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Heffernan: "Trump Is America’s Most Honest President"
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From Politico:

Trump Is America’s Most Honest President
He just can’t help himself from blurting out the truth—even when it’s self-sabotage.
By VIRGINIA HEFFERNAN May 23, 2017

… Donald Trump cannot keep a secret. In fact, the “liar president,” as his opponents would have it, might just be the most pathologically unsecretive—dare I say, honest—president we’ve seen yet.

Sure, we’re accustomed to thinking of Trump as chronically deceptive and flat-out wrong, and he commonly is—about crowd sizes, illegal voting, his “fine-tuned machine” of an administration, the Iraq War, 9/11 cheering, the list is endless. But someone must be putting truth serum in Trump’s second scoop of ice cream these days. No matter the stakes, he doesn’t have even a White House junior aide’s gift for circumspection, spin or truth-shading. Lately, in fact, Trump can’t shut up even when almost everything is at stake.

In a town of snakes and double-agents, the president’s extreme emotional transparency would be admirable, a sign of vulnerability, sincerity, guilelessness—that is, if it weren’t so self-incriminating. Most notably, on the firing of FBI director James Comey, Trump could not for one single day stick to the simple if ludicrous script that his aides hawked in the immediate aftermath: that Comey was fired at the suggestion of Jeff Sessions and Rod Rosenstein, the attorney general and his deputy, out of gallantry to Hillary Clinton, the damsel distressed by Comey’s political whims last October.

No, Trump could not prevaricate.

Obviously, to be be a successful real estate developer, you have to blow a lot of smoke about how everything is coming together beautifully. SlateStarCodex’s review of The Art of the Deal explains:

I started the book with the question: what exactly do real estate developers do? …

As best I can tell, the developer’s job is coordination. This often means blatant lies. The usual process goes like this: the bank would be happy to lend you the money as long as you have guaranteed renters. The renters would be happy to sign up as long as you show them a design. The architect would be happy to design the building as long as you tell them what the government’s allowing. The government would be happy to give you your permit as long as you have a construction company lined up. And the construction company would be happy to sign on with you as long as you have the money from the bank in your pocket. Or some kind of complicated multi-step catch-22 like that. The solution – or at least Trump’s solution – is to tell everybody that all the other players have agreed and the deal is completely done except for their signature. The trick is to lie to the right people in the right order, so that by the time somebody checks to see whether they’ve been conned, you actually do have the signatures you told them that you had. The whole thing sounds very stressful.

But as a politician, Trump doesn’t seem like a very talented liar.

What really makes his enemies mad, however, is when he tells the truth. For example:

“When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. … They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

 
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  1. “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. … They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

    That comment got him elected (that, and the fact that he’s a great entertainer). He needs to remember that much!

    Read More
    • Agree: Barnard, Nico
    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    It's also used by opponents as their most damning evidence of his racism and general unfitness. But the full quote makes it clear that it's simply indisputable--if inconvenient.
    , @Pat Boyle
    There is now some dispute as to whether he lied to American blacks. During the campaign he courted the black vote with statements like - "How much worse could it be?" He implied that the Democrats who had owned the votes of blacks for decades had reneged on their promises. If blacks have not improved their position in American society as much as they had hoped, the Democrats must have been lying.

    He encouraged blacks to vote for him with the tacit understanding that in his administration they would do better for black interests. Now he seems to be intent on reducing the welfare state transfer payments to negroes. His budget apparently calls for cuts in programs like Food Stamps.

    So was Trump being mendacious?
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  2. guest says:

    Trump is naturally seemingly sincere, if that makes sense. I don’t know what he actually believes, but he comes off like he believes what he says. Even when what he says turns over rapidly.

    He’s like Kevin Costner, who isn’t the greatest actor. He doesn’t have much range, but he’s easily credible. I always believe Kevin believes he’s a gunslinger or farmer or Jim Garrison.

    Or take Michael Jackson, who had some chops but wasn’t the world’s greatest singer. I’m convinced part of the reason he was so popular was that people immediately believed him when he opened his mouth. They thought he actually did befriend a rat, and Diana and Billie Jean really were bitches.

    Feel free to replace these with your own, probably more appropriate examples.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pat Boyle
    Kevin Costner, who isn’t the greatest actor

    The problem is that there are at least two very different definitions of the term "actor'. Acting is pretending to others that you are someone other than who you actually are. All people can act at least a little but some people have more 'range' as you say. Nasty people in real life can pretend to be nice. Nice people can pretend to be nasty. Costner doesn't seem to be very good at this kind of thing. He doesn't do impressions and he doesn't speak in accents.

    In films the director and the makeup artist also influence this kind of acting. Jose Ferrer pretended to be shorter than he really was and Al Pacino pretends to be a normal man rather than a dwarf. Costner never does anything like that. He is a good looking tall man with a healthy physique. He doesn't bulk up his muscles with steroids or go on long starvation diets. He doesn't even wear putty noses. He looks pretty much the same in all his films.

    But there is another meaning to the term actor - especially movie actor. In this meaning the job of an actor is to be liked by the paying audience. Supporting actors are expected to embody certain specific characteristics. For example Slim Pickens was always expected to play a Slim Pickens type character. Costner plays the male lead or protagonist and he is expected to be watchable and likeable. This is a talent too.

    Costner in that sense is a great actor.
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  3. Lagertha says:

    sheesh, he is, of course, a good person. I care about Melania, his children, and him; his grandchildren…. I really do, they all represent the USA – immigrants, for eff’s sake…people talk about he expression “woke,” but is that expression segregated? – and for whom? I hate haters.

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  4. Mexico. Indeed.

    Even ignoring the criminal element, I’ve tried to tell people until I am blue in the face……NOT ALL MEXICANS ARE THE SAME. ZMan says he lives on the edge of the Baltimore ghetto. Well, I live on the edge of an Orange County barrio. And I mostly see squat round brown people, the kind you might find in southern Mexico and El Salvador. Because that’s EXACTLY where most of these people are from. These are indigenous, unskilled, semi-literate peasants. Mexico’s version of Arkansas, Mississippi and West Virginia. THAT’s who Mexico sends our way. What would Canada think of Americans if the only visitors to the Great White North were from those three states?

    Read More
    • Replies: @TBA

    What would Canada think of Americans if the only visitors to the Great White North were from those three states?
     
    That they're not sending their best.
    , @Autochthon
    They might think Americans have common sense, as well as self-determination, and courage, among other things – the average resident of Orange County, California certainly conveys none of these qualities.

    Semi-Literate Peasants Indeed.

    , @Stealth
    From what I've heard, those same people have now dispersed throughout Mexico as well. The border states are now home to quite a few of them. A similar process seems to be underway in Brazil, where, as another commenter pointed out, the less caucasoid Brazilians, seeking a better life I"m sure, have mass migrated to the white(r) portions of that country.

    "These are indigenous, unskilled, semi-literate peasants. Mexico’s version of Arkansas, Mississippi and West Virginia."

    Those are great places compared to any state in Mexico, even though Mississippi is becoming a might bit shit-holish these days.

    , @bored identity



    What would Canada think of Americans if the only visitors to the Great White North were from those three states?

     

    Your deep conviction of "indigenous, unskilled, semi-literate peasants of Arkansas, Mississippi and West Virginia" as of being the same stock as a gnomish-morlockish, maize devouring invaders from the southern border is a proof that this country, at least in your head, exists not as a Nation, but as an open wasteland populated by randomly mixed & matched people.

    bored identity believes that almost every Arkansas, Mississippi and /or West Virginia's Uncle Cletus should be considered as a crème de la crème visiting guest in Quebec or Ontario, contrasting with circa 90% of Third World Country Weekly Disposals of Vibrant Rocket Surgeons.

    By the way, if you are Uncle Cletus, why even bother to travel to the country that is run by that guy?:

    https://theconservativetreehouse.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/trudeau-4.jpg
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  5. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    He told the truth about her other examples too. There were Muslims cheering on 9/11, and their were contemporaneous reports about it. Whether it was thousands or hundreds, who knows, but the dishonest press didn’t want to concede that, so they segued to a claim that Trump mocked the disabled reporter who wrote one of those contemporaneous reports, then subsequently said he didn’t remember.

    When you drill down, that’s the basic pattern. Trump tells the truth about something (cheering on 9/11, his crowds being bigger than what the press initially claimed, illegals voting), and then the press claims he lied because his estimate is either off or unconfirmed, even though he is essentially correct (e.g., the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started).

    Read More
    • Agree: Abe, Desiderius, prole
    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started
     
    No, unfortunately it turned out that the Mall was really half-empty during the inauguration, but it seemed fully packed from where Trump stood. There have been time-stamped photos from all angles, and it's clear that as Trump raised his fist, it seemed to be fully packed from where Trump stood, but it was perhaps half empty (or half full) when seen from above (the more accurate angle). It's easy to understand why Trump thought they lied (I thought the same at the time until checking the timestamped photos), and they lie often enough anyway (so that my and probably Trump's default assumption is that they lie whenever they attack him), but this one claim was unfortunately largely true.
    , @Ali Choudhury
    Really, where were they cheering? The only ones I remember publicly cheering were the Gaza Palestinians.

    \Why he even made an issue about the crowd is beyond me, he seems in over his head and apt to starting pointless fights rather than delivering on his agenda. His coddling of the Saudi royals was stomach-churning.
    , @Bill Jones
    You somehow forgot the cheering Jews on 9/11
    , @Romanian
    Didn't Nixon do that to get the hostile press to confirm his ballpark estimates, turning their gotcha moments into revelations for Americans?
    , @NYCTexan
    You don't have to be a raving Trumpista, but the SlateStarCodex guy is obviously some sort of academic and has zero understanding of what it takes to be an entrepreneur.

    His description of Trump as a coordinator of various parties energies is only 1/2 right -- as any entrepreneur, most especially in NYC real estate will tell you, the other 1/2 of the game is not getting fleeced by everyone else in the game like City Hall, Unions, Contractors, Inspectors and Labor Boards -- who view their jobs as fleecing the fat cat sucker who is gonna try to develop some property.

    If you think that those folks don't lie, don't exaggerate, play by the rules, and aren't corrupt -- well then, I got a bridge to sell you.

    , @Moshe
    People shocked by the muslim celebrating thing must not be the sort of people who notice things when they travel.

    EVERYONE was celebrating. Or at least young men everywhere weren't quite devastated as it all went down.

    I was a young dude in israel and stepped into a bodega to watch the unfolding events and the bodega owner was extatic. "Fock America! He said as he slapped his hand on the table.

    People around the world view America as ppl who knew of Rome (and every seemingly dominant empire) felt about them.

    Let me climb to their height as one of them or let them fall and have major problems as we do.

    Don't you guys know how the world works?
    , @prole
    Trump did exaggerate the numbers in Jersey City cheering...there were hundreds of Muslims celebrating on rooftops....not thousands cheering in the street.
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  6. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Heffernan gives the game away (I don’t believe for a minute she’s writing in Aesopian language, emitting coded signals at the smarter reader while shoveling to-be-sure pap at the Acela liberals — she probably idiotically believes this Russkie Collusion Storytime bit really is leading somewhere). The truth is that people who inhabit the imperial capital are frivolous poofs and women who’ve failed at feminine arts, thus turned deranged via obsession with the Machiavellian hermeneutics of etiquette and manners. But look at Montana, the voters don’t even give a rat’s about a candidate beating up a reporter. Trump may end up failing at most or all of the 2016 campaign agenda but he’s not going to be unmasked suddenly as a tacky boor that the public can’t tolerate in the slick, cool, glamorous capital-P Presidency. Give me a break. This Beltway crapola about “Such things are just not done” is way past the spoilage date.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes

    The truth is that people who inhabit the imperial capital are frivolous poofs and women who’ve failed at feminine arts, thus turned deranged via obsession with the Machiavellian hermeneutics of etiquette and manners.
     
    'Nuff said.
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  7. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @Dave Pinsen
    He told the truth about her other examples too. There were Muslims cheering on 9/11, and their were contemporaneous reports about it. Whether it was thousands or hundreds, who knows, but the dishonest press didn't want to concede that, so they segued to a claim that Trump mocked the disabled reporter who wrote one of those contemporaneous reports, then subsequently said he didn't remember.

    When you drill down, that's the basic pattern. Trump tells the truth about something (cheering on 9/11, his crowds being bigger than what the press initially claimed, illegals voting), and then the press claims he lied because his estimate is either off or unconfirmed, even though he is essentially correct (e.g., the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started).

    the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started

    No, unfortunately it turned out that the Mall was really half-empty during the inauguration, but it seemed fully packed from where Trump stood. There have been time-stamped photos from all angles, and it’s clear that as Trump raised his fist, it seemed to be fully packed from where Trump stood, but it was perhaps half empty (or half full) when seen from above (the more accurate angle). It’s easy to understand why Trump thought they lied (I thought the same at the time until checking the timestamped photos), and they lie often enough anyway (so that my and probably Trump’s default assumption is that they lie whenever they attack him), but this one claim was unfortunately largely true.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    What about the photo Trump hung up in the White House?
    , @Luke Lea
    "the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started"

    That is not the case apparently, but the Times certainly published the two crowd photos beside each other on its front page the very first day. Google it.

    Why did they do that? After all, Trump's was still one of the largest crowds in the history of inaugurations, way over the 400,000 that come out for Bush, which was the next biggest after Obama's two according to Wikipedia.

    My guess is that they did it to goad and belittle him with predictable effect.

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  8. gruff says:

    All y’all “he cucked!!1″ whiners need to keep firmly in mind that ICE is off the chain and action is being taken to reduce immigration. Stop wasting your time complaining and start working to make gains in the middle, push that Overton, take ADVANTAGE OF THIS OPPORTUNITY. TIME IS SHORT.

    Read More
    • Agree: European-American
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association. It is true that there weren't many alternatives on offer, but a Saunders type "left wing economic nationalism" would probably have had more of a chance of long term broad based success.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed "people of color" seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for "white people" than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the "talented tenth".

    What the anti-immigration movement needs is more Morrisseys - more "lefty" types willing to stand up and be counted. Wishful thinking probably but the arrogance of the "Desi Girls" of the world may yet get some white lefties to realize they have let vipers into the nest.
    , @Thea
    We absolutely need to be having conversations on these topics with people we know, face to face. When events come up in the media that are spun to fit the narrative, we need to discuss what is really happening and what is important vs trivial.
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  9. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @reiner Tor

    the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started
     
    No, unfortunately it turned out that the Mall was really half-empty during the inauguration, but it seemed fully packed from where Trump stood. There have been time-stamped photos from all angles, and it's clear that as Trump raised his fist, it seemed to be fully packed from where Trump stood, but it was perhaps half empty (or half full) when seen from above (the more accurate angle). It's easy to understand why Trump thought they lied (I thought the same at the time until checking the timestamped photos), and they lie often enough anyway (so that my and probably Trump's default assumption is that they lie whenever they attack him), but this one claim was unfortunately largely true.

    What about the photo Trump hung up in the White House?

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    As I wrote, it's taken from the wrong angle. From that angle it looks as if the Mall was full, but it wasn't.

    You have to take a picture from above from a helicopter or drone in order to see the true density of the crowd.

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  10. Anonym says:

    The trick is to lie to the right people in the right order, so that by the time somebody checks to see whether they’ve been conned, you actually do have the signatures you told them that you had.

    Ok, so if you’ve done this tens or hundreds of times and the vaporware you’ve been selling comes together just like you said it would, are you really lying? Actually you are telling the truth with a high probability. The best way of predicting the future is to create it yourself.

    OT: President of Montenegro, all 600k of people with the combined GDP of the cost of an aircraft carrier, forgot to obey the law of the sea.

    OT: The President of Croatia was thinking to herself – “Why should he settle for some model from Slovenia when he can have the President of Croatia?”

    https://www.reddit.com/r/The_Donald/comments/6dcktz/find_someone_that_looks_at_you_the_way_the/?st=j35jcl50&sh=87215446

    Bonus Pepe signalling (while the senile cat lady does her retarded pose):

    https://www.reddit.com/r/The_Donald/comments/6ddeua/the_madman_pres_trump_does_signature_pepe_pose/?st=j35ieq8i&sh=71fc5131

    Read More
    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    That grinning dude who appears to have even greater affection for Mr. Trump than the Croatian president is my main man Viktor?

    http://hungarytoday.hu/news/nato-summit-hungary-pm-orban-chatting-trump-us-president-shove-aside-montenegrin-premier-video-92785
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  11. OT:
    Real life butt-kicking babes in action in Sveden:
    man attacks the three female, Swedish police officers

    The video was taken from very far away, so a digitally enhanced version is provided here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    Real life butt-kicking babes in action in Sveden:

    Um, it looks to me like they're standing around not accomplishing much until that civilian guy comes in and takes the perp down for them. Or was that the point and is my sarcasm meter off?
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  12. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @Dave Pinsen
    What about the photo Trump hung up in the White House?

    As I wrote, it’s taken from the wrong angle. From that angle it looks as if the Mall was full, but it wasn’t.

    You have to take a picture from above from a helicopter or drone in order to see the true density of the crowd.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You have to take a picture from above from a helicopter or drone in order to see the true density of the crowd.
     
    One problem was white ground covering deployed on the Mall for the Trump inauguration made the visual difference seem all the more stark. Whoever wins the next election would be wise to insist that the grass gets trampled, or that dark covering be used.
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  13. Randal says:

    But as a politician, Trump doesn’t seem like a very talented liar.

    Real estate is little league lying. Becoming a politician, Trump has joined the big league liars, and somewhat been found out.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Trump's biggest 'problem' is that he has been openly honest about the things that the left bombard us with keeping quiet about.

    That being said, he does have trouble with the tact and communication of a politician, because he hasn't been trained and developed experience in being a politician. Its less an issue of someone playing little league trying to now play in the majors, but rather like someone who played professional football his whole life having to now play pro baseball. Nearly everyone else he is dealing with has been playing a different game for decades.

    What's more, there is a political capital that one builds up in Washington, a 'you scratch my back, I scratch yours' kind of arrangement, where even across the aisles, people will do things like support another politician's bill or pork barrel arrangement, with the understanding that they themselves can call for favors from those politicians when they have a piece of legislation that is particularly important to them. But it has to be built up over many years. Trump lacks that from a lack of political experience.

    But while his openness and honesty have been the reason he's been attacked so much it's also been his greatest asset, leading to his election, because the things that they silence are the things that are having the most negative impact on the lives of the most Americans.

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  14. @Dave Pinsen
    He told the truth about her other examples too. There were Muslims cheering on 9/11, and their were contemporaneous reports about it. Whether it was thousands or hundreds, who knows, but the dishonest press didn't want to concede that, so they segued to a claim that Trump mocked the disabled reporter who wrote one of those contemporaneous reports, then subsequently said he didn't remember.

    When you drill down, that's the basic pattern. Trump tells the truth about something (cheering on 9/11, his crowds being bigger than what the press initially claimed, illegals voting), and then the press claims he lied because his estimate is either off or unconfirmed, even though he is essentially correct (e.g., the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started).

    Really, where were they cheering? The only ones I remember publicly cheering were the Gaza Palestinians.

    \Why he even made an issue about the crowd is beyond me, he seems in over his head and apt to starting pointless fights rather than delivering on his agenda. His coddling of the Saudi royals was stomach-churning.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Paterson and Jersey City New Jersey; also some in outer boroughs, IIRC.

    9/11 was before everyone had a video camera in his pocket, and there were fears of Islamophobic backlash (Islamophobiaphobia?), so to some extent this ended up getting memory-holed, but it was in newspapers and TV news broadcasts at the time.
    , @NOTA
    I think he is in over his head, and he hasn't managed to build a team he trusts around him. That's why his White House is leaking everything and all the leaked stories are about the dysfunctional management style.

    But making nice with the Saudis doesn't look so offensive to me. They're truly an awful regime, but they're also an ally, and foreign relations is often about making nice with nauseating allies. (And given what happened in a power vacuum in Iraq, Libya, Yemen, and the uncontrolled areas of Syria, I don't want to know what would happen if the Saudi monarchy fell.).
    , @Kyle a
    I think what you meant to post was, "the Saudi's coddling of our president was stomach-churning." I fixed it for you.
    , @Of course it was
    Picking a fight over the inauguration crowd was really dumb. The obvious reason that previous inaugurations drew bigger crowds was that there are large numbers of inside the beltway (and not far outside the beltway) residents who were much more excited about Obama than Trump, and otherwise have nothing else to do. That the suckers of the public teat aren't thrilled about Trump is a good thing.

    As for coddling the Saudis, the ability and willingness to suck up to assholes can be a valuable skill. I wish I had it. We can only hope that he has something in mind.
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  15. Obviously, to be be a successful real estate developer, you have to blow a lot of smoke about how everything is coming together beautifully.

    Sure, but Trump was not a successful real estate developer. He was at best a mediocre real estate developer, and a very successful reality star and personal brand marketer. Trump is more like the Kardashians than he is like Stephen Ross or Larry Silverstein.

    Read More
    • Disagree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    He built a skyscraper with his name on it on 5th Avenue at 57th Street in Manhattan. If he only did that, he'd qualify has a successful real estate developer, and he did a lot more than that.
    , @Kyle a
    He wasn't a successful real estate developer? Jesus. I have been asleep for the last 40 years.
    , @ben tillman

    Sure, but Trump was not a successful real estate developer. He was at best a mediocre real estate developer, and a very successful reality star and personal brand marketer. Trump is more like the Kardashians than he is like Stephen Ross or Larry Silverstein.
     
    What a fascinating perspective!

    No one has ever heard of Stephen Ross, and Larry Silverstein is known only because he told the authorities to "pull" WTC 7.

    Trump, however, was universally known by the 1980's, and as of the 2016 election there were millions upon millions of Americans who knew of Trump but had never heard of anything relating to him being a "reality star".

    The "reality star" stuff was an offshoot of the "successful developer" stuff. How old are you?
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  16. @gruff
    All y'all "he cucked!!1" whiners need to keep firmly in mind that ICE is off the chain and action is being taken to reduce immigration. Stop wasting your time complaining and start working to make gains in the middle, push that Overton, take ADVANTAGE OF THIS OPPORTUNITY. TIME IS SHORT.

    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association. It is true that there weren’t many alternatives on offer, but a Saunders type “left wing economic nationalism” would probably have had more of a chance of long term broad based success.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed “people of color” seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for “white people” than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the “talented tenth”.

    What the anti-immigration movement needs is more Morrisseys – more “lefty” types willing to stand up and be counted. Wishful thinking probably but the arrogance of the “Desi Girls” of the world may yet get some white lefties to realize they have let vipers into the nest.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Sanders wasn't a viable alternative. He would have been, had he won the nomination, but to win it, he would have had to damage Hillary, which he wasn't willing to do, even after it came out that the Democrats had colluded with her against him.
    , @reiner Tor

    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association.
     
    That is what many of us fear. There is still hope, of course.
    , @Random Dude on the Internet

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed “people of color” seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for “white people” than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the “talented tenth”.
     
    Cultural change never stops on a dime and this is the product of two generations of anti-white sentiment that have been building up.

    That seems pretty obvious to me but I guess people are trying harder and harder to find ways to make it seem like we're totally hopeless and the best thing to do is to throw up our hands and make snarky and pithy blog posts before we get sent off to the labor camps.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    If elected, Sanders would have accomplished nothing as president except what the establishment wanted. He would have folded like a cheap umbrella, as he demonstrated during his campaign. One example was surrendering his stage to BLM and standing behind them like a schmendrick. Another was his refusal to really take Hillary on for her corruption. Still another--and it shows his lack of principle--was his quickly falling in line with the DNC open-borders policy despite demonstrating in his interview with Ezra Klein that he knows it hurts American workers.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Well, there is the consideration that its part of the Trump Derangement Syndrome triggering panic and overwhelming response.
    , @Cloudbuster
    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed “people of color” seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for “white people” than ever before?

    Eight years of Obama and Holder/Lynch?
    , @e
    This seems to be a balanced article about his success in NYC:

    http://nypost.com/2016/02/07/how-donald-trump-helped-save-new-york-city/
    , @MBlanc46
    "Incompetent and transparent fraud" is perhaps a bit strong, but it's certainly the case that anti-globalists deserved a better candidate. Trump's all the political system would allow, so he's what we got. And four years of Trump is better than four years of the Clintons.
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  17. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Ali Choudhury
    Really, where were they cheering? The only ones I remember publicly cheering were the Gaza Palestinians.

    \Why he even made an issue about the crowd is beyond me, he seems in over his head and apt to starting pointless fights rather than delivering on his agenda. His coddling of the Saudi royals was stomach-churning.

    Paterson and Jersey City New Jersey; also some in outer boroughs, IIRC.

    9/11 was before everyone had a video camera in his pocket, and there were fears of Islamophobic backlash (Islamophobiaphobia?), so to some extent this ended up getting memory-holed, but it was in newspapers and TV news broadcasts at the time.

    Read More
    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    http://21stcenturywire.com/2015/09/11/911-revisited-declassified-fbi-files-reveal-new-details-about-the-five-israelis/

    You really are full of shit.
    , @Ali Choudhury
    I'm not convinced by that, I was watching and reading news and blogs heavily back then and I don't remember any mention of public Muslim celebrations in New Jersey.

    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2015/nov/22/donald-trump/fact-checking-trumps-claim-thousands-new-jersey-ch/

    On 11th September 2001, I had to drive friends to a song and dance show in northern England featuring Indian and Pakistani performers with a mostly Muslim audience. During the show a middle-aged man grabbed the mic and said the attack was a long time coming and America had received some well-deserved payback for its global arrogance. Sentiments like that were expressed freely, in places no white journalist would have been around and definitely not in places Trump would have any reason to drive past.
    , @ANON
    If it were in TV broadcasts and newspaper stories in this century, you'd have no trouble finding links.

    Your memory is playing tricks on you.
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  18. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Obviously, to be be a successful real estate developer, you have to blow a lot of smoke about how everything is coming together beautifully.
     
    Sure, but Trump was not a successful real estate developer. He was at best a mediocre real estate developer, and a very successful reality star and personal brand marketer. Trump is more like the Kardashians than he is like Stephen Ross or Larry Silverstein.

    He built a skyscraper with his name on it on 5th Avenue at 57th Street in Manhattan. If he only did that, he’d qualify has a successful real estate developer, and he did a lot more than that.

    Read More
    • Agree: EriK, PiltdownMan
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  19. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Peter Akuleyev
    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association. It is true that there weren't many alternatives on offer, but a Saunders type "left wing economic nationalism" would probably have had more of a chance of long term broad based success.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed "people of color" seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for "white people" than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the "talented tenth".

    What the anti-immigration movement needs is more Morrisseys - more "lefty" types willing to stand up and be counted. Wishful thinking probably but the arrogance of the "Desi Girls" of the world may yet get some white lefties to realize they have let vipers into the nest.

    Sanders wasn’t a viable alternative. He would have been, had he won the nomination, but to win it, he would have had to damage Hillary, which he wasn’t willing to do, even after it came out that the Democrats had colluded with her against him.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    On the plus side ol' Bernie is still alive with a nice new lakefront property.
    , @David
    The 2016 Democratic Primary was like the Yacht Races on the Great Lakes in the War of 1812. Neither candidate wanted to engage the other. It's almost like it was scripted and the outcome foreordained.
    , @Lot

    but to win it, he would have had to damage Hillary, which he wasn’t willing to do
     
    I think Sanders ran a near-perfect campaign. To win he needed the votes of people who personally liked Hillary. Tearing her down would not have helped him.

    He was relentlessly negative about her policy positions and bad judgment on issues from Iraq to Wall Street regulation. But one of the highest points of his campaign was defending her and attacking the press when he said at a debate "I think we are all sick and tired of hearing about Hillary's emails." He started the race expected to be a Dennis Kucinich 3% of the vote type campaign, and ended it fairly close to a winner.

    What killed him was that Southern blacks all voted for Hillary. I think the reason they did this is they are used to losing elections in the South, and based on prior experience know that the best bet is the well funded establishment Democrat. That judgment is usually sound, it just wasn't in 2016.
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  20. Trump is at his best when he acts as a Real State Developer…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cindy
    Think of the USA as one great, great, GREAT big piece of RE. He's doing fine. He's going to be fine.
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  21. @reiner Tor
    As I wrote, it's taken from the wrong angle. From that angle it looks as if the Mall was full, but it wasn't.

    You have to take a picture from above from a helicopter or drone in order to see the true density of the crowd.

    You have to take a picture from above from a helicopter or drone in order to see the true density of the crowd.

    One problem was white ground covering deployed on the Mall for the Trump inauguration made the visual difference seem all the more stark. Whoever wins the next election would be wise to insist that the grass gets trampled, or that dark covering be used.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Thanks, that's new information to me.
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  22. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You have to take a picture from above from a helicopter or drone in order to see the true density of the crowd.
     
    One problem was white ground covering deployed on the Mall for the Trump inauguration made the visual difference seem all the more stark. Whoever wins the next election would be wise to insist that the grass gets trampled, or that dark covering be used.

    Thanks, that’s new information to me.

    Read More
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  23. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @Peter Akuleyev
    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association. It is true that there weren't many alternatives on offer, but a Saunders type "left wing economic nationalism" would probably have had more of a chance of long term broad based success.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed "people of color" seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for "white people" than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the "talented tenth".

    What the anti-immigration movement needs is more Morrisseys - more "lefty" types willing to stand up and be counted. Wishful thinking probably but the arrogance of the "Desi Girls" of the world may yet get some white lefties to realize they have let vipers into the nest.

    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association.

    That is what many of us fear. There is still hope, of course.

    Read More
    • Agree: Kevin C.
    • Replies: @ben tillman
    Give me a break. There is nothing to ruin.

    Anti-immigrationism (i.e., advocacy of society's right to discriminate between self and non-self) is already streng verboten.
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  24. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Just know this: in America, it is traditional to body-slam reporters from The Guardian — it is heritage

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Grappling with the fourth estate—it’s part of the work.
    , @MBlanc46
    It ought to become a tradition. It's past time that partisan professional liars experience some pain from the people that they slander.
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  25. on the firing of FBI director James Comey, Trump could not for one single day stick to the simple if ludicrous script that his aides hawked in the immediate aftermath: that Comey was fired at the suggestion of Jeff Sessions and Rod Rosenstein, the attorney general and his deputy, out of gallantry to Hillary Clinton, the damsel distressed by Comey’s political whims last October.

    While Comey was away in California, Trump fired him by surprise and ordered everything to be confiscated from Comey’s FBI office.

    It seems that Trump had reason to think that Comey had secretly recorded conversations between himself and Trump. That’s why Trump tweeted:

    James Comey better hope that there are no “tapes” of our conversations before he starts leaking to the press.

    https://www.jerrypournelle.com/chaosmanor/recovery-opinionanalysis-on-comey-and-draining-the-swamp-a-note-on-education/

    Read More
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  26. Anonym says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Sanders wasn't a viable alternative. He would have been, had he won the nomination, but to win it, he would have had to damage Hillary, which he wasn't willing to do, even after it came out that the Democrats had colluded with her against him.

    On the plus side ol’ Bernie is still alive with a nice new lakefront property.

    Read More
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  27. Congratulations to Greg Gianforte!

    Read More
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  28. dearieme says:

    “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. … ”

    Until the sudden spurt of Jews in the 30s, I doubt that any country sent their best people to the USA. The point is that there’s a hell of a difference between mediocre people from Europe and the criminal classes from Mexico.

    I’ll bet he’d not be honest enough to say that, though.

    Read More
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  29. Lot says:

    Trump stabs his voters in the back and extends TPS status for Haiti, so more work permits for Haitian illegals plus no deportations

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/haiti/article151930167.html.

    https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/05/24/2017-10749/extension-of-the-designation-of-haiti-for-temporary-protected-status

    All Trump needed to do was nothing and simply let the TPS designation expire. Instead he took an affirmative act to screw us. More illegals with work permits, more crime, more Creole-speakers and voodoo, more Haitian anchor babies, more 80IQ kids dumbing down our public schools, more and larger “Little Haitis” in our cities. Trump this week acted to make America less like America and more like Haiti.

    I hope Kris Kobach is watching. Trump showed the path to winning the presidential election. In 2020 we need someone who keeps his word.

    Read More
    • Replies: @IHTG
    https://www.dhs.gov/news/2017/05/22/secretary-kellys-statement-limited-extension-haitis-designation-temporary-protected

    Secretary Kelly was particularly encouraged by representations made to him directly by the Haitian government regarding their desire to welcome the safe repatriation of Haitian TPS recipients in the near future. “This six-month extension should allow Haitian TPS recipients living in the United States time to attain travel documents and make other necessary arrangements for their ultimate departure from the United States, and should also provide the Haitian government with the time it needs to prepare for the future repatriation of all current TPS recipients. We plan to continue to work closely with the Haitian government, including assisting the government in proactively providing travel documents for its citizens.”
     
    Miami Herald: "Six-month extension for Haitian TPS is not enough"

    Note: We're talking about around 50,000 people here.

    , @reiner Tor
    So much winning! Where are the eeyores now?

    /sarcasm

    The problem is, of course, that while Trump is certainly better than Hillary (see the previous post about the G7 and Italy), he's still awful, and as Peter Akuleyev wrote, he might easily discredit anti-immigration positions in general by associating it with Trumpism - lowbrow, Ryancare, disastrous foreign policy, etc.

    In spite of this Haiti thing, there's still hope, but Ann Coulter's analogy is a good one. As she wrote, he promised to take us from Chicago to California in six days, and spent the first three days driving us to Ohio, raising fears he might be driving to New York instead. Now he may still turn around and get us to California, but there's reason to get worried.
    , @MW
    John Kelly at least claims that this renewal is Fine, But Just This One Last Time. Do you not believe him?

    Trump was never extremely anti-immigration. He wants legal immigration, and smart immigration, but he does want immigration and he's been pretty consistent about that in his speaking. His wall always had a Big, Beautiful Door. His problem was not that Mexico was sending its people, but that it wasn't sending its best people. The fact that Trump was willing to criticize anyone from Mexico made people hear all sorts of things that he never said.

    In the spirit of this post ... part of the problem is that most politicians are dishonest in the other direction. They spend all their days praising immigrants and immigration, when our actual policy is moderately harsh. Yes, we let in millions and it's too much, but that's compared to billions who would move here if they could. So politicians have perhaps trained us to interpret political speech on immigration in the "harsher than they claim" direction.
    , @MBlanc46
    "Stab in the back" is not inappropriate. But I wonder whether it's not more of a matter of his having forgotten all that he said during the campaign about immigration.
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  30. TBA says:
    @fred c dobbs
    Mexico. Indeed.

    Even ignoring the criminal element, I've tried to tell people until I am blue in the face......NOT ALL MEXICANS ARE THE SAME. ZMan says he lives on the edge of the Baltimore ghetto. Well, I live on the edge of an Orange County barrio. And I mostly see squat round brown people, the kind you might find in southern Mexico and El Salvador. Because that's EXACTLY where most of these people are from. These are indigenous, unskilled, semi-literate peasants. Mexico's version of Arkansas, Mississippi and West Virginia. THAT's who Mexico sends our way. What would Canada think of Americans if the only visitors to the Great White North were from those three states?

    What would Canada think of Americans if the only visitors to the Great White North were from those three states?

    That they’re not sending their best.

    Read More
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  31. IHTG says:
    @Lot
    Trump stabs his voters in the back and extends TPS status for Haiti, so more work permits for Haitian illegals plus no deportations

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/haiti/article151930167.html.

    https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/05/24/2017-10749/extension-of-the-designation-of-haiti-for-temporary-protected-status

    All Trump needed to do was nothing and simply let the TPS designation expire. Instead he took an affirmative act to screw us. More illegals with work permits, more crime, more Creole-speakers and voodoo, more Haitian anchor babies, more 80IQ kids dumbing down our public schools, more and larger "Little Haitis" in our cities. Trump this week acted to make America less like America and more like Haiti.

    I hope Kris Kobach is watching. Trump showed the path to winning the presidential election. In 2020 we need someone who keeps his word.

    https://www.dhs.gov/news/2017/05/22/secretary-kellys-statement-limited-extension-haitis-designation-temporary-protected

    Secretary Kelly was particularly encouraged by representations made to him directly by the Haitian government regarding their desire to welcome the safe repatriation of Haitian TPS recipients in the near future. “This six-month extension should allow Haitian TPS recipients living in the United States time to attain travel documents and make other necessary arrangements for their ultimate departure from the United States, and should also provide the Haitian government with the time it needs to prepare for the future repatriation of all current TPS recipients. We plan to continue to work closely with the Haitian government, including assisting the government in proactively providing travel documents for its citizens.”

    Miami Herald: “Six-month extension for Haitian TPS is not enough”

    Note: We’re talking about around 50,000 people here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    No, that is the wrong conclusion from the 56000 number.

    TPS stops deportation of all non-felon illegals because they wait until ICE grabs them before applying for TPS status. For this reason ICE rately even bothers to try to deport TPS country nationals unless they are convicted felons. They know they will lose any removal fight.

    The 56,000 number is just those who applied either because they want an on the books job or to stop a deportation. In reality every Haitian illegal benefits and it encourages more.
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  32. @Peter Akuleyev
    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association. It is true that there weren't many alternatives on offer, but a Saunders type "left wing economic nationalism" would probably have had more of a chance of long term broad based success.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed "people of color" seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for "white people" than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the "talented tenth".

    What the anti-immigration movement needs is more Morrisseys - more "lefty" types willing to stand up and be counted. Wishful thinking probably but the arrogance of the "Desi Girls" of the world may yet get some white lefties to realize they have let vipers into the nest.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed “people of color” seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for “white people” than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the “talented tenth”.

    Cultural change never stops on a dime and this is the product of two generations of anti-white sentiment that have been building up.

    That seems pretty obvious to me but I guess people are trying harder and harder to find ways to make it seem like we’re totally hopeless and the best thing to do is to throw up our hands and make snarky and pithy blog posts before we get sent off to the labor camps.

    Read More
    • Agree: Forbes
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  33. OT, the goy in Montana who allegedly punched a hostile reporter has comfortably won his special election to the U.S. House. Magically the election has immediately ceased to be an Important Test For The Trump Administration ™

    Read More
    • Replies: @27 year old
    Follow up on Montana from Jeff Bezos' emo blog:

    The darker forces that propelled President Trump’s rise are beginning to frame and define the rest of the Republican Party.

    When GOP House candidate Greg Gianforte assaulted a reporter who had attempted to ask him a question Wednesday night in Montana, many saw not an isolated outburst by an individual, but the obvious, violent result of Trump’s charge that journalists are “the enemy of the people.” Nonetheless, Gianforte won Thursday’s special election to fill a safe Republican seat.

    “Respectfully, I’d submit that the president has unearthed some demons,”
    Rep. Mark Sanford (R-S.C.) said.
     
    Where is that name familiar from? Oh right, he used to be governor and he got caught having an affair and a secret baby while his wife died of cancer. Anyway. You might think that this pos is going to whine that Trump's anti media rhetoric has encouraged violence against the media. But actually,

    "I’ve talked to a number of people about it back home. They say, ‘Well, look, if the president can say whatever, why can’t I say whatever?’ He’s given them license.”
    ...
    “There is a total weirdness out there,” Sanford said. “People feel like, if the president of the United States can say anything to anybody at any time, then I guess I can too. And that is a very dangerous phenomenon.”

     

    The real danger according to this REPUBLICAN is that Trump might make people feel free to speak their minds and criticize their rulers...

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/the-gop-inherits-what-trump-has-wrought/2017/05/26/4e1943ea-4177-11e7-adba-394ee67a7582_story.html?utm_term=.745dd1c1427f
    , @Dave Pinsen
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/867973887715192832
    , @Alden
    The Guardian was the main propaganda outlet for the Soviet Union until
    about 1980. It was also a cheerleader for the extermination of White British by black and brown immigrants. The Guardian crusaded for immigration and against policing of the black and brown neighborhoods. The Guardian led the cover up on tens of thousands of rapes of 12-16 year old White English girls by Muslim adult men over 20 years.

    The Guardian loathes and detests White Americans. The educated elites read The Guardian

    Around 1980 the Guardian became the main English propaganda outlet for the usurious banks, globalization and the extermination of White Europeans.

    Why would The Guardian send a reporter to cover an obscure congressional race in a rural White, conservative fly over state? He was sent in the hopes the Democrat would win. Then The Guardian, NYSlimes and all the anti White propaganda outlets would carry on for weeks that the election of a democratic congrrss critter is the beginning of the end of Trump and the evil White Republican Party.

    I should not write what I think should happen to Guardian reporters.
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  34. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @Lot
    Trump stabs his voters in the back and extends TPS status for Haiti, so more work permits for Haitian illegals plus no deportations

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/haiti/article151930167.html.

    https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/05/24/2017-10749/extension-of-the-designation-of-haiti-for-temporary-protected-status

    All Trump needed to do was nothing and simply let the TPS designation expire. Instead he took an affirmative act to screw us. More illegals with work permits, more crime, more Creole-speakers and voodoo, more Haitian anchor babies, more 80IQ kids dumbing down our public schools, more and larger "Little Haitis" in our cities. Trump this week acted to make America less like America and more like Haiti.

    I hope Kris Kobach is watching. Trump showed the path to winning the presidential election. In 2020 we need someone who keeps his word.

    So much winning! Where are the eeyores now?

    /sarcasm

    The problem is, of course, that while Trump is certainly better than Hillary (see the previous post about the G7 and Italy), he’s still awful, and as Peter Akuleyev wrote, he might easily discredit anti-immigration positions in general by associating it with Trumpism – lowbrow, Ryancare, disastrous foreign policy, etc.

    In spite of this Haiti thing, there’s still hope, but Ann Coulter’s analogy is a good one. As she wrote, he promised to take us from Chicago to California in six days, and spent the first three days driving us to Ohio, raising fears he might be driving to New York instead. Now he may still turn around and get us to California, but there’s reason to get worried.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    You are right about Trump harming our cause by association. Public polls of immigration issues have turned strongly against restriction the past few months.

    That would be fine if we were getting results, but we are not.
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  35. astorian says:

    Trump isn’t a liar- he always means exactly what he says at the moment he says it. He always says exactly what he believes at the very second he believes it.

    The problem is, like Mr. Toad of Toad Hall, he’s forever changing his mind about what he believes and what he values. Toad was being totally truthful and sincere when he declared that he wanted to spend the rest of his life in a gypsy caravan. He just moved on to something else (in this case, cars) in a hurry, and truthfully claimed, “The caravan? That was just a whim, a passing fancy. THIS is my true calling!!!”

    Donald Trump was probably on the level when he said immigration is bad and that we should build a wall. He probably meant what he said. But he’s already lost his enthusiasm for the project, and is likely to move on to another fad shortly.

    Which means anybody relying on Trump to do anything he promises is delusional.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon, Laugh Track
    • Replies: @dearieme
    The best reason for voting for Trump was to keep the appalling Hellary out. Anything else is a bonus.
    , @Coemgen
    That Time Trump Spent Nearly $100,000 On An Ad Criticizing U.S. Foreign Policy In 1987

    Trump stays "on message" for things that are important to him. Things that aren't important to him are delegated to subordinates. He is probably enjoying sending sophists into conniptions with his off-the-cuff utterances.
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  36. Hockamaw says:

    Trump is an enigma inside a riddle, wrapped in a mystery. I suspect he never took any of his policies too seriously to be honest, and I’m not expecting many huge victories on immigration. Anyone who still thinks we’re getting a big beautiful wall for example is dreaming. However, Trump’s near-superhuman election win against BOTH the Bush and Clinton machines was probably the greatest blow against the forces of crypto-communist political correctness I’ve seen in my lifetime. He proved to us they aren’t invincible, and for that he is a hero in my eyes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @European-American
    Anyone who has worked in business for a charismatic boss knows they bend, the truth, change their mind, cut corners, aggravate their subordinates, do whatever it takes to get the contract or the sale, go back on their word, play one subordinate against another, misunderstand important details, make bad off-the-cuff decisions, don't follow any kind of principle, and just make no goddam sense.

    Still, the good ones manage to get good stuff done, for a time at least. With success, people talk about the boss's vision, his reality distortion field, his lovable approximations, the loyalty he fosters, and so on. You can't argue with success.

    Presumably this kind of behavior is more rare in established, stable industries, like nuclear power, the auto industry, or the media (last one is a joke). But in turbulent businesses like real estate or the computer industry, it's the norm.
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  37. @Peter Akuleyev
    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association. It is true that there weren't many alternatives on offer, but a Saunders type "left wing economic nationalism" would probably have had more of a chance of long term broad based success.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed "people of color" seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for "white people" than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the "talented tenth".

    What the anti-immigration movement needs is more Morrisseys - more "lefty" types willing to stand up and be counted. Wishful thinking probably but the arrogance of the "Desi Girls" of the world may yet get some white lefties to realize they have let vipers into the nest.

    If elected, Sanders would have accomplished nothing as president except what the establishment wanted. He would have folded like a cheap umbrella, as he demonstrated during his campaign. One example was surrendering his stage to BLM and standing behind them like a schmendrick. Another was his refusal to really take Hillary on for her corruption. Still another–and it shows his lack of principle–was his quickly falling in line with the DNC open-borders policy despite demonstrating in his interview with Ezra Klein that he knows it hurts American workers.

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    • Replies: @anonymous

    He would have folded like a cheap umbrella,
     
    He allowed some fatso black women to push him around like the spineless wimp that he is. He's always been all talk, all armchair theory and has no achievements outside of government employment. Wasn't much there.
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  38. NOTA says:
    @Ali Choudhury
    Really, where were they cheering? The only ones I remember publicly cheering were the Gaza Palestinians.

    \Why he even made an issue about the crowd is beyond me, he seems in over his head and apt to starting pointless fights rather than delivering on his agenda. His coddling of the Saudi royals was stomach-churning.

    I think he is in over his head, and he hasn’t managed to build a team he trusts around him. That’s why his White House is leaking everything and all the leaked stories are about the dysfunctional management style.

    But making nice with the Saudis doesn’t look so offensive to me. They’re truly an awful regime, but they’re also an ally, and foreign relations is often about making nice with nauseating allies. (And given what happened in a power vacuum in Iraq, Libya, Yemen, and the uncontrolled areas of Syria, I don’t want to know what would happen if the Saudi monarchy fell.).

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    • Replies: @e
    I don't know if this is true or not as it came from Dick Morris, who is stunningly accurate on some things and stunningly wrong on others. He says that right before Trump took office, Obama changed the job status of a bunch of White House staffers, political appointees under him, to civil service employees who couldn't be fired. He maintains most of them still are staffers and that man of the leaks that are deemed to have come from the WH come from them.

    I take Morris most of the time with a grain of salt.
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  39. This is true.

    I waver between thinking Trump is just honest, direct, and off-the-cuff / and thinking that he strategically decides just how “off-the-cuff” and rough he will sound.

    His being a smart-ass appeals to many of us. (Very much to me) I assume he knows that, but I can’t tell how cold and calculating he is about this.

    Either way, it works.

    As I’ve said, he’s the big kid who kicks over the big rock with the creepy-crawly things underneath and says, “hey look at the ugly shit under here!” That kid is either doing that to gross you out and enjoy your response, or he is genuinely interested in what he finds…or both. Right now, he’s in trouble with our parents, and they’d rather we not play with him.

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    • Agree: MW
    • Replies: @DRA
    Trump seems to have a cultural affinity to many of his supporters. If he were a Texan he would be accused of telling 'Texas Tall Tales', aka being a 'Cracker'. Not a 'whip cracker', or racist, but part of the cultural continuum from the Celtic fringe through appalachia and the south.

    We recognize the braggadocio and the blarney, and don't take him literally. We don't take it as deep seated dishonesty, as was the case with Hillary. And we think he is on our side, which we never suspected Hillary of being, or Obama after at most the first year.
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  40. @Dave Pinsen
    He told the truth about her other examples too. There were Muslims cheering on 9/11, and their were contemporaneous reports about it. Whether it was thousands or hundreds, who knows, but the dishonest press didn't want to concede that, so they segued to a claim that Trump mocked the disabled reporter who wrote one of those contemporaneous reports, then subsequently said he didn't remember.

    When you drill down, that's the basic pattern. Trump tells the truth about something (cheering on 9/11, his crowds being bigger than what the press initially claimed, illegals voting), and then the press claims he lied because his estimate is either off or unconfirmed, even though he is essentially correct (e.g., the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started).

    You somehow forgot the cheering Jews on 9/11

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I didn't forget about those 5 Israelis, but they weren't relevant there because 1) Trump didn't mention them; and 2) The press didn't claim Trump was lying about them.
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  41. Scottish Enlightenment. German Idealism. The Scots said know the world and make your peace with it no matter how utterly horrible the earthly realm is. That thinking makes good engineers and warriors. The British Empire took advantage of Scots who took the world as it and still found beauty in the world and carried on with honor and energy.

    German Idealism makes you question everything about existence and reality. Who is doing the raping? Someone is doing the raping? President Trump rightly said that illegal alien invaders were raping and killing and assaulting people in the United States. What is knowable? Can we be sure external events and things are real?

    President Trump is German and Scottish. Back To Blood.

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    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    I'm pretty sure that I wouldn't characterize the Scottish Enlightenment as you do, but that's an interesting way to analyze Trump.
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  42. Mark Caplan says: • Website

    Comey was fired [...] out of gallantry to Hillary Clinton.

    I’ve seen that Lefist meme numerous times. My understanding is that Trump fired Comey because, in his view, the FBI’s investigation into Hillary’s home-brew email system was a sham. Comey closed the case while recommending that no criminal charges be brought against Hillary. Comey said Hillary didn’t intend to break the law even though criminal intent was irrelevant to the statute involving mishandling of classified information. The FBI interviewed Hillary without placing her under oath, keeping a transcript of her testimony, or even maintaining a record of which agents interviewed her.

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  43. Mark Caplan says: • Website

    Comey was fired [...] out of gallantry to Hillary Clinton.

    I’ve seen that Lefist meme numerous times. My understanding is that Trump fired Comey because, in his view, the FBI’s investigation into Hillary’s home-brew email system was a sham. Comey recommended that no criminal charges be brought against Hillary on the basis that Hillary didn’t intend to break the law. However, criminal intent was irrelevant to the statute involving mishandling of classified information. The FBI interviewed Hillary without placing her under oath, keeping a transcript of her testimony, or even maintaining a record of which agents interviewed her.

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  44. @27 year old
    OT, the goy in Montana who allegedly punched a hostile reporter has comfortably won his special election to the U.S. House. Magically the election has immediately ceased to be an Important Test For The Trump Administration (tm)

    Follow up on Montana from Jeff Bezos’ emo blog:

    The darker forces that propelled President Trump’s rise are beginning to frame and define the rest of the Republican Party.

    When GOP House candidate Greg Gianforte assaulted a reporter who had attempted to ask him a question Wednesday night in Montana, many saw not an isolated outburst by an individual, but the obvious, violent result of Trump’s charge that journalists are “the enemy of the people.” Nonetheless, Gianforte won Thursday’s special election to fill a safe Republican seat.

    “Respectfully, I’d submit that the president has unearthed some demons,”
    Rep. Mark Sanford (R-S.C.) said.

    Where is that name familiar from? Oh right, he used to be governor and he got caught having an affair and a secret baby while his wife died of cancer. Anyway. You might think that this pos is going to whine that Trump’s anti media rhetoric has encouraged violence against the media. But actually,

    “I’ve talked to a number of people about it back home. They say, ‘Well, look, if the president can say whatever, why can’t I say whatever?’ He’s given them license.”

    “There is a total weirdness out there,” Sanford said. “People feel like, if the president of the United States can say anything to anybody at any time, then I guess I can too. And that is a very dangerous phenomenon.”

    The real danger according to this REPUBLICAN is that Trump might make people feel free to speak their minds and criticize their rulers…

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/the-gop-inherits-what-trump-has-wrought/2017/05/26/4e1943ea-4177-11e7-adba-394ee67a7582_story.html?utm_term=.745dd1c1427f

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Sanford is a South Carolina dirtbag who claimed to be on the Appalachian trail while he was having an affair with a foreigner women. I have some South Carolina ancestry by way of Barbados on my father's side and I can tell you that treasonous rodents like Lindsey Graham and Mark Sanford do not represent the honorable people of South Carolina.
    , @Mike Sylwester

    ... he [Mark Sanford] used to be governor and he got caught having an affair and a secret baby while his wife died of cancer
     
    You are mixing up Mark Sanford and John Edwards.
    , @res
    Wow. The most liked comments at that WaPo article are even more leftish than is usual at the NYT.
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  45. As for blowing smoke and telling every one of fourteen different stake-holders that it’s all coming together beautifully:

    Many endeavors have to come together synergistically. This means that a developer has to find a way to get a bunch of separate parties to agree to something to which they won’t commit individually. Those subcontractors can’t afford to go all-in unless the others are also committed.

    Think: If you’re a banker, you can’t risk your depositors’ money on a building project unless you know it’s going to get built. That means you have to hear from Donny that the city is approving the development, the mob-owned cement company is on board, the EPA isn’t going to say it’s a wetland, etc.

    Rather than trying to label a man as a liar when he gets everyone on board, we should call him a doer who gets people to commit to something. Without those guys, we’d still be living in log cabins. Seriously, such men are heroes in a world of pussies and followers. (Though, admittedly, Donald Trump is one of the more P.T. Barnum types.)

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  46. @27 year old
    Follow up on Montana from Jeff Bezos' emo blog:

    The darker forces that propelled President Trump’s rise are beginning to frame and define the rest of the Republican Party.

    When GOP House candidate Greg Gianforte assaulted a reporter who had attempted to ask him a question Wednesday night in Montana, many saw not an isolated outburst by an individual, but the obvious, violent result of Trump’s charge that journalists are “the enemy of the people.” Nonetheless, Gianforte won Thursday’s special election to fill a safe Republican seat.

    “Respectfully, I’d submit that the president has unearthed some demons,”
    Rep. Mark Sanford (R-S.C.) said.
     
    Where is that name familiar from? Oh right, he used to be governor and he got caught having an affair and a secret baby while his wife died of cancer. Anyway. You might think that this pos is going to whine that Trump's anti media rhetoric has encouraged violence against the media. But actually,

    "I’ve talked to a number of people about it back home. They say, ‘Well, look, if the president can say whatever, why can’t I say whatever?’ He’s given them license.”
    ...
    “There is a total weirdness out there,” Sanford said. “People feel like, if the president of the United States can say anything to anybody at any time, then I guess I can too. And that is a very dangerous phenomenon.”

     

    The real danger according to this REPUBLICAN is that Trump might make people feel free to speak their minds and criticize their rulers...

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/the-gop-inherits-what-trump-has-wrought/2017/05/26/4e1943ea-4177-11e7-adba-394ee67a7582_story.html?utm_term=.745dd1c1427f

    Sanford is a South Carolina dirtbag who claimed to be on the Appalachian trail while he was having an affair with a foreigner women. I have some South Carolina ancestry by way of Barbados on my father’s side and I can tell you that treasonous rodents like Lindsey Graham and Mark Sanford do not represent the honorable people of South Carolina.

    Read More
    • Replies: @FPD72
    Since South Carolina keeps electing these two, I can only interpret your statement as referring to the "honorable" portion of SC voters , who are outnumbered by the "dishonorable" people at the polls. Your statement cannot be interpreted to mean that the people of SC are honorable in the aggregate if they keep electing these dishonorable politicians.
    , @Randal

    I have some South Carolina ancestry by way of Barbados on my father’s side and I can tell you that treasonous rodents like Lindsey Graham and Mark Sanford do not represent the honorable people of South Carolina.
     
    And yet the honorable people of South Carolina keep electing and re-electing these (admittedly) treasonous rodents to represent them in government, with voting figures above 50% and often very greatly in excess of that figure.
    , @Moshe
    One of the finest epiphanies of my life was when I realized that I was "hiking the appalachian trail" while hiking The Appalachian Trail.

    To be clear, I knew I was doing the former but didn't realize I had done it on the more literal trail until I engaged in the customary post-coital math.
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  47. @Peter Akuleyev
    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association. It is true that there weren't many alternatives on offer, but a Saunders type "left wing economic nationalism" would probably have had more of a chance of long term broad based success.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed "people of color" seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for "white people" than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the "talented tenth".

    What the anti-immigration movement needs is more Morrisseys - more "lefty" types willing to stand up and be counted. Wishful thinking probably but the arrogance of the "Desi Girls" of the world may yet get some white lefties to realize they have let vipers into the nest.

    Well, there is the consideration that its part of the Trump Derangement Syndrome triggering panic and overwhelming response.

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  48. Thea says:
    @gruff
    All y'all "he cucked!!1" whiners need to keep firmly in mind that ICE is off the chain and action is being taken to reduce immigration. Stop wasting your time complaining and start working to make gains in the middle, push that Overton, take ADVANTAGE OF THIS OPPORTUNITY. TIME IS SHORT.

    We absolutely need to be having conversations on these topics with people we know, face to face. When events come up in the media that are spun to fit the narrative, we need to discuss what is really happening and what is important vs trivial.

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  49. @27 year old
    Follow up on Montana from Jeff Bezos' emo blog:

    The darker forces that propelled President Trump’s rise are beginning to frame and define the rest of the Republican Party.

    When GOP House candidate Greg Gianforte assaulted a reporter who had attempted to ask him a question Wednesday night in Montana, many saw not an isolated outburst by an individual, but the obvious, violent result of Trump’s charge that journalists are “the enemy of the people.” Nonetheless, Gianforte won Thursday’s special election to fill a safe Republican seat.

    “Respectfully, I’d submit that the president has unearthed some demons,”
    Rep. Mark Sanford (R-S.C.) said.
     
    Where is that name familiar from? Oh right, he used to be governor and he got caught having an affair and a secret baby while his wife died of cancer. Anyway. You might think that this pos is going to whine that Trump's anti media rhetoric has encouraged violence against the media. But actually,

    "I’ve talked to a number of people about it back home. They say, ‘Well, look, if the president can say whatever, why can’t I say whatever?’ He’s given them license.”
    ...
    “There is a total weirdness out there,” Sanford said. “People feel like, if the president of the United States can say anything to anybody at any time, then I guess I can too. And that is a very dangerous phenomenon.”

     

    The real danger according to this REPUBLICAN is that Trump might make people feel free to speak their minds and criticize their rulers...

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/the-gop-inherits-what-trump-has-wrought/2017/05/26/4e1943ea-4177-11e7-adba-394ee67a7582_story.html?utm_term=.745dd1c1427f

    … he [Mark Sanford] used to be governor and he got caught having an affair and a secret baby while his wife died of cancer

    You are mixing up Mark Sanford and John Edwards.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Sanford's the one who got caught having a secret affair conducted in South America on the taxpayer's dime.
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  50. In reaction to Trump promising to drain the swamp, Washington, DC, declared itself a protected wetland.

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    • LOL: Hockamaw, res
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  51. El Dato says:

    OT: It Begins!

    By the sometimes-good-sometimes-abhorrent Andrew Orlowski:

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/05/26/zuckerberg_superpac/

    A fundraising vehicle to help get the world’s fifth richest man Mark Zuckerberg elected as President of the United States will now take your money.

    The Super Political Action Committee (PAC) is called (inevitably) ‘Disrupt for America’ and describes itself as “a progressive advocacy group focused on pragmatic, grassroots activism with an emphasis on social media, organized assembly, and open discourse and debate.”

    These particular ‘progressives’ are a forgiving lot: Zuckerberg’s early business card at Facebook gave his job description as “I’m CEO, bitch”, and the frat boy culture manifested itself early on, according to former employees.

    But that’s all water under the bridge now.

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  52. Romanian says: • Website
    @Dave Pinsen
    He told the truth about her other examples too. There were Muslims cheering on 9/11, and their were contemporaneous reports about it. Whether it was thousands or hundreds, who knows, but the dishonest press didn't want to concede that, so they segued to a claim that Trump mocked the disabled reporter who wrote one of those contemporaneous reports, then subsequently said he didn't remember.

    When you drill down, that's the basic pattern. Trump tells the truth about something (cheering on 9/11, his crowds being bigger than what the press initially claimed, illegals voting), and then the press claims he lied because his estimate is either off or unconfirmed, even though he is essentially correct (e.g., the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started).

    Didn’t Nixon do that to get the hostile press to confirm his ballpark estimates, turning their gotcha moments into revelations for Americans?

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  53. David says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Sanders wasn't a viable alternative. He would have been, had he won the nomination, but to win it, he would have had to damage Hillary, which he wasn't willing to do, even after it came out that the Democrats had colluded with her against him.

    The 2016 Democratic Primary was like the Yacht Races on the Great Lakes in the War of 1812. Neither candidate wanted to engage the other. It’s almost like it was scripted and the outcome foreordained.

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  54. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @27 year old
    OT, the goy in Montana who allegedly punched a hostile reporter has comfortably won his special election to the U.S. House. Magically the election has immediately ceased to be an Important Test For The Trump Administration (tm)

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    2) Journalist-beatdowns are a career-enhancer, not a problem.

    Maybe Trump should reprise his WWE appearance and take down a journalist from time to time.
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  55. res says:
    @27 year old
    Follow up on Montana from Jeff Bezos' emo blog:

    The darker forces that propelled President Trump’s rise are beginning to frame and define the rest of the Republican Party.

    When GOP House candidate Greg Gianforte assaulted a reporter who had attempted to ask him a question Wednesday night in Montana, many saw not an isolated outburst by an individual, but the obvious, violent result of Trump’s charge that journalists are “the enemy of the people.” Nonetheless, Gianforte won Thursday’s special election to fill a safe Republican seat.

    “Respectfully, I’d submit that the president has unearthed some demons,”
    Rep. Mark Sanford (R-S.C.) said.
     
    Where is that name familiar from? Oh right, he used to be governor and he got caught having an affair and a secret baby while his wife died of cancer. Anyway. You might think that this pos is going to whine that Trump's anti media rhetoric has encouraged violence against the media. But actually,

    "I’ve talked to a number of people about it back home. They say, ‘Well, look, if the president can say whatever, why can’t I say whatever?’ He’s given them license.”
    ...
    “There is a total weirdness out there,” Sanford said. “People feel like, if the president of the United States can say anything to anybody at any time, then I guess I can too. And that is a very dangerous phenomenon.”

     

    The real danger according to this REPUBLICAN is that Trump might make people feel free to speak their minds and criticize their rulers...

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/the-gop-inherits-what-trump-has-wrought/2017/05/26/4e1943ea-4177-11e7-adba-394ee67a7582_story.html?utm_term=.745dd1c1427f

    Wow. The most liked comments at that WaPo article are even more leftish than is usual at the NYT.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    That's not left.

    That's the hometown paper of Empire. They're firing up the stormtroopers.
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  56. @Judah Benjamin Hur

    “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. … They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”
     
    That comment got him elected (that, and the fact that he's a great entertainer). He needs to remember that much!

    It’s also used by opponents as their most damning evidence of his racism and general unfitness. But the full quote makes it clear that it’s simply indisputable–if inconvenient.

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  57. It’s that old Jack Nicholson line … fewer and fewer of us can handle the truth nowadays. We’ve gone from Give-them-hell-Harry to Oh-my-God-he-didn’t-Trump!

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  58. @Dave Pinsen
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/867973887715192832

    2) Journalist-beatdowns are a career-enhancer, not a problem.

    Maybe Trump should reprise his WWE appearance and take down a journalist from time to time.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    Has anyone looked at the Web page of Ben Jacobs of The Guardian US. https://www.theguardian.com/profile/ben-jacobs It drips (a brand new legal term I just learned) with incitement.

    What did we fight the Revolutionary War for if not to give a Tory weasel like that a wedgie?
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  59. @fred c dobbs
    Mexico. Indeed.

    Even ignoring the criminal element, I've tried to tell people until I am blue in the face......NOT ALL MEXICANS ARE THE SAME. ZMan says he lives on the edge of the Baltimore ghetto. Well, I live on the edge of an Orange County barrio. And I mostly see squat round brown people, the kind you might find in southern Mexico and El Salvador. Because that's EXACTLY where most of these people are from. These are indigenous, unskilled, semi-literate peasants. Mexico's version of Arkansas, Mississippi and West Virginia. THAT's who Mexico sends our way. What would Canada think of Americans if the only visitors to the Great White North were from those three states?

    They might think Americans have common sense, as well as self-determination, and courage, among other things – the average resident of Orange County, California certainly conveys none of these qualities.

    Semi-Literate Peasants Indeed.

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    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    We live in Los Angeles and share your sentiment heartily.

    The previous commenter is part of the problem with his ignorant and self-satisfied stereotypes about people from those states. Look at the ubiquitous stupidity, ignorance (they are different things), sloth, and immaturity among many MILLIONS of people here in "enlightened" and "sophisticated" SoCal, and Mississippi, Arkansas, and West Virginia white Americans sound pretty good.
    , @ANON
    The only one of your links that I clicked on led to a page about William Faulkner, whose career, fame, and public esteem lies principally upon his continual theme of whites=racists and blacks=victims.

    It's nearly a hundred years of this indoctrination now, and still some of you resist!
    , @fred c dobbs
    Yes, many residents of those three states exhibit the traits you mention. But they are also low on most other socio-economic indices. That's an undeniable fact. If you want to fill in YOUR three favorite "worst" states, have at it. But you are missing my point entirely, just as Trump's detractors have.

    BTW - I love how you (and another responder) assumes I am conflating residents of those three southern states with Mexican peasantry. Y'all need a refresher in Reading Comprehension 101.

    Do you have kinfolk in one of the three? No disrespect intended to Razorback, Mountaineer or Rebel fans then .....lol

    BTW - when you DISAGREE with Sailer, do you then suggest that ".....the average resident of Los Angeles County, California certainly conveys none of these qualities......"???

    A - clown.
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  60. Whiskey says: • Website

    Trump is a sell out, of course. He’s better than Cackle-Pants but pretty much anyone including Michelle Obama and DeRay McKesson would have met that criteria.

    The fundamental problem is not a lack of virtue among politicians, that quality has always been non-existent, but rather structural. We have oligarchs who unlike the old line 19th Century Robber Barons such as Rockefeller, Carnegie, and Vanderbilt, do not build anything but create a “bust-out” like the Mafia.

    Its a short-term milk everything out and then run off with the proceeds to the next target. Carnegie had steel mills, Rockefeller had ongoing refineries and pipelines, and both had to moderate their desire for endless cheap Eastern European labor with the fear that said labor might just move en-masse if big enough to appropriate their stuff for themselves. Owning real property that provides value for oligarchs is a check on their worst population-replacement for cheap labor ambitions.

    Its not just Soros, though his “recipe” (thanks to 2Kevins podcast for this info) has been replicated:

    1. Buy off the Press, all of them. Nearly every press person is bought and paid for by one of: Soros, Buffet, Gates, Zuck, or Murdoch.
    2. Provide a “moralistic” cover for your bust-out activities … Soros did that as a Jew hunter for the Nazis in WWII Hungary, he does it now with Global Warming and BLM activists.
    3. Create chaos and disaster.
    4. Use said chaos and disaster for Western governments to overthrow nationalistic rulers and allow seizure of valuable assets to be stripped of all value and the oligarch to run off with the money leaving a ruined husk.

    The “Sage of Omaha” who has not lived there for forty years, spending most of his time with various mistresses in Palm Beach or NYC, is the same way. He’s lately partnering with the InBev guys for a leveraged buy out of Heinz Foods where the heavy debt load requires running production lines with no breakdown for cleaning. Which means bacteria builds up and people die from listeria. Obviously this type of bust-out is easier when there is no middle and working class as a check on oligarchs.

    Female consumerism and the sea-change in women’s constraints: the pill, condom, anonymous urban living, etc. means that most White women are objectively the enemy when it comes to checking mass Third World immigration by oligarchs and the pivot point of oligarch strength.

    [It is not therefore a "Jewish thing" to make every place look like Pakistan, since Jews don't do so well in Islamabad, but rather an oligarch thing to produce ever more bust-outs and run to New Zealand or the Upper East Side. Quite a number of oligarchs are Jews willing to sell out co-ethnics like Soros hunting them for the Nazis, and quite a number are Warren Buffett easily as evil as Soros but with a better schtick than Dr. Evil. Its not about Jewish HATE HATE HATE but THE MONEY.]

    Thus time to avoid hopium, Montana is an extreme outlier. In California where I live, Kamala Harris is our Senator along with DiFi, and it looks like BRown will be the last White man elected state-wide. Most White women in California just HATE HATE HATE White men for obvious reasons: too much beta male pedestalization which makes nerdy White guys (which is most White men) double down on the pedestalization instead of treating women like a Black pimp would treat them (Norman Mailer was perhaps right on this one thing only when he advised that).

    Reality — Trump was our best shot and he lacked PERFECTION in all things to fight both uber-powerful oligarchs with no real property to seize and their allies White women. Thus doomed to fail, and White men are already discriminated minorities in our own lands, this will not change for the better but worse. After Birmingham, both the US and UK will simply import MORE Muslims.

    Thus it is vital for White men to band together in a social movement, eschewing violence since the Left OWNS that and will crush any alternative (compare/contrast Eric Rudolph and Bill Ayers) but inducing raw fear in our enemies. Particularly White women who when fear is induced, become aroused. This means grinding, attrition social warfare. Making our demands heard, over and over again, by Oligarchs and their allies everywhere — at the Murdoch kids events, their kids schools, their spouses workplaces, and so on. Every day. For the rest of their lives. Look at how effective Muslim constant harassment of Whites has been in Europe to produce a total surrender by the female population there.

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  61. Agent76 says:

    Nice article and I have this with the Donald from his own lips.

    Jul 23, 2016 Trump Exposes Trump

    In his own words, Donald Trump reveals his hypocrisy about Iraq, immigration, health care, abortion, Libya, Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton and more.

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  62. FPD72 says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Sanford is a South Carolina dirtbag who claimed to be on the Appalachian trail while he was having an affair with a foreigner women. I have some South Carolina ancestry by way of Barbados on my father's side and I can tell you that treasonous rodents like Lindsey Graham and Mark Sanford do not represent the honorable people of South Carolina.

    Since South Carolina keeps electing these two, I can only interpret your statement as referring to the “honorable” portion of SC voters , who are outnumbered by the “dishonorable” people at the polls. Your statement cannot be interpreted to mean that the people of SC are honorable in the aggregate if they keep electing these dishonorable politicians.

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  63. @Hippopotamusdrome
    OT:
    Real life butt-kicking babes in action in Sveden:
    man attacks the three female, Swedish police officers

    The video was taken from very far away, so a digitally enhanced version is provided here.

    Real life butt-kicking babes in action in Sveden:

    Um, it looks to me like they’re standing around not accomplishing much until that civilian guy comes in and takes the perp down for them. Or was that the point and is my sarcasm meter off?

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  64. @Peter Akuleyev
    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association. It is true that there weren't many alternatives on offer, but a Saunders type "left wing economic nationalism" would probably have had more of a chance of long term broad based success.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed "people of color" seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for "white people" than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the "talented tenth".

    What the anti-immigration movement needs is more Morrisseys - more "lefty" types willing to stand up and be counted. Wishful thinking probably but the arrogance of the "Desi Girls" of the world may yet get some white lefties to realize they have let vipers into the nest.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed “people of color” seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for “white people” than ever before?

    Eight years of Obama and Holder/Lynch?

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  65. @Autochthon
    They might think Americans have common sense, as well as self-determination, and courage, among other things – the average resident of Orange County, California certainly conveys none of these qualities.

    Semi-Literate Peasants Indeed.

    We live in Los Angeles and share your sentiment heartily.

    The previous commenter is part of the problem with his ignorant and self-satisfied stereotypes about people from those states. Look at the ubiquitous stupidity, ignorance (they are different things), sloth, and immaturity among many MILLIONS of people here in “enlightened” and “sophisticated” SoCal, and Mississippi, Arkansas, and West Virginia white Americans sound pretty good.

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  66. DRA says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    This is true.

    I waver between thinking Trump is just honest, direct, and off-the-cuff / and thinking that he strategically decides just how "off-the-cuff" and rough he will sound.

    His being a smart-ass appeals to many of us. (Very much to me) I assume he knows that, but I can't tell how cold and calculating he is about this.

    Either way, it works.

    As I've said, he's the big kid who kicks over the big rock with the creepy-crawly things underneath and says, "hey look at the ugly shit under here!" That kid is either doing that to gross you out and enjoy your response, or he is genuinely interested in what he finds...or both. Right now, he's in trouble with our parents, and they'd rather we not play with him.

    Trump seems to have a cultural affinity to many of his supporters. If he were a Texan he would be accused of telling ‘Texas Tall Tales’, aka being a ‘Cracker’. Not a ‘whip cracker’, or racist, but part of the cultural continuum from the Celtic fringe through appalachia and the south.

    We recognize the braggadocio and the blarney, and don’t take him literally. We don’t take it as deep seated dishonesty, as was the case with Hillary. And we think he is on our side, which we never suspected Hillary of being, or Obama after at most the first year.

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    • Agree: Hockamaw
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Well said.

    It is unfortunate that there are now a lot of racial/ethnic/cultural types in America who can't seem to understand a man like this. That's sad, because a big part of our heritage and success as a nation includes men just like this.

    Those types who don't get Trump remind me of what we sometimes call "Aspergery" people, or just people who can't take a joke. They are literal thinkers, who, regardless of their IQs, are awfully stupid about catching on to how different people communicate. They are easily fooled by people like Hillary Clinton, TV talking heads, and New York Times writers, who, to us yahoos, are obvious phonies.

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  67. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Harry Baldwin
    If elected, Sanders would have accomplished nothing as president except what the establishment wanted. He would have folded like a cheap umbrella, as he demonstrated during his campaign. One example was surrendering his stage to BLM and standing behind them like a schmendrick. Another was his refusal to really take Hillary on for her corruption. Still another--and it shows his lack of principle--was his quickly falling in line with the DNC open-borders policy despite demonstrating in his interview with Ezra Klein that he knows it hurts American workers.

    He would have folded like a cheap umbrella,

    He allowed some fatso black women to push him around like the spineless wimp that he is. He’s always been all talk, all armchair theory and has no achievements outside of government employment. Wasn’t much there.

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  68. whorefinder says: • Website

    Trump’s supporters take him seriously but not literally. Trump’s enemies take him literally but not seriously.

    One thing I’ve never heard Trump called is a liar. Plenty of big business guys have been caught or called liars; not Trump. Trump goes out of his way in The Art of the Deal to call Barron Hilton two-faced/a liar when Hilton promises a sale to Trump and then reneges on the deal. It seems to have really offended Trump that Hilton lied to him, and Trump makes the point that he stopped defending Hilton’s reputation right after that.

    Trump has a strength in that he can’t be caught lying. Yes, he exaggerates, as he says he does, but those alleged “lies” sound like nothing more than exaggeration or bravado (e.g. how exactly does one measure a politically “fine-tuned machine”?).

    Meanwhile, the corporate media, still caught unawares, keep thinking that his next exaggeration will be a “gotcha”. It’s the same old double-standard for R’s and D’s, but Trump has played it masterfully; instead of walking on eggshells like most R’s, he’s thrown caution to the wind and been as close to harsh as possible when expounding his views. It’s killing the corporate whores he’s not kowtowing to them, and entertaining the rest of us as they squeal in pain.

    Trump strikes me as a guy who would have done horribly in, say, the law or the stock market, because he would have had to lie a lot more and hold his tongue a lot more or risk deals falling apart. In real estate, he doesn’t have to lie.

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  69. Pat Boyle says:
    @guest
    Trump is naturally seemingly sincere, if that makes sense. I don't know what he actually believes, but he comes off like he believes what he says. Even when what he says turns over rapidly.

    He's like Kevin Costner, who isn't the greatest actor. He doesn't have much range, but he's easily credible. I always believe Kevin believes he's a gunslinger or farmer or Jim Garrison.

    Or take Michael Jackson, who had some chops but wasn't the world's greatest singer. I'm convinced part of the reason he was so popular was that people immediately believed him when he opened his mouth. They thought he actually did befriend a rat, and Diana and Billie Jean really were bitches.

    Feel free to replace these with your own, probably more appropriate examples.

    Kevin Costner, who isn’t the greatest actor

    The problem is that there are at least two very different definitions of the term “actor’. Acting is pretending to others that you are someone other than who you actually are. All people can act at least a little but some people have more ‘range’ as you say. Nasty people in real life can pretend to be nice. Nice people can pretend to be nasty. Costner doesn’t seem to be very good at this kind of thing. He doesn’t do impressions and he doesn’t speak in accents.

    In films the director and the makeup artist also influence this kind of acting. Jose Ferrer pretended to be shorter than he really was and Al Pacino pretends to be a normal man rather than a dwarf. Costner never does anything like that. He is a good looking tall man with a healthy physique. He doesn’t bulk up his muscles with steroids or go on long starvation diets. He doesn’t even wear putty noses. He looks pretty much the same in all his films.

    But there is another meaning to the term actor – especially movie actor. In this meaning the job of an actor is to be liked by the paying audience. Supporting actors are expected to embody certain specific characteristics. For example Slim Pickens was always expected to play a Slim Pickens type character. Costner plays the male lead or protagonist and he is expected to be watchable and likeable. This is a talent too.

    Costner in that sense is a great actor.

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    • Replies: @Moshe
    If Al Pacini is 5"7 he's not a dwarf. Isn't Bobo Something like 5"2 without his elevator shoes?

    Besides, I can't recall many Pacino movies offhand but in that Tony Montana movie they definitely didn't try to make him look tall. I think he was supposed to look like a small genius with a world class ego than large and in charge.
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  70. Cindy says:
    @bored identity
    Trump is at his best when he acts as a Real State Developer...

    Think of the USA as one great, great, GREAT big piece of RE. He’s doing fine. He’s going to be fine.

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    • Replies: @bored identity
    1.) Oh, I know HE is going to be fine....but, What About Bob... and bored identity?

    Not to mention that somebody should, please, think of bored identity's children?


    2.) You do know what they say about real estate developers?

    ".blah,blah,blah.....and some, I assume, are good people."


    3.) Wht if Orb Rubbing Orangutan from Queens start using eminent domain the way everybody around him advise him to do it?


    What if he starts wasting Saudi's Bounty Moolah on Summer Camps for Syrian Orange Clockmaking Orphans, instead on investing our future in the Big, Beautiful Wall?
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  71. Kyle a says:
    @Ali Choudhury
    Really, where were they cheering? The only ones I remember publicly cheering were the Gaza Palestinians.

    \Why he even made an issue about the crowd is beyond me, he seems in over his head and apt to starting pointless fights rather than delivering on his agenda. His coddling of the Saudi royals was stomach-churning.

    I think what you meant to post was, “the Saudi’s coddling of our president was stomach-churning.” I fixed it for you.

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    • Replies: @Ali Choudhury
    Not particularly, it is important to be hospitable and make sure your guests are looked after.
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  72. MW says:
    @Lot
    Trump stabs his voters in the back and extends TPS status for Haiti, so more work permits for Haitian illegals plus no deportations

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/haiti/article151930167.html.

    https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/05/24/2017-10749/extension-of-the-designation-of-haiti-for-temporary-protected-status

    All Trump needed to do was nothing and simply let the TPS designation expire. Instead he took an affirmative act to screw us. More illegals with work permits, more crime, more Creole-speakers and voodoo, more Haitian anchor babies, more 80IQ kids dumbing down our public schools, more and larger "Little Haitis" in our cities. Trump this week acted to make America less like America and more like Haiti.

    I hope Kris Kobach is watching. Trump showed the path to winning the presidential election. In 2020 we need someone who keeps his word.

    John Kelly at least claims that this renewal is Fine, But Just This One Last Time. Do you not believe him?

    Trump was never extremely anti-immigration. He wants legal immigration, and smart immigration, but he does want immigration and he’s been pretty consistent about that in his speaking. His wall always had a Big, Beautiful Door. His problem was not that Mexico was sending its people, but that it wasn’t sending its best people. The fact that Trump was willing to criticize anyone from Mexico made people hear all sorts of things that he never said.

    In the spirit of this post … part of the problem is that most politicians are dishonest in the other direction. They spend all their days praising immigrants and immigration, when our actual policy is moderately harsh. Yes, we let in millions and it’s too much, but that’s compared to billions who would move here if they could. So politicians have perhaps trained us to interpret political speech on immigration in the “harsher than they claim” direction.

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    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    part of the problem is that most politicians are dishonest in the other direction. They spend all their days praising immigrants and immigration, when our actual policy is moderately harsh.
     
    This is true. In terms of actual policy Trump and Obama are probably more alike than either side wants to admit. It is interesting that Obama fans and haters take him literally and ignore what he actually did, whereas Trump fans and haters don't really listen to what Trump says, just project their feelings onto him. Maybe I'll be proven wrong, but my impression so far is that Trump's honesty is making him a singularly ineffective President, maybe because as a nation we are too cynical to believe in an honest politician.
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  73. Kyle a says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Obviously, to be be a successful real estate developer, you have to blow a lot of smoke about how everything is coming together beautifully.
     
    Sure, but Trump was not a successful real estate developer. He was at best a mediocre real estate developer, and a very successful reality star and personal brand marketer. Trump is more like the Kardashians than he is like Stephen Ross or Larry Silverstein.

    He wasn’t a successful real estate developer? Jesus. I have been asleep for the last 40 years.

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    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    Yeah, I guess you slept through all the bankruptcies and the mess Trump left behind in Atlantic City.

    Like a lot of businessmen Trump has had failures and successes. Purely as a real-estate developer he has a mediocre track record. As a brand manager and promoter, Trump is one of the best in the world, but that is a different profession. You probably haven't heard of a lot of the truly succesful real estate developers because they aren't all publicity hounds. It also seems to be a profession dominated disproportionately by Jews and Chinese.
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  74. Moshe says:

    “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. … They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

    You can tell from context and from imagining him saying it that he did not say the most controversial part. People don’t enunciate or speak for print when they talk. Especially not a semi-illiterate like Trump.

    He may have been brain-to-mouth meaning to say “there are rapists” but I am nearly certain that what he was saying was: “their rapists”.

    As in:

    “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. … They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. Their rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

    The media heard what they wanted to hear. Not what he actually said.

    We don’t speak for print. And obviously HE doesn’t.

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  75. @Dave Pinsen
    Paterson and Jersey City New Jersey; also some in outer boroughs, IIRC.

    9/11 was before everyone had a video camera in his pocket, and there were fears of Islamophobic backlash (Islamophobiaphobia?), so to some extent this ended up getting memory-holed, but it was in newspapers and TV news broadcasts at the time.
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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    How so, Bill?
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  76. Travis says:

    Trump is probably is the most honey president since TDR.

    one reason Trump appears more honest, he was never a professional politician like the last 9 presidents going back to Eisenhower. It is quite amazing that a 70 year-old man was able to successfully enter politics and win the Presidency. He did appear honest on the campaign trail, which is one reason he was able to defeat the GOP establishment.

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber

    Trump is probably is the most honey president since TDR.
     
    Teddy Roosevelt didn't have a middle initial.
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  77. dearieme says:
    @astorian
    Trump isn't a liar- he always means exactly what he says at the moment he says it. He always says exactly what he believes at the very second he believes it.

    The problem is, like Mr. Toad of Toad Hall, he's forever changing his mind about what he believes and what he values. Toad was being totally truthful and sincere when he declared that he wanted to spend the rest of his life in a gypsy caravan. He just moved on to something else (in this case, cars) in a hurry, and truthfully claimed, "The caravan? That was just a whim, a passing fancy. THIS is my true calling!!!"

    Donald Trump was probably on the level when he said immigration is bad and that we should build a wall. He probably meant what he said. But he's already lost his enthusiasm for the project, and is likely to move on to another fad shortly.

    Which means anybody relying on Trump to do anything he promises is delusional.

    The best reason for voting for Trump was to keep the appalling Hellary out. Anything else is a bonus.

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    • Replies: @Forbes
    Absolutely! Trump is one among a nest of vipers and scumbags--with whom he must work to accomplish anything. We're the Titanic (US) and we missed the iceberg (Hillary), but it doesn't guarantee an uneventful journey.
    , @Thea
    There is reason to believe she would have been so terrible it would have rallied the troops. Possibly Trump just placated people into a stupor, prolonging the inevitable and giving people less will to fight. I'm not seeing any second great awakening .
    , @MBlanc46
    Yes, being the anti-Hillary was worth millions of votes, especially here in the Heartland.
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  78. @Anonym
    The trick is to lie to the right people in the right order, so that by the time somebody checks to see whether they’ve been conned, you actually do have the signatures you told them that you had.

    Ok, so if you've done this tens or hundreds of times and the vaporware you've been selling comes together just like you said it would, are you really lying? Actually you are telling the truth with a high probability. The best way of predicting the future is to create it yourself.

    OT: President of Montenegro, all 600k of people with the combined GDP of the cost of an aircraft carrier, forgot to obey the law of the sea.

    http://i.magaimg.net/img/m9h.gif

    OT: The President of Croatia was thinking to herself - "Why should he settle for some model from Slovenia when he can have the President of Croatia?"

    https://www.reddit.com/r/The_Donald/comments/6dcktz/find_someone_that_looks_at_you_the_way_the/?st=j35jcl50&sh=87215446

    Bonus Pepe signalling (while the senile cat lady does her retarded pose):

    https://www.reddit.com/r/The_Donald/comments/6ddeua/the_madman_pres_trump_does_signature_pepe_pose/?st=j35ieq8i&sh=71fc5131

    That grinning dude who appears to have even greater affection for Mr. Trump than the Croatian president is my main man Viktor?

    http://hungarytoday.hu/news/nato-summit-hungary-pm-orban-chatting-trump-us-president-shove-aside-montenegrin-premier-video-92785

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  79. Randal says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Sanford is a South Carolina dirtbag who claimed to be on the Appalachian trail while he was having an affair with a foreigner women. I have some South Carolina ancestry by way of Barbados on my father's side and I can tell you that treasonous rodents like Lindsey Graham and Mark Sanford do not represent the honorable people of South Carolina.

    I have some South Carolina ancestry by way of Barbados on my father’s side and I can tell you that treasonous rodents like Lindsey Graham and Mark Sanford do not represent the honorable people of South Carolina.

    And yet the honorable people of South Carolina keep electing and re-electing these (admittedly) treasonous rodents to represent them in government, with voting figures above 50% and often very greatly in excess of that figure.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Golfing geezers in South Carolina vote for Graham and Sanford. Retired military and White bloc voting too. Lindsey Graham seems to have a sneaky political machine in South Carolina that always manages to have multiple candidates in the primary to split the vote and let Graham win. I won't blame the people in South Carolina for Lindsey Graham if they don't blame the people in New Hampshire for Jeanne Shaheen.
    , @ben tillman

    And yet the honorable people of South Carolina keep electing and re-electing these (admittedly) treasonous rodents to represent them in government, with voting figures above 50% and often very greatly in excess of that figure.
     
    I threw out something about Grahamnesty on Facebook once, and I have probably 100 friends who went to Graham's high school (though years later).

    I got two responses: one from a "libertarian" and libertine 150-IQ guy who had run for mayor of Asheville on a legalize-dope platform and one from a girl from my 7th-grade biology class.

    He agreed with my negative critique of Graham's immigration policies. She said, "He's a good brother, uncle, and friend."
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  80. @res
    Wow. The most liked comments at that WaPo article are even more leftish than is usual at the NYT.

    That’s not left.

    That’s the hometown paper of Empire. They’re firing up the stormtroopers.

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  81. @Mike Sylwester

    ... he [Mark Sanford] used to be governor and he got caught having an affair and a secret baby while his wife died of cancer
     
    You are mixing up Mark Sanford and John Edwards.

    Sanford’s the one who got caught having a secret affair conducted in South America on the taxpayer’s dime.

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  82. @The Alarmist
    2) Journalist-beatdowns are a career-enhancer, not a problem.

    Maybe Trump should reprise his WWE appearance and take down a journalist from time to time.

    Has anyone looked at the Web page of Ben Jacobs of The Guardian US. https://www.theguardian.com/profile/ben-jacobs It drips (a brand new legal term I just learned) with incitement.

    What did we fight the Revolutionary War for if not to give a Tory weasel like that a wedgie?

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  83. e says:
    @Peter Akuleyev
    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association. It is true that there weren't many alternatives on offer, but a Saunders type "left wing economic nationalism" would probably have had more of a chance of long term broad based success.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed "people of color" seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for "white people" than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the "talented tenth".

    What the anti-immigration movement needs is more Morrisseys - more "lefty" types willing to stand up and be counted. Wishful thinking probably but the arrogance of the "Desi Girls" of the world may yet get some white lefties to realize they have let vipers into the nest.

    This seems to be a balanced article about his success in NYC:

    http://nypost.com/2016/02/07/how-donald-trump-helped-save-new-york-city/

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  84. Svigor says:

    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association.

    Are you using “guilt by association” as a euphemism for Big Media? Cetris paribus, guilt by association doesn’t exist. It’s created by Big Media, et al. Otherwise the delusion of racial equality, blank-slate-ism, and “anti-racism” would have been destroyed long ago by their association with the Soviets.

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    • Agree: Nico
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  85. Luke Lea says:
    @reiner Tor

    the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started
     
    No, unfortunately it turned out that the Mall was really half-empty during the inauguration, but it seemed fully packed from where Trump stood. There have been time-stamped photos from all angles, and it's clear that as Trump raised his fist, it seemed to be fully packed from where Trump stood, but it was perhaps half empty (or half full) when seen from above (the more accurate angle). It's easy to understand why Trump thought they lied (I thought the same at the time until checking the timestamped photos), and they lie often enough anyway (so that my and probably Trump's default assumption is that they lie whenever they attack him), but this one claim was unfortunately largely true.

    “the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started”

    That is not the case apparently, but the Times certainly published the two crowd photos beside each other on its front page the very first day. Google it.

    Why did they do that? After all, Trump’s was still one of the largest crowds in the history of inaugurations, way over the 400,000 that come out for Bush, which was the next biggest after Obama’s two according to Wikipedia.

    My guess is that they did it to goad and belittle him with predictable effect.

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  86. @Randal

    I have some South Carolina ancestry by way of Barbados on my father’s side and I can tell you that treasonous rodents like Lindsey Graham and Mark Sanford do not represent the honorable people of South Carolina.
     
    And yet the honorable people of South Carolina keep electing and re-electing these (admittedly) treasonous rodents to represent them in government, with voting figures above 50% and often very greatly in excess of that figure.

    Golfing geezers in South Carolina vote for Graham and Sanford. Retired military and White bloc voting too. Lindsey Graham seems to have a sneaky political machine in South Carolina that always manages to have multiple candidates in the primary to split the vote and let Graham win. I won’t blame the people in South Carolina for Lindsey Graham if they don’t blame the people in New Hampshire for Jeanne Shaheen.

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  87. NYCTexan says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    He told the truth about her other examples too. There were Muslims cheering on 9/11, and their were contemporaneous reports about it. Whether it was thousands or hundreds, who knows, but the dishonest press didn't want to concede that, so they segued to a claim that Trump mocked the disabled reporter who wrote one of those contemporaneous reports, then subsequently said he didn't remember.

    When you drill down, that's the basic pattern. Trump tells the truth about something (cheering on 9/11, his crowds being bigger than what the press initially claimed, illegals voting), and then the press claims he lied because his estimate is either off or unconfirmed, even though he is essentially correct (e.g., the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started).

    You don’t have to be a raving Trumpista, but the SlateStarCodex guy is obviously some sort of academic and has zero understanding of what it takes to be an entrepreneur.

    His description of Trump as a coordinator of various parties energies is only 1/2 right — as any entrepreneur, most especially in NYC real estate will tell you, the other 1/2 of the game is not getting fleeced by everyone else in the game like City Hall, Unions, Contractors, Inspectors and Labor Boards — who view their jobs as fleecing the fat cat sucker who is gonna try to develop some property.

    If you think that those folks don’t lie, don’t exaggerate, play by the rules, and aren’t corrupt — well then, I got a bridge to sell you.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    He's a psychiatrist, but sure, promising stuff and then working to deliver it is common to entrepreneurship in general.
    , @Forbes

    the other 1/2 of the game is not getting fleeced by everyone else in the game like City Hall, Unions, Contractors, Inspectors and Labor Boards — who view their jobs as fleecing the fat cat sucker who is gonna try to develop some property.
     
    Hell, the fleecing is factored in. The question is, can I get the property developed and still survive. That's why every RE project is developed on a stand alone basis (some exceptions, of course), and the whole reason for non-recourse lending.
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  88. Alden says:
    @27 year old
    OT, the goy in Montana who allegedly punched a hostile reporter has comfortably won his special election to the U.S. House. Magically the election has immediately ceased to be an Important Test For The Trump Administration (tm)

    The Guardian was the main propaganda outlet for the Soviet Union until
    about 1980. It was also a cheerleader for the extermination of White British by black and brown immigrants. The Guardian crusaded for immigration and against policing of the black and brown neighborhoods. The Guardian led the cover up on tens of thousands of rapes of 12-16 year old White English girls by Muslim adult men over 20 years.

    The Guardian loathes and detests White Americans. The educated elites read The Guardian

    Around 1980 the Guardian became the main English propaganda outlet for the usurious banks, globalization and the extermination of White Europeans.

    Why would The Guardian send a reporter to cover an obscure congressional race in a rural White, conservative fly over state? He was sent in the hopes the Democrat would win. Then The Guardian, NYSlimes and all the anti White propaganda outlets would carry on for weeks that the election of a democratic congrrss critter is the beginning of the end of Trump and the evil White Republican Party.

    I should not write what I think should happen to Guardian reporters.

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  89. Moshe says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    He told the truth about her other examples too. There were Muslims cheering on 9/11, and their were contemporaneous reports about it. Whether it was thousands or hundreds, who knows, but the dishonest press didn't want to concede that, so they segued to a claim that Trump mocked the disabled reporter who wrote one of those contemporaneous reports, then subsequently said he didn't remember.

    When you drill down, that's the basic pattern. Trump tells the truth about something (cheering on 9/11, his crowds being bigger than what the press initially claimed, illegals voting), and then the press claims he lied because his estimate is either off or unconfirmed, even though he is essentially correct (e.g., the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started).

    People shocked by the muslim celebrating thing must not be the sort of people who notice things when they travel.

    EVERYONE was celebrating. Or at least young men everywhere weren’t quite devastated as it all went down.

    I was a young dude in israel and stepped into a bodega to watch the unfolding events and the bodega owner was extatic. “Fock America! He said as he slapped his hand on the table.

    People around the world view America as ppl who knew of Rome (and every seemingly dominant empire) felt about them.

    Let me climb to their height as one of them or let them fall and have major problems as we do.

    Don’t you guys know how the world works?

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax

    EVERYONE was celebrating. Or at least young men everywhere weren’t quite devastated as it all went down.
     
    Everyone meaning everyone or everyone meaning nonwhite?

    I was a young dude in israel and stepped into a bodega to watch the unfolding events and the bodega owner was extatic. “Fock America! He said as he slapped his hand on the table.
     
    I assume the bodega owner was Arab? No?
    , @Desiderius

    Don’t you guys know how the world works?
     
    The world's a big place.

    Only the elite of the elite need to know nearly that much.
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  90. Steve , I thought the obnoxious writer of the burrito place article was a dude . Nuff said.

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  91. Svigor says:

    “I’ve talked to a number of people about it back home. They say, ‘Well, look, if the president can say whatever, why can’t I say whatever?’ He’s given them license.”

    “There is a total weirdness out there,” Sanford said. “People feel like, if the president of the United States can say anything to anybody at any time, then I guess I can too. And that is a very dangerous phenomenon.”

    Yes, free speech = dangerous!

    But let’s examine Sanford’s “logic” here for a sec. The President of the United States has the Nuclear Football, can issue Executive Orders, and can veto any bill he doesn’t like. None of that makes me feel like “if the POTUS has the football, writes EOs, and can veto any bill he doesn’t like, then I guess I can, too.”

    Stupidity is a very dangerous phenomenon.

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  92. Lot says:
    @IHTG
    https://www.dhs.gov/news/2017/05/22/secretary-kellys-statement-limited-extension-haitis-designation-temporary-protected

    Secretary Kelly was particularly encouraged by representations made to him directly by the Haitian government regarding their desire to welcome the safe repatriation of Haitian TPS recipients in the near future. “This six-month extension should allow Haitian TPS recipients living in the United States time to attain travel documents and make other necessary arrangements for their ultimate departure from the United States, and should also provide the Haitian government with the time it needs to prepare for the future repatriation of all current TPS recipients. We plan to continue to work closely with the Haitian government, including assisting the government in proactively providing travel documents for its citizens.”
     
    Miami Herald: "Six-month extension for Haitian TPS is not enough"

    Note: We're talking about around 50,000 people here.

    No, that is the wrong conclusion from the 56000 number.

    TPS stops deportation of all non-felon illegals because they wait until ICE grabs them before applying for TPS status. For this reason ICE rately even bothers to try to deport TPS country nationals unless they are convicted felons. They know they will lose any removal fight.

    The 56,000 number is just those who applied either because they want an on the books job or to stop a deportation. In reality every Haitian illegal benefits and it encourages more.

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  93. Lot says:
    @reiner Tor
    So much winning! Where are the eeyores now?

    /sarcasm

    The problem is, of course, that while Trump is certainly better than Hillary (see the previous post about the G7 and Italy), he's still awful, and as Peter Akuleyev wrote, he might easily discredit anti-immigration positions in general by associating it with Trumpism - lowbrow, Ryancare, disastrous foreign policy, etc.

    In spite of this Haiti thing, there's still hope, but Ann Coulter's analogy is a good one. As she wrote, he promised to take us from Chicago to California in six days, and spent the first three days driving us to Ohio, raising fears he might be driving to New York instead. Now he may still turn around and get us to California, but there's reason to get worried.

    You are right about Trump harming our cause by association. Public polls of immigration issues have turned strongly against restriction the past few months.

    That would be fine if we were getting results, but we are not.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    Public polls of immigration issues have turned strongly against restriction the past few months.
     
    It could discredit immigration restrictionism internationally (in the white world), too. That's a big problem, that people need a working model of a modern successful country where immigration restriction works. If instead they see that it leads to turmoil, and that anti-immigration politicians are incompetents and bumbling idiots, then of course many people will be convinced of the establishment position that immigration restriction cannot possibly work and that "populists" don't know how to govern a country.
    , @snorlax
    That's why I was more anti-anti-Trump than pro-Trump while the election was going on — I suspected his presidency would end up something like we were seeing now (though I did underestimate slightly the sheer insanity of the left), but it was a Catch-22 since Trump losing would've done even more to discredit immigration restrictionist politicians in the US and internationally, and giving far-leftists a majority on the Supreme Court would've made future US elections pointless anyhow.

    The Flight 93 Election, in other words.
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  94. prole says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    He told the truth about her other examples too. There were Muslims cheering on 9/11, and their were contemporaneous reports about it. Whether it was thousands or hundreds, who knows, but the dishonest press didn't want to concede that, so they segued to a claim that Trump mocked the disabled reporter who wrote one of those contemporaneous reports, then subsequently said he didn't remember.

    When you drill down, that's the basic pattern. Trump tells the truth about something (cheering on 9/11, his crowds being bigger than what the press initially claimed, illegals voting), and then the press claims he lied because his estimate is either off or unconfirmed, even though he is essentially correct (e.g., the photo of the half-empty mall during his inauguration was taken hours before it started).

    Trump did exaggerate the numbers in Jersey City cheering…there were hundreds of Muslims celebrating on rooftops….not thousands cheering in the street.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    I would like to read about that. What are good sources about muslims cheering?
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  95. Mr. Alden says:

    “The Guardian loathes and detests White Americans. The educated elites read The Guardian.”

    “Around 1980 the Guardian became the main English propaganda outlet for the usurious banks, globalization and the extermination of White Europeans.”

    I say that Ben Jacobs is a corporate propaganda whore who works for The Guardian. President Trump is right to say that the corporate media is the enemy of the American people. The corporate media in the United States and the United Kingdom must be destroyed or dismantled.

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  96. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @Lot
    You are right about Trump harming our cause by association. Public polls of immigration issues have turned strongly against restriction the past few months.

    That would be fine if we were getting results, but we are not.

    Public polls of immigration issues have turned strongly against restriction the past few months.

    It could discredit immigration restrictionism internationally (in the white world), too. That’s a big problem, that people need a working model of a modern successful country where immigration restriction works. If instead they see that it leads to turmoil, and that anti-immigration politicians are incompetents and bumbling idiots, then of course many people will be convinced of the establishment position that immigration restriction cannot possibly work and that “populists” don’t know how to govern a country.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    All we need is a minimum wage for immigrants twice that of citizens. That would force the other side to admit such migrants aren't worth it, and if enforced cut at least 90% from immigrant totals.

    We could also point out that immigrants who fail to meet the income-tax threshold are thus tax evaders.
    , @anonymous

    That’s a big problem, that people need a working model of a modern successful country where immigration restriction works.
     
    There is such an example. It is called Israel. Another one would be Japan.
    , @ANON
    Our enemies are more numerous and more skilful than we. Also, they own the mass media.
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  97. @Dave Pinsen
    Paterson and Jersey City New Jersey; also some in outer boroughs, IIRC.

    9/11 was before everyone had a video camera in his pocket, and there were fears of Islamophobic backlash (Islamophobiaphobia?), so to some extent this ended up getting memory-holed, but it was in newspapers and TV news broadcasts at the time.

    I’m not convinced by that, I was watching and reading news and blogs heavily back then and I don’t remember any mention of public Muslim celebrations in New Jersey.

    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2015/nov/22/donald-trump/fact-checking-trumps-claim-thousands-new-jersey-ch/

    On 11th September 2001, I had to drive friends to a song and dance show in northern England featuring Indian and Pakistani performers with a mostly Muslim audience. During the show a middle-aged man grabbed the mic and said the attack was a long time coming and America had received some well-deserved payback for its global arrogance. Sentiments like that were expressed freely, in places no white journalist would have been around and definitely not in places Trump would have any reason to drive past.

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    • Replies: @El Dato

    During the show a middle-aged man grabbed the mic and said the attack was a long time coming and America had received some well-deserved payback for its global arrogance.
     
    Not surprising.

    There was serious unease and even outright anger about the Clinton regime's cruise missile diplomacy and permasitting on Iraq, about letting Israel roll all over the peace process like Eichmann on amps in a wheelchair and about behaving totally irrationally in Yougoslavia for no good reason except to distribute medals to NATOfags.

    Chalmer's Johnson's "Blowback" came out in 2000.

    Israeli "art students" where being spotted sniffing around various companies like Greys landed from UFOs.

    It was a weird, dreamlike age, like things were getting out of kilter, seriously and fast. You know, like you have a fever but don't know it yet and you start to miss things, make erratic causal connections or pick up startling random noises.

    And then we had all the events in this timeline from the Peter Lance's "Triple Cross". If only half the dots he connects are true, there are behinds that still need to be hauled over very hot coals:

    http://www.peterlance.com/triple_cross_pb_timeline_2009.pdf

    But I want to go back in any case. Maybe one could fix something. Time for a drink.

    , @Dave Pinsen
    I lived in New Jersey at the time, and could see the smoke from the WTC site from my street, and I remember mentions of celebrations in Paterson in particular.
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  98. @Kyle a
    I think what you meant to post was, "the Saudi's coddling of our president was stomach-churning." I fixed it for you.

    Not particularly, it is important to be hospitable and make sure your guests are looked after.

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  99. Roger says: • Website

    Did Trump say “They’re rapists” or “Their rapists”? He may have meant the latter, making the meaning a little different.

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  100. @Kyle a
    He wasn't a successful real estate developer? Jesus. I have been asleep for the last 40 years.

    Yeah, I guess you slept through all the bankruptcies and the mess Trump left behind in Atlantic City.

    Like a lot of businessmen Trump has had failures and successes. Purely as a real-estate developer he has a mediocre track record. As a brand manager and promoter, Trump is one of the best in the world, but that is a different profession. You probably haven’t heard of a lot of the truly succesful real estate developers because they aren’t all publicity hounds. It also seems to be a profession dominated disproportionately by Jews and Chinese.

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    • Replies: @Robert Hume
    I've read that neighboring states built competing casinos nearer many customers, and that that caused Atlantic City to collapse. Were Trump's failures before that?
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  101. JohnnyD says:

    It also makes his enemies mad whenever a Jihadist, illegal immigrant, or black racist proves his point. They’re not really mad about the heinous acts committed, just the fact that it might make some people question the current dogma of “invade and invite the world.”

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  102. @MW
    John Kelly at least claims that this renewal is Fine, But Just This One Last Time. Do you not believe him?

    Trump was never extremely anti-immigration. He wants legal immigration, and smart immigration, but he does want immigration and he's been pretty consistent about that in his speaking. His wall always had a Big, Beautiful Door. His problem was not that Mexico was sending its people, but that it wasn't sending its best people. The fact that Trump was willing to criticize anyone from Mexico made people hear all sorts of things that he never said.

    In the spirit of this post ... part of the problem is that most politicians are dishonest in the other direction. They spend all their days praising immigrants and immigration, when our actual policy is moderately harsh. Yes, we let in millions and it's too much, but that's compared to billions who would move here if they could. So politicians have perhaps trained us to interpret political speech on immigration in the "harsher than they claim" direction.

    part of the problem is that most politicians are dishonest in the other direction. They spend all their days praising immigrants and immigration, when our actual policy is moderately harsh.

    This is true. In terms of actual policy Trump and Obama are probably more alike than either side wants to admit. It is interesting that Obama fans and haters take him literally and ignore what he actually did, whereas Trump fans and haters don’t really listen to what Trump says, just project their feelings onto him. Maybe I’ll be proven wrong, but my impression so far is that Trump’s honesty is making him a singularly ineffective President, maybe because as a nation we are too cynical to believe in an honest politician.

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  103. snorlax says:
    @Moshe
    People shocked by the muslim celebrating thing must not be the sort of people who notice things when they travel.

    EVERYONE was celebrating. Or at least young men everywhere weren't quite devastated as it all went down.

    I was a young dude in israel and stepped into a bodega to watch the unfolding events and the bodega owner was extatic. "Fock America! He said as he slapped his hand on the table.

    People around the world view America as ppl who knew of Rome (and every seemingly dominant empire) felt about them.

    Let me climb to their height as one of them or let them fall and have major problems as we do.

    Don't you guys know how the world works?

    EVERYONE was celebrating. Or at least young men everywhere weren’t quite devastated as it all went down.

    Everyone meaning everyone or everyone meaning nonwhite?

    I was a young dude in israel and stepped into a bodega to watch the unfolding events and the bodega owner was extatic. “Fock America! He said as he slapped his hand on the table.

    I assume the bodega owner was Arab? No?

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    • Replies: @Moshe
    "Non-white"???

    I'm talking about foreigners. Of every stripe. In America though, yes, it probably was just Muslims and Blacks. Abroad though it was everybody - including the Swiss. People just want to see America humbled. That's how it is bro
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  104. snorlax says:
    @Lot
    You are right about Trump harming our cause by association. Public polls of immigration issues have turned strongly against restriction the past few months.

    That would be fine if we were getting results, but we are not.

    That’s why I was more anti-anti-Trump than pro-Trump while the election was going on — I suspected his presidency would end up something like we were seeing now (though I did underestimate slightly the sheer insanity of the left), but it was a Catch-22 since Trump losing would’ve done even more to discredit immigration restrictionist politicians in the US and internationally, and giving far-leftists a majority on the Supreme Court would’ve made future US elections pointless anyhow.

    The Flight 93 Election, in other words.

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    • Replies: @Lot

    That’s why I was more anti-anti-Trump than pro-Trump while the election was going on — I suspected his presidency would end up something like we were seeing now
     
    I was fairly optimistic. I didn't think he'd put much of a dent in legal immigration simply because the Senate has a 70-30 pro-amnesty mass immigration supermajority. I also doubted he'd use his executive powers to impound other DHS funds to start building the part of the Mexico wall that is already authorized by law, but has not been funded yet.

    I did not mind the first few of the awful cabinet picks either. A few Koch brothers people made sense to unite the party.

    I had no idea that the entire cabinet except for Jeff would be horrible. Nor did I suspect he would not even take extremely simple, basic steps to reduce illegal immigration in areas 100% within his power, such as stopping all third world country immigration and setting the annual refugee number the president sets to either 0 or something very low like 5,000. Not in a million years did I think candidate Trump, who thumbed his nose again and again at race PC, would affirmatively act to increase the number of Haitian illegals and anchor babies in the USA. I also did not think he would flat out lie about repealing Obama's two executive amnesties. (He has not even withdrawn the larger one that is currently blocked by the injunction of a Texas judge. In theory that could change if Kennedy decides to go left on the next appeal).

    We really got the worst of both worlds with Trump. Someone like Kobach is smooth and unfailingly polite, but fights like a dog behind the scenes against the browning of America. Trump is a racist boor in public with his Mexican rapist comment and frequently lying about and retweeting fake black crime statistics (as if correct black crime statistics were not shockingly high already). Yet he quietly keeps Obama's floodgates open to the worst people in the entire Western Hemisphere by pretty much any statistic measure.

    While Hillary and Jeb obviously would have been far worse, I wonder about Cruz, Walker, and Kasich.

    1. Cruz had a excellent voting record in the Senate on immigration matters. On the other hand, when he had a cheap labor audience he called for massive increases in legal immigration. He also choose to shut down the government not over Obama's amnesty, but instead a stupid and failed attempt to repeal the ACA. Probably beside the point since Cruz's unattractive personality and extreme positions on social issues made him un-electable.

    2. Walker had basically all of Cruz's flaws as a candidate, just a bit less. He flip flopped on immigration positions but likely was a closet amnesty supporter since he is close to Ryan and the Kochs. However, it did not seem like he actually cared much one way or another.

    3. Kasich flipped and flopped on immigration before running for president. He was positively based in 2011, calling for an end of birthright citizenship and having his entire 22 member cabinet be white, saying he does not believe in tokenism. He seems to have then realized he could not get to Trump's right and that he needed Koch money to win the primary, and moved left on these issues in the 2014-2016 period.

    As a rare elite politician from a Slavic and WWC background, I wonder if his basic political instincts are better than inherited multi-millionaires Trump and Jeb! and lower-tier elite international businessman background of Cruz.

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  105. El Dato says:
    @Ali Choudhury
    I'm not convinced by that, I was watching and reading news and blogs heavily back then and I don't remember any mention of public Muslim celebrations in New Jersey.

    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2015/nov/22/donald-trump/fact-checking-trumps-claim-thousands-new-jersey-ch/

    On 11th September 2001, I had to drive friends to a song and dance show in northern England featuring Indian and Pakistani performers with a mostly Muslim audience. During the show a middle-aged man grabbed the mic and said the attack was a long time coming and America had received some well-deserved payback for its global arrogance. Sentiments like that were expressed freely, in places no white journalist would have been around and definitely not in places Trump would have any reason to drive past.

    During the show a middle-aged man grabbed the mic and said the attack was a long time coming and America had received some well-deserved payback for its global arrogance.

    Not surprising.

    There was serious unease and even outright anger about the Clinton regime’s cruise missile diplomacy and permasitting on Iraq, about letting Israel roll all over the peace process like Eichmann on amps in a wheelchair and about behaving totally irrationally in Yougoslavia for no good reason except to distribute medals to NATOfags.

    Chalmer’s Johnson’s “Blowback” came out in 2000.

    Israeli “art students” where being spotted sniffing around various companies like Greys landed from UFOs.

    It was a weird, dreamlike age, like things were getting out of kilter, seriously and fast. You know, like you have a fever but don’t know it yet and you start to miss things, make erratic causal connections or pick up startling random noises.

    And then we had all the events in this timeline from the Peter Lance’s “Triple Cross”. If only half the dots he connects are true, there are behinds that still need to be hauled over very hot coals:

    http://www.peterlance.com/triple_cross_pb_timeline_2009.pdf

    But I want to go back in any case. Maybe one could fix something. Time for a drink.

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  106. e says:
    @NOTA
    I think he is in over his head, and he hasn't managed to build a team he trusts around him. That's why his White House is leaking everything and all the leaked stories are about the dysfunctional management style.

    But making nice with the Saudis doesn't look so offensive to me. They're truly an awful regime, but they're also an ally, and foreign relations is often about making nice with nauseating allies. (And given what happened in a power vacuum in Iraq, Libya, Yemen, and the uncontrolled areas of Syria, I don't want to know what would happen if the Saudi monarchy fell.).

    I don’t know if this is true or not as it came from Dick Morris, who is stunningly accurate on some things and stunningly wrong on others. He says that right before Trump took office, Obama changed the job status of a bunch of White House staffers, political appointees under him, to civil service employees who couldn’t be fired. He maintains most of them still are staffers and that man of the leaks that are deemed to have come from the WH come from them.

    I take Morris most of the time with a grain of salt.

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    • Replies: @MarkinPNW
    By civil service rules new civil service employees are on probation for at least the first year, still giving Trump time to fire them if he wants to, unless the conversion was more than a year ago.
    , @NOTA
    I remember hearing the same stories about Bush appointees being moved to civil service positions. I suspect this is a standard move made whenever the White House changes parties. Anyone know more?
    , @Alden
    Sounds very reasonable.
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  107. @prole
    Trump did exaggerate the numbers in Jersey City cheering...there were hundreds of Muslims celebrating on rooftops....not thousands cheering in the street.

    I would like to read about that. What are good sources about muslims cheering?

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  108. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Bill Jones
    You somehow forgot the cheering Jews on 9/11

    I didn’t forget about those 5 Israelis, but they weren’t relevant there because 1) Trump didn’t mention them; and 2) The press didn’t claim Trump was lying about them.

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  109. What really makes his enemies mad, however, is when he tells the truth.

    Always remind people that they want rid of Trump not for what he does wrong, but for what he does right.

    In other words, they don’t hate him, they hate you

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    • Agree: Desiderius
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  110. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @NYCTexan
    You don't have to be a raving Trumpista, but the SlateStarCodex guy is obviously some sort of academic and has zero understanding of what it takes to be an entrepreneur.

    His description of Trump as a coordinator of various parties energies is only 1/2 right -- as any entrepreneur, most especially in NYC real estate will tell you, the other 1/2 of the game is not getting fleeced by everyone else in the game like City Hall, Unions, Contractors, Inspectors and Labor Boards -- who view their jobs as fleecing the fat cat sucker who is gonna try to develop some property.

    If you think that those folks don't lie, don't exaggerate, play by the rules, and aren't corrupt -- well then, I got a bridge to sell you.

    He’s a psychiatrist, but sure, promising stuff and then working to deliver it is common to entrepreneurship in general.

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  111. @reiner Tor

    Public polls of immigration issues have turned strongly against restriction the past few months.
     
    It could discredit immigration restrictionism internationally (in the white world), too. That's a big problem, that people need a working model of a modern successful country where immigration restriction works. If instead they see that it leads to turmoil, and that anti-immigration politicians are incompetents and bumbling idiots, then of course many people will be convinced of the establishment position that immigration restriction cannot possibly work and that "populists" don't know how to govern a country.

    All we need is a minimum wage for immigrants twice that of citizens. That would force the other side to admit such migrants aren’t worth it, and if enforced cut at least 90% from immigrant totals.

    We could also point out that immigrants who fail to meet the income-tax threshold are thus tax evaders.

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  112. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Bill Jones
    http://21stcenturywire.com/2015/09/11/911-revisited-declassified-fbi-files-reveal-new-details-about-the-five-israelis/

    You really are full of shit.

    How so, Bill?

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  113. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Ali Choudhury
    I'm not convinced by that, I was watching and reading news and blogs heavily back then and I don't remember any mention of public Muslim celebrations in New Jersey.

    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2015/nov/22/donald-trump/fact-checking-trumps-claim-thousands-new-jersey-ch/

    On 11th September 2001, I had to drive friends to a song and dance show in northern England featuring Indian and Pakistani performers with a mostly Muslim audience. During the show a middle-aged man grabbed the mic and said the attack was a long time coming and America had received some well-deserved payback for its global arrogance. Sentiments like that were expressed freely, in places no white journalist would have been around and definitely not in places Trump would have any reason to drive past.

    I lived in New Jersey at the time, and could see the smoke from the WTC site from my street, and I remember mentions of celebrations in Paterson in particular.

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  114. Forbes says:
    @Anonymous
    Heffernan gives the game away (I don't believe for a minute she's writing in Aesopian language, emitting coded signals at the smarter reader while shoveling to-be-sure pap at the Acela liberals -- she probably idiotically believes this Russkie Collusion Storytime bit really is leading somewhere). The truth is that people who inhabit the imperial capital are frivolous poofs and women who've failed at feminine arts, thus turned deranged via obsession with the Machiavellian hermeneutics of etiquette and manners. But look at Montana, the voters don't even give a rat's about a candidate beating up a reporter. Trump may end up failing at most or all of the 2016 campaign agenda but he's not going to be unmasked suddenly as a tacky boor that the public can't tolerate in the slick, cool, glamorous capital-P Presidency. Give me a break. This Beltway crapola about "Such things are just not done" is way past the spoilage date.

    The truth is that people who inhabit the imperial capital are frivolous poofs and women who’ve failed at feminine arts, thus turned deranged via obsession with the Machiavellian hermeneutics of etiquette and manners.

    ‘Nuff said.

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  115. KunioKun says:

    Growing up with the name Heffernan must have been pretty brutal.

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  116. @Peter Akuleyev
    Yeah, I guess you slept through all the bankruptcies and the mess Trump left behind in Atlantic City.

    Like a lot of businessmen Trump has had failures and successes. Purely as a real-estate developer he has a mediocre track record. As a brand manager and promoter, Trump is one of the best in the world, but that is a different profession. You probably haven't heard of a lot of the truly succesful real estate developers because they aren't all publicity hounds. It also seems to be a profession dominated disproportionately by Jews and Chinese.

    I’ve read that neighboring states built competing casinos nearer many customers, and that that caused Atlantic City to collapse. Were Trump’s failures before that?

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  117. Forbes says:
    @dearieme
    The best reason for voting for Trump was to keep the appalling Hellary out. Anything else is a bonus.

    Absolutely! Trump is one among a nest of vipers and scumbags–with whom he must work to accomplish anything. We’re the Titanic (US) and we missed the iceberg (Hillary), but it doesn’t guarantee an uneventful journey.

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  118. Anonym says:

    OT: I haven’t seen this here before, great commentary on the SJW phenomenon from an unlikely source. Comments are good too.

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    • Replies: @res
    Only the SJWs could turn Mr. Burns into a sympathetic character.
    , @guest
    The Simpsons has presumably always been written by lefties, because who else writes tv shows? But they weren't always as preachy and tendentious as they are now, and I would guess that occasionally they slip back into their old relative even-handedness. I mean, the show has been on for like 29 years, they need things to make fun of, and campus inanity is eminently make-fun-able.

    That, plus Simpsons writers are typically Harvardites, aren't they? Any excuse to denigrate Yalies.

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  119. Forbes says:
    @NYCTexan
    You don't have to be a raving Trumpista, but the SlateStarCodex guy is obviously some sort of academic and has zero understanding of what it takes to be an entrepreneur.

    His description of Trump as a coordinator of various parties energies is only 1/2 right -- as any entrepreneur, most especially in NYC real estate will tell you, the other 1/2 of the game is not getting fleeced by everyone else in the game like City Hall, Unions, Contractors, Inspectors and Labor Boards -- who view their jobs as fleecing the fat cat sucker who is gonna try to develop some property.

    If you think that those folks don't lie, don't exaggerate, play by the rules, and aren't corrupt -- well then, I got a bridge to sell you.

    the other 1/2 of the game is not getting fleeced by everyone else in the game like City Hall, Unions, Contractors, Inspectors and Labor Boards — who view their jobs as fleecing the fat cat sucker who is gonna try to develop some property.

    Hell, the fleecing is factored in. The question is, can I get the property developed and still survive. That’s why every RE project is developed on a stand alone basis (some exceptions, of course), and the whole reason for non-recourse lending.

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  120. @Moshe
    People shocked by the muslim celebrating thing must not be the sort of people who notice things when they travel.

    EVERYONE was celebrating. Or at least young men everywhere weren't quite devastated as it all went down.

    I was a young dude in israel and stepped into a bodega to watch the unfolding events and the bodega owner was extatic. "Fock America! He said as he slapped his hand on the table.

    People around the world view America as ppl who knew of Rome (and every seemingly dominant empire) felt about them.

    Let me climb to their height as one of them or let them fall and have major problems as we do.

    Don't you guys know how the world works?

    Don’t you guys know how the world works?

    The world’s a big place.

    Only the elite of the elite need to know nearly that much.

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    • Replies: @Moshe
    No one is requires to know anything but being as I assume people have been abroad it surprises me how little rhey managed to notice
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  121. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @reiner Tor

    Public polls of immigration issues have turned strongly against restriction the past few months.
     
    It could discredit immigration restrictionism internationally (in the white world), too. That's a big problem, that people need a working model of a modern successful country where immigration restriction works. If instead they see that it leads to turmoil, and that anti-immigration politicians are incompetents and bumbling idiots, then of course many people will be convinced of the establishment position that immigration restriction cannot possibly work and that "populists" don't know how to govern a country.

    That’s a big problem, that people need a working model of a modern successful country where immigration restriction works.

    There is such an example. It is called Israel. Another one would be Japan.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    Don't forget the 1.4B of the world's people with their own ethnostate. AKA China.
    , @reiner Tor
    They never had immigration.

    What is needed is a successful immigration restrictionist government in a country which used to have high levels of immigration and already has a large number of immigrants. You know, where your only choice is a "populist" party or leader if you want no more immigration.
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  122. Recently, I’ve been getting most of my news via iSteve, but today I opened Google News. What did I find?

    Apparently, the Washington Post is now aping TMZ celebrity news. Really. This article is basically a “serious” political version of a TMZ article about the observed relationships, behavior, and fashion of celebrities, full of speculation and innuendo.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/the_americas/sounds-of-silence-trumps-body-language-speaks-volumes/2017/05/26/c65eec4c-4271-11e7-b29f-f40ffced2ddb_story.html

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  123. Svigor says:

    illegal voting

    When Democrats Big Media call this a lie, what they mean is, Trump can’t prove that Democrats engage in a lot of vote fraud. But they probably do.

    They have one, loose set of standards for themselves, and another, tight set of standards for Trump. One thing the two standards have in common is that they frequently change on a whim.

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    • Replies: @res
    You (and others here) might enjoy this illustration of how right you are: https://townhall.com/tipsheet/guybenson/2017/05/24/heh-california-progressives-allege-voter-fraud-in-party-chair-vote-demand-voter-id-n2330955
    , @Lot
    I don't think vote fraud is all that common. Most dems are in solid dem areas and don't need to engage in fraud. In swing areas, doing so risks huge prison sentences, either from GOP US attorneys or from GOP local officials when the area eventually swings back to them.

    What does happen is Dems like to create situations where legal immigrants think they are allowed to vote and there is nobody checking to make sure they can't. Given that only about ~25% or so of Hispanic US citizens are regular voters, there are plenty of legal voters to turn out before it could ever make sense to try to get non-citizens to vote illegally.

    Strong voter ID laws are still good policy. Not to stop the tiny amount of vote fraud, but to decrease turnout among the underclass who lack government IDs and probably vote 80%+ for democrats.
    , @snorlax
    I'd state that a bit more strongly: even if Trump did prove the Democrats engage in vote fraud, with absolutely incontrovertible, everything-crossed-and-dotted evidence, they would still deny it, or at most simply ignore it and attempt to change the subject or engage in whataboutism every time it's brought up.
    , @NOTA
    If there were millions of illegal immigrants voting, I would expect that to leave tons of evidence, and there are enough conservative media sources that I'd expect to see that evidence become widely known. We don't see that evidence, probably because there aren't many illegals voting. (Which makes sense--it's hard to get Americans to bother voting, and it's our country. Why does some Salvadoran here to hang drywall care enough about US elections to bother voting, especially when doing so could get him into trouble?)
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  124. Thea says:
    @dearieme
    The best reason for voting for Trump was to keep the appalling Hellary out. Anything else is a bonus.

    There is reason to believe she would have been so terrible it would have rallied the troops. Possibly Trump just placated people into a stupor, prolonging the inevitable and giving people less will to fight. I’m not seeing any second great awakening .

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    • Agree: reiner Tor
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  125. Stealth says:
    @fred c dobbs
    Mexico. Indeed.

    Even ignoring the criminal element, I've tried to tell people until I am blue in the face......NOT ALL MEXICANS ARE THE SAME. ZMan says he lives on the edge of the Baltimore ghetto. Well, I live on the edge of an Orange County barrio. And I mostly see squat round brown people, the kind you might find in southern Mexico and El Salvador. Because that's EXACTLY where most of these people are from. These are indigenous, unskilled, semi-literate peasants. Mexico's version of Arkansas, Mississippi and West Virginia. THAT's who Mexico sends our way. What would Canada think of Americans if the only visitors to the Great White North were from those three states?

    From what I’ve heard, those same people have now dispersed throughout Mexico as well. The border states are now home to quite a few of them. A similar process seems to be underway in Brazil, where, as another commenter pointed out, the less caucasoid Brazilians, seeking a better life I”m sure, have mass migrated to the white(r) portions of that country.

    “These are indigenous, unskilled, semi-literate peasants. Mexico’s version of Arkansas, Mississippi and West Virginia.”

    Those are great places compared to any state in Mexico, even though Mississippi is becoming a might bit shit-holish these days.

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  126. res says:
    @Anonym
    OT: I haven't seen this here before, great commentary on the SJW phenomenon from an unlikely source. Comments are good too.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=p8M2tg2RkIQ

    Only the SJWs could turn Mr. Burns into a sympathetic character.

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  127. res says:
    @Svigor

    illegal voting
     
    When Democrats Big Media call this a lie, what they mean is, Trump can't prove that Democrats engage in a lot of vote fraud. But they probably do.

    They have one, loose set of standards for themselves, and another, tight set of standards for Trump. One thing the two standards have in common is that they frequently change on a whim.
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  128. @Anonymous
    Just know this: in America, it is traditional to body-slam reporters from The Guardian -- it is heritage

    Grappling with the fourth estate—it’s part of the work.

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  129. donut says:

    Hmm yeah , blah , blah , blah .

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    • Replies: @donut
    Even as a racist I have to ask where have we gone wrong ? You feel me Negro ? You see what I'm saying ?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=su-HUDo7XQ4
    , @donut
    That "Hmm yeah , blah , blah , blah ." was an error on my part .
    , @Harold
    Why should we watch those?
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  130. Coemgen says:
    @astorian
    Trump isn't a liar- he always means exactly what he says at the moment he says it. He always says exactly what he believes at the very second he believes it.

    The problem is, like Mr. Toad of Toad Hall, he's forever changing his mind about what he believes and what he values. Toad was being totally truthful and sincere when he declared that he wanted to spend the rest of his life in a gypsy caravan. He just moved on to something else (in this case, cars) in a hurry, and truthfully claimed, "The caravan? That was just a whim, a passing fancy. THIS is my true calling!!!"

    Donald Trump was probably on the level when he said immigration is bad and that we should build a wall. He probably meant what he said. But he's already lost his enthusiasm for the project, and is likely to move on to another fad shortly.

    Which means anybody relying on Trump to do anything he promises is delusional.

    That Time Trump Spent Nearly $100,000 On An Ad Criticizing U.S. Foreign Policy In 1987

    Trump stays “on message” for things that are important to him. Things that aren’t important to him are delegated to subordinates. He is probably enjoying sending sophists into conniptions with his off-the-cuff utterances.

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  131. Anonym says:
    @anonymous

    That’s a big problem, that people need a working model of a modern successful country where immigration restriction works.
     
    There is such an example. It is called Israel. Another one would be Japan.

    Don’t forget the 1.4B of the world’s people with their own ethnostate. AKA China.

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  132. Lot says:
    @snorlax
    That's why I was more anti-anti-Trump than pro-Trump while the election was going on — I suspected his presidency would end up something like we were seeing now (though I did underestimate slightly the sheer insanity of the left), but it was a Catch-22 since Trump losing would've done even more to discredit immigration restrictionist politicians in the US and internationally, and giving far-leftists a majority on the Supreme Court would've made future US elections pointless anyhow.

    The Flight 93 Election, in other words.

    That’s why I was more anti-anti-Trump than pro-Trump while the election was going on — I suspected his presidency would end up something like we were seeing now

    I was fairly optimistic. I didn’t think he’d put much of a dent in legal immigration simply because the Senate has a 70-30 pro-amnesty mass immigration supermajority. I also doubted he’d use his executive powers to impound other DHS funds to start building the part of the Mexico wall that is already authorized by law, but has not been funded yet.

    I did not mind the first few of the awful cabinet picks either. A few Koch brothers people made sense to unite the party.

    I had no idea that the entire cabinet except for Jeff would be horrible. Nor did I suspect he would not even take extremely simple, basic steps to reduce illegal immigration in areas 100% within his power, such as stopping all third world country immigration and setting the annual refugee number the president sets to either 0 or something very low like 5,000. Not in a million years did I think candidate Trump, who thumbed his nose again and again at race PC, would affirmatively act to increase the number of Haitian illegals and anchor babies in the USA. I also did not think he would flat out lie about repealing Obama’s two executive amnesties. (He has not even withdrawn the larger one that is currently blocked by the injunction of a Texas judge. In theory that could change if Kennedy decides to go left on the next appeal).

    We really got the worst of both worlds with Trump. Someone like Kobach is smooth and unfailingly polite, but fights like a dog behind the scenes against the browning of America. Trump is a racist boor in public with his Mexican rapist comment and frequently lying about and retweeting fake black crime statistics (as if correct black crime statistics were not shockingly high already). Yet he quietly keeps Obama’s floodgates open to the worst people in the entire Western Hemisphere by pretty much any statistic measure.

    While Hillary and Jeb obviously would have been far worse, I wonder about Cruz, Walker, and Kasich.

    1. Cruz had a excellent voting record in the Senate on immigration matters. On the other hand, when he had a cheap labor audience he called for massive increases in legal immigration. He also choose to shut down the government not over Obama’s amnesty, but instead a stupid and failed attempt to repeal the ACA. Probably beside the point since Cruz’s unattractive personality and extreme positions on social issues made him un-electable.

    2. Walker had basically all of Cruz’s flaws as a candidate, just a bit less. He flip flopped on immigration positions but likely was a closet amnesty supporter since he is close to Ryan and the Kochs. However, it did not seem like he actually cared much one way or another.

    3. Kasich flipped and flopped on immigration before running for president. He was positively based in 2011, calling for an end of birthright citizenship and having his entire 22 member cabinet be white, saying he does not believe in tokenism. He seems to have then realized he could not get to Trump’s right and that he needed Koch money to win the primary, and moved left on these issues in the 2014-2016 period.

    As a rare elite politician from a Slavic and WWC background, I wonder if his basic political instincts are better than inherited multi-millionaires Trump and Jeb! and lower-tier elite international businessman background of Cruz.

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    • Replies: @snorlax
    Walker and Cruz (and Rand) I wonder about, because their campaign positions would be improvements on Trump's administration in practice, but Kasich? Come on — the guy makes The Economist practically drown in their own jizz — he's about as far from being on the side of the American people as possible.

    That he used to be better is irrelevant, or simply speaks to his mercenary character. Bill Clinton endorsed (at least publicly) the Barbara Jordan commission's recommendations. 10 years later, Hillary famously demanded we build a wall (which, IIRC, earned her praise on this very blog).
    , @snorlax
    I wouldn't say the entire Cabinet. (Commerce Secy) Wilbur Ross, (Trade Rep) Bob Lighthizer and Gen. Kelly all seem pretty based (although I was initially worried about the latter). And most of the rest have been decent, here defined as being a loyal soldier and keeping a low profile. The outright bad picks (including major non-Cabinet officials) seem to be, in descending order of badness:

    Gen. Flynn (for non-ideological reasons)
    Comey
    Gen. McMaster (one of the biggest leakers)
    Cohn (ditto)
    Mnuchin
    The various swamp creatures Mike Cernovich has identified
    Tillerson (probably the biggest disappointment)
    (Director of National Intelligence) Coats
    (NSA Director) Adm. Rogers
    (UN Ambassador) Haley (inconsequential position and not AFAICT disloyal, but still a bad influence)

    I won't say Kushner or Ivanka because you can't pick your family, but they'd be up there.
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  133. @DRA
    Trump seems to have a cultural affinity to many of his supporters. If he were a Texan he would be accused of telling 'Texas Tall Tales', aka being a 'Cracker'. Not a 'whip cracker', or racist, but part of the cultural continuum from the Celtic fringe through appalachia and the south.

    We recognize the braggadocio and the blarney, and don't take him literally. We don't take it as deep seated dishonesty, as was the case with Hillary. And we think he is on our side, which we never suspected Hillary of being, or Obama after at most the first year.

    Well said.

    It is unfortunate that there are now a lot of racial/ethnic/cultural types in America who can’t seem to understand a man like this. That’s sad, because a big part of our heritage and success as a nation includes men just like this.

    Those types who don’t get Trump remind me of what we sometimes call “Aspergery” people, or just people who can’t take a joke. They are literal thinkers, who, regardless of their IQs, are awfully stupid about catching on to how different people communicate. They are easily fooled by people like Hillary Clinton, TV talking heads, and New York Times writers, who, to us yahoos, are obvious phonies.

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  134. Lot says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Sanders wasn't a viable alternative. He would have been, had he won the nomination, but to win it, he would have had to damage Hillary, which he wasn't willing to do, even after it came out that the Democrats had colluded with her against him.

    but to win it, he would have had to damage Hillary, which he wasn’t willing to do

    I think Sanders ran a near-perfect campaign. To win he needed the votes of people who personally liked Hillary. Tearing her down would not have helped him.

    He was relentlessly negative about her policy positions and bad judgment on issues from Iraq to Wall Street regulation. But one of the highest points of his campaign was defending her and attacking the press when he said at a debate “I think we are all sick and tired of hearing about Hillary’s emails.” He started the race expected to be a Dennis Kucinich 3% of the vote type campaign, and ended it fairly close to a winner.

    What killed him was that Southern blacks all voted for Hillary. I think the reason they did this is they are used to losing elections in the South, and based on prior experience know that the best bet is the well funded establishment Democrat. That judgment is usually sound, it just wasn’t in 2016.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    You do raise a good question of whether Sanders could have won the nomination had he attacked Hillary. With 1990s or 1980s demographics, he probably could have won with the campaign he ran; in 2016, maybe he couldn't have regardless of what he did.
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  135. Lot says:
    @Svigor

    illegal voting
     
    When Democrats Big Media call this a lie, what they mean is, Trump can't prove that Democrats engage in a lot of vote fraud. But they probably do.

    They have one, loose set of standards for themselves, and another, tight set of standards for Trump. One thing the two standards have in common is that they frequently change on a whim.

    I don’t think vote fraud is all that common. Most dems are in solid dem areas and don’t need to engage in fraud. In swing areas, doing so risks huge prison sentences, either from GOP US attorneys or from GOP local officials when the area eventually swings back to them.

    What does happen is Dems like to create situations where legal immigrants think they are allowed to vote and there is nobody checking to make sure they can’t. Given that only about ~25% or so of Hispanic US citizens are regular voters, there are plenty of legal voters to turn out before it could ever make sense to try to get non-citizens to vote illegally.

    Strong voter ID laws are still good policy. Not to stop the tiny amount of vote fraud, but to decrease turnout among the underclass who lack government IDs and probably vote 80%+ for democrats.

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    • Replies: @res

    Strong voter ID laws are still good policy. Not to stop the tiny amount of vote fraud, but to decrease turnout among the underclass who lack government IDs and probably vote 80%+ for democrats.
     
    Statements like this are a big part of the reason the left goes ballistic about voter id.
    , @Autochthon

    I don’t think vote fraud is all that common.
     
    .

    What does happen is Dems [sic] like to create situations where legal immigrants think they are allowed to vote and there is nobody checking to make sure they can’t.
     

    Given that only about ~25% [sic] or so of Hispanic US [sic] citizens are regular voters, there are plenty of legal voters to turn out before it could ever make sense to try to get non-citizens to vote illegally.
     
    Holy Illogical Self-Contradiction, Batman!

    Electoral fraud is uncommon because Democrats regularly encourage electoral fraud but it doesn't "make sense" to encourage this fraud...soooo everything is okie dokie...?
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  136. @Peter Akuleyev

    Obviously, to be be a successful real estate developer, you have to blow a lot of smoke about how everything is coming together beautifully.
     
    Sure, but Trump was not a successful real estate developer. He was at best a mediocre real estate developer, and a very successful reality star and personal brand marketer. Trump is more like the Kardashians than he is like Stephen Ross or Larry Silverstein.

    Sure, but Trump was not a successful real estate developer. He was at best a mediocre real estate developer, and a very successful reality star and personal brand marketer. Trump is more like the Kardashians than he is like Stephen Ross or Larry Silverstein.

    What a fascinating perspective!

    No one has ever heard of Stephen Ross, and Larry Silverstein is known only because he told the authorities to “pull” WTC 7.

    Trump, however, was universally known by the 1980′s, and as of the 2016 election there were millions upon millions of Americans who knew of Trump but had never heard of anything relating to him being a “reality star”.

    The “reality star” stuff was an offshoot of the “successful developer” stuff. How old are you?

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  137. @reiner Tor

    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association.
     
    That is what many of us fear. There is still hope, of course.

    Give me a break. There is nothing to ruin.

    Anti-immigrationism (i.e., advocacy of society’s right to discriminate between self and non-self) is already streng verboten.

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  138. guest says:
    @Anonym
    OT: I haven't seen this here before, great commentary on the SJW phenomenon from an unlikely source. Comments are good too.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=p8M2tg2RkIQ

    The Simpsons has presumably always been written by lefties, because who else writes tv shows? But they weren’t always as preachy and tendentious as they are now, and I would guess that occasionally they slip back into their old relative even-handedness. I mean, the show has been on for like 29 years, they need things to make fun of, and campus inanity is eminently make-fun-able.

    That, plus Simpsons writers are typically Harvardites, aren’t they? Any excuse to denigrate Yalies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    It's the most alt-right type criticism I have seen from them. Even outrage over blackface is mocked through "botface".
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  139. MarkinPNW says:
    @e
    I don't know if this is true or not as it came from Dick Morris, who is stunningly accurate on some things and stunningly wrong on others. He says that right before Trump took office, Obama changed the job status of a bunch of White House staffers, political appointees under him, to civil service employees who couldn't be fired. He maintains most of them still are staffers and that man of the leaks that are deemed to have come from the WH come from them.

    I take Morris most of the time with a grain of salt.

    By civil service rules new civil service employees are on probation for at least the first year, still giving Trump time to fire them if he wants to, unless the conversion was more than a year ago.

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  140. @Randal

    I have some South Carolina ancestry by way of Barbados on my father’s side and I can tell you that treasonous rodents like Lindsey Graham and Mark Sanford do not represent the honorable people of South Carolina.
     
    And yet the honorable people of South Carolina keep electing and re-electing these (admittedly) treasonous rodents to represent them in government, with voting figures above 50% and often very greatly in excess of that figure.

    And yet the honorable people of South Carolina keep electing and re-electing these (admittedly) treasonous rodents to represent them in government, with voting figures above 50% and often very greatly in excess of that figure.

    I threw out something about Grahamnesty on Facebook once, and I have probably 100 friends who went to Graham’s high school (though years later).

    I got two responses: one from a “libertarian” and libertine 150-IQ guy who had run for mayor of Asheville on a legalize-dope platform and one from a girl from my 7th-grade biology class.

    He agreed with my negative critique of Graham’s immigration policies. She said, “He’s a good brother, uncle, and friend.”

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  141. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Lot

    but to win it, he would have had to damage Hillary, which he wasn’t willing to do
     
    I think Sanders ran a near-perfect campaign. To win he needed the votes of people who personally liked Hillary. Tearing her down would not have helped him.

    He was relentlessly negative about her policy positions and bad judgment on issues from Iraq to Wall Street regulation. But one of the highest points of his campaign was defending her and attacking the press when he said at a debate "I think we are all sick and tired of hearing about Hillary's emails." He started the race expected to be a Dennis Kucinich 3% of the vote type campaign, and ended it fairly close to a winner.

    What killed him was that Southern blacks all voted for Hillary. I think the reason they did this is they are used to losing elections in the South, and based on prior experience know that the best bet is the well funded establishment Democrat. That judgment is usually sound, it just wasn't in 2016.

    You do raise a good question of whether Sanders could have won the nomination had he attacked Hillary. With 1990s or 1980s demographics, he probably could have won with the campaign he ran; in 2016, maybe he couldn’t have regardless of what he did.

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  142. snorlax says:
    @Lot

    That’s why I was more anti-anti-Trump than pro-Trump while the election was going on — I suspected his presidency would end up something like we were seeing now
     
    I was fairly optimistic. I didn't think he'd put much of a dent in legal immigration simply because the Senate has a 70-30 pro-amnesty mass immigration supermajority. I also doubted he'd use his executive powers to impound other DHS funds to start building the part of the Mexico wall that is already authorized by law, but has not been funded yet.

    I did not mind the first few of the awful cabinet picks either. A few Koch brothers people made sense to unite the party.

    I had no idea that the entire cabinet except for Jeff would be horrible. Nor did I suspect he would not even take extremely simple, basic steps to reduce illegal immigration in areas 100% within his power, such as stopping all third world country immigration and setting the annual refugee number the president sets to either 0 or something very low like 5,000. Not in a million years did I think candidate Trump, who thumbed his nose again and again at race PC, would affirmatively act to increase the number of Haitian illegals and anchor babies in the USA. I also did not think he would flat out lie about repealing Obama's two executive amnesties. (He has not even withdrawn the larger one that is currently blocked by the injunction of a Texas judge. In theory that could change if Kennedy decides to go left on the next appeal).

    We really got the worst of both worlds with Trump. Someone like Kobach is smooth and unfailingly polite, but fights like a dog behind the scenes against the browning of America. Trump is a racist boor in public with his Mexican rapist comment and frequently lying about and retweeting fake black crime statistics (as if correct black crime statistics were not shockingly high already). Yet he quietly keeps Obama's floodgates open to the worst people in the entire Western Hemisphere by pretty much any statistic measure.

    While Hillary and Jeb obviously would have been far worse, I wonder about Cruz, Walker, and Kasich.

    1. Cruz had a excellent voting record in the Senate on immigration matters. On the other hand, when he had a cheap labor audience he called for massive increases in legal immigration. He also choose to shut down the government not over Obama's amnesty, but instead a stupid and failed attempt to repeal the ACA. Probably beside the point since Cruz's unattractive personality and extreme positions on social issues made him un-electable.

    2. Walker had basically all of Cruz's flaws as a candidate, just a bit less. He flip flopped on immigration positions but likely was a closet amnesty supporter since he is close to Ryan and the Kochs. However, it did not seem like he actually cared much one way or another.

    3. Kasich flipped and flopped on immigration before running for president. He was positively based in 2011, calling for an end of birthright citizenship and having his entire 22 member cabinet be white, saying he does not believe in tokenism. He seems to have then realized he could not get to Trump's right and that he needed Koch money to win the primary, and moved left on these issues in the 2014-2016 period.

    As a rare elite politician from a Slavic and WWC background, I wonder if his basic political instincts are better than inherited multi-millionaires Trump and Jeb! and lower-tier elite international businessman background of Cruz.

    Walker and Cruz (and Rand) I wonder about, because their campaign positions would be improvements on Trump’s administration in practice, but Kasich? Come on — the guy makes The Economist practically drown in their own jizz — he’s about as far from being on the side of the American people as possible.

    That he used to be better is irrelevant, or simply speaks to his mercenary character. Bill Clinton endorsed (at least publicly) the Barbara Jordan commission’s recommendations. 10 years later, Hillary famously demanded we build a wall (which, IIRC, earned her praise on this very blog).

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  143. snorlax says:
    @Svigor

    illegal voting
     
    When Democrats Big Media call this a lie, what they mean is, Trump can't prove that Democrats engage in a lot of vote fraud. But they probably do.

    They have one, loose set of standards for themselves, and another, tight set of standards for Trump. One thing the two standards have in common is that they frequently change on a whim.

    I’d state that a bit more strongly: even if Trump did prove the Democrats engage in vote fraud, with absolutely incontrovertible, everything-crossed-and-dotted evidence, they would still deny it, or at most simply ignore it and attempt to change the subject or engage in whataboutism every time it’s brought up.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "’I'd state that a bit more strongly: even if Trump did prove the Democrats engage in vote fraud, with absolutely incontrovertible, everything-crossed-and-dotted evidence, they would still deny it, or at most simply ignore it and attempt to change the subject or engage in whataboutism every time it’s brought up."

    Yup. That is what happened. There was clear, direct proof from DNC emails, and from investigative journalism, that the Democrats derailed Bernie's campaign, that they brought in Trump protesters, paid students to protest, and paid mentally ill people to violently attack people at Trump rallies. They also have been demonstrated to blatantly support illegal immigrant voting fraud (as they overwhelmingly vote for the Santa Claus party), busing in people to voting centers regardless of whether they are allowed to vote, and limiting efforts to ID voters.

    Not to mention that records show that the MSM repeatedly met with the Dems to shape the news towards the left during the election process, and that one gave Hillary answers to debate questions prior to a national debate with Trump.

    I'd say all of that (and probably more that I inadvertently forgot to mention) pretty clearly is a demonstration of voter fraud on the part of Democrats. And you're right, they and the MSM just ignored it, and instead launched into a campaign of day-and -night hollering at the top of their lungs, without the slightest shred of evidence, that Trump colluded with the Russians to rig the election.
    , @MBlanc46
    And the corporate media would collude in making the evidence of voter fraud disappear down the memory hole.
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  144. snorlax says:
    @Lot

    That’s why I was more anti-anti-Trump than pro-Trump while the election was going on — I suspected his presidency would end up something like we were seeing now
     
    I was fairly optimistic. I didn't think he'd put much of a dent in legal immigration simply because the Senate has a 70-30 pro-amnesty mass immigration supermajority. I also doubted he'd use his executive powers to impound other DHS funds to start building the part of the Mexico wall that is already authorized by law, but has not been funded yet.

    I did not mind the first few of the awful cabinet picks either. A few Koch brothers people made sense to unite the party.

    I had no idea that the entire cabinet except for Jeff would be horrible. Nor did I suspect he would not even take extremely simple, basic steps to reduce illegal immigration in areas 100% within his power, such as stopping all third world country immigration and setting the annual refugee number the president sets to either 0 or something very low like 5,000. Not in a million years did I think candidate Trump, who thumbed his nose again and again at race PC, would affirmatively act to increase the number of Haitian illegals and anchor babies in the USA. I also did not think he would flat out lie about repealing Obama's two executive amnesties. (He has not even withdrawn the larger one that is currently blocked by the injunction of a Texas judge. In theory that could change if Kennedy decides to go left on the next appeal).

    We really got the worst of both worlds with Trump. Someone like Kobach is smooth and unfailingly polite, but fights like a dog behind the scenes against the browning of America. Trump is a racist boor in public with his Mexican rapist comment and frequently lying about and retweeting fake black crime statistics (as if correct black crime statistics were not shockingly high already). Yet he quietly keeps Obama's floodgates open to the worst people in the entire Western Hemisphere by pretty much any statistic measure.

    While Hillary and Jeb obviously would have been far worse, I wonder about Cruz, Walker, and Kasich.

    1. Cruz had a excellent voting record in the Senate on immigration matters. On the other hand, when he had a cheap labor audience he called for massive increases in legal immigration. He also choose to shut down the government not over Obama's amnesty, but instead a stupid and failed attempt to repeal the ACA. Probably beside the point since Cruz's unattractive personality and extreme positions on social issues made him un-electable.

    2. Walker had basically all of Cruz's flaws as a candidate, just a bit less. He flip flopped on immigration positions but likely was a closet amnesty supporter since he is close to Ryan and the Kochs. However, it did not seem like he actually cared much one way or another.

    3. Kasich flipped and flopped on immigration before running for president. He was positively based in 2011, calling for an end of birthright citizenship and having his entire 22 member cabinet be white, saying he does not believe in tokenism. He seems to have then realized he could not get to Trump's right and that he needed Koch money to win the primary, and moved left on these issues in the 2014-2016 period.

    As a rare elite politician from a Slavic and WWC background, I wonder if his basic political instincts are better than inherited multi-millionaires Trump and Jeb! and lower-tier elite international businessman background of Cruz.

    I wouldn’t say the entire Cabinet. (Commerce Secy) Wilbur Ross, (Trade Rep) Bob Lighthizer and Gen. Kelly all seem pretty based (although I was initially worried about the latter). And most of the rest have been decent, here defined as being a loyal soldier and keeping a low profile. The outright bad picks (including major non-Cabinet officials) seem to be, in descending order of badness:

    Gen. Flynn (for non-ideological reasons)
    Comey
    Gen. McMaster (one of the biggest leakers)
    Cohn (ditto)
    Mnuchin
    The various swamp creatures Mike Cernovich has identified
    Tillerson (probably the biggest disappointment)
    (Director of National Intelligence) Coats
    (NSA Director) Adm. Rogers
    (UN Ambassador) Haley (inconsequential position and not AFAICT disloyal, but still a bad influence)

    I won’t say Kushner or Ivanka because you can’t pick your family, but they’d be up there.

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    • Replies: @IHTG
    When even snorlax thinks you're taking it too far.

    Yes, Gen. Kelly is good. Watch his appearances and see for yourself. No, he's not as hardcore as Sessions and Miller. Almost nobody is and it's not a reasonable criteria for approval. Which is why one should be thankful to Trump just for every day those two are in office, no matter what else he doesn't do. It's not to be taken for granted.

    , @snorlax
    Oh, I forgot Mattis, put him one notch above Mnuchin.
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  145. ANON says: • Disclaimer
    @Autochthon
    They might think Americans have common sense, as well as self-determination, and courage, among other things – the average resident of Orange County, California certainly conveys none of these qualities.

    Semi-Literate Peasants Indeed.

    The only one of your links that I clicked on led to a page about William Faulkner, whose career, fame, and public esteem lies principally upon his continual theme of whites=racists and blacks=victims.

    It’s nearly a hundred years of this indoctrination now, and still some of you resist!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    If all you can find in The Sound & The Fury or Absalom, Absalom! is "whites=bad; blacks=victims (or some such nonsense), it's not owing to any failing in Faulkner's genius.*

    Here's something more your speed.

    *To the extent that Faulkner did focus upon racial relations (and he did, as any writer of his subjects must), he evinced a much more sophisitcated understanding than you do:


    The Negro is a part of our economy and our southern traditions. It's true anywhere: Virginia, Mississippi, or Texas. The white southerner loves Negroes as individual Negroes, but he don't like Negroes in the mass; as apart from the northerner who in theory loves the Negroes in the mass but he's terrified and frightened of individual Negroes. I think that the condition of the Negro in the South has got to be changed for two simple reasons. One is that there's seventeen million of him now. He is diffuse over the country to where he can be a political factor anywhere. And also, if we are to cope with a culture which says that man is of no importance as measured and matched against the state, if we're to cope with that and be successful, we ourselves have got to have a culture in which any man is of infinite importance—much more important than the state—and we can't have seventeen million second-class citizens in a culture like that and have anybody believe it. But it's a slow process. It will take a great deal of patience and good sense, but it must be done.

    [Racial integration] won't come into Mississippi or anywhere else because of any decision of any court. That's something that has got to be settled by people. But yes, I think that whether integration may possibly never come in the sense that people think of it, I think that equality for the Negro will come. I think if the Negro has political equality to vote, if he has economic equality, if he has educational equality, then he won't want to mix with white folks any more than white folks wanted to mix him, because I can't imagine any Negro after his experience with white folks wanting to be that close to them. But he will get equality. If it's given to him by a Supreme Court case and enforced with police, as soon as the police are gone then some smart white man or even smart Negro will take his equality away from him again. He has got to be taught the responsibility of equality. That the—that the Constitution never said everybody is to have happiness. They have the right to gain happiness, if they could, and happiness or freedom is something that you've got to work for. If it were not to be worked for it wouldn't be worth having. It's got to be worked for and defended. Who was the Irish Member of Parliament who said, "Man—God hath vouchsafed man liberty only under condition of eternal vigilance, which condition if he break it, servitude is the consequence of his crime, the punishment of his guilt"? Well, that's true of anyone. You can't have freedom unless you deserve it and work to keep it—and equality, of course, is freedom.
     

    Semi-literate peasants, indeed.....
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  146. ANON says: • Disclaimer
    @Dave Pinsen
    Paterson and Jersey City New Jersey; also some in outer boroughs, IIRC.

    9/11 was before everyone had a video camera in his pocket, and there were fears of Islamophobic backlash (Islamophobiaphobia?), so to some extent this ended up getting memory-holed, but it was in newspapers and TV news broadcasts at the time.

    If it were in TV broadcasts and newspaper stories in this century, you’d have no trouble finding links.

    Your memory is playing tricks on you.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Is it easy? Post links where we can see the complete WABC, WCBS, WWOR, WPIX, and WNBC evening newscasts from 9/11/2001 and 9/12/2001 and we can review them.
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  147. ANON says: • Disclaimer
    @reiner Tor

    Public polls of immigration issues have turned strongly against restriction the past few months.
     
    It could discredit immigration restrictionism internationally (in the white world), too. That's a big problem, that people need a working model of a modern successful country where immigration restriction works. If instead they see that it leads to turmoil, and that anti-immigration politicians are incompetents and bumbling idiots, then of course many people will be convinced of the establishment position that immigration restriction cannot possibly work and that "populists" don't know how to govern a country.

    Our enemies are more numerous and more skilful than we. Also, they own the mass media.

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  148. donut says:
    @donut
    Hmm yeah , blah , blah , blah .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nh6pfUGJV0Y

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9mjVFMIbF0&t=289s

    Even as a racist I have to ask where have we gone wrong ? You feel me Negro ? You see what I’m saying ?

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  149. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @anonymous

    That’s a big problem, that people need a working model of a modern successful country where immigration restriction works.
     
    There is such an example. It is called Israel. Another one would be Japan.

    They never had immigration.

    What is needed is a successful immigration restrictionist government in a country which used to have high levels of immigration and already has a large number of immigrants. You know, where your only choice is a “populist” party or leader if you want no more immigration.

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    • Replies: @Nico

    What is needed is a successful immigration restrictionist government in a country which used to have high levels of immigration and already has a large number of immigrants.
     
    We have a precedent. U.S.A., 1924–65 (R.I.P.).
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  150. @ANON
    The only one of your links that I clicked on led to a page about William Faulkner, whose career, fame, and public esteem lies principally upon his continual theme of whites=racists and blacks=victims.

    It's nearly a hundred years of this indoctrination now, and still some of you resist!

    If all you can find in The Sound & The Fury or Absalom, Absalom! is “whites=bad; blacks=victims (or some such nonsense), it’s not owing to any failing in Faulkner’s genius.*

    Here’s something more your speed.

    [MORE]

    *To the extent that Faulkner did focus upon racial relations (and he did, as any writer of his subjects must), he evinced a much more sophisitcated understanding than you do:

    The Negro is a part of our economy and our southern traditions. It’s true anywhere: Virginia, Mississippi, or Texas. The white southerner loves Negroes as individual Negroes, but he don’t like Negroes in the mass; as apart from the northerner who in theory loves the Negroes in the mass but he’s terrified and frightened of individual Negroes. I think that the condition of the Negro in the South has got to be changed for two simple reasons. One is that there’s seventeen million of him now. He is diffuse over the country to where he can be a political factor anywhere. And also, if we are to cope with a culture which says that man is of no importance as measured and matched against the state, if we’re to cope with that and be successful, we ourselves have got to have a culture in which any man is of infinite importance—much more important than the state—and we can’t have seventeen million second-class citizens in a culture like that and have anybody believe it. But it’s a slow process. It will take a great deal of patience and good sense, but it must be done.

    [Racial integration] won’t come into Mississippi or anywhere else because of any decision of any court. That’s something that has got to be settled by people. But yes, I think that whether integration may possibly never come in the sense that people think of it, I think that equality for the Negro will come. I think if the Negro has political equality to vote, if he has economic equality, if he has educational equality, then he won’t want to mix with white folks any more than white folks wanted to mix him, because I can’t imagine any Negro after his experience with white folks wanting to be that close to them. But he will get equality. If it’s given to him by a Supreme Court case and enforced with police, as soon as the police are gone then some smart white man or even smart Negro will take his equality away from him again. He has got to be taught the responsibility of equality. That the—that the Constitution never said everybody is to have happiness. They have the right to gain happiness, if they could, and happiness or freedom is something that you’ve got to work for. If it were not to be worked for it wouldn’t be worth having. It’s got to be worked for and defended. Who was the Irish Member of Parliament who said, “Man—God hath vouchsafed man liberty only under condition of eternal vigilance, which condition if he break it, servitude is the consequence of his crime, the punishment of his guilt”? Well, that’s true of anyone. You can’t have freedom unless you deserve it and work to keep it—and equality, of course, is freedom.

    Semi-literate peasants, indeed…..

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    • Replies: @res
    I somehow managed to miss ever hearing about the book which inspired that image. In case anyone else is in the same boat: https://www.amazon.com/Very-Hungry-Caterpillar-Eric-Carle/dp/0399226907
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  151. donut says:
    @donut
    Hmm yeah , blah , blah , blah .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nh6pfUGJV0Y

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9mjVFMIbF0&t=289s

    That “Hmm yeah , blah , blah , blah .” was an error on my part .

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  152. Anonym says:
    @guest
    The Simpsons has presumably always been written by lefties, because who else writes tv shows? But they weren't always as preachy and tendentious as they are now, and I would guess that occasionally they slip back into their old relative even-handedness. I mean, the show has been on for like 29 years, they need things to make fun of, and campus inanity is eminently make-fun-able.

    That, plus Simpsons writers are typically Harvardites, aren't they? Any excuse to denigrate Yalies.

    It’s the most alt-right type criticism I have seen from them. Even outrage over blackface is mocked through “botface”.

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  153. donut says:

    She so fine . A great instrument that she mastered .

    But her big hit was :

    Sorry for the shitty audio and sorrier still that this great talent has been reduced to a saloon venue . Never the less she is still great and on the + side she is fine and thick .

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  154. IHTG says:
    @snorlax
    I wouldn't say the entire Cabinet. (Commerce Secy) Wilbur Ross, (Trade Rep) Bob Lighthizer and Gen. Kelly all seem pretty based (although I was initially worried about the latter). And most of the rest have been decent, here defined as being a loyal soldier and keeping a low profile. The outright bad picks (including major non-Cabinet officials) seem to be, in descending order of badness:

    Gen. Flynn (for non-ideological reasons)
    Comey
    Gen. McMaster (one of the biggest leakers)
    Cohn (ditto)
    Mnuchin
    The various swamp creatures Mike Cernovich has identified
    Tillerson (probably the biggest disappointment)
    (Director of National Intelligence) Coats
    (NSA Director) Adm. Rogers
    (UN Ambassador) Haley (inconsequential position and not AFAICT disloyal, but still a bad influence)

    I won't say Kushner or Ivanka because you can't pick your family, but they'd be up there.

    When even snorlax thinks you’re taking it too far.

    Yes, Gen. Kelly is good. Watch his appearances and see for yourself. No, he’s not as hardcore as Sessions and Miller. Almost nobody is and it’s not a reasonable criteria for approval. Which is why one should be thankful to Trump just for every day those two are in office, no matter what else he doesn’t do. It’s not to be taken for granted.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonguy

    Yes, Gen. Kelly is good.
     
    He was a southie kid who quit high school, rode the rails, enlisted in the Corps. Got out, went to college, and came back in as an officer.

    FWIW, I was an enlisted Marine in the same battalion when he was a company officer, once went on a (reinforced company) deployment to Norway attached to his command that was a real epic.

    Lost one of his sons in GWOT.

    Has written/commented extensively over the years how a volunteer force is creating a society alienated from broader US society. Most of this was before Obama administration broke the back of military culture, got them all globalized.

    In a saner world, Gen Mattis would have been CMC followed by Kelly. You can think of both as having been purged by that administration. Making those guys his first two appointments was a pretty big statement by Trump.

    We are only 4 months in guys, don't start panicking yet.

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  155. @Hockamaw
    Trump is an enigma inside a riddle, wrapped in a mystery. I suspect he never took any of his policies too seriously to be honest, and I'm not expecting many huge victories on immigration. Anyone who still thinks we're getting a big beautiful wall for example is dreaming. However, Trump's near-superhuman election win against BOTH the Bush and Clinton machines was probably the greatest blow against the forces of crypto-communist political correctness I've seen in my lifetime. He proved to us they aren't invincible, and for that he is a hero in my eyes.

    Anyone who has worked in business for a charismatic boss knows they bend, the truth, change their mind, cut corners, aggravate their subordinates, do whatever it takes to get the contract or the sale, go back on their word, play one subordinate against another, misunderstand important details, make bad off-the-cuff decisions, don’t follow any kind of principle, and just make no goddam sense.

    Still, the good ones manage to get good stuff done, for a time at least. With success, people talk about the boss’s vision, his reality distortion field, his lovable approximations, the loyalty he fosters, and so on. You can’t argue with success.

    Presumably this kind of behavior is more rare in established, stable industries, like nuclear power, the auto industry, or the media (last one is a joke). But in turbulent businesses like real estate or the computer industry, it’s the norm.

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  156. Svigor says:

    I don’t think vote fraud is all that common. Most dems are in solid dem areas and don’t need to engage in fraud. In swing areas, doing so risks huge prison sentences, either from GOP US attorneys or from GOP local officials when the area eventually swings back to them.

    I think it probably is, relative to how much vote fraud the Democrats Big Media would have us think there is, how much “respectable” folk think is going on. To hear them talk, our elections are as clean as a preacher’s sheets. I can’t recall the last time I read an in-depth piece on voting in America, and points in the system that are most vulnerable. E.g., what happens when votes for the outsider party simply disappear? Something tells me this would be a pretty good way to cheat.

    Most Dems seem to live in islands of blue in seas of red, precisely the sorts of places where 1) vote fraud can tip the balance, 2) is hardest to spot, and 3) is easiest for machine politics to carry off.

    I’m not sure how big a risk GOP reprisals are, especially in solidly blue strongholds that are decisive in keeping their states blue (Chicago?).

    What does happen is Dems like to create situations where legal immigrants think they are allowed to vote and there is nobody checking to make sure they can’t.

    That’s passive vote fraud.

    P.S., no matter what I did, I couldn’t get g**gle to give me a search result that looked like it answered my questions about how many states that would otherwise be red are tipped into the blue column, by one or a handful of big blue cities, as in Illinois and Pennsylvania. The number is almost certainly decisive; the question how decisive.

    So a good link would be appreciated.

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  157. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Randal

    But as a politician, Trump doesn’t seem like a very talented liar.
     
    Real estate is little league lying. Becoming a politician, Trump has joined the big league liars, and somewhat been found out.

    Trump’s biggest ‘problem’ is that he has been openly honest about the things that the left bombard us with keeping quiet about.

    That being said, he does have trouble with the tact and communication of a politician, because he hasn’t been trained and developed experience in being a politician. Its less an issue of someone playing little league trying to now play in the majors, but rather like someone who played professional football his whole life having to now play pro baseball. Nearly everyone else he is dealing with has been playing a different game for decades.

    What’s more, there is a political capital that one builds up in Washington, a ‘you scratch my back, I scratch yours’ kind of arrangement, where even across the aisles, people will do things like support another politician’s bill or pork barrel arrangement, with the understanding that they themselves can call for favors from those politicians when they have a piece of legislation that is particularly important to them. But it has to be built up over many years. Trump lacks that from a lack of political experience.

    But while his openness and honesty have been the reason he’s been attacked so much it’s also been his greatest asset, leading to his election, because the things that they silence are the things that are having the most negative impact on the lives of the most Americans.

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  158. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @snorlax
    I'd state that a bit more strongly: even if Trump did prove the Democrats engage in vote fraud, with absolutely incontrovertible, everything-crossed-and-dotted evidence, they would still deny it, or at most simply ignore it and attempt to change the subject or engage in whataboutism every time it's brought up.

    “’I’d state that a bit more strongly: even if Trump did prove the Democrats engage in vote fraud, with absolutely incontrovertible, everything-crossed-and-dotted evidence, they would still deny it, or at most simply ignore it and attempt to change the subject or engage in whataboutism every time it’s brought up.”

    Yup. That is what happened. There was clear, direct proof from DNC emails, and from investigative journalism, that the Democrats derailed Bernie’s campaign, that they brought in Trump protesters, paid students to protest, and paid mentally ill people to violently attack people at Trump rallies. They also have been demonstrated to blatantly support illegal immigrant voting fraud (as they overwhelmingly vote for the Santa Claus party), busing in people to voting centers regardless of whether they are allowed to vote, and limiting efforts to ID voters.

    Not to mention that records show that the MSM repeatedly met with the Dems to shape the news towards the left during the election process, and that one gave Hillary answers to debate questions prior to a national debate with Trump.

    I’d say all of that (and probably more that I inadvertently forgot to mention) pretty clearly is a demonstration of voter fraud on the part of Democrats. And you’re right, they and the MSM just ignored it, and instead launched into a campaign of day-and -night hollering at the top of their lungs, without the slightest shred of evidence, that Trump colluded with the Russians to rig the election.

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  159. U.S. Quietly Lifts Limit on Number of Refugees Allowed In

    State department lifts refugee limit. Trump’s government actively increasing immigration.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    There's some mistake. Jack Hanson told us so. It's all a clever ploy by Mr. Trump to distract from his masterplan, which he will implement Real Soon Now.
    , @res
    I think the swamp/protected wetland is winning.
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  160. @Travis
    Trump is probably is the most honey president since TDR.

    one reason Trump appears more honest, he was never a professional politician like the last 9 presidents going back to Eisenhower. It is quite amazing that a 70 year-old man was able to successfully enter politics and win the Presidency. He did appear honest on the campaign trail, which is one reason he was able to defeat the GOP establishment.

    Trump is probably is the most honey president since TDR.

    Teddy Roosevelt didn’t have a middle initial.

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  161. Moshe says:
    @snorlax

    EVERYONE was celebrating. Or at least young men everywhere weren’t quite devastated as it all went down.
     
    Everyone meaning everyone or everyone meaning nonwhite?

    I was a young dude in israel and stepped into a bodega to watch the unfolding events and the bodega owner was extatic. “Fock America! He said as he slapped his hand on the table.
     
    I assume the bodega owner was Arab? No?

    “Non-white”???

    I’m talking about foreigners. Of every stripe. In America though, yes, it probably was just Muslims and Blacks. Abroad though it was everybody – including the Swiss. People just want to see America humbled. That’s how it is bro

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  162. Moshe says:
    @Desiderius

    Don’t you guys know how the world works?
     
    The world's a big place.

    Only the elite of the elite need to know nearly that much.

    No one is requires to know anything but being as I assume people have been abroad it surprises me how little rhey managed to notice

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  163. @Chief Seattle
    U.S. Quietly Lifts Limit on Number of Refugees Allowed In

    State department lifts refugee limit. Trump's government actively increasing immigration.

    There’s some mistake. Jack Hanson told us so. It’s all a clever ploy by Mr. Trump to distract from his masterplan, which he will implement Real Soon Now.

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  164. @Ali Choudhury
    Really, where were they cheering? The only ones I remember publicly cheering were the Gaza Palestinians.

    \Why he even made an issue about the crowd is beyond me, he seems in over his head and apt to starting pointless fights rather than delivering on his agenda. His coddling of the Saudi royals was stomach-churning.

    Picking a fight over the inauguration crowd was really dumb. The obvious reason that previous inaugurations drew bigger crowds was that there are large numbers of inside the beltway (and not far outside the beltway) residents who were much more excited about Obama than Trump, and otherwise have nothing else to do. That the suckers of the public teat aren’t thrilled about Trump is a good thing.

    As for coddling the Saudis, the ability and willingness to suck up to assholes can be a valuable skill. I wish I had it. We can only hope that he has something in mind.

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  165. res says:
    @Lot
    I don't think vote fraud is all that common. Most dems are in solid dem areas and don't need to engage in fraud. In swing areas, doing so risks huge prison sentences, either from GOP US attorneys or from GOP local officials when the area eventually swings back to them.

    What does happen is Dems like to create situations where legal immigrants think they are allowed to vote and there is nobody checking to make sure they can't. Given that only about ~25% or so of Hispanic US citizens are regular voters, there are plenty of legal voters to turn out before it could ever make sense to try to get non-citizens to vote illegally.

    Strong voter ID laws are still good policy. Not to stop the tiny amount of vote fraud, but to decrease turnout among the underclass who lack government IDs and probably vote 80%+ for democrats.

    Strong voter ID laws are still good policy. Not to stop the tiny amount of vote fraud, but to decrease turnout among the underclass who lack government IDs and probably vote 80%+ for democrats.

    Statements like this are a big part of the reason the left goes ballistic about voter id.

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    • Replies: @Alden
    The underclass needs government IDs to present at the welfare offices. They have IDs. It's the bloviating liberals who claim the underclass are too helpless to get the IDs.
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  166. Nico says:
    @reiner Tor
    They never had immigration.

    What is needed is a successful immigration restrictionist government in a country which used to have high levels of immigration and already has a large number of immigrants. You know, where your only choice is a "populist" party or leader if you want no more immigration.

    What is needed is a successful immigration restrictionist government in a country which used to have high levels of immigration and already has a large number of immigrants.

    We have a precedent. U.S.A., 1924–65 (R.I.P.).

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  167. res says:
    @Autochthon
    If all you can find in The Sound & The Fury or Absalom, Absalom! is "whites=bad; blacks=victims (or some such nonsense), it's not owing to any failing in Faulkner's genius.*

    Here's something more your speed.

    *To the extent that Faulkner did focus upon racial relations (and he did, as any writer of his subjects must), he evinced a much more sophisitcated understanding than you do:


    The Negro is a part of our economy and our southern traditions. It's true anywhere: Virginia, Mississippi, or Texas. The white southerner loves Negroes as individual Negroes, but he don't like Negroes in the mass; as apart from the northerner who in theory loves the Negroes in the mass but he's terrified and frightened of individual Negroes. I think that the condition of the Negro in the South has got to be changed for two simple reasons. One is that there's seventeen million of him now. He is diffuse over the country to where he can be a political factor anywhere. And also, if we are to cope with a culture which says that man is of no importance as measured and matched against the state, if we're to cope with that and be successful, we ourselves have got to have a culture in which any man is of infinite importance—much more important than the state—and we can't have seventeen million second-class citizens in a culture like that and have anybody believe it. But it's a slow process. It will take a great deal of patience and good sense, but it must be done.

    [Racial integration] won't come into Mississippi or anywhere else because of any decision of any court. That's something that has got to be settled by people. But yes, I think that whether integration may possibly never come in the sense that people think of it, I think that equality for the Negro will come. I think if the Negro has political equality to vote, if he has economic equality, if he has educational equality, then he won't want to mix with white folks any more than white folks wanted to mix him, because I can't imagine any Negro after his experience with white folks wanting to be that close to them. But he will get equality. If it's given to him by a Supreme Court case and enforced with police, as soon as the police are gone then some smart white man or even smart Negro will take his equality away from him again. He has got to be taught the responsibility of equality. That the—that the Constitution never said everybody is to have happiness. They have the right to gain happiness, if they could, and happiness or freedom is something that you've got to work for. If it were not to be worked for it wouldn't be worth having. It's got to be worked for and defended. Who was the Irish Member of Parliament who said, "Man—God hath vouchsafed man liberty only under condition of eternal vigilance, which condition if he break it, servitude is the consequence of his crime, the punishment of his guilt"? Well, that's true of anyone. You can't have freedom unless you deserve it and work to keep it—and equality, of course, is freedom.
     

    Semi-literate peasants, indeed.....

    I somehow managed to miss ever hearing about the book which inspired that image. In case anyone else is in the same boat: https://www.amazon.com/Very-Hungry-Caterpillar-Eric-Carle/dp/0399226907

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Believe it or not, I'm not quite so gauche: I quickly sought an image of the original book, meaning only to suggest simple writing (I remember the book from my childhood), but it's being late and my not having on my glasses, I didn't realise I actually selected a blue paraody.

    The original is a great book for toddlers, by the way.
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  168. res says:
    @Chief Seattle
    U.S. Quietly Lifts Limit on Number of Refugees Allowed In

    State department lifts refugee limit. Trump's government actively increasing immigration.

    I think the swamp/protected wetland is winning.

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  169. @res
    I somehow managed to miss ever hearing about the book which inspired that image. In case anyone else is in the same boat: https://www.amazon.com/Very-Hungry-Caterpillar-Eric-Carle/dp/0399226907

    Believe it or not, I’m not quite so gauche: I quickly sought an image of the original book, meaning only to suggest simple writing (I remember the book from my childhood), but it’s being late and my not having on my glasses, I didn’t realise I actually selected a blue paraody.

    The original is a great book for toddlers, by the way.

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  170. Moshe says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Sanford is a South Carolina dirtbag who claimed to be on the Appalachian trail while he was having an affair with a foreigner women. I have some South Carolina ancestry by way of Barbados on my father's side and I can tell you that treasonous rodents like Lindsey Graham and Mark Sanford do not represent the honorable people of South Carolina.

    One of the finest epiphanies of my life was when I realized that I was “hiking the appalachian trail” while hiking The Appalachian Trail.

    To be clear, I knew I was doing the former but didn’t realize I had done it on the more literal trail until I engaged in the customary post-coital math.

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  171. NOTA says:
    @e
    I don't know if this is true or not as it came from Dick Morris, who is stunningly accurate on some things and stunningly wrong on others. He says that right before Trump took office, Obama changed the job status of a bunch of White House staffers, political appointees under him, to civil service employees who couldn't be fired. He maintains most of them still are staffers and that man of the leaks that are deemed to have come from the WH come from them.

    I take Morris most of the time with a grain of salt.

    I remember hearing the same stories about Bush appointees being moved to civil service positions. I suspect this is a standard move made whenever the White House changes parties. Anyone know more?

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  172. Moshe says:
    @Pat Boyle
    Kevin Costner, who isn’t the greatest actor

    The problem is that there are at least two very different definitions of the term "actor'. Acting is pretending to others that you are someone other than who you actually are. All people can act at least a little but some people have more 'range' as you say. Nasty people in real life can pretend to be nice. Nice people can pretend to be nasty. Costner doesn't seem to be very good at this kind of thing. He doesn't do impressions and he doesn't speak in accents.

    In films the director and the makeup artist also influence this kind of acting. Jose Ferrer pretended to be shorter than he really was and Al Pacino pretends to be a normal man rather than a dwarf. Costner never does anything like that. He is a good looking tall man with a healthy physique. He doesn't bulk up his muscles with steroids or go on long starvation diets. He doesn't even wear putty noses. He looks pretty much the same in all his films.

    But there is another meaning to the term actor - especially movie actor. In this meaning the job of an actor is to be liked by the paying audience. Supporting actors are expected to embody certain specific characteristics. For example Slim Pickens was always expected to play a Slim Pickens type character. Costner plays the male lead or protagonist and he is expected to be watchable and likeable. This is a talent too.

    Costner in that sense is a great actor.

    If Al Pacini is 5″7 he’s not a dwarf. Isn’t Bobo Something like 5″2 without his elevator shoes?

    Besides, I can’t recall many Pacino movies offhand but in that Tony Montana movie they definitely didn’t try to make him look tall. I think he was supposed to look like a small genius with a world class ego than large and in charge.

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    • Replies: @Pat Boyle
    Who's Bobo? I tried to look it up, but there were too many entries.

    Pacino in 'The Godfather' wore monster platform shoes. There are pictures somewhere of the Web from outtakes. Lots of Hollywood leading men are not as tall as they would like but even among the Tom Cruises or Robert Downey's Al Pacino is remarkably tiny.

    I don't actually mind Pacino being so much shorter in real life than he what he tries convey on the screen. But he is also very old and white haired. He seems to bath in black hair dye. He's well over seventy but takes on action roles where he is pursued by young women. He is a bad joke.

    And a very limited actor.
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  173. NOTA says:
    @Svigor

    illegal voting
     
    When Democrats Big Media call this a lie, what they mean is, Trump can't prove that Democrats engage in a lot of vote fraud. But they probably do.

    They have one, loose set of standards for themselves, and another, tight set of standards for Trump. One thing the two standards have in common is that they frequently change on a whim.

    If there were millions of illegal immigrants voting, I would expect that to leave tons of evidence, and there are enough conservative media sources that I’d expect to see that evidence become widely known. We don’t see that evidence, probably because there aren’t many illegals voting. (Which makes sense–it’s hard to get Americans to bother voting, and it’s our country. Why does some Salvadoran here to hang drywall care enough about US elections to bother voting, especially when doing so could get him into trouble?)

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  174. MBlanc46 says:
    @Peter Akuleyev
    Problem is that Trump is such an incompetent and transparent fraud that he is going to end up destroying the anti-immigration movement through guilt by association. It is true that there weren't many alternatives on offer, but a Saunders type "left wing economic nationalism" would probably have had more of a chance of long term broad based success.

    And if Trump is winning, how is that self-appointed "people of color" seem to be more outspoken and comfortable in their contempt for "white people" than ever before? This attitude seems especially noticeable among South Asians, East Asians and the "talented tenth".

    What the anti-immigration movement needs is more Morrisseys - more "lefty" types willing to stand up and be counted. Wishful thinking probably but the arrogance of the "Desi Girls" of the world may yet get some white lefties to realize they have let vipers into the nest.

    “Incompetent and transparent fraud” is perhaps a bit strong, but it’s certainly the case that anti-globalists deserved a better candidate. Trump’s all the political system would allow, so he’s what we got. And four years of Trump is better than four years of the Clintons.

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  175. MBlanc46 says:
    @Anonymous
    Just know this: in America, it is traditional to body-slam reporters from The Guardian -- it is heritage

    It ought to become a tradition. It’s past time that partisan professional liars experience some pain from the people that they slander.

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  176. MBlanc46 says:
    @Lot
    Trump stabs his voters in the back and extends TPS status for Haiti, so more work permits for Haitian illegals plus no deportations

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/haiti/article151930167.html.

    https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/05/24/2017-10749/extension-of-the-designation-of-haiti-for-temporary-protected-status

    All Trump needed to do was nothing and simply let the TPS designation expire. Instead he took an affirmative act to screw us. More illegals with work permits, more crime, more Creole-speakers and voodoo, more Haitian anchor babies, more 80IQ kids dumbing down our public schools, more and larger "Little Haitis" in our cities. Trump this week acted to make America less like America and more like Haiti.

    I hope Kris Kobach is watching. Trump showed the path to winning the presidential election. In 2020 we need someone who keeps his word.

    “Stab in the back” is not inappropriate. But I wonder whether it’s not more of a matter of his having forgotten all that he said during the campaign about immigration.

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  177. MBlanc46 says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Scottish Enlightenment. German Idealism. The Scots said know the world and make your peace with it no matter how utterly horrible the earthly realm is. That thinking makes good engineers and warriors. The British Empire took advantage of Scots who took the world as it and still found beauty in the world and carried on with honor and energy.

    German Idealism makes you question everything about existence and reality. Who is doing the raping? Someone is doing the raping? President Trump rightly said that illegal alien invaders were raping and killing and assaulting people in the United States. What is knowable? Can we be sure external events and things are real?

    President Trump is German and Scottish. Back To Blood.

    I’m pretty sure that I wouldn’t characterize the Scottish Enlightenment as you do, but that’s an interesting way to analyze Trump.

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  178. MBlanc46 says:
    @snorlax
    I'd state that a bit more strongly: even if Trump did prove the Democrats engage in vote fraud, with absolutely incontrovertible, everything-crossed-and-dotted evidence, they would still deny it, or at most simply ignore it and attempt to change the subject or engage in whataboutism every time it's brought up.

    And the corporate media would collude in making the evidence of voter fraud disappear down the memory hole.

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  179. MBlanc46 says:
    @dearieme
    The best reason for voting for Trump was to keep the appalling Hellary out. Anything else is a bonus.

    Yes, being the anti-Hillary was worth millions of votes, especially here in the Heartland.

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  180. snorlax says:
    @snorlax
    I wouldn't say the entire Cabinet. (Commerce Secy) Wilbur Ross, (Trade Rep) Bob Lighthizer and Gen. Kelly all seem pretty based (although I was initially worried about the latter). And most of the rest have been decent, here defined as being a loyal soldier and keeping a low profile. The outright bad picks (including major non-Cabinet officials) seem to be, in descending order of badness:

    Gen. Flynn (for non-ideological reasons)
    Comey
    Gen. McMaster (one of the biggest leakers)
    Cohn (ditto)
    Mnuchin
    The various swamp creatures Mike Cernovich has identified
    Tillerson (probably the biggest disappointment)
    (Director of National Intelligence) Coats
    (NSA Director) Adm. Rogers
    (UN Ambassador) Haley (inconsequential position and not AFAICT disloyal, but still a bad influence)

    I won't say Kushner or Ivanka because you can't pick your family, but they'd be up there.

    Oh, I forgot Mattis, put him one notch above Mnuchin.

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  181. @Cindy
    Think of the USA as one great, great, GREAT big piece of RE. He's doing fine. He's going to be fine.

    1.) Oh, I know HE is going to be fine….but, What About Bob… and bored identity?

    Not to mention that somebody should, please, think of bored identity’s children?

    2.) You do know what they say about real estate developers?

    “.blah,blah,blah…..and some, I assume, are good people.”

    3.) Wht if Orb Rubbing Orangutan from Queens start using eminent domain the way everybody around him advise him to do it?

    What if he starts wasting Saudi’s Bounty Moolah on Summer Camps for Syrian Orange Clockmaking Orphans, instead on investing our future in the Big, Beautiful Wall?

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  182. @fred c dobbs
    Mexico. Indeed.

    Even ignoring the criminal element, I've tried to tell people until I am blue in the face......NOT ALL MEXICANS ARE THE SAME. ZMan says he lives on the edge of the Baltimore ghetto. Well, I live on the edge of an Orange County barrio. And I mostly see squat round brown people, the kind you might find in southern Mexico and El Salvador. Because that's EXACTLY where most of these people are from. These are indigenous, unskilled, semi-literate peasants. Mexico's version of Arkansas, Mississippi and West Virginia. THAT's who Mexico sends our way. What would Canada think of Americans if the only visitors to the Great White North were from those three states?

    What would Canada think of Americans if the only visitors to the Great White North were from those three states?

    Your deep conviction of “indigenous, unskilled, semi-literate peasants of Arkansas, Mississippi and West Virginia” as of being the same stock as a gnomish-morlockish, maize devouring invaders from the southern border is a proof that this country, at least in your head, exists not as a Nation, but as an open wasteland populated by randomly mixed & matched people.

    bored identity believes that almost every Arkansas, Mississippi and /or West Virginia’s Uncle Cletus should be considered as a crème de la crème visiting guest in Quebec or Ontario, contrasting with circa 90% of Third World Country Weekly Disposals of Vibrant Rocket Surgeons.

    By the way, if you are Uncle Cletus, why even bother to travel to the country that is run by that guy?:

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    • Replies: @fred c dobbs
    Congratulations. Missed my point entirely. Nice conflation, btw.
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  183. anonguy says:
    @IHTG
    When even snorlax thinks you're taking it too far.

    Yes, Gen. Kelly is good. Watch his appearances and see for yourself. No, he's not as hardcore as Sessions and Miller. Almost nobody is and it's not a reasonable criteria for approval. Which is why one should be thankful to Trump just for every day those two are in office, no matter what else he doesn't do. It's not to be taken for granted.

    Yes, Gen. Kelly is good.

    He was a southie kid who quit high school, rode the rails, enlisted in the Corps. Got out, went to college, and came back in as an officer.

    FWIW, I was an enlisted Marine in the same battalion when he was a company officer, once went on a (reinforced company) deployment to Norway attached to his command that was a real epic.

    Lost one of his sons in GWOT.

    Has written/commented extensively over the years how a volunteer force is creating a society alienated from broader US society. Most of this was before Obama administration broke the back of military culture, got them all globalized.

    In a saner world, Gen Mattis would have been CMC followed by Kelly. You can think of both as having been purged by that administration. Making those guys his first two appointments was a pretty big statement by Trump.

    We are only 4 months in guys, don’t start panicking yet.

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  184. Alden says:
    @e
    I don't know if this is true or not as it came from Dick Morris, who is stunningly accurate on some things and stunningly wrong on others. He says that right before Trump took office, Obama changed the job status of a bunch of White House staffers, political appointees under him, to civil service employees who couldn't be fired. He maintains most of them still are staffers and that man of the leaks that are deemed to have come from the WH come from them.

    I take Morris most of the time with a grain of salt.

    Sounds very reasonable.

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  185. Alden says:
    @res

    Strong voter ID laws are still good policy. Not to stop the tiny amount of vote fraud, but to decrease turnout among the underclass who lack government IDs and probably vote 80%+ for democrats.
     
    Statements like this are a big part of the reason the left goes ballistic about voter id.

    The underclass needs government IDs to present at the welfare offices. They have IDs. It’s the bloviating liberals who claim the underclass are too helpless to get the IDs.

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    • Replies: @res
    That is the part I don't understand. It seems like a compelling argument. Thanks for making it explicit.

    Here is a humorous take: http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/24-things-that-require-a-photo-id/article/2534254

    Voter id seems like a no brainer to me. I called out Lot's statement because I think it adds fuel to liberal objections.

    Here is a relatively thoughtful anti-voter id article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2017/02/15/do-voter-identification-laws-suppress-minority-voting-yes-we-did-the-research
    Their idea is that showing minority turnout declines with voter id is proof of voter suppression. In one sense perhaps, but the important question is whether those suppressed votes were legitimate.

    I am curious how much voter fraud there really is. It seems like intense get out the vote efforts in non-conscientious and population dense areas like inner cities (Philadelphia anyone?) is a recipe for fraud of the form of people voting in the place of others. How would one detect this? I think the easiest way would be (wait for it) to see how much turnout declines after implementing voter id.
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  186. Trump’s Cabinet is in a need of some serious decohnstruction !

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  187. Harold says:
    @donut
    Hmm yeah , blah , blah , blah .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nh6pfUGJV0Y

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9mjVFMIbF0&t=289s

    Why should we watch those?

    Read More
    • Replies: @donut
    Don't then . I only put them up because I found them interesting and it's a channel that not many of Steve's posters might have seen .
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  188. @Lot
    I don't think vote fraud is all that common. Most dems are in solid dem areas and don't need to engage in fraud. In swing areas, doing so risks huge prison sentences, either from GOP US attorneys or from GOP local officials when the area eventually swings back to them.

    What does happen is Dems like to create situations where legal immigrants think they are allowed to vote and there is nobody checking to make sure they can't. Given that only about ~25% or so of Hispanic US citizens are regular voters, there are plenty of legal voters to turn out before it could ever make sense to try to get non-citizens to vote illegally.

    Strong voter ID laws are still good policy. Not to stop the tiny amount of vote fraud, but to decrease turnout among the underclass who lack government IDs and probably vote 80%+ for democrats.

    I don’t think vote fraud is all that common.

    .

    What does happen is Dems [sic] like to create situations where legal immigrants think they are allowed to vote and there is nobody checking to make sure they can’t.

    Given that only about ~25% [sic] or so of Hispanic US [sic] citizens are regular voters, there are plenty of legal voters to turn out before it could ever make sense to try to get non-citizens to vote illegally.

    Holy Illogical Self-Contradiction, Batman!

    Electoral fraud is uncommon because Democrats regularly encourage electoral fraud but it doesn’t “make sense” to encourage this fraud…soooo everything is okie dokie…?

    Read More
    • Replies: @IHTG
    He's obviously referring only to electoral fraud involving illegal immigrant voting.
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  189. IHTG says:
    @Autochthon

    I don’t think vote fraud is all that common.
     
    .

    What does happen is Dems [sic] like to create situations where legal immigrants think they are allowed to vote and there is nobody checking to make sure they can’t.
     

    Given that only about ~25% [sic] or so of Hispanic US [sic] citizens are regular voters, there are plenty of legal voters to turn out before it could ever make sense to try to get non-citizens to vote illegally.
     
    Holy Illogical Self-Contradiction, Batman!

    Electoral fraud is uncommon because Democrats regularly encourage electoral fraud but it doesn't "make sense" to encourage this fraud...soooo everything is okie dokie...?

    He’s obviously referring only to electoral fraud involving illegal immigrant voting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    He's obviously writing about both illegal aliens and legal aliens, as he himself refers to both in his writing. If he means to suggest that illegal aliens don't vote, but aliens legally present do, that's easy enough to write (I just did it); furthermore, it is silly to suggest writing "obviously" means what one particular reader reckons it does (even if that reader is correctly guessing the author's intent) when in fact the writing makes no damned sense objectively.


    In any event, both illegal aliens and those legally present do engage in fraudulant voting regularly. As one of the (doubtless vanishingly rare) elections officers in California concerned about the matter, I have frequently accepted provisional ballots* from people who obviously were not citizens, but which I have every reason to believe the clerk later bent over backwards to count.

    *For those who may not know, when a person unable to demonstrate he is a registered voter nevertheless insists on voting, it is standard practice to permit him to cast a provisional ballot so that the matter can be addressed later without his vote being denied in the (extemely unlikely) event he should prove to be correct and the rolls of registered voters prove to be incorrect about his eligibility to vote.

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  190. @IHTG
    He's obviously referring only to electoral fraud involving illegal immigrant voting.

    He’s obviously writing about both illegal aliens and legal aliens, as he himself refers to both in his writing. If he means to suggest that illegal aliens don’t vote, but aliens legally present do, that’s easy enough to write (I just did it); furthermore, it is silly to suggest writing “obviously” means what one particular reader reckons it does (even if that reader is correctly guessing the author’s intent) when in fact the writing makes no damned sense objectively.

    In any event, both illegal aliens and those legally present do engage in fraudulant voting regularly. As one of the (doubtless vanishingly rare) elections officers in California concerned about the matter, I have frequently accepted provisional ballots* from people who obviously were not citizens, but which I have every reason to believe the clerk later bent over backwards to count.

    *For those who may not know, when a person unable to demonstrate he is a registered voter nevertheless insists on voting, it is standard practice to permit him to cast a provisional ballot so that the matter can be addressed later without his vote being denied in the (extemely unlikely) event he should prove to be correct and the rolls of registered voters prove to be incorrect about his eligibility to vote.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res

    As one of the (doubtless vanishingly rare) elections officers in California concerned about the matter, I have frequently accepted provisional ballots* from people who obviously were not citizens, but which I have every reason to believe the clerk later bent over backwards to count.
     
    What is CA policy regarding the validation of provisional ballots? Is any auditing done? If more then a certain percentage of provisional ballots are being approved doesn't it indicate a problem with the voter rolls that should be addressed?
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  191. res says:
    @Alden
    The underclass needs government IDs to present at the welfare offices. They have IDs. It's the bloviating liberals who claim the underclass are too helpless to get the IDs.

    That is the part I don’t understand. It seems like a compelling argument. Thanks for making it explicit.

    Here is a humorous take: http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/24-things-that-require-a-photo-id/article/2534254

    Voter id seems like a no brainer to me. I called out Lot’s statement because I think it adds fuel to liberal objections.

    Here is a relatively thoughtful anti-voter id article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2017/02/15/do-voter-identification-laws-suppress-minority-voting-yes-we-did-the-research
    Their idea is that showing minority turnout declines with voter id is proof of voter suppression. In one sense perhaps, but the important question is whether those suppressed votes were legitimate.

    I am curious how much voter fraud there really is. It seems like intense get out the vote efforts in non-conscientious and population dense areas like inner cities (Philadelphia anyone?) is a recipe for fraud of the form of people voting in the place of others. How would one detect this? I think the easiest way would be (wait for it) to see how much turnout declines after implementing voter id.

    Read More
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  192. Pat Boyle says:
    @Moshe
    If Al Pacini is 5"7 he's not a dwarf. Isn't Bobo Something like 5"2 without his elevator shoes?

    Besides, I can't recall many Pacino movies offhand but in that Tony Montana movie they definitely didn't try to make him look tall. I think he was supposed to look like a small genius with a world class ego than large and in charge.

    Who’s Bobo? I tried to look it up, but there were too many entries.

    Pacino in ‘The Godfather’ wore monster platform shoes. There are pictures somewhere of the Web from outtakes. Lots of Hollywood leading men are not as tall as they would like but even among the Tom Cruises or Robert Downey’s Al Pacino is remarkably tiny.

    I don’t actually mind Pacino being so much shorter in real life than he what he tries convey on the screen. But he is also very old and white haired. He seems to bath in black hair dye. He’s well over seventy but takes on action roles where he is pursued by young women. He is a bad joke.

    And a very limited actor.

    Read More
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  193. Pat Boyle says:
    @Judah Benjamin Hur

    “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. … They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”
     
    That comment got him elected (that, and the fact that he's a great entertainer). He needs to remember that much!

    There is now some dispute as to whether he lied to American blacks. During the campaign he courted the black vote with statements like – “How much worse could it be?” He implied that the Democrats who had owned the votes of blacks for decades had reneged on their promises. If blacks have not improved their position in American society as much as they had hoped, the Democrats must have been lying.

    He encouraged blacks to vote for him with the tacit understanding that in his administration they would do better for black interests. Now he seems to be intent on reducing the welfare state transfer payments to negroes. His budget apparently calls for cuts in programs like Food Stamps.

    So was Trump being mendacious?

    Read More
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  194. @bored identity



    What would Canada think of Americans if the only visitors to the Great White North were from those three states?

     

    Your deep conviction of "indigenous, unskilled, semi-literate peasants of Arkansas, Mississippi and West Virginia" as of being the same stock as a gnomish-morlockish, maize devouring invaders from the southern border is a proof that this country, at least in your head, exists not as a Nation, but as an open wasteland populated by randomly mixed & matched people.

    bored identity believes that almost every Arkansas, Mississippi and /or West Virginia's Uncle Cletus should be considered as a crème de la crème visiting guest in Quebec or Ontario, contrasting with circa 90% of Third World Country Weekly Disposals of Vibrant Rocket Surgeons.

    By the way, if you are Uncle Cletus, why even bother to travel to the country that is run by that guy?:

    https://theconservativetreehouse.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/trudeau-4.jpg

    Congratulations. Missed my point entirely. Nice conflation, btw.

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  195. @Autochthon
    They might think Americans have common sense, as well as self-determination, and courage, among other things – the average resident of Orange County, California certainly conveys none of these qualities.

    Semi-Literate Peasants Indeed.

    Yes, many residents of those three states exhibit the traits you mention. But they are also low on most other socio-economic indices. That’s an undeniable fact. If you want to fill in YOUR three favorite “worst” states, have at it. But you are missing my point entirely, just as Trump’s detractors have.

    BTW – I love how you (and another responder) assumes I am conflating residents of those three southern states with Mexican peasantry. Y’all need a refresher in Reading Comprehension 101.

    Do you have kinfolk in one of the three? No disrespect intended to Razorback, Mountaineer or Rebel fans then …..lol

    BTW – when you DISAGREE with Sailer, do you then suggest that “…..the average resident of Los Angeles County, California certainly conveys none of these qualities……”???

    A – clown.

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  196. res says:
    @Autochthon
    He's obviously writing about both illegal aliens and legal aliens, as he himself refers to both in his writing. If he means to suggest that illegal aliens don't vote, but aliens legally present do, that's easy enough to write (I just did it); furthermore, it is silly to suggest writing "obviously" means what one particular reader reckons it does (even if that reader is correctly guessing the author's intent) when in fact the writing makes no damned sense objectively.


    In any event, both illegal aliens and those legally present do engage in fraudulant voting regularly. As one of the (doubtless vanishingly rare) elections officers in California concerned about the matter, I have frequently accepted provisional ballots* from people who obviously were not citizens, but which I have every reason to believe the clerk later bent over backwards to count.

    *For those who may not know, when a person unable to demonstrate he is a registered voter nevertheless insists on voting, it is standard practice to permit him to cast a provisional ballot so that the matter can be addressed later without his vote being denied in the (extemely unlikely) event he should prove to be correct and the rolls of registered voters prove to be incorrect about his eligibility to vote.

    As one of the (doubtless vanishingly rare) elections officers in California concerned about the matter, I have frequently accepted provisional ballots* from people who obviously were not citizens, but which I have every reason to believe the clerk later bent over backwards to count.

    What is CA policy regarding the validation of provisional ballots? Is any auditing done? If more then a certain percentage of provisional ballots are being approved doesn’t it indicate a problem with the voter rolls that should be addressed?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    It is the responsibility of the relevant official (usually the clerk or a registrar of voters) in the county to confirm or deny whether a provisional vote is valid. I understand from those with experience in other states that many do not bother at all about provisional ballots if the mathematics indicate they cannot effect the outcome of an election; I had it on authority via direct statements from the responsible official in my (now former) county that this official made every effort to validate and allow all provisional ballots whenever a colourable case of any kind could be made – I believed it.

    The workaday situations of possible incorrect records include those wherein, say, the voter moved but the address was not updated and thus the incorrect polling place was listed the vote could be counted. If the proper address was in the same county, the voter can easily be directed to report to the correct polling precinct and the problem is solved immediately, if that could not be sorted in real-time, the provisional ballot could still be counted later: if the person were a registered voter in another county, the provisional ballot might could even be forwarded to that county's officials for consideration, and so on.

    The hairier stuff arises when the matter is not merely the accuracy of the registration's details about the voter's address and such, but rather when a question whether the voter is in fact duly registered (or, indeed, eligible to be registered) at all.

    In any event, the responsible official has broad discretion to determine whether to count a provisional ballot or not, since no definitive statutes or regulations govern the matter. My own county's clerk mentioned using data from such dubious sources as a voter's Facebook page to verify his location. Draw your own conclusions.

    If you are interested in how the sausage is made:

    As between two precincts, the state's procedures dictate:

    Provisional Voters – In Precinct
    If the ballot was cast by a provisional voter that is registered to that precinct, the ballot shall be cast in its entirety and in its original form.

    Provisional Voters – Out of Precinct
    If the ballot was cast by a provisional voter that is not registered in that precinct, the ballot will be duplicated to a ballot specific to that voter’s precinct. The duplication will reflect only the offices and propositions in which the voter is entitled to vote.

    The controlling statutes can be had here. N.B. the concluding zinger: "This article shall be liberally construed in favor of the
    provisional voter." Indeed.
     
    Get a load of this stuff – a new rule proposed which would effectively remove the mens rea from "inadvertent" registration to vote by those ineligible to vote, and allow them to remove themselves from the rolls with complete confidentiality, removing previous requirements to preserve records of the illegal...sorry, "inadvertent" registration....
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  197. The average resident of Los Angeles County (and, for that matter, of the counties of nearby San Bernardino, San Diego, Imperial, Ventura, and Santa Barbara) differs significantly from one in Orange County, as Steve doubtless knows all too well.

    Stay classy.

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  198. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @ANON
    If it were in TV broadcasts and newspaper stories in this century, you'd have no trouble finding links.

    Your memory is playing tricks on you.

    Is it easy? Post links where we can see the complete WABC, WCBS, WWOR, WPIX, and WNBC evening newscasts from 9/11/2001 and 9/12/2001 and we can review them.

    Read More
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  199. @res

    As one of the (doubtless vanishingly rare) elections officers in California concerned about the matter, I have frequently accepted provisional ballots* from people who obviously were not citizens, but which I have every reason to believe the clerk later bent over backwards to count.
     
    What is CA policy regarding the validation of provisional ballots? Is any auditing done? If more then a certain percentage of provisional ballots are being approved doesn't it indicate a problem with the voter rolls that should be addressed?

    It is the responsibility of the relevant official (usually the clerk or a registrar of voters) in the county to confirm or deny whether a provisional vote is valid. I understand from those with experience in other states that many do not bother at all about provisional ballots if the mathematics indicate they cannot effect the outcome of an election; I had it on authority via direct statements from the responsible official in my (now former) county that this official made every effort to validate and allow all provisional ballots whenever a colourable case of any kind could be made – I believed it.

    The workaday situations of possible incorrect records include those wherein, say, the voter moved but the address was not updated and thus the incorrect polling place was listed the vote could be counted. If the proper address was in the same county, the voter can easily be directed to report to the correct polling precinct and the problem is solved immediately, if that could not be sorted in real-time, the provisional ballot could still be counted later: if the person were a registered voter in another county, the provisional ballot might could even be forwarded to that county’s officials for consideration, and so on.

    The hairier stuff arises when the matter is not merely the accuracy of the registration’s details about the voter’s address and such, but rather when a question whether the voter is in fact duly registered (or, indeed, eligible to be registered) at all.

    In any event, the responsible official has broad discretion to determine whether to count a provisional ballot or not, since no definitive statutes or regulations govern the matter. My own county’s clerk mentioned using data from such dubious sources as a voter’s Facebook page to verify his location. Draw your own conclusions.

    If you are interested in how the sausage is made:

    As between two precincts, the state’s procedures dictate:

    Provisional Voters – In Precinct
    If the ballot was cast by a provisional voter that is registered to that precinct, the ballot shall be cast in its entirety and in its original form.

    Provisional Voters – Out of Precinct
    If the ballot was cast by a provisional voter that is not registered in that precinct, the ballot will be duplicated to a ballot specific to that voter’s precinct. The duplication will reflect only the offices and propositions in which the voter is entitled to vote.

    The controlling statutes can be had here. N.B. the concluding zinger: “This article shall be liberally construed in favor of the
    provisional voter.” Indeed.

    Get a load of this stuff – a new rule proposed which would effectively remove the mens rea from “inadvertent” registration to vote by those ineligible to vote, and allow them to remove themselves from the rolls with complete confidentiality, removing previous requirements to preserve records of the illegal…sorry, “inadvertent” registration….

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Thanks. They really don't mean well it seems... I guess that's what happens in a one party state that has a large untapped pool of potential voters for that party.
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  200. I ain’t gonna read a word of what you babbling fools have to say. Trump is a compulsive liar. He has some good ideas, but he’s a 70 year old fat spoiled child who will accomplish none of them. I hope that his original thinking will remain and his ridiculous ones will be flushed away.

    But it’s politics.

    And this is an Unz review comment section.

    I might as well wish I could fart the truth as hope for reality to be addressed here.

    Here’s wishing good for you Steve Sailer, I like you as a person and as a writer. But holy god you have wondered a long way from where your good mind should have lead you if politics wasn’t such a shit show and the popular opinions weren’t correlated with anger, bitterness, and the antithesis of rational thinking.

    Read More
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  201. res says:
    @Autochthon
    It is the responsibility of the relevant official (usually the clerk or a registrar of voters) in the county to confirm or deny whether a provisional vote is valid. I understand from those with experience in other states that many do not bother at all about provisional ballots if the mathematics indicate they cannot effect the outcome of an election; I had it on authority via direct statements from the responsible official in my (now former) county that this official made every effort to validate and allow all provisional ballots whenever a colourable case of any kind could be made – I believed it.

    The workaday situations of possible incorrect records include those wherein, say, the voter moved but the address was not updated and thus the incorrect polling place was listed the vote could be counted. If the proper address was in the same county, the voter can easily be directed to report to the correct polling precinct and the problem is solved immediately, if that could not be sorted in real-time, the provisional ballot could still be counted later: if the person were a registered voter in another county, the provisional ballot might could even be forwarded to that county's officials for consideration, and so on.

    The hairier stuff arises when the matter is not merely the accuracy of the registration's details about the voter's address and such, but rather when a question whether the voter is in fact duly registered (or, indeed, eligible to be registered) at all.

    In any event, the responsible official has broad discretion to determine whether to count a provisional ballot or not, since no definitive statutes or regulations govern the matter. My own county's clerk mentioned using data from such dubious sources as a voter's Facebook page to verify his location. Draw your own conclusions.

    If you are interested in how the sausage is made:

    As between two precincts, the state's procedures dictate:

    Provisional Voters – In Precinct
    If the ballot was cast by a provisional voter that is registered to that precinct, the ballot shall be cast in its entirety and in its original form.

    Provisional Voters – Out of Precinct
    If the ballot was cast by a provisional voter that is not registered in that precinct, the ballot will be duplicated to a ballot specific to that voter’s precinct. The duplication will reflect only the offices and propositions in which the voter is entitled to vote.

    The controlling statutes can be had here. N.B. the concluding zinger: "This article shall be liberally construed in favor of the
    provisional voter." Indeed.
     
    Get a load of this stuff – a new rule proposed which would effectively remove the mens rea from "inadvertent" registration to vote by those ineligible to vote, and allow them to remove themselves from the rolls with complete confidentiality, removing previous requirements to preserve records of the illegal...sorry, "inadvertent" registration....

    Thanks. They really don’t mean well it seems… I guess that’s what happens in a one party state that has a large untapped pool of potential voters for that party.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Peterike
    While it has no legal authority, the best way to know that Democrats commit massive voter fraud is by how much they and their media cohorts deny it. They don't simply deny it. They scoff at it, as if it were the most ridiculous thing in the world. They do this every single time without exception.

    Protesting too much and all that.
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  202. Peterike says:
    @res
    Thanks. They really don't mean well it seems... I guess that's what happens in a one party state that has a large untapped pool of potential voters for that party.

    While it has no legal authority, the best way to know that Democrats commit massive voter fraud is by how much they and their media cohorts deny it. They don’t simply deny it. They scoff at it, as if it were the most ridiculous thing in the world. They do this every single time without exception.

    Protesting too much and all that.

    Read More
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  203. Svigor says:

    If there were millions of illegal immigrants voting, I would expect that to leave tons of evidence, and there are enough conservative media sources that I’d expect to see that evidence become widely known. We don’t see that evidence, probably because there aren’t many illegals voting. (Which makes sense–it’s hard to get Americans to bother voting, and it’s our country. Why does some Salvadoran here to hang drywall care enough about US elections to bother voting, especially when doing so could get him into trouble?)

    A lot of states have had a lot of close elections.

    Read More
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  204. donut says:
    @Harold
    Why should we watch those?

    Don’t then . I only put them up because I found them interesting and it’s a channel that not many of Steve’s posters might have seen .

    Read More
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