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Quotes by Eric Hoffer (1902-1983):

Mass movements can rise and spread without belief in a God, but never without belief in a devil. …

It has often been said that power corrupts. But it is perhaps equally important to realize that weakness, too, corrupts. Power corrupts the few, while weakness corrupts the many. Hatred, malice, rudeness, intolerance, and suspicion are the faults of weakness. The resentment of the weak does not spring from any injustice done to them but from the sense of inadequacy and impotence. They hate not wickedness but weakness. When it is their power to do so, the weak destroy weakness wherever they see it. …

It is easier to hate an enemy with much good in him than one who is all bad. We cannot hate those we despise. The Japanese had an advantage over us in that they admired us more than we admired them. They could hate us more fervently than we could hate them. The Americans are poor haters in international affairs because of their innate feeling of superiority over all foreigners. An American’s hatred for a fellow American (for Hoover or Roosevelt) is far more virulent than any antipathy he can work up against foreigners. It is of interest that the backward South shows more xenophobia than the rest of the country. Should Americans begin to hate foreigners wholeheartedly, it will be an indication that they have lost confidence in their own way of life. …

 
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  1. One of the joys of being an American who lives abroad is the target that is automatically painted on my back as being a part of The Indispensible Nation. For this privilege I am subjected to (partial) double taxation. Thank you, Uncle Sugar.

    • Replies: @Louis Renault
    , @Anonymous
  2. Interesting but mostly wrong. On the issue of the weak hating the weak for instance, I’ve observed that people hate the character traits opposite from their own. You’d also have to fail to recognize that there is a time for every manifestation of behavior. Of course these may not actually be Eric Hoffer quotes…

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    , @anon
  3. J.Ross says: • Website

    This statement about the Japanese is simply factually wrong, I am not sure I want to see what we would do to Japanese cities if we really really hated them to “Hoffer’s” satisfaction, and the overall point about jealousy represents the very argument that goes missing in complaints about certain movements.
    This is not the quote you were looking for: you’re clearly thinking of the wonderfully erudite Naipaul bit about Iranians hypocritically using Western technologies that they like while vaguely despising “the West.”

    • Replies: @David In TN
  4. @miss marple

    Agreed. This part particularly grates:

    Should Americans begin to hate foreigners wholeheartedly, it will be an indication that they have lost confidence in their own way of life.

    It sounds like something I’d read in the NYT, if I still read the NYT. Along with the ‘xenophobic’ slur against southerners. It quickly reduces in common parlance to: if you object to 50 million third-world immigrants swamping your country, it can only be because you hate your fellow man.

    It can’t possibly be, for instance, because you love your country and seek to preserve it. Couldn’t possibly be that. Much more likely that you’re a hater who is fearful of The Other.

  5. anonymous[182] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve never heard of this man and I’m already tired of him.

  6. This has been my viewpoint for a long time– you can only hate those above you, and I refuse to hate anyone. I read The True Believer and other Hoffer as a teen, so maybe that’s where the seed was planted, to sprout years later.

    I can think of a few times I mentioned something in the comments, and then a year or two later Steve brings it up– eg, Paul Pena. So maybe it’s worked in the other direction.

    Hoffer was a bit of a hobo in his youth. In his autobiography, he tells of nearly being engaged to a girl, then chickening out and skipping town.

    • Replies: @iffen
    , @TTSSYF
  7. @The Alarmist

    Uncle sugar isn’t taxing you twice.

  8. Paul says:

    “It is of interest that the backward South shows more xenophobia than the rest of the country. Should Americans begin to hate foreigners wholeheartedly, it will be an indication that they have lost confidence in their own way of life.”

    Psychobabble — and an interesting comment from a Jewish apologist for the ethnic cleansing of indigenous Palestinians. Where you stand depends on where you sit.

  9. Rosie O’donnell made millions pretending to be a nice fat lady. Ellen Degerneres did it too, makes one wonder about who hates whom. Well, not really. Ellen still enjoys network support despite being a nutjob. She just hasn’t player her hand as blatantly as Rosie did.

    https://www.breitbart.com/entertainment/2019/04/12/ellen-degeneres-trump-transgender-military-limit-is-hatred/

    Nolte made the observation that the news media always portrayed Obama as being popular, but he wasn’t. In fact, Trump is more popular now according to several indexes than when O was president at this time in his presidency.

    There’s probably a line graph to made concerning ‘out’ lesbians vs. lesbians everyone knows are lesbians, but don’t talk about it. Say Rosie/Ellen vs. Jodie Foster/Glenn Close.

  10. eah says:

    “weakness”

    • Replies: @eah
  11. B36 says:

    “It is of interest that the backward South shows more xenophobia than the rest of the country.”
    Damn right.

  12. eah says:

    OT

    Part of a thread about the sacrifice of Justine Diamond to the ‘diversity’ gods murdering Minneapolis cop Mohamed Noor.

    • Replies: @eah
  13. anon[335] • Disclaimer says:

    But it is perhaps equally important to realize that weakness, too, corrupts. Power corrupts the few, while weakness corrupts the many. Hatred, malice, rudeness, intolerance, and suspicion are the faults of weakness.

    This is straight out of Nietzsche and a basic truth of human nature people in our time need to understand.

    People who are strong do not hate the weak. How does the starting quaterback feel about the second string players? They are of no importance. If he notices them at all he wants to teach them what he knows or do them a favor. The weak are either proteges or non entities.

    “Honors to the strong, necessities to the weak”. So say the Romans, worshippers of strength.

    People who are weak cannot help resenting those above them. You cannot ignore the strong and if you have pride you cannot accept that they are better than you. You blame. You accuse. You hate.

    Judaism, Christianity, and modern secular liberals are weakness worshippers. “Blessed are the poor.” Strength equates with culpability, guilt, sin. Weakness equates with innocence and therefore virtue.

    These are simple emotional positions, guiding if not controlling the beliefs of people not much given to analysis or introspection, in other words, almost everyone around you.

    The crazy left wing people in our politics today are weakness worshippers. This goes a long way in explaining and predicting their politics.

  14. Eric Hoffer touches on several iSteve themes. Consider how one of his biographers, Tom Bethell, questioned his origins.

    The story of Hoffer’s early years is little known. Hoffer offered interviewers a rough outline of his first four decades, but his various versions contradicted each other. His date of birth is uncertain, often given as 1902 but more likely 1898. He claimed his German accent came from Alsatian immigrant parents, but it was often described as Bavarian. And the account he often gave of losing his sight at an early age and then regaining it several years later doesn’t fit with some of his other versions—or with medical probability. The man who startled readers with his insight into the truths of revolutionary movements took particular trouble to conceal the truth about his own background. Quite possibly he was born in Germany and never became a legal resident of the United States. …

    Will more information about Hoffer’s background turn up? That’s doubtful. There are signs that he was more than merely forgetful about his early years. In fact, I believe he was deliberately secretive. When pressed for more detail by journalists he would say he was confused or couldn’t remember much of anything. About later events in his life he had an excellent memory. Were there things he didn’t want us to know? One possibility that comes to mind is that he was an illegal immigrant to this country. But again, I have no positive evidence. Did he really teach himself botany, chemistry, and Hebrew on skid row in Los Angeles? One can’t help wondering.

    https://www.hoover.org/research/eric-hoffer-genius-and-enigma

    Possibly both an an illegal immigrant and Jewish. A brilliant mind whose philosophical musings have been mined by the likes of Steve Sailer, Pat Buchanan, and Peter Brimelow. Not really any contradiction there, but it feels a little ironic given the unfair reputations for “hatred” involving these Hoffer admirers.

    • Replies: @Hail
  15. anonymous[182] • Disclaimer says:

    It was a few decades before my time but my impression is that in the early to mid 1940’s my grand parents and their elders had a hatred for the Japanese that came pretty damn close to a fervor.

  16. eah says:
    @eah

    Einstein did those — Gedankentexperimente.

    • Replies: @eah
  17. My observation in politics is that the people you hate the most are those who are like you and should like the things you like, but who betray “the cause”, allegedly for reasons of personal gain.

    Thus the Nazis hated the Jews who were in many ways of a similar social background ie educated middle class. The Bolsheviks hated the Kulaks, namely the small peasant proprietors, who might have been expected to support communism but wished to advance themselves.

    Conservatives loath secular Left-liberals, and vice-versa, despite or perhaps because they are socially similar. Something similar to the “narcissism of small differences”, which has an obvious analog to the Darwinian notion of cons-specific competition for scarce places in an ecological niche.

    There is also an element of projected self-loathing in the hatred of ones own social type, in that they are likely to exemplify the character traits which one finds disagreeable in oneself. But conveniently located in an-Other person who is conveniently available for hatred. Conversely, as John Cale put it “I always fall in love with someone who looks the way I wish that I could be.”.

    People are perverse.

    • Agree: TTSSYF
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Harry Baldwin
  18. Meh. Here’s my past take on “hate” (#352):

    “Hate” can be the right word given the specific case, but one problem with the word “hate” in general is that it’s mockably melodramatically overused by the usual suspect drama queens (e.g. “Hate Has No Home Here” lawn signs or the ADL’s “No Place For Hate” slogan) …

    Contempt is the best attitude for the right towards intransigent enemies—amused contempt if holding power, ruthless contempt if in the fight.

  19. @Mr McKenna

    Liberals want to let the whole world into the US … except Russians, of course.

  20. @anon

    Hmmm. I take him to be saying something quite different in this case:

    The resentment of the weak does not spring from any injustice done to them but from the sense of inadequacy and impotence. They hate not wickedness but weakness. When it is their power to do so, the weak destroy weakness wherever they see it.

    Sort of like the unemployed white, working-class guy who hates black welfare-recipients more than he hates Wall Street grifters. But that would be close to the standard Frankfurt-School Marxist line on the white working-class: that, unlike Marxist theory would have predicted, they prefer to punch down rather than up. To be sure, I have never read the Hoffer; I’m just going by the quotation above.

    But I did read several books by Nietzsche, and I got something totally different from him: he seemed to be annoyed at the lower-class types who punched up. For example, he once likened socialists to a bunch of “little tarantulas” who like to bite those bigger (stronger) than them, then retreat back into the safety of their spider holes. His thinking was closer to that of Ayn Rand.

    I could be wrong, of course. But that’s what I understood.

    • Replies: @ATBOTL
  21. anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    @miss marple

    while “projection” is used ad nauseum by the left so needs to be carefully assessed it is a thing. If you grow up around the poor in particular or animals you will observe they are pitiless with the weak while as we all know the strong are suicidally altruistic for the weak. whe weak understand they could be a target at any time except when someone else is being the target

  22. iffen says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    you can only hate those above you, and I refuse to hate anyone.

    I see what you are doing here.

    • LOL: Kratoklastes
  23. TTSSYF says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Not sure about hate being directly only at those above you. I work to “hate the sin but love the sinner”; however, I find myself succumbing to feelings of hatred when I perceive the “sin” as being willful…whether the person is above me or not.

  24. TTSSYF says:
    @anon

    Very interesting comment, and probably the only quote of Hoffer in this article that I agree with. However, I don’t agree that all weak people resent the strong. I think it is limited to those weak people who are not honest with themselves as to why they are weak (genetics? circumstances? lack of ambition?) Admittedly, this is probably the vast majority of the weak.

  25. @Mr McKenna

    Agree, but if you read the reference to “their own way of life” to refer to the multikulti diversitopian NuAmerica that has replaced real America, then it can make more sense. I think many of us didn’t just “lose confidence” in this “way of life”, we never had confidence in it in the first place.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  26. Anonymous[715] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Alarmist

    Well you always have the marine corps…

  27. flayotters says: • Website

    Sounds like a proto-open borders progressive. Continue at your own risk.

  28. Anonymous[715] • Disclaimer says:

    This whole excerpt smacks of typical Jewish psychobabble and projection.

  29. Hoffer never cites anything. What, for example, is the proof that the Japanese admired us?

    He calls the South “backwards” without any single example.

    Unsupported assertion after unsupported assertion. It’s kind of like the writing you find in contemporary journalism.

  30. The Americans are poor haters in international affairs because of their innate feeling of superiority over all foreigners.

    Brits too! As a US citizen who lived for the first three decades of my life in the UK, I could never feel much animosity for foreigners, seeing that they were so comically ignorant and inept.

    Although we had many ‘racist’ jokes as children, they always seemed quite harmless to me, since I assumed that if we had jokes about Scotsmen, krauts and frogs (er… Goths and Franks), then they had jokes about us too, so it was a wash.

    Anyway, you can only feel sorry for Haitians that they did not have the footsteps of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Dickens, Darwin, Faraday, Fleming, Halley, Newton, Lister, Babbage, Baird, Berners-Lee, Florence Nightingale, Sherlock Holmes, Julie Andrews, and Victoria Beckham to follow in.

    Of course, some foreign countries did have their national heroes, like Hercule Poirot in Belgium, Maigret in France, Don Quixote in Spain, and Captain Ahab in the US.

    • LOL: Desiderius
  31. Paleoconn says:

    I would add that there’s a brand of American liberal that feels inferior to some foreigners. For example, the wealthy Manhattanite couple in The Bonfire of the Vanities who felt inadequate around their English nanny until one evening around the TV they witnessed her making disparaging comments about rioting blacks.

  32. @anon

    Judaism, Christianity, and modern secular liberals are weakness worshippers. “Blessed are the poor.” Strength equates with culpability, guilt, sin. Weakness equates with innocence and therefore virtue.

    More than conquerors, not less.

    Peddle your ignorant gruel elsewhere, we’ve got 2,000 years of dominance to defend and advance here.

  33. @Almost Missouri

    It hasn’t replaced it. It’s a global layer of ash spewed forth from the eruption of existential horrors in the first half of the 20th Century. New sprouts of life are pushing through.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  34. @Jack Strocchi

    People are perverse.

    Thankfully then that we live in four dimeinsions rather than merely three. We are learning machines.

    Your very insightful comment for instance will make me significantly less perverse going forward as it has made me aware of some holes in my thinking.

    There were institutions where our ancestors regularly practiced that process. They were known as churches.

  35. @Jack Strocchi

    Conservatives loath secular Left-liberals, and vice-versa, despite or perhaps because they are socially similar.

    I don’t know, I can’t hate Barack Obama as much as I hate George W. Bush or John McCain. The people that pretend to be on your side while consistently undermining it are the worst.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    , @Jack Strocchi
  36. ATBOTL says:
    @Digital Samizdat

    People who dislike blacks mostly do so because they have had negative personal experiences with them.

    Nothing to do with these psychobabble explanations.

    • Replies: @James Braxton
  37. @Mr McKenna

    You’re overreading it.

    Many of us are for strong borders because we love foreigners.

    Open Borders means there are no foreigners at all.

    Good fences make good neighbors.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Meretricious
    , @AnotherDad
  38. @Desiderius

    I’d like to believe this, but even accepting this metaphor, is the supply of existential horrors to erupt really exhausted already?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  39. @J.Ross

    In Eugene Sledge’s famous WW II memoir, “With the Old Breed,” he tells how the Marines’ bitter hatred for the Japanese was a motivating factor at the time.

  40. @Almost Missouri

    As with actual vulcanism it is difficult to know with any certainty. Life doesn’t give a shit, it’s a persistent bastard.

    That said, the emergence of the capacity for nuclear holocaust is hard to top. All since then is a species-level allergic reaction to that. The Jaffe Memo/TFR crashes most obviously.

  41. I’ve always said that it’s debatable whether blacks are more resentful of being enslaved by Europeans or being set free by Europeans.

  42. @Desiderius

    Open Borders means there are no foreigners at all.

    Sophistry at best. In reality, open borders means we get swamped with foreigners. Keep it simple, unless your intention is to obsfuscate.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  43. @Mr McKenna

    Agreed. This part particularly grates:

    Should Americans begin to hate foreigners wholeheartedly, it will be an indication that they have lost confidence in their own way of life.

    It sounds like something I’d read in the NYT, if I still read the NYT. Along with the ‘xenophobic’ slur against southerners. It quickly reduces in common parlance to: if you object to 50 million third-world immigrants swamping your country, it can only be because you hate your fellow man.

    Verbal discourse lacks the precision of math–lots of stuff is overloaded and “subject to interpretation”.

    Typical leftist\globalist trope that you are a xenophobe or “hate foreigners” if you object to open borders or mass immigration is a obvious non-sequitar. Logically ridiculous.

    I have my–varied–opinions and feelings toward various foreigners but i certainly don’t “hate foreigners”. (For starters i have friends and family who are foreigners.) Mostly i “wish them well”. But i love my nation and want to preserve it–in the best possible shape!–for the people it belongs to, most importantly for my children, my “posterity”.

    The plain truth–and it’s revealed very clearly when people open their mouths (or keyboards)–is that the love\hate emotions skew the other way:
    — the pro-borders people don’t hate foreigners, they love their nation and want to preserve it
    — the open-borders people don’t love foreigners, they hate their nation and its “deplorables” and want to rub it and them out.

    • Agree: Meretricious
    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  44. @Harry Baldwin

    I don’t know, I can’t hate Barack Obama as much as I hate George W. Bush or John McCain. The people that pretend to be on your side while consistently undermining it are the worst.

    Me too. Obama–huge narcissist–could be highly annoying when given his little lectures. But overall … meh. The guy isn’t really much of an American: Kenyan dad–if we buy the official story–crackpot American mom and granddad, raised in Indonesia and Hawaii. That he doesn’t give a shit about preserving America–not a big shock.

    I guess i can muster up some hate for these virtue signallers, who swooned over Obama.

    But the Bushes and McCain–and let’s not forget Paul Ryan–are traitorous cretins who pose as conservatives while working to destroy–not conserve!–my nation. The traditional hanged, drawn and quartered is too good for these odious creeps.

  45. eric says:
    @anon

    Christianity does not worship weakness, rather, humility. “Blessed are the poor in spirit” refers to someone who does not exault themselves. The patient and hopeful endurance of undesirable circumstances is not weak but rather inwardly resilient and strong. The success of the West is largely founded on the success of liberalism, which is based on individualism, which is based on Christian ideas about natural rights (William of Ockham, Grotius, Pufendorf, John Locke).

    Progressives are dominant politically today, but they promote top-down state solutions precisely because they are weak as individuals. The fatherless gender-fluid person of little ability who thinks they deserve things because of their group identity are pathetic, and deep down they know it. Thus they hate those who don’t subscribe to their self-destructive ideology. It’s narcissistic and self-destructive.

  46. @Desiderius

    Good fences make good neighbors.

    I use this one repeatedly myself, and i’d like to see conservatives/nationalists using it all the time as it is both ancient wisdom and immediately accessible to everyone.

    In general, analogies to one’s own home work well discussing immigration. I don’t hate foreigners and i don’t hate my neighbors. (Really like several of my neighbors.) But while i regularly have my neighbors over and would do what i needed to do to help them out in a pinch, they aren’t actually my family and aren’t entitled to take over my house. Neighbors–we help each other out, but your house isn’t mine and my house isn’t yours.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  47. eah says:
    @eah

    “Jussie”

  48. Anonymous[524] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr McKenna

    It sounds like something I’d read in the NYT, if I still read the NYT. Along with the ‘xenophobic’ slur against southerners. It quickly reduces in common parlance to: if you object to 50 million third-world immigrants swamping your country, it can only be because you hate your fellow man.

    The author (Hoffer) may be a Zionist Jew.

  49. @Meretricious

    You’ve got to earn imperative mood. Poor reading comprehension doesn’t cut it.

    • Replies: @Meretricious
  50. Sean says:

    You hate what you fear.

  51. @Desiderius

    One gets the feeling that the irony in your posts is lost on you. Oh well…one can only lead the horse to water.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  52. @AnotherDad

    Funny, after posting I thought I should have included Paul Ryan. I do hate him so.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  53. @Harry Baldwin

    Haven’t seen him since Mayor Pete showed up. Can we be sure they’re not the same person?

  54. I’m confused. Are we now supposed to police our own hateful thoughts to ensure they meet all the criteria of correct hate? Not that correct hate is to be tolerated, unless directed at whites, in which case it is mandatory. No, just that incorrect hate is to suppressed pre-thought as evidence of mental defect whilst correct hate is attacked post-expression.

    Ooh, ooh, I know. How about we reserve our hatred for those who tell us how to think and feel!

  55. Lloyd1927 says:

    “The resentment of the weak does not spring from any injustice done to them but from the sense of inadequacy and impotence. They hate not wickedness but weakness. When it is their power to do so, the weak destroy weakness wherever they see it. …”

    https://isthmus.com/news/news/family-threatens-to-beat-up-leopold-principal/

  56. @Harry Baldwin

    Spousal abuse based on a sense of betrayal or love gone wrong is the most common expression of hate at the personal level.

    The fact that conservatives like you detest “cuckservatives” like Bush more than bog standard Left-liberals like Obama is an explicit implication of my argument. It is no accident that emergence of the swear word “cuckservative” suggests that the sense of betrayal is the most powerful driver of ideological hate on the Right. Liberals mostly accuse conservatives of betraying the universal principles of liberalism, which is why their favourite debating tactic is to compare actual conservative practics to notional liberal principle.

    Blacks, gays, Muslims, indigenes, trans, etc are just pawns in this competitive social status game between conservatives and liberals, Most onservatives don’t “hate” blacks, gays, Muslims, indigenes etc. They don’t blame “Others” for being the way they are, being inclined to believe in the dominance of Nature over Culture. They are behaving “just the way God made them”, as my mother frequently opines. Neither do progressive liberals particularly love the “Others”, they may talk hippie but they act yuppie.

    More generally the Culture War between conservatives and liberals is driven by a bifurcation of loyalties in the West, basically over the value of our ancestors legacy. Both progressive liberals and conservatives stand in awe of our ancestors achievements – the creation of modernity and the conquest of the world.

    Conservatives revere our ancestors legacy and feel a debt of gratitude to them. We express our loyalty to our ancestors through our idolatry of the past in sacred national days of remembrance and monumental art eg. statuary.

    Lberals detest our ancestors legacy, hence their “never ending debate on cultural identity” and the constant need to apologize for the past. Liberals, whether Left-liberal bohemians or Right-liberal bean-counters, are loyal to their own selves, the greatest love of all.

    They detest our ancestors for their good deeds, not their crimes. Western civilization makes progressive liberals feel small and inadequate. They don’t like that feeling because they are narcissistic. They have a constant need to assert their superiority to our ancestors, to quell the nagging doubt that they don’t have the right stuff to do what it takes to make it. Post-modern art is thus the deepest reflection of liberal resentment of our ancestors achievement – it is in essence an act of vandalism.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  57. @Jack Strocchi

    Um, this is a darn good comment. Shrewd observations and they apply to a liberal guy I (unfortunately) work with with amazing accuracy.

  58. @Paleoconn

    Good point.

    And even Sherman feels subtly inferior to the snobbish Argentinian Arguello, who’s from a family Sherman perceives as being ‘lords of the Pampas’.

  59. @eric

    Very well-stated; thanks.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  60. Another way of looking at the Culture War between conservatives and liberals is their different perspectives towards societal space and historical time.

    Conservatives are inward-directed in societal space and backward-directed in historical time, thus concerned to conserve the legacy of their kindred ancestors from their tribe.

    Progressives are outward-directed in societal space and forward directed in historical time, thus concerned to construct a novelty for their alien descendants around the world.

    It is no accident that progressive liberals are attracted to globalist adventures in the UN, with transnational or NGOs. The world is their oyster.

  61. @Meretricious

    Okay, whatever. Guess you’ve got to live up to your handle which by the way cost me a perfect SAT back in my wasted youth, you tricksy bastard!

    We’re done here.

  62. @The Last Real Calvinist

    The individualism part hasn’t held up particularly well recently. Turns out dividing isn’t as important as integrating.

  63. Hibernian says:
    @AnotherDad

    One of the 4 does not belong with the other 3 and it’s Ryan.

  64. MBlanc46 says:
    @AnotherDad

    Horsewhip them before the hanging.

  65. Contempt is the luxury of the powerful.
    Hate is the reaction by the powerless.

  66. No one really understands hate any more than they do love. Too subjective/abstract. Although personally I detest people most when their character flaws start affecting me directly: Meddling in my affairs, status seeking at my expense, transgressing in a way that causes me to suffer over the other person’s behavior. The last one can apply to group consequences for an individual’s actions which may or may not be bad or wrong but which are nevertheless used as the basis for an accusation directed at a community rather than the person who “committed” the controversial action. As in war, the first casualty is truth since the accuser distorts and the lazy, clueless group wants out of the difficulties entailed asap which leads to more untruth while not ending the conflict. Contemporary political strategy consists almost exclusively of this tactic. Eventually everyone involved exhibits a reprehensible amount of bad character therefore all becoming equally hateful. Persecution of the originally accused can go on for decades after the original incident has been forgotten.

  67. This kind of pseudo-profundity was typical of the meditations of Eric Hoffer, a probable Jew who like most of his tribe is more huckster than philosopher. If God is love, as the Bible says, then what does that make you if you hate? The devil, or his slave. These words demonizing hate are meant to resonate with Christians and their cultural counterparts who adopt this part of the Christian worldview. It worked, too. For a brief period a few decades ago, he was a rising star. But it looks like his fifteen minutes are up, as few here appear to have heard of him. Good riddance.

    In reality, in “Nature, red in tooth and claw” as Tennyson put it, hate powers the universe. One who eschews hate opposes Nature, and is lawful prey.

  68. Hail says: • Website
    @Quai Smyrna

    Quite possibly he was born in Germany and never became a legal resident of the United States.

    Possibly both an an illegal immigrant and Jewish.

    Will more information about Hoffer’s background turn up? That’s doubtful. There are signs that he was more than merely forgetful about his early years. In fact, I believe he was deliberately secretive.

    23andMe might work.

    Tom Bethell apparently wrote that it was “doubtful” anything would “turn up” on Hoffer’s background in April 2012. While 23andMe-like ancestral-genetic testing was not brand new at the time, it was still more-or-less on the cusp of the current (late 2010s) fairly widespread and high-profile use thereof. As of 2012, it was still niche, unreliable, and low-profile. Unless Bethell was reading science-oriented forums, or hardcore geneology blogs, etc., he may be forgiven for not knowing what was in store for at little as +5 years, certainly +10 years, regarding ancestral testing.

    If the following s true about Eric Hoffer, we can theoretically confirm or discount the proposed Jewish origin for Hoffer:

    Hoffer, who was an only child, never married. He fathered a child with Lili Fabilli Osborne [1916-2010], named Eric Osborne, who was born in 1955 and raised by Lili Osborne and her husband, Selden Osborne.

    Step 1, Find this Eric Osborne; Step 2, 23andMe him; Step 3, wait. If Eric Osborne is ~20-50% Jewish, and if the Lili Fabilli Osborne line has no known Jewish ancestry (theoretically confirmable by testing some of her other close relatives), Eric Hoffer will have had substantial Jewish ancestry.

    The only problem: How do we know Eric Osborne is really Eric Hoffer’s biological son? Wiki states it, but is certainly an unreliable source in this case (among others). (Wiki mentions none of the uncertainties Quai Smyrna points to. Wiki seems to present Hoffer’s suspicious, curated life-story.)

  69. The Japanese had an advantage over us in that they admired us more than we admired them.

    No, they had total contempt for us. We Americans, at least before Pearl Harbor, tended to admire the Japanese as plucky upstarts who had punched the Russians in the nose and seemed to have a strong and unique culture. The Japanese thought we were a race of mongrel intruders who had no business interfering in East Asia.

    I think Hoffer has it completely backwards. You can only hate people you truly find inferior. The Germans truly hated the Poles, they never managed to really hate the English. I have always found that whites actually hate blacks far more than blacks hate whites. Most blacks deep down still want white approval.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  70. @Peter Akuleyev

    The accurate verb for hating down is despise.

  71. Liza says:

    This whole dumb set of quotes around “hate” and all the incoherent pilpul surrounding it is typical of someone with an axe to grind.

    [There is] a time to love and a time to hate.

    And that is good enough for me.

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