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I'm Not Sure Why, But This Headline Cracks Me Up

Screenshot 2017-01-29 23.32.04

The actual NYT article isn’t all that bad:

Christian Leaders Denounce Trump’s Plan to Favor Christian Refugees
By LAURIE GOODSTEIN JAN. 29, 2017

Over the past decade, Christians in the United States have grown increasingly alarmed about the persecution of other Christians overseas, especially in the Middle East. With each priest kidnapped in Syria, each Christian family attacked in Iraq or each Coptic church bombed in Egypt, the clamor for action rose.

During the campaign, Donald J. Trump picked up on these fears, speaking frequently of Christians who were refused entry to the United States and beheaded by terrorists of the Islamic State: “If you’re a Christian, you have no chance,” he said in Ohio in November.

Now, President Trump has followed through on his campaign promise to rescue Christians who are suffering.

The executive order he signed on Friday gives preference to refugees who belong to a religious minority in their country, and have been persecuted for their religion.

The president detailed his intentions during an interview with the Christian Broadcasting Network on Friday, saying his administration is giving priority to Christians because they had suffered “more so” than others, “so we are going to help them.”

But if Mr. Trump had hoped for Christian leaders to break out in cheers, that is, for the most part, not what he has heard so far.

A broad array of clergy members has strongly denounced Mr. Trump’s order as discriminatory, misguided and inhumane.

Of course, it doesn’t make clear that the refugee racket is a nice source of taxpayer money for more than a few churches. Nor does it point out that budgets for giving actual refugees refuge go much further in third countries than in expensive America.

 
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  1. Let’s not be afraid to note that a lot of churches that are denouncing helping genuinely persecuted Christians, who are the target of majority Muslim hatred and violence in those middle eastern countries, don’t think much of Christianity or Christ either. They’re SJW safe zones, where the mere mention of the Bible is enough to trigger conniptions and vapors.

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  2. The article also doesn’t point out that Christianity has developed suicidal tendencies.

    Read More
    • Agree: DCThrowback
    • Replies: @Space Ghost
    > The article also doesn’t point out that Christianity has developed suicidal tendencies.

    Nietzsche pointed this out 130 years ago. To briefly summarize his diagnosis...Christianity originally involved a "turning away from the world" (this life is pain and suffering; in death you will be reunited with God and experience infinite love) because life was so terrible for the early Christians. At it's very root, Christianity entails a wish-for-death. Nietzsche's solution for this was to reject the teachings of Saint Paul and go back to the example of Jesus (this gave birth to the liberal Christianity we all know and love today) ... unfortunately his solution has failed, obviously.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    The article also doesn’t point out that Left-wing Christianity in service of Marxism has developed suicidal tendencies. TFIFY.

    To Hell with them. I'll try to visit their appearance before the Great White Throne, but I am pretty sure they'll swim in the Lake.
  3. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Apparently, Christianity is all about ‘forgiveness’ and ‘shared humanity’, but this notion that it ‘tolerates’ rival faiths encroaching in turf which it used to regard as ‘its own’ is only of very recent vintage – in fact no older than the time senior churchmen started to take the basic articles of their faith none too seriously.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Like the French First Republic, there must be a "Year Zero" attitude going on, how else can one explain away the long history of struggle against Muslims, the execution of heretics, promotion of Western imperialism.

    You can't make a serious reconciliation of critical theory and any notion of regular Christianity as it has been understood since Augustine. To repudiate the past means claiming the whole time was an error, and only in the current year is the true meaning understood. (Note, in Mormonism there is a doctrine called "continuing revelation" which makes this OK)

    Or we can cut the Gordian Knot of liberalism, and see the truth. It's naked cultural Marxism, the kind that would make every member of the Frankfurt School proud.
  4. Pathological altruism.

    OT

    Yes — we all saw how biased media outlets were during the election — but’s that’s all in the past.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Re Soledad O'Brien's inane tweet:

    Sure, Soledad, everybody in your business was just patting Donny on the head and being cutesy toward him the whole way.

    What a load of crap. You're yet another overpaid, PC-selected piece of media privilege invading my TV screen. Go away.
  5. And here’s the kicker: most people look at the clerical invite-the-world policy and see it as a shrewd long game to get bums on pews. On the contrary, zero effort is made to convert refugees who come from strong-religion cultures.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    And here’s the kicker: most people look at the clerical invite-the-world policy and see it as a shrewd long game to get bums on pews. On the contrary, zero effort is made to convert refugees who come from strong-religion cultures.
     
    The hope is that the refugees can convert the clerical.
    , @Percy Gryce
    In fact, it may have the opposite effect: It says to many if you're Christian, we rich Westerners won't help you; if you're Muslim, we will. Now which faith would you choose?
    , @SFG
    It's one of the big reasons the Catholic Church is pro-Mexican-immigration.

    Of course, they actually are Catholic, with the occasional extra saint...
  6. Cultural Marxism has replaced the four Gospels throughout the Christian churches. Already riven through with feminism, it is not surprising that their leaders will not back the vast majority of their male fellowship that voted for Trump.

    Soros money is also at play here.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2013/10/26/soros-has-donated-more-than-100m-to-immigrant-rights-groups/

    Read More
  7. What about those who we pulled in to the harassment game in Barry`s term? Ain`t no church going to help them…same CIA-trolls still commenting in this site.

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  8. @Anonymous
    Apparently, Christianity is all about 'forgiveness' and 'shared humanity', but this notion that it 'tolerates' rival faiths encroaching in turf which it used to regard as 'its own' is only of very recent vintage - in fact no older than the time senior churchmen started to take the basic articles of their faith none too seriously.

    Like the French First Republic, there must be a “Year Zero” attitude going on, how else can one explain away the long history of struggle against Muslims, the execution of heretics, promotion of Western imperialism.

    You can’t make a serious reconciliation of critical theory and any notion of regular Christianity as it has been understood since Augustine. To repudiate the past means claiming the whole time was an error, and only in the current year is the true meaning understood. (Note, in Mormonism there is a doctrine called “continuing revelation” which makes this OK)

    Or we can cut the Gordian Knot of liberalism, and see the truth. It’s naked cultural Marxism, the kind that would make every member of the Frankfurt School proud.

    Read More
  9. @eah
    Pathological altruism.

    OT

    Yes -- we all saw how biased media outlets were during the election -- but's that's all in the past.

    https://twitter.com/soledadobrien/status/825492463192256512

    Re Soledad O’Brien’s inane tweet:

    Sure, Soledad, everybody in your business was just patting Donny on the head and being cutesy toward him the whole way.

    What a load of crap. You’re yet another overpaid, PC-selected piece of media privilege invading my TV screen. Go away.

    Read More
  10. Over at Occam’s Razor Dark Enlightenment there is the observation that Christianity is today divided mostly between cucked and un-cucked Christians. Here is a prime example of cucked Christians–how dare anyone favor the religion we (sort of) practice.

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  11. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I think I know how Constantinople fell.

    A bunch of Christians said it’s not Christian to favor Christians in the war with Muslims.

    The real taboo is naming the Tribe that did most to mess up the Middle East to the point where that the native Christian communities have been uprooted and destroyed.

    Strange… Arab Christians were safe under Hussein.
    And they are safer under Assad.

    But the Tribe and Obama have been working to aid extreme Jihadis to weaken secular regimes that protect Christians.

    Go figure.

    To the Tribe, Christians favoring Christians sounds like ‘Americans favoring Americans’ which sounds like ‘white gentiles favoring white gentiles’.

    They rhyme.

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  12. Many of these “Christian leaders” and clergy members are objectively anti-Christianity.

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    • Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Truer words were never written.

    Check this out from The United Methodist Church.

    www.umc.org
  13. The only times the NY Times quotes Christian leaders approvingly is when they need the Left’s House Negro Christians to defend some policy on pseudo-religious grounds.

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  14. One can almost imagine these ‘Christian leaders’ on the boat deck of the Titanic protesting Captain Smith’s order for ‘women and children first’ as “discriminatory, misguided and inhumane!’

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Actually, as a matter of fact, many non European peoples don't give a damn about that 'women and children first' moral stricture - as far as I know, it is not a law and never has been a law.
    On the contrary, strong, fit, healthy young men unabashedly put themselves first on the grounds that they are 'the most valuable'.
    This has happened more than a few times on the invader boats currently troubling Italy.
  15. budgets for giving actual refugees refuge go much further in third countries than in expensive America.

    This pretty much unassailable and obvious fact on its own provides strong evidence that what is going on across the Western developed world is more than refugee resettlement. It is part of a deliberate plan to swamp western countries – or less euphemistically… white homelands – to swamp them demographically for political and social engineering reasons.

    I used to be sceptial on this point, of a cock-up over conspiracy chap. However, the evidence – now from this and much else – for the truth of this population replacement conspiracy, is too compelling. So much so that it is now the parsimonious explanation.

    Read More
  16. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @unit472
    One can almost imagine these 'Christian leaders' on the boat deck of the Titanic protesting Captain Smith's order for 'women and children first' as "discriminatory, misguided and inhumane!'

    Actually, as a matter of fact, many non European peoples don’t give a damn about that ‘women and children first’ moral stricture – as far as I know, it is not a law and never has been a law.
    On the contrary, strong, fit, healthy young men unabashedly put themselves first on the grounds that they are ‘the most valuable’.
    This has happened more than a few times on the invader boats currently troubling Italy.

    Read More
  17. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    This ‘broad array’ is probably propaganda spin. Some lawyers make their way to the airport on behalf of the excluded ones and the media uses terms describing it as lawyers are ‘flocking’ there as though there’s some big move. They reported the State Department had some ‘massive’ wave of quits but later turns out to be all of four people along with the political appointments that always leave with changes in administration. NYT doesn’t speak for Christians nor does whatever small group one can round up of ‘clergy’, whoever or whatever they are. Everything is spin with this media.

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  18. The mantra for the mainline Protestant churches and increasingly the Catholic Church under Pope Francis is,

    God wants you to be happy. Therefore, whatever makes you happy is what God wants you to do.

    Just another way of repeating the juvenile aphorism popular among Hippies in the 1960s: “If it feels good, do it ….” Pure relativism that puts all “faiths” on an equal footing.

    These New Age Christians would not want to do anything to interfere with the happiness of Moslems. That would pull on their conscience.

    Read More
  19. Thoughtful people should be cognizant by now of 2 different versions of Christianity in the US.

    There’s the New Testament morality revering Christians and there is the fundamentalist morality Christians who mostly revere Old Testament morality.

    New Testament Christians are the genuine followers of Jesus of Nazareth, whereas fundamentalist are the so-called Judeo-Christians.

    Judeo-Christian literally means Jewish Messiah, and the label Judeo-Christian is definitely not a reference to Jesus of Nazareth.

    Jesus of Nazareth was a heretic relative to Judaism, and was executed specifically because he was a heretic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @eD
    All this @ 16 is actually quite true, though I don't see where throwing Middle Eastern Christians under the bus follows.
    , @Old Okie
    Yes, Christianity was/is a reformation of Judaism. It takes the tribal jewish God and makes him universal. The Old Testament is nothing but the tribal specific document of the jewish "chosen people". The jewish God encourages violence and lying as long as it benefits the jews. Christ rejected all that and has never been forgiven by the jews. These Old Testament Christians are completely brainwashed and worship jews and Isreal - many of my relatives are part of this group and no argument can persuade them.
  20. I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession. Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, they were all pretty bad back then. They were seldom at the top of their class, and they had often already failed in other professions. These are the men (and women) who are running the show today. They are frequently not even believers, and most are liberal arts grads indoctrinated with the same left-wing nonsense as any other liberal arts student.

    The students they were writing about back then would now be hitting there 50s (or older, if they were coming from another profession). They are the guys now running the show.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    I fear you are correct about all that.

    And if you do manage to recall where you read those profiles of people who become clergymen, please post it in a comment.

    Depressing as the subject is, we need to know more about the phenomenon.
    , @PenskeFile

    I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession. Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, they were all pretty bad back then. They were seldom at the top of their class, and they had often already failed in other professions. These are the men (and women) who are running the show today. They are frequently not even believers, and most are liberal arts grads indoctrinated with the same left-wing nonsense as any other liberal arts student.
     
    I take it you do not have any first-hand experience with any clergy then? My experience with most of the Catholic priests I have known personally (more than 20) has been anything but what you describe. Maybe not "top of their class" but certainly intelligent, productive and engaging. The same thing for the religious sisters and with them, they literally are top of their class. My son's HS had a religious sister as a teacher with a PhD in E.E. from the U. of Michigan and another young sister who delivered the Latin commencement address at Harvard (it is an annual tradition for one student to address the graduation in Latin).
    , @Francis G.
    That jibes with my personal experience in college during the '90s. I noticed that the theology majors in my history and philosophy courses tended to be straight-C students. In addition to being academic mediocrities, they were also usually very pompous and preening. These were Episcopalian, Congregationalist, and Unitarian future ministers.
    , @FKA Max
    This is the real problem, in my opinion:

    Why Psychopaths Are Attracted To Jobs in Religious Ministry

    Former FBI Agent Joe Navarro examines why predators find ministerial and clergy positions so desirable in an April 2014 article in Psychology Today. In his article, Joe Navarro reports how a career in church or religious ministry as a member of the clergy is the eighth most popular profession chosen by predators, following on the heels of the seventh most popular profession chosen by predators which are careers in law enforcement.
     
    - http://jamesctanner.com/why-psychopaths-are-attracted-to-jobs-in-religious-ministry/

    Why Predators Are Attracted to Careers in the Clergy
    Some further insight into a serious phenomenon.
    Posted Apr 20, 2014

    1. Organizations provide a convenient infrastructure from which a predator can prey on others for financial gain or to otherwise exploit others (sexually, mentally, physically).

    2. Membership in a legitimate institution, be it a club, a branch of the military, or a corporation, gives legitimacy to individuals. We are more respectful and trusting when we are told a certain person is a VP or head of sales for XYZ company rather than just a stranger off the street. [...]


    5. Many religious organizations preach forgiveness, even for felonies. For predators this is truly a godsend. This means that if they get caught, they can ask for forgiveness and chances are it will be given, in a pious but naïve effort to help the lawbreaker “learn from his mistakes.” Unfortunately, the predator sees this as an opportunity to sharpen his skills and to do his crime again, perhaps this time more carefully. [...]

    11. There is, it should be noted, no religion or sect that screens for psychopathy as defined by Robert Hare that I am aware of. All you need is to be ordained, or you declare yourself a religious leader and the way is clear for the predator. And so while some organizations, such as in law enforcement, screen for pathologies by using psychometric tools, very few religious organization do so. Which is why the predator would benefit from joining or leading such an organization. Across the planet, there is almost no scrutiny or due diligence that is or will be conducted. To connive, or to “con,” the predator merely needs his victim to have faith and trust in the predator something that is often easily achieved with the vestments of a legitimate religious organization.
     
    - https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/spycatcher/201404/why-predators-are-attracted-careers-in-the-clergy
    , @dfordoom

    I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession.
     
    Lots of homosexuals. Lots and lots of homosexuals. The heterosexual ones are often worse - they're basically girly-men.

    There's not a lot of masculinity to be found in the average church.
    , @benjaminl
    Could it have been Paul Wilkes in the Atlantic Monthly, December 1990?

    http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/90dec/wilkes.htm


    There is little doubt that the quality of seminarians has declined. Dean after dean admits that seminaries are getting precious few of those ranked in the top reaches of their undergraduate classes. In 1947 some ten percent of college graduates nominated to Phi Beta Kappa went into the ministry. A Phi Beta Kappa member today who evinced an interest in the ministry would be recruited by seminaries with unholy zeal. The ministry these days must compete for the best and the brightest not only with the ill-paid and too-often thankless helping professions, such as social work and counseling, but also with the high-profile and well-paid professions of law, business, and medicine. There is concern that some of those for whom the seminary marks the beginning of a second or third career may be burdened with cumbersome psychological baggage: finally they have found a profession in which they will get the respect they deserve; the church will protect them in a hostile and confusing world; somehow the tedium of the quotidian will evaporate now that a higher calling is being pursued. One researcher found that, notwithstanding the bankers and lawyers at Harvard, entrepreneu rial- type males were a distinct minority in the seminary population he studied: graduates might be able to tend established churches, but they were not self-starters. "The energy level is shockingly low," the researcher told me. One seminary in the South reported that seven to nine percent of those it admitted over a recent ten-year period had such elevated scores on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Index—which helps to detect mental disorders such as paranoia and schizophrenia—that they warranted immediate counseling.

    ...

    IN MY VISITS TO SEMINARIES AROUND THE COUNTRY, I found that no class was extolled as highly as the one taught by Katie Cannon at Episcopal Divinity School, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. If I really wanted to see what 1990s seminary education was about, and how religious leaders should be formed, I was told, this was the course. "State of the art" and "on the cutting edge" were phrases employed by Fredrica Harris Thompsett, the school's academic dean. (Others in theological education are less enthusiastic, and feel that the school has, as one seminary educator told me, "gone over the edge.") So one Monday morning I found a seat at the back of an amphitheater-sized lecture room, having been put on notice that I could stay for only the first half of the three-hour class. The second half would be too personal; "Layers have been peeled back," Katie Cannon told me.

    The first half hour of Cannon's class, "Genealogy of Race, Sex, Class Oppression," was taken up with student announcements of meetings, talks, and demonstrations; the range was from gay rights to abortion rights to newly found slave documents to the emancipation of Palestinian women. Cannon, an effervescent, mesmerizing, and quite humorous black woman, seemed pleased and patient with the long parade of opportunities presented. The class, composed that day of fifty women and five men, obviously adored her—as evidenced by the "Ahhh"s and "Amen"s, reminiscent of a revival meeting, with which they affirmed many of her statements. When near the end of the announcements, one of the men in the class conveyed his pleasure at having the opportunity to attend such a course, Cannon confided that he was not alone, and that many schools wanted her to teach, but "Can you imagine? They want to make mine a required course! How do you force a person not to be racist? Just for three credits?"
     

  21. Hey, @steve_sailer , you rarely discuss American Christianity in its various forms and how it plays into politics. Do you have any interest in that?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Only an Idiot would ask such a question
    , @FKA Max
    The Curley Effect Versus the Kennedy Effect

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/


    Early in World War I, a wounded British officer arrived in Boston to recruit citizens of the then-neutral United States to fight in the British army. He politely asked the by then legendary Irish mayor of Boston, James Michael Curley, for permission. Curley replied, ‘‘Go ahead Colonel. Take every damn one of them.’’ This statement captures Curley’s lifelong hostility to the AngloSaxons of Boston, whom he described as ‘‘a strange and stupid race,’’ and his clear wish that they just leave.
     
    See my comments: http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/#comment-1619098 and http://www.unz.com/isteve/hemispheric-open-borders-trial-run-puerto-rico/#comment-1622226

    Every Sperm is Sacred - Monty Python's The Meaning of Life

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUspLVStPbk

    The Meaning of Life (4/11) Movie CLIP - Protestants and French Ticklers (1983) HD

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDBjsFAyiwA

  22. Churches know how to stretch their not-taxable dollars. You invite a Syrian refugee family to the United States and collect all of the Pokemon points for extreme virtuousness (anyone could help a local family – we went around the world to get this one!)

    Then, who supports this non-English-speaking, unemployable family and their children, yea until the nth generation? Why, the American taxpayer, of course.

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  23. @G Pinfold
    And here's the kicker: most people look at the clerical invite-the-world policy and see it as a shrewd long game to get bums on pews. On the contrary, zero effort is made to convert refugees who come from strong-religion cultures.

    And here’s the kicker: most people look at the clerical invite-the-world policy and see it as a shrewd long game to get bums on pews. On the contrary, zero effort is made to convert refugees who come from strong-religion cultures.

    The hope is that the refugees can convert the clerical.

    Read More
  24. Christianity has not been a useful marker of tribal identity in Europe since Martin Luther, and global Christendom fell apart in the 8th century after Islam conquered half the Christian world. The French and British had no problem using non-Christian colonial troops to kill Christian Germans in WWI. There was no Christian crusade to defend Polish Catholics from being murdered by Soviet atheists. German Catholics decided rather quickly that being German was far more important than being Catholic when it came to raping and pillaging Poland. This won’t be the first time Western Christianity has left its brother in the East in the lurch. Sadly this may be the last chance they get.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Weltanschauung
    In the film The Bicycle Thief you can see priests requiring recipients of charitable aid to sit through Mass, but that was a long time ago.

    More recently some French identitarians started serving soup to the homeless and included pork both to make the soup more delicious and to target the help toward Français de souche, whereupon the authorities forbade any free distribution of pork products.

    Alors que la distribution de soupe au cochon par le Bloc Identitaire est interdite depuis 2007 par une décision du conseil d’Etat, l’association musulmane « Ensemble pour un repas » offre chaque semaine aux gares de Lyon-Part-Dieu et de Perrache « un repas chaud, composé d'aliments halal ».

    https://www.bloc-identitaire.com/actualite/3114/lyon-soupe-cochon-interdite-mais-soupe-halal-autorisee
    , @Millennial
    Arguably, the schisms of Christianity are the ultimate expressions of European tribal identity. Why should northern Europeans take religious orders from Italians? Why should Greeks?

    For example, Martin Luther compared his struggle against the Papacy to the ancient Germanic struggle against invading Romans.

    It was Luther who first popularized Arminius (of Teutoburg Forest fame) as a nationalist hero (and dubbed him Hermann).
  25. @G Pinfold
    And here's the kicker: most people look at the clerical invite-the-world policy and see it as a shrewd long game to get bums on pews. On the contrary, zero effort is made to convert refugees who come from strong-religion cultures.

    In fact, it may have the opposite effect: It says to many if you’re Christian, we rich Westerners won’t help you; if you’re Muslim, we will. Now which faith would you choose?

    Read More
  26. In the Brooklyn Diocese (NYC), which also covers Queens and Staten Island, the line-staff of “Catholic Charities” of that organization is made up of mostly Central American illegal aliens. If somebody is White and destitute and has gotten a notice from Con Ed that their electricity is about to be cut off, a Puerto Rican supervisor will be called in to translate what you have to say into Spanish; and the odds are that if you are White, you will be reading Decline & Fall of the Roman Empire by candlelight some time in the very near future.

    As Gertrude Stein might have succinctly put it : The Alien Asylum Racket is just a racket. Or maybe Ernest Hemingway, thinking of Gertrude Stein, said it even better : A Rose is a rose is an onion.

    Al Capone missed his true calling.

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    • Replies: @Weltanschauung
    Christianity, the Religion with No Benefits

    Members pay dues, of course, but the table they spread is open to everyone.

    https://orthosphere.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/christianity-the-religion-with-no-benefits/
    , @eD
    When I lived in New York and was married, I had my wife handle any contact with "social services" providers, both government and private. She is an immigrant and can sort of pass as Latino, though it would have been better if she actually had been Latino.
  27. These so-called “Christian leaders” supported either Hillary Clinton or Evan McMullin.

    They want to fund “moderate” rebels, establish “no fly zones”, and do whatever else they can to help ISIS and Al-Qaeda.

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  28. @Detective Club
    In the Brooklyn Diocese (NYC), which also covers Queens and Staten Island, the line-staff of "Catholic Charities" of that organization is made up of mostly Central American illegal aliens. If somebody is White and destitute and has gotten a notice from Con Ed that their electricity is about to be cut off, a Puerto Rican supervisor will be called in to translate what you have to say into Spanish; and the odds are that if you are White, you will be reading Decline & Fall of the Roman Empire by candlelight some time in the very near future.

    As Gertrude Stein might have succinctly put it : The Alien Asylum Racket is just a racket. Or maybe Ernest Hemingway, thinking of Gertrude Stein, said it even better : A Rose is a rose is an onion.

    Al Capone missed his true calling.

    Christianity, the Religion with No Benefits

    Members pay dues, of course, but the table they spread is open to everyone.

    https://orthosphere.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/christianity-the-religion-with-no-benefits/

    Read More
  29. “Christian Leaders Denounce Trump’s Plan to Favor Christian Refugees”

    There should be a corollary to that headline:

    “Christians Need New Leaders”

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  30. Xtians believe every human has an redeemable soul, so this is perfectly consistent with their teachings.

    Read More
  31. @Joe Franklin
    Thoughtful people should be cognizant by now of 2 different versions of Christianity in the US.

    There's the New Testament morality revering Christians and there is the fundamentalist morality Christians who mostly revere Old Testament morality.

    New Testament Christians are the genuine followers of Jesus of Nazareth, whereas fundamentalist are the so-called Judeo-Christians.

    Judeo-Christian literally means Jewish Messiah, and the label Judeo-Christian is definitely not a reference to Jesus of Nazareth.

    Jesus of Nazareth was a heretic relative to Judaism, and was executed specifically because he was a heretic.

    All this @ 16 is actually quite true, though I don’t see where throwing Middle Eastern Christians under the bus follows.

    Read More
    • Agree: snorlax
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    All this @ 16 is actually quite true
     
    No, no it is not.
  32. @Detective Club
    In the Brooklyn Diocese (NYC), which also covers Queens and Staten Island, the line-staff of "Catholic Charities" of that organization is made up of mostly Central American illegal aliens. If somebody is White and destitute and has gotten a notice from Con Ed that their electricity is about to be cut off, a Puerto Rican supervisor will be called in to translate what you have to say into Spanish; and the odds are that if you are White, you will be reading Decline & Fall of the Roman Empire by candlelight some time in the very near future.

    As Gertrude Stein might have succinctly put it : The Alien Asylum Racket is just a racket. Or maybe Ernest Hemingway, thinking of Gertrude Stein, said it even better : A Rose is a rose is an onion.

    Al Capone missed his true calling.

    When I lived in New York and was married, I had my wife handle any contact with “social services” providers, both government and private. She is an immigrant and can sort of pass as Latino, though it would have been better if she actually had been Latino.

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  33. Steve, maybe it is time for the unknown and untaxed housing allowance the leaders of these religious ‘nonprofits’ take. It is beyond an outrage. It is a legal crime. Email me if you like…

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  34. @Buzz Mohawk
    The article also doesn't point out that Christianity has developed suicidal tendencies.

    > The article also doesn’t point out that Christianity has developed suicidal tendencies.

    Nietzsche pointed this out 130 years ago. To briefly summarize his diagnosis…Christianity originally involved a “turning away from the world” (this life is pain and suffering; in death you will be reunited with God and experience infinite love) because life was so terrible for the early Christians. At it’s very root, Christianity entails a wish-for-death. Nietzsche’s solution for this was to reject the teachings of Saint Paul and go back to the example of Jesus (this gave birth to the liberal Christianity we all know and love today) … unfortunately his solution has failed, obviously.

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  35. @Wilkey
    I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession. Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, they were all pretty bad back then. They were seldom at the top of their class, and they had often already failed in other professions. These are the men (and women) who are running the show today. They are frequently not even believers, and most are liberal arts grads indoctrinated with the same left-wing nonsense as any other liberal arts student.

    The students they were writing about back then would now be hitting there 50s (or older, if they were coming from another profession). They are the guys now running the show.

    I fear you are correct about all that.

    And if you do manage to recall where you read those profiles of people who become clergymen, please post it in a comment.

    Depressing as the subject is, we need to know more about the phenomenon.

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  36. @Peter Akuleyev
    Christianity has not been a useful marker of tribal identity in Europe since Martin Luther, and global Christendom fell apart in the 8th century after Islam conquered half the Christian world. The French and British had no problem using non-Christian colonial troops to kill Christian Germans in WWI. There was no Christian crusade to defend Polish Catholics from being murdered by Soviet atheists. German Catholics decided rather quickly that being German was far more important than being Catholic when it came to raping and pillaging Poland. This won't be the first time Western Christianity has left its brother in the East in the lurch. Sadly this may be the last chance they get.

    In the film The Bicycle Thief you can see priests requiring recipients of charitable aid to sit through Mass, but that was a long time ago.

    More recently some French identitarians started serving soup to the homeless and included pork both to make the soup more delicious and to target the help toward Français de souche, whereupon the authorities forbade any free distribution of pork products.

    Alors que la distribution de soupe au cochon par le Bloc Identitaire est interdite depuis 2007 par une décision du conseil d’Etat, l’association musulmane « Ensemble pour un repas » offre chaque semaine aux gares de Lyon-Part-Dieu et de Perrache « un repas chaud, composé d’aliments halal ».

    https://www.bloc-identitaire.com/actualite/3114/lyon-soupe-cochon-interdite-mais-soupe-halal-autorisee

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  37. @Joe Franklin
    Thoughtful people should be cognizant by now of 2 different versions of Christianity in the US.

    There's the New Testament morality revering Christians and there is the fundamentalist morality Christians who mostly revere Old Testament morality.

    New Testament Christians are the genuine followers of Jesus of Nazareth, whereas fundamentalist are the so-called Judeo-Christians.

    Judeo-Christian literally means Jewish Messiah, and the label Judeo-Christian is definitely not a reference to Jesus of Nazareth.

    Jesus of Nazareth was a heretic relative to Judaism, and was executed specifically because he was a heretic.

    Yes, Christianity was/is a reformation of Judaism. It takes the tribal jewish God and makes him universal. The Old Testament is nothing but the tribal specific document of the jewish “chosen people”. The jewish God encourages violence and lying as long as it benefits the jews. Christ rejected all that and has never been forgiven by the jews. These Old Testament Christians are completely brainwashed and worship jews and Isreal – many of my relatives are part of this group and no argument can persuade them.

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  38. Nor does it point out that budgets for giving actual refugees refuge go much further in third countries than in expensive America.

    Escaping the Refugee Crisis

    SEP 1, 2015

    Instead of simply sealing themselves off, affluent countries should be giving much more support to less affluent countries that are supporting large numbers of refugees: Lebanon, Jordan, Ethiopia, and Pakistan are obvious examples. Refugees living securely in countries that border their own are less likely to attempt hazardous journeys to remote regions and more likely to return home once a conflict is resolved. International support for countries bearing the greatest refugee burden also makes economic sense: it costs Jordan about €3,000 ($3,350) to support one refugee for a year; in Germany, the cost is at least €12,000.

    https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/escaping-europe-refugee-crisis-by-peter-singer-2015-09

    Germany’s Jeopardy

    Research conducted at Germany’s Max Planck Society indicates that ethnic change due to immigration will change taxpayers’ motivation, reducing their willingness to support welfare. Comparison of welfare systems around the world shows that as ethnic diversity rises, welfare tends to decline.[xiii]

    Not only welfare declines but any services relying on contributions to public goods. That includes cooperation with police, charities, medical and military authorities.

    Foreign aid, which is international welfare, is even more fragile. Foreign aid is strongly and negatively correlated with donor countries’ ethnic diversity.[xiv]

    The irony could not be more cruel. By accepting large numbers of people of non-Western cultures, who are seeking to benefit from generous welfare, European countries not only risk losing domestic welfare for natives and immigrants alike, but reducing their foreign aid to immigrants’ homelands. It’s a lose-lose strategy.

    http://socialtechnologies.com.au/germanys-jeopardy-could-the-immigrant-influx-end-european-civilization/

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  39. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I’ve taught in a Catholic school recently. It used to be for hard working, disciplined ‘ethnic’ White people (Irish, Polish, Italian). Not now. Some depts represented a third world slum. There were Asians, Blacks, Jews. The actual White people who founded and grew it were in a minority. RC is cycked completely.

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Some depts represented a third world slum. There were Asians, Blacks, Jews."

    Jews are a 3rd world slum? I guarantee the average Jewish household makes significantly more money than you Anon.

    There is a Jews are vastly overrepresented among career professions in The U.S that pull in at least a $100,000 a year.

    Also interesting that you leave out Hispanics and Muslims in your list of demographic groups that you see as part of the 3rd World. Do you see Hispanics and Muslims as affluent 1st World groups for the most part?

    , @Jefferson
    "Jews.”

    Jews are a 3rd world slum? I guarantee the average Jewish household makes significantly more money than you Anon.

    There is a reason Jews are vastly overrepresented among career professions in The U.S that pull in at least a $100,000 a year.

    Also interesting that you leave out Hispanics and Muslims in your list of demographic groups that you see as part of the 3rd World. Do you see Hispanics and Muslims as affluent 1st World groups for the most part?
  40. @G Pinfold
    And here's the kicker: most people look at the clerical invite-the-world policy and see it as a shrewd long game to get bums on pews. On the contrary, zero effort is made to convert refugees who come from strong-religion cultures.

    It’s one of the big reasons the Catholic Church is pro-Mexican-immigration.

    Of course, they actually are Catholic, with the occasional extra saint…

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    with the occasional extra saint…

    Jesús Malverde?
  41. @princemyshkin
    Hey, @steve_sailer , you rarely discuss American Christianity in its various forms and how it plays into politics. Do you have any interest in that?

    Only an Idiot would ask such a question

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  42. As with nearly every institution today, in “church” circles too the elite vs. membership disconnect applies.

    Church World Service, for example, is the outreach arm of the National Council of Churches, once a vigorous (but gentry left) ecumenical organization, but now greatly diminished in staff and influence–largely as a result of wasting resources and prestige on a half-century’s worth of crackpot lefty agenda items. NCC (and thus CWS) can nominally claim “dozens” of denominations in its membership, but it has no influence over any of its member churches, and certainly does not speak for them. The vast majority of local parishes and people in the pews have no direct connection with it whatsoever. They barely suspect it exists.

    Only professional religion reporters acknowledge NCC/CWS officers as “leaders” among Christians. And even then, the reporters will give those folks the time of day only when they need a reliably left-wing comment from a nominal Christian authority. Getting a call from NYT reporter Laurie Goodstein is like finding the Holy Grail to a lot of these people (NYT, NPR and PBS rank a little above Matthew, Mark and Luke in their estimation) so they’ll be happy to virtue-signal that they’re appalled by all the right things.

    But again, to the rank-and-file Protestant or Catholic who voted for Trump, none of this is even on their radar. Noticeably absent from the NYT piece, by the way, was any reporting about the views of Orthodox Christians, many of whom have a more personal experience of Islam, and for the most part do not want large numbers of their former persecutors flocking to this country.

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  43. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    This is sort like asking why there are, and have been for its entire history, Christian missionaries. Why aren’t missionaries preaching to and helping actual Christians instead of non-Christians?

    You’re looking at Christianity and religion not on their own terms, but through a scientistic, atheistic and secular, sociobiological lens, and specifically through the group selection framework you seem to favor, in which there is no religion as such.

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  44. Regarding the decline of European civilization and Christianity on which it is based, I would highly recommend Claire Berlinski’s book and writing to Steve Sailer fans. She agrees with the general view presented here, but has insights on the nature of the decline of Europe and to a lesser extent the west that I find fascinating and would be interesting and easy to read for this crowd.

    Her book actually cites a Steve Sailer article. Sailer should do a book review or interview with her.

    http://a.co/8dCEVx0

    Interview on book:

    http://rightwingnews.com/interviews/an-interview-with-claire-berlinski-author-of-menace-in-europe/

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  45. “Thoughtful people should be cognizant by now of 2 different versions of Christianity in the US.”

    That should be two different versions of semi- or non-Christianity claiming to be so.

    The real thing is largely neither of those, and tends to be despised by both.

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  46. @Peter Akuleyev
    Christianity has not been a useful marker of tribal identity in Europe since Martin Luther, and global Christendom fell apart in the 8th century after Islam conquered half the Christian world. The French and British had no problem using non-Christian colonial troops to kill Christian Germans in WWI. There was no Christian crusade to defend Polish Catholics from being murdered by Soviet atheists. German Catholics decided rather quickly that being German was far more important than being Catholic when it came to raping and pillaging Poland. This won't be the first time Western Christianity has left its brother in the East in the lurch. Sadly this may be the last chance they get.

    Arguably, the schisms of Christianity are the ultimate expressions of European tribal identity. Why should northern Europeans take religious orders from Italians? Why should Greeks?

    For example, Martin Luther compared his struggle against the Papacy to the ancient Germanic struggle against invading Romans.

    It was Luther who first popularized Arminius (of Teutoburg Forest fame) as a nationalist hero (and dubbed him Hermann).

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  47. @Wilkey
    I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession. Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, they were all pretty bad back then. They were seldom at the top of their class, and they had often already failed in other professions. These are the men (and women) who are running the show today. They are frequently not even believers, and most are liberal arts grads indoctrinated with the same left-wing nonsense as any other liberal arts student.

    The students they were writing about back then would now be hitting there 50s (or older, if they were coming from another profession). They are the guys now running the show.

    I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession. Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, they were all pretty bad back then. They were seldom at the top of their class, and they had often already failed in other professions. These are the men (and women) who are running the show today. They are frequently not even believers, and most are liberal arts grads indoctrinated with the same left-wing nonsense as any other liberal arts student.

    I take it you do not have any first-hand experience with any clergy then? My experience with most of the Catholic priests I have known personally (more than 20) has been anything but what you describe. Maybe not “top of their class” but certainly intelligent, productive and engaging. The same thing for the religious sisters and with them, they literally are top of their class. My son’s HS had a religious sister as a teacher with a PhD in E.E. from the U. of Michigan and another young sister who delivered the Latin commencement address at Harvard (it is an annual tradition for one student to address the graduation in Latin).

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  48. @SnakeEyes
    Many of these "Christian leaders" and clergy members are objectively anti-Christianity.

    Truer words were never written.

    Check this out from The United Methodist Church.

    http://www.umc.org

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    • Replies: @J1234
    The Christian church, in seeking validation through progressive social justice (which is the central moral value of the secular world), is trying to be loved or respected or admired by the secular world - a decidedly non-Christian ideology. Christ came, not to save the world, but to save people from the world.

    In an America that seems to be drifting away from Christian values, institutional mainstream Christianity increasingly finds moral elevation through the pursuit of goals that actually undermine or lessen the presence of Christianity in America. Like favoring policies that don't give Christians immigration preference over Muslims. Why? Well, it would be more equal that way, and equality has become one of the worldly values that have replaced Christian values.

    Early Christians placed - like Christ - much emphasis on surrounding themselves with other Christian believers. This is because Christ and early Christians truly understood human nature. People are dissuaded from faith by outside influences and an environment that focuses on worldly goals. It was true then and it's true now. But the modern Christian Church hates being hated by the world. The early Church, on the other hand, understood that being hated by the world was part of what being a Christian is all about.

    To the modern Church, Christ - the one who said, "I came not to send peace, but a sword," and "For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law" - is encapsulated in the ideas of peace and love and compassion. Those things are found in Christ, but they are woefully inadequate to describe the mission of Christ. One's job as a Christian doesn't start and end with peace, love and compassion.

  49. @Wilkey
    I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession. Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, they were all pretty bad back then. They were seldom at the top of their class, and they had often already failed in other professions. These are the men (and women) who are running the show today. They are frequently not even believers, and most are liberal arts grads indoctrinated with the same left-wing nonsense as any other liberal arts student.

    The students they were writing about back then would now be hitting there 50s (or older, if they were coming from another profession). They are the guys now running the show.

    That jibes with my personal experience in college during the ’90s. I noticed that the theology majors in my history and philosophy courses tended to be straight-C students. In addition to being academic mediocrities, they were also usually very pompous and preening. These were Episcopalian, Congregationalist, and Unitarian future ministers.

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  50. @Wilkey
    I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession. Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, they were all pretty bad back then. They were seldom at the top of their class, and they had often already failed in other professions. These are the men (and women) who are running the show today. They are frequently not even believers, and most are liberal arts grads indoctrinated with the same left-wing nonsense as any other liberal arts student.

    The students they were writing about back then would now be hitting there 50s (or older, if they were coming from another profession). They are the guys now running the show.

    This is the real problem, in my opinion:

    Why Psychopaths Are Attracted To Jobs in Religious Ministry

    Former FBI Agent Joe Navarro examines why predators find ministerial and clergy positions so desirable in an April 2014 article in Psychology Today. In his article, Joe Navarro reports how a career in church or religious ministry as a member of the clergy is the eighth most popular profession chosen by predators, following on the heels of the seventh most popular profession chosen by predators which are careers in law enforcement.

    http://jamesctanner.com/why-psychopaths-are-attracted-to-jobs-in-religious-ministry/

    Why Predators Are Attracted to Careers in the Clergy
    Some further insight into a serious phenomenon.
    Posted Apr 20, 2014

    1. Organizations provide a convenient infrastructure from which a predator can prey on others for financial gain or to otherwise exploit others (sexually, mentally, physically).

    2. Membership in a legitimate institution, be it a club, a branch of the military, or a corporation, gives legitimacy to individuals. We are more respectful and trusting when we are told a certain person is a VP or head of sales for XYZ company rather than just a stranger off the street. [...]

    5. Many religious organizations preach forgiveness, even for felonies. For predators this is truly a godsend. This means that if they get caught, they can ask for forgiveness and chances are it will be given, in a pious but naïve effort to help the lawbreaker “learn from his mistakes.” Unfortunately, the predator sees this as an opportunity to sharpen his skills and to do his crime again, perhaps this time more carefully. [...]

    11. There is, it should be noted, no religion or sect that screens for psychopathy as defined by Robert Hare that I am aware of. All you need is to be ordained, or you declare yourself a religious leader and the way is clear for the predator. And so while some organizations, such as in law enforcement, screen for pathologies by using psychometric tools, very few religious organization do so. Which is why the predator would benefit from joining or leading such an organization. Across the planet, there is almost no scrutiny or due diligence that is or will be conducted. To connive, or to “con,” the predator merely needs his victim to have faith and trust in the predator something that is often easily achieved with the vestments of a legitimate religious organization.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/spycatcher/201404/why-predators-are-attracted-careers-in-the-clergy

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  51. “Christian” is an extremely broad term in The U.S which lumps in Catholics, Presbyterians, Mormons, Orthodoxs, Quakers, Black Baptists, White Evangelicals, Protestants, Jehovah’s Witnesses, etc into one umbrella.

    White Evangelical Franklin Graham supports a ban on Muslim refugees entering The U.S.

    http://abc11.com/religion/franklin-graham-endorses-trump-refugee-ban/1728145/

    A whopping 81 percent of White Evangelicals voted for Donald J. Trump.

    http://www.newsmax.com/t/newsmax/article/758096

    Donald J. Trump won a higher percentage of the White Evangelical vote than Mitt Romney did.

    https://www.google.com/amp/insider.foxnews.com/amp/article/52447?client=ms-android-hms-tmobile-us

    So those pro-Muslim leaders do not speak for the vast majority of White Evangelicals.

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  52. @Anon
    I've taught in a Catholic school recently. It used to be for hard working, disciplined 'ethnic' White people (Irish, Polish, Italian). Not now. Some depts represented a third world slum. There were Asians, Blacks, Jews. The actual White people who founded and grew it were in a minority. RC is cycked completely.

    “Some depts represented a third world slum. There were Asians, Blacks, Jews.”

    Jews are a 3rd world slum? I guarantee the average Jewish household makes significantly more money than you Anon.

    There is a Jews are vastly overrepresented among career professions in The U.S that pull in at least a $100,000 a year.

    Also interesting that you leave out Hispanics and Muslims in your list of demographic groups that you see as part of the 3rd World. Do you see Hispanics and Muslims as affluent 1st World groups for the most part?

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    • Replies: @Jimi
    I suspect the Jews that put their kids in Catholic schools are a slightly different demographic.

    In NYC some of the sleaziest people I've dealt with are Russian Jews. A screw or be screwed attitude prevails. Nothing like the Americanized Jews I've met.
  53. @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Truer words were never written.

    Check this out from The United Methodist Church.

    www.umc.org

    The Christian church, in seeking validation through progressive social justice (which is the central moral value of the secular world), is trying to be loved or respected or admired by the secular world – a decidedly non-Christian ideology. Christ came, not to save the world, but to save people from the world.

    In an America that seems to be drifting away from Christian values, institutional mainstream Christianity increasingly finds moral elevation through the pursuit of goals that actually undermine or lessen the presence of Christianity in America. Like favoring policies that don’t give Christians immigration preference over Muslims. Why? Well, it would be more equal that way, and equality has become one of the worldly values that have replaced Christian values.

    Early Christians placed – like Christ – much emphasis on surrounding themselves with other Christian believers. This is because Christ and early Christians truly understood human nature. People are dissuaded from faith by outside influences and an environment that focuses on worldly goals. It was true then and it’s true now. But the modern Christian Church hates being hated by the world. The early Church, on the other hand, understood that being hated by the world was part of what being a Christian is all about.

    To the modern Church, Christ – the one who said, “I came not to send peace, but a sword,” and “For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law” – is encapsulated in the ideas of peace and love and compassion. Those things are found in Christ, but they are woefully inadequate to describe the mission of Christ. One’s job as a Christian doesn’t start and end with peace, love and compassion.

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    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    The Christian church, in seeking validation through...social justice... is trying to be loved ... by the secular world – a decidedly non-Christian ideology. Disgusting, isn't it.
    , @Desiderius

    encapsulated
     
    Yes, as the saying goes: Don't put God in a box.
  54. The priest craft was done away with when Christ came. Jesus was supposed to be our Master Teacher, free of charge. Didn’t he pay the cost for us? The Levitical priesthood helped destroy the Israelites by leading them astray. Unfortunately, it is the same type of people who are doing so again.

    Matthew 17:24-26 (KJV)
    And when they were come to Capernaum, they that received tribute money came to Peter, and said, Doth not your master pay tribute? [25] He saith, Yes. And when he was come into the house, Jesus prevented him, saying, What thinkest thou, Simon? of whom do the kings of the earth take custom or tribute? of their own children, or of strangers? [26] Peter saith unto him, Of strangers. Jesus saith unto him, Then are the children free.

    1 Corinthians 2:12-13 (KJV)
    Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of God; that we might know the things that are freely given to us of God. [13] Which things also we speak, not in the words which man’s wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things with spiritual.

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  55. @Anon
    I've taught in a Catholic school recently. It used to be for hard working, disciplined 'ethnic' White people (Irish, Polish, Italian). Not now. Some depts represented a third world slum. There were Asians, Blacks, Jews. The actual White people who founded and grew it were in a minority. RC is cycked completely.

    “Jews.”

    Jews are a 3rd world slum? I guarantee the average Jewish household makes significantly more money than you Anon.

    There is a reason Jews are vastly overrepresented among career professions in The U.S that pull in at least a $100,000 a year.

    Also interesting that you leave out Hispanics and Muslims in your list of demographic groups that you see as part of the 3rd World. Do you see Hispanics and Muslims as affluent 1st World groups for the most part?

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  56. When Tucker Carlson makes you look like a moron – you are.

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    • Replies: @vinteuil
    That was pretty brutal.

    But, in all fairness, I don't think Appleby came across as a moron. He came across as a reasonably smart & knowledgeable guy defending an indefensible position.
  57. @MarkinLA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvvPt2knwGs

    When Tucker Carlson makes you look like a moron - you are.

    That was pretty brutal.

    But, in all fairness, I don’t think Appleby came across as a moron. He came across as a reasonably smart & knowledgeable guy defending an indefensible position.

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  58. @princemyshkin
    Hey, @steve_sailer , you rarely discuss American Christianity in its various forms and how it plays into politics. Do you have any interest in that?

    The Curley Effect Versus the Kennedy Effect

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/

    Early in World War I, a wounded British officer arrived in Boston to recruit citizens of the then-neutral United States to fight in the British army. He politely asked the by then legendary Irish mayor of Boston, James Michael Curley, for permission. Curley replied, ‘‘Go ahead Colonel. Take every damn one of them.’’ This statement captures Curley’s lifelong hostility to the AngloSaxons of Boston, whom he described as ‘‘a strange and stupid race,’’ and his clear wish that they just leave.

    See my comments: http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/#comment-1619098 and http://www.unz.com/isteve/hemispheric-open-borders-trial-run-puerto-rico/#comment-1622226

    Every Sperm is Sacred – Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life

    The Meaning of Life (4/11) Movie CLIP – Protestants and French Ticklers (1983) HD

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  59. @Buzz Mohawk
    The article also doesn't point out that Christianity has developed suicidal tendencies.

    The article also doesn’t point out that Left-wing Christianity in service of Marxism has developed suicidal tendencies. TFIFY.

    To Hell with them. I’ll try to visit their appearance before the Great White Throne, but I am pretty sure they’ll swim in the Lake.

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  60. @J1234
    The Christian church, in seeking validation through progressive social justice (which is the central moral value of the secular world), is trying to be loved or respected or admired by the secular world - a decidedly non-Christian ideology. Christ came, not to save the world, but to save people from the world.

    In an America that seems to be drifting away from Christian values, institutional mainstream Christianity increasingly finds moral elevation through the pursuit of goals that actually undermine or lessen the presence of Christianity in America. Like favoring policies that don't give Christians immigration preference over Muslims. Why? Well, it would be more equal that way, and equality has become one of the worldly values that have replaced Christian values.

    Early Christians placed - like Christ - much emphasis on surrounding themselves with other Christian believers. This is because Christ and early Christians truly understood human nature. People are dissuaded from faith by outside influences and an environment that focuses on worldly goals. It was true then and it's true now. But the modern Christian Church hates being hated by the world. The early Church, on the other hand, understood that being hated by the world was part of what being a Christian is all about.

    To the modern Church, Christ - the one who said, "I came not to send peace, but a sword," and "For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law" - is encapsulated in the ideas of peace and love and compassion. Those things are found in Christ, but they are woefully inadequate to describe the mission of Christ. One's job as a Christian doesn't start and end with peace, love and compassion.

    The Christian church, in seeking validation through…social justice… is trying to be loved … by the secular world – a decidedly non-Christian ideology. Disgusting, isn’t it.

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  61. @eD
    All this @ 16 is actually quite true, though I don't see where throwing Middle Eastern Christians under the bus follows.

    All this @ 16 is actually quite true

    No, no it is not.

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  62. @J1234
    The Christian church, in seeking validation through progressive social justice (which is the central moral value of the secular world), is trying to be loved or respected or admired by the secular world - a decidedly non-Christian ideology. Christ came, not to save the world, but to save people from the world.

    In an America that seems to be drifting away from Christian values, institutional mainstream Christianity increasingly finds moral elevation through the pursuit of goals that actually undermine or lessen the presence of Christianity in America. Like favoring policies that don't give Christians immigration preference over Muslims. Why? Well, it would be more equal that way, and equality has become one of the worldly values that have replaced Christian values.

    Early Christians placed - like Christ - much emphasis on surrounding themselves with other Christian believers. This is because Christ and early Christians truly understood human nature. People are dissuaded from faith by outside influences and an environment that focuses on worldly goals. It was true then and it's true now. But the modern Christian Church hates being hated by the world. The early Church, on the other hand, understood that being hated by the world was part of what being a Christian is all about.

    To the modern Church, Christ - the one who said, "I came not to send peace, but a sword," and "For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law" - is encapsulated in the ideas of peace and love and compassion. Those things are found in Christ, but they are woefully inadequate to describe the mission of Christ. One's job as a Christian doesn't start and end with peace, love and compassion.

    encapsulated

    Yes, as the saying goes: Don’t put God in a box.

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  63. @SFG
    It's one of the big reasons the Catholic Church is pro-Mexican-immigration.

    Of course, they actually are Catholic, with the occasional extra saint...

    with the occasional extra saint…

    Jesús Malverde?

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  64. @Old Okie
    Yes, Christianity was/is a reformation of Judaism. It takes the tribal jewish God and makes him universal. The Old Testament is nothing but the tribal specific document of the jewish "chosen people". The jewish God encourages violence and lying as long as it benefits the jews. Christ rejected all that and has never been forgiven by the jews. These Old Testament Christians are completely brainwashed and worship jews and Isreal - many of my relatives are part of this group and no argument can persuade them.
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  65. @Jefferson
    "Some depts represented a third world slum. There were Asians, Blacks, Jews."

    Jews are a 3rd world slum? I guarantee the average Jewish household makes significantly more money than you Anon.

    There is a Jews are vastly overrepresented among career professions in The U.S that pull in at least a $100,000 a year.

    Also interesting that you leave out Hispanics and Muslims in your list of demographic groups that you see as part of the 3rd World. Do you see Hispanics and Muslims as affluent 1st World groups for the most part?

    I suspect the Jews that put their kids in Catholic schools are a slightly different demographic.

    In NYC some of the sleaziest people I’ve dealt with are Russian Jews. A screw or be screwed attitude prevails. Nothing like the Americanized Jews I’ve met.

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  66. @Wilkey
    I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession. Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, they were all pretty bad back then. They were seldom at the top of their class, and they had often already failed in other professions. These are the men (and women) who are running the show today. They are frequently not even believers, and most are liberal arts grads indoctrinated with the same left-wing nonsense as any other liberal arts student.

    The students they were writing about back then would now be hitting there 50s (or older, if they were coming from another profession). They are the guys now running the show.

    I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession.

    Lots of homosexuals. Lots and lots of homosexuals. The heterosexual ones are often worse – they’re basically girly-men.

    There’s not a lot of masculinity to be found in the average church.

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  67. @Wilkey
    I remember reading a major article back in high school (early 90s) about the sad state of the modern clergy, and the types of men who went into the profession. Catholic, Protestant, or Jewish, they were all pretty bad back then. They were seldom at the top of their class, and they had often already failed in other professions. These are the men (and women) who are running the show today. They are frequently not even believers, and most are liberal arts grads indoctrinated with the same left-wing nonsense as any other liberal arts student.

    The students they were writing about back then would now be hitting there 50s (or older, if they were coming from another profession). They are the guys now running the show.

    Could it have been Paul Wilkes in the Atlantic Monthly, December 1990?

    http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/90dec/wilkes.htm

    There is little doubt that the quality of seminarians has declined. Dean after dean admits that seminaries are getting precious few of those ranked in the top reaches of their undergraduate classes. In 1947 some ten percent of college graduates nominated to Phi Beta Kappa went into the ministry. A Phi Beta Kappa member today who evinced an interest in the ministry would be recruited by seminaries with unholy zeal. The ministry these days must compete for the best and the brightest not only with the ill-paid and too-often thankless helping professions, such as social work and counseling, but also with the high-profile and well-paid professions of law, business, and medicine. There is concern that some of those for whom the seminary marks the beginning of a second or third career may be burdened with cumbersome psychological baggage: finally they have found a profession in which they will get the respect they deserve; the church will protect them in a hostile and confusing world; somehow the tedium of the quotidian will evaporate now that a higher calling is being pursued. One researcher found that, notwithstanding the bankers and lawyers at Harvard, entrepreneu rial- type males were a distinct minority in the seminary population he studied: graduates might be able to tend established churches, but they were not self-starters. “The energy level is shockingly low,” the researcher told me. One seminary in the South reported that seven to nine percent of those it admitted over a recent ten-year period had such elevated scores on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Index—which helps to detect mental disorders such as paranoia and schizophrenia—that they warranted immediate counseling.

    IN MY VISITS TO SEMINARIES AROUND THE COUNTRY, I found that no class was extolled as highly as the one taught by Katie Cannon at Episcopal Divinity School, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. If I really wanted to see what 1990s seminary education was about, and how religious leaders should be formed, I was told, this was the course. “State of the art” and “on the cutting edge” were phrases employed by Fredrica Harris Thompsett, the school’s academic dean. (Others in theological education are less enthusiastic, and feel that the school has, as one seminary educator told me, “gone over the edge.”) So one Monday morning I found a seat at the back of an amphitheater-sized lecture room, having been put on notice that I could stay for only the first half of the three-hour class. The second half would be too personal; “Layers have been peeled back,” Katie Cannon told me.

    The first half hour of Cannon’s class, “Genealogy of Race, Sex, Class Oppression,” was taken up with student announcements of meetings, talks, and demonstrations; the range was from gay rights to abortion rights to newly found slave documents to the emancipation of Palestinian women. Cannon, an effervescent, mesmerizing, and quite humorous black woman, seemed pleased and patient with the long parade of opportunities presented. The class, composed that day of fifty women and five men, obviously adored her—as evidenced by the “Ahhh”s and “Amen”s, reminiscent of a revival meeting, with which they affirmed many of her statements. When near the end of the announcements, one of the men in the class conveyed his pleasure at having the opportunity to attend such a course, Cannon confided that he was not alone, and that many schools wanted her to teach, but “Can you imagine? They want to make mine a required course! How do you force a person not to be racist? Just for three credits?”

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