who live and work rural, farming etc. Their skin gets browner from the sun. Browner skin is a larger problem for the rural women. It is seen as detracting from femininity. Jungle Asian can refer to highlands Asians. Like the Hmong. And other uneducated hillbillies of Asia.

    Jungle = brownish or brown Asian
    Fancy = white honkie racist Asian

  127. @Twinkie

    You completely missed the point.
     
    No, YOU missed my point. More below.

    Filipino Americans are considerably more prosperous than Korean Americans...

    The point is, Koreans are not a high-achieving group in the US, contrary to the stereotype.
     
    I suggest you look up the definition of "median." Median income is a useful measure for comparison, but can hide different variances.*

    As I wrote before, Filipino immigration (as with Indian immigration) is likely more selective than Korean immigration (high achieving people from South Korea no longer emigrate since the quality of life there is very high unlike in India or the Philippines). On top of that, Filipinos (as with Indians) usually arrive in the U.S. much higher facility with English than Koreans do - which opens up much greater economic opportunities for them with the first generation. However, the real interesting (and meaningful) comparison should be with the American-born. I haven't seen the data, but given the proportions of Koreans (vs. Filipinos) at elite universities, medical schools, law schools, etc. I would think chances are good that the median income of American-born Koreans is likely much higher than that of American-born Filipinos.

    *If you don't understand what I mean by "hiding different variances," think of it this way: Let's consider 100 Filipinos (50 foreign-born, 50 American-born) who are all nurses. Now let's compare them to 100 Koreans (60 foreign-born, 40 American-born), among whom the 60 foreign-born run laundromats while their 40 children are lawyers. In this scenario, the median income of all Filipinos is going to be higher than that of Koreans, but not so with the American-born. Indeed, American-born Koreans would be much "fancier" than their Filipino equivalents.

    If you think a more complex version of this scenario is implausible, let's look at it another way. Can you name a prominent (or "fancy") Filipino-American for me?

    See if you can find a Filipino-American equivalent of this Korean-American guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Yong_Kim

    Jim Yong Kim (Hangul: 짐용김; born December 8, 1959), also known as Kim Yong (Hangul: 김용), is a South Korean-American physician and anthropologist serving as the 12th and current President of the World Bank since 2012.

    A global health leader, he was formerly the Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a co-founder and executive director of Partners In Health before serving as the President of Dartmouth College from 2009 to 2012, becoming the first Asian American president of an Ivy League institution.[1][2]

    Kim was named the world's 50th most powerful person by Forbes Magazine's List of The World's Most Powerful People in 2013.

    Born in Seoul, South Korea in 1959, Jim Yong Kim immigrated with his family to the U.S. at the age of five and grew up in Muscatine, Iowa. His father taught dentistry at the University of Iowa, while his mother received her PhD in philosophy.[4] Kim attended Muscatine High School, where he was valedictorian, president of his class, and played both quarterback for the football team and point guard on the basketball team. After a year and a half at the University of Iowa, he transferred to Brown University, where he graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in human biology in 1982. He was awarded an M.D. at Harvard Medical School in 1991, and a PhD in anthropology at Harvard University in 1993.[5] He was among the first enrollees of Harvard's experimental MD/PhD program in the social sciences.
     
    As for this:

    Among Asians, there is no correlation between the per-capita GDP of the country of origin, and the success rate of that community in the US. Japanese Americans outperform Korean Americans by a lot too, which completely invalidates your convoluted and self-contradictory claim.
     
    You seem not to understand that (self-)selection is very different from origin country to origin country.

    At one time (before the rise of massive Indian immigration), African-immigrants in the U.S. had the highest educational attainment among all immigrants (higher rates of both high school and college degrees). Why? Because the selection effect was stronger with them (likely because living conditions for the educated was comparatively much poorer in African than other source countries, with correspondingly higher brain drain). Did that make Africans in America "fancier" than poorer or less educated immigrants from Europe and East Asia?

    Again, you don’t get it.

    Your long-winded reply is completely invalidated by the fact that Japanese-Americans have higher median incomes than Korean Americans. Japan is richer than South Korea (and has been for ages), yet Japanese-Americans outperform in the US as well. I hope you know how to read graphs and charts :

    See if you can find a Filipino-American equivalent of this Korean-American guy:

    Anecdotes are not a suitable form of debate. I could point out Michelle Malkin as more accomplished than Jim Yong Kim, if anecdotes were a valid rebuttal.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Your long-winded reply is completely invalidated by the fact that Japanese-Americans have higher median incomes than Korean Americans.
     
    No, because the proportions of foreign-born and American-born are very different between the two groups. Do you realize how that makes apples-to apples comparison difficult?

    Also, as a side note, there are many fewer full-blooded Japanese-Americans than the latter today, because the heydays of high Japanese immigration was much older than that for Koreans.

    Anecdotes are not a suitable form of debate. I could point out Michelle Malkin as more accomplished than Jim Yong Kim, if anecdotes were a valid rebuttal.
     
    Malkin is not as fancy as the president of World Bank. Not. Even. Close.

    If you think this is “anecdotal,” look at the respective lists of prominent Filipino- and Korean-Americans in Wikipedia as a proxy for fanciness. By the way, here is an anecdote for you. I am on the board of a large hospital system (multiple healthcare facilities across the South). Filipinos I run across in the system are overwhelmingly nurses with very few doctors. Koreans I run into are overwhelmingly physicians with very few nurses (almost none).

    And, finally, note that among fancy Filipinos, you find Chinese names frequently such as “Chua.” Fancy Asians.
    , @Twinkie
    By the way, you do realize that the graph you keep citing is "median annual HOUSEHOLD income," right?

    If you looked at the actual study from which that graph originates: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2013/04/Asian-Americans-new-full-report-04-2013.pdf

    Koreans in America, median annual personal earnings $45,000, household annual income $50,000, average household size 2.6 (persons), p. 50.

    Filipinos in America, median annual personal earnings $43,000, household annual income $75,000, average household size 3.4 (persons), p. 41.

    So the higher median Filipino household income is at least partly a function of the greater household size. In individual median income Koreans are slightly higher - this despite the fact that more Koreans are foreign-born and their English facility is much worse (54% speak English very well among Koreans vs. 77.7% among Filipinos).

    I think the evidence points to Koreans having much better economic and assimilation characteristics among the subset that is American-born, because Koreans in general (foreign-born + American-born) intermarry at much lower rates than Filipinos overall, BUT their intermarriage rates skyrocket past Filipinos among the American-born.
  128. @Twinkie

    You completely missed the point.
     
    No, YOU missed my point. More below.

    Filipino Americans are considerably more prosperous than Korean Americans...

    The point is, Koreans are not a high-achieving group in the US, contrary to the stereotype.
     
    I suggest you look up the definition of "median." Median income is a useful measure for comparison, but can hide different variances.*

    As I wrote before, Filipino immigration (as with Indian immigration) is likely more selective than Korean immigration (high achieving people from South Korea no longer emigrate since the quality of life there is very high unlike in India or the Philippines). On top of that, Filipinos (as with Indians) usually arrive in the U.S. much higher facility with English than Koreans do - which opens up much greater economic opportunities for them with the first generation. However, the real interesting (and meaningful) comparison should be with the American-born. I haven't seen the data, but given the proportions of Koreans (vs. Filipinos) at elite universities, medical schools, law schools, etc. I would think chances are good that the median income of American-born Koreans is likely much higher than that of American-born Filipinos.

    *If you don't understand what I mean by "hiding different variances," think of it this way: Let's consider 100 Filipinos (50 foreign-born, 50 American-born) who are all nurses. Now let's compare them to 100 Koreans (60 foreign-born, 40 American-born), among whom the 60 foreign-born run laundromats while their 40 children are lawyers. In this scenario, the median income of all Filipinos is going to be higher than that of Koreans, but not so with the American-born. Indeed, American-born Koreans would be much "fancier" than their Filipino equivalents.

    If you think a more complex version of this scenario is implausible, let's look at it another way. Can you name a prominent (or "fancy") Filipino-American for me?

    See if you can find a Filipino-American equivalent of this Korean-American guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Yong_Kim

    Jim Yong Kim (Hangul: 짐용김; born December 8, 1959), also known as Kim Yong (Hangul: 김용), is a South Korean-American physician and anthropologist serving as the 12th and current President of the World Bank since 2012.

    A global health leader, he was formerly the Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a co-founder and executive director of Partners In Health before serving as the President of Dartmouth College from 2009 to 2012, becoming the first Asian American president of an Ivy League institution.[1][2]

    Kim was named the world's 50th most powerful person by Forbes Magazine's List of The World's Most Powerful People in 2013.

    Born in Seoul, South Korea in 1959, Jim Yong Kim immigrated with his family to the U.S. at the age of five and grew up in Muscatine, Iowa. His father taught dentistry at the University of Iowa, while his mother received her PhD in philosophy.[4] Kim attended Muscatine High School, where he was valedictorian, president of his class, and played both quarterback for the football team and point guard on the basketball team. After a year and a half at the University of Iowa, he transferred to Brown University, where he graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in human biology in 1982. He was awarded an M.D. at Harvard Medical School in 1991, and a PhD in anthropology at Harvard University in 1993.[5] He was among the first enrollees of Harvard's experimental MD/PhD program in the social sciences.
     
    As for this:

    Among Asians, there is no correlation between the per-capita GDP of the country of origin, and the success rate of that community in the US. Japanese Americans outperform Korean Americans by a lot too, which completely invalidates your convoluted and self-contradictory claim.
     
    You seem not to understand that (self-)selection is very different from origin country to origin country.

    At one time (before the rise of massive Indian immigration), African-immigrants in the U.S. had the highest educational attainment among all immigrants (higher rates of both high school and college degrees). Why? Because the selection effect was stronger with them (likely because living conditions for the educated was comparatively much poorer in African than other source countries, with correspondingly higher brain drain). Did that make Africans in America "fancier" than poorer or less educated immigrants from Europe and East Asia?

    However, the real interesting (and meaningful) comparison should be with the American-born. I haven’t seen the data, but given the proportions of Koreans (vs. Filipinos) at elite universities, medical schools, law schools, etc. I would think chances are good that the median income of American-born Koreans is likely much higher than that of American-born Filipinos.

    Yes, this would be meaningful data. It would answer a lot of questions about assimilation, etc.

    There are still too few Asian-Americans who have reached adulthood (let alone the post-30 peak earning age). Quite a few second-gen Asian-Americans are half-white (say, 15-20%), which also blurs the data.

  129. IBC says:
    @Twinkie
    By that convoluted logic, Koreans in America should be driving Shelby Cobras: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Chun

    Well some Korean-Americans probably do drive them, at least on the weekends…

    But I looked at that link, and the AC Cobra just looks like an AC Ace that’s been hitting the gym. So John Chun probably didn’t have that much influence on it, though apparently he redesigned the Cobra badge. But he definitely was one of the designers of the Shelby Mustang; and later on, the Dodge Charger, another famous muscle car. So credit where credit is due and thanks for mentioning him because I hadn’t heard of him before. Wikipedia cites the following article and it’s actually a much better account of Chun’s work:

    https://www.hemmings.com/blog/index.php/2013/07/09/former-shelby-american-designer-john-chun-dies-at-age-84/

    And it’s also kind of interesting that one of the of the key designers of the Corvette Sting Ray was Japanese-American:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Shinoda

    So the Ford vs. Chevy thing is not just a white redneck thing. But personally, I’m a Citroën enthusiast and I try to use sunscreen…

  130. @Thomm
    Again, you don't get it.

    Your long-winded reply is completely invalidated by the fact that Japanese-Americans have higher median incomes than Korean Americans. Japan is richer than South Korea (and has been for ages), yet Japanese-Americans outperform in the US as well. I hope you know how to read graphs and charts :

    http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2017/09/08091819/FT_17.09.08_asian_income.png


    See if you can find a Filipino-American equivalent of this Korean-American guy:
     
    Anecdotes are not a suitable form of debate. I could point out Michelle Malkin as more accomplished than Jim Yong Kim, if anecdotes were a valid rebuttal.

    Your long-winded reply is completely invalidated by the fact that Japanese-Americans have higher median incomes than Korean Americans.

    No, because the proportions of foreign-born and American-born are very different between the two groups. Do you realize how that makes apples-to apples comparison difficult?

    Also, as a side note, there are many fewer full-blooded Japanese-Americans than the latter today, because the heydays of high Japanese immigration was much older than that for Koreans.

    Anecdotes are not a suitable form of debate. I could point out Michelle Malkin as more accomplished than Jim Yong Kim, if anecdotes were a valid rebuttal.

    Malkin is not as fancy as the president of World Bank. Not. Even. Close.

    If you think this is “anecdotal,” look at the respective lists of prominent Filipino- and Korean-Americans in Wikipedia as a proxy for fanciness. By the way, here is an anecdote for you. I am on the board of a large hospital system (multiple healthcare facilities across the South). Filipinos I run across in the system are overwhelmingly nurses with very few doctors. Koreans I run into are overwhelmingly physicians with very few nurses (almost none).

    And, finally, note that among fancy Filipinos, you find Chinese names frequently such as “Chua.” Fancy Asians.

  131. @Thomm
    Again, you don't get it.

    Your long-winded reply is completely invalidated by the fact that Japanese-Americans have higher median incomes than Korean Americans. Japan is richer than South Korea (and has been for ages), yet Japanese-Americans outperform in the US as well. I hope you know how to read graphs and charts :

    http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2017/09/08091819/FT_17.09.08_asian_income.png


    See if you can find a Filipino-American equivalent of this Korean-American guy:
     
    Anecdotes are not a suitable form of debate. I could point out Michelle Malkin as more accomplished than Jim Yong Kim, if anecdotes were a valid rebuttal.

    By the way, you do realize that the graph you keep citing is “median annual HOUSEHOLD income,” right?

    If you looked at the actual study from which that graph originates: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2013/04/Asian-Americans-new-full-report-04-2013.pdf

    Koreans in America, median annual personal earnings $45,000, household annual income $50,000, average household size 2.6 (persons), p. 50.

    Filipinos in America, median annual personal earnings $43,000, household annual income $75,000, average household size 3.4 (persons), p. 41.

    So the higher median Filipino household income is at least partly a function of the greater household size. In individual median income Koreans are slightly higher – this despite the fact that more Koreans are foreign-born and their English facility is much worse (54% speak English very well among Koreans vs. 77.7% among Filipinos).

    I think the evidence points to Koreans having much better economic and assimilation characteristics among the subset that is American-born, because Koreans in general (foreign-born + American-born) intermarry at much lower rates than Filipinos overall, BUT their intermarriage rates skyrocket past Filipinos among the American-born.

  132. @Thomm
    Contrary to this narrative, Filipino Americans are considerably more prosperous than Korean Americans :

    http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2017/09/08091819/FT_17.09.08_asian_income.png


    is a vastly prosperous highrise district.
     
    Even Steve fell for it. Koreans are somehow assumed to be wealthy even among Asian-Americans, perhaps because of some TV shows in the 80s and 90s. The truth is quite different.

    Nurses can make good money. IIRC, Filipinos weren’t always this successful, but the more recent immigrant waves have been more selective (correct me if I’m wrong). I also came across recent Filipino academic figures and the numbers are quite good and comparable to the Fancy Asians.

    Most of these groups are more successful and law abiding than the average American – even the average White American – so from a purely utilitarian perspective they’re a net benefit. Unfortunately, even when you limit yourself to high-IQ immigrants diversity has other negative effects.

  133. @tomv
    For all of China's rich history and culture, I've never considered the Chinese "fancy" anything. They were, of course, very poor for most of the 20th century, but even now when they're getting more prosperous by the day (and good for them), they're not becoming proportionally fancier in my eyes for two reasons.

    1. Fancy doesn't scale well, certainly not to a billion.
    2. The Chinese are a rather earthy people. This can actually be admirable, but fancy it isn't. (Just Singaporeans, Hong Kongers, and Taiwanese.)

    Interestingly, the Chinese are rather similar to Americans in this regard. Does any European (even among legions of Americophiles) ever describe Americans in general as fancy?

    Sure, the distinction between East, South, and Southeast Asians is a useful one, but let's not adopt this broad's coinage as iStevism. It's not even clever.

    (I'm sure iSteve commenters can come up with much better alternatives.)

    Maybe, but for a nation than hasn’t even reached first world status yet, they sure exhibit a lot of snobbery towards manual labour. Chinese economic observers are already worried about a looming shortage of manual labour (skilled and unskilled):

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/china-suffers-from-shortage-blue-collar-workers-antonio-graceffo

    https://qz.com/148688/hong-kongs-labor-shortage-means-140-per-day-construction-workers-waiters-with-great-benefits/

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Maybe, but for a nation than hasn’t even reached first world status yet, they sure exhibit a lot of snobbery towards manual labour.
     
    Funny that "coolie" is taken as such an insult. I have a lot of respect for genuine coolies.

    On the other hand, it is an Indian word.
    , @Autochthon
    It should never cease to amaze anyone The Man has ever feared a Looming Shortage of Labour Real Soon Now just as sure as any policeman will tell you crime is out of control, teachers know better than anyone formal education is critically underfunded, and (of course!) farmers are forever one season away from all the crops rotting in the fields.

    Yessir, almost eight billions of people, but nary a body to work in the factory or clean the lavatories. What's that, you say? Wages? Supply and de-huh? Look, I'm just a simple, unfrozen caveman lawyer, and your voodoo idea the Rothschilds, Patels, and Wengens of the world might not really produce billions of dollars in value whereas their peons could maybe stand to be paid enough money for the luxury of supporting at least one child and not working eighty hours per week rather than ever more overpopulation of an underclass until It's People! – well...even I know that's all just crazy talk....
  134. @Anon
    If Latinos are now Latinx, are Chinese now Chinx?

    Please report immediately to Room 101.

  135. @Unzerker
    Even the first Mongol invasion was stopped by the Czechs, Croatians and Austrians respectively.
    Their big successes in Europe were on the plains of Russia, Poland and Hungary. Every else they seemed to struggle.

    Even the first Mongol invasion was stopped by the Czechs, Croatians and Austrians respectively.
    Their big successes in Europe were on the plains of Russia, Poland and Hungary. Every else they seemed to struggle.

    It’s good to have mountains.

    • Replies: @Buster Keaton’s Stunt Double
    And castles.
  136. @unpc downunder
    Maybe, but for a nation than hasn't even reached first world status yet, they sure exhibit a lot of snobbery towards manual labour. Chinese economic observers are already worried about a looming shortage of manual labour (skilled and unskilled):

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/china-suffers-from-shortage-blue-collar-workers-antonio-graceffo

    https://qz.com/148688/hong-kongs-labor-shortage-means-140-per-day-construction-workers-waiters-with-great-benefits/

    Maybe, but for a nation than hasn’t even reached first world status yet, they sure exhibit a lot of snobbery towards manual labour.

    Funny that “coolie” is taken as such an insult. I have a lot of respect for genuine coolies.

    On the other hand, it is an Indian word.

  137. @Twinkie

    Many Japanese would probably object to being lumped in with Koreans and Chinese, who they wouldn’t consider fancy. Interestingly, they tend to identify with Mongolians, who they consider to be their forebears , more than any other Asians.
     
    That's a complete nonsense. Japanese don't consider Mongolians to be their forebears (indeed, the famed/infamous Kamikaze pilots of World War II derived their name - "Divine Wind" - from the storms that destroyed the Mongol-Korean invasion force in 1281).

    Most educated Japanese know that their Divine Emperor descends from Koreans as do a substantial fraction of their most illustrious noble families. Indeed, the Yamato people - the "founders" of Japan - themselves are considered to be invaders from the Korean Peninsula.

    Japanese and Korean genetics are quite similar (similar North Eurasian hunter-gatherer + southern rice grower proportions), and some ancestry testing sites such as DNA Land do not distinguish the two.

    In the post-modern era, many Japanese fancy Korean pop and drama stars. And, of course, despite the old enmities, Koreans are always trying to close the gap with the Japanese, whom they acknowledge as being economically more successful.

    My view comes from several visits to Japan as well as having Japanese friends and acquaintances . They are quick to inform you there is a difference between them and Chinese and Koreans. They don’t like it when you say you can’t see the difference between them. Their history, language and culture has been largely separate form the continent since about 800AD. Something like Britain and Europe , only more so.

    I’m not up on all the recent DNA studies , but I have heard more than one Japanese say they ‘re descended from Mongolians and that Mongolians have the same facial features. Interestingly, it is only Chinese and Koreans that say they are Japan’s forebears.

    As for the Mongol attempted invasions in the 13th century. Just because the Mongols settled your islands thousands of years before doesn’t mean you let them invade you.

  138. @Twinkie

    Confucian merchant culture
     
    What?

    He probably means 21st Century Confucian culture, as opposed to the anachronistic definition provided by Wikipedia.

    Classical Confucian culture: scholars on top, artisans and farmers in the middle, merchants bottom.

    Post-communist Confucian culture: white collar workers on top, blue collar workers bottom.

    • Replies: @White Guy In Japan
    Yes, thanks for that. The economic data on Vietnam surpasses all their neighbors (except maybe Thailand) and their academic test scores are closer to the East Asian cluster.

    More corruption and street crime, though.
  139. @Daniel Chieh
    The land now known as Vietnam was part of China for a significant portion of its history.

    The land now known as Vietnam was part of China for a significant portion of its history.

    That’s true, but it seems China has no use for Vietnam now, or in the foreseeable future.

    China doesn’t need more people, and what resources Vietnam has are also found in the rest of mainland south-east Asia, or in China itself.

    As long as Vietnam is not used by an outside power as geographical springboard against China, they are considered no real threat – a bit like a hypothetical united Korea, actually – (not, of course, in any ethno-cultural sense, but in a geopolitical setting).

    Sidenote: It seems the Han never tried to erase Korean identity, only steer it in a more Sinic direction. Those who did try to erase the Korean identity, by which I mean, of course, Japan, have earned the lasting hatred of Koreans – which persists to this day, and likely beyond.

  140. @Reg Cæsar

    Even the first Mongol invasion was stopped by the Czechs, Croatians and Austrians respectively.
    Their big successes in Europe were on the plains of Russia, Poland and Hungary. Every else they seemed to struggle.
     
    It's good to have mountains.

    And castles.

  141. @YetAnotherAnon
    "from what I can tell (it’s not easy to measure) Bangladeshi men have THE HIGHEST RATE in the world, of violence against women"

    Certainly East London, heavily Bangladeshi, is the epicentre of the UK acid attack epidemic (which black gangs have quickly adopted). It seems to have started as a way of showing displeasure with one's wife, though it rapidly mutated into a general tool of thuggery. On the other hand Bangladeshis have traditionally not been as into Islamist terror as their Pakistani co-religionists, though there have been some recent (mostly failed) plots.

    Back on topic, the Koreatown boys are simply following the guidance of the late James Brown

    The way I like it
    Is the way it is
    I've got mine
    Don't worry 'bout his

     

    59 YetAnotheAnon > It seems to have started as a way of showing displeasure with one’s wife

    i think it mostly happens when a girl refuses the advances of a guy.

  142. @YetAnotherAnon
    "from what I can tell (it’s not easy to measure) Bangladeshi men have THE HIGHEST RATE in the world, of violence against women"

    Certainly East London, heavily Bangladeshi, is the epicentre of the UK acid attack epidemic (which black gangs have quickly adopted). It seems to have started as a way of showing displeasure with one's wife, though it rapidly mutated into a general tool of thuggery. On the other hand Bangladeshis have traditionally not been as into Islamist terror as their Pakistani co-religionists, though there have been some recent (mostly failed) plots.

    Back on topic, the Koreatown boys are simply following the guidance of the late James Brown

    The way I like it
    Is the way it is
    I've got mine
    Don't worry 'bout his

     

    Certainly East London, heavily Bangladeshi, is the epicentre of the UK acid attack epidemic (which black gangs have quickly adopted). It seems to have started as a way of showing displeasure with one’s wife

    Whose “wife” was Victor Riesel?

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    He didn't my have my dinner ready on time.
  143. @unpc downunder
    He probably means 21st Century Confucian culture, as opposed to the anachronistic definition provided by Wikipedia.

    Classical Confucian culture: scholars on top, artisans and farmers in the middle, merchants bottom.

    Post-communist Confucian culture: white collar workers on top, blue collar workers bottom.

    Yes, thanks for that. The economic data on Vietnam surpasses all their neighbors (except maybe Thailand) and their academic test scores are closer to the East Asian cluster.

    More corruption and street crime, though.

  144. @unpc downunder
    Maybe, but for a nation than hasn't even reached first world status yet, they sure exhibit a lot of snobbery towards manual labour. Chinese economic observers are already worried about a looming shortage of manual labour (skilled and unskilled):

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/china-suffers-from-shortage-blue-collar-workers-antonio-graceffo

    https://qz.com/148688/hong-kongs-labor-shortage-means-140-per-day-construction-workers-waiters-with-great-benefits/

    It should never cease to amaze anyone The Man has ever feared a Looming Shortage of Labour Real Soon Now just as sure as any policeman will tell you crime is out of control, teachers know better than anyone formal education is critically underfunded, and (of course!) farmers are forever one season away from all the crops rotting in the fields.

    Yessir, almost eight billions of people, but nary a body to work in the factory or clean the lavatories. What’s that, you say? Wages? Supply and de-huh? Look, I’m just a simple, unfrozen caveman lawyer, and your voodoo idea the Rothschilds, Patels, and Wengens of the world might not really produce billions of dollars in value whereas their peons could maybe stand to be paid enough money for the luxury of supporting at least one child and not working eighty hours per week rather than ever more overpopulation of an underclass until It’s People! – well…even I know that’s all just crazy talk….

  145. @Reg Cæsar

    Certainly East London, heavily Bangladeshi, is the epicentre of the UK acid attack epidemic (which black gangs have quickly adopted). It seems to have started as a way of showing displeasure with one’s wife
     
    Whose "wife" was Victor Riesel?

    http://www.nydailynews.com/resizer/GPLcaNWbX5gZbBwvCse_eeQxEfg=/1400x0/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-tronc.s3.amazonaws.com/public/KKLRMOEL4BGECZGCLCQ7ZDR3IE.jpg

    He didn’t my have my dinner ready on time.

  146. @Twinkie
    There are jungle Asians, there are fancy Asians, and then there are rooftop Asians. You all can guess which I prefer.

    Fancy rooftop Asians?

  147. Koreatown, west of Downtown Los Angeles on Wilshire Blvd., is a vastly prosperous highrise district.

    LOL. As someone who spends a part of most summers in LA I can assure you that Koreatown is a ghetto. It’s where you go if you can’t afford housing or office space in the more desirable parts of LA.

    Clipper games usually featured courtside a lot of Big Renters from Pusan as Sterling’s very special guests.)

    Wrong again. There are rarely any Koreans or Asians of any sort courtside at Clipper games.

    See any Asians? Ok, I think that’s Lucy Liu behind Conan O’Brien.

    I see someone doesn’t know anything about Los Angeles yet chooses to pontificate.

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