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Our Man in Hackensack also writes in Seeking Alpha on the financial implications of Google’s recent moves:

Google May Have Just Increased The Chances Of Antitrust Action Against It
Jun. 10, 2019 2:25 PM ET|16 comments | About: Alphabet Inc. (GOOGL), GOOG
David Pinsen

Portfolio strategy

Summary
Amazingly, after news broke that the Department of Justice was preparing an antitrust investigation into Alphabet, the company did something to further fuel antitrust concerns.

Last week, its YouTube unit demonetized numerous conservative channels, apparently after being bullied into doing so by one journalist.

I elaborate, explain why Alphabet shareholders should be concerned by this, and show some new ways cautious bulls can limit their risk.

 
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  1. Thomas says:

    A VPN has been one of my better investments in online security, especially at work.

    • Replies: @anon
  2. anon[102] • Disclaimer says:

    A VPN has been one of my better investments in online security, especially at work

    Could you please explain how one works and how to set it up?

    • Agree: 95Theses
  3. t says:

    OT:

  4. Marty says:

    Also at the Krispy Kreme near the Olympic Club.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  5. Wilkey says:

    Or, Google is ramping up its partisan bias to keep Democrats in Congress from going along with any new laws that would rein it in. Here is a case when increased partisanship may actually be to its benefit.

    If Google weren’t biased at all then it would probably have Republicans in its corner. But since it already is somewhat biased it may be more to its benefit to make that bias more explicit. And of course there are already plenty of slavishly pro-business Republican whores in Congress who won’t vote to limit Google’s power no matter what.

  6. Anonymous[211] • Disclaimer says:

    I wouldn’t sweat it, Steve. It’s not necessarily a bad thing not to be affiliated with Five Guys these days. Five Guys locations in the northeast are gaining notoriety as gay cruising and pickup spots. The food’s good and there’s nothing gay about the restaurants in terms of decor and the like, and AFAIK, there’s nothing gay about the management or ownership, so I’m guessing it started as an inside joke among gays having to do with the name and then they gradually turned into cruising spots. I won’t step foot in a lot of locations. I just do Grubhub when I really want some.

  7. Alfa158 says:

    Alphabet is calling Trump’s bluff. They may have concluded, with justification, that Trump is too weak and ditzy to actually go after his enemies and press an anti-trust case. The risk here is that even if the Democratic Congress and the Republican cucks can slow or thwart anti-trust prosecutions, the financial robustness of these companies is regarded with a jaundiced eye by many investors. They are running a risk that simply initiating the actions, even if they don’t go anywhere, could trigger a bloodbath as the smart money cashes out its chips and heads for the exits. There is something of a gamble going on here that Trump won’t do anything that would trigger a 2008 style Wall Street collapse. Either way, the scorpion can’t resist stinging the frog, even knowing what will happen afterwards.

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
    , @istevefan
    , @Anon
  8. Michael S says:

    I doubt very much that Five Guys had anything to do with it; it’s almost certainly part of some generic “hate speech” filter on whatever crummy wifi service they use.

    Of course, you never know in Clown World. Maybe the franchisee really does have a hate chub for Steve.

  9. steve is like a black lesbian on fire island.

    • LOL: ThreeCranes
  10. Anonymous[679] • Disclaimer says:

    Last time I checked, you’re also blocked at Macy’s in NYC.

  11. Was that the entire “Teasers” page, David, or some individual articles? We need more data. Steve likes data. When I’ve seen this phenomenon, and reported it here, at hotel lobbies, it’s usually some iSteve post-pages and not others. I didn’t see a pattern off-hand.

    Besides, Dave, who needs a burger out in Hackensack? Blogging too hard can give you a heart-attack-ack-ack-ack-ack-ack, you ought to know by now …

    says Anthony

    • LOL: Digital Samizdat
    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
  12. anon[102] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thomas

    A VPN has been one of my better investments in online security, especially at work

    Could you please explain how one works and how to set it up?

  13. Unfortunately, the censorship will help Google in its anti-trust case, not hurt it. The federal bureaucracy wants a internet monopoly to silence critics of the official narrative. If anything, the anti-trust investigation will lead to even more censorship.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  14. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    Thanks for the mention, Steve.

    I don’t think that link goes to the Seeking Alpha article on Google though. Here’s one that does: https://seekingalpha.com/article/4269465-google-may-just-increased-chances-antitrust-action

  15. Anon[252] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    You pay about $5 a month and install some VPN software on your computer or phone, and all traffic is encrypted and passed through a server from the VPN company before going out onto the internet, with return traffic coming back through the VPN.The local Starbucks doesn’t know what you’re doing. You can read e-mail via a webmail service if you want. To the local WIFI you are accessing just one IP address; to the sites you visit you are coming from the VPN server. Rarely, services will research the IP addresses of prominent VPN companies and ban them. This is mostly a problem using Google, which puts you through a captcha before completing your search. Crosswalks, buses, traffic signs, traffic lights, bicycles. You get pretty fast at doing captchas.

    Tor Browser is a different thing, but it also gets through content filters and is a free, slow, high security option.

    Here’s an article from the New York Times that mentions VPNs.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/30/travel/china-tips-visas-vpn-phone.html

    Here’s a recent article from Slate that mentions how mysterious these companies are and looks in to their ownership and security:

    https://slate.com/technology/2019/02/best-vpn-companies-trust-privacy.html

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Known Fact
    , @Lot
    , @El Dato
  16. @Alfa158

    If Google does not play its cards right they will run into issues down the road when they try to launch things like driver-less cars and AI. Without the government’s and public’s cooperation, they will never be able to operate. The Justice can also block future mergers which it probably should anyway.

    The internet is a cash cow but the technological edge they have is fleeting and consumers can change literally at the click of a button. Once it all comes out that they have been spying on our peccadilloes and using the information to overturn democracy they will be the once cut out of the future.

    • Replies: @bomag
  17. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @t

    Zach is great, an anti-Coates.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  18. @anon

    Install the Opera browser, which comes with its own VPN service built in.
    Alternatively, install the Brave browser, which comes with Tor support built in.
    For phone, install Orbot and run your phone in VPN mode.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Almost Missouri
  19. Thomas says:
    @anon

    Could you please explain how one works and how to set it up?

    There are a lot better resources out there than I could offer in this forum. Basically though, the idea is that the VPN is like a middle man for your internet traffic. Traffic is encrypted between you and the VPN, so the local network you’re on can’t tell what you’re doing (and also incidentally can’t selectively block websites they don’t like), and anyone looking at what you’re doing on the far end will see it coming from the VPN, rather than from your actual IP address. A lot of VPN providers claim they don’t log traffic, so they supposedly would have nothing to provide if, say the authorities or a lawyer with a subpoena came calling, though I’m not sure how much I trust those claims (and I assume real secret squirrels like the NSA can do more sophisticated traffic analysis to get around any security a VPN might provide). Both network admins and remote websites can also do things to block (or try to block) VPN traffic. I hear different things from time to time about which VPNs do or don’t work in China at any given moment, for example, and some websites occasionally will block traffic from known VPNs, presumably on the assumption they’re used for abuse (this is much rarer than it used to be a couple of years ago though).

    The most basic way to set it up is you subscribe to one, and then either use their downloaded client on your computer or mobile device, or a third-party client like OpenVPN. I use TorGuard, which accepts Bitcoin, but I also found a lifetime deal on StackSocial for KeepSolid’s VPN Unlimited for $39, which was too good a deal to pass up for a backup.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Anon
  20. Anon[252] • Disclaimer says:

    To Steve: It’s not impossible to get removed from content filters. You contact the company operating the filter (for instance, McDonald’s uses TitanHQ). They may compile their own filters or aggregate others, including some open filters (the toughest to get off of, operated by volunteer zeolots). You find the list or lists you are on and contact them and make your case.

    They will not want to spend much time dealing with you, and someone can send them one quote from your decades of writing that will push them to ban you. So you might make a personal profile page painting a more balanced, favorable picture of your career (published in Pinker book, profile on NYMag, UPI reporter, education, quoted by various named luminaries, not banned on any social network), while admitting that you are controversial, and put that link in any email.

    You could get several viral reported posts or Taki columns out of it, which might make the time spent profitable. “How I Got Unbanned by Five Guys,” or “Starbucks Relies in Part on an Anonymous Content Filter Guy in Romania to Ban Websites, and Boy is He an Asshole,” etc.

    • Replies: @bored identity
  21. Check it out Steve. Monsanto deploying “white supremacy” to smear sustainable agriculture through Woke Commentary.

    “The unbearable whiteness of heirloom tomatoes”

    https://mobile.twitter.com/SarahTaber_bww/status/1138210355837116416

    • Replies: @vinteuil
    , @Lot
  22. anon[102] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thomas

    Thank you very much, Thomas. Do websites allow comments to comment sections through VPNs? Is one able to login to one’s web accounts, such as email, through VPNs?

    What is good about TorGuard?

    • Replies: @Lot
  23. @anon

    VPN comparison site (scroll around a bit, it takes figuring out).

    https://thatoneprivacysite.net

  24. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    From the incomparable, and completely heterosexual, Jim Goad:

    gay hamburgers of portland

    When I was a small boy…and I need to clarify that I was a small heterosexual boy, whereas now I’m a full-blown heterosexual man who enjoys intimate relationships exclusively with women, lest any of you wisenheimers get the wrong idea…but anyway, when I was a small boy, I used to spend lots of time wondering about house pets owned by black people…were the pets black, too?

  25. anon[102] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Thank you, Anon!

    Aren’t you worried that a VPN company is just a front to capture all your personal information (name, passwords, SSN) or other communications (dissident thought) and store them for some nefarious future use?

    How strongly would you recommend to people they they use VPNs or “Tor Browser”?

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    , @Anon
  26. istevefan says:
    @Alfa158

    They are running out the clock. It takes quite a while to do these investigations, and in 17 months we will know who the next president will be. Right now I don’t see how Trump’s Justice Department can do all it needs to do between now and election time. They should be working on raiding employers who hire illegals. They should be working on punishing the deep state participants who tried to stage a coup. I don’t see how they do all that, and go after Google over the next 17 months.

    Of course Trump could win in 2020, but I still consider that less than a 50-50 chance. I am not saying his odds are as bad as they were in 2016, but I think the election is the democrats to lose.

    PS. Trump sometimes retweets this guy who is one of the biggest cheerleaders around. I fear Trump might mistake support like this for actual support among the people who put him over the top. While Ann Coulter got the cold shoulder for continuing to remind Trump about his number one campaign promise, this guy seems to think we’re winning:

  27. @Anon

    I’ve been hearing Norton advertise its vpn on Limbaugh, so that seems pretty mainstream

  28. JimB says:

    Well, iSteve isn’t blocked at In-n-Out which usually gets two more stars than Five Guy’s on Yelp. Maybe the rating difference is due to irate Steve Sailer fans.

  29. istevefan says:

    At my local Sam’s Club I sometimes stop to check out the PCs on display. Often I before I leave I open a browser and pull up Steve’s blog. So far it’s always come up. I’ve wondered if I have ever turned anyone on to this blog.

    • Replies: @PJ101
  30. Steve, you’re also blocked at Home Depot via AT&T. As of ~March this year.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
  31. @Dave Pinsen

    “Blue-on-white” is a better issue than “black-on-white” for exposing censorship.

    When two or three black thugs torture and murder a young white couple, the press has a perfectly valid excuse for sitting on the story: it really isn’t news. It happens every night of the week in every city in America.

    At least that’s what they imply. We should hammer that point home, not whine about being silenced.

    And it’s not just race. The (somewhat questionable) Matthew Shepard story got hundreds of times the ink as did Jesse Dirkhising’s murder. Because the latter was dog-bites-man.

    Heck, Gary Trzaska’s murder in Buffalo on the same night as Shepard’s got a microscopic amount of coverage in comparison. Five black teens beat a white queer to death? That’s just another Friday night in Buffalo.

    And Cleveland. And Detroit. And Chicago. And St Louis. And Kansas City. And Memphis. And Little Rock. And Shreveport…

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  32. Lot says:
    @Anon

    Seems like blocking iSteve is a Metro NY thing. Never happened to me in California.

  33. @istevefan

    Today, Botswana decriminalized homosexuality

    The white man’s voodoo poison spreads.

  34. Lot says:
    @istevefan

    “They should be working on raiding employers who hire illegals.”

    Here and there I agree, the current complete impunity illegal employers have is a problem.

    But I prefer maximum impact. That means not dealing with the expense of federal criminal prosecutions, nor even too much on employed illegals who can hire a lawyer.

    Of the roughly 12 million US illegals, about 1 million have a current, valid deportation order. They normally can be removed from the USA quickly and easily as soon as they are located. Trump has increased the anemic Obama pace of these deportations, but can do a lot more.

    The other thing I want him to do, and he should have done already, is roll out the big executive policy changes. Scale back birthright citizenship, order the military to build border fences, and refuse to process any further new asylum applications unless they are done outside of the USA. Also stop all work permits for any reason to illegals. Right now illegals can join the legal US labor force under a number of programs fully controlled by the executive branch. Further, a travel ban should extend to every African nation that is not controlling its migrants or who have a history of sending fake tourists who disappear here on tourist visas.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  35. @Anon

    Wouldn’t be easier for y’all of us to simply put a permanent filter on any of Five Guys that find Uncle Sailer’s writing not worthy of being served along with this:

    or that :

    http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1905549_1905546_1905455,00.html

    Anyway, bored identity’s health-of-the-nation-conscious diet consists exclusively of three servings of My Pillow a day.

    Yes, it’s pricey – but it’s also soy-free and Made in USA.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    , @Olorin
    , @Alden
  36. Lot says:
    @anon

    “Do websites allow comments to comment sections through VPNs?”

    Normally they do. Unz.com will.

    Some sites will find VPN IPs suspicious and block access or block comments. They may also require captchas more.

    “Is one able to login to one’s web accounts, such as email, through VPNs?”

    Yes. Again, a few sites might flag a vpn user as suspicious, but this would be at worst a small problem. And you can just turn off the VPN to do email or access a site that doesn’t like it.

    “What is good about TorGuard?”

    Never heard of it, but it’s a bad sign to use the name of an open source software/protocol in a for-profit commercial enterprise. Distasteful like “Kennedy Fried Chicken” even if not illegal.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Thomas
  37. anon[199] • Disclaimer says:
    @Matthew Kelly

    Thank you, Mr. Kelly. Does using a VPN or Tor Browser limit you in any significant way compared to regular use of the Internet? For example, are you still able to login to your accounts (email, bank, etc.)? Can you post comments to comment sections anonymously?

  38. anon[199] • Disclaimer says:
    @istevefan

    Of course Trump could win in 2020, but I still consider that less than a 50-50 chance. I am not saying his odds are as bad as they were in 2016, but I think the election is the democrats to lose.

    What is the reasoning behind that assessment?

    President Trump’s global push to decriminalize homosexuality is achieving results across the world

    Isn’t this a wise political move? Few costs, withpotential gains in vote differential?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  39. anon[199] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    Thank you, Lot!

    Some sites will find VPN IPs suspicious and block access or block comments. They may also require captchas more.

    When you hear about a commenter on a site or a Twitter account user being “IP banned”, supposing that commenter or user was using a VPN, how are the sites able to do that without also banning all the other people who use that VPN? Isn’t each VPN assigned an IP address, and so all its customers use that IP address?

    • Replies: @Lot
  40. neir says:

    I’m pretty sure most companies uses third party filter like McAfee Safe Family. Do you really think a hamburger joint would spend resources to manually block websites.

    • Replies: @Cowboy shaw
  41. Anon[129] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alfa158

    Google employees, who mainly live in liberal enclaves on the coasts, really think conservatives are just a few people out there posting on the internet who are influencing a huge mass of weak-minded silly centrists, and that if you block conservatives and make them vanish, all the centrists will suddenly become die-hard leftists.

    Yeah, right.

  42. Clyde says:
    @bored identity

    The only things useful at Five Guys are their fresh hot french fries and free peanuts in the shell.

  43. vinteuil says:
    @Jack Hanson

    Wow, this Sarah Taber person is a real prize.

  44. PJ101 says:
    @istevefan

    Yeah, a young guy who skipped college because he found peddling boilerplate conservative politics to be such a lucrative gig.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/03/the-21-year-old-becoming-a-major-player-in-conservative-politics/451110/

  45. Pericles says:
    @istevefan

    Today, Botswana decriminalized homosexuality

    President Trump’s global push to decriminalize homosexuality is achieving results across the world

    It’s not called Globohomo for nothing.

    “The national HIV prevalence rate among adults ages 15 to 49 [in Botswana] is 24.8 percent, which is the third highest in the world, behind Lesotho and Swaziland.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HIV/AIDS_in_Botswana

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Alden
  46. PJ101 says:
    @istevefan

    At my local Sam’s Club I sometimes stop to check out the PCs on display. Often I before I leave I open a browser and pull up Steve’s blog. So far it’s always come up. I’ve wondered if I have ever turned anyone on to this blog

    A gutsier move would be to open a Ron Unz American Pravda piece and leave it on there.

  47. eah says:

    Things could be worse — and probably will get worse.

  48. @anon

    Your mileage may vary, you’ll have to test this. Also, VPNs help against corporate snooping (if you’re knowledgeable and very careful, else there’s less protection) but NSA etc. probably can crack it, at least partially. If your life depends on something or you risk jail time rather don’t do things online.

    • Replies: @anon
  49. eah says:

    Last week, its YouTube unit demonetized numerous conservative channels, apparently after being bullied into doing so by one journalist.

    Sure, “one journalist” — the ADL and other Jewish organizations are and have been the ones pushing hardest for censorship — the one homo journalist was just a convenient pretext to deflect blame.

    Assuming the action against GOOG moves forward, it will be interesting to compare the language GOOG uses to defend their censorship campaign against ‘hate’ to the language the Supreme Court used to uphold racial discrimination affirmative action in Grutter v. Bollinger.

    • Replies: @eah
    , @Mishima Zaibatsu
  50. This is the case in the UK too: Steve is blocked in some of the BT wifis (can’t recall which – I think it’s Costa coffee) but you can access the main site. I might check 5 guys today.

  51. @Reg Cæsar

    If the media reported black-on-white crime, do you know how many Leonard Pitts columns that would trigger? We don’t need more fodder for TD.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  52. Lot says:
    @anon

    The VPNs have ranges of IP addresses that are rotated between users. So you may be banned based on another user’s behavior.

    I’m sure you can get a deluxe account with some VPNs that give you your own permanent IP address for a lot more money.

  53. @neir

    Yeah they must share the same list and someone has it in for Steve. Probably an aggressive high T tranny puts together this for macaffee, and the providers use that.

    • Replies: @kikz
  54. Lot says:
    @anon

    Tor is absurdly slow the couple times I tried using it.

    Remember 1997 dial up? Slower than that.

  55. @Marty

    Probably no one at Krispy Kreme nor at Five Guys ever heard of iSteve. More likely they (and PF Chang’s) simply all use the same NetNanny-type service.

  56. Olorin says:
    @bored identity

    Apart from their workers never once getting the whole party’s order right in my experiences at several locales….

    Their burgers are a squishy mess and not particularly flavorful. The buns disintegrate when exposed to moisture.

    Their fries …well I’m not big on fried stuff, but Big Ag potatoes are, iirc, second only to cottonseed for amounts and numbers of ag chemicals applied at every stage of soil prep, planting, growing, harvesting/post harvest, and storage.

    We make much better ones at home. I.e. both burgers and potatoes.

    • Replies: @Alden
  57. Lot says:
    @Jack Hanson

    Monsanto is now owned by Bayer.

    Kind of sad from an investment perspective, the well-run US based leader in agri-tech and some
    small but profitable niches like speciality fertilizers now chained to a bloated German conglomerate.

    I threw an heirloom tomato that got moldy into my yard last year, now there are several plants from it with attractive irregular tomatoes. Half have worms, the other half are tasty.

    I wish I knew a better name for this type, “heirloom” sounds too precious.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    , @Anonymous
  58. @t

    “In sum, white men shot dead at the hands of police don’t generate enough ‘clicks’ to be worth covering.”

    I think once the bodycam footage came out, the police slaughter of Daniel Shaver story did generate a fair amount of public interest. (Recall that it was the girlfriend’s video of Castile bleeding out that was the vehicle for mass hysteria in what otherwise would have been a he-said-she-said text story.)

    The NYT et al. declining to cover Daniel Shaver is an active, not a reactive decision. There is a chicken and egg dynamic, or “Megaphonics” as Steve calls it. By not promoting the story (in particular by not inserting it into their Opinion piece outrage machine) the story doesn’t generate buzz. By promoting a story, the story does generate buzz. So the “newsworthiness” of these events is still fairly self-fulfilling, and it is not really accurate to say that “white men shot dead” “don’t generate enough ‘clicks’”. They could, if the Megaphone holders chose to promote it.

    Anyhow, most of these papers abandoned the profit motive long ago and are now run by ideologues backed by billionaires, so they don’t really care what the public is interested in.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    , @Alec Leamas
  59. Bill B. says:
    @t

    How come that policeman has as many tattoos as a gang member? Do the police have gangs?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  60. @Anonymous

    “Five Guys locations in the northeast are gaining notoriety as gay cruising and pickup spots”

    Oh crap. That explains why some rando took unsolicited interest in my presence there the other day.

    The things I learn on iSteve.

    Oh well, that was my last burger there then.

  61. @Matthew Kelly

    Last I heard, Opera is now owned by a Chinese “cyber-security” firm, so you can assume that the ChiComs will eventually get your browsing history. OTOH hand, I’d rather they spy on me than the Feds, but the Feds have other methods and probably don’t need to buy an obscure browser shop to see what everyone’s doing.

  62. @Lot

    All your policy recommendations are spot on.

    Trump will do none of them.

  63. @Bill B.

    There is an investigation going on in the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department to determine whether this one tattoo that keeps showing up on its deputies indicates that they belong to a “club” (as the deputies claim) or a “gang’ (as others suspect).

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
  64. Hail says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    gaining notoriety as gay cruising and pickup spots

    Haven’t they just been outsourcing this labor, by the mid-late 2010s and presumably into the 2020s, to the gay “dating” app(s)?

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
  65. Hail says: • Website
    @istevefan

    Honest Q. Is Charlie Kirk gay?

  66. @Almost Missouri

    Anyhow, most of these papers abandoned the profit motive long ago and are now run by ideologues backed by billionaires, so they don’t really care what the public is interested in.

    I feel like I’ve been waiting forever for someone to notice this.

    Minor quibble: oh, they do care, which is why they expend so much effort in manipulation.

    • Agree: Triumph104
  67. @Chief Seattle

    Home Depot, huh? What were you doing there? Looking for some wetbacks to paint your house?

  68. @Hail

    That was my first thought.

    My second was, “How much pedo?”

  69. kikz says:
    @Cowboy shaw

    speakin of macafee, saw something fly by somewhere.. macafee was ranting…. he’d bring down the gov..????? he’s an odd duck….

  70. @Lot

    Tomatoes were always difficult to grow in low desert, but moving to grassland/valley type biome I’ve got tomatoes coming out of my ears.

    The Cherokee Purples grow really well here.

  71. One thing that does impress me is how Larry Page is able to keep such a low profile. Make no mistake, the buck stops with him at Google, no less than it does with Bezos or Zuckerberg at their companies. Yet you hear next to nothing about him. That Indian guy may take most of the the heat when it comes to questions about Google’s left-leaning bias, but there can be no doubt that ((Page)) is behind all of it.

  72. Steve

    Isteve still comes in loud and clear by the little Windmill on the Dock…..

  73. @anon

    Yes, this is a good point. With a VPN, you are entrusting even more personal information to someone you don’t know.

    Under normal circumstances, your browsing can be read by your ISP (internet service provider). A VPN cuts the ISP out of the loop but cuts the VPN in, and now with more personal information (your credit card number, which to be fair, the ISP may also have) and opaque, proprietary software installed on your computer. ISPs also often try to get you to install such software on your computer too so they can better spy on you, but you can just skip it. With a VPN, you need that software for the VPN to work.

    If you are using the Chrome browser (aka Google spyware), Google’s already spying on you at the source, and a VPN won’t shield anything from them. Indeed, since Google knows the source and destination of your browsing, it effectively invalidates the VPN, as far as Google is concerned. The same goes for other social apps, e.g., Facebook. (Note I said “app”, not just browsing a Google or Facebook page in a secure browser. They will still try to vacuum up all the data they can from your browser visit, but without source-side software, they are much more constrained.)

    Also note that pretty much any computer made since 2008 has at least two additional operating systems you probably don’t know about (Management Engine and UEFI) which start before and stop after the operating system you think you are using. Most NSA-tier hacks probably happen here and VPNs will do nothing against it.

    All that said, a VPN with a good reputation may still be worthwhile. Anyone with a subpoena (only slightly harder to get than a ham sandwich) can go to your ISP and get your full browsing history. With a VPN, the ISP will have nothing but the VPN’s URL to hand over. This will of course tell the subpoena holder that he needs to serve it on the VPN instead, which he will then do. The VPN will comply and hand over all of your browsing history they have, which at a good VPN should be no more than the last few seconds worth, at most.

    So yeah, if you anticipate ever being in a lawsuit, you should probably get a VPN. If you think doxxers are after you, you should probably get a VPN and quit Chrome. If you think the NSA is after, you should quit the internet and the airwaves, retire to a villa in Abbottabad.

  74. @Almost Missouri

    The NYT et al. declining to cover Daniel Shaver is an active, not a reactive decision. There is a chicken and egg dynamic, or “Megaphonics” as Steve calls it. By not promoting the story (in particular by not inserting it into their Opinion piece outrage machine) the story doesn’t generate buzz. By promoting a story, the story does generate buzz. So the “newsworthiness” of these events is still fairly self-fulfilling, and it is not really accurate to say that “white men shot dead” “don’t generate enough ‘clicks’”. They could, if the Megaphone holders chose to promote it.

    If it came to be known that Police make mistakes of judgment in high intensity situations involving suspects of all colors including white men, it would be much more difficult to maintain the narrative and political mobilization useful for fringe coalition politics.

    I don’t think it’s much more complicated than curating the information that forms the daily news cycle in such a way as to conform to their politics and worldview.

  75. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    Just the opposite happened. Bayer now at threat of bankruptcy from massive litigation and settlements, liabilities against Monsanto. Being described as the worst acquisition in history which is a vast group of calamities.

    Irony is the merger attempts nearly failed repeatedly and took more than two years before ultimately finalized.

    Careful what you wish and pay for.

  76. @Hail

    Haven’t they just been outsourcing this labor, by the mid-late 2010s and presumably into the 2020s, to the gay “dating” app(s)?

    My friend’s father and brother are LEOs in suburban New Jersey and from their anecdotes the answer is a decided NO.

    Gays pick a spot for cruising that is less than conspicuous and some have theorized that the fact that they are transgressing social boundaries is part of the turn on for them. One spot that was popular for a while that the cops busted was a certain department store’s rest room in a mall. With the social attitudes in this part of New Jersey and the easy availability of discrete short term venues and apps to arrange assignations they could be having anonymous gay sex with little or no legal jeopardy but they just can’t seem to manage it. Those busted included a surprising proportion of men with families and a decent station in life.

  77. @Anonymous

    All the Five Guys around here mysteriously went out of business.

  78. @Steve Sailer

    Good thing LA isn’t approaching Third World status while its investigative apparatuses waste time on shit like this.

  79. @Hail

    The new kids are playing Ds are the real homophobes for some reason.

  80. jim jones says:
    @Almost Missouri

    I chose Private Internet Access for my VPN because their privacy claims have been tested in the Courts:

    https://torrentfreak.com/private-internet-access-no-logging-claims-proven-true-again-in-court-180606/

  81. @anon

    No, it is wise in no sense whatsoever.

    • Replies: @anon
  82. Anon[252] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    VPNs are useful if you live overseas, like me, or if you access via an insecure node like a Starbucks. From your home or office it might not be as useful.

    VPNs probably keep server logs, even ones that claim not to.

    It’s a tradeoff between a VPN somewhere overseas logging your internet use versus your own local internet provider logging it.

    Also, there is a superficial obfuscation on the other side: sites I visit know the VPN IP address, and they may be able to know that it is a VPN, but they don’t know my actual IP address.

    The government and the spooks can the information in various ways, at least for servers in their country.

    If you tunnel Tor Browser via a VPN, which means to start the VPN, then launch Tor, your local ISP just sees a VPN, but not what you’re doing, and the VPN just sees that you are using Tor, but not what you’re doing. Sites you visit see someone from Tor, although if you log in they know it’s you.

    Tor sends you through a triple encrypted three-server onion system, unwrapping a piece at a time, with servers all over the world. Tor slows you down, and some sites block Tor users. I think it’s a good idea to use it on principle for at least part of the day. Use it or lose it. Make it harder for legislators to outlaw it by making it popular. I read the newspaper with it, and then just continue with it until it gets too slow or is blocked, then I switch to VPN.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Lot
  83. istevefan says:
    @Hail

    I wondered about that when he appeared to be Candace Owen’s boyfriend. Perhaps now he is thinking about scheduling his next vacation in Botswana.

  84. anon[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Desiderius

    No, it is wise in no sense whatsoever.

    It makes President Trump more appealing (or less unappealing) to gays and liberals. That is wise.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  85. @anon

    For what is worth, I am finishing my PhD in computer science. I think there is a lot of misinformation and confusion on this thread.

    This is how a VPN works. Let’s say you want to connect to wwww.facebook.com

    Without VPN: Your computer –> ISP –> http://www.facebook.com

    With VPN: Your computer –> ISP –> VPN –> http://www.facebook.com

    What are the advantages?
    – Your ISP (Internet Provider) doesn’t know what websites or game servers or services you use.
    – If you sometimes use unprotected HTTP websites (instead of HTTPS), then the VPN software will encrypt your data so that your ISP cannot read it. If you already use HTTPS websites, then it doesn’t matter, you’re already protected from your ISP or other middlemen.

    What are the disadvantages?
    – It’s slower.
    – Your VPN now knows what websites or game servers or services you use. But if your VPN is in another country, then it’s much harder for police to get a subpoena.
    – Your browser, operating system or mobile phone will know everything you do. It doesn’t matter if you use a VPN or not. It’s impossible to work-around this fact. You need to use an operating system and browser that has a good reputation.
    – The website you use (e.g. facebook) will obviously know how many times you visit it and etc. VPN does *not* make you anonymous. If there is a login, then the website will know everything you do *within* the website, it doesn’t matter if you use a VPN or not. Also, even if there is not a login, if you don’t disable cookies, the website will also how many times you come to the website and what you do.

  86. @Desiderius

    All the Five Guys around here mysteriously went out of business.

    If all 5 of them were the pay-for-sex homos who hang out at the burger joint, it’s a good thing. You can get a greasy burger and a shake, and surf a portion of iSteve in peace now.

  87. @Almost Missouri

    That’s great generally-useful stuff, A.M., and written well. I’d like to post this on Peak Stupidity when I get more into the iEspionage posting. OK with you?

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  88. @Desiderius

    All the Five Guys around here mysteriously went out of business.

    It’s difficult to get the franchise thing right, and many franchisors are eager to collect a franchise fee and less concerned about the franchisee failing in any particular case (see the practice of “churning”). Miscalculation about the acceptable store location resulting in too-high overhead is a big problem. I’m not saying this about Five Guys specifically but about the franchise businesses generally. I’ve seen loads of comfortable middle class people cash the equity out of their homes, quit a decent and well-paying if otherwise unsatisfying job, and decide to “be my own boss” with disastrous results. Lots of foreclosures and Bankruptcies 18-24 months after the big idea, resultant divorces and so forth.

    I think it’s also been the case that the hamburger market has diversified a lot lately in response to the new premium hamburger craze initiated by outlets like Five Guys, with lots of restaurants from fast food outlets to national chains to local and upscale restaurants offering their version of a premium hamburger at all price points. If you want a burger fast you can go to the drive thru joints, if you want your burger served with a draft beer you can go to a Chilis or Applebees or a million others similar, if you want an upscale burger there is probably a restaurant within range that will serve you that. The niche for Five Guys between all of these overlapping options may just be too small in most places to draw consistent business in order to sustain the store for the long term.

    After all, making a good burger isn’t a grand culinary mystery so you’d have to ask why you’d really need to pay a franchise fee, restrict your venue choices, purchase your marked-up supplies, and pay an immediate point-of-sale fee on every burger and order of fries even when your store is in the red in order to make a living selling hamburgers.

    • Agree: Triumph104
    • Replies: @Desiderius
  89. El Dato says:

    I elaborate, explain why Alphabet shareholders should be concerned by this, and show some new ways cautious bulls can limit their risk.

    Hopefully after the Big West Coast Earthquake, the problem will self-resolve.

    Meanwhile in the Zauberberg – I mean, Zuckerberg – imperium, we have incoming news about the completely useless and economic rationale-less “Pinterest” thing:

    Pro-life group kicked off Pinterest for ‘misinformation’ after flagged as porn site

    Just hours before the ban, conservative media activist James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas published an exposé revealing that Pinterest had taken steps to censor the pro-life group. In February, the platform deliberately added Live Action’s website to a pornography ban list, restricting users’ ability to share the site in their posts (or ‘pins’), according to an employee at Pinterest who requested not to be named.

    “LiveAction.org was added to a porn block list,” the employee said. “That means that if you try to make a pin that links to Liveaction.org, you won’t be allowed to – it won’t be created.”

    The pro-life group’s site was not the only one wrongly added to the porn filter, the employee said. Documents he provided to Project Veritas reveal right-of-center website PJ Media also made the list.

    The employee, according to O’Keefe, was fired from Pinterest later on Tuesday afternoon, after the exposé made waves online.

    So long then, based reality winner.

    • Replies: @95Theses
  90. @Redneck farmer

    If the papers reported black-on-white crime, environmentalists would be up in arms about deforestation.

  91. Take comfort – the last time I gave Chick-fil-et another chance, you’d been de-blacklisted by them (or their contracted cyber-nanny).

  92. @Desiderius

    All the Five Guys around here mysteriously went out of business.

    With that name, you do have to wonder about the source of their meat. Gerber had to take their baby logo off their products in Africa and replace it with pictures of the food inside.

    St Paul used to have a Pizza Hut one door down from Planned Parenthood. I was afraid to ask about toppings.

  93. providing this service as a courtesy to guests and customers

    This is newspeak for “you better not complain, or else we won’t let you access the internet at all”

  94. anon[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Thank you, AM.

    If you are using the Chrome browser (aka Google spyware), Google’s already spying on you at the source, and a VPN won’t shield anything from them. Indeed, since Google knows the source and destination of your browsing, it effectively invalidates the VPN, as far as Google is concerned.

    Does this mean that someone with a subpoena could just subpoena Google, rather than a VPN, for a VPN user’s web activity if the VPN user was using Chrome?

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  95. @Alec Leamas

    suburban New Jersey … Gays pick a spot for cruising that is less than conspicuous

    As Dave Pinsen could surely tell you, a popular spot for that sort of thing is the Vince Lombardi Service Area, which is the last one on the New Jersey Turnpike.

  96. anon[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @theo the kraut

    (if you’re knowledgeable and very careful, else there’s less protection)

    Thank you for your post. What sort of cautionary steps need to be taken?

    If your life depends on something or you risk jail time rather don’t do things online.

    In this day and age, isn’t engaging in dissenting thought and speech–I am not referring to criminal activity or violence–a risk to one’s livelihood, and possibly to one’s life?

  97. @istevefan

    Odd that you can have so much power inside the borders of a far away backwards nation and so little on the southern border of your own. I’m not concerned with the gay Botswanans in Botswana, I’m concerned about the Botswanans (and all Africans except White South Africans) entering the US, whether legally or illegally.

    And Charlie Kirk is an idiot, still seeking the lefties’ approval. They want to KILL you, Charlie, accept that.

  98. @Alec Leamas

    I used to live near a municipal park in a medium size midwestern town. The park was a pickup site for queer stranger sex. The “code” for being available for a hook-up was backing into a parking space (!). I guess the city wasn’t up for or had no legal basis to roust the gays out of the park, so they required, by city ordinance, the parking equivalent of the missionary position.

  99. @Almost Missouri

    Sorry if these questions were answered elsewhere, but what browser would you recommend in place of Chrome? Also is there a specific VPN you’d recommend?

  100. 95Theses says:
    @t

    Think Like A Cop did a blow-by-blow on that video after it was released to the public, and he didn’t mince words in his criticism of how those cops handled (or rather mishandled) this unnecessary tragedy.

    When I posted it on what I thought was a conservative Disqus forum, I caught heck for being “anti-cop”. Bruh-ther!

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  101. anon[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Thank you, Anon.

    What is the signicance of this observation? And what is the significance of knowing one’s “actual IP address”?

    Also, there is a superficial obfuscation on the other side: sites I visit know the VPN IP address, and they may be able to know that it is a VPN, but they don’t know my actual IP address.

  102. El Dato says:
    @Anon

    You pay about $5 a month and install some VPN software on your computer or phone, and all traffic is encrypted and passed through a server from the VPN company before going out onto the internet, with return traffic coming back through the VPN.

    I recommend against that. There is at least one company offering VPN software which looks extremely suspicious, can’t remember the name now.

    Unless you want to contact your company’s internal network from the public Internet or some other untrusted point, you really don’t need full VPN.

    When browsing, using HTTPS and secure DNS (DNS over HTTPS, which is still newfangled). That should be good enough. After all, HTTPS *is* basically a VPN between the browser and the remote web server. Make sure you do not have compromised “root certificates” in the trust store of the browser (cough Symantec cough Comodo) as these can be used to open up the encrypted connection by a Man in the Middle. Modern browser should be correctly configured in that regard.

  103. 95Theses says:
    @El Dato

    Outstanding video and story. Completely unsurprising, but no less irritating. James O’Keefe is a national treasure.

    Thanks for posting this.

  104. @Sextus Empiricus

    LOL, “Head in parking only”

    Are they sure that’s what they meant?

  105. @Sextus Empiricus

    I always thought that people who backed into parking spaces were obnoxious pains in the asses, but I didn’t mean it literally…

  106. @William Badwhite

    I usually use the Brave browser and PIA as my VPN. They work well for me. Because Brave uses the same engine as Google’s Chrome, it helps you get lost in the crowd. You can also spoof what operating system you’re running by using a “user agent switcher” plugin.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  107. Lot says:
    @Anon

    “VPNs probably keep server logs, even ones that claim not to.”

    Why would they do that? It is extra work, bad for business, requires they lie to customers, invites subpoenas.

    Maybe the CIA visits the owners and tells them they really should so it anyway. But there are so many of them, and they require little skill or capital to set up, I think they are mostly honest on this point.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  108. @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, but Dave can pay Uncle Sam with the overtime.

  109. @Lot

    Yes, tech nerds are gossips and purists so it would be very hard for a VPN to keep its staff from snitching on them if they lied about their service. Being the hacker who proves one of the big VPN providers is lying is like being the guy who won a Super Bowl ring.

  110. Thomas says:
    @Lot

    “What is good about TorGuard?”

    Never heard of it, but it’s a bad sign to use the name of an open source software/protocol in a for-profit commercial enterprise. Distasteful like “Kennedy Fried Chicken” even if not illegal.

    I think their marketing people say it refers to BitTorrenting, which is sort of their target market. Obviously I don’t think they mind the potential for confusion with Tor.

  111. Thomas says:
    @William Badwhite

    Sorry if these questions were answered elsewhere, but what browser would you recommend in place of Chrome?

    Brave is a decent, privacy-focused browser that forks a lot of Chrome’s code. Its dev is also run by Brendan Eich, who invented JavaScript and founded Mozilla before he was hounded out for donating to California’s Proposition 8 (which opposed homosexual marriage). In case you wanted to support an early victim of the Wokocaust.

  112. Thomas says:
    @Almost Missouri

    With a VPN, you need that software for the VPN to work.

    Not necessarily. Get a VPN that uses OpenVPN.

  113. @anon

    They’re never gonna vote for him anyway. To them, voting isn’t a rational calculation; it’s a fashion accessory. And Trump is not fabulous!

    Meanwhile it drains what little vestigial enthusiasm is left for Trump from his base.

    • Agree: Corn
    • Replies: @anon
  114. @anon

    Yes, which raises the question of why we don’t see headlines like “Divorce Lawyers Now Subpoena Google History”. I believe the answer was provided by a commenter here last year: Google just ignores civil subpoenas. Not because of any privacy principle, hahaha no, but just because it is an all-cost-no-revenue activity for them. They have better things to do with their time and money than comply with court orders from little people. But isn’t it illegal to ignore subpoenas? Why yes it is. But Google is big and has powerful friends. Also Google does respond to criminal subpoenas, which keeps law enforcement happy enough, so they let ’em slide on the civil stuff.

    Still, one day Google might get religion and allow your particular Google history to be subpoenaed. Particularly if you happen to be a crusading anti-surveillance-state Congressman, for example…

  115. @William Badwhite

    I second Brave for the reasons Thomas outlined.

    If Mozilla ever vomits out the severe SJW infection it has contracted, then Firefox may become viable again. (Also it would be nice if it got less bloated and lumbering.)

    You can use Opera if you don’t mind the Chinese reading your browsing history. At least they’re unlikely to share with the Feds or Mossad. Lol.

  116. @William Badwhite

    I don’t have any VPN recommendation other than to use one that has shown it will respond to subpoenas with empty hands. I believe most of the big ones have passed this test.

    Thomas recommends using something using OpenVPN, but I don’t know how that works. Maybe he can explain.

    I like the ethnonationalist overtone of NordVPN, but maybe its a Fed traphouse. Lol.

    Avoid anything with “Pizza”, “chicken lover” or rainbows or knotted handkerchiefs in the title or promotional material.

    • Replies: @Thomas
  117. @Desiderius

    You’ve got White Castle. How can anyone compete with that?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @ScarletNumber
  118. anon[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Almost Missouri

    They’re never gonna vote for him anyway.

    Some may. Others may stay home. Both are beneficial.

    I don’t think his supporters care much about this one way or the other. It’s what he isn’t getting done in key areas that is demoralizing them, and creating the need for him to shore up his support by appealing to other factions, such as in this instance.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  119. imblocked says:

    I’m blocked by Ron Unz under other emails other than this one though i’m not sure this will even go through so welcome to the club Steve Sailer all because I said John Derbyshire transcribing all of his Radio Derb Podcasts going back to his beginning neo-con days was a waste of time. Keep throwing those stones from your ivory towers. I guess this minor slight gets you banned from Unz.com the bastion of free speech.

    • Replies: @Ragno
  120. @anon

    Or he could just, you know, do the stuff he campaigned on and got elected for.

    • Replies: @anon
  121. anon[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Or he could just, you know, do the stuff he campaigned on and got elected for.

    Recruiting more supporters and deflating the opposition are conducive to achieving the stuff he campaigned on. He badly needs more net support. I do not imagine that the posture toward Botswana/rest of world on homosexuality has taken much time or energy.

    This seems like a reasonable cost-benefit strategy.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  122. @anon

    It’s moot anyway, that’s Trump’s play and that of his generation. It could make progtards look even more unreasonable to regular people if they run on Orange Man Hates Gays. Human Events thinks they have a winner with Ds are the real homophobes. Whatever. Shit never works as advertised, makes Rs look (rightfully) weak.

    Hawley is the new alternative but that won’t be coming to fruition for awhile.

  123. @Intelligent Dasein

    Good one.

    Thank God Whitey Casales’ is now in my rearview mirror.

  124. Anon[419] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thomas

    In China in May. Express vpn worked well.

  125. @95Theses

    That’s big C Conservatives for you. This site isn’t alt-Right because the isn’t Right, not because it isn’t alt-.

  126. @anon

    When has it not been? Grown men can navigate the risks relative to our duties and/or opportunities.

    • Replies: @anon
  127. anon[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Desiderius

    Grown men can navigate the risks relative to our duties and/or opportunities.

    In other words, grown men are selfish and cowardly, go along to get along, looking out for Number One and the easy dollar, to hell with the country and our posterity. Yeah, we knew that already. Did you have anything to actually contribute?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  128. Codey says:
    @anon

    Totally agree on this one. I have also invested in a good and trustworthy VPN – NordVPN. My company is small, only 5 workers, however, it is enough, as you can have up to 6 simultaneous connections. I managed to set it up no our router by myself and using it is a rule number one at our workplace. I signed to a 3-year plan with a discount, so I pay 2,60 per month, not that expensive for being calm and safe I guess. I got it here https://nordvpn.com/coupon/deal/?coupon=salenord>

  129. @eah

    I don’t comment enough to be permitted ‘Agree/Disagree’ so I will register my agreement here.

    No way could this massive ban have been rolled out within a matter of 24 hours without at least weeks of planning and preparation beforehand, and it is revealing the number of accounts which talk about ww2, holodomor, 9/11 etc I hear have been banned.

    • Agree: eah
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @eah
  130. @anon

    No, those who do those things never achieved full manhood, which is the problem.

  131. @Alec Leamas

    I didn’t go much because I’m generally shooting for healthier. Guess I could have cut the bun but that kind of defeats the purpose.

  132. @Cagey Beast

    Thank you, also thanks to Cagey Beast and Thomas

  133. @anon

    > What sort of cautionary steps need to be taken?

    Here’s some tips that are by no means exhausting:
    https://thebestvpn.com/safe-internet-browsing

    If you aren’t a programmer or knowledgeable about networking it’s difficult. If you just want to avoid being tracked by big corporations using the brave browser (https://brave.com/) is a good starting point. Its CEO is Brendan Eich, who got sacked by Mozilla/Firefox (which he had founded) for supporting California Proposition 8. (he got doxxed) Turning off JavaScript is helpful, but it breaks many sites, so sometimes you have to activate it or do without those sites completely.

  134. EdwardM says:
    @t

    His mistake was staying in LaQuinta Inn. The cops probably figured it was a hotel for blacks.

  135. Anonymous[363] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mishima Zaibatsu

    Yes, of course. You also saw this with the purge that followed the Charlottesville riot. It was just a pretext to carry out something that had been planned beforehand.

  136. eah says:
    @Mishima Zaibatsu

  137. Ragno says:
    @imblocked

    Three cheers for Ron Unz!

  138. Thomas says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Thomas recommends using something using OpenVPN, but I don’t know how that works. Maybe he can explain.

    OpenVPN is an open-source VPN protocol (as the name implies). You can get it for Windows, Mac (using either Private Tunnel or else an app called Tunnelblick), or iOS, or build from source (those are the platforms I have experience with it). Once you have it up and running, assuming you have a subscription to a VPN compatible with it, it mostly works by loading .OVPN config files into it that point it at various VPN servers.

  139. bomag says:
    @Prof. Woland

    Once it all comes out that they have been spying on our peccadilloes and using the information to overturn democracy they will be at once cut out of the future.

    Naa. The populace is pretty well zombiefied. There’ll just be a blip of discontent.

  140. @Intelligent Dasein

    There is a White Castle in Hackensack, but sadly it is on the other side of the city from Five Guys.

  141. Alden says:
    @Pericles

    So Botswana legalized the reality that its already a gay country. Do the Botswanans even know that gay male anal sex causes AIDS? As long as they keep it in Africa.

  142. Alden says:
    @Olorin

    Why do restaurants insist on putting a nasty salad and slimy sauces on hamburgers?

  143. Alden says:
    @bored identity

    Looks like a half an ounce of meat hiding under a salad.

  144. Anonymous[156] • Disclaimer says:

    What if you use https?

    If you use https, it can only tell that you’re visiting unz, but it can’t tell whether you’re visiting Steve or Anatoly. Do they block both or block neither?

    (Actually…I’m not sure about the technical details, but since they let you reach unz at all, they’re not blocking at the dns level, and then it’s a cdn, so they must let through https, right?)

  145. Saxon says:
    @istevefan

    Gunboat Poopdick Enforcement is what grifters and astroturf shills like Charlie Kirk would like you to believe is “winning” because they’re paid to present this to you. Don’t think for a second he actually believes any of this, though. The proper term for these people is a Claque.

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