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From MSNBC:

THE 11TH HOUR WITH BRIAN WILLIAMS 8/2/17

Historians discuss White House Statue of Liberty comments

Jon Meacham and Michael Beschloss talk about the White House comments on the Statue of Liberty. Beschloss compares it to separating the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Duration: 6:40

You can watch the video there. It’s rather hilarious.

Highlights include:

Prof. Jon Meacham: “I don’t think you could celebrate liberty without celebrating immigration. We are in fact a nation, almost entirely, of immigrants.” …

Brian Williams (of all people): “Michael, when has Truth been doubted before, the way it has been doubted under this Administration by enormous segments of society?”

Prof. Michael Bechloss: “I think never in the history of the Presidency, I think it’s pretty fair to say that. And even what we saw with Mr. Miller was an example of that. His saying that the poem doesn’t count because it was put on later, you know, it’s sort of like the Bill of Rights was ratified four years after the Constitution, so Bill of Rights isn’t very important either.”

Uh … I guess I must have dozed through the history class when we discussed how Emma Lazarus’s poem was ratified by two-thirds vote of both houses of Congress and then by three-fourths of the states.

 
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  1. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Off topic: Check out this article if you haven’t Steve. Pretty deeply reasoned piece about isteve themes of citizenism and immigration, etc. I think the writer is a leftist too. http://theweek.com/articles/716164/lefts-immigration-problem

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM
    The one thing that pops to mind from that article is that if any sort of rational immigration policy will be considered racist, would it be possible to leverage that extreme thinking to close down the borders entirely?

    Shut off all immigration and then we're not discriminating against anyone in particular.
    , @IHTG
    TheWeek appears to be a strange consortium of leftists and AmConMag-style paleocons. Damon Linker embodies both of those trends.
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  2. I just want a separate nation from these nimrods.

    Let’s go ahead and split.

    Read More
    • Agree: ben tillman, Kylie
    • Replies: @Jake
    Yes, please. We need a peaceful break up of the US before the Left gets riled up enough to play Bolshie 1917.
    , @Henry Bowman
    How about we deport all the fake Americans?
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  3. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Beschloss compares it to separating the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

    Sure, it’s just like that, only completely different, because one is the basis of laws and Supreme Court decisions, whereas the other is, no matter how much you want to kvetch about it, still just a poem.

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don’t usually seem to be particularly dumb. Every so often, that fact just hits me as being astonishing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don’t usually seem to be particularly dumb
     
    The modern era seems to have particularly strong "See how smart I am" issue, having created into the virtue it is not.

    But not everyone can be doctor or an intellectual in this case. Many modern outlets have perfect a style of broadcast and/or writing that actively flatters the listener/reader into imagining they're the smartest person in the room.

    PBS is the #1 offender in that regard, but most mainstream outlets have it some extent. Pop non-fiction almost exclusively relies on an intimate writing style, with a relatively low reading level, that reassures the reader of the intelligence of themselves and the author.

    My vocabulary level is pretty poor. There are authors that force me to routinely look up words while reading. I haven't read much pop non-fiction recently, but I've never once had to crack open up a dictionary while reading them.
    , @anonymous

    … whereas the other is … still just a poem.
     
    Yep. About as meaningful (legally, philosophically, and artistically) as the "Governor Sigma welcomes you to the State of Delta" sign on the interstate.
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don’t usually seem to be particularly dumb. Every so often, that fact just hits me as being astonishing.
     
    I'll go another step - I'm astonished by anyone that still watches the TV, period.

    Uh … I guess I must have dozed through the history class when we discussed how Emma Lazarus’s poem was ratified by two-thirds vote of both houses of Congress and then by three-fourths of the states.
     
    Great stuff, Steve!
    , @International Jew

    no matter how much you want to kvetch about it
     
    The word you want is kvell, not kvetch.
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  4. Liberals have no problem violating the spirit of historical statues that they disagree with and even tearing them down. So even if the statue of liberty meant what they want it to, why are they pretending as though we’re obligated to do what old statues tell us to? That’s both absurd and hypocritical.

    Read More
    • Agree: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @neovictorian23
    Actually, tearing the Bitch down would solve this whole stupid question quite neatly.
    , @Corn
    Someone on twitter said that the modern Left "treats a Lazarus poem like Constitutional law and the Constitution like vague poetry".
    , @International Jew
    Right. Tell your liberal friends that, like the Constitution, Emma Lazarus' poem is "a living document".

    And that like the 2nd Amendment which didn't anticipate modern assault rifles, Emma didn't anticipate a world in which 90% of humanity looks nothing like her, shares few of her values, and would be happy to come to America by the billions.
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  5. Heavens. At the all-in network, even the beta males are on the rag.

    Read More
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  6. BenKenobi says:

    The Society-Navigator’s Guild:

    The diversity must flow.

    It’s the most important substance in the universe.

    Read More
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  7. Bugg says:

    Who needs some fancy Constitution, Congressional statutes and case law precedent when you have poems-

    Read More
    • Replies: @Johan Schmidt
    So THAT'S where Jeremy Corbyn got his asinine comments at Glastonbury Festival about evil right-wing teachers suppressing children's poetic urges.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. mobi says:

    Steve – step away from the amphetamines!

    Read More
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  9. AM says:
    @anon

    Beschloss compares it to separating the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
     
    Sure, it's just like that, only completely different, because one is the basis of laws and Supreme Court decisions, whereas the other is, no matter how much you want to kvetch about it, still just a poem.

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don't usually seem to be particularly dumb. Every so often, that fact just hits me as being astonishing.

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don’t usually seem to be particularly dumb

    The modern era seems to have particularly strong “See how smart I am” issue, having created into the virtue it is not.

    But not everyone can be doctor or an intellectual in this case. Many modern outlets have perfect a style of broadcast and/or writing that actively flatters the listener/reader into imagining they’re the smartest person in the room.

    PBS is the #1 offender in that regard, but most mainstream outlets have it some extent. Pop non-fiction almost exclusively relies on an intimate writing style, with a relatively low reading level, that reassures the reader of the intelligence of themselves and the author.

    My vocabulary level is pretty poor. There are authors that force me to routinely look up words while reading. I haven’t read much pop non-fiction recently, but I’ve never once had to crack open up a dictionary while reading them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @kihowi
    I've said this many times (because I'm proud of figuring it out): The surest way to get rich is to give white people a way to feel more intelligent than other white people without doing any real work.

    See: Daily Show, Ted, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Bill Nye, atheism, pop science, Reddit, documentaries, art house movies, "edgy" comedians, xkcd, BBC, and basically everything else.

    , @International Jew
    AM, are you Russian? I notice you missed a "the", and left out a "to" where the next word would be in the dative case.
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  10. Anonym says:

    I watched the video. It (and Michael Bechloss in particular) had me reaching for my They Live sunglasses.

    These guys in general were like a high school debating B team. The vaunted Pulitzer prize winner Meecham says “This strikes me a little as a ‘history by google’ argument by the White House”. Really? How dare the filthy peasants be able to read the Bible in English! It was better back in the days when there were three television stations and you had to know how to look things up in a library and have the time to spend a couple hours to find out that a high school girl wrote the poem in 1883 and that it was mounted in 1903, and that the statue itself was dedicated in 1886, a century or so after the constitution was ratified.

    How hard hitting is that, btw? Invite 2 of your friends over to have a one-sided discussion. These were the people who used to claim journalism is objective. It’s like they’re not even trying any more. They are starting to realize how inconsequential they are at least. If you look at the earth from space, how important is it that mentally ill men use women’s bathrooms, and the host of other liberal causes over the years including open bordersism?

    Read More
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  11. AM says:
    @anon
    Off topic: Check out this article if you haven't Steve. Pretty deeply reasoned piece about isteve themes of citizenism and immigration, etc. I think the writer is a leftist too. http://theweek.com/articles/716164/lefts-immigration-problem

    The one thing that pops to mind from that article is that if any sort of rational immigration policy will be considered racist, would it be possible to leverage that extreme thinking to close down the borders entirely?

    Shut off all immigration and then we’re not discriminating against anyone in particular.

    Read More
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  12. JohnnyD says:

    Steve’s concept of the “Zeoroeth Amendment” is no longer satire. It’s actually part of the constitution now.

    Read More
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  13. @Guy de Champlagne
    Liberals have no problem violating the spirit of historical statues that they disagree with and even tearing them down. So even if the statue of liberty meant what they want it to, why are they pretending as though we're obligated to do what old statues tell us to? That's both absurd and hypocritical.

    Actually, tearing the Bitch down would solve this whole stupid question quite neatly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corn
    No argument here
    , @mobi

    Actually, tearing the Bitch down would solve this whole stupid question quite neatly.
     
    Abdul-Mohammed-bin-Aziz-Mohammed-Abdulla-bin-Mohammed-al-Mohammed

    ...is on it!
    , @crowbar
    Interesting.

    Pulling down beloved old statues is all the rage nowadays.

    What would it take to mobilize public opinion to simply pry that crummy poem off the statue?

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  14. AM says:

    We are in fact a nation, almost entirely, of immigrants.” …

    Bull.

    Before the West closed, we were a nation of settlers. It’s one thing to adjust to a civilization already here, it’s quite another to create European civilization out of wilderness and hostile natives.

    And yeah, we killed people when they wouldn’t move on. And they killed us right back. The French and the Indians almost won. We were bottled up on the coast for almost 200 years. Only the technology advances after the Civil War created a huge imbalance in war capability between us and the Indians.

    The immigrants in the wave after the west closed shared some of the traits of the original settlers, but in order to enhance that immigration was shut down in 1927, I believe. Christianity was pushed in a top down way culturally to everyone but the Jews as way of encouraging a common set of values. American history was a big deal and taught unequivocally. Immigrants made it on their own, with no help from the government.

    Fast forward to now. Immigrants can expect welfare as a fall back, sometimes even illegals. Even the natives can’t seem to drive to a church and/or imagine that there might more problems than just a little cultural adjustment issue with Islamic immigration. American history reads more like: “Gosh, we were just the biggest jerkiest jerks ever.” The most frequent integration activity seems to be mall trips.

    Tired of the globalist re-writting of American history. We aren’t all immigrants, sorry.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    You make a lot of great points. I agree that we were better off when we were a Christian country, but as a lapsed Catholic I have no desire to return to the church. It's a major part of the problem now. What does it have to offer?
    , @Frau Katze
    The entire population of the planet, except perhaps the pygmies of Southern Africa are or have ancestors that immigrated, or moved from one place to another.

    We are a territorial animal. It's hard-wired into our thinking.

    These open borders people are very strange, in world historical terms. Most of the world would consider them crackpots, downright dangerous.

    For example, Europe is a continent of immigrants, who just moved in and replaced the Neanderthals.

    We have also been fighting with each other over territory for eons, before we diverged from the common pre-chimpanzee, pre-human line (chimps are very territorial).

    Open borders is yet another idealistic idea that ignores human nature. Communism was another.

    Communism failed and the situation will become very bad if open-borders is not stopped.

    Nor can it be reversed as Communism was, at least not without draconian measures, likely violence.

    The great failing of leftism is their refusal to admit that some things are hard wired in human nature and cannot be changed. No amount of screeching "racist" or "xenophobe" will have any permanent effect.

    Contrast with Adam Smith, who had a good grasp of human nature and councilled working with it, not trying to pretend that it doesn't even exist.

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  15. @Bugg
    Who needs some fancy Constitution, Congressional statutes and case law precedent when you have poems-

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QbNznz6cWHo

    So THAT’S where Jeremy Corbyn got his asinine comments at Glastonbury Festival about evil right-wing teachers suppressing children’s poetic urges.

    Read More
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  16. I read Meacham’s bio of George H.W. Bush recently. Not bad as hagiography, anyway. Skipped over any good secret NWO business, of course.

    Read More
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  17. IHTG says:
    @anon
    Off topic: Check out this article if you haven't Steve. Pretty deeply reasoned piece about isteve themes of citizenism and immigration, etc. I think the writer is a leftist too. http://theweek.com/articles/716164/lefts-immigration-problem

    TheWeek appears to be a strange consortium of leftists and AmConMag-style paleocons. Damon Linker embodies both of those trends.

    Read More
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  18. Many on the left are saying that Miller’s views on immigration (and, by extension, the RAISE Act), are extreme-o to the max. Like “how can you even have a conversation with someone who thinks this way?” extreme-o.

    I’d be willing to give on the “must speak English” requirement. I’d admit that’s inching into territory with no historical precedent (I think). But otherwise, the response to Miller’s press conference has proven once again that there is no middle ground, no compromising, when it comes to immigration policy. The left wants de facto open borders or nothing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    I’d be willing to give on the “must speak English” requirement. I’d admit that’s inching into territory with no historical precedent (I think).
     
    Isn't it the law?
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  19. DevilDog says:

    The Bill of Rights applies to citizens of the United States. It does not apply to foreigners seeking to enter the United States.

    It would be nice if the Trump administration would remind them that the rights of citizens, and the Constitution of this nation take precedence over foreigners, who only have privileges that we grant them at our discretion, and that we may rescind at any time.

    Read More
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  20. kihowi says:
    @AM

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don’t usually seem to be particularly dumb
     
    The modern era seems to have particularly strong "See how smart I am" issue, having created into the virtue it is not.

    But not everyone can be doctor or an intellectual in this case. Many modern outlets have perfect a style of broadcast and/or writing that actively flatters the listener/reader into imagining they're the smartest person in the room.

    PBS is the #1 offender in that regard, but most mainstream outlets have it some extent. Pop non-fiction almost exclusively relies on an intimate writing style, with a relatively low reading level, that reassures the reader of the intelligence of themselves and the author.

    My vocabulary level is pretty poor. There are authors that force me to routinely look up words while reading. I haven't read much pop non-fiction recently, but I've never once had to crack open up a dictionary while reading them.

    I’ve said this many times (because I’m proud of figuring it out): The surest way to get rich is to give white people a way to feel more intelligent than other white people without doing any real work.

    See: Daily Show, Ted, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Bill Nye, atheism, pop science, Reddit, documentaries, art house movies, “edgy” comedians, xkcd, BBC, and basically everything else.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Yeah, I've been racking my brain for years to figure out a way to make money off of all of this.

    The fact that I can't shows that whites (liberals and conservatives, btw) don't actually live by what they say. That's why I can't make money off of them.

    However, I hadn't thought about the entertainment angle, so kudos to you.
    , @Anonym
    Few people have gone broke telling others untrue things they want to hear. Making not-so-bright people feel intelligent is a subset of this.

    (And you, dear reader, by virtue of paying me money to read this written text, are so much smarter than everyone else! I want you to pat yourself on the back right now.)

    The downside of being a yes man is that others lose respect for you and eventually your bad advice comes back to hurt you.
    , @NorthOfTheOneOhOne
    It's even better when you can convince the Goodwhites that they're getting revenge on the Badwhites for something that happened to the ancestors of some Nonwhites.

    Case in point; Morris Dees.
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  21. J1234 says:

    Brian Williams lecturing the administration about…the truth???

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Stealth
    Good point. We can only think about so many things at one time, and I was so flabbergasted by the stupidity of the good professor's argument that I didn't even think about Brian Williams' fabrications. Man has gall.
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  22. Corn says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    Liberals have no problem violating the spirit of historical statues that they disagree with and even tearing them down. So even if the statue of liberty meant what they want it to, why are they pretending as though we're obligated to do what old statues tell us to? That's both absurd and hypocritical.

    Someone on twitter said that the modern Left “treats a Lazarus poem like Constitutional law and the Constitution like vague poetry”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MB
    Correction, the LibProgs think Lazarus's poem is Constitutional, while the real Constitution is just so much used toilet paper.
    So let's burn it.
    Cause that's what they do with used toilet paper in Mexico.
    At least those parts where lots of our recent immigrants have come from.
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  23. Corn says:
    @neovictorian23
    Actually, tearing the Bitch down would solve this whole stupid question quite neatly.

    No argument here

    Read More
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  24. Maybe I’m just a bit dense today, but I had trouble figuring out what, if anything, was actually being said by any of the people in that segment. It’s like they were conversing entirely in weird, esoteric aphorisms–none of which bore any obvious relation to the other.

    “Time has become so compressed.”

    “We’re in this odd, post-truth era.”

    “How an emergency, an exigency, can change the presidency, the conversation, and our country in an instant.”

    Huh? At least two of these guys are billed as public intellectuals (or something). Yet as far as I can tell, their arguments consist of little more than alternating between somber hand-wringing and sophomoric cliches. Can the standards for discourse really have fallen that far? Guess I hadn’t watched MSNBC in a while . . .

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I've made the point before, but I'll bang the drum again: These people are all Oswald Bates. Stop watching television; you are permitting people who despise you and want to dispossess and devastate you to micterate in your eyes.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. @kihowi
    I've said this many times (because I'm proud of figuring it out): The surest way to get rich is to give white people a way to feel more intelligent than other white people without doing any real work.

    See: Daily Show, Ted, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Bill Nye, atheism, pop science, Reddit, documentaries, art house movies, "edgy" comedians, xkcd, BBC, and basically everything else.

    Yeah, I’ve been racking my brain for years to figure out a way to make money off of all of this.

    The fact that I can’t shows that whites (liberals and conservatives, btw) don’t actually live by what they say. That’s why I can’t make money off of them.

    However, I hadn’t thought about the entertainment angle, so kudos to you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew

    I’ve been racking my brain for years to figure out a way to make money off of all of this.
     
    And I'd love to make money off the global warming hysteria, but so far Miami Beach real estate isn't being helpful; it's doubled in price since just 2010.
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  26. Brian Williams (of all people): “Michael, when has Truth been doubted before, the way it has been doubted under this Administration by enormous segments of society?”

    Prof. Michael Bechloss: “I think never in the history of the Presidency, I think it’s pretty fair to say that. And even what we saw with Mr. Miller was an example of that. His saying that the poem doesn’t count because it was put on later, you know, it’s sort of like the Bill of Rights was ratified four years after the Constitution, so Bill of Rights isn’t very important either.”

    Miller’s telling the truth is an attack on truth.

    2+2=5

    There is no starvation in Moscow.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    No executions or gulags either.
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  27. utu says:

    It is just a poem. This should end the discussion one would think but this poem was a part of world wide campaign on behalf of Jewish immigration from Russia and this changes everything. This makes the poem sacrosanct and untouchable not only because touching it may shed light on the dynamic of Jewish power in America.

    “On January 11, 1882, the London Times published an article entitled “The Persecution of the Jews in Russia,” and this is most likely the source from which Lazarus first learned of the atrocities that had been occurring in Russia for the previous eight months.”

    “In the wake of these events, Lazarus’s interest in Jewish culture, in helping Jews from across the world, and eventually in advocating for a separate Jewish nation picked up speed. ”

    “Since 1881 she had been working with Jewish refugees at the Wards Island immigration center; in 1882 she began studying Hebrew with Louis Schnabel, who was the superintendent of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum; in February 1883 she published an essay entitled “The Jewish Problem” in The Century, in which she argued for a Jewish nation”

    “in May 1883 she went to England to solicit support for “The Society for the Improvement and Colonization of East European Jews,” an organization she had established with several friends whose goal it was to resettle these Jews in Palestine. ”

    “she tackles the politics of immigration by turning this American monument into one that has the history of the Jews inscribed on it. By making the statue into the “mother of exiles,” Lazarus turns the nation into the home of exiles, a home not unlike what she had been imagining for Jews in Palestine. ”

    “Lazarus took this most public of opportunities to make the history of the Jewish people central to international politics.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    Emma Lazarus did not seem to care much about liberty in general or the Statue of Liberty in particular. She was asked to contribute her work to auction organized to collect money for the pedestal for the statue but was not interested at first but when the potential connection to the Jewish cause was shown to her she agreed.

    Writer Constance Cary Harrison also had to conjure an image of Lady Liberty to persuade Emma Lazarus to contribute. When first approached, Lazarus demurred. She didn’t write “to order” and made fun of her “portfolio fiend” friend. But Harrison had read Lazarus’s articles about the plight of Russian Jews abroad and knew of her volunteer work at the hospital on Ward’s Island:

    “Think of that Goddess standing on her pedestal down yonder in the bay, and holding her torch out to those Russian refugees of yours you are so fond of visiting at Ward’s Island.” The shaft sped home—her dark eyes deepened—her cheek flushed—the time for merriment had passed—she said not a word more, then.
     

     
    , @Chrisnonymous
    What are you quoting from here? Got a link?

    I don't think you need much historical context to see the poem's connection to specifically and narrowly Jewish immigration. It's obvious from the text of the poem, as I pointed out on iSteve previously:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/why-the-establishment-is-so-berserk-over-trump-talking-sense-on-immigration/#comment-1455828


    ...The original Colossus’ Greek dedication then talks about kindling the torch of freedom and independence, but does Lazarus give us a parallel freedom torch in her poem? No, her torch is simply a beacon to follow, rather like the pillar of fire that the Israelites followed to the promised land.

    Does the poem ask for the poor and huddle masses? Yes, but it also identifies the homeless, tempest-tost and calls the statue the Mother of Exiles… Were the poor of Europe homeless and exiled? No, but of course Jewish people were.

    The poem ends with the “golden door” to the USA. What is this golden door, this poem’s culmination, this strange imagery that we never notice because we stop paying attention after “breathe free”? I think given the propensity for religious imagery in 19th century America, we can say quite certainly that it is Jerusalem’s Gate of Mercy, which is also called the Golden Gate, one with Messianic importance for Jews.

    The original Greek Colossus’ dedication ends saying that the sea and land belong to the descendants of Hercules (in the vein of “to us and our posterity”) while Lazarus’ dedication ends saying that the land should be populated by foreigners who enter through the שער הרחמים. It is quite clear that Lazarus intended her dedication to envision not a statue to celebrate the homeland of its natives but a statue to collect and create a new homeland for Jews.

    And that brings us to my major objection to the poem, which is not actually its art or its Zionism, but the way that, in acting as an intentional inversion of the original Greek dedication poem, it asks us to see the Statue of Liberty as a feminist, pacifist, “cuck” symbol.

    While the Greek dedication praises the people for crowning their city with the spoils of an enemy who attacked them, Lazarus' poem begins with the double-entendre of “brazen”, suggesting the Greeks were shameless in celebrating their military victory. It then continues with the original complaint of “manspreading”, comparing the Colossus’ spread legs to the Greeks’ shameless military bravado, and saying that the USA would not have this masculine symbol, but instead “a mighty woman”, a “Mother”. And what will this mother do? Will she take care of us, her children? No, she’ll take care of the children of other nations, and we should praise her for it.

    I don’t hate the Statue of Liberty, as I don’t entirely hate past immigration to the US. However, I don’t like Lazarus’ poem, and I think the statue ought to be a symbol of American liberty as an example to the world, not a symbol of American largesse as a right of the world.
     
    , @International Jew

    “Lazarus took this most public of opportunities to make the history of the Jewish people central to international politics.”
     
    The history of the Jewish people has been "central to international politics" since the dawn of Christianity.
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  28. Stealth says:
    @J1234
    Brian Williams lecturing the administration about...the truth???

    Good point. We can only think about so many things at one time, and I was so flabbergasted by the stupidity of the good professor’s argument that I didn’t even think about Brian Williams’ fabrications. Man has gall.

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  29. utu says:
    @utu
    It is just a poem. This should end the discussion one would think but this poem was a part of world wide campaign on behalf of Jewish immigration from Russia and this changes everything. This makes the poem sacrosanct and untouchable not only because touching it may shed light on the dynamic of Jewish power in America.

    "On January 11, 1882, the London Times published an article entitled “The Persecution of the Jews in Russia,” and this is most likely the source from which Lazarus first learned of the atrocities that had been occurring in Russia for the previous eight months."

    "In the wake of these events, Lazarus’s interest in Jewish culture, in helping Jews from across the world, and eventually in advocating for a separate Jewish nation picked up speed. "

    "Since 1881 she had been working with Jewish refugees at the Wards Island immigration center; in 1882 she began studying Hebrew with Louis Schnabel, who was the superintendent of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum; in February 1883 she published an essay entitled “The Jewish Problem” in The Century, in which she argued for a Jewish nation"

    "in May 1883 she went to England to solicit support for “The Society for the Improvement and Colonization of East European Jews,” an organization she had established with several friends whose goal it was to resettle these Jews in Palestine. "

    "she tackles the politics of immigration by turning this American monument into one that has the history of the Jews inscribed on it. By making the statue into the “mother of exiles,” Lazarus turns the nation into the home of exiles, a home not unlike what she had been imagining for Jews in Palestine. "

    "Lazarus took this most public of opportunities to make the history of the Jewish people central to international politics."

    Emma Lazarus did not seem to care much about liberty in general or the Statue of Liberty in particular. She was asked to contribute her work to auction organized to collect money for the pedestal for the statue but was not interested at first but when the potential connection to the Jewish cause was shown to her she agreed.

    Writer Constance Cary Harrison also had to conjure an image of Lady Liberty to persuade Emma Lazarus to contribute. When first approached, Lazarus demurred. She didn’t write “to order” and made fun of her “portfolio fiend” friend. But Harrison had read Lazarus’s articles about the plight of Russian Jews abroad and knew of her volunteer work at the hospital on Ward’s Island:

    “Think of that Goddess standing on her pedestal down yonder in the bay, and holding her torch out to those Russian refugees of yours you are so fond of visiting at Ward’s Island.” The shaft sped home—her dark eyes deepened—her cheek flushed—the time for merriment had passed—she said not a word more, then.

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  30. Broski says:

    In a nutshell,

    Jews: one of us wrote an ethnocentric poem about how we should be allowed to colonize you 100 years after the Revolution and 2o years after the Civil War. That poem is de facto law.

    Founding stock Americans: what? Wait a sec. what is going on here?

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  31. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Apparently the historians have never heard of the 1924 Immigration Act, nor President Coolidge.

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    • Replies: @Barnard
    They would argue the 1924 immigration act was a shameful violation of this sacred poem and part of the legacy of Jim Crow (everything else seems to be part of the legacy of Jim Crow). That there haven't been calls to tear down Calvin Coolidge's boyhood home in Vermont are surprising. Maybe they will get to that after they finish off the Confederates.
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  32. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @anon

    Beschloss compares it to separating the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
     
    Sure, it's just like that, only completely different, because one is the basis of laws and Supreme Court decisions, whereas the other is, no matter how much you want to kvetch about it, still just a poem.

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don't usually seem to be particularly dumb. Every so often, that fact just hits me as being astonishing.

    … whereas the other is … still just a poem.

    Yep. About as meaningful (legally, philosophically, and artistically) as the “Governor Sigma welcomes you to the State of Delta” sign on the interstate.

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  33. Wilkey says:

    “Uh … I guess I must have dozed through the history class when we discussed how Emma Lazarus’s poem was ratified by two-thirds vote of both houses of Congress and then by three-fourths of the states.”

    In which class in law school do they teach the legal ramifications of the Emma Lazarus poem? Is it taught as part of Constitutional law?

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  34. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    We are in fact a nation, almost entirely, of immigrants.” …

    Entirely by definition is one hundred percent. Almost entirely must surely be defined as significantly above 50 percent.

    So have we ever been a nation in which significantly more than half of our population were immigrants?

    Additionally, if they are trying to suggest we are all immigrants because somewhere in our family tree someone came here from Europe, then why would the founders make a distinction in the Constitution about one having to be ‘natural’ born to be eligible to be the president? And why would Andrew Hamilton be celebrated today as Mr. Immigrant when in fact all of the Founders must have been immigrants by such a definition?

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    • Replies: @Clark Westwood
    When people say "we're a nation of immigrants," what they mean is, "Hey, you Micks, Wops, and Polaks, we let you in, so just shut up and step aside while we let the Muzzies and Mestizos in."
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  35. @Seth Largo
    Many on the left are saying that Miller's views on immigration (and, by extension, the RAISE Act), are extreme-o to the max. Like "how can you even have a conversation with someone who thinks this way?" extreme-o.

    I'd be willing to give on the "must speak English" requirement. I'd admit that's inching into territory with no historical precedent (I think). But otherwise, the response to Miller's press conference has proven once again that there is no middle ground, no compromising, when it comes to immigration policy. The left wants de facto open borders or nothing.

    I’d be willing to give on the “must speak English” requirement. I’d admit that’s inching into territory with no historical precedent (I think).

    Isn’t it the law?

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  36. Barnard says:
    @Anonymous
    Apparently the historians have never heard of the 1924 Immigration Act, nor President Coolidge.

    They would argue the 1924 immigration act was a shameful violation of this sacred poem and part of the legacy of Jim Crow (everything else seems to be part of the legacy of Jim Crow). That there haven’t been calls to tear down Calvin Coolidge’s boyhood home in Vermont are surprising. Maybe they will get to that after they finish off the Confederates.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Maybe they could extend the punishment to FDR, Truman, and JFK, who basically retained the 1924 policy.
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  37. mobi says:
    @neovictorian23
    Actually, tearing the Bitch down would solve this whole stupid question quite neatly.

    Actually, tearing the Bitch down would solve this whole stupid question quite neatly.

    Abdul-Mohammed-bin-Aziz-Mohammed-Abdulla-bin-Mohammed-al-Mohammed

    …is on it!

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  38. Glaivester says: • Website

    I like the way that Miller started referring to the poem as the “Statue of Liberty Law of the Land” when asking whether or not times of lower immigration had violated it. I wonder if Acosta or any of the other leftists understood that they were being mocked.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I like the way that Miller started referring to the poem as the “Statue of Liberty Law of the Land” when asking whether or not times of lower immigration had violated it. I wonder if Acosta or any of the other leftists understood that they were being mocked.
     
    Probably not. It's so far out of their pale of thought that they probably can't grok it. As Ann Coulter said (wrote, tweeted?), it would be nice if more of Trump's people were as smart as Miller is.
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  39. Anonym says:
    @kihowi
    I've said this many times (because I'm proud of figuring it out): The surest way to get rich is to give white people a way to feel more intelligent than other white people without doing any real work.

    See: Daily Show, Ted, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Bill Nye, atheism, pop science, Reddit, documentaries, art house movies, "edgy" comedians, xkcd, BBC, and basically everything else.

    Few people have gone broke telling others untrue things they want to hear. Making not-so-bright people feel intelligent is a subset of this.

    (And you, dear reader, by virtue of paying me money to read this written text, are so much smarter than everyone else! I want you to pat yourself on the back right now.)

    The downside of being a yes man is that others lose respect for you and eventually your bad advice comes back to hurt you.

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  40. anonguy says:

    I like the way that Miller started referring to the poem as the “Statue of Liberty Law of the Land” when asking whether or not times of lower immigration had violated it. I wonder if Acosta or any of the other leftists understood that they were being mocked.

    I liked that as well and wondered the same thing. My impression was no, they didn’t. That is how yawning the cognitive gap is. They exist in an entirely different world.

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  41. I don’t like the verses in that poem by a Jew about immigration into America.

    I like these verses by a Jew about immigration into America. They’re more honest.

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  42. “I guess I must have dozed through the history class when we discussed how Emma Lazarus’s poem was ratified by two-thirds vote of both houses of Congress and then by three-fourths of the states.”

    It came at the very end of the class before dismissal. Was expressed in the phrase “The Narrative is what we say it is and don’t anyone here forget it!”

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  43. @anon

    Beschloss compares it to separating the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
     
    Sure, it's just like that, only completely different, because one is the basis of laws and Supreme Court decisions, whereas the other is, no matter how much you want to kvetch about it, still just a poem.

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don't usually seem to be particularly dumb. Every so often, that fact just hits me as being astonishing.

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don’t usually seem to be particularly dumb. Every so often, that fact just hits me as being astonishing.

    I’ll go another step – I’m astonished by anyone that still watches the TV, period.

    Uh … I guess I must have dozed through the history class when we discussed how Emma Lazarus’s poem was ratified by two-thirds vote of both houses of Congress and then by three-fourths of the states.

    Great stuff, Steve!

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  44. If enough judges say a poem trumps the constitution then it effectively becomes true. If enough people favor ‘fairness’ over constitutionality then fairness becomes the new constitution.

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  45. @AM

    We are in fact a nation, almost entirely, of immigrants.” …
     
    Bull.

    Before the West closed, we were a nation of settlers. It's one thing to adjust to a civilization already here, it's quite another to create European civilization out of wilderness and hostile natives.

    And yeah, we killed people when they wouldn't move on. And they killed us right back. The French and the Indians almost won. We were bottled up on the coast for almost 200 years. Only the technology advances after the Civil War created a huge imbalance in war capability between us and the Indians.

    The immigrants in the wave after the west closed shared some of the traits of the original settlers, but in order to enhance that immigration was shut down in 1927, I believe. Christianity was pushed in a top down way culturally to everyone but the Jews as way of encouraging a common set of values. American history was a big deal and taught unequivocally. Immigrants made it on their own, with no help from the government.

    Fast forward to now. Immigrants can expect welfare as a fall back, sometimes even illegals. Even the natives can't seem to drive to a church and/or imagine that there might more problems than just a little cultural adjustment issue with Islamic immigration. American history reads more like: "Gosh, we were just the biggest jerkiest jerks ever." The most frequent integration activity seems to be mall trips.

    Tired of the globalist re-writting of American history. We aren't all immigrants, sorry.

    You make a lot of great points. I agree that we were better off when we were a Christian country, but as a lapsed Catholic I have no desire to return to the church. It’s a major part of the problem now. What does it have to offer?

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    • Replies: @Jake
    If Christianity is true, then Christ founded a church that was meant to be the vehicle through which Christian teachings would, however slowly, civilize all parts of the world in which they came to rule. That means that to choose not to participate in that church is to be AWOL.

    Snd good people going AWOL always means the enemy has a much easier time.

    You should go back to the Church and demand that you hear the Gospel and the defined morals that go with it.

    Every person like you not doing that is necessary to every whiney Liberal shit being heard and more easily petted by bleeding heart clergymen.
    , @Anon
    Via, et veritas, et vita.
    , @AM

    I agree that we were better off when we were a Christian country, but as a lapsed Catholic I have no desire to return to the church. It’s a major part of the problem now. What does it have to offer?
     
    Yep, the church is a part of the modern problem, partially because so many Catholic clerics and Bishops don't believe the faith. It's clear that many man have allowed themselves to have whole careers in the church without actually believing the faith. I walked away when I didn't believe in what the church taught, knowing it was at least honest. I have no idea what these men will say when their time comes.

    Anyway, the Priests scandals, the watered down liturgy, the kumba ya social justice/immigration non-sense is coming from Priests/Bishops with no sense of the faith. It will probably get worse for a while longer until the money runs out completely.

    That said, think about going to church anyway. It's good for you personally and it's not that hard once the habit is re-formed. Christ is still there and given His sacrifice and those of the saints, annoying people for an hour on Sunday isn't that bad. We're in desperate need of simple good examples. If you're young enough as regular church go-er, you'll be there to help rebuild.

    Find the best parish you can and give it just a enough money to keep the lights on. Give directly to orthodox orders if you're so inclined and do your best to starve the beast called the Bishop's fund. No need to participate in the many one-off activities that are now the part of churches, now that they've forgotten they're supposed to save souls by encouraging people to follow the 10 commandments.

    If you're looking for better explanations of the faith, The Church Militant is a masculine shot in the arm. You maybe off put by his tone, but he's 100% on Catholic doctrine. I have not watched any of his old clips, but Bishop Fulton Sheen is on YouTube and he spent most of his life explaining the faith. He was responsible for a lot of conversions in the 1950's and all he did was just explain Catholicism on TV. CS Lewis was not a Catholic, but he has wonderful line of apologetic works, if you've never read them.

    Anyway, I am totally agreed on modern institution that is the American Catholic church. I wish I could do something other than pray and watch (and encourage) it's collapse, but that seems to be The Current Year.
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  46. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Whew! Thank God I wasn’t the only one who dozed off during that class.

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  47. D. K. says:

    “Historian” Jon Meacham has a B.A., from the University of the South, according to Wikipedia.org (with his undergraduate major unlisted therein).

    “Historian” Michael Beschloss has a bachelor’s degree, in Political Science, from Williams College, and an M.B.A., from the Harvard Business School, according to that same popular source.

    When I was majoring in History (and English), at Purdue University, forty years ago, people with the academic credentials of Mssrs. Meacham and Beschloss were NOT referred to as “historians.” Likewise, those of us who graduated with a major in History, at the undergraduate level, did not refer to ourselves as “historians.”

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    • Replies: @Dr. X

    “Historian” Jon Meacham has a B.A., from the University of the South, according to Wikipedia.org (with his undergraduate major unlisted therein).

    “Historian” Michael Beschloss has a bachelor’s degree, in Political Science, from Williams College, and an M.B.A., from the Harvard Business School, according to that same popular source.

    When I was majoring in History (and English), at Purdue University, forty years ago, people with the academic credentials of Mssrs. Meacham and Beschloss were NOT referred to as “historians.” Likewise, those of us who graduated with a major in History, at the undergraduate level, did not refer to ourselves as “historians.”

     

    Amen to that. As someone who actually wrote a 300 page academic dissertation, I can say that these guys are frauds. I read one of Meacham's books once -- well, half of one -- before I tossed it. The guy's a f-king poser. So is Beschloss. Williams, of course, got canned for lying on the air -- what's he doing back??

    These guys are the kind of sophists Socrates would have eviscerated.

    , @guest
    Don't go all credentialist on us. Historians are as historians do. By their bookish fruits you shall know them.

    Meacham is a readable pop historian. Beschloss is at the knuckle-dragger level of reading comprehension.
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  48. Jake says:
    @AnotherDad
    I just want a separate nation from these nimrods.

    Let's go ahead and split.

    Yes, please. We need a peaceful break up of the US before the Left gets riled up enough to play Bolshie 1917.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Not gonna happen. The two dominant ideologies are "Leave me alone and Ill leave you alone" and "We deserve to hold your leash because we went to Harvard". If you think Blue America is just gonna accept that people are living without their "enlightenment" you have been asleep for the the last few decades.

    Sorry but the answer to 1917 Bolshie is going to end up being 1973 Chile. I know that fact sends Boomers for the fainting couch but that's where its going.
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  49. Jake says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    You make a lot of great points. I agree that we were better off when we were a Christian country, but as a lapsed Catholic I have no desire to return to the church. It's a major part of the problem now. What does it have to offer?

    If Christianity is true, then Christ founded a church that was meant to be the vehicle through which Christian teachings would, however slowly, civilize all parts of the world in which they came to rule. That means that to choose not to participate in that church is to be AWOL.

    Snd good people going AWOL always means the enemy has a much easier time.

    You should go back to the Church and demand that you hear the Gospel and the defined morals that go with it.

    Every person like you not doing that is necessary to every whiney Liberal shit being heard and more easily petted by bleeding heart clergymen.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    If his experience is like mine, though, he was driven aeay from the church, by a heretical congregation and clergy.What is he to do? Attend each week, as the surly man in the back pew no one will socialise with and everyone wishes would go away? If he earnestly tries to continue making his points, he may well be physically barred. You are asking him to go and reason with irrational people who hate him.
    , @Bob S
    Well yeah, but there was a reason for the Protestant Reformation.
    Long story short, Rome's gospel of justification by faithful attendance at the mass's re-sacrifice of Christ is not Christ's gospel of justification by faith alone in Christ's completed work in his life and death for which there is no substitute, supplement or addition to.
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  50. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Barnard
    They would argue the 1924 immigration act was a shameful violation of this sacred poem and part of the legacy of Jim Crow (everything else seems to be part of the legacy of Jim Crow). That there haven't been calls to tear down Calvin Coolidge's boyhood home in Vermont are surprising. Maybe they will get to that after they finish off the Confederates.

    Maybe they could extend the punishment to FDR, Truman, and JFK, who basically retained the 1924 policy.

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  51. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Does the left denounce amendment -1, the national anthem?

    O thus be it ever when freemen shall stand
    Between their lov’d home and the war’s desolation!
    Blest with vict’ry and peace may the heav’n rescued land
    Praise the power that hath made and preserv’d us a nation!
    Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
    And this be our motto – “In God is our trust,”
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
    O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    What are some other incriminating poems that the progressives
    unconstitutionally oppose?

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  52. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Harry Baldwin
    You make a lot of great points. I agree that we were better off when we were a Christian country, but as a lapsed Catholic I have no desire to return to the church. It's a major part of the problem now. What does it have to offer?

    Via, et veritas, et vita.

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  53. Dr. X says:
    @D. K.
    "Historian" Jon Meacham has a B.A., from the University of the South, according to Wikipedia.org (with his undergraduate major unlisted therein).

    "Historian" Michael Beschloss has a bachelor's degree, in Political Science, from Williams College, and an M.B.A., from the Harvard Business School, according to that same popular source.

    When I was majoring in History (and English), at Purdue University, forty years ago, people with the academic credentials of Mssrs. Meacham and Beschloss were NOT referred to as "historians." Likewise, those of us who graduated with a major in History, at the undergraduate level, did not refer to ourselves as "historians."

    “Historian” Jon Meacham has a B.A., from the University of the South, according to Wikipedia.org (with his undergraduate major unlisted therein).

    “Historian” Michael Beschloss has a bachelor’s degree, in Political Science, from Williams College, and an M.B.A., from the Harvard Business School, according to that same popular source.

    When I was majoring in History (and English), at Purdue University, forty years ago, people with the academic credentials of Mssrs. Meacham and Beschloss were NOT referred to as “historians.” Likewise, those of us who graduated with a major in History, at the undergraduate level, did not refer to ourselves as “historians.”

    Amen to that. As someone who actually wrote a 300 page academic dissertation, I can say that these guys are frauds. I read one of Meacham’s books once — well, half of one — before I tossed it. The guy’s a f-king poser. So is Beschloss. Williams, of course, got canned for lying on the air — what’s he doing back??

    These guys are the kind of sophists Socrates would have eviscerated.

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    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Bitfu
    I think Beschloss is a noted historian because of his comprehensive work on the IQs of all the US Presidents. An amazing work of scholarship. Somehow Beschloss managed to unearth the actual presidential IQ tests all the way back to Washington. [Those tests from the late 1700s had a lot of troubling cultural bias baked in, so I don't know what to make of those.]

    ANYWAYS...At this point, you must be wondering who holds the IQ Title Belt for the smartest US President of all time. Here you go...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c50JUQohYwY
    , @Desiderius
    Network TV is now for people LARPing intellect.
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  54. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Valley Forge, Custer’s ranks,
    San Juan Hill and Patton’s tanks,
    And the Army went rolling along
    Minute men, from the start,
    Always fighting from the heart,
    And the Army keeps rolling along.

    Men in rags, men who froze,
    Still that Army met its foes,
    And the Army went rolling along.
    Faith in God, then we’re right,
    And we’ll fight with all our might,
    As the Army keeps rolling along.

    That includes support statements for the Native American killer Custer, the US attack on Cuba in the late 1890′s, and an insistence on faith. Those are all constitutional amendments that all Americans must support.

    Also constitutional Americans must support the existence of armed Minute Men. They were members of militias that were not recognized by the evil Royalist government of the era, and they owned arms, including rifles, that were banned.

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  55. Beschloss is the one who said that Obama was the smartest person to ever be elected president.

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    • Replies: @guest
    "Beschloss is the one who said that Obama was the smartest person to ever be elected president."

    Indeed he was. Obama, don't you know, invented or improved upon the dumbwaiter, the polygraph, the revolving bookstand, the pedometer, some kind of plow, and the wheel cipher.

    He was an agronomist.

    He introduced neoclassical architecture, macaroni and cheese, French cuisine, and vanilla to America.

    He wrote the Declaration of Independence and the Notes on Virginia.

    He founded the University of Virginia and helped found the Library of Congress.

    Must have been a smart guy.

    ...Wait a minute...that was Thomas Jefferson!

    Oh well, with a name like "Jefferson" he must have been black, too. Still counts.
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  56. Stealth says:

    We should have open borders. No one is allowed to question it. Why, it would be equivalent to questioning the Bill of Rights!

    What an interesting choice for a comparison, given the fact that most immigration enthusiasts likely consider the Bill of Rights to be a regretable mistake on the part of the Founding Fathers, those white devils.

    Making the idea of mass immigration sacrosanct and beyond challenge, for sentimental reasons, is just really f***ing stupid. I’ll bet Professor What’s-his-face doesn’t treat the First and Second amendments with quite the same reverence.

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  57. Mr. Anon says:

    I think I remember this from one of those School-House Rock spots from the 1970s: “How a Bill Becomes a Law”. First an amateur poet submits a poem to a contest that is part of a promotional campaign for a statue. It is not selected. Eventually, the poets friends (and/or co-ethnics) lobby to have a plaque with the poem added to the base of the statue…………………..and then the sentiments expressed in the poem become simlutaneously the law of the land and a foundational principle of the Republic.

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    • Replies: @Kylie
    I know I've said it before, Mr. Anon, but you never disappoint.
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  58. crowbar says:
    @neovictorian23
    Actually, tearing the Bitch down would solve this whole stupid question quite neatly.

    Interesting.

    Pulling down beloved old statues is all the rage nowadays.

    What would it take to mobilize public opinion to simply pry that crummy poem off the statue?

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  59. guest says:

    Tonight on MSNBC: court historians patch up the pierced veil of Narrative.

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  60. guest says:
    @D. K.
    "Historian" Jon Meacham has a B.A., from the University of the South, according to Wikipedia.org (with his undergraduate major unlisted therein).

    "Historian" Michael Beschloss has a bachelor's degree, in Political Science, from Williams College, and an M.B.A., from the Harvard Business School, according to that same popular source.

    When I was majoring in History (and English), at Purdue University, forty years ago, people with the academic credentials of Mssrs. Meacham and Beschloss were NOT referred to as "historians." Likewise, those of us who graduated with a major in History, at the undergraduate level, did not refer to ourselves as "historians."

    Don’t go all credentialist on us. Historians are as historians do. By their bookish fruits you shall know them.

    Meacham is a readable pop historian. Beschloss is at the knuckle-dragger level of reading comprehension.

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  61. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    How long till Marvel rolls out a comic heroine or crime-fighting mech robot (Lazatron XL?) endowed with such super powers deemed conducive to the enforcement of the 1892 Statue-Poetry Act upon Amerikkka… Or would it be enough just to put her on the $20 bill instead

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Well, DC is putting out a TV show featuring a Muslim woman formerly named "Isis". Is that close enough?

    http://www.salon.com/2017/06/07/dc-legends-of-tomorrow-cw-zari-adrianna-tomaz-tala-ashe/

    I note that the executives of DC want to thrill us with the first female Islamic superhero on TV, but aren't willing to risk any money by making her adhere to Islamic notions of physical modesty.
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  62. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Just think– if only Joe Paterno had thought to prophylactically include some Emma L.-penned constitutional verbiage at the pedestal of his own statue

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  63. guest says:
    @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    Beschloss is the one who said that Obama was the smartest person to ever be elected president.

    “Beschloss is the one who said that Obama was the smartest person to ever be elected president.”

    Indeed he was. Obama, don’t you know, invented or improved upon the dumbwaiter, the polygraph, the revolving bookstand, the pedometer, some kind of plow, and the wheel cipher.

    He was an agronomist.

    He introduced neoclassical architecture, macaroni and cheese, French cuisine, and vanilla to America.

    He wrote the Declaration of Independence and the Notes on Virginia.

    He founded the University of Virginia and helped found the Library of Congress.

    Must have been a smart guy.

    …Wait a minute…that was Thomas Jefferson!

    Oh well, with a name like “Jefferson” he must have been black, too. Still counts.

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  64. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    If you try to remove that plaque, I’m picturing Lady Liberty slowly lurching to life, crossing over to Battery Park, I guess then climbing up the new WTC before being shot down by the NYPD Vintage Biplane Unit

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    • Replies: @anon
    I’m picturing Lady Liberty slowly lurching to life, crossing over to Battery Park,

    Wow. Chills went down my spine when I read that.

    Don't you remember how the Statue Of Liberty coming to life was the climax of Ghostbusters II?

    Somewhere, Paul Feig is cooking up the sequel to the Ghostbusters reboot, and trying to figure out a way to wedge that into the plot. I know he is. What with Lady Liberty being in the news all of a sudden, and the potential for the ultimate girl power visual, he just has to be.
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  65. @utu
    It is just a poem. This should end the discussion one would think but this poem was a part of world wide campaign on behalf of Jewish immigration from Russia and this changes everything. This makes the poem sacrosanct and untouchable not only because touching it may shed light on the dynamic of Jewish power in America.

    "On January 11, 1882, the London Times published an article entitled “The Persecution of the Jews in Russia,” and this is most likely the source from which Lazarus first learned of the atrocities that had been occurring in Russia for the previous eight months."

    "In the wake of these events, Lazarus’s interest in Jewish culture, in helping Jews from across the world, and eventually in advocating for a separate Jewish nation picked up speed. "

    "Since 1881 she had been working with Jewish refugees at the Wards Island immigration center; in 1882 she began studying Hebrew with Louis Schnabel, who was the superintendent of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum; in February 1883 she published an essay entitled “The Jewish Problem” in The Century, in which she argued for a Jewish nation"

    "in May 1883 she went to England to solicit support for “The Society for the Improvement and Colonization of East European Jews,” an organization she had established with several friends whose goal it was to resettle these Jews in Palestine. "

    "she tackles the politics of immigration by turning this American monument into one that has the history of the Jews inscribed on it. By making the statue into the “mother of exiles,” Lazarus turns the nation into the home of exiles, a home not unlike what she had been imagining for Jews in Palestine. "

    "Lazarus took this most public of opportunities to make the history of the Jewish people central to international politics."

    What are you quoting from here? Got a link?

    I don’t think you need much historical context to see the poem’s connection to specifically and narrowly Jewish immigration. It’s obvious from the text of the poem, as I pointed out on iSteve previously:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/why-the-establishment-is-so-berserk-over-trump-talking-sense-on-immigration/#comment-1455828

    …The original Colossus’ Greek dedication then talks about kindling the torch of freedom and independence, but does Lazarus give us a parallel freedom torch in her poem? No, her torch is simply a beacon to follow, rather like the pillar of fire that the Israelites followed to the promised land.

    Does the poem ask for the poor and huddle masses? Yes, but it also identifies the homeless, tempest-tost and calls the statue the Mother of Exiles… Were the poor of Europe homeless and exiled? No, but of course Jewish people were.

    The poem ends with the “golden door” to the USA. What is this golden door, this poem’s culmination, this strange imagery that we never notice because we stop paying attention after “breathe free”? I think given the propensity for religious imagery in 19th century America, we can say quite certainly that it is Jerusalem’s Gate of Mercy, which is also called the Golden Gate, one with Messianic importance for Jews.

    The original Greek Colossus’ dedication ends saying that the sea and land belong to the descendants of Hercules (in the vein of “to us and our posterity”) while Lazarus’ dedication ends saying that the land should be populated by foreigners who enter through the שער הרחמים. It is quite clear that Lazarus intended her dedication to envision not a statue to celebrate the homeland of its natives but a statue to collect and create a new homeland for Jews.

    And that brings us to my major objection to the poem, which is not actually its art or its Zionism, but the way that, in acting as an intentional inversion of the original Greek dedication poem, it asks us to see the Statue of Liberty as a feminist, pacifist, “cuck” symbol.

    While the Greek dedication praises the people for crowning their city with the spoils of an enemy who attacked them, Lazarus’ poem begins with the double-entendre of “brazen”, suggesting the Greeks were shameless in celebrating their military victory. It then continues with the original complaint of “manspreading”, comparing the Colossus’ spread legs to the Greeks’ shameless military bravado, and saying that the USA would not have this masculine symbol, but instead “a mighty woman”, a “Mother”. And what will this mother do? Will she take care of us, her children? No, she’ll take care of the children of other nations, and we should praise her for it.

    I don’t hate the Statue of Liberty, as I don’t entirely hate past immigration to the US. However, I don’t like Lazarus’ poem, and I think the statue ought to be a symbol of American liberty as an example to the world, not a symbol of American largesse as a right of the world.

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    • Replies: @utu
    Thanks. I was not aware of your comment.

    In terms of content, while I generally dismiss claims of Jewish influence, in the case of this poem, it is quite clear that the poem intentionally re-purposes the statue from a celebration of freedom to a welcome specifically to Jews, announcing the USA as a new Jewish homeland.
     
    It was not clear to me from the text alone. But I had a suspicion because all I knew she was Jewish. Jews infrequently are motivated solely by ethnic causes but they disguise their motives as universal ones. Obviously thinking like that on my part is borderline anti-semitic, or it is not?. But I was correct. She was not even interested in the whole case of putting the statue up (auction for the pedestal) until somebody made a connection for her with the Jews from Russia.

    I got the excerpts for here
    https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/the-poems-we-think-we-know-emma-lazaruss-the-new-colossus/
    and here
    http://blog.loa.org/2010/10/mark-twain-and-emma-lazarus-two-visions.html

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  66. @AnotherDad
    I just want a separate nation from these nimrods.

    Let's go ahead and split.

    How about we deport all the fake Americans?

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  67. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    How long till Marvel rolls out a comic heroine or crime-fighting mech robot (Lazatron XL?) endowed with such super powers deemed conducive to the enforcement of the 1892 Statue-Poetry Act upon Amerikkka... Or would it be enough just to put her on the $20 bill instead

    Well, DC is putting out a TV show featuring a Muslim woman formerly named “Isis”. Is that close enough?

    http://www.salon.com/2017/06/07/dc-legends-of-tomorrow-cw-zari-adrianna-tomaz-tala-ashe/

    I note that the executives of DC want to thrill us with the first female Islamic superhero on TV, but aren’t willing to risk any money by making her adhere to Islamic notions of physical modesty.

    Read More
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  68. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    If you try to remove that plaque, I'm picturing Lady Liberty slowly lurching to life, crossing over to Battery Park, I guess then climbing up the new WTC before being shot down by the NYPD Vintage Biplane Unit

    I’m picturing Lady Liberty slowly lurching to life, crossing over to Battery Park,

    Wow. Chills went down my spine when I read that.

    Don’t you remember how the Statue Of Liberty coming to life was the climax of Ghostbusters II?

    Somewhere, Paul Feig is cooking up the sequel to the Ghostbusters reboot, and trying to figure out a way to wedge that into the plot. I know he is. What with Lady Liberty being in the news all of a sudden, and the potential for the ultimate girl power visual, he just has to be.

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    • Agree: bomag
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  69. @AM

    We are in fact a nation, almost entirely, of immigrants.” …
     
    Bull.

    Before the West closed, we were a nation of settlers. It's one thing to adjust to a civilization already here, it's quite another to create European civilization out of wilderness and hostile natives.

    And yeah, we killed people when they wouldn't move on. And they killed us right back. The French and the Indians almost won. We were bottled up on the coast for almost 200 years. Only the technology advances after the Civil War created a huge imbalance in war capability between us and the Indians.

    The immigrants in the wave after the west closed shared some of the traits of the original settlers, but in order to enhance that immigration was shut down in 1927, I believe. Christianity was pushed in a top down way culturally to everyone but the Jews as way of encouraging a common set of values. American history was a big deal and taught unequivocally. Immigrants made it on their own, with no help from the government.

    Fast forward to now. Immigrants can expect welfare as a fall back, sometimes even illegals. Even the natives can't seem to drive to a church and/or imagine that there might more problems than just a little cultural adjustment issue with Islamic immigration. American history reads more like: "Gosh, we were just the biggest jerkiest jerks ever." The most frequent integration activity seems to be mall trips.

    Tired of the globalist re-writting of American history. We aren't all immigrants, sorry.

    The entire population of the planet, except perhaps the pygmies of Southern Africa are or have ancestors that immigrated, or moved from one place to another.

    We are a territorial animal. It’s hard-wired into our thinking.

    These open borders people are very strange, in world historical terms. Most of the world would consider them crackpots, downright dangerous.

    For example, Europe is a continent of immigrants, who just moved in and replaced the Neanderthals.

    We have also been fighting with each other over territory for eons, before we diverged from the common pre-chimpanzee, pre-human line (chimps are very territorial).

    Open borders is yet another idealistic idea that ignores human nature. Communism was another.

    Communism failed and the situation will become very bad if open-borders is not stopped.

    Nor can it be reversed as Communism was, at least not without draconian measures, likely violence.

    The great failing of leftism is their refusal to admit that some things are hard wired in human nature and cannot be changed. No amount of screeching “racist” or “xenophobe” will have any permanent effect.

    Contrast with Adam Smith, who had a good grasp of human nature and councilled working with it, not trying to pretend that it doesn’t even exist.

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  70. We have also been fighting with each other over territory for eons, before we diverged from the common pre-chimpanzee, pre-human line (chimps are very territorial).

    Stanley Kubrick understood this.

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  71. Hubbub says:

    Michael Beschloss? Wasn’t he the ‘historian’ who said back in the day that Obama was probably the most intelligent presidential candidate in American history?

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Michael Beschloss? Wasn’t he the ‘historian’ who said back in the day that Obama was probably the most intelligent presidential candidate in American history?
     
    He's as much a historian as is Doris Kearns Goodwin. Both Beschloss and Goodwin are referred to as "Presidential Historian", which is another way of saying "fawning groupie of liberal Presidents".
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  72. AM says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    You make a lot of great points. I agree that we were better off when we were a Christian country, but as a lapsed Catholic I have no desire to return to the church. It's a major part of the problem now. What does it have to offer?

    I agree that we were better off when we were a Christian country, but as a lapsed Catholic I have no desire to return to the church. It’s a major part of the problem now. What does it have to offer?

    Yep, the church is a part of the modern problem, partially because so many Catholic clerics and Bishops don’t believe the faith. It’s clear that many man have allowed themselves to have whole careers in the church without actually believing the faith. I walked away when I didn’t believe in what the church taught, knowing it was at least honest. I have no idea what these men will say when their time comes.

    Anyway, the Priests scandals, the watered down liturgy, the kumba ya social justice/immigration non-sense is coming from Priests/Bishops with no sense of the faith. It will probably get worse for a while longer until the money runs out completely.

    That said, think about going to church anyway. It’s good for you personally and it’s not that hard once the habit is re-formed. Christ is still there and given His sacrifice and those of the saints, annoying people for an hour on Sunday isn’t that bad. We’re in desperate need of simple good examples. If you’re young enough as regular church go-er, you’ll be there to help rebuild.

    Find the best parish you can and give it just a enough money to keep the lights on. Give directly to orthodox orders if you’re so inclined and do your best to starve the beast called the Bishop’s fund. No need to participate in the many one-off activities that are now the part of churches, now that they’ve forgotten they’re supposed to save souls by encouraging people to follow the 10 commandments.

    If you’re looking for better explanations of the faith, The Church Militant is a masculine shot in the arm. You maybe off put by his tone, but he’s 100% on Catholic doctrine. I have not watched any of his old clips, but Bishop Fulton Sheen is on YouTube and he spent most of his life explaining the faith. He was responsible for a lot of conversions in the 1950′s and all he did was just explain Catholicism on TV. CS Lewis was not a Catholic, but he has wonderful line of apologetic works, if you’ve never read them.

    Anyway, I am totally agreed on modern institution that is the American Catholic church. I wish I could do something other than pray and watch (and encourage) it’s collapse, but that seems to be The Current Year.

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  73. Turns out the body of permanent law is found not in the U.S. Code but in the Best-Loved Poems of the American People.

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    • Replies: @RudyM
    Poets are now the fully acknowledged legislators of the world.
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  74. Bitfu says:
    @Dr. X

    “Historian” Jon Meacham has a B.A., from the University of the South, according to Wikipedia.org (with his undergraduate major unlisted therein).

    “Historian” Michael Beschloss has a bachelor’s degree, in Political Science, from Williams College, and an M.B.A., from the Harvard Business School, according to that same popular source.

    When I was majoring in History (and English), at Purdue University, forty years ago, people with the academic credentials of Mssrs. Meacham and Beschloss were NOT referred to as “historians.” Likewise, those of us who graduated with a major in History, at the undergraduate level, did not refer to ourselves as “historians.”

     

    Amen to that. As someone who actually wrote a 300 page academic dissertation, I can say that these guys are frauds. I read one of Meacham's books once -- well, half of one -- before I tossed it. The guy's a f-king poser. So is Beschloss. Williams, of course, got canned for lying on the air -- what's he doing back??

    These guys are the kind of sophists Socrates would have eviscerated.

    I think Beschloss is a noted historian because of his comprehensive work on the IQs of all the US Presidents. An amazing work of scholarship. Somehow Beschloss managed to unearth the actual presidential IQ tests all the way back to Washington. [Those tests from the late 1700s had a lot of troubling cultural bias baked in, so I don't know what to make of those.]

    ANYWAYS…At this point, you must be wondering who holds the IQ Title Belt for the smartest US President of all time. Here you go…

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  75. unit472 says:

    Here is a stanza from the even earlier and, arguably more ‘American’ poem “Hiawatha by Longfellow.

    Then the Black-Robe chief, the Prophet,
    Told his message to the people,
    Told the purport of his mission,
    Told them of the Virgin Mary,
    And her blessed Son, the Saviour,
    How in distant lands and ages
    He had lived on earth as we do;
    How he fasted, prayed, and labored;
    How the Jews, the tribe accursed,
    Mocked him, scourged him, crucified him;
    How he rose from where they laid him,
    Walked again with his disciples,
    And ascended into heaven.

    Wonder how the Jews would like this to be engraved on the Statue of Liberty?

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  76. utu says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    What are you quoting from here? Got a link?

    I don't think you need much historical context to see the poem's connection to specifically and narrowly Jewish immigration. It's obvious from the text of the poem, as I pointed out on iSteve previously:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/why-the-establishment-is-so-berserk-over-trump-talking-sense-on-immigration/#comment-1455828


    ...The original Colossus’ Greek dedication then talks about kindling the torch of freedom and independence, but does Lazarus give us a parallel freedom torch in her poem? No, her torch is simply a beacon to follow, rather like the pillar of fire that the Israelites followed to the promised land.

    Does the poem ask for the poor and huddle masses? Yes, but it also identifies the homeless, tempest-tost and calls the statue the Mother of Exiles… Were the poor of Europe homeless and exiled? No, but of course Jewish people were.

    The poem ends with the “golden door” to the USA. What is this golden door, this poem’s culmination, this strange imagery that we never notice because we stop paying attention after “breathe free”? I think given the propensity for religious imagery in 19th century America, we can say quite certainly that it is Jerusalem’s Gate of Mercy, which is also called the Golden Gate, one with Messianic importance for Jews.

    The original Greek Colossus’ dedication ends saying that the sea and land belong to the descendants of Hercules (in the vein of “to us and our posterity”) while Lazarus’ dedication ends saying that the land should be populated by foreigners who enter through the שער הרחמים. It is quite clear that Lazarus intended her dedication to envision not a statue to celebrate the homeland of its natives but a statue to collect and create a new homeland for Jews.

    And that brings us to my major objection to the poem, which is not actually its art or its Zionism, but the way that, in acting as an intentional inversion of the original Greek dedication poem, it asks us to see the Statue of Liberty as a feminist, pacifist, “cuck” symbol.

    While the Greek dedication praises the people for crowning their city with the spoils of an enemy who attacked them, Lazarus' poem begins with the double-entendre of “brazen”, suggesting the Greeks were shameless in celebrating their military victory. It then continues with the original complaint of “manspreading”, comparing the Colossus’ spread legs to the Greeks’ shameless military bravado, and saying that the USA would not have this masculine symbol, but instead “a mighty woman”, a “Mother”. And what will this mother do? Will she take care of us, her children? No, she’ll take care of the children of other nations, and we should praise her for it.

    I don’t hate the Statue of Liberty, as I don’t entirely hate past immigration to the US. However, I don’t like Lazarus’ poem, and I think the statue ought to be a symbol of American liberty as an example to the world, not a symbol of American largesse as a right of the world.
     

    Thanks. I was not aware of your comment.

    In terms of content, while I generally dismiss claims of Jewish influence, in the case of this poem, it is quite clear that the poem intentionally re-purposes the statue from a celebration of freedom to a welcome specifically to Jews, announcing the USA as a new Jewish homeland.

    It was not clear to me from the text alone. But I had a suspicion because all I knew she was Jewish. Jews infrequently are motivated solely by ethnic causes but they disguise their motives as universal ones. Obviously thinking like that on my part is borderline anti-semitic, or it is not?. But I was correct. She was not even interested in the whole case of putting the statue up (auction for the pedestal) until somebody made a connection for her with the Jews from Russia.

    I got the excerpts for here

    https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/the-poems-we-think-we-know-emma-lazaruss-the-new-colossus/

    and here

    http://blog.loa.org/2010/10/mark-twain-and-emma-lazarus-two-visions.html

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  77. @Dr. X

    “Historian” Jon Meacham has a B.A., from the University of the South, according to Wikipedia.org (with his undergraduate major unlisted therein).

    “Historian” Michael Beschloss has a bachelor’s degree, in Political Science, from Williams College, and an M.B.A., from the Harvard Business School, according to that same popular source.

    When I was majoring in History (and English), at Purdue University, forty years ago, people with the academic credentials of Mssrs. Meacham and Beschloss were NOT referred to as “historians.” Likewise, those of us who graduated with a major in History, at the undergraduate level, did not refer to ourselves as “historians.”

     

    Amen to that. As someone who actually wrote a 300 page academic dissertation, I can say that these guys are frauds. I read one of Meacham's books once -- well, half of one -- before I tossed it. The guy's a f-king poser. So is Beschloss. Williams, of course, got canned for lying on the air -- what's he doing back??

    These guys are the kind of sophists Socrates would have eviscerated.

    Network TV is now for people LARPing intellect.

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  78. @Boomer the Dog
    Maybe I'm just a bit dense today, but I had trouble figuring out what, if anything, was actually being said by any of the people in that segment. It's like they were conversing entirely in weird, esoteric aphorisms--none of which bore any obvious relation to the other.

    "Time has become so compressed."

    "We're in this odd, post-truth era."

    "How an emergency, an exigency, can change the presidency, the conversation, and our country in an instant."

    Huh? At least two of these guys are billed as public intellectuals (or something). Yet as far as I can tell, their arguments consist of little more than alternating between somber hand-wringing and sophomoric cliches. Can the standards for discourse really have fallen that far? Guess I hadn't watched MSNBC in a while . . .

    I’ve made the point before, but I’ll bang the drum again: These people are all Oswald Bates. Stop watching television; you are permitting people who despise you and want to dispossess and devastate you to micterate in your eyes.

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  79. @Jake
    If Christianity is true, then Christ founded a church that was meant to be the vehicle through which Christian teachings would, however slowly, civilize all parts of the world in which they came to rule. That means that to choose not to participate in that church is to be AWOL.

    Snd good people going AWOL always means the enemy has a much easier time.

    You should go back to the Church and demand that you hear the Gospel and the defined morals that go with it.

    Every person like you not doing that is necessary to every whiney Liberal shit being heard and more easily petted by bleeding heart clergymen.

    If his experience is like mine, though, he was driven aeay from the church, by a heretical congregation and clergy.What is he to do? Attend each week, as the surly man in the back pew no one will socialise with and everyone wishes would go away? If he earnestly tries to continue making his points, he may well be physically barred. You are asking him to go and reason with irrational people who hate him.

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  80. RudyM says:

    Subtle.

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    • Replies: @guest
    "Immigrant voices make democracy stronger"

    Democracy is stronger when my side wins.
    , @Ivy
    "Meanwhile, all you stale dudes just keep sending those checks, or our movement might fail. Pleeeeeease"
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  81. Mr. Anon says:
    @Glaivester
    I like the way that Miller started referring to the poem as the "Statue of Liberty Law of the Land" when asking whether or not times of lower immigration had violated it. I wonder if Acosta or any of the other leftists understood that they were being mocked.

    I like the way that Miller started referring to the poem as the “Statue of Liberty Law of the Land” when asking whether or not times of lower immigration had violated it. I wonder if Acosta or any of the other leftists understood that they were being mocked.

    Probably not. It’s so far out of their pale of thought that they probably can’t grok it. As Ann Coulter said (wrote, tweeted?), it would be nice if more of Trump’s people were as smart as Miller is.

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  82. Mr. Anon says:
    @Hubbub
    Michael Beschloss? Wasn't he the 'historian' who said back in the day that Obama was probably the most intelligent presidential candidate in American history?

    Michael Beschloss? Wasn’t he the ‘historian’ who said back in the day that Obama was probably the most intelligent presidential candidate in American history?

    He’s as much a historian as is Doris Kearns Goodwin. Both Beschloss and Goodwin are referred to as “Presidential Historian”, which is another way of saying “fawning groupie of liberal Presidents”.

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  83. @anon

    Beschloss compares it to separating the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
     
    Sure, it's just like that, only completely different, because one is the basis of laws and Supreme Court decisions, whereas the other is, no matter how much you want to kvetch about it, still just a poem.

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don't usually seem to be particularly dumb. Every so often, that fact just hits me as being astonishing.

    no matter how much you want to kvetch about it

    The word you want is kvell, not kvetch.

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  84. Right. Tell your liberal friends that, like the Constitution, Emma Lazarus’ poem is “a living document”.

    And that like the 2nd Amendment which didn’t anticipate modern assault rifles, Emma didn’t anticipate a world in which 90% of humanity looks nothing like her, shares few of her values, and would be happy to come to America by the billions.

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  85. @Guy de Champlagne
    Liberals have no problem violating the spirit of historical statues that they disagree with and even tearing them down. So even if the statue of liberty meant what they want it to, why are they pretending as though we're obligated to do what old statues tell us to? That's both absurd and hypocritical.

    Right. Tell your liberal friends that, like the Constitution, Emma Lazarus’ poem is “a living document”.

    And that like the 2nd Amendment which didn’t anticipate modern assault rifles, Emma didn’t anticipate a world in which 90% of humanity looks nothing like her, shares few of her values, and would be happy to come to America by the billions.

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  86. @AM

    I actually know people who take MSNBC seriously. People who don’t usually seem to be particularly dumb
     
    The modern era seems to have particularly strong "See how smart I am" issue, having created into the virtue it is not.

    But not everyone can be doctor or an intellectual in this case. Many modern outlets have perfect a style of broadcast and/or writing that actively flatters the listener/reader into imagining they're the smartest person in the room.

    PBS is the #1 offender in that regard, but most mainstream outlets have it some extent. Pop non-fiction almost exclusively relies on an intimate writing style, with a relatively low reading level, that reassures the reader of the intelligence of themselves and the author.

    My vocabulary level is pretty poor. There are authors that force me to routinely look up words while reading. I haven't read much pop non-fiction recently, but I've never once had to crack open up a dictionary while reading them.

    AM, are you Russian? I notice you missed a “the”, and left out a “to” where the next word would be in the dative case.

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    • Replies: @AM

    AM, are you Russian? I notice you missed a “the”, and left out a “to” where the next word would be in the dative case.
     
    LOL! I am not. I am a studiously monolingual American with poor typing skills.
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  87. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Yeah, I've been racking my brain for years to figure out a way to make money off of all of this.

    The fact that I can't shows that whites (liberals and conservatives, btw) don't actually live by what they say. That's why I can't make money off of them.

    However, I hadn't thought about the entertainment angle, so kudos to you.

    I’ve been racking my brain for years to figure out a way to make money off of all of this.

    And I’d love to make money off the global warming hysteria, but so far Miami Beach real estate isn’t being helpful; it’s doubled in price since just 2010.

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  88. @utu
    It is just a poem. This should end the discussion one would think but this poem was a part of world wide campaign on behalf of Jewish immigration from Russia and this changes everything. This makes the poem sacrosanct and untouchable not only because touching it may shed light on the dynamic of Jewish power in America.

    "On January 11, 1882, the London Times published an article entitled “The Persecution of the Jews in Russia,” and this is most likely the source from which Lazarus first learned of the atrocities that had been occurring in Russia for the previous eight months."

    "In the wake of these events, Lazarus’s interest in Jewish culture, in helping Jews from across the world, and eventually in advocating for a separate Jewish nation picked up speed. "

    "Since 1881 she had been working with Jewish refugees at the Wards Island immigration center; in 1882 she began studying Hebrew with Louis Schnabel, who was the superintendent of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum; in February 1883 she published an essay entitled “The Jewish Problem” in The Century, in which she argued for a Jewish nation"

    "in May 1883 she went to England to solicit support for “The Society for the Improvement and Colonization of East European Jews,” an organization she had established with several friends whose goal it was to resettle these Jews in Palestine. "

    "she tackles the politics of immigration by turning this American monument into one that has the history of the Jews inscribed on it. By making the statue into the “mother of exiles,” Lazarus turns the nation into the home of exiles, a home not unlike what she had been imagining for Jews in Palestine. "

    "Lazarus took this most public of opportunities to make the history of the Jewish people central to international politics."

    “Lazarus took this most public of opportunities to make the history of the Jewish people central to international politics.”

    The history of the Jewish people has been “central to international politics” since the dawn of Christianity.

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  89. @anonymous

    We are in fact a nation, almost entirely, of immigrants.” …
     
    Entirely by definition is one hundred percent. Almost entirely must surely be defined as significantly above 50 percent.

    So have we ever been a nation in which significantly more than half of our population were immigrants?

    Additionally, if they are trying to suggest we are all immigrants because somewhere in our family tree someone came here from Europe, then why would the founders make a distinction in the Constitution about one having to be 'natural' born to be eligible to be the president? And why would Andrew Hamilton be celebrated today as Mr. Immigrant when in fact all of the Founders must have been immigrants by such a definition?

    When people say “we’re a nation of immigrants,” what they mean is, “Hey, you Micks, Wops, and Polaks, we let you in, so just shut up and step aside while we let the Muzzies and Mestizos in.”

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  90. @kihowi
    I've said this many times (because I'm proud of figuring it out): The surest way to get rich is to give white people a way to feel more intelligent than other white people without doing any real work.

    See: Daily Show, Ted, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Bill Nye, atheism, pop science, Reddit, documentaries, art house movies, "edgy" comedians, xkcd, BBC, and basically everything else.

    It’s even better when you can convince the Goodwhites that they’re getting revenge on the Badwhites for something that happened to the ancestors of some Nonwhites.

    Case in point; Morris Dees.

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  91. @Clark Westwood

    Brian Williams (of all people): “Michael, when has Truth been doubted before, the way it has been doubted under this Administration by enormous segments of society?”

    Prof. Michael Bechloss: “I think never in the history of the Presidency, I think it’s pretty fair to say that. And even what we saw with Mr. Miller was an example of that. His saying that the poem doesn’t count because it was put on later, you know, it’s sort of like the Bill of Rights was ratified four years after the Constitution, so Bill of Rights isn’t very important either.”
     
    Miller's telling the truth is an attack on truth.

    2+2=5

    There is no starvation in Moscow.

    No executions or gulags either.

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  92. MB says: • Website
    @Corn
    Someone on twitter said that the modern Left "treats a Lazarus poem like Constitutional law and the Constitution like vague poetry".

    Correction, the LibProgs think Lazarus’s poem is Constitutional, while the real Constitution is just so much used toilet paper.
    So let’s burn it.
    Cause that’s what they do with used toilet paper in Mexico.
    At least those parts where lots of our recent immigrants have come from.

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  93. Bob S says: • Website
    @Jake
    If Christianity is true, then Christ founded a church that was meant to be the vehicle through which Christian teachings would, however slowly, civilize all parts of the world in which they came to rule. That means that to choose not to participate in that church is to be AWOL.

    Snd good people going AWOL always means the enemy has a much easier time.

    You should go back to the Church and demand that you hear the Gospel and the defined morals that go with it.

    Every person like you not doing that is necessary to every whiney Liberal shit being heard and more easily petted by bleeding heart clergymen.

    Well yeah, but there was a reason for the Protestant Reformation.
    Long story short, Rome’s gospel of justification by faithful attendance at the mass’s re-sacrifice of Christ is not Christ’s gospel of justification by faith alone in Christ’s completed work in his life and death for which there is no substitute, supplement or addition to.

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    • Replies: @AM

    Long story short, Rome’s gospel of justification by faithful attendance at the mass’s re-sacrifice of Christ is not Christ’s gospel of justification by faith alone in Christ’s completed work in his life and death for which there is no substitute, supplement or addition to.
     
    You might want to read the Council of Trent documents. They clarified and confirmed (a bit too late I'm afraid), that we are saved by faith. Faith without works is dead, however and that's always been the Catholic stance. But salvation through works would create a merit badge system to Heaven that doesn't exist.

    Or in other words, if the point of the Church is to learn to love God, we have to want to demonstrate our faith. A modern Mass in particular is not a whole lot to show we appreciate the gift of life.

    It's too bad Luther broke off, rather stay try to reform and get rid of the rampant corruption. He had two legitimate points that could have lead to a real renewal of the whole church.

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  94. @Jake
    Yes, please. We need a peaceful break up of the US before the Left gets riled up enough to play Bolshie 1917.

    Not gonna happen. The two dominant ideologies are “Leave me alone and Ill leave you alone” and “We deserve to hold your leash because we went to Harvard”. If you think Blue America is just gonna accept that people are living without their “enlightenment” you have been asleep for the the last few decades.

    Sorry but the answer to 1917 Bolshie is going to end up being 1973 Chile. I know that fact sends Boomers for the fainting couch but that’s where its going.

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  95. guest says:
    @RudyM
    https://twitter.com/tedtalks/status/870307428889440256

    Subtle.

    “Immigrant voices make democracy stronger”

    Democracy is stronger when my side wins.

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  96. RudyM says:
    @Jonathan Silber
    Turns out the body of permanent law is found not in the U.S. Code but in the Best-Loved Poems of the American People.

    Poets are now the fully acknowledged legislators of the world.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Certain poets and certain poems.

    Several poems on the meaning of the Statue of Liberty were put inside the cornerstone to preserve them for the future, but I can' find copies online of the ones I looked for.

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  97. @RudyM
    Poets are now the fully acknowledged legislators of the world.

    Certain poets and certain poems.

    Several poems on the meaning of the Statue of Liberty were put inside the cornerstone to preserve them for the future, but I can’ find copies online of the ones I looked for.

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Steve, from a search I find that among a great many articles and medals, the following poems were put in a copper box under the cornerstone:

    A copy of the poem to "Liberty," by E. R. Johnes.
    A copy of the " Song to Liberty," by Harby Kennedy.
    A copy of the Constitution of the " Sons of the Revolution."
    A copy of the poem to "Liberty Enlightening the World," by James M.
    Stewart.
     
    https://books.google.com/books?id=_1ZLAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA50&lpg=PA50&ots=sC8d_RltvO&focus=viewport&dq=‘Poem+on+Liberty’+by+E.+R.+Johnes&output=text#c_top
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  98. AM says:
    @International Jew
    AM, are you Russian? I notice you missed a "the", and left out a "to" where the next word would be in the dative case.

    AM, are you Russian? I notice you missed a “the”, and left out a “to” where the next word would be in the dative case.

    LOL! I am not. I am a studiously monolingual American with poor typing skills.

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  99. AM says:
    @Bob S
    Well yeah, but there was a reason for the Protestant Reformation.
    Long story short, Rome's gospel of justification by faithful attendance at the mass's re-sacrifice of Christ is not Christ's gospel of justification by faith alone in Christ's completed work in his life and death for which there is no substitute, supplement or addition to.

    Long story short, Rome’s gospel of justification by faithful attendance at the mass’s re-sacrifice of Christ is not Christ’s gospel of justification by faith alone in Christ’s completed work in his life and death for which there is no substitute, supplement or addition to.

    You might want to read the Council of Trent documents. They clarified and confirmed (a bit too late I’m afraid), that we are saved by faith. Faith without works is dead, however and that’s always been the Catholic stance. But salvation through works would create a merit badge system to Heaven that doesn’t exist.

    Or in other words, if the point of the Church is to learn to love God, we have to want to demonstrate our faith. A modern Mass in particular is not a whole lot to show we appreciate the gift of life.

    It’s too bad Luther broke off, rather stay try to reform and get rid of the rampant corruption. He had two legitimate points that could have lead to a real renewal of the whole church.

    Read More
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  100. Ivy says:
    @RudyM
    https://twitter.com/tedtalks/status/870307428889440256

    Subtle.

    “Meanwhile, all you stale dudes just keep sending those checks, or our movement might fail. Pleeeeeease”

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  101. @Steve Sailer
    Certain poets and certain poems.

    Several poems on the meaning of the Statue of Liberty were put inside the cornerstone to preserve them for the future, but I can' find copies online of the ones I looked for.

    Steve, from a search I find that among a great many articles and medals, the following poems were put in a copper box under the cornerstone:

    A copy of the poem to “Liberty,” by E. R. Johnes.
    A copy of the ” Song to Liberty,” by Harby Kennedy.
    A copy of the Constitution of the ” Sons of the Revolution.”
    A copy of the poem to “Liberty Enlightening the World,” by James M.
    Stewart.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=_1ZLAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA50&lpg=PA50&ots=sC8d_RltvO&focus=viewport&dq=‘Poem+on+Liberty’+by+E.+R.+Johnes&output=text#c_top

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  102. Kylie says:
    @Mr. Anon
    I think I remember this from one of those School-House Rock spots from the 1970s: "How a Bill Becomes a Law". First an amateur poet submits a poem to a contest that is part of a promotional campaign for a statue. It is not selected. Eventually, the poets friends (and/or co-ethnics) lobby to have a plaque with the poem added to the base of the statue.......................and then the sentiments expressed in the poem become simlutaneously the law of the land and a foundational principle of the Republic.

    I know I’ve said it before, Mr. Anon, but you never disappoint.

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