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From The Guardian:

Maybe the dimples?

How did ‘less than stellar’ high school student Jared Kushner get into Harvard?

Daniel Golden

Donald Trump’s son-in-law was accepted into the Ivy League university in the wake of a $2.5m pledge made by his parents

Friday 18 November 2016 13.00

I would like to express my gratitude to Jared Kushner for reviving interest in my 2006 book, The Price of Admission. …

My book exposed a grubby secret of American higher education: that the rich buy their underachieving children’s way into elite universities with massive, tax-deductible donations. It reported that New Jersey real estate developer Charles Kushner had pledged $2.5m to Harvard University not long before his son Jared was admitted to the prestigious Ivy League school, which at the time accepted about one of every nine applicants. (Nowadays, it only takes one out of 20.)

I also quoted administrators at Jared’s high school, who described him as a less-than-stellar student and expressed dismay at Harvard’s decision.

“There was no way anybody in the administrative office of the school thought he would on the merits get into Harvard,’’ a former official at the Frisch school in Paramus, New Jersey, told me. “His GPA [grade point average] did not warrant it, his SAT scores did not warrant it. We thought, for sure, there was no way this was going to happen. Then, lo and behold, Jared was accepted. It was a little bit disappointing because there were at the time other kids we thought should really get in on the merits, and they did not.’’ …

This anecdote from the late 1990s matches it up with what I later heard about the current Harvard Number as of 2010. I blogged:

The Harvard Number is the amount of money Harvard would want as a donation for accepting your kid as an undergraduate. It’s not the kind of information they post on their website. You have to ask the right people in the right manner.

He said he just found out that the current Harvard Number — assuming your kid’s application was “competitive” (i.e., there’s some chance your kid would get in even if you didn’t write a check) — is $5 million.

If your kid’s “not competitive,” then it is $10 million.

If there are about 1,800 freshmen at Harvard each year, then Harvard could admit, say, 100 competitive applicants whose fathers (typically, hedge fund guys) write the Harvard Number on a check — without tangibly lowering the quality of the class. That’s, theoretically, a half billion per year in virtually free money. How could an institution resist that temptation?

Quid pro quo arrangements aren’t supposed to be tax deductible as charity, but how often does the IRS get the goods on this? In practice, a big chunk of the Harvard Number gets refunded by the taxpayers.

My confidant, an old Harvard man, was disgusted by how expensive the Harvard Number had gotten: “Hedge fund guys ruin it for everybody.”

More from Daniel Golden:

Charles Kushner differed from his peers on the committee in another way: he had a criminal record. Five years after Jared entered Harvard, the elder Kushner pleaded guilty in 2004 to tax violations, illegal campaign donations and retaliating against a witness. (As it happens, the prosecutor in the case was Chris Christie, recently ousted as the head of Trump’s transition team.) Charles Kushner had hired a prostitute to seduce his brother-in-law, who was cooperating with federal authorities. Kushner then had a videotape of the tryst sent to his sister. He was sentenced to two years in federal prison.

During last year’s campaign when everybody was going on and on about how different the candidates were, I kept getting the Clintons and Trumps confused. They belong to the same country club, their inlaws were convicted of similar crimes …

 
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  1. iffen says:

    Thank God for a corrupt and slimy process. Where would we be if the #2 power in the Presidency had gone to Podunk U.

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  2. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    http://forward.com/fast-forward/361591/soros-rips-would-be-dictator-trump-lends-money-to-his-in-laws-the-kushners/

    “Soros has had a long and productive relationship with the Kushner family,” an unnamed source told the Real Deal, which broke the story on Friday.

    Read More
  3. MC says:

    Having grown up in middle-class suburbia, I find it genuinely disconcerting just how grasping and greedy our elites are. Heaven forbid that Harvard get by on a measly few tens of billions, and use its name recognition to attract the absolute best and brightest across the country, to create a meritocractic and noble aristocracy for America. No, you can’t let Yale or Stanford or Chicago get the jump on you; you gotta let the hedge fund kids buy their way in over the 1600-SAT starting linebacker from Ypsilanti who runs the local Young Life. No one who matters will even notice the difference, and here we are getting fatter, dumber, happier.

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    • Replies: @guest
    They wouldn't be creating a meritocratic and noble aristocracy, anyway. So what's the difference?

    PC will still allow us to have a certain number engineers, for instance, so that bridges don't fall on people's heads every day. But they won't allow us that.

  4. Ron Unz says:

    Yeah, exactly. Although I’m sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years, Jared Kushner seems to be the only provable case, partly based on the trial records that sent his father off to federal prison.

    During my unsuccessful Free Harvard/Fair Harvard campaign last year, I was sure the MSM journalists would absolutely jump at the Kushner story when I gave it to them, given that the MSM hated Trump so much and were willing to use anything against him.

    But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.

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    • Replies: @Sid
    "But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred."

    Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump are also seen as the "good faction" within the Trump team. It's guys like Steve Bannon they loathe.
    , @JohnnyWalker123

    other factors
     
    Lots of wealthy financiers and businessmen probably have bribed their child's way into an Ivy League education. So I assume a lot of elite journalists understood not to touch that issue. If you're an elite journalist that wants to stay an elite journalist, you have to be careful to not step on the toes of powerful people. If a journalist brought up the Kushner bribery issue, they'd risk getting all these oligarchs into the media spotlight.

    Also, maybe a lot of insiders knew that Kushner was a globalist cuck. So they figured that if Trump somehow got elected, Kushner could push out the Alt-Right/nationalist types. However, if Kushner was politically damaged by this revelation and Trump still somehow got elected, Kushner would be too weak to have any leverage.
    , @Anon
    Mr. Unz,

    I went to a good high school in Mass. and in my senior year 12 students were admitted to Harvard. Of those kids, probably only a handful deserved to be there.

    For instance, one of the kids had a father and a sister who were alumni . His father worked in an important position at a major insurance company, so I'm sure the dad donated money, although not Charles Kushner money. They were neighbors on Martha's vineyard with the Harvard application reader for our area, and so I think there was an unofficial assurance that he would get in. He wasn't a terrible student, but he would probably be going to Bates, or something, if not for this.

    There were also the cases of professors whose children sort of regressed to the mean. Once again, not terrible students, but then again certainly not Harvard material either.

    Also, there were affirmative action admits. The kids who got in via affirmative action were worse students than the kids listed above. I would say affirmative Action was worth about 300 SAT points (on a 2400 point scale) whereas the kids above probably got like 150 points (this is all very rough guesstimation). In any case one of the girls who got in through affirmative action had a white mother, and had parents who made a lot of money. The other girl was hispanic, poor, and earnest, but not especially bright.

    , @anon
    (((other factors)))

    hi, i fixed it for you

    , @jacques sheete

    Although I’m sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years...
     
    No doubt about it. It's just another racket. And it ain't exactly news, either.

    Benjamin Franklin attended school for two years, and his schooling ended when he was ten.
    This is Ben Franklin (as Silence Dogood) at age 16 :


    “…I reflected in my Mind on the extreme Folly of those Parents, who, blind to their Childrens Dullness, and insensible of the Solidity of their Skulls, because they think their Purses can afford it, will need send them to the Temple of Learning, where, for want of a suitable Genius, they learn little more than how to carry themselves handsomely, and enter a Room genteely, (which might as well be acquir’d at a Dancing-School,) and from whence they return, after Abundance of Trouble and Charge, as great Blockheads as ever, only more proud and self-conceited.


    …[and] he, without much Study, presently interpreted it, assuring me, That it was a lively Representation of HARVARD COLLEGE, Etcetera. I remain, Sir, Your Humble Servant,

    Silence Dogood, (No. 4)

    Printed in The New-England Courant, May 14, 1722.


     

    , @Dahlia
    I saw the Journolist clique passing it around and loving it, but true, not the elite guys.

    I *really* think that when Brad Parscale said Jared Kushner was important to his data operation, the biggest unsung success story of the election, he was probably not telling the entire truth. Just flattering of the boss's son-in-law? I thought it a little strange when that big story came out about Kushner that Parscale was given little credit; too inconvenient for the narrative, I guess.

    But, though many factors elected Trump, Brad Parscale is one piece, that, if you removed him, Trump would have lost.

    , @CouldNotAgree
    They knew he was one of them.
    , @Forbes
    JW123 has it. Namely, peeling back the onion layers on Harvard admits would expose too many others for questionable admission. Inconvenient questions are those that few want answered. What you don't know won't hurt you.

    And really, who's surprised that money eases the way for some? It's present in virtually all walks of life. Only the naïve see life as pristine from the influence of money.
    , @Opinionator
    Why do you have a problem with this, Ron?

    Is it not better for the country that not all talent (and consequentially power) is concentrated at Harvard and among its graduates?
  5. Sid says:

    Jared Kushner majored in Sociology at Harvard. Give me a break.

    He got an MBA and JD at NYU, but again, his father donated to the school.

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  6. Par for the course, but was Jared “competitive” or “Not competitive? Enquiring middle easterners might want to know.

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  7. Sid says:
    @Ron Unz
    Yeah, exactly. Although I'm sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years, Jared Kushner seems to be the only provable case, partly based on the trial records that sent his father off to federal prison.

    During my unsuccessful Free Harvard/Fair Harvard campaign last year, I was sure the MSM journalists would absolutely jump at the Kushner story when I gave it to them, given that the MSM hated Trump so much and were willing to use anything against him.

    But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.

    “But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.”

    Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump are also seen as the “good faction” within the Trump team. It’s guys like Steve Bannon they loathe.

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  8. ‘Hedge fund guys.’ My brother-in-law has run two small hedge funds broke over the last two decades, while managing to live rather well. And in that business, he’s quite a small potatoes goy with no family connections; just a former theoretical physicist with a sincere, no doubt naive, belief in what your Takimag colleague Scott Locklin used to call “quantitative finance.”

    Imagine how Kushner père et famille can live on your money.

    Say, whatever happened to Scott Locklin? Used to be a burgeoning figure on the ‘Dissident Lite.’ I always wondered whether he ran a fund or two into the ground. Or maybe prospective employers weren’t keen on his political expressions.

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    • Replies: @Triumph104
    An unemployed Princeton grad killed his father when pops threatened to decrease son's allowance. Turns out the 70 year-old hedge fund manager was only worth $1.6 million -- probably not even enough to retire and maintain his current lifestyle.

    Martin Shkreli decided to go into pharmaceuticals because there wasn't enough money in hedge funds.
  9. TangoMan says:

    “His GPA [grade point average] did not warrant it, his SAT scores did not warrant it. We thought, for sure, there was no way this was going to happen. Then, lo and behold, Jared was accepted.

    Maybe Jared was transracial before Rachel Dolezal but never came out of the closet?

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  10. newrouter says:

    “I kept getting the Clintons and Trumps confused.”

    Que Sera, Sera

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  11. Kushner is Jewish and went to a yeshiva high school.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jared_Kushner

    Kushner was raised in a Modern Orthodox Jewish family in New Jersey.[18] He graduated from the Frisch School, a private, coed yeshiva high school, in 1999.

    His father spent two years in prison for tax evasion, illegal donations, and witness tampering.

    His father, Charles Kushner, was arrested on charges of tax evasion, illegal campaign donations, and witness tampering in 2004, and was eventually convicted on all charges (by the then U.S. Attorney Chris Christie)[30] and sentenced to two years in federal prison.[

    Bannon called Jared Kushner a “cuck” and a “globalist.”

    http://www.salon.com/2017/04/07/the-kushner-bannon-feud-is-about-ideology-and-steve-bannon-is-losing/

    President Donald Trump’s decision to attack Syria with missile strikes was apparently executed over Bannon’s strenuous objections, according to a report by New York Magazine. Bannon’s reasoning was that the missile strikes violated Trump’s America First ideology, while his ideological foe in the White House — Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner — insisted they were necessary as a response to Bashar al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons against his own people.

    The Kushner-Bannon fight is about ideology. Kushner is a globalist, while Bannon is an Alt-Right nationalist.

    While Bannon’s office contains a board that lists what he believes represent Trump’s core populist promises, Kushner has pushed against them with a centrist perspective that has caused Bannon to call him a “Democrat.” (Kushner has indeed given a great deal of money to Democrats and has in the past expressed admiration for presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy.)

    Kushner is well-liked by Slate columnist Michelle Goldberg. Bannon is not.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2017/04/bannon_and_nunes_out_kushner_in_we_might_be_ok.html

    Jared Kushner may save us all.

    According to a CNN broadcaster, Bannon might be out of the Whitehouse in the next few months.

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    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    If, in actuality, Trump is motivated by the desire to get handjobs from the likes of Bill Kristol, Bannon is figuratively a dead man walking.
  12. neutral says:

    Don’t understand why The Guardian is attacking him, he is a liberal that supports waging war everywhere to spread that ideology, exactly what The Guardian also supports.

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  13. That caption has me cracking up more than it should. Something tells me it’s more than a mere 100 spots set aside. 5 million dollars seems relatively affordable for the mega-wealthy across the world. And what about spots set aside for politicians’ children? I doubt Malia got in on her merits.

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    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    Obama and Bush both went to Harvard grad school (JD and MBA respectively).

    I wonder if they got in on their merits.

    In particular, how did Bush make it into a Harvard MBA? In what world does George W. Bush get into the most competitive business-school in the world?
    , @Anonymous
    If I recall correctly, Malia has to wait a year before starting at Harvard.
  14. Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    I have hope, so long as Sessions, Bannon, and Miller are there.
    , @neutral

    do you still see some hope?
     
    Lets put it this way, if you have CNN, Merkel, neocons, McCain, Salon, The Guardian, Hollande, etc, supporting his actions then you should ask why you are supporting him ? If he is that weak willed and that unrestrained that some dead children propaganda works that easy on him, then why shouldn't that drowned child propaganda (that so easily worked on Merkel) not make him let in all the refugees ?
    , @Jonathan Mason

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?
     
    Apparently he meant nothing that he promised while he was running for office. The only question now is whether there will be another election in 4 years or will he follow in the footsteps of the Emperor Augustus and create a hereditary monarchy with lifetime tenure?
    , @candid_observer
    While the Syria thing makes me cringe, there's a reasonable chance it will not lead to any escalated actions in Syria. It may actually make it easier for Trump to do his job, because he's changing the story, getting some positive comments from some severe critics, putting to rest the idiot Russia narrative, and generally, to many people, looking every bit the President.

    Of course I continue to be baffled as to why he did this thing in Syria to begin with.

    I mean, pictures of kids?

    Jesus. Just Jesus.

    , @anon
    I feel pretty meh about the strike, but I think there is a real danger to how uncommitted Trump is to anything he actually says.

    To be frank, I wouldn't be mad at all if the strike was simply a wag the dog thing rather than a sincere policy shift (so long as there isn't serious blowback).

    The stuff about Banon being sidelined is quite concerning though.

    , @Rod1963
    Yes and no.

    Trump blew up bits and pieces of a old airbase which got the Neo-Con's off his back and sent a message to that fat dwarf in NK and let the Chinese know he doesn't screw around. Oddly enough no one is talking about the second base supposedly bombed. The Russians report only half of the SLCM's reached their target.

    This is weird, even RT doesn't mention the second air base.

    Then he has Tillerson put on a show verbal slapping the Russians. Shutting up the Democrats.

    Which is all fine provided he goes no further. If he escalates, he seals his fate.

    Of course when you play real politik like that, especially when you run on a platform of putting America first, Trump is risking turning his base against him.
    , @Realist
    Trump is just another dumb ass pawn of the deep state.
    , @Buck Turgidson
    Hope. I do trust, and like, Mr Trump. We do have Jeff Sessions as our AG. But we need to see some real action on immigration, such as a serious call for a moratorium.

    Time will tell how the Syrian foray plays out. I know we have to deal with lunatics in places like N Korea and Iran who understand one thing, and one thing only.
    , @TomSchmidt
    Never had hope, but figured he might be different. He isn't.

    We don't vote our way out of this.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    I've pretty much given up because I don't think Syria was a realpolitik calculation to solve his domestic media and foreign negotiation problems.

    But if things reverse course, I'm happy to support Trump in the future. The airstrike was not a dealbreaker in itself.
  15. Why should this bother us?

    It is s good thing Harvard accepts legacies, because it means less talent is concentrated there and more is dispersed throughout the rest of the country.

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  16. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    I have hope, so long as Sessions, Bannon, and Miller are there.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    Maybe not.

    According to one source, Bannon might be on the way out.

    http://uproxx.com/news/trump-may-dump-bannon-priebus/

    If Bannon is gone, then it's just Sessions and Miller.

    There are also calls for Sessions to resign over his role in the Russia "scandal." If Bannon is no longer there, then there won't be anyone to protect Sessions. I could see the Kushner clique pushing him out.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/mar/02/jeff-sessions-calls-for-resignation-claims-lies-russia

    As for Stephen Miller, there are those who want him out too. Joe Scarborough (who talks to Trump pretty often) hates Miller and has really torn into him. It's unusual to see a speechwriter get hit so hard, but Scarborough doesn't want him in the Trump administration. Sessions brought Miller to DC with him, but what happens if Sessions and Bannon are gone.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2017/02/13/joe-scarborough-is-trying-to-make-trump-turn-on-stephen-miller/?utm_term=.c352fba34869

    Even the Washington Post is surprised by how much Scarborough hates Miller.

    There are also a lot of stories about how a lot of original Trump backers are getting frozen out of White House jobs, which are now going to Republican establishment types and New York globalists (such as Goldman Sachs exec Gary Cohn).
    , @Jack Highlands
    Re Miller, let's face it: the Kushner issue does raise the old spectre again, as it should. Most of us worried about it; now most of us are vindicated.

    So where does Miller stand? On the one hand, we have to suspect he was the main VDare reader in the group who got the Sailer Strategy through to Trump in the first place, presumably with cred from Sessions. OTOH, his disavowal of Spencer in that Mother Jones piece seems hypocritical, vindictive and weak. And untrue; he must have known Spencer, who I understand was already at AmConMag, ie working with no less known a figure than Buchanan.

    Re the old spectre: this may even turn out to be a great tactical victory for Trump, allowing him to do things, thanks to 59 missiles and some unfortunate dead in Syria, that would otherwise have bogged him down forever. But that wouldn't change the fact that the mask is off: it's clear Kushner is a globalist stooge who is trying to derail the essence of electoral Trumpism, which is populist nationalism. As personified in Bannon.
    , @Ed
    Well Bannon is hanging on by a thread, doubt he'll finish out the year.
  17. Anon7 says:

    “My book exposed a grubby secret of American higher education: that the rich buy their underachieving children’s way into elite universities with massive, tax-deductible donations.”

    What do you mean, “grubby secret”? This has been their business plan for several hundred years; introducing the scions of wealthy New England families to each other is the whole point of Harvard. The 15 percent of kids who get in because of how smart they are, are just interviewing for jobs with the firms the sons will one day run.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    What do you mean, “grubby secret”? This has been their business plan for several hundred years; introducing the scions of wealthy New England families to each other is the whole point of Harvard.

    What I've been wondering is if a big part of the purpose of these top schools now is to introduce the scions of the global elite to each other, and if that's the reason for admitting so many international students.
  18. Jared Kushner is the least Jewish looking Jewish person I’ve ever seen.

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  19. Whatever the level of intellectual achievement a kid demonstrated in his studies by the age of 17 is only a rough guide to what ability he might show by the age of 35.

    While Jesus was–it is claimed–stunning the temple elders with his wit and wisdom at the age of 12, Charles Darwin was a late-developing son of a wealthy family who dropped out of medical school. He then enrolled in a Bachelor’s degee at the University of Cambridge, where he preferred riding and shooting to studying, and was delighted by the language and logic of William Paley’s Evidences of Christianity.

    Both had careers that changed the world.

    Like Hillary Clinton, Kushner married well and could possibly be a future President in training. Then again, maybe not, but at this point we don’t really know what he might evolve into.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    "While Jesus was–it is claimed–stunning the temple elders with his wit and wisdom at the age of 12,"

    Nothing personal, but I do wish people would stop quoting fairy tales as if they were data.

    Is this why Americans think movies and TV shows are history?
  20. newrouter says:

    “Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?”

    Ivanka you.

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  21. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/trump-white-house-gary-cohn_us_58e80609e4b00de141039aa3

    Elevating Gary Cohn to chief of staff would be a major win for the Wall Street wing of the White House.

    Cohn is personally close to Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, and Trump’s daughter and aide Ivanka, the White House official notes. Cohn’s status in the White House is also bolstered by Goldman Sachs veteran Dina Powell, who was effectively hired as an aid to and proxy for Ivanka and now serves on the National Security Council.

    “Dina Powell is going to be a big, big person in the White House” the official said. “She can boost Cohn, and Cohn can do the same for her.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @candid_observer
    I think that people may generally be underrating the importance of the personal in the Trump WH.

    My guess is that one of Trump's real weaknesses is an inclination for nepotism. He seems entirely too eager to put family members in positions of power -- which may work in a real estate business, but is likely to backfire badly in the running of a government.

    I think he has a lot of difficulty saying no to his own family, especially those, like Ivanka, upon whom he especially dotes. Jarred comes with her, of course.

    I'd guess that Bannon is probably not a particularly easy character to deal with on a day to day basis. Also, he's not a worshipful sort, and Trump loves some worship.

    While we (and others) may see these people in terms of what they stand for ideologically, I doubt that that's the prominent consideration in Trump's mind when he thinks about them. Frankly, if we were working with them, it's probably not their ideology that would be most prominent in our minds.

    How it plays out, who knows?

  22. Of course I haven’t given up; I’m astounded by how many posters here are suddenly buying into the “Trump is a vain/shallow/opportunistic/idiotic/incoherent blunderer” story that’s been sold by the media ever since he announced his run for the Presidency. Most of the posts seem to take it for granted that Trump has no mind or will of his own, and that he’s a sort of Pinocchio being pulled back and forth between Jiminy Cricket (Bannon) and Foulfellow the Fox (Kushner). Trump was talking about his signature trade and immigration issues as far back as the 1980s, long before he ever met Bannon; Bannon also didn’t come on board in his campaign until fairly late in the game. I definitely wish Trump hadn’t stuck his foot into the Syrian mess, but, unless he makes a more definite move (which God forbid), it seems to me that he’s almost certainly made this token strike merely to (1) silence the “Russian puppet” accusation, (2) forestall his enemies in both parties from claiming that his quasi-approval of Assad emboldened Assad’s alleged gas attack, and (3) throw a little scare into China, North Korea, and Iran. I don’t think he did it simply because Kushner suggested it to him, or because Ivanka started crying over pictures of gassed babies; to believe that, I’d have have to believe that he’s the mindless empty vessel that his enemies have painted him as, and he’s come too far for me to ever believe that.

    If Trump’s improbable political career has shown anything, it’s that he’s not just the sum of the people around him. I remember hearing the doomsayers proclaiming that it was all over when Lewandowski was dumped for the slicker and shadier Manafort, or when Kellyanne Conway (with her dubious record on illegal immigration) came on board the campaign, and the doom didn’t come to pass. Also, Bannon hasn’t even been dumped yet; he went with Trump on Air Force One to the meeting with the Chinese, for goodness sake. In the meantime, we have Gorsuch on the Supreme Court (instead of Garland, or–gag–Obama, who might well have been put there by Hillary), we have Sessions as AG cracking down on sanctuary cities instead of Loretta Lynch strapping racism-detecting body-cams to Ferguson policemen, and we have bids being taken on the Great Border Wall. Until I see boots on the ground in Syria, I’ll continue to be far more pleased than disappointed by the outcome of the election.

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    • Agree: IHTG, Jack Hanson
    • Replies: @Jean Ralphio
    Thank you for your measured and sane comments Manfred Mann.
    , @Art

    Most of the posts seem to take it for granted that Trump has no mind or will of his own, and that he’s a sort of Pinocchio being pulled back and forth between Jiminy Cricket (Bannon) and Foulfellow the Fox (Kushner).
     
    Hmm -- does Trump lose his mind when Ivanka insists on something?

    Donald Trump carried out Syria missile strike ‘after being convinced by daughter Ivanka’

    DONALD Trump’s decision to rain down 59 Tomahawk missiles on a Syrian air base was sparked by his daughter Ivanka’s “heartbroken” response to Assad’s chemical attack, insiders have claimed.

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/789399/Donald-Trump-Ivanka-Trump-Syria-Missile-Strike-Assad-US-Russia-Tomahawk
     
    , @Jack Hanson
    Agree. I wasn't happy about Syria but then again iSteve has been blackpill from top to bottom with the weirdest strain of masochism since Aug 2015.
  23. neutral says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    do you still see some hope?

    Lets put it this way, if you have CNN, Merkel, neocons, McCain, Salon, The Guardian, Hollande, etc, supporting his actions then you should ask why you are supporting him ? If he is that weak willed and that unrestrained that some dead children propaganda works that easy on him, then why shouldn’t that drowned child propaganda (that so easily worked on Merkel) not make him let in all the refugees ?

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  24. @Ron Unz
    Yeah, exactly. Although I'm sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years, Jared Kushner seems to be the only provable case, partly based on the trial records that sent his father off to federal prison.

    During my unsuccessful Free Harvard/Fair Harvard campaign last year, I was sure the MSM journalists would absolutely jump at the Kushner story when I gave it to them, given that the MSM hated Trump so much and were willing to use anything against him.

    But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.

    other factors

    Lots of wealthy financiers and businessmen probably have bribed their child’s way into an Ivy League education. So I assume a lot of elite journalists understood not to touch that issue. If you’re an elite journalist that wants to stay an elite journalist, you have to be careful to not step on the toes of powerful people. If a journalist brought up the Kushner bribery issue, they’d risk getting all these oligarchs into the media spotlight.

    Also, maybe a lot of insiders knew that Kushner was a globalist cuck. So they figured that if Trump somehow got elected, Kushner could push out the Alt-Right/nationalist types. However, if Kushner was politically damaged by this revelation and Trump still somehow got elected, Kushner would be too weak to have any leverage.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    No, a cuck is a gentile who shills out for Zionists.

    Kushner, as part of the Tribe, cannot be a cuck.
    , @Moshe
    Johnny, are you really that naive and pure of heart??

    As per your previous comment, everybody knows that Kushner is Jewish, that's why he's automatically assumed to have Machiavellied Trump into bombing Assad because, well, that's what Jews do. The WHOLE Kushner brouhaha is about his semitism.

    And now you somehow don't get Unz's "other factors"?

    You're playing me bro.

    I thought the man spelled it out clearly enough - here, and in every 3rd word he's written over the past few years - but I'll help spell it out even simpler.

    "I, Ronald "RKU" Unz, am not one of THOSE Jews. I am a good Jew. A Jew who finds his face, name, personality and proclivities ugly and who will OurDamnedSpot! it by spitting at every imaginary mirror he imagines passing in the shade of a fellow Hebe. I. See. Jewish. Nepotism. Everywhere. Oh, and I weep for wrongly done Palestinian youth too. Woe, unto we goyim - i said WE GOYIM - to see the sadness in the face of one rock throwing little Mooslem boy. Be still my goiyishe heart..."

    I've just saved you the trouble of having to read Ron'z future comments. That'll be a dollar per post and $10 for saving you the trouble of having to purchase a sticky copy of portnoy's complaint on Amazon, now that you know that you can read Portnoy's Therapeutic Soliloquy online for free should the proverse mode strike you.

  25. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    Apparently he meant nothing that he promised while he was running for office. The only question now is whether there will be another election in 4 years or will he follow in the footsteps of the Emperor Augustus and create a hereditary monarchy with lifetime tenure?

    Read More
  26. guest says:

    Better question: how did he get into Ivanka? That was his true path to power.

    Read More
  27. guest says:
    @MC
    Having grown up in middle-class suburbia, I find it genuinely disconcerting just how grasping and greedy our elites are. Heaven forbid that Harvard get by on a measly few tens of billions, and use its name recognition to attract the absolute best and brightest across the country, to create a meritocractic and noble aristocracy for America. No, you can't let Yale or Stanford or Chicago get the jump on you; you gotta let the hedge fund kids buy their way in over the 1600-SAT starting linebacker from Ypsilanti who runs the local Young Life. No one who matters will even notice the difference, and here we are getting fatter, dumber, happier.

    They wouldn’t be creating a meritocratic and noble aristocracy, anyway. So what’s the difference?

    PC will still allow us to have a certain number engineers, for instance, so that bridges don’t fall on people’s heads every day. But they won’t allow us that.

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  28. unit472 says:

    At least we know that Kushner actually enrolled at and attended university. Probably has people who remember him from those days too which is more than we can say about Columbia man B. Obama.

    Now what is it about these ‘high school administrators’ speaking anonymously about the academic achievements of Jared Kushner? Guess they are safely retired now because I could not imagine anyone in a position to know, revealing the academic record of Obama and not being ‘unmasked’ and destroyed.

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  29. @(((King Curtis)))
    That caption has me cracking up more than it should. Something tells me it's more than a mere 100 spots set aside. 5 million dollars seems relatively affordable for the mega-wealthy across the world. And what about spots set aside for politicians' children? I doubt Malia got in on her merits.

    Obama and Bush both went to Harvard grad school (JD and MBA respectively).

    I wonder if they got in on their merits.

    In particular, how did Bush make it into a Harvard MBA? In what world does George W. Bush get into the most competitive business-school in the world?

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    In a world where it matters who your daddy is.
    , @PV van der Byl
    The same world in which he becomes a major league baseball team owner, for very little down.
    , @Osgood Oznot
    When W applied to the HBS, admissions was not near as competitive as it is today. Last year HBS accepted 11% of its applicants.
    In 1973, according to a Bloomberg article:
    "Surely junior's application stood out. George W. Bush was a picture of honor once he got past his party days at Yale with the Delta Kappa Epsilon brothers and members of Skull & Bones, a secret society that enrolled him during his senior year -- so hush-hush, in fact, it barely gets a mention in his book. Bush earned an undergraduate degree in history from Yale in 1968. His grades weren't great, and nobody can seem to locate his GMAT scores. The story starts with Bush's application. "
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2001-02-14/george-w-dot-s-b-school-days
  30. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    He looks like Hugh Hefner.

    In SOCIAL NETWORK, we get really smart Jew vs privileged wasps who would rather row.

    Now, some Jews are turning ‘waspy’ with connections.

    Read More
  31. 1/ Nobody here can look on the bright side. His family seems to have spent a lot of money for a piece of paper. People here should be happy.

    2/ He got into Harvard the way anyone got into Trump U.

    3/ He’s obviously smart (or smarter than his opponents). He seems to be doing better than a lot of the genii who took sociology along with him.

    4/ He got himself a hot wife and is procreating. Can anyone here say that? Some people here have a serious case of yan hong disease.

    BTW if anyone here actually cares about Bannon you should get word to him to get into shape. He looks terrible.

    Maybe Trump keeps him around because he looks even in worse shape than Trump does these days.

    http://blog.chinadaily.com.cn/blog-1573415-27859.html

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  32. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @JohnnyWalker123

    other factors
     
    Lots of wealthy financiers and businessmen probably have bribed their child's way into an Ivy League education. So I assume a lot of elite journalists understood not to touch that issue. If you're an elite journalist that wants to stay an elite journalist, you have to be careful to not step on the toes of powerful people. If a journalist brought up the Kushner bribery issue, they'd risk getting all these oligarchs into the media spotlight.

    Also, maybe a lot of insiders knew that Kushner was a globalist cuck. So they figured that if Trump somehow got elected, Kushner could push out the Alt-Right/nationalist types. However, if Kushner was politically damaged by this revelation and Trump still somehow got elected, Kushner would be too weak to have any leverage.

    No, a cuck is a gentile who shills out for Zionists.

    Kushner, as part of the Tribe, cannot be a cuck.

    Read More
  33. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @(((King Curtis)))
    That caption has me cracking up more than it should. Something tells me it's more than a mere 100 spots set aside. 5 million dollars seems relatively affordable for the mega-wealthy across the world. And what about spots set aside for politicians' children? I doubt Malia got in on her merits.

    If I recall correctly, Malia has to wait a year before starting at Harvard.

    Read More
  34. @Opinionator
    I have hope, so long as Sessions, Bannon, and Miller are there.

    Maybe not.

    According to one source, Bannon might be on the way out.

    http://uproxx.com/news/trump-may-dump-bannon-priebus/

    If Bannon is gone, then it’s just Sessions and Miller.

    There are also calls for Sessions to resign over his role in the Russia “scandal.” If Bannon is no longer there, then there won’t be anyone to protect Sessions. I could see the Kushner clique pushing him out.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/mar/02/jeff-sessions-calls-for-resignation-claims-lies-russia

    As for Stephen Miller, there are those who want him out too. Joe Scarborough (who talks to Trump pretty often) hates Miller and has really torn into him. It’s unusual to see a speechwriter get hit so hard, but Scarborough doesn’t want him in the Trump administration. Sessions brought Miller to DC with him, but what happens if Sessions and Bannon are gone.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2017/02/13/joe-scarborough-is-trying-to-make-trump-turn-on-stephen-miller/?utm_term=.c352fba34869

    Even the Washington Post is surprised by how much Scarborough hates Miller.

    There are also a lot of stories about how a lot of original Trump backers are getting frozen out of White House jobs, which are now going to Republican establishment types and New York globalists (such as Goldman Sachs exec Gary Cohn).

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    No one who takes Joe Scarborough that seriously deserves to be president.
    , @Mr. Anon

    There are also calls for Sessions to resign over his role in the Russia “scandal.” If Bannon is no longer there, then there won’t be anyone to protect Sessions. I could see the Kushner clique pushing him out.
     
    Trump quite possibly owes his Presidency to Jeff Sessions. During the primary, Alabama turned out 44% for Trump - a bunch of southern baptists voted for the Yankee New Yorker who doesn't care about abortion or gay rights. Jeff Sessions endorsement probably had a lot to do with that. The deep south - against expectation - came out strong for Trump. If Trump gets rid of Sessions, he's a fool. Naturally, my desire would be for Trump to keep Sessions, Miller, and Bannon, and accord them even greater influence.
    , @anonguy
    Trump manages the White House staff like Bob Wills managed the roster of the Texas Playboys.

    If you don't know what I'm talking about, google is your friend as well as not knowing enough about Bob Wills, American music icon, you should be ashamed you gotta google him.

    This stuff is so easy.

  35. @Opinionator
    I have hope, so long as Sessions, Bannon, and Miller are there.

    Re Miller, let’s face it: the Kushner issue does raise the old spectre again, as it should. Most of us worried about it; now most of us are vindicated.

    So where does Miller stand? On the one hand, we have to suspect he was the main VDare reader in the group who got the Sailer Strategy through to Trump in the first place, presumably with cred from Sessions. OTOH, his disavowal of Spencer in that Mother Jones piece seems hypocritical, vindictive and weak. And untrue; he must have known Spencer, who I understand was already at AmConMag, ie working with no less known a figure than Buchanan.

    Re the old spectre: this may even turn out to be a great tactical victory for Trump, allowing him to do things, thanks to 59 missiles and some unfortunate dead in Syria, that would otherwise have bogged him down forever. But that wouldn’t change the fact that the mask is off: it’s clear Kushner is a globalist stooge who is trying to derail the essence of electoral Trumpism, which is populist nationalism. As personified in Bannon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator

    OTOH, his disavowal of Spencer in that Mother Jones piece seems hypocritical, vindictive and weak. And untrue; he must have known Spencer, who I understand was already at AmConMag, ie working with no less known a figure than Buchanan.

     

    How is our cause helped if Miller does not disavowing Spencer?

    And it's not like Spencer was some innocent private citizen whose privacy was invaded by the media or by Miller blabbing away. Spencer chose to go public with his alleged personal relationships. The honorable thing is for public figures like Spencer to keep personal relationships private.
  36. Farenheit says:

    Anyone have any idea how much dough Joseph p Kennedy had to pony up to get his boys into Harvard ?….I’m betting teddy cost a mint.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    And after he got Teddy in, he had to keep him in.

    That must really have been expensive!
    , @5371
    I suspect the Harvard Number has suffered even more extreme inflation than Harvard tuition.
  37. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anon7
    "My book exposed a grubby secret of American higher education: that the rich buy their underachieving children’s way into elite universities with massive, tax-deductible donations."

    What do you mean, "grubby secret"? This has been their business plan for several hundred years; introducing the scions of wealthy New England families to each other is the whole point of Harvard. The 15 percent of kids who get in because of how smart they are, are just interviewing for jobs with the firms the sons will one day run.

    What do you mean, “grubby secret”? This has been their business plan for several hundred years; introducing the scions of wealthy New England families to each other is the whole point of Harvard.

    What I’ve been wondering is if a big part of the purpose of these top schools now is to introduce the scions of the global elite to each other, and if that’s the reason for admitting so many international students.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Also to indoctrinate the foreign students in...whatever it is Harvard teaches and our elites believe or pretend to believe in.
    , @Anon7
    The vast endowments of the best American universities (even the "public" state schools) are now encouraging the belief that they can just cut themselves loose from their state charters and become schools for the global (money) elite. So you're right there.

    America was once revered around the world; I think that feeling has been lost, as far as the wealthiest globalists are concerned. Still, the best schools are here, for now anyway, so that's where they come. I don't think that the male Chinese students who come here for math, science and engineering believe one bit of the libtard crap that is served up, for instance.
  38. @Anonymous
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/trump-white-house-gary-cohn_us_58e80609e4b00de141039aa3

    Elevating Gary Cohn to chief of staff would be a major win for the Wall Street wing of the White House.

    Cohn is personally close to Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, and Trump’s daughter and aide Ivanka, the White House official notes. Cohn’s status in the White House is also bolstered by Goldman Sachs veteran Dina Powell, who was effectively hired as an aid to and proxy for Ivanka and now serves on the National Security Council.

    “Dina Powell is going to be a big, big person in the White House” the official said. “She can boost Cohn, and Cohn can do the same for her.”
     

    I think that people may generally be underrating the importance of the personal in the Trump WH.

    My guess is that one of Trump’s real weaknesses is an inclination for nepotism. He seems entirely too eager to put family members in positions of power — which may work in a real estate business, but is likely to backfire badly in the running of a government.

    I think he has a lot of difficulty saying no to his own family, especially those, like Ivanka, upon whom he especially dotes. Jarred comes with her, of course.

    I’d guess that Bannon is probably not a particularly easy character to deal with on a day to day basis. Also, he’s not a worshipful sort, and Trump loves some worship.

    While we (and others) may see these people in terms of what they stand for ideologically, I doubt that that’s the prominent consideration in Trump’s mind when he thinks about them. Frankly, if we were working with them, it’s probably not their ideology that would be most prominent in our minds.

    How it plays out, who knows?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sid
    One thing that stood out to me about how Trump is that, for all his game and connections, very few people who had worked with him came out to support him.

    Compare that with the Clintons, where for all their perfidy, they had a whole mafia of loyalists.

    The sense I get is that the Trumps have burned through a lot of people, and one of the recurring iSteve themes is that when strangers and friends don't trust you and you don't trust them, family is all you've got.
  39. So at these prices, each hashtag #BlackLivesMatter is worth 100 big ones?

    (I say 100 only because in that case it couldn’t have been fifty.)

    Read More
  40. ‘If you’re an elite journalist that wants to stay an elite journalist, you have to be careful to not step on the toes of powerful people.’

    Courtier stenographists.

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  41. It’s no use. Kushner will defeat Brannon. Trump does family like a Jew, an early 20th century Italian, or an Indian. This is something generic gentiles raised in the faint echoes of a bygone wasp culture will never understand. Did anyone really think the fat guy had a chance?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Guy de Champlagne
    Is Bannon really that disgusting looking? I really don't get all the comments about his appearance.

    I think he puts enough into his appearance that it's really rude the way people always comment on how ugly he is. And I also just don't think he's that bad looking.
  42. @Manfred Arcane
    Of course I haven't given up; I'm astounded by how many posters here are suddenly buying into the "Trump is a vain/shallow/opportunistic/idiotic/incoherent blunderer" story that's been sold by the media ever since he announced his run for the Presidency. Most of the posts seem to take it for granted that Trump has no mind or will of his own, and that he's a sort of Pinocchio being pulled back and forth between Jiminy Cricket (Bannon) and Foulfellow the Fox (Kushner). Trump was talking about his signature trade and immigration issues as far back as the 1980s, long before he ever met Bannon; Bannon also didn't come on board in his campaign until fairly late in the game. I definitely wish Trump hadn't stuck his foot into the Syrian mess, but, unless he makes a more definite move (which God forbid), it seems to me that he's almost certainly made this token strike merely to (1) silence the "Russian puppet" accusation, (2) forestall his enemies in both parties from claiming that his quasi-approval of Assad emboldened Assad's alleged gas attack, and (3) throw a little scare into China, North Korea, and Iran. I don't think he did it simply because Kushner suggested it to him, or because Ivanka started crying over pictures of gassed babies; to believe that, I'd have have to believe that he's the mindless empty vessel that his enemies have painted him as, and he's come too far for me to ever believe that.

    If Trump's improbable political career has shown anything, it's that he's not just the sum of the people around him. I remember hearing the doomsayers proclaiming that it was all over when Lewandowski was dumped for the slicker and shadier Manafort, or when Kellyanne Conway (with her dubious record on illegal immigration) came on board the campaign, and the doom didn't come to pass. Also, Bannon hasn't even been dumped yet; he went with Trump on Air Force One to the meeting with the Chinese, for goodness sake. In the meantime, we have Gorsuch on the Supreme Court (instead of Garland, or--gag--Obama, who might well have been put there by Hillary), we have Sessions as AG cracking down on sanctuary cities instead of Loretta Lynch strapping racism-detecting body-cams to Ferguson policemen, and we have bids being taken on the Great Border Wall. Until I see boots on the ground in Syria, I'll continue to be far more pleased than disappointed by the outcome of the election.

    Thank you for your measured and sane comments Manfred Mann.

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  43. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    While the Syria thing makes me cringe, there’s a reasonable chance it will not lead to any escalated actions in Syria. It may actually make it easier for Trump to do his job, because he’s changing the story, getting some positive comments from some severe critics, putting to rest the idiot Russia narrative, and generally, to many people, looking every bit the President.

    Of course I continue to be baffled as to why he did this thing in Syria to begin with.

    I mean, pictures of kids?

    Jesus. Just Jesus.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous

    It may actually make it easier for Trump to do his job, because he’s changing the story, getting some positive comments from some severe critics, putting to rest the idiot Russia narrative, and generally, to many people, looking every bit the President.
     
    Let's hope the Susan Rice story is not allowed to die. It appeared something was about to blow open in the "tapped my wires" story. Please don't let Rice and company off the hook.
  44. @Julio the Magnificent
    It's no use. Kushner will defeat Brannon. Trump does family like a Jew, an early 20th century Italian, or an Indian. This is something generic gentiles raised in the faint echoes of a bygone wasp culture will never understand. Did anyone really think the fat guy had a chance?

    Is Bannon really that disgusting looking? I really don’t get all the comments about his appearance.

    I think he puts enough into his appearance that it’s really rude the way people always comment on how ugly he is. And I also just don’t think he’s that bad looking.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old fogey
    You are perfectly correct. There is nothing unnatural or off-putting in Bannon's appearance. He looks like a very intelligent normal person to me.
    , @Pericles
    Maybe Bannon looks strange to wogs?
  45. @Farenheit
    Anyone have any idea how much dough Joseph p Kennedy had to pony up to get his boys into Harvard ?....I'm betting teddy cost a mint.

    And after he got Teddy in, he had to keep him in.

    That must really have been expensive!

    Read More
  46. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    I feel pretty meh about the strike, but I think there is a real danger to how uncommitted Trump is to anything he actually says.

    To be frank, I wouldn’t be mad at all if the strike was simply a wag the dog thing rather than a sincere policy shift (so long as there isn’t serious blowback).

    The stuff about Banon being sidelined is quite concerning though.

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  47. guest says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Obama and Bush both went to Harvard grad school (JD and MBA respectively).

    I wonder if they got in on their merits.

    In particular, how did Bush make it into a Harvard MBA? In what world does George W. Bush get into the most competitive business-school in the world?

    In a world where it matters who your daddy is.

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  48. @Jack Highlands
    'Hedge fund guys.' My brother-in-law has run two small hedge funds broke over the last two decades, while managing to live rather well. And in that business, he's quite a small potatoes goy with no family connections; just a former theoretical physicist with a sincere, no doubt naive, belief in what your Takimag colleague Scott Locklin used to call "quantitative finance."

    Imagine how Kushner père et famille can live on your money.

    Say, whatever happened to Scott Locklin? Used to be a burgeoning figure on the 'Dissident Lite.' I always wondered whether he ran a fund or two into the ground. Or maybe prospective employers weren't keen on his political expressions.

    An unemployed Princeton grad killed his father when pops threatened to decrease son’s allowance. Turns out the 70 year-old hedge fund manager was only worth $1.6 million — probably not even enough to retire and maintain his current lifestyle.

    Martin Shkreli decided to go into pharmaceuticals because there wasn’t enough money in hedge funds.

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  49. guest says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Maybe not.

    According to one source, Bannon might be on the way out.

    http://uproxx.com/news/trump-may-dump-bannon-priebus/

    If Bannon is gone, then it's just Sessions and Miller.

    There are also calls for Sessions to resign over his role in the Russia "scandal." If Bannon is no longer there, then there won't be anyone to protect Sessions. I could see the Kushner clique pushing him out.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/mar/02/jeff-sessions-calls-for-resignation-claims-lies-russia

    As for Stephen Miller, there are those who want him out too. Joe Scarborough (who talks to Trump pretty often) hates Miller and has really torn into him. It's unusual to see a speechwriter get hit so hard, but Scarborough doesn't want him in the Trump administration. Sessions brought Miller to DC with him, but what happens if Sessions and Bannon are gone.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2017/02/13/joe-scarborough-is-trying-to-make-trump-turn-on-stephen-miller/?utm_term=.c352fba34869

    Even the Washington Post is surprised by how much Scarborough hates Miller.

    There are also a lot of stories about how a lot of original Trump backers are getting frozen out of White House jobs, which are now going to Republican establishment types and New York globalists (such as Goldman Sachs exec Gary Cohn).

    No one who takes Joe Scarborough that seriously deserves to be president.

    Read More
  50. guest says:
    @Anonymous
    What do you mean, “grubby secret”? This has been their business plan for several hundred years; introducing the scions of wealthy New England families to each other is the whole point of Harvard.

    What I've been wondering is if a big part of the purpose of these top schools now is to introduce the scions of the global elite to each other, and if that's the reason for admitting so many international students.

    Also to indoctrinate the foreign students in…whatever it is Harvard teaches and our elites believe or pretend to believe in.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I hadn't thought of that angle, but that's a really good point.
  51. Dr. X says:

    My book exposed a grubby secret of American higher education: that the rich buy their underachieving children’s way into elite universities with massive, tax-deductible donations.

    Ummm… exactly when did this become a “secret”? Ted Kennedy, call your office…

    Read More
  52. @JohnnyWalker123
    Obama and Bush both went to Harvard grad school (JD and MBA respectively).

    I wonder if they got in on their merits.

    In particular, how did Bush make it into a Harvard MBA? In what world does George W. Bush get into the most competitive business-school in the world?

    The same world in which he becomes a major league baseball team owner, for very little down.

    Read More
  53. Whiskey says: • Website

    I’ve given up on Trump, his family and making his daughter and son in law happy come first before country, duty, or plain common sense.

    There will be no border wall, deportations, limits on mass Third World Immigration, or anything. America is over. We will have endless and meaningless wars we are not aiming to win nor will be allowed to win. We will be over-run by half or more of the Third World because nice Blonde Ladies figure that any “REAL” White man would be just fine like her husband or father. Bannon is already fired, he just does not know it yet. Between family and the dude who creates success, its always family. Just ask Roger Ailes, who James Murdoch got rid of in his make-over of Fox News into MSNBC. Because as all upper class people, he HATES HATE HATES ordinary Whites. Because aristocratic White women always have: Marie Antoinette being exhibit A.

    All that being said, the role of Harvard, Yale, etc. is to create the leadership class. When it is comprised entirely of Ziad BLM, Transgender Theys, (stabbing and non-stabbing variety), dumb rich dudes, random Third World princelings like Obama, etc. then both the ability to connect emotionally and sway the White population erodes, and the competence to find their behinds in the dark with a flashlight and map erodes to nothing.

    America is not even France in its leadership class: Kushner is stupid and idiotic to think that after four years of Bush II re-runs Trump and his whole clan won’t be bounced into prison by Black King in Exile Obama and the obvious Kamala Harris Restoration. Jared Kushner’s only chance at avoiding jail just for being a Trump clan member is to motivate the base who gave Trump the narrowest of victories. Just as the only way to keep the Murdoch money machine going is to generate the free cash that ultra cheap Fox News throws off by simply not being an uber-liberal MSNBC. But James and Lachlan Murdoch are too stupid to add up the yearly debt payments for Fox (over a billion per year) and the profits from Fox News (a bit more).

    We don’t have the French ENArchs who can at least add two and two and get four; we have the Austrian Archdukes because Harvard is in the business of selecting not future big shots with a smattering of able ordinary men and women; but SJW idiots, rich men’s spawn and Third World princelings.

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  54. @Jack Highlands
    Re Miller, let's face it: the Kushner issue does raise the old spectre again, as it should. Most of us worried about it; now most of us are vindicated.

    So where does Miller stand? On the one hand, we have to suspect he was the main VDare reader in the group who got the Sailer Strategy through to Trump in the first place, presumably with cred from Sessions. OTOH, his disavowal of Spencer in that Mother Jones piece seems hypocritical, vindictive and weak. And untrue; he must have known Spencer, who I understand was already at AmConMag, ie working with no less known a figure than Buchanan.

    Re the old spectre: this may even turn out to be a great tactical victory for Trump, allowing him to do things, thanks to 59 missiles and some unfortunate dead in Syria, that would otherwise have bogged him down forever. But that wouldn't change the fact that the mask is off: it's clear Kushner is a globalist stooge who is trying to derail the essence of electoral Trumpism, which is populist nationalism. As personified in Bannon.

    OTOH, his disavowal of Spencer in that Mother Jones piece seems hypocritical, vindictive and weak. And untrue; he must have known Spencer, who I understand was already at AmConMag, ie working with no less known a figure than Buchanan.

    How is our cause helped if Miller does not disavowing Spencer?

    And it’s not like Spencer was some innocent private citizen whose privacy was invaded by the media or by Miller blabbing away. Spencer chose to go public with his alleged personal relationships. The honorable thing is for public figures like Spencer to keep personal relationships private.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Highlands
    As I'm to the right of Spencer (a position I share with thousands of activists, approximated at TheRightStuff.biz), my question would be, "how is our cause helped if Miller does not avow Spencer?

    And it must come to that if America is to become great again, for it was made great as a White offshoot of Western Europe, and fell from greatness through anti-White animus, the latter instigated in no small part by Jews.
  55. Old fogey says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    Is Bannon really that disgusting looking? I really don't get all the comments about his appearance.

    I think he puts enough into his appearance that it's really rude the way people always comment on how ugly he is. And I also just don't think he's that bad looking.

    You are perfectly correct. There is nothing unnatural or off-putting in Bannon’s appearance. He looks like a very intelligent normal person to me.

    Read More
  56. @JohnnyWalker123
    Kushner is Jewish and went to a yeshiva high school.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jared_Kushner

    Kushner was raised in a Modern Orthodox Jewish family in New Jersey.[18] He graduated from the Frisch School, a private, coed yeshiva high school, in 1999.
     
    His father spent two years in prison for tax evasion, illegal donations, and witness tampering.

    His father, Charles Kushner, was arrested on charges of tax evasion, illegal campaign donations, and witness tampering in 2004, and was eventually convicted on all charges (by the then U.S. Attorney Chris Christie)[30] and sentenced to two years in federal prison.[
     
    Bannon called Jared Kushner a "cuck" and a "globalist."

    https://www.thejc.com/news/world/bannon-and-cuck-kushner-1.435984

    According to the Daily Beast, Mr Bannon called Mr Kushner, who is Jewish, a “Cuck” and a “Globalist” - terms that carry antisemitic undertones, and are often used by the radical alt-right
     
    Bannon wanted to stay out Syria. Kushner wanted to go into Syria.

    http://www.salon.com/2017/04/07/the-kushner-bannon-feud-is-about-ideology-and-steve-bannon-is-losing/

    President Donald Trump’s decision to attack Syria with missile strikes was apparently executed over Bannon’s strenuous objections, according to a report by New York Magazine. Bannon’s reasoning was that the missile strikes violated Trump’s America First ideology, while his ideological foe in the White House — Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner — insisted they were necessary as a response to Bashar al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons against his own people.
     
    The Kushner-Bannon fight is about ideology. Kushner is a globalist, while Bannon is an Alt-Right nationalist.

    While Bannon’s office contains a board that lists what he believes represent Trump’s core populist promises, Kushner has pushed against them with a centrist perspective that has caused Bannon to call him a “Democrat.” (Kushner has indeed given a great deal of money to Democrats and has in the past expressed admiration for presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy.)
     
    Kushner is well-liked by Slate columnist Michelle Goldberg. Bannon is not.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2017/04/bannon_and_nunes_out_kushner_in_we_might_be_ok.html

    Jared Kushner may save us all.
     
    According to a CNN broadcaster, Bannon might be out of the Whitehouse in the next few months.

    If, in actuality, Trump is motivated by the desire to get handjobs from the likes of Bill Kristol, Bannon is figuratively a dead man walking.

    Read More
  57. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Ron Unz
    Yeah, exactly. Although I'm sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years, Jared Kushner seems to be the only provable case, partly based on the trial records that sent his father off to federal prison.

    During my unsuccessful Free Harvard/Fair Harvard campaign last year, I was sure the MSM journalists would absolutely jump at the Kushner story when I gave it to them, given that the MSM hated Trump so much and were willing to use anything against him.

    But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.

    Mr. Unz,

    I went to a good high school in Mass. and in my senior year 12 students were admitted to Harvard. Of those kids, probably only a handful deserved to be there.

    For instance, one of the kids had a father and a sister who were alumni . His father worked in an important position at a major insurance company, so I’m sure the dad donated money, although not Charles Kushner money. They were neighbors on Martha’s vineyard with the Harvard application reader for our area, and so I think there was an unofficial assurance that he would get in. He wasn’t a terrible student, but he would probably be going to Bates, or something, if not for this.

    There were also the cases of professors whose children sort of regressed to the mean. Once again, not terrible students, but then again certainly not Harvard material either.

    Also, there were affirmative action admits. The kids who got in via affirmative action were worse students than the kids listed above. I would say affirmative Action was worth about 300 SAT points (on a 2400 point scale) whereas the kids above probably got like 150 points (this is all very rough guesstimation). In any case one of the girls who got in through affirmative action had a white mother, and had parents who made a lot of money. The other girl was hispanic, poor, and earnest, but not especially bright.

    Read More
    • Replies: @benjaminl
    That's interesting to hear. I was aware that students from a) Massachusetts b) New England and c) the Northeast in general were overrepresented at Harvard, etc., but I assumed it was because the students from there were smarter, or more desirous of Ivy credentials, or more ideologically in tune with the elite, or all of the above. Didn't realize there was so much of this going on.
    , @newrouter
    "I went to a good high school in Mass."

    Ivanka you!!11!!
  58. anon says: • Disclaimer

    I don’t understand how dumb people can graduate from Harvard without being permanently mentally scarred. Why aren’t they suffering nervous breakdowns over not being able to keep up with the workload? Why isn’t their self-esteem being destroyed by being surrounded by people who are way smarter than them? I guess that wealth does equal happiness after all.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    don’t understand how dumb people can graduate from Harvard without being permanently mentally scarred. Why aren’t they suffering nervous breakdowns over not being able to keep up with the workload?

    1. In a number of majors, the workload isn't what it used to be.
    2. Decent grades are easier to come by than a couple of decades ago.
    3. If your parents are wealthy, there is little downside to mediocre performance, as long as you get your degree. AFAIK, Harvard doesn't flunk anyone out after freshman year anymore.

    , @oddsbodkins
    It is nearly impossible to give a D or an F to a student in the ivy league.
    , @guest
    I don't mind being around more intelligent, better looking, more athletic, more creative people. Happens more than I'd like; I'm a middling human being. I don't live a high-pressure life, however, so I wouldn't know about that part.

    If you don't have an image of yourself as being the smartest guy in the room, the best looking, the whatever, you won't have your expectations crushed. And there are always other games to be played. Kushner had money, yes. He also sleeps with a beautiful woman and has the ear of the president. Would you take that, or being Harvard-smart? That ain't everything. Some people know that, even (especially?) at college age.

    , @black sea
    I think you are confusing Harvard with MIT.

    The median course grade at Harvard is -A. Ninety-one percent of the students graduate with honors.

    As the old saying goes, "The hardest thing about Harvard is getting in." And apparently that's not so hard with enough of Daddy's money.
  59. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Ron Unz
    Yeah, exactly. Although I'm sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years, Jared Kushner seems to be the only provable case, partly based on the trial records that sent his father off to federal prison.

    During my unsuccessful Free Harvard/Fair Harvard campaign last year, I was sure the MSM journalists would absolutely jump at the Kushner story when I gave it to them, given that the MSM hated Trump so much and were willing to use anything against him.

    But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.

    (((other factors)))

    hi, i fixed it for you

    Read More
  60. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @candid_observer
    While the Syria thing makes me cringe, there's a reasonable chance it will not lead to any escalated actions in Syria. It may actually make it easier for Trump to do his job, because he's changing the story, getting some positive comments from some severe critics, putting to rest the idiot Russia narrative, and generally, to many people, looking every bit the President.

    Of course I continue to be baffled as to why he did this thing in Syria to begin with.

    I mean, pictures of kids?

    Jesus. Just Jesus.

    It may actually make it easier for Trump to do his job, because he’s changing the story, getting some positive comments from some severe critics, putting to rest the idiot Russia narrative, and generally, to many people, looking every bit the President.

    Let’s hope the Susan Rice story is not allowed to die. It appeared something was about to blow open in the “tapped my wires” story. Please don’t let Rice and company off the hook.

    Read More
  61. benjaminl says:
    @Anon
    Mr. Unz,

    I went to a good high school in Mass. and in my senior year 12 students were admitted to Harvard. Of those kids, probably only a handful deserved to be there.

    For instance, one of the kids had a father and a sister who were alumni . His father worked in an important position at a major insurance company, so I'm sure the dad donated money, although not Charles Kushner money. They were neighbors on Martha's vineyard with the Harvard application reader for our area, and so I think there was an unofficial assurance that he would get in. He wasn't a terrible student, but he would probably be going to Bates, or something, if not for this.

    There were also the cases of professors whose children sort of regressed to the mean. Once again, not terrible students, but then again certainly not Harvard material either.

    Also, there were affirmative action admits. The kids who got in via affirmative action were worse students than the kids listed above. I would say affirmative Action was worth about 300 SAT points (on a 2400 point scale) whereas the kids above probably got like 150 points (this is all very rough guesstimation). In any case one of the girls who got in through affirmative action had a white mother, and had parents who made a lot of money. The other girl was hispanic, poor, and earnest, but not especially bright.

    That’s interesting to hear. I was aware that students from a) Massachusetts b) New England and c) the Northeast in general were overrepresented at Harvard, etc., but I assumed it was because the students from there were smarter, or more desirous of Ivy credentials, or more ideologically in tune with the elite, or all of the above. Didn’t realize there was so much of this going on.

    Read More
  62. When Jared was a teen Benjamin Netanyahu literally slept in his bed. Jared moved to the basement that night. Trump is obviously relying on Kushner for advice on the Middle East.

    Israel wants Assad gone in order to counter growing Iranian hegemony. Separate Iran from Hezbollah in Lebanon by taking out Assad, even if it means backing groups sympathetic to al Qaeda. Sy Hersh wrote about this in a March 5, 2007, New Yorker article, “The Redirection.”

    Top neocon thinking goes like this:

    1) An EMP weapon (nuclear bomb) could result in the death of up to 90% of all Americans.

    2) Nobody’s hands are clean in the Middle East.

    3) Thus we’re justified in arming the same people who toppled the Twin Towers, because it hurts Iran.

    So here we are, with al Qaeda apparently calling in a U.S. air strike on Syrian government assets by setting off chemical weapons. Can’t prove that’s what happened, but I’m a good guesser.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    1) An EMP weapon (nuclear bomb) could result in the death of up to 90% of all Americans.
     
    That is almost certainly bullshit.
  63. @Opinionator

    OTOH, his disavowal of Spencer in that Mother Jones piece seems hypocritical, vindictive and weak. And untrue; he must have known Spencer, who I understand was already at AmConMag, ie working with no less known a figure than Buchanan.

     

    How is our cause helped if Miller does not disavowing Spencer?

    And it's not like Spencer was some innocent private citizen whose privacy was invaded by the media or by Miller blabbing away. Spencer chose to go public with his alleged personal relationships. The honorable thing is for public figures like Spencer to keep personal relationships private.

    As I’m to the right of Spencer (a position I share with thousands of activists, approximated at TheRightStuff.biz), my question would be, “how is our cause helped if Miller does not avow Spencer?

    And it must come to that if America is to become great again, for it was made great as a White offshoot of Western Europe, and fell from greatness through anti-White animus, the latter instigated in no small part by Jews.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Spencer represents the advocacy of ethnic cleansing and racial superiority.

    If Miller avowed Spencer he would be out of the White House. If Trump avows Spencer, he will be out of the White House.
  64. I know a nice kid who got into Stanford last year, whose dad made a large ($10+million) contribution to Stanford in the year preceding her application. Funny thing is, she may well have got in without the donation. Stellar grades, maxed out on IB courses, ethnic/cultural East Indian with an East African passport (and thus self-identified as African), and on the Olympic swim team of some minor country that she had been sent to boarding school at. Billionaire dad, transnational identity. I know the dad through business, and he was candid about it being a belt and suspenders move.

    The rest of us don’t stand a chance against the plutocratic class, and there are lots of them around, compared to 35 years ago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Karl
    62 Piltdown Man > The rest of us don’t stand a chance against the plutocratic class


    ....if you play by their rules, one of which is to give respect to a Harvard sheepskin.


    One is reminded of my constant whining about the contributions that iSteve ==could have been making== to the White American people, if he had just stopped reading the SJW press all day so that he could dissect it.

    I am friendly with a kid here who is about to finish his conscript service in Unit 8200. He wants to go to MIT (probably does have a plausible chance of getting in); I told him to instead, go to South Dakota School of Mines or Texas A&M.

    By the way, how did Harvard get its land? Who was genocided to make room for Harvard?

    , @Pericles
    Top education sort of mirrors home buying in America. First, you could use HOAs to keep out the riff raff. Now you make joining too expensive for the riff raff.
  65. @anon
    I don't understand how dumb people can graduate from Harvard without being permanently mentally scarred. Why aren't they suffering nervous breakdowns over not being able to keep up with the workload? Why isn't their self-esteem being destroyed by being surrounded by people who are way smarter than them? I guess that wealth does equal happiness after all.

    don’t understand how dumb people can graduate from Harvard without being permanently mentally scarred. Why aren’t they suffering nervous breakdowns over not being able to keep up with the workload?

    1. In a number of majors, the workload isn’t what it used to be.
    2. Decent grades are easier to come by than a couple of decades ago.
    3. If your parents are wealthy, there is little downside to mediocre performance, as long as you get your degree. AFAIK, Harvard doesn’t flunk anyone out after freshman year anymore.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    PiltdownMan:

    Yes, good grades are easier to achieve than at earlier times.

    To wit, 91% of Harvard students graduated summa, magna, or cum laude in 2001.

    Grade inflation on steroids!
    , @Jim Don Bob
    The average grade at Harvard is an A-. (https://www.boston.com/news/local-news/2015/05/27/harvard-class-with-a-average-not-worried-about-grade-inflation).

    You could probably graduate with a degree in liberal arts and skip classes altogether.
  66. Buddy Ray says:

    I’m leaning towards giving up hope. There is no way a man who promotes people based on nepotism will ever drain the swamp.

    Read More
  67. newrouter says:
    @Anon
    Mr. Unz,

    I went to a good high school in Mass. and in my senior year 12 students were admitted to Harvard. Of those kids, probably only a handful deserved to be there.

    For instance, one of the kids had a father and a sister who were alumni . His father worked in an important position at a major insurance company, so I'm sure the dad donated money, although not Charles Kushner money. They were neighbors on Martha's vineyard with the Harvard application reader for our area, and so I think there was an unofficial assurance that he would get in. He wasn't a terrible student, but he would probably be going to Bates, or something, if not for this.

    There were also the cases of professors whose children sort of regressed to the mean. Once again, not terrible students, but then again certainly not Harvard material either.

    Also, there were affirmative action admits. The kids who got in via affirmative action were worse students than the kids listed above. I would say affirmative Action was worth about 300 SAT points (on a 2400 point scale) whereas the kids above probably got like 150 points (this is all very rough guesstimation). In any case one of the girls who got in through affirmative action had a white mother, and had parents who made a lot of money. The other girl was hispanic, poor, and earnest, but not especially bright.

    “I went to a good high school in Mass.”

    Ivanka you!!11!!

    Read More
  68. Dan Hayes says:
    @PiltdownMan
    don’t understand how dumb people can graduate from Harvard without being permanently mentally scarred. Why aren’t they suffering nervous breakdowns over not being able to keep up with the workload?

    1. In a number of majors, the workload isn't what it used to be.
    2. Decent grades are easier to come by than a couple of decades ago.
    3. If your parents are wealthy, there is little downside to mediocre performance, as long as you get your degree. AFAIK, Harvard doesn't flunk anyone out after freshman year anymore.

    PiltdownMan:

    Yes, good grades are easier to achieve than at earlier times.

    To wit, 91% of Harvard students graduated summa, magna, or cum laude in 2001.

    Grade inflation on steroids!

    Read More
  69. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    https://ftalphaville.ft.com/2017/04/07/2187127/trump-appoints-pro-immigration-free-trader-as-cea-chair/

    Trump to nominate pro-immigration free-trading globalist as CEA chair

    America Needs more workers
    … With lackluster GDP growth threatening to become our new normal, allowing more immigrants to enter for the sake of employment is one of the few policies that might restore our old normal. If the U.S. doubled its total immigration and prioritized bringing in new workers, it could add more than half a percentage point a year to expected GDP growth.

    Understanding the role of the United States in the global economy
    … Liberalized trade — in broadly multilateral, regional, or bilateral agreements — is a key ingredient in the recipe for prosperity. … An absolute prerequisite for long-term economic growth is full participation in the global economy and trading system.

    Analysis of the economic effects of immigration reform
    … This paper explores the economic consequences of expanded immigration on the U.S. economy. It begins by reviewing the immigration practices of our OECD trading partners, and documenting that immigration, as a share of the work force, is well below international norms. The literature identifying the economic impact of immigration is reviewed, suggesting that economic growth could expand significantly if immigration in the U.S. were expanded.

    These passages are by Kevin Hassett, the economist who will be nominated by Donald Trump to be the next chair of the Council of Economic Advisors.

    The latest reports of internal White House drama suggest that [Kushner pal] Gary Cohn is amassing power and that Steven Bannon is struggling. With the selection of Hassett as CEA chair, it would seem that nationalist forces have lost some ground when it comes to the economic advice reaching the president — at least for now.

    Anyone else tired of all this winning?

    Read More
  70. 5371 says:
    @Farenheit
    Anyone have any idea how much dough Joseph p Kennedy had to pony up to get his boys into Harvard ?....I'm betting teddy cost a mint.

    I suspect the Harvard Number has suffered even more extreme inflation than Harvard tuition.

    Read More
  71. Here’s another way of looking at this. By grossly overpaying for your child’s education at Harvard, you are providing funds that are used to maintain the school and hire excellent professors. This benefits all the students who only paid the normal price. It’s kind of like how first class passengers paying more subsidize the passengers riding in coach. So how is it unfair?

    What is unfair is when someone gets into Harvard based on their skin color, ethnicity, immigration/refugee status, or sexual preference. Then they get scholarships for the same reason.

    Read More
  72. @anon
    I don't understand how dumb people can graduate from Harvard without being permanently mentally scarred. Why aren't they suffering nervous breakdowns over not being able to keep up with the workload? Why isn't their self-esteem being destroyed by being surrounded by people who are way smarter than them? I guess that wealth does equal happiness after all.

    It is nearly impossible to give a D or an F to a student in the ivy league.

    Read More
  73. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    It’s so crazy to think that Kushner is stealing the Trump revolution away.

    Trump is a nasty old NYC real estate shark. He has thrown many people under the bus in his life. And it’s not a problem to betray the voters who put him in office.

    Trump has a Patton/Great General fixation. He was obviously lying about his promise of no foreign wars.

    Trump never had any intention of significant deportations. The wall is the Maguffin in the movie of your mind.

    Trump doesn’t care about Obamacare. It’s a nuisance issue for him. He backed Ryancare just to get it out of the way. He literally doesn’t care about the details.

    All of the high powered inner circle liberals are in the white house because TRUMP WANTS THEM THERE. Those are his people.

    Read More
  74. Daniel Golden is a not-especially-bright middle class grind (Jewish, for those here who track that). He attended Harvard and was shocked, shocked to discover that its class profile and system of admission is different from CalTech’s.

    For 10 years, Golden has been pointing to Kushner as the prime example of Harvard admitting mediocre students for money. Events have shown that Golden and his source were idiots, and the Harvard admission office hit the ball out of the park by choosing Kushner over other applicants with higher scores.

    Read More
  75. Mr. Anon says:

    At least perhaps he isn’t super bright (although I doubt he’s a dullard).

    Read More
  76. Mr. Anon says:
    @Adam Grant
    When Jared was a teen Benjamin Netanyahu literally slept in his bed. Jared moved to the basement that night. Trump is obviously relying on Kushner for advice on the Middle East.

    Israel wants Assad gone in order to counter growing Iranian hegemony. Separate Iran from Hezbollah in Lebanon by taking out Assad, even if it means backing groups sympathetic to al Qaeda. Sy Hersh wrote about this in a March 5, 2007, New Yorker article, "The Redirection."

    Top neocon thinking goes like this:

    1) An EMP weapon (nuclear bomb) could result in the death of up to 90% of all Americans.

    2) Nobody's hands are clean in the Middle East.

    3) Thus we're justified in arming the same people who toppled the Twin Towers, because it hurts Iran.

    So here we are, with al Qaeda apparently calling in a U.S. air strike on Syrian government assets by setting off chemical weapons. Can't prove that's what happened, but I'm a good guesser.

    1) An EMP weapon (nuclear bomb) could result in the death of up to 90% of all Americans.

    That is almost certainly bullshit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Adam Grant
    I've heard leading neocons like Daniel Pipes state that an EMP could lead to the death of up to 90% of Americans. That numbercomes from the Congressional EMP Commission and has been used by Pipes and others to support the arming of unsavory groups in Syria. Here's an article that Pipes mentioned on his twitter feed:





    Iran endorses nuclear EMP attack on United States

    By PAUL BEDARD (@SECRETSBEDARD) • 3/19/15 11:46 AM
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    America's electric grid threatened; blackout could kill 9 of 10
    Washington Examiner


    00:0001:00
    Suspected for years of plotting to dismantle the U.S. electric grid, American officials have confirmed that Iranian military brass have endorsed a nuclear electromagnetic pulse explosion that would attack the country's power system.

    American defense experts made the discovery while translating a secret Iranian military handbook, raising new concerns about Tehran's recent nuclear talks with the administration.


    Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, right, attends a graduation ceremony of army cadets, accompanied by Revolutionary Guard commander Mohammad Ali Jafari, left, Chief of the General Staff of Iran's Armed Forces, Hasan Firouzabadi, second left in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, Oct. 5 2013. (AP Photo/Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader)




    The issue of a nuclear EMP attack was raised in the final hours of this week's elections in Israel when U.S. authority Peter Vincent Pry penned a column for Arutz Sheva warning of Iran's threat to free nations.



    "Iranian military documents describe such a scenario — including a recently translated Iranian military textbook that endorses nuclear EMP attack against the United States," he wrote.

    A knowledgable source said that the textbook discusses an EMP attack on America in 20 different places.

    Arizona Republican Rep. Trent Franks, who is leading an effort to protect the U.S. electric grid from an EMP attack, has recently made similar claims based on the document translated by military authorities.

    Once sneered at by critics, recent moves by Iran and North Korea have given credibility to the potential EMP threat from an atmospheric nuclear explosion over the U.S.



    Pry has suggested ways for Iran to deliver a nuclear attack: by ship launched off the East Coast, a missile or via satellite.

    Either way the result could be destruction of all or part of the U.S. electric grid, robbing the public of power, computers, water and communications for potentially a year.


    Frank Gaffney, founder and president of the Center for Security Policy, said the threat to the grid can also come from solar activity.

    He has been pushing Washington and state governments to take the relatively inexpensive move to protect the electric grid, though his concern is from a nuclear attack by Iran or North Korea.


    "It is increasingly frightening," he said. "We have to get started on this."

    He noted that Iran's top military leader recently announced that he was ready for war with the U.S.

    "We are ready for the decisive battle against the U.S. and the Zionist regime," Iranian Armed Forces Chief of Staff General Hassan Firouzabadi told Iran's Fars News Agency in 2014.

    Below is from Pry's column that discusses an Iran EMP attack:



    Iran armed with nuclear missiles poses an unprecedented threat to global civilization.



    One nuclear warhead detonated at high-altitude over the United States would blackout the national electric grid and other life sustaining critical infrastructures for months or years by means of an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). A nationwide blackout lasting one year, according to the Congressional EMP Commission, could cause chaos and starvation that leaves 90 percent of Americans dead.



    Iranian military documents describe such a scenario--including a recently translated Iranian military textbook that endorses nuclear EMP attack against the United States.



    Thus, Iran with a small number of nuclear missiles can by EMP attack threaten the existence of modernity and be the death knell for Western principles of international law, humanism and freedom. For the first time in history, a failed state like Iran could destroy the most successful societies on Earth and convert an evolving benign world order into world chaos.

    Paul Bedard, the Washington Examiner's "Washington Secrets" columnist, can be contacted at pbedard@washingtonexaminer.com.
  77. Mr. Anon says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Maybe not.

    According to one source, Bannon might be on the way out.

    http://uproxx.com/news/trump-may-dump-bannon-priebus/

    If Bannon is gone, then it's just Sessions and Miller.

    There are also calls for Sessions to resign over his role in the Russia "scandal." If Bannon is no longer there, then there won't be anyone to protect Sessions. I could see the Kushner clique pushing him out.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/mar/02/jeff-sessions-calls-for-resignation-claims-lies-russia

    As for Stephen Miller, there are those who want him out too. Joe Scarborough (who talks to Trump pretty often) hates Miller and has really torn into him. It's unusual to see a speechwriter get hit so hard, but Scarborough doesn't want him in the Trump administration. Sessions brought Miller to DC with him, but what happens if Sessions and Bannon are gone.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2017/02/13/joe-scarborough-is-trying-to-make-trump-turn-on-stephen-miller/?utm_term=.c352fba34869

    Even the Washington Post is surprised by how much Scarborough hates Miller.

    There are also a lot of stories about how a lot of original Trump backers are getting frozen out of White House jobs, which are now going to Republican establishment types and New York globalists (such as Goldman Sachs exec Gary Cohn).

    There are also calls for Sessions to resign over his role in the Russia “scandal.” If Bannon is no longer there, then there won’t be anyone to protect Sessions. I could see the Kushner clique pushing him out.

    Trump quite possibly owes his Presidency to Jeff Sessions. During the primary, Alabama turned out 44% for Trump – a bunch of southern baptists voted for the Yankee New Yorker who doesn’t care about abortion or gay rights. Jeff Sessions endorsement probably had a lot to do with that. The deep south – against expectation – came out strong for Trump. If Trump gets rid of Sessions, he’s a fool. Naturally, my desire would be for Trump to keep Sessions, Miller, and Bannon, and accord them even greater influence.

    Read More
  78. guest says:
    @anon
    I don't understand how dumb people can graduate from Harvard without being permanently mentally scarred. Why aren't they suffering nervous breakdowns over not being able to keep up with the workload? Why isn't their self-esteem being destroyed by being surrounded by people who are way smarter than them? I guess that wealth does equal happiness after all.

    I don’t mind being around more intelligent, better looking, more athletic, more creative people. Happens more than I’d like; I’m a middling human being. I don’t live a high-pressure life, however, so I wouldn’t know about that part.

    If you don’t have an image of yourself as being the smartest guy in the room, the best looking, the whatever, you won’t have your expectations crushed. And there are always other games to be played. Kushner had money, yes. He also sleeps with a beautiful woman and has the ear of the president. Would you take that, or being Harvard-smart? That ain’t everything. Some people know that, even (especially?) at college age.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Kushner is a handsome guy in a slightly Justin Trudeau way. Part of Harvard's admission strategy is to make sure to let in some good-looking people.
  79. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I’ll bet a zillion Trumpbucks that Jared & Ivanka actually finalized Gorsuch as the scotus nominee.

    I’ll bet another zillion Trumpbucks that they chose Gorsuch because of the left wing church he attends.

    I’ll bet yet another zillion Trumpbucks that Gorsuch will be another Kennedy within five years.

    Read More
  80. @guest
    I don't mind being around more intelligent, better looking, more athletic, more creative people. Happens more than I'd like; I'm a middling human being. I don't live a high-pressure life, however, so I wouldn't know about that part.

    If you don't have an image of yourself as being the smartest guy in the room, the best looking, the whatever, you won't have your expectations crushed. And there are always other games to be played. Kushner had money, yes. He also sleeps with a beautiful woman and has the ear of the president. Would you take that, or being Harvard-smart? That ain't everything. Some people know that, even (especially?) at college age.

    Kushner is a handsome guy in a slightly Justin Trudeau way. Part of Harvard’s admission strategy is to make sure to let in some good-looking people.

    Read More
    • Replies: @academic gossip

    Part of Harvard’s admission strategy is to make sure to let in some good-looking people.
     
    Is this something they can know for 17 year olds, given that kids are still developing?
    I think they might consider high placement in a major beauty contest as a significant item on a resume and thus admit some state or regional beauty pageant winners with good test scores.

    In other Harvard - Sailer intersectionality: http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2017/4/6/fair-harvard-lyrics-change/


    Harvard will hold a competition to change the final line of “Fair Harvard,” the University’s 181-year-old alma mater, which has read “Till the stock of the Puritans die” since its composition in 1836
     
    , @Anonymous
    Kushner is a handsome guy in a slightly Justin Trudeau way. Part of Harvard’s admission strategy is to make sure to let in some good-looking people.

    He definitely has a look similar to Justin Trudeau's, and both bear a resemblance to Matthew McConaughey.

  81. Rod1963 says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    Yes and no.

    Trump blew up bits and pieces of a old airbase which got the Neo-Con’s off his back and sent a message to that fat dwarf in NK and let the Chinese know he doesn’t screw around. Oddly enough no one is talking about the second base supposedly bombed. The Russians report only half of the SLCM’s reached their target.

    This is weird, even RT doesn’t mention the second air base.

    Then he has Tillerson put on a show verbal slapping the Russians. Shutting up the Democrats.

    Which is all fine provided he goes no further. If he escalates, he seals his fate.

    Of course when you play real politik like that, especially when you run on a platform of putting America first, Trump is risking turning his base against him.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    My FB feed, filled with salt of the earth types who repost Trump memes, is pretty much 100% "freedom boner" style memes about Trump Strong.

    I think as long as he keeps from invading Syria, he'll be alright.

    I honestly can't take 90% of the iSteve commentariat seriously anymore because its all people trying to out doom each other around here based on the flimsiest of pretexts.

    There is no penalty for being wrong. Every bump in the road is GOODBYE AMERICA and then when the mushroom clouds don't appear they just stumble around until the next situation (unless they're patting themselves on the back about being the Secret Masters of Politics lmfao).
  82. anonguy says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Maybe not.

    According to one source, Bannon might be on the way out.

    http://uproxx.com/news/trump-may-dump-bannon-priebus/

    If Bannon is gone, then it's just Sessions and Miller.

    There are also calls for Sessions to resign over his role in the Russia "scandal." If Bannon is no longer there, then there won't be anyone to protect Sessions. I could see the Kushner clique pushing him out.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/mar/02/jeff-sessions-calls-for-resignation-claims-lies-russia

    As for Stephen Miller, there are those who want him out too. Joe Scarborough (who talks to Trump pretty often) hates Miller and has really torn into him. It's unusual to see a speechwriter get hit so hard, but Scarborough doesn't want him in the Trump administration. Sessions brought Miller to DC with him, but what happens if Sessions and Bannon are gone.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2017/02/13/joe-scarborough-is-trying-to-make-trump-turn-on-stephen-miller/?utm_term=.c352fba34869

    Even the Washington Post is surprised by how much Scarborough hates Miller.

    There are also a lot of stories about how a lot of original Trump backers are getting frozen out of White House jobs, which are now going to Republican establishment types and New York globalists (such as Goldman Sachs exec Gary Cohn).

    Trump manages the White House staff like Bob Wills managed the roster of the Texas Playboys.

    If you don’t know what I’m talking about, google is your friend as well as not knowing enough about Bob Wills, American music icon, you should be ashamed you gotta google him.

    This stuff is so easy.

    Read More
  83. black sea says:
    @anon
    I don't understand how dumb people can graduate from Harvard without being permanently mentally scarred. Why aren't they suffering nervous breakdowns over not being able to keep up with the workload? Why isn't their self-esteem being destroyed by being surrounded by people who are way smarter than them? I guess that wealth does equal happiness after all.

    I think you are confusing Harvard with MIT.

    The median course grade at Harvard is -A. Ninety-one percent of the students graduate with honors.

    As the old saying goes, “The hardest thing about Harvard is getting in.” And apparently that’s not so hard with enough of Daddy’s money.

    Read More
  84. Ivy says:

    At what point does the Harvard Number become .45? Let in a few oligarch spawn to find out.

    Read More
  85. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    My opinions are mixed.
    I brute-forced it into a HYP school (and contrary to conventional wisdom, this is possible) but my “results” are unimpressive. I’m extremely underemployed and now posting anonymously on iSteve. I could probably use my real name since no one knows who I am, but I dream.
    But still…. Jared Kushner managed to become (it seems) one of the top two advisors to the president of the United States. How exactly is Harvard wrong? Maybe I’m being somewhat cynical, but the guy clearly has something going on.
    Apparently Bannon is calling him a “cuck” and a “Democrat”. I sympathize with Bannon, but Jared seems to be a very competent Democratic cuck, if that is what he really is. Life is complex,

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    He managed to marry Ivanka. Not a small feat, but you don't need to be smart or competent, being rich, tall and handsome with a nice, but not too nice personality might do the trick.

    Then he gained the trust of his father-in-law, for which you need to have a nice personality and also be an at least somewhat competent businessman.

    Then you have to be lucky for your father-in-law to become president. Some stories have it that he was running some computer simulations to show where he needed to hold speeches.

    That's not unimpressive at all (though the much of it, like being handsome etc. is or should be irrelevant to Harvard), though one might wonder how many other people would have been capable of doing that.
    , @eD
    "I brute-forced it into a HYP school (and contrary to conventional wisdom, this is possible) but my “results” are unimpressive. I’m extremely underemployed and now posting anonymously on iSteve."

    The USA is clearly becoming a more caste based society, so I suspect you are not the only person in this situation.

    As someone else pointed out, these schools increasingly exist for the children of the 1% -and now its the 1% from around the world- to spend some time together as young adults and make connections. If you are a middle class student who got into these places through good grads/ test scores, these places are just not for you. I would advise a bright middle class student entering college in 2017 to go to their State U., where the connections they would be making would be within their own caste and might actually be useful down the road.

    If things continue on as they have, the next step is that HYP just stops admitting middle class students. Actually this would return things to how they were before the GI bill. The thing about that period is that an Ivy League degree just wasn't thought as something that a bright middle class man (no co-ed higher education!) would normally have, and it was normal to be successful, even in professions, without any bachelor of arts or equivalent at all. Unfortunately for a few generations, there will be a lag before the culture catches up with the fact that things are not as they were in the post World War 2 decades in this country, as in other things.
  86. @Steve Sailer
    Kushner is a handsome guy in a slightly Justin Trudeau way. Part of Harvard's admission strategy is to make sure to let in some good-looking people.

    Part of Harvard’s admission strategy is to make sure to let in some good-looking people.

    Is this something they can know for 17 year olds, given that kids are still developing?
    I think they might consider high placement in a major beauty contest as a significant item on a resume and thus admit some state or regional beauty pageant winners with good test scores.

    In other Harvard – Sailer intersectionality: http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2017/4/6/fair-harvard-lyrics-change/

    Harvard will hold a competition to change the final line of “Fair Harvard,” the University’s 181-year-old alma mater, which has read “Till the stock of the Puritans die” since its composition in 1836

    Read More
  87. jackmcg says:

    One of those conspiracy theories that just sounds so perfectly plausible is that Charles Kushner was working for Israeli intelligence specializing in blackmail. Kushner’s Israeli govt. relationships are well known, as is Kushner’s penchant for blackmail and sketchy circles.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Another conspiracy theory is that there really is a Trump-Putin connection, except it goes through Kushner to his Chabad rabbi to Putin's favorite Chabad rabbi to Putin, so nobody talks about it.
  88. @jackmcg
    One of those conspiracy theories that just sounds so perfectly plausible is that Charles Kushner was working for Israeli intelligence specializing in blackmail. Kushner's Israeli govt. relationships are well known, as is Kushner's penchant for blackmail and sketchy circles.

    Another conspiracy theory is that there really is a Trump-Putin connection, except it goes through Kushner to his Chabad rabbi to Putin’s favorite Chabad rabbi to Putin, so nobody talks about it.

    Read More
  89. Realist says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    Trump is just another dumb ass pawn of the deep state.

    Read More
  90. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2017/03/30/i-worked-with-jared-kushner-hes-the-wrong-businessman-to-reinvent-government/

    … I don’t even know how to quantify Kushner’s expertise, anyway. Yes, he ran the company — which he inherited, not uncommon in New York’s dynastic, insular real estate world. But he was sure he had the goods. When I worked for him, I didn’t think he had a realistic view of his own capabilities since, like his father-in-law, he seemed to view his wealth and its concomitant accoutrements as rewards for his personal success in business, and not something he would have had in any case. To me, he appeared to view his position and net worth as the products of an essentially meritocratic process.

    Read More
  91. Lindamae says:

    Ha!
    J got in the same way Obama got into his prep school and later college, perhaps?
    However, it’s hypocritical to make a big issue on such a normal event.

    Read More
  92. sabril says:

    My child just went through the whole college admissions process and what was striking to me was the level of discrimination against East Asian kids by elite schools. In fact, there was one girl with the misfortune of having an Asian last name despite being 3/4 white. She got slammed by all the top schools even though she had good grades and test scores and is the sort of genuinely good person who gets excellent recommendations.

    Read More
  93. Karl says:
    @PiltdownMan
    I know a nice kid who got into Stanford last year, whose dad made a large ($10+million) contribution to Stanford in the year preceding her application. Funny thing is, she may well have got in without the donation. Stellar grades, maxed out on IB courses, ethnic/cultural East Indian with an East African passport (and thus self-identified as African), and on the Olympic swim team of some minor country that she had been sent to boarding school at. Billionaire dad, transnational identity. I know the dad through business, and he was candid about it being a belt and suspenders move.

    The rest of us don't stand a chance against the plutocratic class, and there are lots of them around, compared to 35 years ago.

    62 Piltdown Man > The rest of us don’t stand a chance against the plutocratic class

    ….if you play by their rules, one of which is to give respect to a Harvard sheepskin.

    One is reminded of my constant whining about the contributions that iSteve ==could have been making== to the White American people, if he had just stopped reading the SJW press all day so that he could dissect it.

    I am friendly with a kid here who is about to finish his conscript service in Unit 8200. He wants to go to MIT (probably does have a plausible chance of getting in); I told him to instead, go to South Dakota School of Mines or Texas A&M.

    By the way, how did Harvard get its land? Who was genocided to make room for Harvard?

    Read More
  94. Pericles says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    Is Bannon really that disgusting looking? I really don't get all the comments about his appearance.

    I think he puts enough into his appearance that it's really rude the way people always comment on how ugly he is. And I also just don't think he's that bad looking.

    Maybe Bannon looks strange to wogs?

    Read More
  95. Pericles says:
    @PiltdownMan
    I know a nice kid who got into Stanford last year, whose dad made a large ($10+million) contribution to Stanford in the year preceding her application. Funny thing is, she may well have got in without the donation. Stellar grades, maxed out on IB courses, ethnic/cultural East Indian with an East African passport (and thus self-identified as African), and on the Olympic swim team of some minor country that she had been sent to boarding school at. Billionaire dad, transnational identity. I know the dad through business, and he was candid about it being a belt and suspenders move.

    The rest of us don't stand a chance against the plutocratic class, and there are lots of them around, compared to 35 years ago.

    Top education sort of mirrors home buying in America. First, you could use HOAs to keep out the riff raff. Now you make joining too expensive for the riff raff.

    Read More
  96. This anecdote from the late 1990s matches it up with what I later heard about the current Harvard Number as of 2010.

    Read More
  97. IHTG says:

    Kushner is descended from Bielski partisans, there’s some fire in that blue blood

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    Jared Kushner's paternal grandfather was born in Poland.
    Ivanka Trump is half-Czech. Together they have that western
    Slavonic, Central European connection
  98. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    Hope. I do trust, and like, Mr Trump. We do have Jeff Sessions as our AG. But we need to see some real action on immigration, such as a serious call for a moratorium.

    Time will tell how the Syrian foray plays out. I know we have to deal with lunatics in places like N Korea and Iran who understand one thing, and one thing only.

    Read More
  99. Ed says:
    @Opinionator
    I have hope, so long as Sessions, Bannon, and Miller are there.

    Well Bannon is hanging on by a thread, doubt he’ll finish out the year.

    Read More
  100. @Ron Unz
    Yeah, exactly. Although I'm sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years, Jared Kushner seems to be the only provable case, partly based on the trial records that sent his father off to federal prison.

    During my unsuccessful Free Harvard/Fair Harvard campaign last year, I was sure the MSM journalists would absolutely jump at the Kushner story when I gave it to them, given that the MSM hated Trump so much and were willing to use anything against him.

    But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.

    Although I’m sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years…

    No doubt about it. It’s just another racket. And it ain’t exactly news, either.

    Benjamin Franklin attended school for two years, and his schooling ended when he was ten.
    This is Ben Franklin (as Silence Dogood) at age 16 :

    “…I reflected in my Mind on the extreme Folly of those Parents, who, blind to their Childrens Dullness, and insensible of the Solidity of their Skulls, because they think their Purses can afford it, will need send them to the Temple of Learning, where, for want of a suitable Genius, they learn little more than how to carry themselves handsomely, and enter a Room genteely, (which might as well be acquir’d at a Dancing-School,) and from whence they return, after Abundance of Trouble and Charge, as great Blockheads as ever, only more proud and self-conceited.

    …[and] he, without much Study, presently interpreted it, assuring me, That it was a lively Representation of HARVARD COLLEGE, Etcetera. I remain, Sir, Your Humble Servant,

    Silence Dogood, (No. 4)

    Printed in The New-England Courant, May 14, 1722.

    Read More
  101. @Anonymous
    My opinions are mixed.
    I brute-forced it into a HYP school (and contrary to conventional wisdom, this is possible) but my "results" are unimpressive. I'm extremely underemployed and now posting anonymously on iSteve. I could probably use my real name since no one knows who I am, but I dream.
    But still.... Jared Kushner managed to become (it seems) one of the top two advisors to the president of the United States. How exactly is Harvard wrong? Maybe I'm being somewhat cynical, but the guy clearly has something going on.
    Apparently Bannon is calling him a "cuck" and a "Democrat". I sympathize with Bannon, but Jared seems to be a very competent Democratic cuck, if that is what he really is. Life is complex,

    He managed to marry Ivanka. Not a small feat, but you don’t need to be smart or competent, being rich, tall and handsome with a nice, but not too nice personality might do the trick.

    Then he gained the trust of his father-in-law, for which you need to have a nice personality and also be an at least somewhat competent businessman.

    Then you have to be lucky for your father-in-law to become president. Some stories have it that he was running some computer simulations to show where he needed to hold speeches.

    That’s not unimpressive at all (though the much of it, like being handsome etc. is or should be irrelevant to Harvard), though one might wonder how many other people would have been capable of doing that.

    Read More
  102. Didn’t Ivanka tweet in 2015 how it was stupid and unfair that you could be proud to be black but not to be white, or something along those lines? Or do I mix her up with someone? Perhaps with a parody account? I seem to remember that a commenter here cited it back then.

    Read More
  103. Thea says:

    This reminds me I still need to write a review for “The Myth of American Meritocracy”

    Gawker used to write scathing articles about Kushner years before he married Ivanka. For some reason they never liked him.

    Read More
  104. Dahlia says:
    @Ron Unz
    Yeah, exactly. Although I'm sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years, Jared Kushner seems to be the only provable case, partly based on the trial records that sent his father off to federal prison.

    During my unsuccessful Free Harvard/Fair Harvard campaign last year, I was sure the MSM journalists would absolutely jump at the Kushner story when I gave it to them, given that the MSM hated Trump so much and were willing to use anything against him.

    But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.

    I saw the Journolist clique passing it around and loving it, but true, not the elite guys.

    I *really* think that when Brad Parscale said Jared Kushner was important to his data operation, the biggest unsung success story of the election, he was probably not telling the entire truth. Just flattering of the boss’s son-in-law? I thought it a little strange when that big story came out about Kushner that Parscale was given little credit; too inconvenient for the narrative, I guess.

    But, though many factors elected Trump, Brad Parscale is one piece, that, if you removed him, Trump would have lost.

    Read More
    • Replies: @IHTG
    He recently retweeted this: https://twitter.com/parscale

    https://twitter.com/TrumpSuperPAC/status/850631411820363776
  105. @PiltdownMan
    don’t understand how dumb people can graduate from Harvard without being permanently mentally scarred. Why aren’t they suffering nervous breakdowns over not being able to keep up with the workload?

    1. In a number of majors, the workload isn't what it used to be.
    2. Decent grades are easier to come by than a couple of decades ago.
    3. If your parents are wealthy, there is little downside to mediocre performance, as long as you get your degree. AFAIK, Harvard doesn't flunk anyone out after freshman year anymore.

    The average grade at Harvard is an A-. (https://www.boston.com/news/local-news/2015/05/27/harvard-class-with-a-average-not-worried-about-grade-inflation).

    You could probably graduate with a degree in liberal arts and skip classes altogether.

    Read More
  106. Charles Kushner had hired a prostitute to seduce his brother-in-law, who was cooperating with federal authorities. Kushner then had a videotape of the tryst sent to his sister.

    I wonder what the Kushners have on Trump. Every time the two are together in a room, Kushner looks composed – with a hint of a smile. Trump looks disgruntled. The whole Trump shtick has been a mask of populism designed to get the usual suspects in power. If you think Trump will be non-interventionist or push hard against immigration, then you forget who owns him.

    Read More
  107. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    Never had hope, but figured he might be different. He isn’t.

    We don’t vote our way out of this.

    Read More
  108. @Mr. Anon

    1) An EMP weapon (nuclear bomb) could result in the death of up to 90% of all Americans.
     
    That is almost certainly bullshit.

    I’ve heard leading neocons like Daniel Pipes state that an EMP could lead to the death of up to 90% of Americans. That numbercomes from the Congressional EMP Commission and has been used by Pipes and others to support the arming of unsavory groups in Syria. Here’s an article that Pipes mentioned on his twitter feed:

    Iran endorses nuclear EMP attack on United States

    By PAUL BEDARD (@SECRETSBEDARD) • 3/19/15 11:46 AM
    SHARE
    TWEET
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    America’s electric grid threatened; blackout could kill 9 of 10
    Washington Examiner

    00:0001:00
    Suspected for years of plotting to dismantle the U.S. electric grid, American officials have confirmed that Iranian military brass have endorsed a nuclear electromagnetic pulse explosion that would attack the country’s power system.

    American defense experts made the discovery while translating a secret Iranian military handbook, raising new concerns about Tehran’s recent nuclear talks with the administration.

    Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, right, attends a graduation ceremony of army cadets, accompanied by Revolutionary Guard commander Mohammad Ali Jafari, left, Chief of the General Staff of Iran’s Armed Forces, Hasan Firouzabadi, second left in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, Oct. 5 2013. (AP Photo/Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader)

    The issue of a nuclear EMP attack was raised in the final hours of this week’s elections in Israel when U.S. authority Peter Vincent Pry penned a column for Arutz Sheva warning of Iran’s threat to free nations.

    “Iranian military documents describe such a scenario — including a recently translated Iranian military textbook that endorses nuclear EMP attack against the United States,” he wrote.

    A knowledgable source said that the textbook discusses an EMP attack on America in 20 different places.

    Arizona Republican Rep. Trent Franks, who is leading an effort to protect the U.S. electric grid from an EMP attack, has recently made similar claims based on the document translated by military authorities.

    Once sneered at by critics, recent moves by Iran and North Korea have given credibility to the potential EMP threat from an atmospheric nuclear explosion over the U.S.

    [MORE]

    Pry has suggested ways for Iran to deliver a nuclear attack: by ship launched off the East Coast, a missile or via satellite.

    Either way the result could be destruction of all or part of the U.S. electric grid, robbing the public of power, computers, water and communications for potentially a year.

    Frank Gaffney, founder and president of the Center for Security Policy, said the threat to the grid can also come from solar activity.

    He has been pushing Washington and state governments to take the relatively inexpensive move to protect the electric grid, though his concern is from a nuclear attack by Iran or North Korea.

    “It is increasingly frightening,” he said. “We have to get started on this.”

    He noted that Iran’s top military leader recently announced that he was ready for war with the U.S.

    “We are ready for the decisive battle against the U.S. and the Zionist regime,” Iranian Armed Forces Chief of Staff General Hassan Firouzabadi told Iran’s Fars News Agency in 2014.

    Below is from Pry’s column that discusses an Iran EMP attack:

    Iran armed with nuclear missiles poses an unprecedented threat to global civilization.

    One nuclear warhead detonated at high-altitude over the United States would blackout the national electric grid and other life sustaining critical infrastructures for months or years by means of an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). A nationwide blackout lasting one year, according to the Congressional EMP Commission, could cause chaos and starvation that leaves 90 percent of Americans dead.

    Iranian military documents describe such a scenario–including a recently translated Iranian military textbook that endorses nuclear EMP attack against the United States.

    Thus, Iran with a small number of nuclear missiles can by EMP attack threaten the existence of modernity and be the death knell for Western principles of international law, humanism and freedom. For the first time in history, a failed state like Iran could destroy the most successful societies on Earth and convert an evolving benign world order into world chaos.

    Paul Bedard, the Washington Examiner’s “Washington Secrets” columnist, can be contacted at pbedard@washingtonexaminer.com.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I’ve heard leading neocons like Daniel Pipes state that an EMP could lead to the death of up to 90% of Americans. That number comes from the Congressional EMP Commission and has been used by Pipes and others to support the arming of unsavory groups in Syria. Here’s an article that Pipes mentioned on his twitter feed:
     
    Which to me sounds like a means of ginning up american resolve to oppose Iran. One or two nuclear weapons is not really much of a threat to the U.S., unless these dire claims about EMP are true. By the way, I looked in the report you mentioned, which I believe is this:

    Critical National Infrastructures

    I didn't find any such claim about EMP leading to the deaths of up to 90% of Americans. Of course, I didn't read the whole thing, but I searched keywords such as "kill", "killed", "death", "casualty", etc.. If you can find the claim, please let me know.

    The fact that people like Frank Gaffney are torqued up about the topic does not especially alarm me. Gaffney has the reputation (perhaps not entirely justified) of being something of a crank.

    EMP is a potentially damaging phenomenon, and we ought to be doing a few things to harden the electrical grid against it - against the possibility of a solar event, if for no other reason. But the notion that it levels the playing field between small nations like Iran and North Korea and us seems ludicrous to me. In particular, it would not shield them from retaliation. Strategic nuclear forces are specifically designed to withstand EMP, at least better than anything else is, and we would probably still have enough of them left to turn any such attacker into a wasteland of smoking craters.

    I stand by my assertion that wild claims about Iran or North Korea being able to destroy us with a single nuclear weapon are, essentially, tendentious bullshit.
  109. IHTG says:
    @Dahlia
    I saw the Journolist clique passing it around and loving it, but true, not the elite guys.

    I *really* think that when Brad Parscale said Jared Kushner was important to his data operation, the biggest unsung success story of the election, he was probably not telling the entire truth. Just flattering of the boss's son-in-law? I thought it a little strange when that big story came out about Kushner that Parscale was given little credit; too inconvenient for the narrative, I guess.

    But, though many factors elected Trump, Brad Parscale is one piece, that, if you removed him, Trump would have lost.

    He recently retweeted this: https://twitter.com/parscale

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dahlia
    Interesting. What do you think it means?
    I suspect going back and reading and listening to Parscale interviews, and what he said about Jared would be most illuminating. When he spoke at Harvard, he spoke more in tech mode, so that would be a good place to start.
    I want to be fair to Kushner, because I truly may have forgotten something, but my sense was that while he got praised, nothing specific was pointed to. And I'm not aware of Kushner being asked tech, or any questions, about the operation; no sense there that he's the go-to guy for anything like this.

    Again, I want to be fair: I really do have a bad memory. I read and listened to every single Parscale piece or interview because I found it, utterly, *utterly*, fascinating, but I got the impression, an overall sense, that despite Parscale saying Kushner was fundamental, that Kushner's big role was really more about believing in Parscale and giving him wide breadth. No small thing by the way: God knows Hillary Clinton didn't have a Brad Parscale on her team and if he'd landed on their laps, they'd been at a loss with what to do with him.

    Related, last I checked, Parscale had been dimished at "American First" policies. I hope that's wrong. But in any event, this man simply has not gotten his due. Democrats preferred hearing about how nefarious forces, the same ones that our ruling class just happens to want to war with for years, robbed them of the election than that of Parscale's genius machinations.

  110. Anon 2 says:
    @IHTG
    Kushner is descended from Bielski partisans, there's some fire in that blue blood

    Jared Kushner’s paternal grandfather was born in Poland.
    Ivanka Trump is half-Czech. Together they have that western
    Slavonic, Central European connection

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  111. “Put none but AMERICANS on guard tonight.” — George Washington

    European Christian Ancestral Core — or — White Core American?

    A politician would pick White Core American knowing that he might have to say it a few thousand times. Also, you could add a twangy, country and western accent to it to make it sound more down-home.

    Jared “Knish” Kushner and Harvard are both extremely irritating subjects. The White Core Americans who voted for President Trump did not vote to be ruled by a little rich boy bastard who benefited from having his daddy buy their way into Harvard. Harvard is a hedge fund disguised as a university. Harvard Hates America.

    White Core Americans voted for Trump to reduce legal immigration and deport illegal aliens. White Core Americans voted for Trump to scrap trade deal scams that ship jobs out of the USA. White Core Americans voted for Trump to stop the endless overseas wars that waste blood and treasure. White Core Americans voted for Trump to put AMERICA FIRST.

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  112. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Jonathan Mason
    Whatever the level of intellectual achievement a kid demonstrated in his studies by the age of 17 is only a rough guide to what ability he might show by the age of 35.

    While Jesus was--it is claimed--stunning the temple elders with his wit and wisdom at the age of 12, Charles Darwin was a late-developing son of a wealthy family who dropped out of medical school. He then enrolled in a Bachelor's degee at the University of Cambridge, where he preferred riding and shooting to studying, and was delighted by the language and logic of William Paley's Evidences of Christianity.

    Both had careers that changed the world.

    Like Hillary Clinton, Kushner married well and could possibly be a future President in training. Then again, maybe not, but at this point we don't really know what he might evolve into.

    “While Jesus was–it is claimed–stunning the temple elders with his wit and wisdom at the age of 12,”

    Nothing personal, but I do wish people would stop quoting fairy tales as if they were data.

    Is this why Americans think movies and TV shows are history?

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  113. Jared recently got $250 million from Soros.

    http://jewishbusinessnews.com/2017/01/31/george-soros-backed-jared-kushner-venture-cadre-250-million/

    It’s almost like Jews stick together against other people.

    But that’s an anti-Semitic canard, according to Jews.

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  114. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @guest
    Also to indoctrinate the foreign students in...whatever it is Harvard teaches and our elites believe or pretend to believe in.

    I hadn’t thought of that angle, but that’s a really good point.

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  115. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    Kushner is a handsome guy in a slightly Justin Trudeau way. Part of Harvard's admission strategy is to make sure to let in some good-looking people.

    Kushner is a handsome guy in a slightly Justin Trudeau way. Part of Harvard’s admission strategy is to make sure to let in some good-looking people.

    He definitely has a look similar to Justin Trudeau’s, and both bear a resemblance to Matthew McConaughey.

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  116. @JohnnyWalker123
    Obama and Bush both went to Harvard grad school (JD and MBA respectively).

    I wonder if they got in on their merits.

    In particular, how did Bush make it into a Harvard MBA? In what world does George W. Bush get into the most competitive business-school in the world?

    When W applied to the HBS, admissions was not near as competitive as it is today. Last year HBS accepted 11% of its applicants.
    In 1973, according to a Bloomberg article:
    “Surely junior’s application stood out. George W. Bush was a picture of honor once he got past his party days at Yale with the Delta Kappa Epsilon brothers and members of Skull & Bones, a secret society that enrolled him during his senior year — so hush-hush, in fact, it barely gets a mention in his book. Bush earned an undergraduate degree in history from Yale in 1968. His grades weren’t great, and nobody can seem to locate his GMAT scores. The story starts with Bush’s application. ”

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2001-02-14/george-w-dot-s-b-school-days

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  117. eD says:
    @Anonymous
    My opinions are mixed.
    I brute-forced it into a HYP school (and contrary to conventional wisdom, this is possible) but my "results" are unimpressive. I'm extremely underemployed and now posting anonymously on iSteve. I could probably use my real name since no one knows who I am, but I dream.
    But still.... Jared Kushner managed to become (it seems) one of the top two advisors to the president of the United States. How exactly is Harvard wrong? Maybe I'm being somewhat cynical, but the guy clearly has something going on.
    Apparently Bannon is calling him a "cuck" and a "Democrat". I sympathize with Bannon, but Jared seems to be a very competent Democratic cuck, if that is what he really is. Life is complex,

    “I brute-forced it into a HYP school (and contrary to conventional wisdom, this is possible) but my “results” are unimpressive. I’m extremely underemployed and now posting anonymously on iSteve.”

    The USA is clearly becoming a more caste based society, so I suspect you are not the only person in this situation.

    As someone else pointed out, these schools increasingly exist for the children of the 1% -and now its the 1% from around the world- to spend some time together as young adults and make connections. If you are a middle class student who got into these places through good grads/ test scores, these places are just not for you. I would advise a bright middle class student entering college in 2017 to go to their State U., where the connections they would be making would be within their own caste and might actually be useful down the road.

    If things continue on as they have, the next step is that HYP just stops admitting middle class students. Actually this would return things to how they were before the GI bill. The thing about that period is that an Ivy League degree just wasn’t thought as something that a bright middle class man (no co-ed higher education!) would normally have, and it was normal to be successful, even in professions, without any bachelor of arts or equivalent at all. Unfortunately for a few generations, there will be a lag before the culture catches up with the fact that things are not as they were in the post World War 2 decades in this country, as in other things.

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  118. @Ron Unz
    Yeah, exactly. Although I'm sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years, Jared Kushner seems to be the only provable case, partly based on the trial records that sent his father off to federal prison.

    During my unsuccessful Free Harvard/Fair Harvard campaign last year, I was sure the MSM journalists would absolutely jump at the Kushner story when I gave it to them, given that the MSM hated Trump so much and were willing to use anything against him.

    But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.

    They knew he was one of them.

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  119. Sid says:
    @candid_observer
    I think that people may generally be underrating the importance of the personal in the Trump WH.

    My guess is that one of Trump's real weaknesses is an inclination for nepotism. He seems entirely too eager to put family members in positions of power -- which may work in a real estate business, but is likely to backfire badly in the running of a government.

    I think he has a lot of difficulty saying no to his own family, especially those, like Ivanka, upon whom he especially dotes. Jarred comes with her, of course.

    I'd guess that Bannon is probably not a particularly easy character to deal with on a day to day basis. Also, he's not a worshipful sort, and Trump loves some worship.

    While we (and others) may see these people in terms of what they stand for ideologically, I doubt that that's the prominent consideration in Trump's mind when he thinks about them. Frankly, if we were working with them, it's probably not their ideology that would be most prominent in our minds.

    How it plays out, who knows?

    One thing that stood out to me about how Trump is that, for all his game and connections, very few people who had worked with him came out to support him.

    Compare that with the Clintons, where for all their perfidy, they had a whole mafia of loyalists.

    The sense I get is that the Trumps have burned through a lot of people, and one of the recurring iSteve themes is that when strangers and friends don’t trust you and you don’t trust them, family is all you’ve got.

    Read More
    • Replies: @IHTG
    Gee, I wonder why people from New York City wouldn't have wanted to openly support Donald Trump in 2016.
    , @reiner Tor
    He was the racist candidate, who was drawing votes from a basket of deplorables. He had many shy supporters. So I wouldn't read much into it.
    , @Opinionator
    One thing that stood out to me about how Trump is that, for all his game and connections, very few people who had worked with him came out to support him.

    Very few people came out against him on the basis of personal familiarity with him.
  120. Art says:
    @Manfred Arcane
    Of course I haven't given up; I'm astounded by how many posters here are suddenly buying into the "Trump is a vain/shallow/opportunistic/idiotic/incoherent blunderer" story that's been sold by the media ever since he announced his run for the Presidency. Most of the posts seem to take it for granted that Trump has no mind or will of his own, and that he's a sort of Pinocchio being pulled back and forth between Jiminy Cricket (Bannon) and Foulfellow the Fox (Kushner). Trump was talking about his signature trade and immigration issues as far back as the 1980s, long before he ever met Bannon; Bannon also didn't come on board in his campaign until fairly late in the game. I definitely wish Trump hadn't stuck his foot into the Syrian mess, but, unless he makes a more definite move (which God forbid), it seems to me that he's almost certainly made this token strike merely to (1) silence the "Russian puppet" accusation, (2) forestall his enemies in both parties from claiming that his quasi-approval of Assad emboldened Assad's alleged gas attack, and (3) throw a little scare into China, North Korea, and Iran. I don't think he did it simply because Kushner suggested it to him, or because Ivanka started crying over pictures of gassed babies; to believe that, I'd have have to believe that he's the mindless empty vessel that his enemies have painted him as, and he's come too far for me to ever believe that.

    If Trump's improbable political career has shown anything, it's that he's not just the sum of the people around him. I remember hearing the doomsayers proclaiming that it was all over when Lewandowski was dumped for the slicker and shadier Manafort, or when Kellyanne Conway (with her dubious record on illegal immigration) came on board the campaign, and the doom didn't come to pass. Also, Bannon hasn't even been dumped yet; he went with Trump on Air Force One to the meeting with the Chinese, for goodness sake. In the meantime, we have Gorsuch on the Supreme Court (instead of Garland, or--gag--Obama, who might well have been put there by Hillary), we have Sessions as AG cracking down on sanctuary cities instead of Loretta Lynch strapping racism-detecting body-cams to Ferguson policemen, and we have bids being taken on the Great Border Wall. Until I see boots on the ground in Syria, I'll continue to be far more pleased than disappointed by the outcome of the election.

    Most of the posts seem to take it for granted that Trump has no mind or will of his own, and that he’s a sort of Pinocchio being pulled back and forth between Jiminy Cricket (Bannon) and Foulfellow the Fox (Kushner).

    Hmm — does Trump lose his mind when Ivanka insists on something?

    Donald Trump carried out Syria missile strike ‘after being convinced by daughter Ivanka’

    DONALD Trump’s decision to rain down 59 Tomahawk missiles on a Syrian air base was sparked by his daughter Ivanka’s “heartbroken” response to Assad’s chemical attack, insiders have claimed.

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/789399/Donald-Trump-Ivanka-Trump-Syria-Missile-Strike-Assad-US-Russia-Tomahawk

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  121. Mr. Anon says:
    @Adam Grant
    I've heard leading neocons like Daniel Pipes state that an EMP could lead to the death of up to 90% of Americans. That numbercomes from the Congressional EMP Commission and has been used by Pipes and others to support the arming of unsavory groups in Syria. Here's an article that Pipes mentioned on his twitter feed:





    Iran endorses nuclear EMP attack on United States

    By PAUL BEDARD (@SECRETSBEDARD) • 3/19/15 11:46 AM
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    America's electric grid threatened; blackout could kill 9 of 10
    Washington Examiner


    00:0001:00
    Suspected for years of plotting to dismantle the U.S. electric grid, American officials have confirmed that Iranian military brass have endorsed a nuclear electromagnetic pulse explosion that would attack the country's power system.

    American defense experts made the discovery while translating a secret Iranian military handbook, raising new concerns about Tehran's recent nuclear talks with the administration.


    Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, right, attends a graduation ceremony of army cadets, accompanied by Revolutionary Guard commander Mohammad Ali Jafari, left, Chief of the General Staff of Iran's Armed Forces, Hasan Firouzabadi, second left in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, Oct. 5 2013. (AP Photo/Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader)




    The issue of a nuclear EMP attack was raised in the final hours of this week's elections in Israel when U.S. authority Peter Vincent Pry penned a column for Arutz Sheva warning of Iran's threat to free nations.



    "Iranian military documents describe such a scenario — including a recently translated Iranian military textbook that endorses nuclear EMP attack against the United States," he wrote.

    A knowledgable source said that the textbook discusses an EMP attack on America in 20 different places.

    Arizona Republican Rep. Trent Franks, who is leading an effort to protect the U.S. electric grid from an EMP attack, has recently made similar claims based on the document translated by military authorities.

    Once sneered at by critics, recent moves by Iran and North Korea have given credibility to the potential EMP threat from an atmospheric nuclear explosion over the U.S.



    Pry has suggested ways for Iran to deliver a nuclear attack: by ship launched off the East Coast, a missile or via satellite.

    Either way the result could be destruction of all or part of the U.S. electric grid, robbing the public of power, computers, water and communications for potentially a year.


    Frank Gaffney, founder and president of the Center for Security Policy, said the threat to the grid can also come from solar activity.

    He has been pushing Washington and state governments to take the relatively inexpensive move to protect the electric grid, though his concern is from a nuclear attack by Iran or North Korea.


    "It is increasingly frightening," he said. "We have to get started on this."

    He noted that Iran's top military leader recently announced that he was ready for war with the U.S.

    "We are ready for the decisive battle against the U.S. and the Zionist regime," Iranian Armed Forces Chief of Staff General Hassan Firouzabadi told Iran's Fars News Agency in 2014.

    Below is from Pry's column that discusses an Iran EMP attack:



    Iran armed with nuclear missiles poses an unprecedented threat to global civilization.



    One nuclear warhead detonated at high-altitude over the United States would blackout the national electric grid and other life sustaining critical infrastructures for months or years by means of an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). A nationwide blackout lasting one year, according to the Congressional EMP Commission, could cause chaos and starvation that leaves 90 percent of Americans dead.



    Iranian military documents describe such a scenario--including a recently translated Iranian military textbook that endorses nuclear EMP attack against the United States.



    Thus, Iran with a small number of nuclear missiles can by EMP attack threaten the existence of modernity and be the death knell for Western principles of international law, humanism and freedom. For the first time in history, a failed state like Iran could destroy the most successful societies on Earth and convert an evolving benign world order into world chaos.

    Paul Bedard, the Washington Examiner's "Washington Secrets" columnist, can be contacted at pbedard@washingtonexaminer.com.

    I’ve heard leading neocons like Daniel Pipes state that an EMP could lead to the death of up to 90% of Americans. That number comes from the Congressional EMP Commission and has been used by Pipes and others to support the arming of unsavory groups in Syria. Here’s an article that Pipes mentioned on his twitter feed:

    Which to me sounds like a means of ginning up american resolve to oppose Iran. One or two nuclear weapons is not really much of a threat to the U.S., unless these dire claims about EMP are true. By the way, I looked in the report you mentioned, which I believe is this:

    Critical National Infrastructures

    I didn’t find any such claim about EMP leading to the deaths of up to 90% of Americans. Of course, I didn’t read the whole thing, but I searched keywords such as “kill”, “killed”, “death”, “casualty”, etc.. If you can find the claim, please let me know.

    The fact that people like Frank Gaffney are torqued up about the topic does not especially alarm me. Gaffney has the reputation (perhaps not entirely justified) of being something of a crank.

    EMP is a potentially damaging phenomenon, and we ought to be doing a few things to harden the electrical grid against it – against the possibility of a solar event, if for no other reason. But the notion that it levels the playing field between small nations like Iran and North Korea and us seems ludicrous to me. In particular, it would not shield them from retaliation. Strategic nuclear forces are specifically designed to withstand EMP, at least better than anything else is, and we would probably still have enough of them left to turn any such attacker into a wasteland of smoking craters.

    I stand by my assertion that wild claims about Iran or North Korea being able to destroy us with a single nuclear weapon are, essentially, tendentious bullshit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Adam Grant
    Just to be clear, I didn't say that up to 90% of Americans would die in an EMP attack. I was pointing out that top neocons are saying that and using that scenario to justify the arming of groups sympathetic to al Qaeda.

    I found this article from 2 weeks ago wherein James Woolsey uses the "up to 90%" figure: https://www.google.com/amp/thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/defense/326094-how-north-korea-could-kill-up-to-90-percent-of-americans-at-any%3Famp

    Note that North Korea may have a "super-EMP" weapon and that they have 2 satellites orbit. Iran also launches satellites. Agree with you that the threat of retaliation makes such an attack unlikely, but their are ways to avoid attribution. Giving super-EMP to terrorists, for example.

    Here's another scenario: Dear Leader diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, given 2 months to live. He remembers that American prostitute that snickered at the size of his manhood and decides to detonate super-EMP over U.S., just for fun.

    Agree with you on Frank Gaffney.

    Regarding Iran, some people think they have 4 nuclear weapons (per Yossef Bodansky).

    Regarding 90% figure in Congressional EMP Commission report, I couldn't find it either. Peter Pry served in that commission and he says it's in the report, that's what I relied on. Skimmed thru the report quickly, might have missed it.
  122. Forbes says:
    @Ron Unz
    Yeah, exactly. Although I'm sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years, Jared Kushner seems to be the only provable case, partly based on the trial records that sent his father off to federal prison.

    During my unsuccessful Free Harvard/Fair Harvard campaign last year, I was sure the MSM journalists would absolutely jump at the Kushner story when I gave it to them, given that the MSM hated Trump so much and were willing to use anything against him.

    But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.

    JW123 has it. Namely, peeling back the onion layers on Harvard admits would expose too many others for questionable admission. Inconvenient questions are those that few want answered. What you don’t know won’t hurt you.

    And really, who’s surprised that money eases the way for some? It’s present in virtually all walks of life. Only the naïve see life as pristine from the influence of money.

    Read More
  123. IHTG says:
    @Sid
    One thing that stood out to me about how Trump is that, for all his game and connections, very few people who had worked with him came out to support him.

    Compare that with the Clintons, where for all their perfidy, they had a whole mafia of loyalists.

    The sense I get is that the Trumps have burned through a lot of people, and one of the recurring iSteve themes is that when strangers and friends don't trust you and you don't trust them, family is all you've got.

    Gee, I wonder why people from New York City wouldn’t have wanted to openly support Donald Trump in 2016.

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  124. As far as #FireKushner goes, the problem is that Ivanka is #DaddysGirl. The solution is obvious and delicious.

    Somebody needs to pull a Charles Kushner on Jared. That’d turn Trump against him. And if can’t be seduced willingly, well, I’m sure the CIA/Deep State has some tactics that could be applicable. Could something involving “water sports” be staged? That would also be delicious.

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  125. Anon7 says:
    @Anonymous
    What do you mean, “grubby secret”? This has been their business plan for several hundred years; introducing the scions of wealthy New England families to each other is the whole point of Harvard.

    What I've been wondering is if a big part of the purpose of these top schools now is to introduce the scions of the global elite to each other, and if that's the reason for admitting so many international students.

    The vast endowments of the best American universities (even the “public” state schools) are now encouraging the belief that they can just cut themselves loose from their state charters and become schools for the global (money) elite. So you’re right there.

    America was once revered around the world; I think that feeling has been lost, as far as the wealthiest globalists are concerned. Still, the best schools are here, for now anyway, so that’s where they come. I don’t think that the male Chinese students who come here for math, science and engineering believe one bit of the libtard crap that is served up, for instance.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dahlia

    The vast endowments of the best American universities (even the “public” state schools) are now encouraging the belief that they can just cut themselves loose from their state charters and become schools for the global (money) elite.
     
    Status Striving Era. Your primary age little tykes' Catholic schools in cities have had this strange new tolerance policy for the last 15 years of taking in non-Catholics, but not at all tolerating, except a token inner-city kid or two, parents who can't come up with at least $16,000 per year.
    (I'm Catholic, so all too well aware, but I'd guess other denominations are similar based on various Protestant college tuition $$$, though Steve has intimated BYU hasn't been corrupted. The more rural Catholic primary schools have not been corrupted.)
  126. @JohnnyWalker123
    Here is a question to everyone here.

    Have you given up on Trump or do you still see some hope?

    I’ve pretty much given up because I don’t think Syria was a realpolitik calculation to solve his domestic media and foreign negotiation problems.

    But if things reverse course, I’m happy to support Trump in the future. The airstrike was not a dealbreaker in itself.

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  127. @Sid
    One thing that stood out to me about how Trump is that, for all his game and connections, very few people who had worked with him came out to support him.

    Compare that with the Clintons, where for all their perfidy, they had a whole mafia of loyalists.

    The sense I get is that the Trumps have burned through a lot of people, and one of the recurring iSteve themes is that when strangers and friends don't trust you and you don't trust them, family is all you've got.

    He was the racist candidate, who was drawing votes from a basket of deplorables. He had many shy supporters. So I wouldn’t read much into it.

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  128. Nick Diaz says:

    Aw, Steve Sailer still upset that his own boys aren’t smart enough to get into Harvard, so of course all those other kids that successfully made the cut are not smarter than Sailer’s kids: they are slimy cheaters!

    I get ya, Steve.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    And what school did you graduate from, pendejo? DeVry?
  129. @Manfred Arcane
    Of course I haven't given up; I'm astounded by how many posters here are suddenly buying into the "Trump is a vain/shallow/opportunistic/idiotic/incoherent blunderer" story that's been sold by the media ever since he announced his run for the Presidency. Most of the posts seem to take it for granted that Trump has no mind or will of his own, and that he's a sort of Pinocchio being pulled back and forth between Jiminy Cricket (Bannon) and Foulfellow the Fox (Kushner). Trump was talking about his signature trade and immigration issues as far back as the 1980s, long before he ever met Bannon; Bannon also didn't come on board in his campaign until fairly late in the game. I definitely wish Trump hadn't stuck his foot into the Syrian mess, but, unless he makes a more definite move (which God forbid), it seems to me that he's almost certainly made this token strike merely to (1) silence the "Russian puppet" accusation, (2) forestall his enemies in both parties from claiming that his quasi-approval of Assad emboldened Assad's alleged gas attack, and (3) throw a little scare into China, North Korea, and Iran. I don't think he did it simply because Kushner suggested it to him, or because Ivanka started crying over pictures of gassed babies; to believe that, I'd have have to believe that he's the mindless empty vessel that his enemies have painted him as, and he's come too far for me to ever believe that.

    If Trump's improbable political career has shown anything, it's that he's not just the sum of the people around him. I remember hearing the doomsayers proclaiming that it was all over when Lewandowski was dumped for the slicker and shadier Manafort, or when Kellyanne Conway (with her dubious record on illegal immigration) came on board the campaign, and the doom didn't come to pass. Also, Bannon hasn't even been dumped yet; he went with Trump on Air Force One to the meeting with the Chinese, for goodness sake. In the meantime, we have Gorsuch on the Supreme Court (instead of Garland, or--gag--Obama, who might well have been put there by Hillary), we have Sessions as AG cracking down on sanctuary cities instead of Loretta Lynch strapping racism-detecting body-cams to Ferguson policemen, and we have bids being taken on the Great Border Wall. Until I see boots on the ground in Syria, I'll continue to be far more pleased than disappointed by the outcome of the election.

    Agree. I wasn’t happy about Syria but then again iSteve has been blackpill from top to bottom with the weirdest strain of masochism since Aug 2015.

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  130. @Rod1963
    Yes and no.

    Trump blew up bits and pieces of a old airbase which got the Neo-Con's off his back and sent a message to that fat dwarf in NK and let the Chinese know he doesn't screw around. Oddly enough no one is talking about the second base supposedly bombed. The Russians report only half of the SLCM's reached their target.

    This is weird, even RT doesn't mention the second air base.

    Then he has Tillerson put on a show verbal slapping the Russians. Shutting up the Democrats.

    Which is all fine provided he goes no further. If he escalates, he seals his fate.

    Of course when you play real politik like that, especially when you run on a platform of putting America first, Trump is risking turning his base against him.

    My FB feed, filled with salt of the earth types who repost Trump memes, is pretty much 100% “freedom boner” style memes about Trump Strong.

    I think as long as he keeps from invading Syria, he’ll be alright.

    I honestly can’t take 90% of the iSteve commentariat seriously anymore because its all people trying to out doom each other around here based on the flimsiest of pretexts.

    There is no penalty for being wrong. Every bump in the road is GOODBYE AMERICA and then when the mushroom clouds don’t appear they just stumble around until the next situation (unless they’re patting themselves on the back about being the Secret Masters of Politics lmfao).

    Read More
    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Your hallucination is noted.
    , @reiner Tor

    My FB feed, filled with salt of the earth types who repost Trump memes, is pretty much 100% “freedom boner” style memes about Trump Strong.
     
    Actually, that's pretty depressing. Why are you blackpilling us? This means that if Trump goes full Dubya he can still get re-elected. No need for him to worry.
  131. Mr. Anon says:
    @Nick Diaz
    Aw, Steve Sailer still upset that his own boys aren't smart enough to get into Harvard, so of course all those other kids that successfully made the cut are not smarter than Sailer's kids: they are slimy cheaters!

    I get ya, Steve.

    And what school did you graduate from, pendejo? DeVry?

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  132. @Sid
    One thing that stood out to me about how Trump is that, for all his game and connections, very few people who had worked with him came out to support him.

    Compare that with the Clintons, where for all their perfidy, they had a whole mafia of loyalists.

    The sense I get is that the Trumps have burned through a lot of people, and one of the recurring iSteve themes is that when strangers and friends don't trust you and you don't trust them, family is all you've got.

    One thing that stood out to me about how Trump is that, for all his game and connections, very few people who had worked with him came out to support him.

    Very few people came out against him on the basis of personal familiarity with him.

    Read More
  133. @Jack Hanson
    My FB feed, filled with salt of the earth types who repost Trump memes, is pretty much 100% "freedom boner" style memes about Trump Strong.

    I think as long as he keeps from invading Syria, he'll be alright.

    I honestly can't take 90% of the iSteve commentariat seriously anymore because its all people trying to out doom each other around here based on the flimsiest of pretexts.

    There is no penalty for being wrong. Every bump in the road is GOODBYE AMERICA and then when the mushroom clouds don't appear they just stumble around until the next situation (unless they're patting themselves on the back about being the Secret Masters of Politics lmfao).

    Your hallucination is noted.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    I am with Jack Hanson. There is too much doom and gloom. Experience has shown that Jack is right. And everyone from Derbyshire on down has been wrong. Are you sure that the hallucinating is attributable to Jack?
    , @Jack Hanson
    The guy who was nonstop doom and 'President Hillary' since August 2015 calling anyone delusional is the pinnacle of the hubris around here.

    Its not like your comment history of being WRONG isn't publicly viewable, boyo.
  134. @Ron Unz
    Yeah, exactly. Although I'm sure lots of wealthy families have bought a place at Harvard for their children over the years, Jared Kushner seems to be the only provable case, partly based on the trial records that sent his father off to federal prison.

    During my unsuccessful Free Harvard/Fair Harvard campaign last year, I was sure the MSM journalists would absolutely jump at the Kushner story when I gave it to them, given that the MSM hated Trump so much and were willing to use anything against him.

    But none of them were interested. I guess other factors overcame their fanatical Trump-hatred.

    Why do you have a problem with this, Ron?

    Is it not better for the country that not all talent (and consequentially power) is concentrated at Harvard and among its graduates?

    Read More
  135. Well we knew they were whores. We did not know the price for a roll in the hay (at least I did not). And this country is supposed to be a meritocracy.

    Read More
  136. @Opinionator
    Your hallucination is noted.

    I am with Jack Hanson. There is too much doom and gloom. Experience has shown that Jack is right. And everyone from Derbyshire on down has been wrong. Are you sure that the hallucinating is attributable to Jack?

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor, @Chrisnonymous

    Experience has shown that Jack is right.
     
    Can you give us a list? Or are you just referring to the election outcome? Yeah, he got that 50/50 proposition right, but I seem to remember talk of landslides, which was not right. Also, if I remember, he was on board with the "Hillary has Parkinsons" theory, which I think we can all safely say now was bogus. This is not to mention the "things fall apart" post from a few days ago, revealing the gimp mask Jack himself so carefully hides.

    DACA continues, Australian refugee resettlement continues (despite Trump's phone call), Syrian refugees are coming over. I know Trump is busy, but just look at how his time is taken up--any president's schedule is dominated now by "security"--councils, briefings, staffing decisions... If Trump weren't winging it, he might just recognize that 50 missiles attack is the likely outcome when war councils are called for every little news item.

    The border wall and more broadly immigration are going to take 110% determination or they'll get undermined. I don't see "governing based on my little girl's tears" as a strategy likely to see things through to the end. Time will tell.
  137. Dahlia says:
    @IHTG
    He recently retweeted this: https://twitter.com/parscale

    https://twitter.com/TrumpSuperPAC/status/850631411820363776

    Interesting. What do you think it means?
    I suspect going back and reading and listening to Parscale interviews, and what he said about Jared would be most illuminating. When he spoke at Harvard, he spoke more in tech mode, so that would be a good place to start.
    I want to be fair to Kushner, because I truly may have forgotten something, but my sense was that while he got praised, nothing specific was pointed to. And I’m not aware of Kushner being asked tech, or any questions, about the operation; no sense there that he’s the go-to guy for anything like this.

    Again, I want to be fair: I really do have a bad memory. I read and listened to every single Parscale piece or interview because I found it, utterly, *utterly*, fascinating, but I got the impression, an overall sense, that despite Parscale saying Kushner was fundamental, that Kushner’s big role was really more about believing in Parscale and giving him wide breadth. No small thing by the way: God knows Hillary Clinton didn’t have a Brad Parscale on her team and if he’d landed on their laps, they’d been at a loss with what to do with him.

    Related, last I checked, Parscale had been dimished at “American First” policies. I hope that’s wrong. But in any event, this man simply has not gotten his due. Democrats preferred hearing about how nefarious forces, the same ones that our ruling class just happens to want to war with for years, robbed them of the election than that of Parscale’s genius machinations.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dahlia
    https://medium.com/@Cernovich/h-r-mcmaster-manipulating-intelligence-reports-to-trump-wants-150-000-ground-soldiers-in-syria-83346c433e99

    If this is true...
    I take it back, my God!, I take it back!!!

    Cernovich intimates been sitting on this story, dropped the Rice story first for credibility... McMaster and Patreus manipulated intelligence, Kushner and Bannon were opposed. McMaster allies responsible for Bannon-Kushner feud stories.
  138. @Opinionator
    Your hallucination is noted.

    The guy who was nonstop doom and ‘President Hillary’ since August 2015 calling anyone delusional is the pinnacle of the hubris around here.

    Its not like your comment history of being WRONG isn’t publicly viewable, boyo.

    Read More
  139. Dahlia says:
    @Anon7
    The vast endowments of the best American universities (even the "public" state schools) are now encouraging the belief that they can just cut themselves loose from their state charters and become schools for the global (money) elite. So you're right there.

    America was once revered around the world; I think that feeling has been lost, as far as the wealthiest globalists are concerned. Still, the best schools are here, for now anyway, so that's where they come. I don't think that the male Chinese students who come here for math, science and engineering believe one bit of the libtard crap that is served up, for instance.

    The vast endowments of the best American universities (even the “public” state schools) are now encouraging the belief that they can just cut themselves loose from their state charters and become schools for the global (money) elite.

    Status Striving Era. Your primary age little tykes’ Catholic schools in cities have had this strange new tolerance policy for the last 15 years of taking in non-Catholics, but not at all tolerating, except a token inner-city kid or two, parents who can’t come up with at least $16,000 per year.
    (I’m Catholic, so all too well aware, but I’d guess other denominations are similar based on various Protestant college tuition $$$, though Steve has intimated BYU hasn’t been corrupted. The more rural Catholic primary schools have not been corrupted.)

    Read More
  140. Have even better conundrum for you:

    “How did Harvard get into Jared Kushner?”

    Read More
  141. Dahlia says:
    @Dahlia
    Interesting. What do you think it means?
    I suspect going back and reading and listening to Parscale interviews, and what he said about Jared would be most illuminating. When he spoke at Harvard, he spoke more in tech mode, so that would be a good place to start.
    I want to be fair to Kushner, because I truly may have forgotten something, but my sense was that while he got praised, nothing specific was pointed to. And I'm not aware of Kushner being asked tech, or any questions, about the operation; no sense there that he's the go-to guy for anything like this.

    Again, I want to be fair: I really do have a bad memory. I read and listened to every single Parscale piece or interview because I found it, utterly, *utterly*, fascinating, but I got the impression, an overall sense, that despite Parscale saying Kushner was fundamental, that Kushner's big role was really more about believing in Parscale and giving him wide breadth. No small thing by the way: God knows Hillary Clinton didn't have a Brad Parscale on her team and if he'd landed on their laps, they'd been at a loss with what to do with him.

    Related, last I checked, Parscale had been dimished at "American First" policies. I hope that's wrong. But in any event, this man simply has not gotten his due. Democrats preferred hearing about how nefarious forces, the same ones that our ruling class just happens to want to war with for years, robbed them of the election than that of Parscale's genius machinations.

    https://medium.com/@Cernovich/h-r-mcmaster-manipulating-intelligence-reports-to-trump-wants-150-000-ground-soldiers-in-syria-83346c433e99

    If this is true…
    I take it back, my God!, I take it back!!!

    Cernovich intimates been sitting on this story, dropped the Rice story first for credibility… McMaster and Patreus manipulated intelligence, Kushner and Bannon were opposed. McMaster allies responsible for Bannon-Kushner feud stories.

    Read More
  142. @Jack Hanson
    My FB feed, filled with salt of the earth types who repost Trump memes, is pretty much 100% "freedom boner" style memes about Trump Strong.

    I think as long as he keeps from invading Syria, he'll be alright.

    I honestly can't take 90% of the iSteve commentariat seriously anymore because its all people trying to out doom each other around here based on the flimsiest of pretexts.

    There is no penalty for being wrong. Every bump in the road is GOODBYE AMERICA and then when the mushroom clouds don't appear they just stumble around until the next situation (unless they're patting themselves on the back about being the Secret Masters of Politics lmfao).

    My FB feed, filled with salt of the earth types who repost Trump memes, is pretty much 100% “freedom boner” style memes about Trump Strong.

    Actually, that’s pretty depressing. Why are you blackpilling us? This means that if Trump goes full Dubya he can still get re-elected. No need for him to worry.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Im saying its not the end of the world (for the Nth time), but I know I won't penetrate the funk of the eeyores around here with ropes perpetually around their neck.
  143. I created a 4d chess explanation. I’ll repost it here for fun:

    Trump probably realized he’d need dictatorial powers to drain the swamp. He also realized he’d need the same to stop immigration. Possibly he also realized he’d need to actually reverse much of the post-1965 immigration to MAGA. But he realized he has no power to do all these.

    4d chess: like Skynet, he attacks Russia (probably sending nukes the way of China in the meantime), who in turn will destroy his enemies in DC, also NYC, LA and countless other big cities with their huge liberal and immigrant populations, maybe accomplishing the same for European countries, too. It will also make it easy for him to assume dictatorial powers.

    The end result will be God Emperor Trump ruling over the ruins and a much whiter population.

    Read More
  144. @reiner Tor

    My FB feed, filled with salt of the earth types who repost Trump memes, is pretty much 100% “freedom boner” style memes about Trump Strong.
     
    Actually, that's pretty depressing. Why are you blackpilling us? This means that if Trump goes full Dubya he can still get re-elected. No need for him to worry.

    Im saying its not the end of the world (for the Nth time), but I know I won’t penetrate the funk of the eeyores around here with ropes perpetually around their neck.

    Read More
  145. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    I am with Jack Hanson. There is too much doom and gloom. Experience has shown that Jack is right. And everyone from Derbyshire on down has been wrong. Are you sure that the hallucinating is attributable to Jack?
    Read More
  146. reiner Tor says: • Website

    Is this really Jared Kushner’s last.fm account? If yes, he has some shitty musical taste. Also, he listened to the Hamilton soundtrack right after he made his father-in-law fire missiles to Syria.

    Read More
  147. reiner Tor says: • Website

    These days I rarely read Counter Currents, but this Greg Johnson piece is good on the disappointment many on the alt-right felt after Trump’s neocon attack. I think the explanation he finds the most likely is quite plausible. It’s possible Trump never had a coherent philosophy, just always said the opposite of what Obama said or did – which would explain the contradiction why Trump kept warmongering regarding Iran. It’s also likely that simply Trump shot his mouth off when he criticized Obama’s weakness after his red line was broken during the press conference with King Abdullah, and of course he couldn’t backtrack his words later.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Yeah cause eight years of "Not Obama" was a stellar strategy.

    You're going to have to pardon my incredulity at niche bloggers with little ability to get together a strategy for success declaring grandly that Trump is just bumbling.
  148. Moshe says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    other factors
     
    Lots of wealthy financiers and businessmen probably have bribed their child's way into an Ivy League education. So I assume a lot of elite journalists understood not to touch that issue. If you're an elite journalist that wants to stay an elite journalist, you have to be careful to not step on the toes of powerful people. If a journalist brought up the Kushner bribery issue, they'd risk getting all these oligarchs into the media spotlight.

    Also, maybe a lot of insiders knew that Kushner was a globalist cuck. So they figured that if Trump somehow got elected, Kushner could push out the Alt-Right/nationalist types. However, if Kushner was politically damaged by this revelation and Trump still somehow got elected, Kushner would be too weak to have any leverage.

    Johnny, are you really that naive and pure of heart??

    As per your previous comment, everybody knows that Kushner is Jewish, that’s why he’s automatically assumed to have Machiavellied Trump into bombing Assad because, well, that’s what Jews do. The WHOLE Kushner brouhaha is about his semitism.

    And now you somehow don’t get Unz’s “other factors”?

    You’re playing me bro.

    I thought the man spelled it out clearly enough – here, and in every 3rd word he’s written over the past few years – but I’ll help spell it out even simpler.

    “I, Ronald “RKU” Unz, am not one of THOSE Jews. I am a good Jew. A Jew who finds his face, name, personality and proclivities ugly and who will OurDamnedSpot! it by spitting at every imaginary mirror he imagines passing in the shade of a fellow Hebe. I. See. Jewish. Nepotism. Everywhere. Oh, and I weep for wrongly done Palestinian youth too. Woe, unto we goyim – i said WE GOYIM – to see the sadness in the face of one rock throwing little Mooslem boy. Be still my goiyishe heart…”

    I’ve just saved you the trouble of having to read Ron’z future comments. That’ll be a dollar per post and $10 for saving you the trouble of having to purchase a sticky copy of portnoy’s complaint on Amazon, now that you know that you can read Portnoy’s Therapeutic Soliloquy online for free should the proverse mode strike you.

    Read More
  149. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    I am with Jack Hanson. There is too much doom and gloom. Experience has shown that Jack is right. And everyone from Derbyshire on down has been wrong. Are you sure that the hallucinating is attributable to Jack?

    Experience has shown that Jack is right.

    Can you give us a list? Or are you just referring to the election outcome? Yeah, he got that 50/50 proposition right, but I seem to remember talk of landslides, which was not right. Also, if I remember, he was on board with the “Hillary has Parkinsons” theory, which I think we can all safely say now was bogus. This is not to mention the “things fall apart” post from a few days ago, revealing the gimp mask Jack himself so carefully hides.

    DACA continues, Australian refugee resettlement continues (despite Trump’s phone call), Syrian refugees are coming over. I know Trump is busy, but just look at how his time is taken up–any president’s schedule is dominated now by “security”–councils, briefings, staffing decisions… If Trump weren’t winging it, he might just recognize that 50 missiles attack is the likely outcome when war councils are called for every little news item.

    The border wall and more broadly immigration are going to take 110% determination or they’ll get undermined. I don’t see “governing based on my little girl’s tears” as a strategy likely to see things through to the end. Time will tell.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    You really have to admire your uninhibited, unrestricted and unqualified embrace of pessimism. You are at the end of the spectrum. Congratulations.

    Trumps victory was a 50/50 proposition? That has to be the most pathetic analysis anyone can construct. In fact, analysis is too generous a term for your dismissal. You and the rest of the Eeyore chorus were certain Trump would lose. It was not 50/50 in your expressions of what surely would befall us. 1/99 would be a long shot in your mind. WE ARE DOOMED! to invoke your patron saint. And your dismal assessment had what purpose? To drain the morale of Trump supporters and get them to stay home on election day? Well it is just too damned bad for you that Trump won, isn't it?

    I used to think people like you would get off your ass and help, if push came to shove. But I am sure I was wrong. You would prefer to wallow in self pity about how screwed you are, and life is unfair, and there is no hope at all for anything - and so you will just sit this out.

    I suppose I should be glad you are not actively working against the rest of us.

    But they you are working against us, aren't you?
  150. Did anybody know Bannon is plotting to start WW 3 in order to genocide the minorities and make sure he controls the future of DNA?

    https://medium.com/emergent-culture/and-fear-no-darkness-7079dc86d5f4

    Read More
  151. @reiner Tor
    These days I rarely read Counter Currents, but this Greg Johnson piece is good on the disappointment many on the alt-right felt after Trump's neocon attack. I think the explanation he finds the most likely is quite plausible. It's possible Trump never had a coherent philosophy, just always said the opposite of what Obama said or did - which would explain the contradiction why Trump kept warmongering regarding Iran. It's also likely that simply Trump shot his mouth off when he criticized Obama's weakness after his red line was broken during the press conference with King Abdullah, and of course he couldn't backtrack his words later.

    Yeah cause eight years of “Not Obama” was a stellar strategy.

    You’re going to have to pardon my incredulity at niche bloggers with little ability to get together a strategy for success declaring grandly that Trump is just bumbling.

    Read More
  152. @Chrisnonymous

    Experience has shown that Jack is right.
     
    Can you give us a list? Or are you just referring to the election outcome? Yeah, he got that 50/50 proposition right, but I seem to remember talk of landslides, which was not right. Also, if I remember, he was on board with the "Hillary has Parkinsons" theory, which I think we can all safely say now was bogus. This is not to mention the "things fall apart" post from a few days ago, revealing the gimp mask Jack himself so carefully hides.

    DACA continues, Australian refugee resettlement continues (despite Trump's phone call), Syrian refugees are coming over. I know Trump is busy, but just look at how his time is taken up--any president's schedule is dominated now by "security"--councils, briefings, staffing decisions... If Trump weren't winging it, he might just recognize that 50 missiles attack is the likely outcome when war councils are called for every little news item.

    The border wall and more broadly immigration are going to take 110% determination or they'll get undermined. I don't see "governing based on my little girl's tears" as a strategy likely to see things through to the end. Time will tell.

    You really have to admire your uninhibited, unrestricted and unqualified embrace of pessimism. You are at the end of the spectrum. Congratulations.

    Trumps victory was a 50/50 proposition? That has to be the most pathetic analysis anyone can construct. In fact, analysis is too generous a term for your dismissal. You and the rest of the Eeyore chorus were certain Trump would lose. It was not 50/50 in your expressions of what surely would befall us. 1/99 would be a long shot in your mind. WE ARE DOOMED! to invoke your patron saint. And your dismal assessment had what purpose? To drain the morale of Trump supporters and get them to stay home on election day? Well it is just too damned bad for you that Trump won, isn’t it?

    I used to think people like you would get off your ass and help, if push came to shove. But I am sure I was wrong. You would prefer to wallow in self pity about how screwed you are, and life is unfair, and there is no hope at all for anything – and so you will just sit this out.

    I suppose I should be glad you are not actively working against the rest of us.

    But they you are working against us, aren’t you?

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    In fact, analysis is too generous a term for your dismissal. You and the rest of the Eeyore chorus were certain Trump would lose. It was not 50/50 in your expressions of what surely would befall us. 1/99 would be a long shot in your mind. WE ARE DOOMED! to invoke your patron saint.
     
    I'm not Chrisonymous, but for the record, while I thought at the time a Clinton victory was more likely (and, admit it, Trump won by a razor thing margin in a those swing states, there was no monster vote), I put some money betting for a Trump victory, because I thought the 1:5 odds for his victory were too low. You can check the comments, the day before the election I endorsed Trump among the commenters with something like "vote for him guys, it's not only about saving Western Civilization, but making me money."
  153. @Chrisnonymous
    Did anybody know Bannon is plotting to start WW 3 in order to genocide the minorities and make sure he controls the future of DNA?

    https://medium.com/emergent-culture/and-fear-no-darkness-7079dc86d5f4

    I wrote that already. As a joke.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Actually, the generational crisis theory context of that article is not unrelated to Steve's Most Important Graph in the World, but as you say the conclusions drawn about Bannon are a joke.
  154. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    You really have to admire your uninhibited, unrestricted and unqualified embrace of pessimism. You are at the end of the spectrum. Congratulations.

    Trumps victory was a 50/50 proposition? That has to be the most pathetic analysis anyone can construct. In fact, analysis is too generous a term for your dismissal. You and the rest of the Eeyore chorus were certain Trump would lose. It was not 50/50 in your expressions of what surely would befall us. 1/99 would be a long shot in your mind. WE ARE DOOMED! to invoke your patron saint. And your dismal assessment had what purpose? To drain the morale of Trump supporters and get them to stay home on election day? Well it is just too damned bad for you that Trump won, isn't it?

    I used to think people like you would get off your ass and help, if push came to shove. But I am sure I was wrong. You would prefer to wallow in self pity about how screwed you are, and life is unfair, and there is no hope at all for anything - and so you will just sit this out.

    I suppose I should be glad you are not actively working against the rest of us.

    But they you are working against us, aren't you?

    In fact, analysis is too generous a term for your dismissal. You and the rest of the Eeyore chorus were certain Trump would lose. It was not 50/50 in your expressions of what surely would befall us. 1/99 would be a long shot in your mind. WE ARE DOOMED! to invoke your patron saint.

    I’m not Chrisonymous, but for the record, while I thought at the time a Clinton victory was more likely (and, admit it, Trump won by a razor thing margin in a those swing states, there was no monster vote), I put some money betting for a Trump victory, because I thought the 1:5 odds for his victory were too low. You can check the comments, the day before the election I endorsed Trump among the commenters with something like “vote for him guys, it’s not only about saving Western Civilization, but making me money.”

    Read More
  155. @reiner Tor
    I wrote that already. As a joke.

    Actually, the generational crisis theory context of that article is not unrelated to Steve’s Most Important Graph in the World, but as you say the conclusions drawn about Bannon are a joke.

    Read More
  156. @Jack Highlands
    As I'm to the right of Spencer (a position I share with thousands of activists, approximated at TheRightStuff.biz), my question would be, "how is our cause helped if Miller does not avow Spencer?

    And it must come to that if America is to become great again, for it was made great as a White offshoot of Western Europe, and fell from greatness through anti-White animus, the latter instigated in no small part by Jews.

    Spencer represents the advocacy of ethnic cleansing and racial superiority.

    If Miller avowed Spencer he would be out of the White House. If Trump avows Spencer, he will be out of the White House.

    Read More
  157. @Mr. Anon

    I’ve heard leading neocons like Daniel Pipes state that an EMP could lead to the death of up to 90% of Americans. That number comes from the Congressional EMP Commission and has been used by Pipes and others to support the arming of unsavory groups in Syria. Here’s an article that Pipes mentioned on his twitter feed:
     
    Which to me sounds like a means of ginning up american resolve to oppose Iran. One or two nuclear weapons is not really much of a threat to the U.S., unless these dire claims about EMP are true. By the way, I looked in the report you mentioned, which I believe is this:

    Critical National Infrastructures

    I didn't find any such claim about EMP leading to the deaths of up to 90% of Americans. Of course, I didn't read the whole thing, but I searched keywords such as "kill", "killed", "death", "casualty", etc.. If you can find the claim, please let me know.

    The fact that people like Frank Gaffney are torqued up about the topic does not especially alarm me. Gaffney has the reputation (perhaps not entirely justified) of being something of a crank.

    EMP is a potentially damaging phenomenon, and we ought to be doing a few things to harden the electrical grid against it - against the possibility of a solar event, if for no other reason. But the notion that it levels the playing field between small nations like Iran and North Korea and us seems ludicrous to me. In particular, it would not shield them from retaliation. Strategic nuclear forces are specifically designed to withstand EMP, at least better than anything else is, and we would probably still have enough of them left to turn any such attacker into a wasteland of smoking craters.

    I stand by my assertion that wild claims about Iran or North Korea being able to destroy us with a single nuclear weapon are, essentially, tendentious bullshit.

    Just to be clear, I didn’t say that up to 90% of Americans would die in an EMP attack. I was pointing out that top neocons are saying that and using that scenario to justify the arming of groups sympathetic to al Qaeda.

    I found this article from 2 weeks ago wherein James Woolsey uses the “up to 90%” figure: https://www.google.com/amp/thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/defense/326094-how-north-korea-could-kill-up-to-90-percent-of-americans-at-any%3Famp

    Note that North Korea may have a “super-EMP” weapon and that they have 2 satellites orbit. Iran also launches satellites. Agree with you that the threat of retaliation makes such an attack unlikely, but their are ways to avoid attribution. Giving super-EMP to terrorists, for example.

    Here’s another scenario: Dear Leader diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, given 2 months to live. He remembers that American prostitute that snickered at the size of his manhood and decides to detonate super-EMP over U.S., just for fun.

    Agree with you on Frank Gaffney.

    Regarding Iran, some people think they have 4 nuclear weapons (per Yossef Bodansky).

    Regarding 90% figure in Congressional EMP Commission report, I couldn’t find it either. Peter Pry served in that commission and he says it’s in the report, that’s what I relied on. Skimmed thru the report quickly, might have missed it.

    Read More

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