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How Andrew Gelman Hurt the Feelings of the Power Posing Lady
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I’ve written a lot over the years about the Replication Crisis in the social sciences as academics attempt to emulate Malcolm Gladwell’s success on the corporate conference circuit. The New York Times Magazine offers a long sympathetic article about the Power Posing lady at Harvard Business School who has made a lot of money off her claim to have scientifically proven that certain powerful postures will help you get jobs and sales:

When the Revolution Came for Amy Cuddy

As a young social psychologist, she played by the rules and won big: an influential study, a viral TED talk, a prestigious job at Harvard. Then, suddenly, the rules changed.

BY SUSAN DOMINUSOCT. 18, 2017

Blogger Andrew Gelman gets cast in the article as the unsympathetic hardass who hurts the feelings of Dr. Cuddy. (Here’s Gelman responding.)

Dr. Cuddy looks rather like Phoebe on Friends. Granted, that’s not quite the same as looking like Rachel or Monica on Friends, but it’s not bad by academic standards. She probably was not used to being treated in an unladylike manner. She was likely more used to being treated as a cute blonde than as a scientist.

At the end of the article, Dr. Cuddy is getting out of the social science racket and more into writing motivational books and speaking. That’s kind of like how Malcolm Gladwell responded to the barrage of criticism that built up from 2005 onward. That seems reasonable. Some people have a real gift for telling people what they want to hear and they deserve to get paid for it.

Why is psychology at the center of the storm? As Greg Cochran has pointed out, most social sciences have the same problems as psychology. The psychologists, though, tend to have enough conscience to feel guilty about it.

As I’ve often mentioned before, I was in the marketing research business, which uses the same methodologies as the social sciences … but doesn’t claim to be discovering eternal laws of nature.

In fact, marketing researchers don’t really want their results to be endlessly replicable because that would be bad for business, as I discovered to my financial disadvantage.

I worked in the 1980s for the best real world test marketing laboratory ever constructed. It was wildly popular in the first half of the 1980s as brand managers in the consumer packaged goods industry went nuts paying to test their fondest hope: that doubling their television advertising budget on current ads would increase sales of well-known brands.

It would have been great for our long term success if this question proved not to replicate: if, say, half the time it worked and half the time it failed and the only way you could tell ahead of time was to conduct an expensive test with us.

Unfortunately, this question proved pretty replicable: unless you had some new news to convey to consumers that really was valuable for them to learn, doubling your ad budget would barely move the sales needle. (I recommended that clients test with us cutting their ad budgets, but few were interested: you don’t move up in brand management management by voluntarily giving up ad budget to your colleagues; you move up by outcompeting your fellow brand managers within the firm for ad budget.)

By 1986, Procter & Gamble had decided that increased advertising for same old brands very seldom worked, so it cut testing with us sharply, and the rest soon followed. Our business went way down: not because it had failed scientifically, but because it had proven too depressingly scientific.

(The next business we got into likewise revolutionized market research scientifically, which once again proved bad for business: the truth turns out to be a commodity. The previous firms in this niche had been providing clients with highly stylized data, which made it hard for clients to switch to the other supplier just because they offered to cut prices. Instead, we collected ultra-accurate data on supermarket sales, which proved to be replicable by our competitor, which allowed clients to goad us into a price war.)

Another rule of thumb within the marketing research business was that researchers could often unconsciously talk subjects into answering survey questions with whatever the interviewer seemed to want to hear, so it was better to track what they spent their money upon.

And some marketers are more persuasive than others.

Arnold Schwarzenegger was a careful student of the interplay of posture, self-confidence, and success. Donald Trump has kept using the posture drilled into him at military school. I wouldn’t be surprised if overachievers tend to have better posture than underachievers: that seems like a hypothesis that could be studied. (Of course, that wouldn’t answer the question of which way causality flows, but it would be a start.)

More generally, how exactly are we supposed to test motivational techniques that are premised on subjects believing that they work? If you pay $100 to attend a motivational workshop at which a very confident-sounding Arnold Schwarzenegger teaches the packed audience the posture that helped him intimidate Lou Ferrigno at a cocktail party before the start of a 1970s bodybuilding competition and assures you that it will work for you too in your next job interview, can we really replicate that experience in a psychology laboratory by having a neutral-sounding grad student read instructions from an index card?

After all, Schwarzenegger is living proof that power posing can start you on a career all the way to being governor of a state whose name you can’t pronounce.

Similarly, we did a test in the early 1980s on Jello Pudding Pop commercials featuring Bill Cosby. I don’t remember the exact results, but let’s say they were positive. Would you expect Bill Cosby commercial for Jello Pudding Pops to replicate in 2017?

 
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  1. IHTG says:

    the unsympathetic hardass who hurts the feelings of Dr. Cuddy.

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    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    I knew the names of both doctors Cuddy, but could not place where I knew Amy from because of House.
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  2. iffen says:

    Schwarzenegger is living proof that power posing can lead you on a career to being governor of a state whose name you can’t even pronounce.

    Stop it! You simply have to stop writing stuff like this out loud.

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  3. An erect posture, alert manner and a confident stride help prevent a person from being mugged, studies have shown. Criminals have an eye out for the weak member of the herd.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Bad posture makes people look weak, unconfident, and generally unattractive. It makes them look as though they don't have a strong sense of well-being.
    , @Alden
    Who did the studies??? Not mugggers, rapists, robbers or police, and prosecutors I'm sure. They look more for location. And they will follow people for a few blocks or a few miles. They don't just happen to find their victims. They often follow them. And since the standard mugging team is almost always three, not one, I doubt they care about confident posture.

    SOP is one on foot behind the victim, one in front to accost the victim so the one in back can attack first and one driving the car. Better than believing some liberal BS about posture, always, always look for three black men in a cars. Almost always a mugging/rape team. One black man is probably all right. Two might just be two guy together, but three is a mugging team.


    Sounds like just more liberal c**p. This is also blame the victim public defender c**p. How many times did I hear this from the criminals and dey mammas and women. And those federally funded save the criminals organization staffed by young Jews in their year off from college and grad school.
    " She takes the bus at night. He goes out at night and walks home. Shouldn't park on a dark street, just drive around for another hour looking for a parking spot. Don't carry a purse. Don't do this and don't do that"

    Just watch out for three black men.

    I remember when the feminazis were claiming that a 5'3 120 pd women could fight off a 6'2 rapist by shoving their car keys into his eyes. It's hard to shove anything into the eyes of someone 11 inches taller unless that person allows it.

    The cause of being mugged on the street is mostly being out at night alone.
    , @Silva
    I have the last 2, a perfect absence of the first, and can tell you it also works for deflecting violence. It just doesn't work for anything else. :)
    , @Father O'Hara
    How did the erect posture work out for Harvey?
    , @Colleen Pater
    And how did they do this study? analyse the posture of mugging victims? ask leading questions of muggers? if this were substantially true men would almost never be mugged women only occasionally and most of the time old ladies and children, while we become outraged when they are mugged and no doubt they are sometime targeted for this reason its not ubiquitous.circumstance is far more important
    , @Mr. Anon

    An erect posture, alert manner and a confident stride help prevent a person from being mugged, studies have shown. Criminals have an eye out for the weak member of the herd.
     
    I can easily believe that. Nowadays, however, even just being that one person in the crowd who isn't staring at a phone may provide some protection.
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    I used to avoid muggings by twitching and muttering to myself. Maybe that's just the NYC subway.
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  4. Anonym says:

    At least as far as jobs are concerned, I’ve found that good references are most valuable. They allow an employer to select reliable, good employees from the poseurs. A lot of job opportunities come from networking.

    However it is surprising the number of employees who don’t even bother to pose well during an interview. If you can’t wear professional work wear in an interview why would anyone believe you are going to perform on the job?

    Unless of course you are Steven Bannon, who has earned the right to dress like a bozo… but that goes back to track record. He has the track record to enable that behavior. A surprising amount of people don’t have either track record or the ability to convey professionalism during an interview.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Unless of course you are Steven Bannon, who has earned the right to dress like a bozo…
     
    Bannon would be a helluva lot more effective if he looked like Mike Rowe (with a decent trainer he could get close enough), even more so if he dressed like him.
    , @Anon
    On interview, don't rinse your mouth and spit into the potted plant nearby. (Serious.)
    , @Opinionator
    Richard Spencer tweeted this week that Bannon is overrated.
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  5. she played by the rules

    Being Rewarded for Playing By the Rules is very, very important stuff for middle class “professional” women.

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have imagination, or brains, or common sense, or a willingness to take responsibility or face hard truths or make tough decisions (or even easy ones). Criticism of any kind puts them in an emotional tailspin, they don’t have a good sense of the difference between reality and fantasy, and they don’t take risks, but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules, and if they aren’t well-rewarded, well…

    IT’S JUST NOT FAIR!

    Read More
    • Agree: Desiderius, Abe
    • Replies: @Flip
    And it's not OK.
    , @Olorin
    I wouldn't put it as globally as you did, since I've known many rational, empirical, more or less quanty gals who take criticism just fine and work in the realm of reality. And I wouldn't mistake Miss Dominus's rhetoric for global truth.

    But I agree overall with the observation about the many who are as you describe. (Especially in the case of It's Her Turn (TM).)

    We're cutting to the core of academe's milky underbelly with this topic: it's no longer about finding out what we can know and what we have learned about the true, real, and beautiful, and imparting that to young people, whose minds and skills we seek to develop. Or for that matter learning what doesn't work and has failed in the past, and warning young people off that.

    Instead, it's Girl (or Boy) Scouting. Go down the lists of accomplishments for each badge, win the ones you're good at, and when your badge sash (or whatever they have today) is full enough with all the right badges, and you're a certain age, you fly up to the next level. On and on till you're an Eagle Scout, or whatever the equivalent is for girls these days.

    This is also what's wrong with K-12 education, where kids are rewarded not for learning actual stuff that's true and real, but for sitting down, shutting up, and doing what they're told.

    Both some of the best and some of the worst bosses I've had were women. The worst women bosses were confused darlings who seemed to think they were GS troop leaders and the workplace was a GS summer camp, which is to say lesbian hookup camp. And as Wilbur says, they expected rewards for doing what they were told. Not for what they produced or effected that is of value to others.

    , @Alden
    That's what we are told in school. To succeed in school one must be very conformist and obedient. So for 12 years we are rewarded for following the rules with As and Bs in conduct and behavior and getting along with others. In some public schools homework is half the grade. So grades don't depend on high test scores, just doing stupid busywork and turning it in on time.

    College used to be very free, but now every word is monitored by the liberal minions of Satan that rule college campuses.

    So we get into the working world and find that we are surrounded by nasty people, under paid and overworked and it is just horrible and we get all traumatized. I don't know how it is today in women's magazines but when I used to read them it was all about how wonderful work is and how you will meet so many wonderful friends and be fulfilled* and work is such a wonderful thing. Women expect to be happy at work. Men and sensible women know it's just a job.

    * what does fulfilled mean??? I never understood.
    , @Kevin C.

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have… a willingness to take responsibility…
     
    Well, when, in any society, have women ever had to take responsibility for their actions, and bear the costs and consequences of their choices, to near the same degree as similarly-situated men? When have men not been called upon, either individually or collectively (such as via the state), to "man up" and shoulder the burden of women's mistakes? Men are the expendable sex, and more attention is always paid toward ameliorating women's pains and burdens. (Remember Hillary's comment about how women are the ones who always suffer the most in war, because they lose husbands or sons?) Very few people, male or female, Left or Right, feminist or traditionalist, actually act as if they really believe women have the same level of agency, responsibility, and moral culpability as adult men. (There are reasons solid Libertarians skew not just heavily male, but disproportionately single or gay men.)

    they don’t take risks
     
    Predicted by basic evolutionary theory: see Bateman's principle and Robert Trivers's work on sexual selection and parental investment theory. Whichever sex invests more resources in offspring (usually the female, and pretty much always for placental mammals, given pregnancy and lactation), will see less variation in reproductive success, and cluster around a "safe" strategy, while the other sex, seeing more reproductive variance, compete with one another in pursuit of the higher-investing sex. Humans are no exception. (The estimate is that something like 80% of all women who've ever lived have successfully reproduced, but only 40% of men; but on the other hand, a woman is biologically incapable of having the runaway reproductive success of a Ramesis or a Genghis Khan.) See also various distribution curves, like intelligence or status, where males have higher variance, dominating both the high and low ends.

    but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules
     
    In other words, sticking to the safe, average strategy and following the herd. Again, just as evolution predicts for female mammals.
    , @guest
    On the other hand, I take criticism like a Stone Wall most of the time because I (stupidly) took our culture's admonition not to care what other people think* seriously.

    I'm also a failure by all objective measurement, possibly because I'm stupidly stone-wallish.

    *They probably mean "Don't be afraid to have homosex and vote Democrat." I don't know if it ever occurs to them that some people take it as, "Don't be afraid to be fat and emit body odor."

    , @Kylie
    You're so mean.
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  6. One of the subtexts of the article is that all the nasty, bullying, rigid, statistical types were men, and the greatest proportion of their poor, heart-of-gold, victim types were women.

    If it weren’t for the Patriarchy and its disgusting mansplaining, power posing would be a real thing, and Cuddy would still be riding high, sharing the stage perhaps with Elizabeth Holmes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thomm
    Quite often, a woman can receive fame and wealth for........nothing really. A man who produced the same would be a nobody.
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  7. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I’ve gone through most of this pop-psychology TEDTalk stuff out there by Ph.D’s. Most of the books can by found on audio on YouTube. Presence, The Charisma Myth, Decisive, Influence, Made to Stick, Mindset, Start With Why, et al. Here’s the deal. You will find the very same stuff in sales training materials from 50 years ago. Only difference is the former is propped up a lot of unnecessary bullshit, stories/anecdotes, and scientific talk.

    In fact, I haven’t read or heard anything from these TEDTalk social-psych Ph.D.’s that is not covered in the works of charlatan Dale Carnegie or con-man Napoleon Hill.

    Read More
    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But Carnegie and Hill were competent charlatans and conmen. They told you stuff like: To get somebody to care about you, it's more important to get them to do you a favor than for you to do them a favor.
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    I somehow stumbled upon a TED talk by a woman who was pushing back against the conventional wisdom that adults have all the time in the world to experiment and find themselves and then still be able to swing for the fence in their 30's and 40's. I don't remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.
    , @Desiderius

    the works of charlatan Dale Carnegie
     
    The post-Carnegie half-century have revealed that widely held opinion to be the perfect as the enemy of the good.
    , @Ivy
    Dale Carnegie's book and similar ones may be viewed as ways to jolt a salesman out of some rut. That isn't a very scientific explanation but can be effective. Sales and other parts of business are demanding enough that people look for ways to change approaches, whether frequently or as part of a mid-career tune-up or introspection. Sometimes a new perspective works just enough, without many literal overtones or promises of figurative cancer cures or what have you. Paying a small amount for a book, or podcast, or just viewing on YouTube may serve a purpose.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Exactly. The use of body language, movement, posture, etc. as effective non-verbal communication isn't new, and goes back for centuries. The ancient Romans and during the Middle Ages had observations and descriptions for exactly these kinds of details (e.g. poor posture was equated with "weakness", while a head erect, non-smiling staring straight ahead was viewed as "powerful", and especially "confident" etc.). Those observations on body posture equals a more confident approach to "life", how to lead a successful group, or team, within one's particular goal aren't distinctly 20th century American at all. What is apparently unique is that traditionally it was viewed more as a male dominated field, an obsession to gain the additional edge to becoming top alpha, and king of the mountain.
    , @Opinionator
    Is the work "Influence" that you mention the book by Robert Cialdini?

    Why do you think Carnegie is a charlatan?

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  8. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Harry Baldwin
    An erect posture, alert manner and a confident stride help prevent a person from being mugged, studies have shown. Criminals have an eye out for the weak member of the herd.

    Bad posture makes people look weak, unconfident, and generally unattractive. It makes them look as though they don’t have a strong sense of well-being.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    French ,Italian and German men all have extremely good posture. American men generally don't have good posture I'm sorry to say.Neither do American women.
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  9. Steve, the issue you raise is the very same one William James considered in his notion of pragmatism.

    So-called “soft” pragmatism is of the “believing something to be true gave me enough confidence to carry on as though it were and I won through to success in the end” kind of pragmatism. So, for example, if believing in God gives a person’s life meaning and makes them a better person, then God is in some sense “real” and such a belief is pragmatically “true”.

    The other, “hard” pragmatism was more the Kuhn Structure of Scientific Revolutions type in which believing a theory to be true provided a researcher with an intellectual falsework* which enabled him to posit entities and conduct experiments which eventually proved out. So, early researchers in electricity had only a dim conception of what electricity was, but they could measure magnetic fields, resistance, current and volts and carry on as though they knew what they were doing until a more complete picture emerged. And theory or apparatus that allowed them to do this was pragmatically “true” because it was useful.

    So was Arnold’s progress as a bodybuilder, actor and politician of the soft type or the hard?

    *falsework is the structurally sound scaffolding built under, say, an arched bridge, that holds up all the stones until the last, keystone is put into place. Then the falsework is removed and tossed, having served its purpose. The arch now stands on its own.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    the soft type or the hard?
     
    I'm having difficulty seeing the distinction.
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  10. @Anonymous
    I've gone through most of this pop-psychology TEDTalk stuff out there by Ph.D's. Most of the books can by found on audio on YouTube. Presence, The Charisma Myth, Decisive, Influence, Made to Stick, Mindset, Start With Why, et al. Here's the deal. You will find the very same stuff in sales training materials from 50 years ago. Only difference is the former is propped up a lot of unnecessary bullshit, stories/anecdotes, and scientific talk.

    In fact, I haven't read or heard anything from these TEDTalk social-psych Ph.D.'s that is not covered in the works of charlatan Dale Carnegie or con-man Napoleon Hill.

    But Carnegie and Hill were competent charlatans and conmen. They told you stuff like: To get somebody to care about you, it’s more important to get them to do you a favor than for you to do them a favor.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Right, Carnegie gave tips on practical social skills that can be learned and practiced and will help one navigate business and professional life.

    I don't know if Carnegie was a charlatan and conman. Hill may have been; I don't know much about him other than that he was more mystical in his approach.
    , @anon

    It's called a confidence game. Why? Because you give me your confidence? No. Because I give you mine.
     
    An old but enjoyable film, House of Games. David Mamet, 1986

    Are you going to review, Nocturnal Animals? I don't know if it is any good, but I enjoyed it.
    , @FKA Max
    BBC Presents Warren Buffett on Dale Carnegie - Dale Carnegie Training

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7gXaPY524I

    BBC presents Warren Buffett and his thoughts on the Dale Carnegie Course and public speaking including how the Dale Carnegie Course improved his communication skills.

    Heather Graham's new boyfriend leaves her! / Old Spice commercial

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDVbTPu2IM8

    There's nothing you can't do if you believe... Autosuggestion and side effects / Sorry Heather...
    , @Father O'Hara
    Every pick up guru praises Hill to high heaven.
    , @The Alarmist
    The trick is to get them to want to do you the favour. I learned early on that people in power liked me more when I let them tell me all about them and their experiences. Over a few boozy lunches (these were three-martini guys who came up through the sixties ... think Mad Men), EVPs practically adopted me as their new son.

    I'm not sure who was the bigger sociopath in those relationships, but it was great fun ;)

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  11. Tony says:

    The only thing Bill Cosby can do a commercial for now is Quaaludes.

    Read More
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  12. Flip says:
    @Wilbur Hassenfus

    she played by the rules
     
    Being Rewarded for Playing By the Rules is very, very important stuff for middle class “professional” women.

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have imagination, or brains, or common sense, or a willingness to take responsibility or face hard truths or make tough decisions (or even easy ones). Criticism of any kind puts them in an emotional tailspin, they don’t have a good sense of the difference between reality and fantasy, and they don’t take risks, but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules, and if they aren’t well-rewarded, well...

    IT’S JUST NOT FAIR!

    And it’s not OK.

    Read More
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  13. @Anonymous
    I've gone through most of this pop-psychology TEDTalk stuff out there by Ph.D's. Most of the books can by found on audio on YouTube. Presence, The Charisma Myth, Decisive, Influence, Made to Stick, Mindset, Start With Why, et al. Here's the deal. You will find the very same stuff in sales training materials from 50 years ago. Only difference is the former is propped up a lot of unnecessary bullshit, stories/anecdotes, and scientific talk.

    In fact, I haven't read or heard anything from these TEDTalk social-psych Ph.D.'s that is not covered in the works of charlatan Dale Carnegie or con-man Napoleon Hill.

    I somehow stumbled upon a TED talk by a woman who was pushing back against the conventional wisdom that adults have all the time in the world to experiment and find themselves and then still be able to swing for the fence in their 30′s and 40′s. I don’t remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    I don’t remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.

    This is Boulder we're talking about- where the main economy is catering to people's sense of awesomeness.
    , @AKAHorace

    I somehow stumbled upon a TED talk by a woman who was pushing back against the conventional wisdom that adults have all the time in the world to experiment and find themselves and then still be able to swing for the fence in their 30′s and 40′s. I don’t remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.
     
    I remember it, but like you cannot remember the woman. Did she say that "thirties are not the new twenties, a lot of research shows that the decisions you make in your twenties are very imporant"?

    I may be paraphrasing.
    , @Pericles

    adults have all the time in the world to experiment and find themselves and then still be able to swing for the fence in their 30′s and 40′s.

     

    It does work if your parents are rich. And if you strike out, well ... don't worry.
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  14. Another rule of thumb within the marketing research business was that researchers often talked subjects into agreeing answer surveys with whatever they wanted to hear, so it was better to track what they spent their money upon.

    I work in the consumer packaged goods industry, and I always find your marketing research asides to be interesting. Maybe I’m being slow today, but I can’t make heads or tails of that statement. Is it what the subjects themselves wanted to hear or the what the sponsoring agency wanted to hear? And what type of marketing survey are you talking about?

    Read More
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    What the firm conducting the research wanted to hear and I assume one of those group interviews. I did one for Harrods when I was a student, I didn't shop at Harrods as I was a student and just made stuff up. Got a nice shopping voucher out if it though, and they got data I thought might be accurate.
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  15. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    But Carnegie and Hill were competent charlatans and conmen. They told you stuff like: To get somebody to care about you, it's more important to get them to do you a favor than for you to do them a favor.

    Right, Carnegie gave tips on practical social skills that can be learned and practiced and will help one navigate business and professional life.

    I don’t know if Carnegie was a charlatan and conman. Hill may have been; I don’t know much about him other than that he was more mystical in his approach.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Do you think the favor principle Steve mentions works or not?

    Maybe Steve is being sly here and pointing out that the principle sort of begs the question it gets the causation arrow reversed.
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  16. Olorin says:
    @Wilbur Hassenfus

    she played by the rules
     
    Being Rewarded for Playing By the Rules is very, very important stuff for middle class “professional” women.

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have imagination, or brains, or common sense, or a willingness to take responsibility or face hard truths or make tough decisions (or even easy ones). Criticism of any kind puts them in an emotional tailspin, they don’t have a good sense of the difference between reality and fantasy, and they don’t take risks, but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules, and if they aren’t well-rewarded, well...

    IT’S JUST NOT FAIR!

    I wouldn’t put it as globally as you did, since I’ve known many rational, empirical, more or less quanty gals who take criticism just fine and work in the realm of reality. And I wouldn’t mistake Miss Dominus’s rhetoric for global truth.

    But I agree overall with the observation about the many who are as you describe. (Especially in the case of It’s Her Turn (TM).)

    We’re cutting to the core of academe’s milky underbelly with this topic: it’s no longer about finding out what we can know and what we have learned about the true, real, and beautiful, and imparting that to young people, whose minds and skills we seek to develop. Or for that matter learning what doesn’t work and has failed in the past, and warning young people off that.

    Instead, it’s Girl (or Boy) Scouting. Go down the lists of accomplishments for each badge, win the ones you’re good at, and when your badge sash (or whatever they have today) is full enough with all the right badges, and you’re a certain age, you fly up to the next level. On and on till you’re an Eagle Scout, or whatever the equivalent is for girls these days.

    This is also what’s wrong with K-12 education, where kids are rewarded not for learning actual stuff that’s true and real, but for sitting down, shutting up, and doing what they’re told.

    Both some of the best and some of the worst bosses I’ve had were women. The worst women bosses were confused darlings who seemed to think they were GS troop leaders and the workplace was a GS summer camp, which is to say lesbian hookup camp. And as Wilbur says, they expected rewards for doing what they were told. Not for what they produced or effected that is of value to others.

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    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    This is also my experience, and why each year I consider educational credentials less and less valuable. In fact recently for hiring purposes I've start to count them against the applicant after a certain point. If somebody does 3 fellowships they have something wrong with them.
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  17. @The Anti-Gnostic
    I somehow stumbled upon a TED talk by a woman who was pushing back against the conventional wisdom that adults have all the time in the world to experiment and find themselves and then still be able to swing for the fence in their 30's and 40's. I don't remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.

    I don’t remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.

    This is Boulder we’re talking about- where the main economy is catering to people’s sense of awesomeness.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    This is Boulder we’re talking about- where the main economy is catering to people’s sense of awesomeness.

    But not after 9 pm. There is no economy in Boulder after 9 pm.

    , @Pericles
    They should follow the example of Denver though and decriminalize street defecation. Backwards Boulder.
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  18. Roger says: • Website

    Gelman is merciless on those he accuses of sloppy statistics or ethical errors.

    If you over-sell your results, you could get criticism in proportion to the over-selling. I do not think that rule has changed.

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  19. @Anonym
    At least as far as jobs are concerned, I've found that good references are most valuable. They allow an employer to select reliable, good employees from the poseurs. A lot of job opportunities come from networking.

    However it is surprising the number of employees who don't even bother to pose well during an interview. If you can't wear professional work wear in an interview why would anyone believe you are going to perform on the job?

    Unless of course you are Steven Bannon, who has earned the right to dress like a bozo... but that goes back to track record. He has the track record to enable that behavior. A surprising amount of people don't have either track record or the ability to convey professionalism during an interview.

    Unless of course you are Steven Bannon, who has earned the right to dress like a bozo…

    Bannon would be a helluva lot more effective if he looked like Mike Rowe (with a decent trainer he could get close enough), even more so if he dressed like him.

    Read More
    • Replies: @newrouter
    "Bannon would be a helluva lot more effective if he looked like Mike Rowe (with a decent trainer he could get close enough), even more so if he dressed like him."

    Weinstein was effective no?
    , @LondonBob
    Only truly successful people with unique talent can dress like an individual, Bannon is one of those few. Everyone else should take the advice I was given, dress smart and dress conservative. Sign of Bannon's power he can dress like a slob.
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    Maybe it's just genetically bad coloring and poor diet, but Bannon looks like a hardcore alcoholic.
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  20. @Anonymous
    I've gone through most of this pop-psychology TEDTalk stuff out there by Ph.D's. Most of the books can by found on audio on YouTube. Presence, The Charisma Myth, Decisive, Influence, Made to Stick, Mindset, Start With Why, et al. Here's the deal. You will find the very same stuff in sales training materials from 50 years ago. Only difference is the former is propped up a lot of unnecessary bullshit, stories/anecdotes, and scientific talk.

    In fact, I haven't read or heard anything from these TEDTalk social-psych Ph.D.'s that is not covered in the works of charlatan Dale Carnegie or con-man Napoleon Hill.

    the works of charlatan Dale Carnegie

    The post-Carnegie half-century have revealed that widely held opinion to be the perfect as the enemy of the good.

    Read More
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  21. George says:

    General’s McMaster and Mattis have great posture and they convinced Trump that NATO was not obsolete, Afghanistan will be won, and the F-35 is worth every penny.

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  22. @ThreeCranes
    Steve, the issue you raise is the very same one William James considered in his notion of pragmatism.

    So-called "soft" pragmatism is of the "believing something to be true gave me enough confidence to carry on as though it were and I won through to success in the end" kind of pragmatism. So, for example, if believing in God gives a person's life meaning and makes them a better person, then God is in some sense "real" and such a belief is pragmatically "true".

    The other, "hard" pragmatism was more the Kuhn Structure of Scientific Revolutions type in which believing a theory to be true provided a researcher with an intellectual falsework* which enabled him to posit entities and conduct experiments which eventually proved out. So, early researchers in electricity had only a dim conception of what electricity was, but they could measure magnetic fields, resistance, current and volts and carry on as though they knew what they were doing until a more complete picture emerged. And theory or apparatus that allowed them to do this was pragmatically "true" because it was useful.

    So was Arnold's progress as a bodybuilder, actor and politician of the soft type or the hard?


    *falsework is the structurally sound scaffolding built under, say, an arched bridge, that holds up all the stones until the last, keystone is put into place. Then the falsework is removed and tossed, having served its purpose. The arch now stands on its own.

    the soft type or the hard?

    I’m having difficulty seeing the distinction.

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    • Agree: Opinionator
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    What's unclear? As I read it, it's the difference between "fake it 'til you make it" and "the numbers check out". Between "The Little Engine That Could" or Dumbo's feather, and an engineer's "rules of thumb" and tables.
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  23. Thomm says:
    @candid_observer
    One of the subtexts of the article is that all the nasty, bullying, rigid, statistical types were men, and the greatest proportion of their poor, heart-of-gold, victim types were women.

    If it weren't for the Patriarchy and its disgusting mansplaining, power posing would be a real thing, and Cuddy would still be riding high, sharing the stage perhaps with Elizabeth Holmes.

    Quite often, a woman can receive fame and wealth for……..nothing really. A man who produced the same would be a nobody.

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  24. Roissy’s always been big on posture.

    https://heartiste.wordpress.com/2008/10/15/standing-like-an-alpha/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrapposto

    For what it’s worth it definitely worked for me.

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I don't know if Clint Eastwood figured it out for himself or Sergio Leone told him to stand contrapposto., but it's one of the most popular images of him. It may not have the same effect if you look more like Dom Deluise than Clint Eastwood.
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51EQnY2S93L._SL500_AC_SS350_.jpg
    , @Colleen Pater
    If its true that there a saturation point on propaganda and only new propaganda will move the needle that good news for altright
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  25. Hodag says:

    My sister works for one of the enormous technology companies. One time I was out cocktailing with those folks and they took everything they heard on a TEd talk as true. It was shocking…I have met Jehovah’s Witnesses who were less likely to be taken for a mark.

    Also, Cubs have a sign of life. MLB is wetting themselves with a NYY v either Cubs or LAD series.

    One more thing:. Home sick today and watched Ex Machina. Well worth watching and I like how if the guy from Dredd was an AI or not.

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  26. “Some people have a real gift for telling people what they want to hear and they deserve to get paid for it.”

    Why? Couldn’t people just tell themselves what they want to hear? This would cut out the middleman and lower the price to be paid on raising their personal self-esteem.

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  27. Ivy says:
    @Anonymous
    I've gone through most of this pop-psychology TEDTalk stuff out there by Ph.D's. Most of the books can by found on audio on YouTube. Presence, The Charisma Myth, Decisive, Influence, Made to Stick, Mindset, Start With Why, et al. Here's the deal. You will find the very same stuff in sales training materials from 50 years ago. Only difference is the former is propped up a lot of unnecessary bullshit, stories/anecdotes, and scientific talk.

    In fact, I haven't read or heard anything from these TEDTalk social-psych Ph.D.'s that is not covered in the works of charlatan Dale Carnegie or con-man Napoleon Hill.

    Dale Carnegie’s book and similar ones may be viewed as ways to jolt a salesman out of some rut. That isn’t a very scientific explanation but can be effective. Sales and other parts of business are demanding enough that people look for ways to change approaches, whether frequently or as part of a mid-career tune-up or introspection. Sometimes a new perspective works just enough, without many literal overtones or promises of figurative cancer cures or what have you. Paying a small amount for a book, or podcast, or just viewing on YouTube may serve a purpose.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    Sometimes a late night infomercial can be very motivational. Picture it: You stumble home from your meaningless job where you have no social life at the office and don't go out after work. You walk into your empty apartment, have a dinner of fast food and beer, and fall asleep on the couch with the tube on. As you startle awake at 2 AM, there's somebody making a pretty energetic case that you really can improve your life dramatically with a Bow Flex or a non-stick frying pan. The soft blue light and swanky electro-pop music have got you feeling kind of positive. It's only one phone call away. And if you need to validate those feelings first, you can always call the Psychic Hotline.

    It may be that none of it's true, but if you can just hang on to that moment it might get you somewhere.

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  28. Alden says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    An erect posture, alert manner and a confident stride help prevent a person from being mugged, studies have shown. Criminals have an eye out for the weak member of the herd.

    Who did the studies??? Not mugggers, rapists, robbers or police, and prosecutors I’m sure. They look more for location. And they will follow people for a few blocks or a few miles. They don’t just happen to find their victims. They often follow them. And since the standard mugging team is almost always three, not one, I doubt they care about confident posture.

    SOP is one on foot behind the victim, one in front to accost the victim so the one in back can attack first and one driving the car. Better than believing some liberal BS about posture, always, always look for three black men in a cars. Almost always a mugging/rape team. One black man is probably all right. Two might just be two guy together, but three is a mugging team.

    Sounds like just more liberal c**p. This is also blame the victim public defender c**p. How many times did I hear this from the criminals and dey mammas and women. And those federally funded save the criminals organization staffed by young Jews in their year off from college and grad school.
    ” She takes the bus at night. He goes out at night and walks home. Shouldn’t park on a dark street, just drive around for another hour looking for a parking spot. Don’t carry a purse. Don’t do this and don’t do that”

    Just watch out for three black men.

    I remember when the feminazis were claiming that a 5’3 120 pd women could fight off a 6’2 rapist by shoving their car keys into his eyes. It’s hard to shove anything into the eyes of someone 11 inches taller unless that person allows it.

    The cause of being mugged on the street is mostly being out at night alone.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I heard about it in a class with Craig "Southnarc" Douglas, and if you know who he is you'll be aware he doesn't spout "liberal c**p."

    In a study, convicts were asked to look at a number of videos of people walking along the street and identify those twho looked like suitable victims. The people they consistently picked out were those with poor posture, walked with a slightly "off" gait, and looked as if they weren't attending to their surroundings.

    Not all muggers work in teams like you describe, though that's obviously an extremely dangerous scenario.

    Anyway, I'm surprised you make this sound like it's so outlandish. I don't understand why it set you off on such a tirade.
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  29. Alden says:
    @Anonymous
    Bad posture makes people look weak, unconfident, and generally unattractive. It makes them look as though they don't have a strong sense of well-being.

    French ,Italian and German men all have extremely good posture. American men generally don’t have good posture I’m sorry to say.Neither do American women.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    My (foreign) wife often remarks upon my posture (positively, being surprised and impressed by it); American women have never said word one about it in my entire life.

    If you want good posture, do a stint in the military; there is no substitute. (For ridiculously good posture, do a stint in the honour guard in the military.)

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  30. @Anonymous
    I've gone through most of this pop-psychology TEDTalk stuff out there by Ph.D's. Most of the books can by found on audio on YouTube. Presence, The Charisma Myth, Decisive, Influence, Made to Stick, Mindset, Start With Why, et al. Here's the deal. You will find the very same stuff in sales training materials from 50 years ago. Only difference is the former is propped up a lot of unnecessary bullshit, stories/anecdotes, and scientific talk.

    In fact, I haven't read or heard anything from these TEDTalk social-psych Ph.D.'s that is not covered in the works of charlatan Dale Carnegie or con-man Napoleon Hill.

    Exactly. The use of body language, movement, posture, etc. as effective non-verbal communication isn’t new, and goes back for centuries. The ancient Romans and during the Middle Ages had observations and descriptions for exactly these kinds of details (e.g. poor posture was equated with “weakness”, while a head erect, non-smiling staring straight ahead was viewed as “powerful”, and especially “confident” etc.). Those observations on body posture equals a more confident approach to “life”, how to lead a successful group, or team, within one’s particular goal aren’t distinctly 20th century American at all. What is apparently unique is that traditionally it was viewed more as a male dominated field, an obsession to gain the additional edge to becoming top alpha, and king of the mountain.

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  31. AKAHorace says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    I somehow stumbled upon a TED talk by a woman who was pushing back against the conventional wisdom that adults have all the time in the world to experiment and find themselves and then still be able to swing for the fence in their 30's and 40's. I don't remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.

    I somehow stumbled upon a TED talk by a woman who was pushing back against the conventional wisdom that adults have all the time in the world to experiment and find themselves and then still be able to swing for the fence in their 30′s and 40′s. I don’t remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.

    I remember it, but like you cannot remember the woman. Did she say that “thirties are not the new twenties, a lot of research shows that the decisions you make in your twenties are very imporant”?

    I may be paraphrasing.

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    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://www.ted.com/talks/meg_jay_why_30_is_not_the_new_20/transcript
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  32. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonym
    At least as far as jobs are concerned, I've found that good references are most valuable. They allow an employer to select reliable, good employees from the poseurs. A lot of job opportunities come from networking.

    However it is surprising the number of employees who don't even bother to pose well during an interview. If you can't wear professional work wear in an interview why would anyone believe you are going to perform on the job?

    Unless of course you are Steven Bannon, who has earned the right to dress like a bozo... but that goes back to track record. He has the track record to enable that behavior. A surprising amount of people don't have either track record or the ability to convey professionalism during an interview.

    On interview, don’t rinse your mouth and spit into the potted plant nearby. (Serious.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles
    In fact, just stay away from the potted plants altogether, Harvey.
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  33. Alden says:
    @Wilbur Hassenfus

    she played by the rules
     
    Being Rewarded for Playing By the Rules is very, very important stuff for middle class “professional” women.

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have imagination, or brains, or common sense, or a willingness to take responsibility or face hard truths or make tough decisions (or even easy ones). Criticism of any kind puts them in an emotional tailspin, they don’t have a good sense of the difference between reality and fantasy, and they don’t take risks, but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules, and if they aren’t well-rewarded, well...

    IT’S JUST NOT FAIR!

    That’s what we are told in school. To succeed in school one must be very conformist and obedient. So for 12 years we are rewarded for following the rules with As and Bs in conduct and behavior and getting along with others. In some public schools homework is half the grade. So grades don’t depend on high test scores, just doing stupid busywork and turning it in on time.

    College used to be very free, but now every word is monitored by the liberal minions of Satan that rule college campuses.

    So we get into the working world and find that we are surrounded by nasty people, under paid and overworked and it is just horrible and we get all traumatized. I don’t know how it is today in women’s magazines but when I used to read them it was all about how wonderful work is and how you will meet so many wonderful friends and be fulfilled* and work is such a wonderful thing. Women expect to be happy at work. Men and sensible women know it’s just a job.

    * what does fulfilled mean??? I never understood.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Traditionally speaking, fulfilled meant for a man: King of the mountain, with all the rivals crushed and prostrated before him (either literally, during times of war, or at least not making as much money and not having the best coolest stuff in life).

    Traditionally speaking, being fulfilled for a woman meant having a well rounded life: The ideal mate, just the right number of kids, a nice house, etc.

    Think Goldilocks when she sampled the last things (chair, food, bed, etc) : It's just right.

    So being fulfilled for women meant: It's just right, it's all good.
    , @ScarletNumber
    Why is following the rules such a bad thing. There are plenty of people in society who don't follow the rules and I would rather not deal with them.
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  34. Remember GoldieBlox ?

    Via Adweek, here’s their recent promo for… what? Maybe Steve’s right about CGI-only kids in showbiz. The video appears to be a stereotypically girly fashion show/dance-off with superimposed text about how girls/women are overcoming stereotypes.

    Included are esteemed role models Hillary Clinton and lady Ghostbusters.

    Hidden Figures Reveals
    Shocking News
    About Rocket Scientists

    They Aren’t All
    Old White Men

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hodag
    My sister bought my daughter goldiblox. It did not work and was built like crap. She is a clever kid and had no interest.
    , @Laugh Track

    Via Adweek, here’s their recent promo for… what? Maybe Steve’s right about CGI-only kids in showbiz. The video appears to be a stereotypically girly fashion show/dance-off with superimposed text about how girls/women are overcoming stereotypes.
     
    I'm sure this was conceived as empowering. No doubt it is my bad that it strikes me as pathetic. All these poor girls waving signs and hyping ideals that have little reasonable chance of materializing. And when they don't materialize, it will be the fault of the Patriarchy, not of the would-be social engineers who repeatedly overreach.
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  35. @Desiderius
    Roissy's always been big on posture.

    https://heartiste.wordpress.com/2008/10/15/standing-like-an-alpha/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrapposto

    For what it's worth it definitely worked for me.

    I don’t know if Clint Eastwood figured it out for himself or Sergio Leone told him to stand contrapposto., but it’s one of the most popular images of him. It may not have the same effect if you look more like Dom Deluise than Clint Eastwood.

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    • Replies: @Kylie
    My god, he was gorgeous.

    My father actually bought one of those serape things to wear after watching Clint as the Man With No Name. Unfortunately the serape was fuchsia and my father was in his 70's and about 60 lbs. overweight. He gave it to me but it was too scratchy to wear.
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  36. newrouter says:
    @Desiderius

    Unless of course you are Steven Bannon, who has earned the right to dress like a bozo…
     
    Bannon would be a helluva lot more effective if he looked like Mike Rowe (with a decent trainer he could get close enough), even more so if he dressed like him.

    “Bannon would be a helluva lot more effective if he looked like Mike Rowe (with a decent trainer he could get close enough), even more so if he dressed like him.”

    Weinstein was effective no?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    (a) different target market

    (b) no, not particularly
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  37. Hodag says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Remember GoldieBlox ?

    Via Adweek, here’s their recent promo for… what? Maybe Steve’s right about CGI-only kids in showbiz. The video appears to be a stereotypically girly fashion show/dance-off with superimposed text about how girls/women are overcoming stereotypes.

    Included are esteemed role models Hillary Clinton and lady Ghostbusters.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TC9AgWYLYlQ

    Hidden Figures Reveals
    Shocking News
    About Rocket Scientists

    They Aren’t All
    Old White Men
     

    My sister bought my daughter goldiblox. It did not work and was built like crap. She is a clever kid and had no interest.

    Read More
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  38. Trelane says:

    A plastic surgeon fixes a broken face. The patient, now armed with a vastly improved self-image, is transformed into a new and potentially better person.

    Jerry Lewis and The Nutty Professor played off of Maxwell Maltz’ 1960 book Psycho-Cybernetics which, itself borrowed from Norbert Weiner’s Cybernetics (1948).

    Maltz was a plastic surgeon and could see for himself the power of self-image.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    And Maltz discovered that plastic surgery, e.g. a nose job, didn't necessarily improve self-image. Self-image being principally psychological, not physical.
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  39. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The problem with you Steve is you are such a stat and science nerd you don’t realize marketing is convincing fat and lazy people that what you’re selling is easy and somehow beneficial. Its not really science but understanding that the perfect consumer is a lazy idiot that wants something fast and easy. Guys like Arnold go far. Its not the hard nosed dedication of guys with handicaps like Lou Ferrigno, but cheaters who use performance enhancing drugs and know the right people that get ahead. Like Arnold. This guy came from a former Soviet Bloc country and used the performance enhancing drugs that made East German Women a running gag into a lucrative career. First on the Bodybuilding Circuit, then in the supplement business. And finally going into movies and doing what every muscle bound guy didn’t before, making money. Its not talent, its cheating, schmoozing, using tricks and being noticed. You could probably be rich too, if you would stop wasting time analyzing stuff like moneyball which only spergies would care about and come up with something that sounds too good to be true but cannot be disproved until you make millions.

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    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @SnakeEyes
    Arnold was from Austria - not an "Eastern Bloc" country.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    Arnold was and is a showman, but Austria was not a Soviet bloc country--never, for example, in the Warsaw Pact.
    , @Lurker

    This guy came from a former Soviet Bloc country
     
    Who, Arnold? Because he was from Austria.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    Steroids don't magically make you muscular anyway. What steroids do is enable you to recover from extreme gym work, but you've still got to do the work. Arnold probably worked as hard in the gym as Ferrigno did.

    And finally going into movies and doing what every muscle bound guy didn’t before, making money. Its not talent, its cheating, schmoozing, using tricks and being noticed.
     
    Being noticed is a talent!
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  40. OT, but iSteve-relevant.

    What’s next after WWT?

    Well, this likely will be more of a skirmish than a war, but it could well be WWC(ousins).

    An article linked at Instapundit (LINK) is saying that first-cousin marriage not only isn’t (very) harmful, it’s very possibly actually potentially really quite beneficial! And where was the research conducted? Pakistan, of course.

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    • Replies: @whorefinder
    I know it's cliche to point out how George Soros and Israel influence our culture through propaganda, but we can't forget how the Saudis are also doing this as well. That oil money covered up the fact that the 9/11 terrorists were all Saudis. And now protecting that vital Muslim ideal: banging your cousin.
    , @whorefinder

    What’s next after WWT?
     
    WWT isn't over yet. They've actually experienced a loss---they had the military, and Trump kicked them out.

    They put a tranny in Playboy for next month---yes, they did----but that's already bringing out the laughs. Playboy was dead anyway, as dead as Hefner is now, and they're just trying to revive the corpse with shock value.
    , @Silva
    "So, exactly what’d the scientists find? Namely, they discovered that the risk of giving birth to children with genetic defects as a result of marriages between first cousins is no greater than that run by women over 40 who get knocked up."

    "Something that shouldn't happen no worse than something else that shouldn't happen".
    , @Kevin C.
    As to that article, of course they miss that the problem isn't just the risk of genetic defects, it's that, in increasing consanguinity and thus genetic similarity between relatives, in the long run you select for higher kinship altruism, likely at the expense of reciprocal altruism, and end up producing a more "clannish" society. (People also miss that when it comes to cousin marriage, the West is mostly the outlier for avoiding it.) Plus, one should note that all their talk about "lower heart disease risk" refers to a family of Pakistanis with a particular mutant gene, and isn't actually relevant to cousin marriage at all.

    As for what comes after WWT, I still suspect that polygamy is a likely contender, just as soon as they come up with a convincing (to judges) legal rationale to legalize it for Muslims but not Mormons.

    , @Nico

    WWC(ousins)
     
    One more battle in the War on Noticing.

    Anyone in the West who's tried to have an intelligent one-on-one conversation with a Muslim for over 15 minutes knows it's usually hopeless: upwards of 80 percent of them can't help themselves turning to religion and spouting off absolute nonsense. They can put on a veneer of sanity but that's it.

    And once you have a look at their rates of consanguinity and the historic cumulation of such unions, you understand exactly why.
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  41. unit472 says:

    Following the proxy fight at P&G and their attempt to swindle users of Tide detergent with their ‘new’ laundry pellets I don’t think much of brand name advertising campaigns and can only wonder what the rebel factions championing of Nathan Peltz had in store for America.

    Obviously it is cheaper to ship detergent in concentrated pellets than the familar Tide liquid containers and pre proportioning detergent into one unit per load, no matter the size of the laundry load will force consumers to waste detergent but how is this an ‘improvement’? Only in the mind of advertisers I suppose.

    The other battle seems to be in the condiment aisles where Kraft Heinz has decided to take on French’s mustard for market share. As a note aside, the excellent English brand, Colmans, looks to be closing its venerable production facility and will probably end up being sold in thimble sized containers made in Bangladesh.

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    • Replies: @anon
    ...being sold in thimble sized containers made in Bangladesh.
    Look for a sharp drop in quality if that happens.
    Some readers may remember the poor quality and chemical fragrance of Pears Transparent Soap after production shifted to India about 35 years ago.
    , @LondonBob
    Colman's mustard is the gold standard of mustards.

    I went to the Silicon Valley event in Moscow when I lived there. Chock full of Russian and North American billionaires as well as the then Russian President. No question Arnold dominated that room, as I said to a Canadian VC bigwig, charisma, presence and drive can take you a long way.
    , @Jack D
    Capsules have been a great success in dishwashers so why not clothes washers? Consumers will vote with their purchases. Advertising can persuade people to try the product once but if they don't like it then no amount of advertising will force them to buy it again.
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  42. TheBoom says:

    One of women’s core competencies is playing by the rules with the goal of getting a trophy at the end without having to actually accomplish something of importance. That is why female students flourish in the educational system, academia in non STEM fields, and highly bureaucratic but non productive fields like HR. It is also why women tend not to flourish in startup companies in complex and rapidly changing fields like tech.

    One of the more unintentionally humorous articles in the NYT in recent years was a look at why woman don’t flourish in tech startups. The two feminists found that women are more comfortable with bureaucracy rather than the free flowing, less structured cultures of startups. The proposed solution was for startups to be more bureaucratic to help the ladies. Yeah, that will work.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder

    One of the more unintentionally humorous articles in the NYT in recent years was a look at why woman don’t flourish in tech startups. The two feminists found that women are more comfortable with bureaucracy rather than the free flowing, less structured cultures of startups. The proposed solution was for startups to be more bureaucratic to help the ladies. Yeah, that will work.
     
    If you want to get something done, call a man.

    If you want to get someone kicked out, call a woman.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    Whiskey vindicated again! I remember reading years ago on his blog how women actually preferred expressly hierarchical structures (like mediaeval courts) where status could be easily seen. They hate hate hate beta males for upsetting this structure with inventions such as gunpowder and man-portable firearms, etc.
    , @Lurker
    I've got a new lady boss who is, in turn, the placewoman of another woman. Our department has been turned into a powerhouse of box ticking, jobsworthing and petty disciplinary action!
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  43. Interestingly, P&G recently defected from the Adwords and associated Social Media rackets, saying it made absolutely zero difference to their sales. Restoration Hardware has notably (and humorously) followed suit.

    So, Steve, can you recall how long it was between P&G defecting and your old business imploding? Um, asking for a friend.

    To save you all a click, here’s the punch line, from RH’s CEO:

    “… And they came back the next week and we sat in a meeting and all of a sudden, I can tell you there’s a little change in the faces. They had to wear it kind of down. Everybody kind of came in. I said, so what did we find out?

    And they said, well, we’ve found out that 98% of our business was coming from 22 words. So, wait, we’re buying 3,200 words and 98% of the business is coming from 22 words. What are the 22 words? And they said, well, it’s the word Restoration Hardware and the 21 ways to spell it wrong, okay?

    Immediately the next day, we cancelled all the words, including our own name. By the way, we are paying for the little shaded box above our words and said, oh no, we have to hang on to that because Pottery Barn might squat on top of us. I said, excuse me? I said, if someone goes to a mall or a shopping center and they’re going to Restoration Hardware and there’s a Pottery Bam there, they’re already squatting, okay? It doesn’t mean they’re going to go into their store. If somebody wanted to buy a diamond from Tiffany and just because Zale’s is sitting on top of them in a shaded box doesn’t mean they’re going to go to Zale’s and buy a diamond.

    I mean, I can’t believe how many companies buy their own name and they’re paying Google millions of dollars a year for their own name, like maybe if this is webcast, right, a lot of people are going to go, holy crap. They’re going to look at their investments. They’d go, maybe we don’t need to buy our own name. Google’s market cap might go down…

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  44. Interestingly, P&G recently defected from the Adwords and associated Social Media rackets, saying it made absolutely zero difference to their sales. Restoration Hardware has notably (and humorously) followed suit.

    So, Steve, can you recall how long it was between P&G defecting and your old firm imploding? Um, asking for a friend.

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  45. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Remember GoldieBlox ?

    Via Adweek, here’s their recent promo for… what? Maybe Steve’s right about CGI-only kids in showbiz. The video appears to be a stereotypically girly fashion show/dance-off with superimposed text about how girls/women are overcoming stereotypes.

    Included are esteemed role models Hillary Clinton and lady Ghostbusters.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TC9AgWYLYlQ

    Hidden Figures Reveals
    Shocking News
    About Rocket Scientists

    They Aren’t All
    Old White Men
     

    Via Adweek, here’s their recent promo for… what? Maybe Steve’s right about CGI-only kids in showbiz. The video appears to be a stereotypically girly fashion show/dance-off with superimposed text about how girls/women are overcoming stereotypes.

    I’m sure this was conceived as empowering. No doubt it is my bad that it strikes me as pathetic. All these poor girls waving signs and hyping ideals that have little reasonable chance of materializing. And when they don’t materialize, it will be the fault of the Patriarchy, not of the would-be social engineers who repeatedly overreach.

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  46. @yaqub the mad scientist
    I don’t remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.

    This is Boulder we're talking about- where the main economy is catering to people's sense of awesomeness.

    This is Boulder we’re talking about- where the main economy is catering to people’s sense of awesomeness.

    But not after 9 pm. There is no economy in Boulder after 9 pm.

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  47. jim jones says:

    I see that Disqus has shut down Return of Kings for sexism:

    http://www.returnofkings.com/132206/disqus-is-shutting-down-rok-comments-effective-friday

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    • Replies: @Pericles
    The comment system on this site, for example, is better than Disqus. However, for only $99/month, Disqus can provide your site with shadow banning.
    , @Kevin C.
    Just another part of the growing trend. Expect only more and more of this, until us "deplorables" are driven from the Internet entirely.
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  48. @Alden
    French ,Italian and German men all have extremely good posture. American men generally don't have good posture I'm sorry to say.Neither do American women.

    My (foreign) wife often remarks upon my posture (positively, being surprised and impressed by it); American women have never said word one about it in my entire life.

    If you want good posture, do a stint in the military; there is no substitute. (For ridiculously good posture, do a stint in the honour guard in the military.)

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  49. whorefinder says: • Website

    “Man points out woman’s statements are lies, man called evil for noticing.”

    Noticing things is taboo to a rabbit.

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  50. whorefinder says: • Website
    @TheBoom
    One of women's core competencies is playing by the rules with the goal of getting a trophy at the end without having to actually accomplish something of importance. That is why female students flourish in the educational system, academia in non STEM fields, and highly bureaucratic but non productive fields like HR. It is also why women tend not to flourish in startup companies in complex and rapidly changing fields like tech.

    One of the more unintentionally humorous articles in the NYT in recent years was a look at why woman don't flourish in tech startups. The two feminists found that women are more comfortable with bureaucracy rather than the free flowing, less structured cultures of startups. The proposed solution was for startups to be more bureaucratic to help the ladies. Yeah, that will work.

    One of the more unintentionally humorous articles in the NYT in recent years was a look at why woman don’t flourish in tech startups. The two feminists found that women are more comfortable with bureaucracy rather than the free flowing, less structured cultures of startups. The proposed solution was for startups to be more bureaucratic to help the ladies. Yeah, that will work.

    If you want to get something done, call a man.

    If you want to get someone kicked out, call a woman.

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  51. SnakeEyes says:
    @Anonymous
    The problem with you Steve is you are such a stat and science nerd you don't realize marketing is convincing fat and lazy people that what you're selling is easy and somehow beneficial. Its not really science but understanding that the perfect consumer is a lazy idiot that wants something fast and easy. Guys like Arnold go far. Its not the hard nosed dedication of guys with handicaps like Lou Ferrigno, but cheaters who use performance enhancing drugs and know the right people that get ahead. Like Arnold. This guy came from a former Soviet Bloc country and used the performance enhancing drugs that made East German Women a running gag into a lucrative career. First on the Bodybuilding Circuit, then in the supplement business. And finally going into movies and doing what every muscle bound guy didn't before, making money. Its not talent, its cheating, schmoozing, using tricks and being noticed. You could probably be rich too, if you would stop wasting time analyzing stuff like moneyball which only spergies would care about and come up with something that sounds too good to be true but cannot be disproved until you make millions.

    Arnold was from Austria – not an “Eastern Bloc” country.

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  52. whorefinder says: • Website
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT, but iSteve-relevant.

    What's next after WWT?

    Well, this likely will be more of a skirmish than a war, but it could well be WWC(ousins).

    An article linked at Instapundit (LINK) is saying that first-cousin marriage not only isn't (very) harmful, it's very possibly actually potentially really quite beneficial! And where was the research conducted? Pakistan, of course.

    I know it’s cliche to point out how George Soros and Israel influence our culture through propaganda, but we can’t forget how the Saudis are also doing this as well. That oil money covered up the fact that the 9/11 terrorists were all Saudis. And now protecting that vital Muslim ideal: banging your cousin.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    That oil money covered up the fact that the 9/11 terrorists were all Saudis.

    Evidence please.
    , @Nico

    I know it’s cliche to point out how George Soros and Israel influence our culture through propaganda, but we can’t forget how the Saudis are also doing this as well. That oil money covered up the fact that the 9/11 terrorists were all Saudis.
     
    It's important to expose, at every turn we get, that in the power games of the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and other American allies in the region are de facto on the side of Israel, regardless of whatever front their official ideology may put up. And that while the Islamic State certainly plays off anti-Israel sentiment (among other things), Netanyahu's interests are not served by an immediate extinction of what has to be his perfect foil.

    If Israel did not exist, switching our alignment and chief oil suppliers from the Sunni-cum-Kemalist bloc to the Shia-cum Ba'athist bloc would have been much easier, much earlier on, and would have put Russia into a far more convenient corner for us. It is likely that so long as it exists, Israel is never going to be a geopolitical "regularity" and will serve no purpose other than to upset the regional and indeed global balance of power, to the benefit of the wild jackals of the human species.

    A stake must be driven through the heart of Christian Zionism, and a massive iconoclasm must be directed toward every image, bust or statue of Arthur Balfour, as soon as possible.

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  53. whorefinder says: • Website
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT, but iSteve-relevant.

    What's next after WWT?

    Well, this likely will be more of a skirmish than a war, but it could well be WWC(ousins).

    An article linked at Instapundit (LINK) is saying that first-cousin marriage not only isn't (very) harmful, it's very possibly actually potentially really quite beneficial! And where was the research conducted? Pakistan, of course.

    What’s next after WWT?

    WWT isn’t over yet. They’ve actually experienced a loss—they had the military, and Trump kicked them out.

    They put a tranny in Playboy for next month—yes, they did—-but that’s already bringing out the laughs. Playboy was dead anyway, as dead as Hefner is now, and they’re just trying to revive the corpse with shock value.

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    • Replies: @Dissident

    They’ve [proponents of "transgender" depravity] actually experienced a loss—they had the military, and Trump kicked them out.
     
    Did he? I know that the President had made an announcement to that effect but didn't he then, shortly afterward, fold like a cheap camera?

    Playboy was dead anyway, as dead as Hefner is now,
     
    Ah, for the days when a boy could reach his teens having seen no smut worse than Playboy.
    , @Kevin C.

    They’ve actually experienced a loss—they had the military, and Trump kicked them out.
     
    I know he announced that, but have any trannies in the military actually received their discharge papers yet? Last I heard, Mattis's response to the orders from his Commander-in-Chief to give these folks the boot was to commission a study.
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  54. @Anonymous
    The problem with you Steve is you are such a stat and science nerd you don't realize marketing is convincing fat and lazy people that what you're selling is easy and somehow beneficial. Its not really science but understanding that the perfect consumer is a lazy idiot that wants something fast and easy. Guys like Arnold go far. Its not the hard nosed dedication of guys with handicaps like Lou Ferrigno, but cheaters who use performance enhancing drugs and know the right people that get ahead. Like Arnold. This guy came from a former Soviet Bloc country and used the performance enhancing drugs that made East German Women a running gag into a lucrative career. First on the Bodybuilding Circuit, then in the supplement business. And finally going into movies and doing what every muscle bound guy didn't before, making money. Its not talent, its cheating, schmoozing, using tricks and being noticed. You could probably be rich too, if you would stop wasting time analyzing stuff like moneyball which only spergies would care about and come up with something that sounds too good to be true but cannot be disproved until you make millions.

    Arnold was and is a showman, but Austria was not a Soviet bloc country–never, for example, in the Warsaw Pact.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Part of Austria was Soviet occupied until 1955. Arnold talks about visiting that part as a child.
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  55. @Diversity Heretic
    Arnold was and is a showman, but Austria was not a Soviet bloc country--never, for example, in the Warsaw Pact.

    Part of Austria was Soviet occupied until 1955. Arnold talks about visiting that part as a child.

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    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    I stand corrected. I thought that the Soviets had pulled out around 1948. I wonder if that Soviet/Russian ocupation has anything to do with the Austrian attitudes towards "migrants" that more closely resemble those of the Visegrad countries and the former German Democratic Republic than those of western Europe.

    Not sure what, if any, effect it had on Arnold Schwarzenegger.

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  56. @TheBoom
    One of women's core competencies is playing by the rules with the goal of getting a trophy at the end without having to actually accomplish something of importance. That is why female students flourish in the educational system, academia in non STEM fields, and highly bureaucratic but non productive fields like HR. It is also why women tend not to flourish in startup companies in complex and rapidly changing fields like tech.

    One of the more unintentionally humorous articles in the NYT in recent years was a look at why woman don't flourish in tech startups. The two feminists found that women are more comfortable with bureaucracy rather than the free flowing, less structured cultures of startups. The proposed solution was for startups to be more bureaucratic to help the ladies. Yeah, that will work.

    Whiskey vindicated again! I remember reading years ago on his blog how women actually preferred expressly hierarchical structures (like mediaeval courts) where status could be easily seen. They hate hate hate beta males for upsetting this structure with inventions such as gunpowder and man-portable firearms, etc.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Why would that be?
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  57. Lurker says:
    @Anonymous
    The problem with you Steve is you are such a stat and science nerd you don't realize marketing is convincing fat and lazy people that what you're selling is easy and somehow beneficial. Its not really science but understanding that the perfect consumer is a lazy idiot that wants something fast and easy. Guys like Arnold go far. Its not the hard nosed dedication of guys with handicaps like Lou Ferrigno, but cheaters who use performance enhancing drugs and know the right people that get ahead. Like Arnold. This guy came from a former Soviet Bloc country and used the performance enhancing drugs that made East German Women a running gag into a lucrative career. First on the Bodybuilding Circuit, then in the supplement business. And finally going into movies and doing what every muscle bound guy didn't before, making money. Its not talent, its cheating, schmoozing, using tricks and being noticed. You could probably be rich too, if you would stop wasting time analyzing stuff like moneyball which only spergies would care about and come up with something that sounds too good to be true but cannot be disproved until you make millions.

    This guy came from a former Soviet Bloc country

    Who, Arnold? Because he was from Austria.

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  58. Lurker says:
    @TheBoom
    One of women's core competencies is playing by the rules with the goal of getting a trophy at the end without having to actually accomplish something of importance. That is why female students flourish in the educational system, academia in non STEM fields, and highly bureaucratic but non productive fields like HR. It is also why women tend not to flourish in startup companies in complex and rapidly changing fields like tech.

    One of the more unintentionally humorous articles in the NYT in recent years was a look at why woman don't flourish in tech startups. The two feminists found that women are more comfortable with bureaucracy rather than the free flowing, less structured cultures of startups. The proposed solution was for startups to be more bureaucratic to help the ladies. Yeah, that will work.

    I’ve got a new lady boss who is, in turn, the placewoman of another woman. Our department has been turned into a powerhouse of box ticking, jobsworthing and petty disciplinary action!

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  59. @Steve Sailer
    Part of Austria was Soviet occupied until 1955. Arnold talks about visiting that part as a child.

    I stand corrected. I thought that the Soviets had pulled out around 1948. I wonder if that Soviet/Russian ocupation has anything to do with the Austrian attitudes towards “migrants” that more closely resemble those of the Visegrad countries and the former German Democratic Republic than those of western Europe.

    Not sure what, if any, effect it had on Arnold Schwarzenegger.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Arnold was exposed to the Communist side of Austria as a child and didn't like it.
    , @Dieter Kief
    Austria took in very much migrants in Europe in 2015/16 if - what makes sense, - calculated per capita of it's inhabitants - more than Switzerland, France, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Germany... - maybe not more than Sweden, I'd have to look this one up).

    - Now, that was then - - and we'll see, what happens next.

    If the course of Austrian migration-politics would really change in the next months, it would have anything to do with the consequences of 2015/16 - and hardly anything, if anything at all, with the Soviet occupation, as far as I can see - (and I can even see into Austria - but only if the air is clear, though).

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  60. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous
    The problem with you Steve is you are such a stat and science nerd you don't realize marketing is convincing fat and lazy people that what you're selling is easy and somehow beneficial. Its not really science but understanding that the perfect consumer is a lazy idiot that wants something fast and easy. Guys like Arnold go far. Its not the hard nosed dedication of guys with handicaps like Lou Ferrigno, but cheaters who use performance enhancing drugs and know the right people that get ahead. Like Arnold. This guy came from a former Soviet Bloc country and used the performance enhancing drugs that made East German Women a running gag into a lucrative career. First on the Bodybuilding Circuit, then in the supplement business. And finally going into movies and doing what every muscle bound guy didn't before, making money. Its not talent, its cheating, schmoozing, using tricks and being noticed. You could probably be rich too, if you would stop wasting time analyzing stuff like moneyball which only spergies would care about and come up with something that sounds too good to be true but cannot be disproved until you make millions.

    Steroids don’t magically make you muscular anyway. What steroids do is enable you to recover from extreme gym work, but you’ve still got to do the work. Arnold probably worked as hard in the gym as Ferrigno did.

    And finally going into movies and doing what every muscle bound guy didn’t before, making money. Its not talent, its cheating, schmoozing, using tricks and being noticed.

    Being noticed is a talent!

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    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    Schwarzenegger's an interesting guy, and I can't help but admire him. He worked extremely hard in the iron game.

    One thing he did very well was to stay within his range as an actor. He became a multi-millionaire by knowing his limits. Years ago, I read about a documentary where a filmmaker casually interviewed celebrities, and let the camera roll as their inflated egos showed them up as total asses. Apparently Arnold was the only one who came off as having some sense of humility and gratitude for the opportunities.

    Remember his long-term affair with his dowdy maid? Look up pictures of the product of that union, Joseph Baena. Arnold knew.
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  61. pyrrhus says:

    My comment on the blog–To nearly all women in present Academia, who have been treated like hothouse flowers all their lives, any criticism constitutes “bullying.” That’s how far we have sunk….

    I would add that statistics is based on an incredibly simple concept..Is what we are investigating likely to be real, or is it just an accident due to small data samples? What is the probability of either?

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  62. pyrrhus says:

    I am reminded of a memorable quote from Ambrose Bierce–”The woman who can take constructive criticism has not yet been born.”

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    • Replies: @dwb
    Reminds me of another I heard in college =

    "Any man who thinks a woman is his intellectual equal is probably right."

    (I was a student at an east coast college that had relatively recently gone co-ed. The quip was usually said in tandem with the observation that, "It's not a question of whether women should be educated at , it's whether they should be educated at all.")

    Usually got a laugh or two from the older alums.
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  63. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    But Carnegie and Hill were competent charlatans and conmen. They told you stuff like: To get somebody to care about you, it's more important to get them to do you a favor than for you to do them a favor.

    It’s called a confidence game. Why? Because you give me your confidence? No. Because I give you mine.

    An old but enjoyable film, House of Games. David Mamet, 1986

    Are you going to review, Nocturnal Animals? I don’t know if it is any good, but I enjoyed it.

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  64. Gelman does point out in his article (and/or in the comments) that he does think studying power poses/posture research is worth doing. However, it needs to be done more carefully—conceptualizing, operationalizing, and measuring the variables there sounds like a difficult (personally, I think nightmarish) task. The statistical methods used also need to be improved, or even changed, to find what the actual effect is and the magnitude of the effect.

    IMO, social psychologists could get a lot of mileage from coauthoring or citing biological literature about how other body language in other species functions.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Right. Animals engage in a lot of body language displays. For example, cats arch their backs to (presumably) make themselves look bigger to potential threats. Does it make them feel more confident? I don't know. But it would be interesting to study biochemically.
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  65. @Diversity Heretic
    I stand corrected. I thought that the Soviets had pulled out around 1948. I wonder if that Soviet/Russian ocupation has anything to do with the Austrian attitudes towards "migrants" that more closely resemble those of the Visegrad countries and the former German Democratic Republic than those of western Europe.

    Not sure what, if any, effect it had on Arnold Schwarzenegger.

    Arnold was exposed to the Communist side of Austria as a child and didn’t like it.

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  66. MEH 0910 says:
    @AKAHorace

    I somehow stumbled upon a TED talk by a woman who was pushing back against the conventional wisdom that adults have all the time in the world to experiment and find themselves and then still be able to swing for the fence in their 30′s and 40′s. I don’t remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.
     
    I remember it, but like you cannot remember the woman. Did she say that "thirties are not the new twenties, a lot of research shows that the decisions you make in your twenties are very imporant"?

    I may be paraphrasing.
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    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    I've never listened to a TED talk before; not because I haven't tried but because there wasn't enough there to justify spending the time listening. But I let her have my ear for the 14 minutes her spiel took.

    She leads off soothingly, anecdotally but then puts it in gear and drills down to the bedrock of statistics, "80% of life's major moments happen before the age of 35"!

    (sotto voce to self, "Wow! I hope that doesn't include death! and what does this even mean??? I mean, how can one quantify "major moments"?)

    So I turned to her expectantly for clarification.

    And it wasn't long in coming.

    "How much money you'll make..."

    Aha!!!! There it is. Chateau Heartiste is correct. With a woman, it's always about the dough ra mi. The Loot, the Long Green.

    The rest of her presentation followed predictably.

    And that's why I don't bother listening to TED Talks.

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  67. @al-Gharaniq
    Gelman does point out in his article (and/or in the comments) that he does think studying power poses/posture research is worth doing. However, it needs to be done more carefully—conceptualizing, operationalizing, and measuring the variables there sounds like a difficult (personally, I think nightmarish) task. The statistical methods used also need to be improved, or even changed, to find what the actual effect is and the magnitude of the effect.

    IMO, social psychologists could get a lot of mileage from coauthoring or citing biological literature about how other body language in other species functions.

    Right. Animals engage in a lot of body language displays. For example, cats arch their backs to (presumably) make themselves look bigger to potential threats. Does it make them feel more confident? I don’t know. But it would be interesting to study biochemically.

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    • Replies: @Kylie
    Dogs raise their hackles to make themselves look bigger.

    My dog is a 70 lb. alpha female. I'm about 130lbs. She will obey my much larger husband whether he's seated or standing but she's occasionally reluctant to obey me when I'm seated.
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  68. MEH 0910 says:
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  69. O'Really says:

    The real problem with social scientists is that they are ignorant of 3000 years of accumulated wisdom of Western civilization, ranging from simple common sense to old wives tales to the wisdom of the Bible and Dostoevsky, and seek to supplant all of these with the study of 50 college undergraduates seeking course credit in contrived situations.

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    • Agree: Thea, Forbes
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Well said.
    , @ThreeCranes
    I agree with Harry. Yours is a very good comment.
    , @Samuel Skinner
    That is a feature, not a bug. Being aware of it means admitting there were people in the past who were more important, smarter or more competent then you. The weak despise the strong.
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  70. Silva says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    An erect posture, alert manner and a confident stride help prevent a person from being mugged, studies have shown. Criminals have an eye out for the weak member of the herd.

    I have the last 2, a perfect absence of the first, and can tell you it also works for deflecting violence. It just doesn’t work for anything else. :)

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  71. Silva says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT, but iSteve-relevant.

    What's next after WWT?

    Well, this likely will be more of a skirmish than a war, but it could well be WWC(ousins).

    An article linked at Instapundit (LINK) is saying that first-cousin marriage not only isn't (very) harmful, it's very possibly actually potentially really quite beneficial! And where was the research conducted? Pakistan, of course.

    “So, exactly what’d the scientists find? Namely, they discovered that the risk of giving birth to children with genetic defects as a result of marriages between first cousins is no greater than that run by women over 40 who get knocked up.”

    “Something that shouldn’t happen no worse than something else that shouldn’t happen”.

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    • Agree: Nico
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  72. LondonBob says:
    @quai smyrna

    Another rule of thumb within the marketing research business was that researchers often talked subjects into agreeing answer surveys with whatever they wanted to hear, so it was better to track what they spent their money upon.
     
    I work in the consumer packaged goods industry, and I always find your marketing research asides to be interesting. Maybe I'm being slow today, but I can't make heads or tails of that statement. Is it what the subjects themselves wanted to hear or the what the sponsoring agency wanted to hear? And what type of marketing survey are you talking about?

    What the firm conducting the research wanted to hear and I assume one of those group interviews. I did one for Harrods when I was a student, I didn’t shop at Harrods as I was a student and just made stuff up. Got a nice shopping voucher out if it though, and they got data I thought might be accurate.

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  73. LondonBob says:
    @Desiderius

    Unless of course you are Steven Bannon, who has earned the right to dress like a bozo…
     
    Bannon would be a helluva lot more effective if he looked like Mike Rowe (with a decent trainer he could get close enough), even more so if he dressed like him.

    Only truly successful people with unique talent can dress like an individual, Bannon is one of those few. Everyone else should take the advice I was given, dress smart and dress conservative. Sign of Bannon’s power he can dress like a slob.

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    • Replies: @Fredrik
    Harvey Weinstein also dressed and looked like a slob. I think you're right.
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  74. FKA Max says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    But Carnegie and Hill were competent charlatans and conmen. They told you stuff like: To get somebody to care about you, it's more important to get them to do you a favor than for you to do them a favor.

    BBC Presents Warren Buffett on Dale Carnegie – Dale Carnegie Training

    BBC presents Warren Buffett and his thoughts on the Dale Carnegie Course and public speaking including how the Dale Carnegie Course improved his communication skills.

    Heather Graham’s new boyfriend leaves her! / Old Spice commercial


    There’s nothing you can’t do if you believe… Autosuggestion and side effects / Sorry Heather…

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  75. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @unit472
    Following the proxy fight at P&G and their attempt to swindle users of Tide detergent with their 'new' laundry pellets I don't think much of brand name advertising campaigns and can only wonder what the rebel factions championing of Nathan Peltz had in store for America.

    Obviously it is cheaper to ship detergent in concentrated pellets than the familar Tide liquid containers and pre proportioning detergent into one unit per load, no matter the size of the laundry load will force consumers to waste detergent but how is this an 'improvement'? Only in the mind of advertisers I suppose.

    The other battle seems to be in the condiment aisles where Kraft Heinz has decided to take on French's mustard for market share. As a note aside, the excellent English brand, Colmans, looks to be closing its venerable production facility and will probably end up being sold in thimble sized containers made in Bangladesh.

    …being sold in thimble sized containers made in Bangladesh.
    Look for a sharp drop in quality if that happens.
    Some readers may remember the poor quality and chemical fragrance of Pears Transparent Soap after production shifted to India about 35 years ago.

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  76. LondonBob says:
    @unit472
    Following the proxy fight at P&G and their attempt to swindle users of Tide detergent with their 'new' laundry pellets I don't think much of brand name advertising campaigns and can only wonder what the rebel factions championing of Nathan Peltz had in store for America.

    Obviously it is cheaper to ship detergent in concentrated pellets than the familar Tide liquid containers and pre proportioning detergent into one unit per load, no matter the size of the laundry load will force consumers to waste detergent but how is this an 'improvement'? Only in the mind of advertisers I suppose.

    The other battle seems to be in the condiment aisles where Kraft Heinz has decided to take on French's mustard for market share. As a note aside, the excellent English brand, Colmans, looks to be closing its venerable production facility and will probably end up being sold in thimble sized containers made in Bangladesh.

    Colman’s mustard is the gold standard of mustards.

    I went to the Silicon Valley event in Moscow when I lived there. Chock full of Russian and North American billionaires as well as the then Russian President. No question Arnold dominated that room, as I said to a Canadian VC bigwig, charisma, presence and drive can take you a long way.

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  77. Pericles says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    I somehow stumbled upon a TED talk by a woman who was pushing back against the conventional wisdom that adults have all the time in the world to experiment and find themselves and then still be able to swing for the fence in their 30's and 40's. I don't remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.

    adults have all the time in the world to experiment and find themselves and then still be able to swing for the fence in their 30′s and 40′s.

    It does work if your parents are rich. And if you strike out, well … don’t worry.

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  78. Pericles says:
    @yaqub the mad scientist
    I don’t remember the details but the audience was notably unenthusiastic.

    This is Boulder we're talking about- where the main economy is catering to people's sense of awesomeness.

    They should follow the example of Denver though and decriminalize street defecation. Backwards Boulder.

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  79. We really need to get away from referring to the social sciences, which are at best dark arts.

    I learned as the suit in a television production company that produced ads and internal comms for major corporations that the best way to keep the ad dollars flowing was to remember the client at Christmas time with something more substantial than a card. I learned on the Street that keeping hookers and blow on tap for clients kept their dollars flowing to me.

    I will simply point out that the world economy has gone into the tank since they tightened up the compliance policy enforcement for those below the C-Suite.

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    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    ... My point being that it is rarely about giving the client what they need and often about giving them what they want.
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  80. Pericles says:
    @jim jones
    I see that Disqus has shut down Return of Kings for sexism:

    http://www.returnofkings.com/132206/disqus-is-shutting-down-rok-comments-effective-friday

    The comment system on this site, for example, is better than Disqus. However, for only $99/month, Disqus can provide your site with shadow banning.

    Read More
    • Replies: @peterike

    The comment system on this site, for example, is better than Disqus. However, for only $99/month, Disqus can provide your site with shadow banning.

     

    Indeed. Maybe packaging and selling the Unz comment system would be a nice way for Ron to make some extra bucks. And with Disqus increasingly turning towards censorship, there will definitely be a market for a uncensored comment system.
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  81. @O'Really
    The real problem with social scientists is that they are ignorant of 3000 years of accumulated wisdom of Western civilization, ranging from simple common sense to old wives tales to the wisdom of the Bible and Dostoevsky, and seek to supplant all of these with the study of 50 college undergraduates seeking course credit in contrived situations.

    Well said.

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  82. Pericles says:
    @Anon
    On interview, don't rinse your mouth and spit into the potted plant nearby. (Serious.)

    In fact, just stay away from the potted plants altogether, Harvey.

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  83. @The Alarmist
    We really need to get away from referring to the social sciences, which are at best dark arts.

    I learned as the suit in a television production company that produced ads and internal comms for major corporations that the best way to keep the ad dollars flowing was to remember the client at Christmas time with something more substantial than a card. I learned on the Street that keeping hookers and blow on tap for clients kept their dollars flowing to me.

    I will simply point out that the world economy has gone into the tank since they tightened up the compliance policy enforcement for those below the C-Suite.

    … My point being that it is rarely about giving the client what they need and often about giving them what they want.

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  84. @Desiderius

    Unless of course you are Steven Bannon, who has earned the right to dress like a bozo…
     
    Bannon would be a helluva lot more effective if he looked like Mike Rowe (with a decent trainer he could get close enough), even more so if he dressed like him.

    Maybe it’s just genetically bad coloring and poor diet, but Bannon looks like a hardcore alcoholic.

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    • Agree: Thomas
    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    He looked pretty good in his black attire giving his speech at the Values summit. His skin looked better, too. He has a nice head of hair, a pleasing profile, and attractive voice. Just needs to lose a few pounds. Then it really wouldn't matter if he continued to dress like a rumpled professor. To a good many women, thin and clean are at the top of the list.
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  85. @Harry Baldwin
    An erect posture, alert manner and a confident stride help prevent a person from being mugged, studies have shown. Criminals have an eye out for the weak member of the herd.

    How did the erect posture work out for Harvey?

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  86. @Steve Sailer
    But Carnegie and Hill were competent charlatans and conmen. They told you stuff like: To get somebody to care about you, it's more important to get them to do you a favor than for you to do them a favor.

    Every pick up guru praises Hill to high heaven.

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  87. @Dave Pinsen
    Steroids don't magically make you muscular anyway. What steroids do is enable you to recover from extreme gym work, but you've still got to do the work. Arnold probably worked as hard in the gym as Ferrigno did.

    And finally going into movies and doing what every muscle bound guy didn’t before, making money. Its not talent, its cheating, schmoozing, using tricks and being noticed.
     
    Being noticed is a talent!

    Schwarzenegger’s an interesting guy, and I can’t help but admire him. He worked extremely hard in the iron game.

    One thing he did very well was to stay within his range as an actor. He became a multi-millionaire by knowing his limits. Years ago, I read about a documentary where a filmmaker casually interviewed celebrities, and let the camera roll as their inflated egos showed them up as total asses. Apparently Arnold was the only one who came off as having some sense of humility and gratitude for the opportunities.

    Remember his long-term affair with his dowdy maid? Look up pictures of the product of that union, Joseph Baena. Arnold knew.

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    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Remember his long-term affair with his dowdy maid? Look up pictures of the product of that union, Joseph Baena. Arnold knew."

    Arnold knew what?

    That he was like Trump and Weinstein in how he couldn't keep it in his pants?
    That he had fathered a child while married?
    That he is part of the moral cesspool known as Hollywood?
    That his offspring with a "commoner" would be another Hercules?

    Please, by all means, tells us Arnold knew...
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  88. TTSSYF says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    Maybe it's just genetically bad coloring and poor diet, but Bannon looks like a hardcore alcoholic.

    He looked pretty good in his black attire giving his speech at the Values summit. His skin looked better, too. He has a nice head of hair, a pleasing profile, and attractive voice. Just needs to lose a few pounds. Then it really wouldn’t matter if he continued to dress like a rumpled professor. To a good many women, thin and clean are at the top of the list.

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  89. @Anonym
    At least as far as jobs are concerned, I've found that good references are most valuable. They allow an employer to select reliable, good employees from the poseurs. A lot of job opportunities come from networking.

    However it is surprising the number of employees who don't even bother to pose well during an interview. If you can't wear professional work wear in an interview why would anyone believe you are going to perform on the job?

    Unless of course you are Steven Bannon, who has earned the right to dress like a bozo... but that goes back to track record. He has the track record to enable that behavior. A surprising amount of people don't have either track record or the ability to convey professionalism during an interview.

    Richard Spencer tweeted this week that Bannon is overrated.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    That's hilarious coming from Spencer, who has absolutely nothing to show for himself other than a half ass website.
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  90. @Anonymous
    I've gone through most of this pop-psychology TEDTalk stuff out there by Ph.D's. Most of the books can by found on audio on YouTube. Presence, The Charisma Myth, Decisive, Influence, Made to Stick, Mindset, Start With Why, et al. Here's the deal. You will find the very same stuff in sales training materials from 50 years ago. Only difference is the former is propped up a lot of unnecessary bullshit, stories/anecdotes, and scientific talk.

    In fact, I haven't read or heard anything from these TEDTalk social-psych Ph.D.'s that is not covered in the works of charlatan Dale Carnegie or con-man Napoleon Hill.

    Is the work “Influence” that you mention the book by Robert Cialdini?

    Why do you think Carnegie is a charlatan?

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Is the work “Influence” that you mention the book by Robert Cialdini?

     

    Yep, Cialdini.

    Why do you think Carnegie is a charlatan?
     
    This was the opinion of Sinclair Lewis and H.L. Mencken.
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  91. @Steve Sailer
    But Carnegie and Hill were competent charlatans and conmen. They told you stuff like: To get somebody to care about you, it's more important to get them to do you a favor than for you to do them a favor.

    The trick is to get them to want to do you the favour. I learned early on that people in power liked me more when I let them tell me all about them and their experiences. Over a few boozy lunches (these were three-martini guys who came up through the sixties … think Mad Men), EVPs practically adopted me as their new son.

    I’m not sure who was the bigger sociopath in those relationships, but it was great fun ;)

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  92. @Anonymous
    Right, Carnegie gave tips on practical social skills that can be learned and practiced and will help one navigate business and professional life.

    I don't know if Carnegie was a charlatan and conman. Hill may have been; I don't know much about him other than that he was more mystical in his approach.

    Do you think the favor principle Steve mentions works or not?

    Maybe Steve is being sly here and pointing out that the principle sort of begs the question it gets the causation arrow reversed.

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    • Replies: @guest
    The causation isn't backwards. You don't win friends and influence people by being an errand boy or suck-up. Think of all the people you've ever been loyal to in your life. Did you get that way because they did a bunch of favors for you? That's the sort of thing desperate salesmen do. There's nothing more suspicious.

    Problem most people have with such advice is that the hard part is getting people to do stuff for you in the first place. If they knew how to do that, they'd already be popular and wouldn't need Dale Carnegie's help.

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  93. @whorefinder
    I know it's cliche to point out how George Soros and Israel influence our culture through propaganda, but we can't forget how the Saudis are also doing this as well. That oil money covered up the fact that the 9/11 terrorists were all Saudis. And now protecting that vital Muslim ideal: banging your cousin.

    That oil money covered up the fact that the 9/11 terrorists were all Saudis.

    Evidence please.

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    • Replies: @whorefinder
    The interwebs is your friend, little one:

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Hijackers_in_the_September_11_attacks
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  94. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Diversity Heretic
    Whiskey vindicated again! I remember reading years ago on his blog how women actually preferred expressly hierarchical structures (like mediaeval courts) where status could be easily seen. They hate hate hate beta males for upsetting this structure with inventions such as gunpowder and man-portable firearms, etc.

    Why would that be?

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    • Replies: @Kevin C.

    Why would that be?
     
    In terms of the women's thought processes? Probably just that they're unconscious is wired that way. Why do we humans like to eat sugars, fats, and other calorie-dense foods? Because they're tasty. Why do we find more symmetrical faces more attractive? Because that's how our attraction systems are wired.

    Now, there's the evolutionary explanations for why people are wired that way, but remember, organisms are adaptation executors, not fitness maximizers. In this case, it's likely for the same reason that "preselection" is an element of how women's attraction systems evaluate men: the more the male status hierarchy is clear and pre-set, the less work a woman's (unconscious) brain has to do to evaluate potential suitors to find the highest quality one.
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  95. @O'Really
    The real problem with social scientists is that they are ignorant of 3000 years of accumulated wisdom of Western civilization, ranging from simple common sense to old wives tales to the wisdom of the Bible and Dostoevsky, and seek to supplant all of these with the study of 50 college undergraduates seeking course credit in contrived situations.

    I agree with Harry. Yours is a very good comment.

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  96. Art Deco says:

    She was likely more used to being treated as a cute blonde than as a scientist.

    Only a tiny minority of people over a certain age have blonde hair that isn’t coming out of a bottle.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    After a certain age, silver works better.

    The punk princess and the country queen who still aren't talking after that cat fight in '71 at Max's have apparently figured it out. Big Little Miss Muffett hasn't.
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  97. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Coffee Talk

    Matthew McConaughey giving a pep talk to the UT basketball team: power pose or a street walker’s come-hither stance? Talk amongst yourselves…

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    • Replies: @fish
    Channeling Nathan Lane
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  98. @Harry Baldwin
    An erect posture, alert manner and a confident stride help prevent a person from being mugged, studies have shown. Criminals have an eye out for the weak member of the herd.

    And how did they do this study? analyse the posture of mugging victims? ask leading questions of muggers? if this were substantially true men would almost never be mugged women only occasionally and most of the time old ladies and children, while we become outraged when they are mugged and no doubt they are sometime targeted for this reason its not ubiquitous.circumstance is far more important

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Depends where you are. Philly muggers like to assault you based on race, even if you clearly have nothing much. NYC muggers prefer rich tourists. Carry an oversized dance bag with smelly leotards and crumpled copies of Backstage sticking out of it and you're just another out-of-work actor, not worth the trouble of mugging.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    Here is an excerpt from one article about the study. There is lots and lots of references to this on the web. Sorry I didn't provide a link before, but I didn't realize that people would have trouble believing this.

    Now, let’s talk about what criminals tend to look for. Much like a wild animal, a human predator wants an easy prey, which means they will seek out someone they perceive as weak, submissive, and unlikely to fight back. Because of this, any sign of strength or defiance the criminal perceives when approaching their chosen victim can in many instances be enough to turn around and look for a more suitable victim. In 1984, Betty Grayson and Morris I. Stein conducted a study to determine the selection criteria used by predators. As part of their study, they videotaped over 60 people walking on a busy New York City sidewalk without their knowledge over a three day period. This tape was later played for convicts of violent crimes who identified those they would consider desirable targets. Within seven seconds, the participants made their selections, and shockingly, there was a huge consistency.

    Contrary to what many would have predicted, in this experiment, some small women were passed over for larger men; the convicts did not base their decision on race, age, size, or gender. Instead, upon further analysis of the selected victims from the tape, they realized that they all had several things in common. Those selected as victims dragged or shuffled their feet, and tended to walk slower than the flow of pedestrian traffic, lacking a sense of purpose. Also, unlike those passed over, the selected victims tended to move awkwardly, with less coordination, balance, and confidence. Finally, they all had a slumped posture and walked with their eyes to the ground; a downward gaze implies unawareness, and can be perceived as submission, making for an apparently easy target. Basically, the criminals were assessing the ease with which they could overpower the victims based on nonverbal signals which the victims were not even aware of.
     
    http://firearmtrainingstore.com/about-us/blog/how-do-criminals-choose-their-victims/
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  99. @MEH 0910
    https://www.ted.com/talks/meg_jay_why_30_is_not_the_new_20/transcript

    I’ve never listened to a TED talk before; not because I haven’t tried but because there wasn’t enough there to justify spending the time listening. But I let her have my ear for the 14 minutes her spiel took.

    She leads off soothingly, anecdotally but then puts it in gear and drills down to the bedrock of statistics, “80% of life’s major moments happen before the age of 35″!

    (sotto voce to self, “Wow! I hope that doesn’t include death! and what does this even mean??? I mean, how can one quantify “major moments”?)

    So I turned to her expectantly for clarification.

    And it wasn’t long in coming.

    “How much money you’ll make…”

    Aha!!!! There it is. Chateau Heartiste is correct. With a woman, it’s always about the dough ra mi. The Loot, the Long Green.

    The rest of her presentation followed predictably.

    And that’s why I don’t bother listening to TED Talks.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Aha!!!! There it is. Chateau Heartiste is correct. With a woman, it’s always about the dough ra mi. The Loot, the Long Green.

    And therefore with men it must always be about the dough ra mi, sadly enough.
    , @donut
    "(sotto voce to self, “Wow! I hope that doesn’t include death! "

    LOL
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  100. @Desiderius
    Roissy's always been big on posture.

    https://heartiste.wordpress.com/2008/10/15/standing-like-an-alpha/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrapposto

    For what it's worth it definitely worked for me.

    If its true that there a saturation point on propaganda and only new propaganda will move the needle that good news for altright

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  101. Thea says:

    Women can do well in STEM if there is a fixed formula to follow. Smarter women can follow complex formulas but we really don’t add anything new or innovate very often. I say this as a woman in STEM for decades. If there were suddenly no women in these fields the results would be negligible but if the men left STEM careers the lights would go out.

    The reason this has come down on psychology harder than the other fields is that these results have been used in education and in major court cases to decide how society ought to be run. The results have been disastrous but yet they tenaciously cling to power.

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  102. Jack D says:
    @unit472
    Following the proxy fight at P&G and their attempt to swindle users of Tide detergent with their 'new' laundry pellets I don't think much of brand name advertising campaigns and can only wonder what the rebel factions championing of Nathan Peltz had in store for America.

    Obviously it is cheaper to ship detergent in concentrated pellets than the familar Tide liquid containers and pre proportioning detergent into one unit per load, no matter the size of the laundry load will force consumers to waste detergent but how is this an 'improvement'? Only in the mind of advertisers I suppose.

    The other battle seems to be in the condiment aisles where Kraft Heinz has decided to take on French's mustard for market share. As a note aside, the excellent English brand, Colmans, looks to be closing its venerable production facility and will probably end up being sold in thimble sized containers made in Bangladesh.

    Capsules have been a great success in dishwashers so why not clothes washers? Consumers will vote with their purchases. Advertising can persuade people to try the product once but if they don’t like it then no amount of advertising will force them to buy it again.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    All-in-one laundry detergent packets plus whitener plus something else are great for guys who don't know much about doing laundry like me.

    If you were an expert, however, you'd probably prefer to pour your own precise mixture customized for each differing load.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    If you put the detergent directly in the tub where the clothes go, then liquid is best, so you can let the water fill up partly and suds up before you put the clothes in. If you're using a machine where the water and the detergent interact before they hit the clothes, then capsules would make more sense.
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  103. Mr. Anon says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    An erect posture, alert manner and a confident stride help prevent a person from being mugged, studies have shown. Criminals have an eye out for the weak member of the herd.

    An erect posture, alert manner and a confident stride help prevent a person from being mugged, studies have shown. Criminals have an eye out for the weak member of the herd.

    I can easily believe that. Nowadays, however, even just being that one person in the crowd who isn’t staring at a phone may provide some protection.

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  104. @IHTG

    the unsympathetic hardass who hurts the feelings of Dr. Cuddy.
     
    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1716102292/dr-house.jpg

    I knew the names of both doctors Cuddy, but could not place where I knew Amy from because of House.

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  105. peterike says:
    @Pericles
    The comment system on this site, for example, is better than Disqus. However, for only $99/month, Disqus can provide your site with shadow banning.

    The comment system on this site, for example, is better than Disqus. However, for only $99/month, Disqus can provide your site with shadow banning.

    Indeed. Maybe packaging and selling the Unz comment system would be a nice way for Ron to make some extra bucks. And with Disqus increasingly turning towards censorship, there will definitely be a market for a uncensored comment system.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    Doesn't it rely pretty heavily on Steve though? I get the impression there's not some incredible AI behind the comment system, just Steve reading through the comment and posting or not posting in batches. Unfortunately Steve is not scalable.

    Disqus and LiveFyre are totally worthless, I agree. This site and Slashdot are the two sites that seem to have pretty good comment moderation and filtering and both of them rely on the human element; either one extremely good moderator (here) or a longstanding, organic community (Slashdot.)
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  106. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Motivational speakers seem to be a uniquely American phenomenon. It’s an entire industry. Also, thinking/imagining one’s way to success and happiness is also a popular idea. Just giving people what they want one might suppose although that could be appalling sometimes.

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    • Replies: @dwb
    This is in my opinion a good observation.

    I've been working for many years, and every place I've been has some variation on the "speaker series" - they bring in some well-known person or expert to give a talk about how to "lean in" (ick) or something to that effect.

    I'm a maths guy, and often sit with others in my field. We tend to leave these quietly mocking them in our little group, but the general tone in the US is "wow! That was really something, especially when he said..."

    A couple of years ago, I moved to France, and my (American) employer replicated the experience with a monthly "lunch and learn" type of event.

    The first (and last) one was met with open derision.
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  107. Dissident says:
    @whorefinder

    What’s next after WWT?
     
    WWT isn't over yet. They've actually experienced a loss---they had the military, and Trump kicked them out.

    They put a tranny in Playboy for next month---yes, they did----but that's already bringing out the laughs. Playboy was dead anyway, as dead as Hefner is now, and they're just trying to revive the corpse with shock value.

    They’ve [proponents of "transgender" depravity] actually experienced a loss—they had the military, and Trump kicked them out.

    Did he? I know that the President had made an announcement to that effect but didn’t he then, shortly afterward, fold like a cheap camera?

    Playboy was dead anyway, as dead as Hefner is now,

    Ah, for the days when a boy could reach his teens having seen no smut worse than Playboy.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    No, but you swallow that blackpill.

    Taking the time to craft regulations in order to make it harder for a 9th Circus judge to decide they have the power to regulate the military isn't folding, but many of you here seem determined to learn nothing and remember nothing.
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  108. Forbes says:
    @Trelane
    A plastic surgeon fixes a broken face. The patient, now armed with a vastly improved self-image, is transformed into a new and potentially better person.

    Jerry Lewis and The Nutty Professor played off of Maxwell Maltz' 1960 book Psycho-Cybernetics which, itself borrowed from Norbert Weiner's Cybernetics (1948).

    Maltz was a plastic surgeon and could see for himself the power of self-image.

    https://youtu.be/uoYumFYBafQ

    And Maltz discovered that plastic surgery, e.g. a nose job, didn’t necessarily improve self-image. Self-image being principally psychological, not physical.

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  109. It’s been my experience that “magic bullets” like “power posing,” — just like fad diets — really can work, although the effectiveness of said “magic bullets” is as much about changing how you perceive yourself, as well as how you act. In other words, if you are self-aware enough to realize “I need to act more confident and stand up straight!” there’s a decent chance you’ll achieve some degree of self-improvement if for no other reason than you are recognizing a deficiency.

    For instance, you can come up with a million different diets — low carb, high protein, gluten free… hell, eat only pickles — and they’ll work a good percentage of the time provided you burn more calories than you take in. In other words, it’s not the pickles which are the magic bullet (it could be cucumbers), but it’s the overall diminution in calories, along with a commitment to eat less and exercise more, often with the encouragement of fellow gym members or some guru who wrote a book.

    Another example are these “financial advisors.” Here’s my advice: “Stop spending more than you have!” Brilliant!

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  110. Thomas says:

    A girl I was trying to bed was into the power pose every morning thing a few years ago. I convinced her to add squats and hip raises to her routine (for a number of reasons). She later became a lesbian and moved to the East Bay.

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    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    I like quirky, personal comments like the one you just posted. (but that's just my own personal quirk)
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  111. @O'Really
    The real problem with social scientists is that they are ignorant of 3000 years of accumulated wisdom of Western civilization, ranging from simple common sense to old wives tales to the wisdom of the Bible and Dostoevsky, and seek to supplant all of these with the study of 50 college undergraduates seeking course credit in contrived situations.

    That is a feature, not a bug. Being aware of it means admitting there were people in the past who were more important, smarter or more competent then you. The weak despise the strong.

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  112. Female academics, ugh. Random thoughts:

    I actually read the paper and this reads like something out of People Magazine and not an academic journal. The first line is, “The proud peacock fans his tail feathers in pursuit of a mate.” I can just hear my 10th grade English teacher saying “pick out a topic sentence that grabs the reader!”

    This kerfuffle is a good illustration of the fact that generally women value process and men value results. When female academics teach a class, they start awarding points based on attendance, participation in discussions, the act of handing in problem sets (regardless of the accuracy of the answers) etc. So they end up with warm chairs, everyone making precisely 2 asinine comments per class and then zoning out, and papers covered in meaningless scribbles. This is great if the goal of education is babysitting/aging vat/quarantine but not so useful at actually imparting knowledge.

    Male academics tend to have a discreet thing that they want to teach and then structure the class around imparting and testing that knowledge, stripped of all the fluff. The major drawback to male academics as teachers is they often don’t really want to teach as they are more into their research. However, once you get beyond teaching basic, basic material, wanting to teach is really not as important as having a deep understanding of the field. Deep enough that you can conduct meaningful research in the field.

    This is why whenever I hear a student complain ‘teacher x was not a great teacher, he was more into research…’ I recognize this as code for ‘I was too dumb for the class’ or ‘I am upset with my grade.’ Good students immediately recognize a very strong correlation between research and teaching prowess; I have been lucky enough to take classes from two professors who were/became Nobel laureates and they were both outstanding teachers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Roger Sweeny
    Good students immediately recognize a very strong correlation between research and teaching prowess

    Oh, bull bleep. I have attended several universities where everyone on the faculty was a well-regarded researcher with many publications. The teaching quality varied enormously.
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  113. @Thomas
    A girl I was trying to bed was into the power pose every morning thing a few years ago. I convinced her to add squats and hip raises to her routine (for a number of reasons). She later became a lesbian and moved to the East Bay.

    I like quirky, personal comments like the one you just posted. (but that’s just my own personal quirk)

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  114. @peterike

    The comment system on this site, for example, is better than Disqus. However, for only $99/month, Disqus can provide your site with shadow banning.

     

    Indeed. Maybe packaging and selling the Unz comment system would be a nice way for Ron to make some extra bucks. And with Disqus increasingly turning towards censorship, there will definitely be a market for a uncensored comment system.

    Doesn’t it rely pretty heavily on Steve though? I get the impression there’s not some incredible AI behind the comment system, just Steve reading through the comment and posting or not posting in batches. Unfortunately Steve is not scalable.

    Disqus and LiveFyre are totally worthless, I agree. This site and Slashdot are the two sites that seem to have pretty good comment moderation and filtering and both of them rely on the human element; either one extremely good moderator (here) or a longstanding, organic community (Slashdot.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dissident

    either one extremely good moderator (here)
     
    Are you sure that Mr. Sailer himself handles the comment moderation all alone?

    Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.
     
    Didn't the disclaimer originally say "moderated by Steve Sailer? That is what I recall and I have wondered for some time whether the change to iSteve was made to reflect that Mr. Sailer no longer personally moderates all of the comments to his blog posts here but has help.

    (I have long wondered how one man, alone, could possibly manage to read through that many comments daily, on top of writing as much and reading as much as Mr. Sailer's writing requires him to. Plus Twitter, the comment threads at TakiMag and watching films. To say nothing of playing golf and the inevitable countless other real world activities that our estimable host no doubt participates in daily. How does he do it?)
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  115. Kevin C. says:
    @Wilbur Hassenfus

    she played by the rules
     
    Being Rewarded for Playing By the Rules is very, very important stuff for middle class “professional” women.

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have imagination, or brains, or common sense, or a willingness to take responsibility or face hard truths or make tough decisions (or even easy ones). Criticism of any kind puts them in an emotional tailspin, they don’t have a good sense of the difference between reality and fantasy, and they don’t take risks, but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules, and if they aren’t well-rewarded, well...

    IT’S JUST NOT FAIR!

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have… a willingness to take responsibility…

    Well, when, in any society, have women ever had to take responsibility for their actions, and bear the costs and consequences of their choices, to near the same degree as similarly-situated men? When have men not been called upon, either individually or collectively (such as via the state), to “man up” and shoulder the burden of women’s mistakes? Men are the expendable sex, and more attention is always paid toward ameliorating women’s pains and burdens. (Remember Hillary’s comment about how women are the ones who always suffer the most in war, because they lose husbands or sons?) Very few people, male or female, Left or Right, feminist or traditionalist, actually act as if they really believe women have the same level of agency, responsibility, and moral culpability as adult men. (There are reasons solid Libertarians skew not just heavily male, but disproportionately single or gay men.)

    they don’t take risks

    Predicted by basic evolutionary theory: see Bateman’s principle and Robert Trivers’s work on sexual selection and parental investment theory. Whichever sex invests more resources in offspring (usually the female, and pretty much always for placental mammals, given pregnancy and lactation), will see less variation in reproductive success, and cluster around a “safe” strategy, while the other sex, seeing more reproductive variance, compete with one another in pursuit of the higher-investing sex. Humans are no exception. (The estimate is that something like 80% of all women who’ve ever lived have successfully reproduced, but only 40% of men; but on the other hand, a woman is biologically incapable of having the runaway reproductive success of a Ramesis or a Genghis Khan.) See also various distribution curves, like intelligence or status, where males have higher variance, dominating both the high and low ends.

    but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules

    In other words, sticking to the safe, average strategy and following the herd. Again, just as evolution predicts for female mammals.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Whichever sex invests more resources in offspring (usually the female, and pretty much always for placental mammals, given pregnancy and lactation), will see less variation in reproductive success, and cluster around a “safe” strategy.

    Why though?
    , @female lurker
    Women bear the brunt of the consequences of sexual intercourse. For men, those consequences are optional. That's been true in... all societies, I think.

    It's optional for men to stick around and help care for children they helped create. The also lack the desire to nurture children who are not their own biological children.* Because of those facts, in high-paternal-investment i.e. patriarchal societies, men impose restrictions on women's freedoms in order to make damn sure the children they're helping raise are theirs. It's the tradeoff of patriarchy.

    In current Western society, women tend to enjoy all the benefits of patriarchy without the traditional concomitant restraints on women.



    *Obviously, exceptions exist, such as the beautiful story of Silas Marner.
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  116. Kevin C. says:
    @Desiderius

    the soft type or the hard?
     
    I'm having difficulty seeing the distinction.

    What’s unclear? As I read it, it’s the difference between “fake it ’til you make it” and “the numbers check out”. Between “The Little Engine That Could” or Dumbo’s feather, and an engineer’s “rules of thumb” and tables.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Nothing.

    I just said I still don’t see the distinction. Still don’t.

    (There may be more of a false dichotomy there than you recognize)
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  117. fish says:
    @anon
    Coffee Talk

    Matthew McConaughey giving a pep talk to the UT basketball team: power pose or a street walker's come-hither stance? Talk amongst yourselves...

    Channeling Nathan Lane

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  118. @ThreeCranes
    I've never listened to a TED talk before; not because I haven't tried but because there wasn't enough there to justify spending the time listening. But I let her have my ear for the 14 minutes her spiel took.

    She leads off soothingly, anecdotally but then puts it in gear and drills down to the bedrock of statistics, "80% of life's major moments happen before the age of 35"!

    (sotto voce to self, "Wow! I hope that doesn't include death! and what does this even mean??? I mean, how can one quantify "major moments"?)

    So I turned to her expectantly for clarification.

    And it wasn't long in coming.

    "How much money you'll make..."

    Aha!!!! There it is. Chateau Heartiste is correct. With a woman, it's always about the dough ra mi. The Loot, the Long Green.

    The rest of her presentation followed predictably.

    And that's why I don't bother listening to TED Talks.

    Aha!!!! There it is. Chateau Heartiste is correct. With a woman, it’s always about the dough ra mi. The Loot, the Long Green.

    And therefore with men it must always be about the dough ra mi, sadly enough.

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  119. Kevin C. says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT, but iSteve-relevant.

    What's next after WWT?

    Well, this likely will be more of a skirmish than a war, but it could well be WWC(ousins).

    An article linked at Instapundit (LINK) is saying that first-cousin marriage not only isn't (very) harmful, it's very possibly actually potentially really quite beneficial! And where was the research conducted? Pakistan, of course.

    As to that article, of course they miss that the problem isn’t just the risk of genetic defects, it’s that, in increasing consanguinity and thus genetic similarity between relatives, in the long run you select for higher kinship altruism, likely at the expense of reciprocal altruism, and end up producing a more “clannish” society. (People also miss that when it comes to cousin marriage, the West is mostly the outlier for avoiding it.) Plus, one should note that all their talk about “lower heart disease risk” refers to a family of Pakistanis with a particular mutant gene, and isn’t actually relevant to cousin marriage at all.

    As for what comes after WWT, I still suspect that polygamy is a likely contender, just as soon as they come up with a convincing (to judges) legal rationale to legalize it for Muslims but not Mormons.

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  120. @Diversity Heretic
    I stand corrected. I thought that the Soviets had pulled out around 1948. I wonder if that Soviet/Russian ocupation has anything to do with the Austrian attitudes towards "migrants" that more closely resemble those of the Visegrad countries and the former German Democratic Republic than those of western Europe.

    Not sure what, if any, effect it had on Arnold Schwarzenegger.

    Austria took in very much migrants in Europe in 2015/16 if – what makes sense, – calculated per capita of it’s inhabitants – more than Switzerland, France, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Germany… – maybe not more than Sweden, I’d have to look this one up).

    - Now, that was then – – and we’ll see, what happens next.

    If the course of Austrian migration-politics would really change in the next months, it would have anything to do with the consequences of 2015/16 – and hardly anything, if anything at all, with the Soviet occupation, as far as I can see – (and I can even see into Austria – but only if the air is clear, though).

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  121. Kevin C. says:
    @jim jones
    I see that Disqus has shut down Return of Kings for sexism:

    http://www.returnofkings.com/132206/disqus-is-shutting-down-rok-comments-effective-friday

    Just another part of the growing trend. Expect only more and more of this, until us “deplorables” are driven from the Internet entirely.

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  122. @Ivy
    Dale Carnegie's book and similar ones may be viewed as ways to jolt a salesman out of some rut. That isn't a very scientific explanation but can be effective. Sales and other parts of business are demanding enough that people look for ways to change approaches, whether frequently or as part of a mid-career tune-up or introspection. Sometimes a new perspective works just enough, without many literal overtones or promises of figurative cancer cures or what have you. Paying a small amount for a book, or podcast, or just viewing on YouTube may serve a purpose.

    Sometimes a late night infomercial can be very motivational. Picture it: You stumble home from your meaningless job where you have no social life at the office and don’t go out after work. You walk into your empty apartment, have a dinner of fast food and beer, and fall asleep on the couch with the tube on. As you startle awake at 2 AM, there’s somebody making a pretty energetic case that you really can improve your life dramatically with a Bow Flex or a non-stick frying pan. The soft blue light and swanky electro-pop music have got you feeling kind of positive. It’s only one phone call away. And if you need to validate those feelings first, you can always call the Psychic Hotline.

    It may be that none of it’s true, but if you can just hang on to that moment it might get you somewhere.

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  123. Kevin C. says:
    @whorefinder

    What’s next after WWT?
     
    WWT isn't over yet. They've actually experienced a loss---they had the military, and Trump kicked them out.

    They put a tranny in Playboy for next month---yes, they did----but that's already bringing out the laughs. Playboy was dead anyway, as dead as Hefner is now, and they're just trying to revive the corpse with shock value.

    They’ve actually experienced a loss—they had the military, and Trump kicked them out.

    I know he announced that, but have any trannies in the military actually received their discharge papers yet? Last I heard, Mattis’s response to the orders from his Commander-in-Chief to give these folks the boot was to commission a study.

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  124. @Kevin C.

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have… a willingness to take responsibility…
     
    Well, when, in any society, have women ever had to take responsibility for their actions, and bear the costs and consequences of their choices, to near the same degree as similarly-situated men? When have men not been called upon, either individually or collectively (such as via the state), to "man up" and shoulder the burden of women's mistakes? Men are the expendable sex, and more attention is always paid toward ameliorating women's pains and burdens. (Remember Hillary's comment about how women are the ones who always suffer the most in war, because they lose husbands or sons?) Very few people, male or female, Left or Right, feminist or traditionalist, actually act as if they really believe women have the same level of agency, responsibility, and moral culpability as adult men. (There are reasons solid Libertarians skew not just heavily male, but disproportionately single or gay men.)

    they don’t take risks
     
    Predicted by basic evolutionary theory: see Bateman's principle and Robert Trivers's work on sexual selection and parental investment theory. Whichever sex invests more resources in offspring (usually the female, and pretty much always for placental mammals, given pregnancy and lactation), will see less variation in reproductive success, and cluster around a "safe" strategy, while the other sex, seeing more reproductive variance, compete with one another in pursuit of the higher-investing sex. Humans are no exception. (The estimate is that something like 80% of all women who've ever lived have successfully reproduced, but only 40% of men; but on the other hand, a woman is biologically incapable of having the runaway reproductive success of a Ramesis or a Genghis Khan.) See also various distribution curves, like intelligence or status, where males have higher variance, dominating both the high and low ends.

    but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules
     
    In other words, sticking to the safe, average strategy and following the herd. Again, just as evolution predicts for female mammals.

    Whichever sex invests more resources in offspring (usually the female, and pretty much always for placental mammals, given pregnancy and lactation), will see less variation in reproductive success, and cluster around a “safe” strategy.

    Why though?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    See Bateman's principle. Basically, it's what the rules of evolution by natural selection predict when applied to competition in sexual reproduction. It's what's adaptive. (Note that for "sex-role-reversed" species like seahorses or some birds, where males invest more than females, we see the same behaviors, only reversed, with females having greater reproductive variance and pursuing choosy males with lower reproductive variance.)
    , @Jack D
    Suppose we go to a casino and you and I both have $10 to bet. But your $10 is in the form of 10 $1 coins and mine is in the form of 200 nickels. I might wander from nickel slot to nickel slot because it's no big deal to lose a nickel. You will study the machines carefully because you only have a few chances before you are wiped out.
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  125. Man Steve packed this post with a lot of subtle shivs.

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  126. @SimpleSong
    Female academics, ugh. Random thoughts:

    I actually read the paper and this reads like something out of People Magazine and not an academic journal. The first line is, "The proud peacock fans his tail feathers in pursuit of a mate." I can just hear my 10th grade English teacher saying "pick out a topic sentence that grabs the reader!"

    This kerfuffle is a good illustration of the fact that generally women value process and men value results. When female academics teach a class, they start awarding points based on attendance, participation in discussions, the act of handing in problem sets (regardless of the accuracy of the answers) etc. So they end up with warm chairs, everyone making precisely 2 asinine comments per class and then zoning out, and papers covered in meaningless scribbles. This is great if the goal of education is babysitting/aging vat/quarantine but not so useful at actually imparting knowledge.

    Male academics tend to have a discreet thing that they want to teach and then structure the class around imparting and testing that knowledge, stripped of all the fluff. The major drawback to male academics as teachers is they often don't really want to teach as they are more into their research. However, once you get beyond teaching basic, basic material, wanting to teach is really not as important as having a deep understanding of the field. Deep enough that you can conduct meaningful research in the field.

    This is why whenever I hear a student complain 'teacher x was not a great teacher, he was more into research...' I recognize this as code for 'I was too dumb for the class' or 'I am upset with my grade.' Good students immediately recognize a very strong correlation between research and teaching prowess; I have been lucky enough to take classes from two professors who were/became Nobel laureates and they were both outstanding teachers.

    Good students immediately recognize a very strong correlation between research and teaching prowess

    Oh, bull bleep. I have attended several universities where everyone on the faculty was a well-regarded researcher with many publications. The teaching quality varied enormously.

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    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    I'm not saying that research acumen and teaching ability are the same things, I'm saying they are correlated (at the university level only, and it makes no difference until about 3000 level classes). Of course there will be individual variation. Might I ask, if everyone on your faculty was a well regarded researcher, and you had no control group, then how exactly do you know that they were no better than non-researchers/poorly regarded researchers? How do you know that non-researchers even had the ability to teach the classes at all? (As an aside, having lots of publications does not equal being a good researcher, although they are faintly correlated. You can pretty much sum up Claude Shannon's or Albert Einstein's career in less than fifteen publications.)

    Regarding teaching, if you're looking for a teacher in an intro class to spoon feed students what they could just read in a textbook, no, that doesn't correlate terribly well with research acumen, since that's mostly just a matter of teacher patience and a good textbook. In that case, the textbook is pretty much what is doing the teaching, not the teacher. The teacher is just there to organize the class, assign and grade the homework, and have a base enough level of competence to answer questions and deliver a lecture that summarizes each chapter. At some point these classes (calculus I and whatnot) will just be replaced with Khan academy, which would probably be an improvement over the non-English speaking TAs currently running the show.

    A good teacher, at the university level, is someone who can teach at the ragged edges of a discipline. That is, where things are not completely understood, there is no textbook or the existing textbooks have major flaws or omissions, the future of the field and its implications for industry/society/science are unknown. Teaching at the edge is virtually impossible to do if you aren't actively involved in research.

    Feynman and Landau spring to mind as examples of superlative teachers and researchers--however they were only superlative teachers for superlative students. Could Feynman make D'shawntavious understand trigonometry? Probably not. If that is your definition of a 'good' teacher, then he was not a 'good' teacher--I think you're looking for someone like Michelle Pfeiffer's character in Dangerous Minds. However, most people who listen to the Feynman lectures would call Feynman a good teacher.

    I guess it comes down to your definition of a 'good' teacher: one pole would be Aristotle teaching Alexander the Great, the other pole is the 'Stand and Deliver' guy. If the former is the sort of model you are looking for, then yes, they need to do research. Research is where you take your ideas into the real world and field test them.

    Last note: All of this only applies to physical sciences. Anthropology and whatnot, I have no idea, but they don't really belong in a university anyway. :)
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  127. Tiny Duck says:

    You guys need to read the comments of the article to see how out of touch you are

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  128. @Kevin C.

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have… a willingness to take responsibility…
     
    Well, when, in any society, have women ever had to take responsibility for their actions, and bear the costs and consequences of their choices, to near the same degree as similarly-situated men? When have men not been called upon, either individually or collectively (such as via the state), to "man up" and shoulder the burden of women's mistakes? Men are the expendable sex, and more attention is always paid toward ameliorating women's pains and burdens. (Remember Hillary's comment about how women are the ones who always suffer the most in war, because they lose husbands or sons?) Very few people, male or female, Left or Right, feminist or traditionalist, actually act as if they really believe women have the same level of agency, responsibility, and moral culpability as adult men. (There are reasons solid Libertarians skew not just heavily male, but disproportionately single or gay men.)

    they don’t take risks
     
    Predicted by basic evolutionary theory: see Bateman's principle and Robert Trivers's work on sexual selection and parental investment theory. Whichever sex invests more resources in offspring (usually the female, and pretty much always for placental mammals, given pregnancy and lactation), will see less variation in reproductive success, and cluster around a "safe" strategy, while the other sex, seeing more reproductive variance, compete with one another in pursuit of the higher-investing sex. Humans are no exception. (The estimate is that something like 80% of all women who've ever lived have successfully reproduced, but only 40% of men; but on the other hand, a woman is biologically incapable of having the runaway reproductive success of a Ramesis or a Genghis Khan.) See also various distribution curves, like intelligence or status, where males have higher variance, dominating both the high and low ends.

    but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules
     
    In other words, sticking to the safe, average strategy and following the herd. Again, just as evolution predicts for female mammals.

    Women bear the brunt of the consequences of sexual intercourse. For men, those consequences are optional. That’s been true in… all societies, I think.

    It’s optional for men to stick around and help care for children they helped create. The also lack the desire to nurture children who are not their own biological children.* Because of those facts, in high-paternal-investment i.e. patriarchal societies, men impose restrictions on women’s freedoms in order to make damn sure the children they’re helping raise are theirs. It’s the tradeoff of patriarchy.

    In current Western society, women tend to enjoy all the benefits of patriarchy without the traditional concomitant restraints on women.

    *Obviously, exceptions exist, such as the beautiful story of Silas Marner.

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  129. Kevin C. says:
    @Anonymous
    Why would that be?

    Why would that be?

    In terms of the women’s thought processes? Probably just that they’re unconscious is wired that way. Why do we humans like to eat sugars, fats, and other calorie-dense foods? Because they’re tasty. Why do we find more symmetrical faces more attractive? Because that’s how our attraction systems are wired.

    Now, there’s the evolutionary explanations for why people are wired that way, but remember, organisms are adaptation executors, not fitness maximizers. In this case, it’s likely for the same reason that “preselection” is an element of how women’s attraction systems evaluate men: the more the male status hierarchy is clear and pre-set, the less work a woman’s (unconscious) brain has to do to evaluate potential suitors to find the highest quality one.

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    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    Good comment. The reason that women hate hate hate beta males who upset the system is that a woman may make a perfectl reasonable mating choice according to an existing hierarchy, but if that hierarchy changes rapidly because of technological innovations, she finds that her choice was a poor one.
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  130. Kevin C. says:
    @Opinionator
    Whichever sex invests more resources in offspring (usually the female, and pretty much always for placental mammals, given pregnancy and lactation), will see less variation in reproductive success, and cluster around a “safe” strategy.

    Why though?

    See Bateman’s principle. Basically, it’s what the rules of evolution by natural selection predict when applied to competition in sexual reproduction. It’s what’s adaptive. (Note that for “sex-role-reversed” species like seahorses or some birds, where males invest more than females, we see the same behaviors, only reversed, with females having greater reproductive variance and pursuing choosy males with lower reproductive variance.)

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  131. MarkinLA says:

    I bought a stupid book back in the day called “Skinetics”. The con man got me for 10 buck for a book that probably cost 25 cents to print. It was all about doing that handshake you see people like Trump doing where they also grab at you when they shake you hand and variations of it. I thought it was total BS in the engineering world. Maybe Trump bought a copy as well.

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  132. @Harry Baldwin
    An erect posture, alert manner and a confident stride help prevent a person from being mugged, studies have shown. Criminals have an eye out for the weak member of the herd.

    I used to avoid muggings by twitching and muttering to myself. Maybe that’s just the NYC subway.

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  133. @Alden
    That's what we are told in school. To succeed in school one must be very conformist and obedient. So for 12 years we are rewarded for following the rules with As and Bs in conduct and behavior and getting along with others. In some public schools homework is half the grade. So grades don't depend on high test scores, just doing stupid busywork and turning it in on time.

    College used to be very free, but now every word is monitored by the liberal minions of Satan that rule college campuses.

    So we get into the working world and find that we are surrounded by nasty people, under paid and overworked and it is just horrible and we get all traumatized. I don't know how it is today in women's magazines but when I used to read them it was all about how wonderful work is and how you will meet so many wonderful friends and be fulfilled* and work is such a wonderful thing. Women expect to be happy at work. Men and sensible women know it's just a job.

    * what does fulfilled mean??? I never understood.

    Traditionally speaking, fulfilled meant for a man: King of the mountain, with all the rivals crushed and prostrated before him (either literally, during times of war, or at least not making as much money and not having the best coolest stuff in life).

    Traditionally speaking, being fulfilled for a woman meant having a well rounded life: The ideal mate, just the right number of kids, a nice house, etc.

    Think Goldilocks when she sampled the last things (chair, food, bed, etc) : It’s just right.

    So being fulfilled for women meant: It’s just right, it’s all good.

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  134. @Colleen Pater
    And how did they do this study? analyse the posture of mugging victims? ask leading questions of muggers? if this were substantially true men would almost never be mugged women only occasionally and most of the time old ladies and children, while we become outraged when they are mugged and no doubt they are sometime targeted for this reason its not ubiquitous.circumstance is far more important

    Depends where you are. Philly muggers like to assault you based on race, even if you clearly have nothing much. NYC muggers prefer rich tourists. Carry an oversized dance bag with smelly leotards and crumpled copies of Backstage sticking out of it and you’re just another out-of-work actor, not worth the trouble of mugging.

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  135. whorefinder says: • Website
    @Opinionator
    That oil money covered up the fact that the 9/11 terrorists were all Saudis.

    Evidence please.
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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Link doesn't support an "oil-money coverup." What's your evidence of that?
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  136. donut says:
    @ThreeCranes
    I've never listened to a TED talk before; not because I haven't tried but because there wasn't enough there to justify spending the time listening. But I let her have my ear for the 14 minutes her spiel took.

    She leads off soothingly, anecdotally but then puts it in gear and drills down to the bedrock of statistics, "80% of life's major moments happen before the age of 35"!

    (sotto voce to self, "Wow! I hope that doesn't include death! and what does this even mean??? I mean, how can one quantify "major moments"?)

    So I turned to her expectantly for clarification.

    And it wasn't long in coming.

    "How much money you'll make..."

    Aha!!!! There it is. Chateau Heartiste is correct. With a woman, it's always about the dough ra mi. The Loot, the Long Green.

    The rest of her presentation followed predictably.

    And that's why I don't bother listening to TED Talks.

    “(sotto voce to self, “Wow! I hope that doesn’t include death! ”

    LOL

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  137. dwb says:
    @pyrrhus
    I am reminded of a memorable quote from Ambrose Bierce--"The woman who can take constructive criticism has not yet been born."

    Reminds me of another I heard in college =

    “Any man who thinks a woman is his intellectual equal is probably right.”

    (I was a student at an east coast college that had relatively recently gone co-ed. The quip was usually said in tandem with the observation that, “It’s not a question of whether women should be educated at , it’s whether they should be educated at all.”)

    Usually got a laugh or two from the older alums.

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  138. Sean says:

    http://andrewgelman.com/2014/05/09/nicholas-wade-paradox-racism/

    In any era, racism is typically supported by comparing two groups that are socially unequal and with clear physical differences. But both these sorts of comparisons are moving targets. . . .

    That said, I can’t say that Wade’s theories are wrong. As noted above, racial explanations of current social and economic inequality are compelling, in part because it is always natural to attribute individuals’ successes and failures to their individual traits, and to attribute the successes and failures of larger societies to group characteristics. And genes provide a mechanism that supplies a particularly flexible set of explanations when linked to culture. . . .

    But I think the themes of a book like Wade’s are necessarily contingent both on the era when it is written and the audience to which it is addressed. At the start of his last chapter, Wade speaks to his readers: “Imagine you, as an English speaker of European descent …” In the spirit of modern ideas in theoretical physics, one might imagine a multiverse of possible Nicholas Wades, writing in all possible epochs and for all possible audiences, dividing up humans into groups at different levels of coarseness and focusing on different economic and social outcomes. The racial explanation tuned to our social group and our time period will look oh so reasonable, while all the others will just look silly, like either historical relics or desperate attempts to shore up the status quo. . . .

    At any given time, racial explanations are a convenient and natural way to explain social and economic inequality. Then, as relations between and within societies change, the racial explanations change alongside. The terms of race are simply too flexible given the limited information we have regarding the connections between genes and behavior.

    Gelman’s sister was an author of the paper Are ethnic groups biological “species” to the human brain? Essentialism in our cognition of some social categories.

    Cuddy = (John Murray) Cuddihy

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  139. @Opinionator
    Richard Spencer tweeted this week that Bannon is overrated.

    That’s hilarious coming from Spencer, who has absolutely nothing to show for himself other than a half ass website.

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  140. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Opinionator
    Is the work "Influence" that you mention the book by Robert Cialdini?

    Why do you think Carnegie is a charlatan?

    Is the work “Influence” that you mention the book by Robert Cialdini?

    Yep, Cialdini.

    Why do you think Carnegie is a charlatan?

    This was the opinion of Sinclair Lewis and H.L. Mencken.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Interrsting that Scott Adams has so much praise for Cialdini.

    What about the book do you think is a crock?
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  141. @Dissident

    They’ve [proponents of "transgender" depravity] actually experienced a loss—they had the military, and Trump kicked them out.
     
    Did he? I know that the President had made an announcement to that effect but didn't he then, shortly afterward, fold like a cheap camera?

    Playboy was dead anyway, as dead as Hefner is now,
     
    Ah, for the days when a boy could reach his teens having seen no smut worse than Playboy.

    No, but you swallow that blackpill.

    Taking the time to craft regulations in order to make it harder for a 9th Circus judge to decide they have the power to regulate the military isn’t folding, but many of you here seem determined to learn nothing and remember nothing.

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  142. Nico says:
    @whorefinder
    I know it's cliche to point out how George Soros and Israel influence our culture through propaganda, but we can't forget how the Saudis are also doing this as well. That oil money covered up the fact that the 9/11 terrorists were all Saudis. And now protecting that vital Muslim ideal: banging your cousin.

    I know it’s cliche to point out how George Soros and Israel influence our culture through propaganda, but we can’t forget how the Saudis are also doing this as well. That oil money covered up the fact that the 9/11 terrorists were all Saudis.

    It’s important to expose, at every turn we get, that in the power games of the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and other American allies in the region are de facto on the side of Israel, regardless of whatever front their official ideology may put up. And that while the Islamic State certainly plays off anti-Israel sentiment (among other things), Netanyahu’s interests are not served by an immediate extinction of what has to be his perfect foil.

    If Israel did not exist, switching our alignment and chief oil suppliers from the Sunni-cum-Kemalist bloc to the Shia-cum Ba’athist bloc would have been much easier, much earlier on, and would have put Russia into a far more convenient corner for us. It is likely that so long as it exists, Israel is never going to be a geopolitical “regularity” and will serve no purpose other than to upset the regional and indeed global balance of power, to the benefit of the wild jackals of the human species.

    A stake must be driven through the heart of Christian Zionism, and a massive iconoclasm must be directed toward every image, bust or statue of Arthur Balfour, as soon as possible.

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    • LOL: IHTG
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  143. @whorefinder
    The interwebs is your friend, little one:

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Hijackers_in_the_September_11_attacks

    Link doesn’t support an “oil-money coverup.” What’s your evidence of that?

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  144. Nico says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    OT, but iSteve-relevant.

    What's next after WWT?

    Well, this likely will be more of a skirmish than a war, but it could well be WWC(ousins).

    An article linked at Instapundit (LINK) is saying that first-cousin marriage not only isn't (very) harmful, it's very possibly actually potentially really quite beneficial! And where was the research conducted? Pakistan, of course.

    WWC(ousins)

    One more battle in the War on Noticing.

    Anyone in the West who’s tried to have an intelligent one-on-one conversation with a Muslim for over 15 minutes knows it’s usually hopeless: upwards of 80 percent of them can’t help themselves turning to religion and spouting off absolute nonsense. They can put on a veneer of sanity but that’s it.

    And once you have a look at their rates of consanguinity and the historic cumulation of such unions, you understand exactly why.

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  145. dwb says:
    @anonymous
    Motivational speakers seem to be a uniquely American phenomenon. It's an entire industry. Also, thinking/imagining one's way to success and happiness is also a popular idea. Just giving people what they want one might suppose although that could be appalling sometimes.

    This is in my opinion a good observation.

    I’ve been working for many years, and every place I’ve been has some variation on the “speaker series” – they bring in some well-known person or expert to give a talk about how to “lean in” (ick) or something to that effect.

    I’m a maths guy, and often sit with others in my field. We tend to leave these quietly mocking them in our little group, but the general tone in the US is “wow! That was really something, especially when he said…”

    A couple of years ago, I moved to France, and my (American) employer replicated the experience with a monthly “lunch and learn” type of event.

    The first (and last) one was met with open derision.

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  146. @Anonymous

    Is the work “Influence” that you mention the book by Robert Cialdini?

     

    Yep, Cialdini.

    Why do you think Carnegie is a charlatan?
     
    This was the opinion of Sinclair Lewis and H.L. Mencken.

    Interrsting that Scott Adams has so much praise for Cialdini.

    What about the book do you think is a crock?

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Interrsting that Scott Adams has so much praise for Cialdini.

    What about the book do you think is a crock?
     
    I merely had a problem with this work passing itself off as scientific. It's all old school sales training stuff repackaged. You do realize that that Cialdini's work was initially a sales training course from Dartnell Corporation from the 80's don't you? I'm not knocking sales training and salesmen, I have infinitely more respect for them than social "scientists".
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  147. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Getting noticed isn’t a talent, but there is a trick to it. Gurus and swamis of the infomercial will offer a special crash course open only to first come first serve early birds on the Jedi Mind Trick of pulling pussy and getting stinking rich. Actually its simple. Don’t try to hard. Losers try too hard. The dreaded teacher’s pet and sycophant beta orbiters that piss people off and you all try to avoid. Cool. Stay calm and let it happen. Patience is a virtue. A good hunter blends in and lets his prey get too close.
    Women go on and on about how they just hate hate HATE arrogant guys. They get all hot and bothered. They are dripping wet, and all over those arrogant bastards. Meanwhile all the losers are using lines and the “law of averages”. All you Math innumerate guys don’t know it, but “the law of averages” is how idiots do things. Probability is what people who don’t know what they are doing are using to waste your time and theirs. Keep calm. Act cool. Let them come to you. Stand out by wearing one thing different. Don’t be weird like a weirdo wearing a costume. Wear a simple “conversation” piece. They will mingle and that ONE THING THAT STANDS OUT will get NOTICED and start a conversation. Be patient. Good hunters sit and wait.

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  148. whorefinder says: • Website

    ROFL. Saudis attack U.S. in terrorist plot. Saudi Arabia home to terrorist training. As a result we attack….

    Afghanistan

    And never Saudi Arabia, the source of the attacks.

    Yup, no hint of the Saudis using their money to cover up their crimes. Oh wait, Bush 43 flew the Saudis literally out of the country right after 9/11 occurred, almost as if to protect them from scrutiny….

    Nice try with the coverup, son.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Yup, no hint of the Saudis using their money to cover up their crimes.

    Apparently, no evidence of their doing so.
    , @Dissident

    Bush 43 flew the Saudis literally out of the country right after 9/11 occurred
     
    As opposed to merely flying them figuratively out of the country?
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  149. @Kevin C.

    Why would that be?
     
    In terms of the women's thought processes? Probably just that they're unconscious is wired that way. Why do we humans like to eat sugars, fats, and other calorie-dense foods? Because they're tasty. Why do we find more symmetrical faces more attractive? Because that's how our attraction systems are wired.

    Now, there's the evolutionary explanations for why people are wired that way, but remember, organisms are adaptation executors, not fitness maximizers. In this case, it's likely for the same reason that "preselection" is an element of how women's attraction systems evaluate men: the more the male status hierarchy is clear and pre-set, the less work a woman's (unconscious) brain has to do to evaluate potential suitors to find the highest quality one.

    Good comment. The reason that women hate hate hate beta males who upset the system is that a woman may make a perfectl reasonable mating choice according to an existing hierarchy, but if that hierarchy changes rapidly because of technological innovations, she finds that her choice was a poor one.

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    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Whiskey vindicated again! I remember reading years ago on his blog how women actually preferred expressly hierarchical structures (like mediaeval courts) where status could be easily seen."

    Whiskey? Vindicated? Men, not women, prefer hierarchical structures that focuses on the status of the group they are part of, not because they get tingles by being privy to high-powered men.

    http://magazine.utoronto.ca/leading-edge/teamwork-men-vs-women-jennifer-berdahl-cameron-anderson/

    https://www.helioshr.com/2015/06/a-review-of-gender-leadership-styles-common-traits-in-men-vs-women/

    "They hate hate hate beta males for upsetting this structure with inventions such as gunpowder and man-portable firearms, etc."

    The social-sexual hierarchy that you tout is fraught with confirmation bias and subjectiveness.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    You misspelled HATE HATE HATE.
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  150. Fredrik says:
    @LondonBob
    Only truly successful people with unique talent can dress like an individual, Bannon is one of those few. Everyone else should take the advice I was given, dress smart and dress conservative. Sign of Bannon's power he can dress like a slob.

    Harvey Weinstein also dressed and looked like a slob. I think you’re right.

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  151. guest says:
    @Wilbur Hassenfus

    she played by the rules
     
    Being Rewarded for Playing By the Rules is very, very important stuff for middle class “professional” women.

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have imagination, or brains, or common sense, or a willingness to take responsibility or face hard truths or make tough decisions (or even easy ones). Criticism of any kind puts them in an emotional tailspin, they don’t have a good sense of the difference between reality and fantasy, and they don’t take risks, but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules, and if they aren’t well-rewarded, well...

    IT’S JUST NOT FAIR!

    On the other hand, I take criticism like a Stone Wall most of the time because I (stupidly) took our culture’s admonition not to care what other people think* seriously.

    I’m also a failure by all objective measurement, possibly because I’m stupidly stone-wallish.

    *They probably mean “Don’t be afraid to have homosex and vote Democrat.” I don’t know if it ever occurs to them that some people take it as, “Don’t be afraid to be fat and emit body odor.”

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  152. guest says:
    @Opinionator
    Do you think the favor principle Steve mentions works or not?

    Maybe Steve is being sly here and pointing out that the principle sort of begs the question it gets the causation arrow reversed.

    The causation isn’t backwards. You don’t win friends and influence people by being an errand boy or suck-up. Think of all the people you’ve ever been loyal to in your life. Did you get that way because they did a bunch of favors for you? That’s the sort of thing desperate salesmen do. There’s nothing more suspicious.

    Problem most people have with such advice is that the hard part is getting people to do stuff for you in the first place. If they knew how to do that, they’d already be popular and wouldn’t need Dale Carnegie’s help.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Problem most people have with such advice is that the hard part is getting people to do stuff for you in the first place. If they knew how to do that, they’d already be popular and wouldn’t need Dale Carnegie’s help.
     
    Asking works.
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  153. @whorefinder
    ROFL. Saudis attack U.S. in terrorist plot. Saudi Arabia home to terrorist training. As a result we attack....

    Afghanistan

    And never Saudi Arabia, the source of the attacks.

    Yup, no hint of the Saudis using their money to cover up their crimes. Oh wait, Bush 43 flew the Saudis literally out of the country right after 9/11 occurred, almost as if to protect them from scrutiny....

    Nice try with the coverup, son.

    Yup, no hint of the Saudis using their money to cover up their crimes.

    Apparently, no evidence of their doing so.

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    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
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  154. KunioKun says:

    The single biggest “pose” improvement a person can have today is to not be fat. Any pose skinny is better than the best pose fat for any situation.

    If you want to do a good study of these poses, then maybe the same methods used by Gaydar AI on pictures of different people with different poses would work.

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  155. @Alden
    Who did the studies??? Not mugggers, rapists, robbers or police, and prosecutors I'm sure. They look more for location. And they will follow people for a few blocks or a few miles. They don't just happen to find their victims. They often follow them. And since the standard mugging team is almost always three, not one, I doubt they care about confident posture.

    SOP is one on foot behind the victim, one in front to accost the victim so the one in back can attack first and one driving the car. Better than believing some liberal BS about posture, always, always look for three black men in a cars. Almost always a mugging/rape team. One black man is probably all right. Two might just be two guy together, but three is a mugging team.


    Sounds like just more liberal c**p. This is also blame the victim public defender c**p. How many times did I hear this from the criminals and dey mammas and women. And those federally funded save the criminals organization staffed by young Jews in their year off from college and grad school.
    " She takes the bus at night. He goes out at night and walks home. Shouldn't park on a dark street, just drive around for another hour looking for a parking spot. Don't carry a purse. Don't do this and don't do that"

    Just watch out for three black men.

    I remember when the feminazis were claiming that a 5'3 120 pd women could fight off a 6'2 rapist by shoving their car keys into his eyes. It's hard to shove anything into the eyes of someone 11 inches taller unless that person allows it.

    The cause of being mugged on the street is mostly being out at night alone.

    I heard about it in a class with Craig “Southnarc” Douglas, and if you know who he is you’ll be aware he doesn’t spout “liberal c**p.”

    In a study, convicts were asked to look at a number of videos of people walking along the street and identify those twho looked like suitable victims. The people they consistently picked out were those with poor posture, walked with a slightly “off” gait, and looked as if they weren’t attending to their surroundings.

    Not all muggers work in teams like you describe, though that’s obviously an extremely dangerous scenario.

    Anyway, I’m surprised you make this sound like it’s so outlandish. I don’t understand why it set you off on such a tirade.

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    • Replies: @Alden
    27 years in law enforcement.
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  156. @Roger Sweeny
    Good students immediately recognize a very strong correlation between research and teaching prowess

    Oh, bull bleep. I have attended several universities where everyone on the faculty was a well-regarded researcher with many publications. The teaching quality varied enormously.

    I’m not saying that research acumen and teaching ability are the same things, I’m saying they are correlated (at the university level only, and it makes no difference until about 3000 level classes). Of course there will be individual variation. Might I ask, if everyone on your faculty was a well regarded researcher, and you had no control group, then how exactly do you know that they were no better than non-researchers/poorly regarded researchers? How do you know that non-researchers even had the ability to teach the classes at all? (As an aside, having lots of publications does not equal being a good researcher, although they are faintly correlated. You can pretty much sum up Claude Shannon’s or Albert Einstein’s career in less than fifteen publications.)

    Regarding teaching, if you’re looking for a teacher in an intro class to spoon feed students what they could just read in a textbook, no, that doesn’t correlate terribly well with research acumen, since that’s mostly just a matter of teacher patience and a good textbook. In that case, the textbook is pretty much what is doing the teaching, not the teacher. The teacher is just there to organize the class, assign and grade the homework, and have a base enough level of competence to answer questions and deliver a lecture that summarizes each chapter. At some point these classes (calculus I and whatnot) will just be replaced with Khan academy, which would probably be an improvement over the non-English speaking TAs currently running the show.

    A good teacher, at the university level, is someone who can teach at the ragged edges of a discipline. That is, where things are not completely understood, there is no textbook or the existing textbooks have major flaws or omissions, the future of the field and its implications for industry/society/science are unknown. Teaching at the edge is virtually impossible to do if you aren’t actively involved in research.

    Feynman and Landau spring to mind as examples of superlative teachers and researchers–however they were only superlative teachers for superlative students. Could Feynman make D’shawntavious understand trigonometry? Probably not. If that is your definition of a ‘good’ teacher, then he was not a ‘good’ teacher–I think you’re looking for someone like Michelle Pfeiffer’s character in Dangerous Minds. However, most people who listen to the Feynman lectures would call Feynman a good teacher.

    I guess it comes down to your definition of a ‘good’ teacher: one pole would be Aristotle teaching Alexander the Great, the other pole is the ‘Stand and Deliver’ guy. If the former is the sort of model you are looking for, then yes, they need to do research. Research is where you take your ideas into the real world and field test them.

    Last note: All of this only applies to physical sciences. Anthropology and whatnot, I have no idea, but they don’t really belong in a university anyway. :)

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  157. @Olorin
    I wouldn't put it as globally as you did, since I've known many rational, empirical, more or less quanty gals who take criticism just fine and work in the realm of reality. And I wouldn't mistake Miss Dominus's rhetoric for global truth.

    But I agree overall with the observation about the many who are as you describe. (Especially in the case of It's Her Turn (TM).)

    We're cutting to the core of academe's milky underbelly with this topic: it's no longer about finding out what we can know and what we have learned about the true, real, and beautiful, and imparting that to young people, whose minds and skills we seek to develop. Or for that matter learning what doesn't work and has failed in the past, and warning young people off that.

    Instead, it's Girl (or Boy) Scouting. Go down the lists of accomplishments for each badge, win the ones you're good at, and when your badge sash (or whatever they have today) is full enough with all the right badges, and you're a certain age, you fly up to the next level. On and on till you're an Eagle Scout, or whatever the equivalent is for girls these days.

    This is also what's wrong with K-12 education, where kids are rewarded not for learning actual stuff that's true and real, but for sitting down, shutting up, and doing what they're told.

    Both some of the best and some of the worst bosses I've had were women. The worst women bosses were confused darlings who seemed to think they were GS troop leaders and the workplace was a GS summer camp, which is to say lesbian hookup camp. And as Wilbur says, they expected rewards for doing what they were told. Not for what they produced or effected that is of value to others.

    This is also my experience, and why each year I consider educational credentials less and less valuable. In fact recently for hiring purposes I’ve start to count them against the applicant after a certain point. If somebody does 3 fellowships they have something wrong with them.

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  158. Jack D says:
    @Opinionator
    Whichever sex invests more resources in offspring (usually the female, and pretty much always for placental mammals, given pregnancy and lactation), will see less variation in reproductive success, and cluster around a “safe” strategy.

    Why though?

    Suppose we go to a casino and you and I both have $10 to bet. But your $10 is in the form of 10 $1 coins and mine is in the form of 200 nickels. I might wander from nickel slot to nickel slot because it’s no big deal to lose a nickel. You will study the machines carefully because you only have a few chances before you are wiped out.

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  159. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    just stay away from the potted plants”

    Good advice, they’re seductive. But I swear, it wasn’t personal to me. I have never had an intimate experience with a potted plant.

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  160. Kylie says:
    @Wilbur Hassenfus

    she played by the rules
     
    Being Rewarded for Playing By the Rules is very, very important stuff for middle class “professional” women.

    The Still-She-Persisted ladies and the Well-Behaved-Women ladies don’t have imagination, or brains, or common sense, or a willingness to take responsibility or face hard truths or make tough decisions (or even easy ones). Criticism of any kind puts them in an emotional tailspin, they don’t have a good sense of the difference between reality and fantasy, and they don’t take risks, but they know how to keep a chair warm and Play By The Rules, and if they aren’t well-rewarded, well...

    IT’S JUST NOT FAIR!

    You’re so mean.

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  161. @Kevin C.
    What's unclear? As I read it, it's the difference between "fake it 'til you make it" and "the numbers check out". Between "The Little Engine That Could" or Dumbo's feather, and an engineer's "rules of thumb" and tables.

    Nothing.

    I just said I still don’t see the distinction. Still don’t.

    (There may be more of a false dichotomy there than you recognize)

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  162. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Art Deco
    She was likely more used to being treated as a cute blonde than as a scientist.

    Only a tiny minority of people over a certain age have blonde hair that isn't coming out of a bottle.

    After a certain age, silver works better.

    The punk princess and the country queen who still aren’t talking after that cat fight in ’71 at Max’s have apparently figured it out. Big Little Miss Muffett hasn’t.

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  163. @Jack D
    Capsules have been a great success in dishwashers so why not clothes washers? Consumers will vote with their purchases. Advertising can persuade people to try the product once but if they don't like it then no amount of advertising will force them to buy it again.

    All-in-one laundry detergent packets plus whitener plus something else are great for guys who don’t know much about doing laundry like me.

    If you were an expert, however, you’d probably prefer to pour your own precise mixture customized for each differing load.

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  164. Kylie says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    I don't know if Clint Eastwood figured it out for himself or Sergio Leone told him to stand contrapposto., but it's one of the most popular images of him. It may not have the same effect if you look more like Dom Deluise than Clint Eastwood.
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51EQnY2S93L._SL500_AC_SS350_.jpg

    My god, he was gorgeous.

    My father actually bought one of those serape things to wear after watching Clint as the Man With No Name. Unfortunately the serape was fuchsia and my father was in his 70′s and about 60 lbs. overweight. He gave it to me but it was too scratchy to wear.

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  165. Kylie says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Right. Animals engage in a lot of body language displays. For example, cats arch their backs to (presumably) make themselves look bigger to potential threats. Does it make them feel more confident? I don't know. But it would be interesting to study biochemically.

    Dogs raise their hackles to make themselves look bigger.

    My dog is a 70 lb. alpha female. I’m about 130lbs. She will obey my much larger husband whether he’s seated or standing but she’s occasionally reluctant to obey me when I’m seated.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I took my dog to dog training school and the first thing the woman said was to stand tall and tell the dog in a command voice what to to to. Say it once and make the dog do it. Works with children too.
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  166. Doing market research for Weber grills in the Buffalo Grove Forest Preserve, I stumbled onto people making the beast with two backs. In the middle of the afternoon in the middle of a field. The 60s were something. Every time I see a Weber grill… no not really.

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  167. @newrouter
    "Bannon would be a helluva lot more effective if he looked like Mike Rowe (with a decent trainer he could get close enough), even more so if he dressed like him."

    Weinstein was effective no?

    (a) different target market

    (b) no, not particularly

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  168. @guest
    The causation isn't backwards. You don't win friends and influence people by being an errand boy or suck-up. Think of all the people you've ever been loyal to in your life. Did you get that way because they did a bunch of favors for you? That's the sort of thing desperate salesmen do. There's nothing more suspicious.

    Problem most people have with such advice is that the hard part is getting people to do stuff for you in the first place. If they knew how to do that, they'd already be popular and wouldn't need Dale Carnegie's help.

    Problem most people have with such advice is that the hard part is getting people to do stuff for you in the first place. If they knew how to do that, they’d already be popular and wouldn’t need Dale Carnegie’s help.

    Asking works.

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    • Replies: @guest
    You might be surprised how many people have trouble doing or thinking to do as simple a thing as that.
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  169. @Alden
    That's what we are told in school. To succeed in school one must be very conformist and obedient. So for 12 years we are rewarded for following the rules with As and Bs in conduct and behavior and getting along with others. In some public schools homework is half the grade. So grades don't depend on high test scores, just doing stupid busywork and turning it in on time.

    College used to be very free, but now every word is monitored by the liberal minions of Satan that rule college campuses.

    So we get into the working world and find that we are surrounded by nasty people, under paid and overworked and it is just horrible and we get all traumatized. I don't know how it is today in women's magazines but when I used to read them it was all about how wonderful work is and how you will meet so many wonderful friends and be fulfilled* and work is such a wonderful thing. Women expect to be happy at work. Men and sensible women know it's just a job.

    * what does fulfilled mean??? I never understood.

    Why is following the rules such a bad thing. There are plenty of people in society who don’t follow the rules and I would rather not deal with them.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Good floor, lousy ceiling.
    , @Wilbur Hassenfus
    The rules in question don’t include making sure your results are replicable. The rules HRC followed don’t say anything about not taking bribes. Elizabeth Warren’s rules are fine with lying and plagiarism, because career is god.

    They’re not talking about the same rules as you. They’re talking about go-along-get-along and groupthink.

    Funny, I submitted that and then saw this just above, and had to edit:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/how-andrew-gelman-hurt-the-feelings-of-the-power-posing-lady/#comment-2049684


    he contends there that the vast majority of modern “scientists” are “not even trying” to get at the truth. They are instead trying to adhere to the social conventions of modern “scientific” institutions.
     
    Those rules.
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  170. @Colleen Pater
    And how did they do this study? analyse the posture of mugging victims? ask leading questions of muggers? if this were substantially true men would almost never be mugged women only occasionally and most of the time old ladies and children, while we become outraged when they are mugged and no doubt they are sometime targeted for this reason its not ubiquitous.circumstance is far more important

    Here is an excerpt from one article about the study. There is lots and lots of references to this on the web. Sorry I didn’t provide a link before, but I didn’t realize that people would have trouble believing this.

    Now, let’s talk about what criminals tend to look for. Much like a wild animal, a human predator wants an easy prey, which means they will seek out someone they perceive as weak, submissive, and unlikely to fight back. Because of this, any sign of strength or defiance the criminal perceives when approaching their chosen victim can in many instances be enough to turn around and look for a more suitable victim. In 1984, Betty Grayson and Morris I. Stein conducted a study to determine the selection criteria used by predators. As part of their study, they videotaped over 60 people walking on a busy New York City sidewalk without their knowledge over a three day period. This tape was later played for convicts of violent crimes who identified those they would consider desirable targets. Within seven seconds, the participants made their selections, and shockingly, there was a huge consistency.

    Contrary to what many would have predicted, in this experiment, some small women were passed over for larger men; the convicts did not base their decision on race, age, size, or gender. Instead, upon further analysis of the selected victims from the tape, they realized that they all had several things in common. Those selected as victims dragged or shuffled their feet, and tended to walk slower than the flow of pedestrian traffic, lacking a sense of purpose. Also, unlike those passed over, the selected victims tended to move awkwardly, with less coordination, balance, and confidence. Finally, they all had a slumped posture and walked with their eyes to the ground; a downward gaze implies unawareness, and can be perceived as submission, making for an apparently easy target. Basically, the criminals were assessing the ease with which they could overpower the victims based on nonverbal signals which the victims were not even aware of.

    http://firearmtrainingstore.com/about-us/blog/how-do-criminals-choose-their-victims/

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    • Replies: @hyperbola
    In other words, this "scientific study" has very little real basis and is a typical sociology/psychology scam. A grand total of 60 individuals were filmed and shown to an unknown number of "convicts". The number and type of "attributes" considered to be displayed by the victims are unknown (at least at the link given). Whether the "result" is valid in any other location/society/group is completely untested. From this a tremendous house of cards of "truth" is constructed.

    This is how one generates profitable "snake-oil" scams.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    One of the times I got mugged in NYC was by two Amish. One stopped me to ask a question and the guy behind me grabbed me. I had been studying inside for finals all day and did not realize that the police had gone on strike as threatened. They did let me keep my driver's license.
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  171. @Opinionator
    Yup, no hint of the Saudis using their money to cover up their crimes.

    Apparently, no evidence of their doing so.

    Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Of course it is.
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  172. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Jack D
    Capsules have been a great success in dishwashers so why not clothes washers? Consumers will vote with their purchases. Advertising can persuade people to try the product once but if they don't like it then no amount of advertising will force them to buy it again.

    If you put the detergent directly in the tub where the clothes go, then liquid is best, so you can let the water fill up partly and suds up before you put the clothes in. If you’re using a machine where the water and the detergent interact before they hit the clothes, then capsules would make more sense.

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  173. anonguy says:

    Cuddy’s methodology may be flawed, but the central thesis of power posing seems reasonable.

    For instance, it is one of the most important things they teach Marines in boot camp, how to stand up straight, be imposing, etc.

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  174. guest says:
    @Desiderius

    Problem most people have with such advice is that the hard part is getting people to do stuff for you in the first place. If they knew how to do that, they’d already be popular and wouldn’t need Dale Carnegie’s help.
     
    Asking works.

    You might be surprised how many people have trouble doing or thinking to do as simple a thing as that.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Indeed so. Married to one.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Many, many females, even of the current supposedly liberated generation, have a hard time asking, and an even harder time saying a simple "No".
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  175. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Opinionator
    Interrsting that Scott Adams has so much praise for Cialdini.

    What about the book do you think is a crock?

    Interrsting that Scott Adams has so much praise for Cialdini.

    What about the book do you think is a crock?

    I merely had a problem with this work passing itself off as scientific. It’s all old school sales training stuff repackaged. You do realize that that Cialdini’s work was initially a sales training course from Dartnell Corporation from the 80′s don’t you? I’m not knocking sales training and salesmen, I have infinitely more respect for them than social “scientists”.

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  176. @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

    Of course it is.

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  177. @ScarletNumber
    Why is following the rules such a bad thing. There are plenty of people in society who don't follow the rules and I would rather not deal with them.

    Good floor, lousy ceiling.

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  178. @guest
    You might be surprised how many people have trouble doing or thinking to do as simple a thing as that.

    Indeed so. Married to one.

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  179. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    She played by the rules and then the rules changed?

    This seems to confirm what Bruce Charlton contends in his minibook: http://corruption-of-science.blogspot.co.uk/

    In short, he contends there that the vast majority of modern “scientists” are “not even trying” to get at the truth. They are instead trying to adhere to the social conventions of modern “scientific” institutions.

    This is really worth a full reading if you are interested in this issue. I’ve read it once and will probably read it again soon.

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  180. @ScarletNumber
    Why is following the rules such a bad thing. There are plenty of people in society who don't follow the rules and I would rather not deal with them.

    The rules in question don’t include making sure your results are replicable. The rules HRC followed don’t say anything about not taking bribes. Elizabeth Warren’s rules are fine with lying and plagiarism, because career is god.

    They’re not talking about the same rules as you. They’re talking about go-along-get-along and groupthink.

    Funny, I submitted that and then saw this just above, and had to edit:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/how-andrew-gelman-hurt-the-feelings-of-the-power-posing-lady/#comment-2049684

    he contends there that the vast majority of modern “scientists” are “not even trying” to get at the truth. They are instead trying to adhere to the social conventions of modern “scientific” institutions.

    Those rules.

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  181. Corvinus says:
    @Diversity Heretic
    Good comment. The reason that women hate hate hate beta males who upset the system is that a woman may make a perfectl reasonable mating choice according to an existing hierarchy, but if that hierarchy changes rapidly because of technological innovations, she finds that her choice was a poor one.

    “Whiskey vindicated again! I remember reading years ago on his blog how women actually preferred expressly hierarchical structures (like mediaeval courts) where status could be easily seen.”

    Whiskey? Vindicated? Men, not women, prefer hierarchical structures that focuses on the status of the group they are part of, not because they get tingles by being privy to high-powered men.

    http://magazine.utoronto.ca/leading-edge/teamwork-men-vs-women-jennifer-berdahl-cameron-anderson/

    https://www.helioshr.com/2015/06/a-review-of-gender-leadership-styles-common-traits-in-men-vs-women/

    “They hate hate hate beta males for upsetting this structure with inventions such as gunpowder and man-portable firearms, etc.”

    The social-sexual hierarchy that you tout is fraught with confirmation bias and subjectiveness.

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  182. Corvinus says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    Schwarzenegger's an interesting guy, and I can't help but admire him. He worked extremely hard in the iron game.

    One thing he did very well was to stay within his range as an actor. He became a multi-millionaire by knowing his limits. Years ago, I read about a documentary where a filmmaker casually interviewed celebrities, and let the camera roll as their inflated egos showed them up as total asses. Apparently Arnold was the only one who came off as having some sense of humility and gratitude for the opportunities.

    Remember his long-term affair with his dowdy maid? Look up pictures of the product of that union, Joseph Baena. Arnold knew.

    “Remember his long-term affair with his dowdy maid? Look up pictures of the product of that union, Joseph Baena. Arnold knew.”

    Arnold knew what?

    That he was like Trump and Weinstein in how he couldn’t keep it in his pants?
    That he had fathered a child while married?
    That he is part of the moral cesspool known as Hollywood?
    That his offspring with a “commoner” would be another Hercules?

    Please, by all means, tells us Arnold knew…

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  183. Dissident says:
    @SimpleSong
    Doesn't it rely pretty heavily on Steve though? I get the impression there's not some incredible AI behind the comment system, just Steve reading through the comment and posting or not posting in batches. Unfortunately Steve is not scalable.

    Disqus and LiveFyre are totally worthless, I agree. This site and Slashdot are the two sites that seem to have pretty good comment moderation and filtering and both of them rely on the human element; either one extremely good moderator (here) or a longstanding, organic community (Slashdot.)

    either one extremely good moderator (here)

    Are you sure that Mr. Sailer himself handles the comment moderation all alone?

    Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.

    Didn’t the disclaimer originally say “moderated by Steve Sailer? That is what I recall and I have wondered for some time whether the change to iSteve was made to reflect that Mr. Sailer no longer personally moderates all of the comments to his blog posts here but has help.

    (I have long wondered how one man, alone, could possibly manage to read through that many comments daily, on top of writing as much and reading as much as Mr. Sailer’s writing requires him to. Plus Twitter, the comment threads at TakiMag and watching films. To say nothing of playing golf and the inevitable countless other real world activities that our estimable host no doubt participates in daily. How does he do it?)

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    How does our estimable host do it?
     
    I understand that you wanted to say, that he maybe doesn’t (do it – all by himself).

    I don’t know.

    What I thought all the time was, that some algorithms help (him – or them?) to edit the pretty numerous iSteve comments. Could be, I think.

    Anyhow – the workload is exceptional (stunnig in my opinion, too), and wouldn’t be possible to unload on anybody by means of the law or a contract or something. This whole iSteve thing takes place somewhere else (in it’s own orbit, way out there. I struggle if I look for parallels. Jean Paul did read an awful lot, and wrote daily, day in day out. His vocabulary was even bigger than Steve Sailer’s I’d assume from what I’ve read. And then there’d be Karl Kraus and his just like isteve meta-critical & explicitly media-critical periodical “Die Fackel” – roughly 20 000 pages, most of them written by Kraus himself…Jonathan Franzen loves Die Fackel and even wrote a book about it: He#d be somewhat prepared, to have a look at iSteve and sort out the differences…

    Jean Paul lived in southern Germany (in and near Bayreuth in Franken), writing from roughly 1778 to 1825; he was definitely an ant-interventionist – and wrote about everything, almost, from astronomy to pop-culture to politics, aesthetics, philosophy, chemistry, pedagogics – but very little about sports…)

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  184. Dissident says:
    @whorefinder
    ROFL. Saudis attack U.S. in terrorist plot. Saudi Arabia home to terrorist training. As a result we attack....

    Afghanistan

    And never Saudi Arabia, the source of the attacks.

    Yup, no hint of the Saudis using their money to cover up their crimes. Oh wait, Bush 43 flew the Saudis literally out of the country right after 9/11 occurred, almost as if to protect them from scrutiny....

    Nice try with the coverup, son.

    Bush 43 flew the Saudis literally out of the country right after 9/11 occurred

    As opposed to merely flying them figuratively out of the country?

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  185. Alden says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    I heard about it in a class with Craig "Southnarc" Douglas, and if you know who he is you'll be aware he doesn't spout "liberal c**p."

    In a study, convicts were asked to look at a number of videos of people walking along the street and identify those twho looked like suitable victims. The people they consistently picked out were those with poor posture, walked with a slightly "off" gait, and looked as if they weren't attending to their surroundings.

    Not all muggers work in teams like you describe, though that's obviously an extremely dangerous scenario.

    Anyway, I'm surprised you make this sound like it's so outlandish. I don't understand why it set you off on such a tirade.

    27 years in law enforcement.

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Yikes.
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  186. @Alden
    27 years in law enforcement.

    Yikes.

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  187. @Dissident

    either one extremely good moderator (here)
     
    Are you sure that Mr. Sailer himself handles the comment moderation all alone?

    Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.
     
    Didn't the disclaimer originally say "moderated by Steve Sailer? That is what I recall and I have wondered for some time whether the change to iSteve was made to reflect that Mr. Sailer no longer personally moderates all of the comments to his blog posts here but has help.

    (I have long wondered how one man, alone, could possibly manage to read through that many comments daily, on top of writing as much and reading as much as Mr. Sailer's writing requires him to. Plus Twitter, the comment threads at TakiMag and watching films. To say nothing of playing golf and the inevitable countless other real world activities that our estimable host no doubt participates in daily. How does he do it?)

    How does our estimable host do it?

    I understand that you wanted to say, that he maybe doesn’t (do it – all by himself).

    I don’t know.

    What I thought all the time was, that some algorithms help (him – or them?) to edit the pretty numerous iSteve comments. Could be, I think.

    Anyhow – the workload is exceptional (stunnig in my opinion, too), and wouldn’t be possible to unload on anybody by means of the law or a contract or something. This whole iSteve thing takes place somewhere else (in it’s own orbit, way out there. I struggle if I look for parallels. Jean Paul did read an awful lot, and wrote daily, day in day out. His vocabulary was even bigger than Steve Sailer’s I’d assume from what I’ve read. And then there’d be Karl Kraus and his just like isteve meta-critical & explicitly media-critical periodical “Die Fackel” – roughly 20 000 pages, most of them written by Kraus himself…Jonathan Franzen loves Die Fackel and even wrote a book about it: He#d be somewhat prepared, to have a look at iSteve and sort out the differences…

    Jean Paul lived in southern Germany (in and near Bayreuth in Franken), writing from roughly 1778 to 1825; he was definitely an ant-interventionist – and wrote about everything, almost, from astronomy to pop-culture to politics, aesthetics, philosophy, chemistry, pedagogics – but very little about sports…)

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  188. hyperbola says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    Here is an excerpt from one article about the study. There is lots and lots of references to this on the web. Sorry I didn't provide a link before, but I didn't realize that people would have trouble believing this.

    Now, let’s talk about what criminals tend to look for. Much like a wild animal, a human predator wants an easy prey, which means they will seek out someone they perceive as weak, submissive, and unlikely to fight back. Because of this, any sign of strength or defiance the criminal perceives when approaching their chosen victim can in many instances be enough to turn around and look for a more suitable victim. In 1984, Betty Grayson and Morris I. Stein conducted a study to determine the selection criteria used by predators. As part of their study, they videotaped over 60 people walking on a busy New York City sidewalk without their knowledge over a three day period. This tape was later played for convicts of violent crimes who identified those they would consider desirable targets. Within seven seconds, the participants made their selections, and shockingly, there was a huge consistency.

    Contrary to what many would have predicted, in this experiment, some small women were passed over for larger men; the convicts did not base their decision on race, age, size, or gender. Instead, upon further analysis of the selected victims from the tape, they realized that they all had several things in common. Those selected as victims dragged or shuffled their feet, and tended to walk slower than the flow of pedestrian traffic, lacking a sense of purpose. Also, unlike those passed over, the selected victims tended to move awkwardly, with less coordination, balance, and confidence. Finally, they all had a slumped posture and walked with their eyes to the ground; a downward gaze implies unawareness, and can be perceived as submission, making for an apparently easy target. Basically, the criminals were assessing the ease with which they could overpower the victims based on nonverbal signals which the victims were not even aware of.
     
    http://firearmtrainingstore.com/about-us/blog/how-do-criminals-choose-their-victims/

    In other words, this “scientific study” has very little real basis and is a typical sociology/psychology scam. A grand total of 60 individuals were filmed and shown to an unknown number of “convicts”. The number and type of “attributes” considered to be displayed by the victims are unknown (at least at the link given). Whether the “result” is valid in any other location/society/group is completely untested. From this a tremendous house of cards of “truth” is constructed.

    This is how one generates profitable “snake-oil” scams.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    You could do one person social science experiments that would come up with highly reasonable results: tell J.K. Simmons to walk down the street like the kind of person a mugger would pick on and then walk down the street like the kind of hardass that no mugger would dare take on.

    Seriously, for hypothesis generation purposes in "human ethology," which is sort of like nature documentary making for human behavior, you could start with two skilled professional actors or comedians and just ask them to realistically improv various scenes.

    Once they come up with something new but plausible in your science, go recruit a sample to test the hypothesis.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    I really don't understand why so many at iSteve think the results of this study require debunking. Regardless of what you think of psychology studies in general, doesn't it simply make sense that presenting yourself in public like a healthy, strong, alert person is something you can do to help avoid being targeted by predators? How is this "a scam"? Who is "selling snake oil"? What is this "tremendous house of cards" you speak of? Go ahead, shuffle along down the sidewalk, slouching over your iPhone. What do I care?
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  189. @hyperbola
    In other words, this "scientific study" has very little real basis and is a typical sociology/psychology scam. A grand total of 60 individuals were filmed and shown to an unknown number of "convicts". The number and type of "attributes" considered to be displayed by the victims are unknown (at least at the link given). Whether the "result" is valid in any other location/society/group is completely untested. From this a tremendous house of cards of "truth" is constructed.

    This is how one generates profitable "snake-oil" scams.

    You could do one person social science experiments that would come up with highly reasonable results: tell J.K. Simmons to walk down the street like the kind of person a mugger would pick on and then walk down the street like the kind of hardass that no mugger would dare take on.

    Seriously, for hypothesis generation purposes in “human ethology,” which is sort of like nature documentary making for human behavior, you could start with two skilled professional actors or comedians and just ask them to realistically improv various scenes.

    Once they come up with something new but plausible in your science, go recruit a sample to test the hypothesis.

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  190. @Kylie
    Dogs raise their hackles to make themselves look bigger.

    My dog is a 70 lb. alpha female. I'm about 130lbs. She will obey my much larger husband whether he's seated or standing but she's occasionally reluctant to obey me when I'm seated.

    I took my dog to dog training school and the first thing the woman said was to stand tall and tell the dog in a command voice what to to to. Say it once and make the dog do it. Works with children too.

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  191. @Harry Baldwin
    Here is an excerpt from one article about the study. There is lots and lots of references to this on the web. Sorry I didn't provide a link before, but I didn't realize that people would have trouble believing this.

    Now, let’s talk about what criminals tend to look for. Much like a wild animal, a human predator wants an easy prey, which means they will seek out someone they perceive as weak, submissive, and unlikely to fight back. Because of this, any sign of strength or defiance the criminal perceives when approaching their chosen victim can in many instances be enough to turn around and look for a more suitable victim. In 1984, Betty Grayson and Morris I. Stein conducted a study to determine the selection criteria used by predators. As part of their study, they videotaped over 60 people walking on a busy New York City sidewalk without their knowledge over a three day period. This tape was later played for convicts of violent crimes who identified those they would consider desirable targets. Within seven seconds, the participants made their selections, and shockingly, there was a huge consistency.

    Contrary to what many would have predicted, in this experiment, some small women were passed over for larger men; the convicts did not base their decision on race, age, size, or gender. Instead, upon further analysis of the selected victims from the tape, they realized that they all had several things in common. Those selected as victims dragged or shuffled their feet, and tended to walk slower than the flow of pedestrian traffic, lacking a sense of purpose. Also, unlike those passed over, the selected victims tended to move awkwardly, with less coordination, balance, and confidence. Finally, they all had a slumped posture and walked with their eyes to the ground; a downward gaze implies unawareness, and can be perceived as submission, making for an apparently easy target. Basically, the criminals were assessing the ease with which they could overpower the victims based on nonverbal signals which the victims were not even aware of.
     
    http://firearmtrainingstore.com/about-us/blog/how-do-criminals-choose-their-victims/

    One of the times I got mugged in NYC was by two Amish. One stopped me to ask a question and the guy behind me grabbed me. I had been studying inside for finals all day and did not realize that the police had gone on strike as threatened. They did let me keep my driver’s license.

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  192. @guest
    You might be surprised how many people have trouble doing or thinking to do as simple a thing as that.

    Many, many females, even of the current supposedly liberated generation, have a hard time asking, and an even harder time saying a simple “No”.

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  193. @Diversity Heretic
    Good comment. The reason that women hate hate hate beta males who upset the system is that a woman may make a perfectl reasonable mating choice according to an existing hierarchy, but if that hierarchy changes rapidly because of technological innovations, she finds that her choice was a poor one.

    You misspelled HATE HATE HATE.

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  194. OT: Ann Althouse has a great clip (http://althouse.blogspot.com/2017/10/john-mcwhorter-goes-on-epic-tirade.html) of John McWhorter eviscerating Genius T Coates while Glenn Loury nods agreement.

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  195. @hyperbola
    In other words, this "scientific study" has very little real basis and is a typical sociology/psychology scam. A grand total of 60 individuals were filmed and shown to an unknown number of "convicts". The number and type of "attributes" considered to be displayed by the victims are unknown (at least at the link given). Whether the "result" is valid in any other location/society/group is completely untested. From this a tremendous house of cards of "truth" is constructed.

    This is how one generates profitable "snake-oil" scams.

    I really don’t understand why so many at iSteve think the results of this study require debunking. Regardless of what you think of psychology studies in general, doesn’t it simply make sense that presenting yourself in public like a healthy, strong, alert person is something you can do to help avoid being targeted by predators? How is this “a scam”? Who is “selling snake oil”? What is this “tremendous house of cards” you speak of? Go ahead, shuffle along down the sidewalk, slouching over your iPhone. What do I care?

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    The studies, often paid for by tax money held hostage, touted by the MSM generally fall into two categories: the common-sensical and the obviously wrong. (Either often are also trivial.) The latter is not the only category that requires debunking. Studies which in the aggregate uphold truth can also be full of falsehood, mistakes, and crimes against intellect.

    Without doing any experiments or research whatsoever, I can declare that good posture is associated with success. I might go so far as to say to a certain degree it may determine success. Which is fine in itself, and there may be no point in contradicting me even though it's just a half-assed bald assertion.

    On the other hand, if I were to assume the mantle of Science for my "discovery," you'd be honor-bound to contradict me even if I'm right.

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  196. Anon says: • Disclaimer

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  197. guest says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    I really don't understand why so many at iSteve think the results of this study require debunking. Regardless of what you think of psychology studies in general, doesn't it simply make sense that presenting yourself in public like a healthy, strong, alert person is something you can do to help avoid being targeted by predators? How is this "a scam"? Who is "selling snake oil"? What is this "tremendous house of cards" you speak of? Go ahead, shuffle along down the sidewalk, slouching over your iPhone. What do I care?

    The studies, often paid for by tax money held hostage, touted by the MSM generally fall into two categories: the common-sensical and the obviously wrong. (Either often are also trivial.) The latter is not the only category that requires debunking. Studies which in the aggregate uphold truth can also be full of falsehood, mistakes, and crimes against intellect.

    Without doing any experiments or research whatsoever, I can declare that good posture is associated with success. I might go so far as to say to a certain degree it may determine success. Which is fine in itself, and there may be no point in contradicting me even though it’s just a half-assed bald assertion.

    On the other hand, if I were to assume the mantle of Science for my “discovery,” you’d be honor-bound to contradict me even if I’m right.

    Read More
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