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Kevin Michael Grace and Kevin Steel have a podcast program at their 2Kevins.com website. This week, I’m their first guest, with a 1 hour and 16 minute conversation between Grace and myself.

I’ll be back at 2Kevins.com to finish up next week.

Here’s the 2004 article, “Baby Gap,” that I mention in the early part of the interview.

 
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  1. WhatEvvs [AKA "Anonymuss Annie"] says:

    OT, but I’ve been reading the tweets about the Dem. debate. They are virtually all from leftoid SJW types. Their worldview is completely distorted. It’s maniacal, in fact. They have nothing in common with the old left.

    Bernie Sanders isn’t going to be the nominee, but if in some alternate universe he were to be, he’d be absolutely beholden to these radical nutcases. I suspect that he’s basically a sensible person, if economically illiterate, but he’d be under the Black Lives Matter thumb.

    In any case I don’t see how the country can survive when you have such polarization, and massive immigration.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Sanders has already shown that, while he is not beholden to Wall Street like most politicians are, he seems to have no problem letting himself be controlled by radical identity politics rent seekers. He is controlled opposition.
    , @Bert
    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who's just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont. He's used to dealing with old white people who care about things like private-sector pensions and public land use. He's completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn't know how to deal with them, more like he's terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they'll leave him alone.
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  2. I am actually extremely geeked to hear this.

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  3. Any chance you will ever appear on Gavin McInnes’ podcast?

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  4. Transcript for the ADD crowd please…

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  5. What a treat. Hope that there will be much more audio/video Sailer in the future.

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  6. @WhatEvvs
    OT, but I've been reading the tweets about the Dem. debate. They are virtually all from leftoid SJW types. Their worldview is completely distorted. It's maniacal, in fact. They have nothing in common with the old left.

    Bernie Sanders isn't going to be the nominee, but if in some alternate universe he were to be, he'd be absolutely beholden to these radical nutcases. I suspect that he's basically a sensible person, if economically illiterate, but he'd be under the Black Lives Matter thumb.

    In any case I don't see how the country can survive when you have such polarization, and massive immigration.

    Sanders has already shown that, while he is not beholden to Wall Street like most politicians are, he seems to have no problem letting himself be controlled by radical identity politics rent seekers. He is controlled opposition.

    Read More
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  7. Joe Rogan, w/ his 3 hour expansive format, is the best fit. He’s already had memorable podcats w/ Chuck Johnson and Milo Yiannopoulos.

    Obviously TGMS is an option w/ your taki connection, but gavin still thinks mia love is the solution for the GOP.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    Seconded on the Joe Rogan Podcast. His podcast is extremely undisciplined which gives people plenty of time to talk. Located just West of the San Fernando Valley, Rogan seems like an ideal fit. Joe is a "bro" and reaches a diverse audience by podcast standards. He signals pretty Left on certain issues and presents himself as a "Marijuana Libertarian" type in order to avoid being ostracized, but one look at his guests shows that he knows what time it is.

    Even if he disagrees with you, he tends to do so in a funny, playful manner without the usual grandstanding. He is obsessed with MMA obviously, as well as mind and body enhancement. There are likely natural overlaps in interest.

    If you have any Ayahuasca experience, you are golden with Rogan.
    , @BurplesonAFB
    I used to think something like that would be cool but now? Disagree. Joe isn't especially friendly to the isteve worldview and Joe would dominate him verbally

    I'd like to see Steve on counter currents or one of the other reactionary podcasts where he could add some more mature commentary
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  8. @WhatEvvs
    OT, but I've been reading the tweets about the Dem. debate. They are virtually all from leftoid SJW types. Their worldview is completely distorted. It's maniacal, in fact. They have nothing in common with the old left.

    Bernie Sanders isn't going to be the nominee, but if in some alternate universe he were to be, he'd be absolutely beholden to these radical nutcases. I suspect that he's basically a sensible person, if economically illiterate, but he'd be under the Black Lives Matter thumb.

    In any case I don't see how the country can survive when you have such polarization, and massive immigration.

    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who’s just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont. He’s used to dealing with old white people who care about things like private-sector pensions and public land use. He’s completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn’t know how to deal with them, more like he’s terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they’ll leave him alone.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Polynices
    Really funny to read "He’s used to dealing with... public land use. He’s completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM." in your comment Bert. I immediately thought "Bureau of Land Management? But didn't you just say he was good with land use?" Then I thought about it for a bit longer...

    Had to share.

    , @The Anti-Gnostic

    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who’s just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont.
     
    I LOL'd. Sanders has a plan to bring water to the Dust Bowl.
    , @WhatEvvs

    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who’s just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont.
     
    LOL. At least his cryogenic tank, unlike the one in Arizona, works. He's pretty spry.

    He’s completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn’t know how to deal with them, more like he’s terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they’ll leave him alone.
     
    Yes. I don't think his heart is in it, the way Elizabeth Warren's is, when she snarls about this. I was kind of disappointed in her cave to #blacklivesmatter. I sort of like her economic populism. But if she's a #blacklivesmatter stooge I can't vote for her.

    They are crazy. I check out one of their websites and one of their demands is to end broken windows policing. Broken windows policing saved NYC.
    , @tbraton
    "He’s completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn’t know how to deal with them, more like he’s terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they’ll leave him alone."

    I was able to watch only the first hour of last night's debate, but I believe I caught the various responses re the BLM. I was astounded that Sanders and O'Malley got down on their knees and genuflected before BLM. I suggested back in August that Trump should try to make an issue of BLM and tattoo it to Clinton's forehead, since it appears after last night's debate that she is likely to be the nominee, unless Biden decides to enter the race. All Trump has to do is make an innocuous statement (such as O'Malley made out in Arizona and got hooted down) that "all lives matter." I think the large majority of Americans would subscribe to that color-blind policy, and it would throw a live grenade into the Democratic nominating process. If Trump waits until the election starts in the early fall of 2016, that would allow Hillary to pull a "Sistah Soulja" moment after she secures the nomination and distance herself from the BLM. My gut feeling is that white America is fed up with all the racist nonsense that is going on and that 2016 is looking like 1968. By tying Clinton tightly to the BLM movement, Trump would enhance both his chances of securing the Republican nomination and winning the 2016 election imo.
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  9. OT: Slate calls Bernie Sanders racist for saying that guns cause problems in Baltimore and not Vermont:

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2015/10/13/bernie_sanders_on_guns_at_the_debate.html?wpsrc=sh_all_dt_tw_top

    This answer is pretty much the worst one Sanders could possibly provide. By alleging that urban areas need stricter gun laws than rural ones, the senator adds an awkward racial undertone to the gun debate. Vermont—which, Sanders claims, can handle loose gun restrictions—is 1 percent black. Baltimore—which Sanders has cited as an area in need of stricter gun control—is about 64 percent black. It’s alarmingly easy to read Sanders’ rejoinder here as an implication that rural whites can be trusted with guns and urban blacks cannot be.

    Read More
    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Harold

    […]the senator adds an awkward racial undertone to the gun debate.
     
    Not even problematic, just awkward. So gauche.

    It’s alarmingly easy to read Sanders’ rejoinder here as an implication that rural whites can be trusted with guns and urban blacks cannot be.
     
    Whether the statistics show it to be true or not true, one simply ought not to suggest such things.
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  10. Excellent! Love to listen while working around the house.

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  11. You should do more interviews and podcasts. Enjoyed hearing from you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Big Bill
    Vox Day did a one hour podcast yesterday with Red Ice Radio, a Swedish website, about SJWS and his book "SJWs Always Lie".

    Boost your European readership. Check in with other foreign podcast sites. Europeans are really getting fired up about the Muslim Invasion.
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  12. Bernie’s job is to be a left-magnet for Hillary… even though he’s pretty out of his element with the very far left. It gives H room to move to the right. (relatively speaking, of course.) He’ll endorse her in the end.

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  13. 1. Steve comes across as eminently reasonable in this podcast. I’m looking forward to part 2.

    2. To Kevin Michael Grace: “Grace and Steel” is indeed a better name than “2Kevins”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harold
    “Grace and Steel” sounds like it involves bodice ripping.
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  14. OT-

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/12/us/after-1600-pennsylvania-avenue-where-to.html?_r=0

    The NYTimes seems to be spending an inordinate amount of time on where oh where will the Obamas live after Obama’s second term. They are having a little fun with this, which is nice, as usually the NYTimes is stone cold serious when it comes to all things Obama. I can’t for the life of me remember the same level of intense speculation about any other previous President. Everyone knew that Carter would return to his beloved Georgia, Reagan to Brentwood, Bush I to Maine and Bush II to Tejas. Clinton seems to be the exception, but his move to New York was in part driven by election forum shopping by the Missus.

    I guess this is due in part to Obama’s general rootless nature and vague autobiography. While there would be a certain poetic justice to Obama moving to Rancho Mirage, the desert outpost seems to achieve peak golf opportunity, but lacks the access to the real corridors of political power and easy money. I would love the irony of Clinton and now Obama having to resort to Trump branded country clubs if the Old Money has no time for the hassles of Presidential memberships. Various factions of the elite media really wants Obama to “choose” their preferred jurisdiction so expect these speculations to heat up as we get closer to the zero hour.

    For now, Mr. Obama continues to live in the White House and follow what has become something of an obsession — golf. According to a count kept by Mark Knoller of CBS News, Mr. Obama has played 256 rounds since becoming president and now lets few weekends go by without hitting the links. Since he will no longer have easy access to his own helicopter, airplane or motorcade, he may want a course in the neighborhood, which could rule out living in the heart of any city.

    Which state has the most golf courses? Florida.

    If Obama was sane, he would simply hang loose for the next 30 years in O’ahu, write his memoirs and maybe become actually interesting, but I think that he has bigger aspirations and certainly Michelle would prefer a more traditionally urban setting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Central Park North, for that Harlem cred, but way over toward the Upper West Side.
    , @Lot
    I remember Reagan retiring to Bel Air, not Brentwood.
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  15. @Clifford Brown
    OT-

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/12/us/after-1600-pennsylvania-avenue-where-to.html?_r=0

    The NYTimes seems to be spending an inordinate amount of time on where oh where will the Obamas live after Obama's second term. They are having a little fun with this, which is nice, as usually the NYTimes is stone cold serious when it comes to all things Obama. I can't for the life of me remember the same level of intense speculation about any other previous President. Everyone knew that Carter would return to his beloved Georgia, Reagan to Brentwood, Bush I to Maine and Bush II to Tejas. Clinton seems to be the exception, but his move to New York was in part driven by election forum shopping by the Missus.

    I guess this is due in part to Obama's general rootless nature and vague autobiography. While there would be a certain poetic justice to Obama moving to Rancho Mirage, the desert outpost seems to achieve peak golf opportunity, but lacks the access to the real corridors of political power and easy money. I would love the irony of Clinton and now Obama having to resort to Trump branded country clubs if the Old Money has no time for the hassles of Presidential memberships. Various factions of the elite media really wants Obama to "choose" their preferred jurisdiction so expect these speculations to heat up as we get closer to the zero hour.

    For now, Mr. Obama continues to live in the White House and follow what has become something of an obsession — golf. According to a count kept by Mark Knoller of CBS News, Mr. Obama has played 256 rounds since becoming president and now lets few weekends go by without hitting the links. Since he will no longer have easy access to his own helicopter, airplane or motorcade, he may want a course in the neighborhood, which could rule out living in the heart of any city.

    Which state has the most golf courses? Florida.
     
    If Obama was sane, he would simply hang loose for the next 30 years in O'ahu, write his memoirs and maybe become actually interesting, but I think that he has bigger aspirations and certainly Michelle would prefer a more traditionally urban setting.

    Central Park North, for that Harlem cred, but way over toward the Upper West Side.

    Read More
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  16. @Dcthrowback
    Joe Rogan, w/ his 3 hour expansive format, is the best fit. He's already had memorable podcats w/ Chuck Johnson and Milo Yiannopoulos.

    Obviously TGMS is an option w/ your taki connection, but gavin still thinks mia love is the solution for the GOP.

    Seconded on the Joe Rogan Podcast. His podcast is extremely undisciplined which gives people plenty of time to talk. Located just West of the San Fernando Valley, Rogan seems like an ideal fit. Joe is a “bro” and reaches a diverse audience by podcast standards. He signals pretty Left on certain issues and presents himself as a “Marijuana Libertarian” type in order to avoid being ostracized, but one look at his guests shows that he knows what time it is.

    Even if he disagrees with you, he tends to do so in a funny, playful manner without the usual grandstanding. He is obsessed with MMA obviously, as well as mind and body enhancement. There are likely natural overlaps in interest.

    If you have any Ayahuasca experience, you are golden with Rogan.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    With his Swiss German name Steve I think would be partial to LSD, discovered by Albert Hoffman.
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  17. “Grace and Steel”–obvious, right? Truth to tell, I had not even considered it until Steve mentioned it. Having considered it, I’m of two minds. It is powerful and metaphorical. But it is also cheesy: like a 70s or 80s TV actioner. “Grace and Steel. A Quinn Martin Production. Starring Pierce Brosnan and Robert Conrad. Tonight’s Episode: Requiem for a Nightingale.” See what I mean?

    OT: Svetlana Alexievich’s English translator is Keith Gessen?! TPTB are not even trying to disguise their handiwork anymore.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BubbaJoe
    "Make America Great Again!" is also both cheesy and powerful. It seems to be working for Trump though. Good show, thank you.
    , @D. K.
    You ought not to mock the late Quinn Martin: on Tuesday night, August 29, 1967, an estimated 78 million Americans tuned in to ABC to watch the series finale of "The Fugitive"-- at a time when the resident American population was still, just barely, under 200 million! That included up to eleven native-born Americans in my own family's small living room.
    , @Anonymous
    I'm of two minds on this, as well. 2Kevins might be easier to remember than "Grace and Steele", especially if you don't have a big marketing budget to pound the name into potential viewers'/listeners' heads. 2Kevins is not fancy, but it's pretty memorable in a straight-forward way.
    , @Bill Jones
    When the latest Royal Spawn in the UK was in the offing the bookies were offering odds of 1,000 to 1 that it would be named Kevin.
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  18. @t
    OT: Slate calls Bernie Sanders racist for saying that guns cause problems in Baltimore and not Vermont:

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2015/10/13/bernie_sanders_on_guns_at_the_debate.html?wpsrc=sh_all_dt_tw_top

    This answer is pretty much the worst one Sanders could possibly provide. By alleging that urban areas need stricter gun laws than rural ones, the senator adds an awkward racial undertone to the gun debate. Vermont—which, Sanders claims, can handle loose gun restrictions—is 1 percent black. Baltimore—which Sanders has cited as an area in need of stricter gun control—is about 64 percent black. It’s alarmingly easy to read Sanders’ rejoinder here as an implication that rural whites can be trusted with guns and urban blacks cannot be.
     

    […]the senator adds an awkward racial undertone to the gun debate.

    Not even problematic, just awkward. So gauche.

    It’s alarmingly easy to read Sanders’ rejoinder here as an implication that rural whites can be trusted with guns and urban blacks cannot be.

    Whether the statistics show it to be true or not true, one simply ought not to suggest such things.

    Read More
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  19. @BubbaJoe
    1. Steve comes across as eminently reasonable in this podcast. I'm looking forward to part 2.

    2. To Kevin Michael Grace: "Grace and Steel" is indeed a better name than "2Kevins".

    “Grace and Steel” sounds like it involves bodice ripping.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BubbaJoe
    Ha! Maybe that'll attract more females then.
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  20. @Dcthrowback
    Joe Rogan, w/ his 3 hour expansive format, is the best fit. He's already had memorable podcats w/ Chuck Johnson and Milo Yiannopoulos.

    Obviously TGMS is an option w/ your taki connection, but gavin still thinks mia love is the solution for the GOP.

    I used to think something like that would be cool but now? Disagree. Joe isn’t especially friendly to the isteve worldview and Joe would dominate him verbally

    I’d like to see Steve on counter currents or one of the other reactionary podcasts where he could add some more mature commentary

    Read More
    • Replies: @BurplesonAFB
    Or, if he's ready to do some shitlording, I'd like to see a Between Two Lampshades with Steve and Mike Enoch at therightstuff.biz
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  21. @Bert
    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who's just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont. He's used to dealing with old white people who care about things like private-sector pensions and public land use. He's completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn't know how to deal with them, more like he's terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they'll leave him alone.

    Really funny to read “He’s used to dealing with… public land use. He’s completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM.” in your comment Bert. I immediately thought “Bureau of Land Management? But didn’t you just say he was good with land use?” Then I thought about it for a bit longer…

    Had to share.

    Read More
    • Agree: (((Owen)))
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  22. @BurplesonAFB
    I used to think something like that would be cool but now? Disagree. Joe isn't especially friendly to the isteve worldview and Joe would dominate him verbally

    I'd like to see Steve on counter currents or one of the other reactionary podcasts where he could add some more mature commentary

    Or, if he’s ready to do some shitlording, I’d like to see a Between Two Lampshades with Steve and Mike Enoch at therightstuff.biz

    Read More
    • Replies: @DCThrowback
    While TRS is interesting, do you really think Steve's energy level is good fit for a those guys? Plus they all like to talk. I want to hear Steve talk. That being said, I still think writing is Steve's best milieu. I like the asides, insider parentheticals and shivs he deals in his writing - doubtful those slings and arrows would be made in person.

    Rogan would be perfect, as long as Steve had some of his caveman coffee to up his energy level (no Natural Light, please.). Steve actually belongs on NPR with his logical connectors, muted vocal tones & thoughtful phrasing.

    My generation would have listen to Steve on a podcast at 2x speed, or at least 1.5x.

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  23. I haven’t listened to it all yet, but here are my thoughts so far:
    1. I am disappointed that Sailer doesn’t say “huwhite” like Taylor.
    2. “The democrats are the party of dying alone”—Steve Sailer.

    Read More
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  24. Taylor Swift and Paris Hilton each had boyfriends who shared their given names. It would have been fun to hear you on “The Two Taylors” or “The Two Parises”.

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  25. Is this the Dangerfield bit?

    That canny Jew sure showed up that WASP professor as a pompous ass.

    Pedantry alert: Nash wasn’t one of the founders of game theory.

    “Football is better than war, basically—It’s a lot like war, but, you know, it kills somewhat fewer people.”—Steve Sailer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    oh, so that's the character on which Mr Burns' son is based. Lol. I recognised that voice.
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  26. @Harold
    “Grace and Steel” sounds like it involves bodice ripping.

    Ha! Maybe that’ll attract more females then.

    Read More
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  27. @Kevin Michael Grace
    "Grace and Steel"--obvious, right? Truth to tell, I had not even considered it until Steve mentioned it. Having considered it, I'm of two minds. It is powerful and metaphorical. But it is also cheesy: like a 70s or 80s TV actioner. "Grace and Steel. A Quinn Martin Production. Starring Pierce Brosnan and Robert Conrad. Tonight's Episode: Requiem for a Nightingale." See what I mean?

    OT: Svetlana Alexievich's English translator is Keith Gessen?! TPTB are not even trying to disguise their handiwork anymore.

    “Make America Great Again!” is also both cheesy and powerful. It seems to be working for Trump though. Good show, thank you.

    Read More
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  28. @Clifford Brown
    OT-

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/12/us/after-1600-pennsylvania-avenue-where-to.html?_r=0

    The NYTimes seems to be spending an inordinate amount of time on where oh where will the Obamas live after Obama's second term. They are having a little fun with this, which is nice, as usually the NYTimes is stone cold serious when it comes to all things Obama. I can't for the life of me remember the same level of intense speculation about any other previous President. Everyone knew that Carter would return to his beloved Georgia, Reagan to Brentwood, Bush I to Maine and Bush II to Tejas. Clinton seems to be the exception, but his move to New York was in part driven by election forum shopping by the Missus.

    I guess this is due in part to Obama's general rootless nature and vague autobiography. While there would be a certain poetic justice to Obama moving to Rancho Mirage, the desert outpost seems to achieve peak golf opportunity, but lacks the access to the real corridors of political power and easy money. I would love the irony of Clinton and now Obama having to resort to Trump branded country clubs if the Old Money has no time for the hassles of Presidential memberships. Various factions of the elite media really wants Obama to "choose" their preferred jurisdiction so expect these speculations to heat up as we get closer to the zero hour.

    For now, Mr. Obama continues to live in the White House and follow what has become something of an obsession — golf. According to a count kept by Mark Knoller of CBS News, Mr. Obama has played 256 rounds since becoming president and now lets few weekends go by without hitting the links. Since he will no longer have easy access to his own helicopter, airplane or motorcade, he may want a course in the neighborhood, which could rule out living in the heart of any city.

    Which state has the most golf courses? Florida.
     
    If Obama was sane, he would simply hang loose for the next 30 years in O'ahu, write his memoirs and maybe become actually interesting, but I think that he has bigger aspirations and certainly Michelle would prefer a more traditionally urban setting.

    I remember Reagan retiring to Bel Air, not Brentwood.

    Read More
    • Replies: @D. K.
    Correct:

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/668-St-Cloud-Rd-Los-Angeles-CA-90077/20526857_zpid/

    As I recall, a group of friends and supporters bought it for the Reagans, shortly before his second term as president ended. Most notoriously, it was numbered 666, at the time, and either the buyers or the Reagans themselves got it changed to 668!?! I believe that it is next door to the house that was used for the famous exterior shots of the Clampett's home in Beverly Hills, on "The Beverly Hillbillies" television series.
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  29. @Kevin Michael Grace
    "Grace and Steel"--obvious, right? Truth to tell, I had not even considered it until Steve mentioned it. Having considered it, I'm of two minds. It is powerful and metaphorical. But it is also cheesy: like a 70s or 80s TV actioner. "Grace and Steel. A Quinn Martin Production. Starring Pierce Brosnan and Robert Conrad. Tonight's Episode: Requiem for a Nightingale." See what I mean?

    OT: Svetlana Alexievich's English translator is Keith Gessen?! TPTB are not even trying to disguise their handiwork anymore.

    You ought not to mock the late Quinn Martin: on Tuesday night, August 29, 1967, an estimated 78 million Americans tuned in to ABC to watch the series finale of “The Fugitive”– at a time when the resident American population was still, just barely, under 200 million! That included up to eleven native-born Americans in my own family’s small living room.

    Read More
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  30. @Clifford Brown
    Seconded on the Joe Rogan Podcast. His podcast is extremely undisciplined which gives people plenty of time to talk. Located just West of the San Fernando Valley, Rogan seems like an ideal fit. Joe is a "bro" and reaches a diverse audience by podcast standards. He signals pretty Left on certain issues and presents himself as a "Marijuana Libertarian" type in order to avoid being ostracized, but one look at his guests shows that he knows what time it is.

    Even if he disagrees with you, he tends to do so in a funny, playful manner without the usual grandstanding. He is obsessed with MMA obviously, as well as mind and body enhancement. There are likely natural overlaps in interest.

    If you have any Ayahuasca experience, you are golden with Rogan.

    With his Swiss German name Steve I think would be partial to LSD, discovered by Albert Hoffman.

    Read More
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  31. @Lot
    I remember Reagan retiring to Bel Air, not Brentwood.

    Correct:

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/668-St-Cloud-Rd-Los-Angeles-CA-90077/20526857_zpid/

    As I recall, a group of friends and supporters bought it for the Reagans, shortly before his second term as president ended. Most notoriously, it was numbered 666, at the time, and either the buyers or the Reagans themselves got it changed to 668!?! I believe that it is next door to the house that was used for the famous exterior shots of the Clampett’s home in Beverly Hills, on “The Beverly Hillbillies” television series.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Grumpy
    It's interesting to see all of the new mega-mansions being crammed into the Reagans' neighborhood. It was probably a beautiful area once, but from the air the new construction looks almost embarrassingly overdone... is 'tacky' the right word for it?
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  32. Steve,

    You’ve got a very good voice for radio, and a nice, calm and measured way of expressing yourself without stuttering, umming and awwing.

    You should do more podcasting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dirk Dagger
    I enjoyed hearing iSteve but he has a wee bit of the yunnows:
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  33. @Harold
    Is this the Dangerfield bit?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlVDGmjz7eM
    That canny Jew sure showed up that WASP professor as a pompous ass.

    Pedantry alert: Nash wasn’t one of the founders of game theory.

    “Football is better than war, basically—It’s a lot like war, but, you know, it kills somewhat fewer people.”—Steve Sailer.

    oh, so that’s the character on which Mr Burns’ son is based. Lol. I recognised that voice.

    Read More
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  34. @Kevin Michael Grace
    "Grace and Steel"--obvious, right? Truth to tell, I had not even considered it until Steve mentioned it. Having considered it, I'm of two minds. It is powerful and metaphorical. But it is also cheesy: like a 70s or 80s TV actioner. "Grace and Steel. A Quinn Martin Production. Starring Pierce Brosnan and Robert Conrad. Tonight's Episode: Requiem for a Nightingale." See what I mean?

    OT: Svetlana Alexievich's English translator is Keith Gessen?! TPTB are not even trying to disguise their handiwork anymore.

    I’m of two minds on this, as well. 2Kevins might be easier to remember than “Grace and Steele”, especially if you don’t have a big marketing budget to pound the name into potential viewers’/listeners’ heads. 2Kevins is not fancy, but it’s pretty memorable in a straight-forward way.

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  35. @Bert
    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who's just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont. He's used to dealing with old white people who care about things like private-sector pensions and public land use. He's completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn't know how to deal with them, more like he's terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they'll leave him alone.

    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who’s just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont.

    I LOL’d. Sanders has a plan to bring water to the Dust Bowl.

    Read More
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  36. Steve needs his own radio show. :)

    Read More
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  37. Did Freud really do well for money? I don’t know a lot of the details of his life, and it’s hard to gauge this sort of thing in hindsight (a lot of times, what seems like a struggle at the time can appear more or less a breeze in hindsight). I know Freud envied Jung his wealth (who wouldn’t?)

    Now that I’m thinking about it, any suggestions for biography of Freud?

    Read More
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  38. @D. K.
    Correct:

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/668-St-Cloud-Rd-Los-Angeles-CA-90077/20526857_zpid/

    As I recall, a group of friends and supporters bought it for the Reagans, shortly before his second term as president ended. Most notoriously, it was numbered 666, at the time, and either the buyers or the Reagans themselves got it changed to 668!?! I believe that it is next door to the house that was used for the famous exterior shots of the Clampett's home in Beverly Hills, on "The Beverly Hillbillies" television series.

    It’s interesting to see all of the new mega-mansions being crammed into the Reagans’ neighborhood. It was probably a beautiful area once, but from the air the new construction looks almost embarrassingly overdone… is ‘tacky’ the right word for it?

    Read More
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  39. Do you not get many offers for interviews or do you just not like doing them?

    The couple of times I have heard you present either in video or radio it has been quite good even though I recall you saying that you weren’t too comfortable outside of writing. Your interview with Craig Bodeker is a great example of how to unpack a large issue in a straight forward way. So I don’t think you have reason to be too self conscious. The same is true of your written interviews like the great one with Luke Ford.

    And what happened to your podcast? I’m very cheap but that is something I would pay for in a second. For a former marketeer you don’t seem that anxious to make money off of your readers. I mean you could easily have several ebooks on entire topics just based on your former articles.

    Read More
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  40. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Bruce Springsteen, like him or not personally(he is a ham), was once a great talent.

    Never allow personal feelings to get in the way of artistic assessment.

    And yes, 70s NY was pretty scary, but there was more cultural and political upheaval in the air precisely because so much was up for grabs. And it wasn’t just about punk music. Check the magazines and newspapers back then. Made of tougher material and stronger personalities.
    Once NY became an expensive bubble, the enclosed hipster culture became more pampered and privileged, less racy. Nicer place to live if you have the money but at cost to edginess.

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  41. @Hugh
    Steve,

    You've got a very good voice for radio, and a nice, calm and measured way of expressing yourself without stuttering, umming and awwing.

    You should do more podcasting.

    I enjoyed hearing iSteve but he has a wee bit of the yunnows:

    Read More
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  42. @Big Fan
    You should do more interviews and podcasts. Enjoyed hearing from you.

    Vox Day did a one hour podcast yesterday with Red Ice Radio, a Swedish website, about SJWS and his book “SJWs Always Lie”.

    Boost your European readership. Check in with other foreign podcast sites. Europeans are really getting fired up about the Muslim Invasion.

    Read More
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  43. @BurplesonAFB
    Or, if he's ready to do some shitlording, I'd like to see a Between Two Lampshades with Steve and Mike Enoch at therightstuff.biz

    While TRS is interesting, do you really think Steve’s energy level is good fit for a those guys? Plus they all like to talk. I want to hear Steve talk. That being said, I still think writing is Steve’s best milieu. I like the asides, insider parentheticals and shivs he deals in his writing – doubtful those slings and arrows would be made in person.

    Rogan would be perfect, as long as Steve had some of his caveman coffee to up his energy level (no Natural Light, please.). Steve actually belongs on NPR with his logical connectors, muted vocal tones & thoughtful phrasing.

    My generation would have listen to Steve on a podcast at 2x speed, or at least 1.5x.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "My generation would have listen to Steve on a podcast at 2x speed, or at least 1.5x."

    If I did my own podcasts, what are the pros and cons of using software to speed my recorded talk up? Or should I just let listeners use software at their end to speed me up?
    , @Kudzu Bob
    Steve wouldn't be a good fit for The Daily Shoah for several reasons, none of which reflect badly on him or anybody else; but he would make a fine guest for the Shoah's somewhat more structured show-within-the Shoah, Between Two Lampshades, especially if Mike Enoch conducted the interview.
    , @BurplesonAFB
    https://youtu.be/v4IyBf0iPsY?t=1h31m22s
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  44. WhatEvvs [AKA "Anonymuss Annie"] says:
    @Bert
    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who's just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont. He's used to dealing with old white people who care about things like private-sector pensions and public land use. He's completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn't know how to deal with them, more like he's terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they'll leave him alone.

    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who’s just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont.

    LOL. At least his cryogenic tank, unlike the one in Arizona, works. He’s pretty spry.

    He’s completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn’t know how to deal with them, more like he’s terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they’ll leave him alone.

    Yes. I don’t think his heart is in it, the way Elizabeth Warren’s is, when she snarls about this. I was kind of disappointed in her cave to #blacklivesmatter. I sort of like her economic populism. But if she’s a #blacklivesmatter stooge I can’t vote for her.

    They are crazy. I check out one of their websites and one of their demands is to end broken windows policing. Broken windows policing saved NYC.

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    "Broken windows policing saved NYC."

    That's the myth anyway. As I have pointed out many times, that policy was first articulated and proposed by James Q. Wilson back in 1982 but not instituted in NYC until after Giuliani became mayor on January 1, 1994. The only problem is that the crime rate began to fall dramatically in NYC and around the country in 1990, fully three years before Giuliani became mayor of NYC and started instituting Wilson's "broken-window" policies. Here is what I posted on City Journal three years ago:

    "tbraton May 13, 2012 at 12:08 PM

    Although Giuliani states that he became mayor in 1993, he was only elected in November 1993 and did not become mayor until January 1, 1994. His misleading statement becomes important when one considers that the crime rate in NYC started dropping dramatically in 1990, more than three years before Giuliani became mayor and started implementing Wilson's ideas. Similar drops in the crime rate started in other American cities about the same time. Frankly, we have little idea of what causes the crime rate to go up or go down, but way too much credit has been given to Wilson's ideas for causing the crime rate to drop in NYC. It is an example of the philosophical fallacy of "post hoc ergo propter hoc." It's just as fallacious to credit President Clinton's cops on the street program, which was not enacted until 1995, with causing the great reduction in crime across the country."

    I followed with another message:

    "tbraton May 14, 2012 at 9:38 AM

    "Freakenomics, only a liberal would try to claim that the drop in the crime rate in the 90s was the result of legalizing abortion 20 years earlier and those criminals simply were never born."

    Foncool, as I stated in my earlier comment, we simply don't know what causes the crime rate to go up or go down. There are many theories. What is undisputable is that NYC's crime rate reached its peak in 1990 and started falling dramatically (as it did in other parts of the country) fully three years before Giuliani became mayor on January 1,1994 and began implementing Wilson's ideas. (The crime rate continued to fall in NYC long after Giuliani left office at the end of 2001. Just last week, I read in the NYTimes that the murder rate had fallen to its lowest rate in 40 years when statistics started to be collected.) It's hard to argue that Giuliani was responsible for causing the crime rate to fall, when it had begun falling fast three years earlier. Since Wilson first forumlated his ideas in 1982, it's too bad someone didn't implement them sooner so a true test could have been made while the crime rate was still climbing. Incidentally, I am far from being a liberal. As a paleoconservative, I still retain a respect for the facts and believe that all theories, whether liberal or conservative, must be tested against the facts.

    BTW a recent controversy has emerged in NYC over stop and frisk laws. Forbes had a recent article which said this about the presumed connection between the s-and-f policies and the falling murder rate:
    " The Daily News reports that according to the NYPD’s top spokesman, Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne, “Over the past 10 years, there were 5,430 murders in New York City, compared with 11,058 in the decade before Mayor Michael Bloomberg took office.” Police Commissioner Ray Kelly directly links a significant drop in the city’s murder rate with the stop-and-frisk policy.

    Is it so? Despite all the talk of declining crime and increased numbers of stop-and-frisks, are the two connected? The short answer is no! All of the graphs in today’s post make it clear that the astronomical increase in stop-and-frisks came well after the significant decrease in number of murders, and thus cannot be the cause of the drop." "
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  45. @DCThrowback
    While TRS is interesting, do you really think Steve's energy level is good fit for a those guys? Plus they all like to talk. I want to hear Steve talk. That being said, I still think writing is Steve's best milieu. I like the asides, insider parentheticals and shivs he deals in his writing - doubtful those slings and arrows would be made in person.

    Rogan would be perfect, as long as Steve had some of his caveman coffee to up his energy level (no Natural Light, please.). Steve actually belongs on NPR with his logical connectors, muted vocal tones & thoughtful phrasing.

    My generation would have listen to Steve on a podcast at 2x speed, or at least 1.5x.

    “My generation would have listen to Steve on a podcast at 2x speed, or at least 1.5x.”

    If I did my own podcasts, what are the pros and cons of using software to speed my recorded talk up? Or should I just let listeners use software at their end to speed me up?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Oh god, don't listen to these comenters that want you to talk faster. I thought the interview was great. I'm very comfortable with the way you speak, you sound relaxed and good-natured, not stressed or angry. Also you speak clearly and in an organized fashion, no fumfering. Your corporate experience, where no doubt you had to speak at meetings and not waste words, is evident. You should get more interviews.
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  46. @Steve Sailer
    "My generation would have listen to Steve on a podcast at 2x speed, or at least 1.5x."

    If I did my own podcasts, what are the pros and cons of using software to speed my recorded talk up? Or should I just let listeners use software at their end to speed me up?

    Oh god, don’t listen to these comenters that want you to talk faster. I thought the interview was great. I’m very comfortable with the way you speak, you sound relaxed and good-natured, not stressed or angry. Also you speak clearly and in an organized fashion, no fumfering. Your corporate experience, where no doubt you had to speak at meetings and not waste words, is evident. You should get more interviews.

    Read More
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  47. @DCThrowback
    While TRS is interesting, do you really think Steve's energy level is good fit for a those guys? Plus they all like to talk. I want to hear Steve talk. That being said, I still think writing is Steve's best milieu. I like the asides, insider parentheticals and shivs he deals in his writing - doubtful those slings and arrows would be made in person.

    Rogan would be perfect, as long as Steve had some of his caveman coffee to up his energy level (no Natural Light, please.). Steve actually belongs on NPR with his logical connectors, muted vocal tones & thoughtful phrasing.

    My generation would have listen to Steve on a podcast at 2x speed, or at least 1.5x.

    Steve wouldn’t be a good fit for The Daily Shoah for several reasons, none of which reflect badly on him or anybody else; but he would make a fine guest for the Shoah’s somewhat more structured show-within-the Shoah, Between Two Lampshades, especially if Mike Enoch conducted the interview.

    Read More
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  48. @WhatEvvs

    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who’s just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont.
     
    LOL. At least his cryogenic tank, unlike the one in Arizona, works. He's pretty spry.

    He’s completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn’t know how to deal with them, more like he’s terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they’ll leave him alone.
     
    Yes. I don't think his heart is in it, the way Elizabeth Warren's is, when she snarls about this. I was kind of disappointed in her cave to #blacklivesmatter. I sort of like her economic populism. But if she's a #blacklivesmatter stooge I can't vote for her.

    They are crazy. I check out one of their websites and one of their demands is to end broken windows policing. Broken windows policing saved NYC.

    “Broken windows policing saved NYC.”

    That’s the myth anyway. As I have pointed out many times, that policy was first articulated and proposed by James Q. Wilson back in 1982 but not instituted in NYC until after Giuliani became mayor on January 1, 1994. The only problem is that the crime rate began to fall dramatically in NYC and around the country in 1990, fully three years before Giuliani became mayor of NYC and started instituting Wilson’s “broken-window” policies. Here is what I posted on City Journal three years ago:

    “tbraton May 13, 2012 at 12:08 PM

    Although Giuliani states that he became mayor in 1993, he was only elected in November 1993 and did not become mayor until January 1, 1994. His misleading statement becomes important when one considers that the crime rate in NYC started dropping dramatically in 1990, more than three years before Giuliani became mayor and started implementing Wilson’s ideas. Similar drops in the crime rate started in other American cities about the same time. Frankly, we have little idea of what causes the crime rate to go up or go down, but way too much credit has been given to Wilson’s ideas for causing the crime rate to drop in NYC. It is an example of the philosophical fallacy of “post hoc ergo propter hoc.” It’s just as fallacious to credit President Clinton’s cops on the street program, which was not enacted until 1995, with causing the great reduction in crime across the country.”

    I followed with another message:

    “tbraton May 14, 2012 at 9:38 AM

    “Freakenomics, only a liberal would try to claim that the drop in the crime rate in the 90s was the result of legalizing abortion 20 years earlier and those criminals simply were never born.”

    Foncool, as I stated in my earlier comment, we simply don’t know what causes the crime rate to go up or go down. There are many theories. What is undisputable is that NYC’s crime rate reached its peak in 1990 and started falling dramatically (as it did in other parts of the country) fully three years before Giuliani became mayor on January 1,1994 and began implementing Wilson’s ideas. (The crime rate continued to fall in NYC long after Giuliani left office at the end of 2001. Just last week, I read in the NYTimes that the murder rate had fallen to its lowest rate in 40 years when statistics started to be collected.) It’s hard to argue that Giuliani was responsible for causing the crime rate to fall, when it had begun falling fast three years earlier. Since Wilson first forumlated his ideas in 1982, it’s too bad someone didn’t implement them sooner so a true test could have been made while the crime rate was still climbing. Incidentally, I am far from being a liberal. As a paleoconservative, I still retain a respect for the facts and believe that all theories, whether liberal or conservative, must be tested against the facts.

    BTW a recent controversy has emerged in NYC over stop and frisk laws. Forbes had a recent article which said this about the presumed connection between the s-and-f policies and the falling murder rate:
    ” The Daily News reports that according to the NYPD’s top spokesman, Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne, “Over the past 10 years, there were 5,430 murders in New York City, compared with 11,058 in the decade before Mayor Michael Bloomberg took office.” Police Commissioner Ray Kelly directly links a significant drop in the city’s murder rate with the stop-and-frisk policy.

    Is it so? Despite all the talk of declining crime and increased numbers of stop-and-frisks, are the two connected? The short answer is no! All of the graphs in today’s post make it clear that the astronomical increase in stop-and-frisks came well after the significant decrease in number of murders, and thus cannot be the cause of the drop.” “

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    James Q. Wilson's 1974 suggestion in his influential Thinking About Crime book, long before "broken windows," was that criminals can't commit crimes against civilians if they are in prison, so lock 'em up.

    "Broken windows" seems more elegant, so it gets more publicity, but I suspect that Wilson would have ranked his earlier suggestion -- lock up more criminals for longer -- as his foremost contribution to the public weal.

    , @Bill Jones
    It was Roe versus Wade.
    Hard for black youths to commit crimes if they've been aborted 16 years earlier.
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  49. @tbraton
    "Broken windows policing saved NYC."

    That's the myth anyway. As I have pointed out many times, that policy was first articulated and proposed by James Q. Wilson back in 1982 but not instituted in NYC until after Giuliani became mayor on January 1, 1994. The only problem is that the crime rate began to fall dramatically in NYC and around the country in 1990, fully three years before Giuliani became mayor of NYC and started instituting Wilson's "broken-window" policies. Here is what I posted on City Journal three years ago:

    "tbraton May 13, 2012 at 12:08 PM

    Although Giuliani states that he became mayor in 1993, he was only elected in November 1993 and did not become mayor until January 1, 1994. His misleading statement becomes important when one considers that the crime rate in NYC started dropping dramatically in 1990, more than three years before Giuliani became mayor and started implementing Wilson's ideas. Similar drops in the crime rate started in other American cities about the same time. Frankly, we have little idea of what causes the crime rate to go up or go down, but way too much credit has been given to Wilson's ideas for causing the crime rate to drop in NYC. It is an example of the philosophical fallacy of "post hoc ergo propter hoc." It's just as fallacious to credit President Clinton's cops on the street program, which was not enacted until 1995, with causing the great reduction in crime across the country."

    I followed with another message:

    "tbraton May 14, 2012 at 9:38 AM

    "Freakenomics, only a liberal would try to claim that the drop in the crime rate in the 90s was the result of legalizing abortion 20 years earlier and those criminals simply were never born."

    Foncool, as I stated in my earlier comment, we simply don't know what causes the crime rate to go up or go down. There are many theories. What is undisputable is that NYC's crime rate reached its peak in 1990 and started falling dramatically (as it did in other parts of the country) fully three years before Giuliani became mayor on January 1,1994 and began implementing Wilson's ideas. (The crime rate continued to fall in NYC long after Giuliani left office at the end of 2001. Just last week, I read in the NYTimes that the murder rate had fallen to its lowest rate in 40 years when statistics started to be collected.) It's hard to argue that Giuliani was responsible for causing the crime rate to fall, when it had begun falling fast three years earlier. Since Wilson first forumlated his ideas in 1982, it's too bad someone didn't implement them sooner so a true test could have been made while the crime rate was still climbing. Incidentally, I am far from being a liberal. As a paleoconservative, I still retain a respect for the facts and believe that all theories, whether liberal or conservative, must be tested against the facts.

    BTW a recent controversy has emerged in NYC over stop and frisk laws. Forbes had a recent article which said this about the presumed connection between the s-and-f policies and the falling murder rate:
    " The Daily News reports that according to the NYPD’s top spokesman, Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne, “Over the past 10 years, there were 5,430 murders in New York City, compared with 11,058 in the decade before Mayor Michael Bloomberg took office.” Police Commissioner Ray Kelly directly links a significant drop in the city’s murder rate with the stop-and-frisk policy.

    Is it so? Despite all the talk of declining crime and increased numbers of stop-and-frisks, are the two connected? The short answer is no! All of the graphs in today’s post make it clear that the astronomical increase in stop-and-frisks came well after the significant decrease in number of murders, and thus cannot be the cause of the drop." "

    James Q. Wilson’s 1974 suggestion in his influential Thinking About Crime book, long before “broken windows,” was that criminals can’t commit crimes against civilians if they are in prison, so lock ‘em up.

    “Broken windows” seems more elegant, so it gets more publicity, but I suspect that Wilson would have ranked his earlier suggestion — lock up more criminals for longer — as his foremost contribution to the public weal.

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    Well, we started locking up criminals when Rockefeller was Governor of NYS and yet the crime rate in NY climbed until 1990. As I stated, the issue of what causes the crime rate to rise and fall has many theories, but there is no simple answer. The authors of "Freakonomics" came up with their theory that it was abortion that prevented future criminals from being born, a theory that was not especially popular among conservatives but certainly explained Romania. We know that the Black Death in the 14th century led to the end of feudalism and raised the wages of common folk, but has anybody studied the crime rate in the 14th century to determine what affect the drastic reduction in population caused? BTW there are even various theories about what caused Nelson Rockefeller's death. (Personally, I think God was responsible. http://www.reformation.org/megan-marshak.html)
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  50. @Bert
    Sanders is an old FDR Democrat who's just emerged from the political cryogenic tank that is Vermont. He's used to dealing with old white people who care about things like private-sector pensions and public land use. He's completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn't know how to deal with them, more like he's terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they'll leave him alone.

    “He’s completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn’t know how to deal with them, more like he’s terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they’ll leave him alone.”

    I was able to watch only the first hour of last night’s debate, but I believe I caught the various responses re the BLM. I was astounded that Sanders and O’Malley got down on their knees and genuflected before BLM. I suggested back in August that Trump should try to make an issue of BLM and tattoo it to Clinton’s forehead, since it appears after last night’s debate that she is likely to be the nominee, unless Biden decides to enter the race. All Trump has to do is make an innocuous statement (such as O’Malley made out in Arizona and got hooted down) that “all lives matter.” I think the large majority of Americans would subscribe to that color-blind policy, and it would throw a live grenade into the Democratic nominating process. If Trump waits until the election starts in the early fall of 2016, that would allow Hillary to pull a “Sistah Soulja” moment after she secures the nomination and distance herself from the BLM. My gut feeling is that white America is fed up with all the racist nonsense that is going on and that 2016 is looking like 1968. By tying Clinton tightly to the BLM movement, Trump would enhance both his chances of securing the Republican nomination and winning the 2016 election imo.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    As President, I will swear to uphold the Constitution, which includes "the equal protection of the laws." So, to me, "all lives matter."
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  51. @tbraton
    "He’s completely out of his depth when dealing with the likes of BLM. He doesn’t know how to deal with them, more like he’s terrified of them. I take most of his recent statements as a sign he just wants to pacify them in hopes they’ll leave him alone."

    I was able to watch only the first hour of last night's debate, but I believe I caught the various responses re the BLM. I was astounded that Sanders and O'Malley got down on their knees and genuflected before BLM. I suggested back in August that Trump should try to make an issue of BLM and tattoo it to Clinton's forehead, since it appears after last night's debate that she is likely to be the nominee, unless Biden decides to enter the race. All Trump has to do is make an innocuous statement (such as O'Malley made out in Arizona and got hooted down) that "all lives matter." I think the large majority of Americans would subscribe to that color-blind policy, and it would throw a live grenade into the Democratic nominating process. If Trump waits until the election starts in the early fall of 2016, that would allow Hillary to pull a "Sistah Soulja" moment after she secures the nomination and distance herself from the BLM. My gut feeling is that white America is fed up with all the racist nonsense that is going on and that 2016 is looking like 1968. By tying Clinton tightly to the BLM movement, Trump would enhance both his chances of securing the Republican nomination and winning the 2016 election imo.

    As President, I will swear to uphold the Constitution, which includes “the equal protection of the laws.” So, to me, “all lives matter.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    If you become President, who will handle your blog? BTW, as a declared candidate, what is your policy on immigration? No more pussy-footing allowed.
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  52. @Steve Sailer
    James Q. Wilson's 1974 suggestion in his influential Thinking About Crime book, long before "broken windows," was that criminals can't commit crimes against civilians if they are in prison, so lock 'em up.

    "Broken windows" seems more elegant, so it gets more publicity, but I suspect that Wilson would have ranked his earlier suggestion -- lock up more criminals for longer -- as his foremost contribution to the public weal.

    Well, we started locking up criminals when Rockefeller was Governor of NYS and yet the crime rate in NY climbed until 1990. As I stated, the issue of what causes the crime rate to rise and fall has many theories, but there is no simple answer. The authors of “Freakonomics” came up with their theory that it was abortion that prevented future criminals from being born, a theory that was not especially popular among conservatives but certainly explained Romania. We know that the Black Death in the 14th century led to the end of feudalism and raised the wages of common folk, but has anybody studied the crime rate in the 14th century to determine what affect the drastic reduction in population caused? BTW there are even various theories about what caused Nelson Rockefeller’s death. (Personally, I think God was responsible. http://www.reformation.org/megan-marshak.html)

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    One of the things I remember about NYC in the 1980s was the free rein black teens seem to have to annoy and inconvenience the rest of us. For example, a group of them would sit on the steps leading down to a subway platform, glowering balefully, allowing space for one person at a time to walk between them. This was the routine sort of hassle that New Yorkers had to deal with daily. The transit police would stand nearby and do nothing about it. It promoted a sense of the impotence of the law. Can I mark a point on a timeline when this stopped and prove it was shortly after Giuliani was in office? I can't, but it sure seemed that way.

    BTW, one of Giuliani's great accomplishments was uniting New York City's police departments. Before him, there was the NYPD, the housing police, the transit police, and, believe it or not, the sanitation police (they had badges and guns, and gave out summonses for uncovered garbage cans and failure to sweep the sidewalk in front of one's premises). This situation had persisted for decades, and Mayor Ed Koch claimed that it couldn't be resolved due to their separate contracts, though everyone agreed it was ridiculous. Giuliani came in and united the departments. I believe Koch, who frequently said he was the best mayor New York would ever have, never forgave him for that. Before 9/11, Koch was always taking petty little potshots at Giuliani.
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  53. @DCThrowback
    While TRS is interesting, do you really think Steve's energy level is good fit for a those guys? Plus they all like to talk. I want to hear Steve talk. That being said, I still think writing is Steve's best milieu. I like the asides, insider parentheticals and shivs he deals in his writing - doubtful those slings and arrows would be made in person.

    Rogan would be perfect, as long as Steve had some of his caveman coffee to up his energy level (no Natural Light, please.). Steve actually belongs on NPR with his logical connectors, muted vocal tones & thoughtful phrasing.

    My generation would have listen to Steve on a podcast at 2x speed, or at least 1.5x.

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  54. @tbraton
    Well, we started locking up criminals when Rockefeller was Governor of NYS and yet the crime rate in NY climbed until 1990. As I stated, the issue of what causes the crime rate to rise and fall has many theories, but there is no simple answer. The authors of "Freakonomics" came up with their theory that it was abortion that prevented future criminals from being born, a theory that was not especially popular among conservatives but certainly explained Romania. We know that the Black Death in the 14th century led to the end of feudalism and raised the wages of common folk, but has anybody studied the crime rate in the 14th century to determine what affect the drastic reduction in population caused? BTW there are even various theories about what caused Nelson Rockefeller's death. (Personally, I think God was responsible. http://www.reformation.org/megan-marshak.html)

    One of the things I remember about NYC in the 1980s was the free rein black teens seem to have to annoy and inconvenience the rest of us. For example, a group of them would sit on the steps leading down to a subway platform, glowering balefully, allowing space for one person at a time to walk between them. This was the routine sort of hassle that New Yorkers had to deal with daily. The transit police would stand nearby and do nothing about it. It promoted a sense of the impotence of the law. Can I mark a point on a timeline when this stopped and prove it was shortly after Giuliani was in office? I can’t, but it sure seemed that way.

    BTW, one of Giuliani’s great accomplishments was uniting New York City’s police departments. Before him, there was the NYPD, the housing police, the transit police, and, believe it or not, the sanitation police (they had badges and guns, and gave out summonses for uncovered garbage cans and failure to sweep the sidewalk in front of one’s premises). This situation had persisted for decades, and Mayor Ed Koch claimed that it couldn’t be resolved due to their separate contracts, though everyone agreed it was ridiculous. Giuliani came in and united the departments. I believe Koch, who frequently said he was the best mayor New York would ever have, never forgave him for that. Before 9/11, Koch was always taking petty little potshots at Giuliani.

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    • Replies: @tbraton
    It's undeniable that the crime rate peaked in 1990 and started declining rapidly. The mayor of NYC at the time was Dinkins. Giuliani didn't assume office until January 1, 1994. And, btw, the crime rate started declining not just in NYC but across the country (with the major exception of Baltimore, which is why we have that outstanding cable TV show "The Wire"). There is a major fallacy referred to "post hoc ergo propter hoc"; in other words, the Sun rises because the cock crows. Politicians of all stripes take advantage of that all the time. They identify a secular trend that might be occurring for whatever reason, propose a program to address the problem and then claim credit for the result, which would have happened anyway. Even Bill Clinton, fully aware of the noise Giuliani was making about crime in NYC, tried to claim credit for the decline in the crime rate as a result of his wasteful Cops on the Street federal program, which wasn't adopted until 1995, as I recall. Along similar lines, Bill Clinton takes credit for getting the economy going again as a result of his economic program, which involved raising taxes on the wealthy. The facts show, however, that the economy bottomed out in March 1991, nearly two years before Clinton assumed office, and was slowly recovering under George H.W. Bush. That recession, btw, was one of the shortest and mildest post-WWII recessions, although you couldn't tell from all the blather issuing forth from the Clinton campaign and the MSM.

    These are points I made on a number of occasions over on TAC and elsewhere. Here is a link to two messages I posted in 2012 on the occasion of James Q. Wilson's death.
    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/2012/03/02/james-q-wilson-rip/comment-page-1/#comment-153996 (the second message follows the first)

    That is not to say that what Giuliani did was useless. It improves civic life not to have broken windows or strangers offering to squeegee your car windows while you are stuck in traffic. But it is not consistent with the facts to credit Giuliani's policies with causing the crime rate to fall.
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  55. @Harry Baldwin
    One of the things I remember about NYC in the 1980s was the free rein black teens seem to have to annoy and inconvenience the rest of us. For example, a group of them would sit on the steps leading down to a subway platform, glowering balefully, allowing space for one person at a time to walk between them. This was the routine sort of hassle that New Yorkers had to deal with daily. The transit police would stand nearby and do nothing about it. It promoted a sense of the impotence of the law. Can I mark a point on a timeline when this stopped and prove it was shortly after Giuliani was in office? I can't, but it sure seemed that way.

    BTW, one of Giuliani's great accomplishments was uniting New York City's police departments. Before him, there was the NYPD, the housing police, the transit police, and, believe it or not, the sanitation police (they had badges and guns, and gave out summonses for uncovered garbage cans and failure to sweep the sidewalk in front of one's premises). This situation had persisted for decades, and Mayor Ed Koch claimed that it couldn't be resolved due to their separate contracts, though everyone agreed it was ridiculous. Giuliani came in and united the departments. I believe Koch, who frequently said he was the best mayor New York would ever have, never forgave him for that. Before 9/11, Koch was always taking petty little potshots at Giuliani.

    It’s undeniable that the crime rate peaked in 1990 and started declining rapidly. The mayor of NYC at the time was Dinkins. Giuliani didn’t assume office until January 1, 1994. And, btw, the crime rate started declining not just in NYC but across the country (with the major exception of Baltimore, which is why we have that outstanding cable TV show “The Wire”). There is a major fallacy referred to “post hoc ergo propter hoc”; in other words, the Sun rises because the cock crows. Politicians of all stripes take advantage of that all the time. They identify a secular trend that might be occurring for whatever reason, propose a program to address the problem and then claim credit for the result, which would have happened anyway. Even Bill Clinton, fully aware of the noise Giuliani was making about crime in NYC, tried to claim credit for the decline in the crime rate as a result of his wasteful Cops on the Street federal program, which wasn’t adopted until 1995, as I recall. Along similar lines, Bill Clinton takes credit for getting the economy going again as a result of his economic program, which involved raising taxes on the wealthy. The facts show, however, that the economy bottomed out in March 1991, nearly two years before Clinton assumed office, and was slowly recovering under George H.W. Bush. That recession, btw, was one of the shortest and mildest post-WWII recessions, although you couldn’t tell from all the blather issuing forth from the Clinton campaign and the MSM.

    These are points I made on a number of occasions over on TAC and elsewhere. Here is a link to two messages I posted in 2012 on the occasion of James Q. Wilson’s death.
    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/2012/03/02/james-q-wilson-rip/comment-page-1/#comment-153996 (the second message follows the first)

    That is not to say that what Giuliani did was useless. It improves civic life not to have broken windows or strangers offering to squeegee your car windows while you are stuck in traffic. But it is not consistent with the facts to credit Giuliani’s policies with causing the crime rate to fall.

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  56. @Steve Sailer
    As President, I will swear to uphold the Constitution, which includes "the equal protection of the laws." So, to me, "all lives matter."

    If you become President, who will handle your blog? BTW, as a declared candidate, what is your policy on immigration? No more pussy-footing allowed.

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  57. Great interview.

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  58. @Kevin Michael Grace
    "Grace and Steel"--obvious, right? Truth to tell, I had not even considered it until Steve mentioned it. Having considered it, I'm of two minds. It is powerful and metaphorical. But it is also cheesy: like a 70s or 80s TV actioner. "Grace and Steel. A Quinn Martin Production. Starring Pierce Brosnan and Robert Conrad. Tonight's Episode: Requiem for a Nightingale." See what I mean?

    OT: Svetlana Alexievich's English translator is Keith Gessen?! TPTB are not even trying to disguise their handiwork anymore.

    When the latest Royal Spawn in the UK was in the offing the bookies were offering odds of 1,000 to 1 that it would be named Kevin.

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  59. @tbraton
    "Broken windows policing saved NYC."

    That's the myth anyway. As I have pointed out many times, that policy was first articulated and proposed by James Q. Wilson back in 1982 but not instituted in NYC until after Giuliani became mayor on January 1, 1994. The only problem is that the crime rate began to fall dramatically in NYC and around the country in 1990, fully three years before Giuliani became mayor of NYC and started instituting Wilson's "broken-window" policies. Here is what I posted on City Journal three years ago:

    "tbraton May 13, 2012 at 12:08 PM

    Although Giuliani states that he became mayor in 1993, he was only elected in November 1993 and did not become mayor until January 1, 1994. His misleading statement becomes important when one considers that the crime rate in NYC started dropping dramatically in 1990, more than three years before Giuliani became mayor and started implementing Wilson's ideas. Similar drops in the crime rate started in other American cities about the same time. Frankly, we have little idea of what causes the crime rate to go up or go down, but way too much credit has been given to Wilson's ideas for causing the crime rate to drop in NYC. It is an example of the philosophical fallacy of "post hoc ergo propter hoc." It's just as fallacious to credit President Clinton's cops on the street program, which was not enacted until 1995, with causing the great reduction in crime across the country."

    I followed with another message:

    "tbraton May 14, 2012 at 9:38 AM

    "Freakenomics, only a liberal would try to claim that the drop in the crime rate in the 90s was the result of legalizing abortion 20 years earlier and those criminals simply were never born."

    Foncool, as I stated in my earlier comment, we simply don't know what causes the crime rate to go up or go down. There are many theories. What is undisputable is that NYC's crime rate reached its peak in 1990 and started falling dramatically (as it did in other parts of the country) fully three years before Giuliani became mayor on January 1,1994 and began implementing Wilson's ideas. (The crime rate continued to fall in NYC long after Giuliani left office at the end of 2001. Just last week, I read in the NYTimes that the murder rate had fallen to its lowest rate in 40 years when statistics started to be collected.) It's hard to argue that Giuliani was responsible for causing the crime rate to fall, when it had begun falling fast three years earlier. Since Wilson first forumlated his ideas in 1982, it's too bad someone didn't implement them sooner so a true test could have been made while the crime rate was still climbing. Incidentally, I am far from being a liberal. As a paleoconservative, I still retain a respect for the facts and believe that all theories, whether liberal or conservative, must be tested against the facts.

    BTW a recent controversy has emerged in NYC over stop and frisk laws. Forbes had a recent article which said this about the presumed connection between the s-and-f policies and the falling murder rate:
    " The Daily News reports that according to the NYPD’s top spokesman, Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne, “Over the past 10 years, there were 5,430 murders in New York City, compared with 11,058 in the decade before Mayor Michael Bloomberg took office.” Police Commissioner Ray Kelly directly links a significant drop in the city’s murder rate with the stop-and-frisk policy.

    Is it so? Despite all the talk of declining crime and increased numbers of stop-and-frisks, are the two connected? The short answer is no! All of the graphs in today’s post make it clear that the astronomical increase in stop-and-frisks came well after the significant decrease in number of murders, and thus cannot be the cause of the drop." "

    It was Roe versus Wade.
    Hard for black youths to commit crimes if they’ve been aborted 16 years earlier.

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    • Replies: @tbraton
    The authors of "Freakonomics" made out a case of why Romanians overthrew and killed the dictator Ceaucescu and his wife and concluded that it was Ceaucescu's action outlawing abortion roughly 20 years earlier in order to spur the population that resulted in a cohort of young, rebellious males that had no respect for authority. Kind of the reverse of Roe v. Wade, but the same underlying theory. The authors got to Roe v. Wade and the legalization of abortion in the U.S. at the end of their chapter on crime but started off the chapter with the exact opposite action in Romania around the same time and its aftereffect, especially on the Ceaucescus. Since crime has long been recognized as a young man's game, it stands to reason that the fewer young men in the population the less crime. That's why Germany may be in for a very rude awakening in the next several years.

    BTW the theory does not amount to an endorsement of abortion as a means of stopping crime, any more than an argument that the Black Death ended feudalism and raised the wages of the common man constitutes an endorsement of the plague as an economic stimulus program.
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  60. @Bill Jones
    It was Roe versus Wade.
    Hard for black youths to commit crimes if they've been aborted 16 years earlier.

    The authors of “Freakonomics” made out a case of why Romanians overthrew and killed the dictator Ceaucescu and his wife and concluded that it was Ceaucescu’s action outlawing abortion roughly 20 years earlier in order to spur the population that resulted in a cohort of young, rebellious males that had no respect for authority. Kind of the reverse of Roe v. Wade, but the same underlying theory. The authors got to Roe v. Wade and the legalization of abortion in the U.S. at the end of their chapter on crime but started off the chapter with the exact opposite action in Romania around the same time and its aftereffect, especially on the Ceaucescus. Since crime has long been recognized as a young man’s game, it stands to reason that the fewer young men in the population the less crime. That’s why Germany may be in for a very rude awakening in the next several years.

    BTW the theory does not amount to an endorsement of abortion as a means of stopping crime, any more than an argument that the Black Death ended feudalism and raised the wages of the common man constitutes an endorsement of the plague as an economic stimulus program.

    Read More
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