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Harry Baldwin: Trump's Progress in Headlines, Corsican Ogre-style

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French army sent to shoot escaped Bonaparte joins him instead

Harry Baldwin has put together a Trumpified version of the headlines that supposedly appeared in the French government’s official newspaper Le Moniteur in March 1815 when Napoleon Bonaparte escape dElba and astonished Europe by retaking the throne via courage and charisma, setting off his 100 Days that ended with his own personal Waterloo:

March 9, 1815 : The Monster has escaped from his place of banishment.

March 10: The Corsican Orge has landed at Cape Juan

March 11: The Tiger has shown himself at Gap. The Troops are advancing on all sides to arrest his progress. He will conclude his miserable adventure by becoming a wanderer among the mountains.

March 12: The Monster has actually advanced as far as Grenoble

March 13: The Tyrant is now at Lyon. Fear and Terror seized all at his appearance.

March 18: The Usurper has ventured to approach to within 60 hours’ march of the capital.

March 19: Bonaparte is advancing by forced marches, but it is impossible he can reach Paris.

March 20: Napoleon will arrive under the walls of Paris tomorrow.

March 21: The Emperor Napoleon is at Fountainbleau

March 22: Yesterday evening His Majesty the Emperor made his public entry and arrived at the Tuileries. Nothing can exceed the universal joy.

Note: I’ve read these a million times, but I can’t vouch they’re really real.

Commenter Harry Baldwin writes:

February 24, 2016 at 3:06 am GMT • 300 Words (Edit-1334638)

If been thinking about a “Trump Marches on Washington” version of the “Napoleon Marches on Paris” piece Steve runs occasionally. Insulting names for Trump courtesy of Karl Rove, Charles Krauthammer, George Will, Jonah Goldberg, Steve Hayes, John Sununu, Rich Lowry, and Fred Barnes.

April 2015: The Complete Idiot announces he’s seriously considering running for the Republican presidential nomination. On Fox News, George Will looked forward to watching him crash and burn.

June 2015: The Al Sharpton of the Republican Party declared his candidacy in a rambling speech full of racist attacks on Mexican immigrants intended to rile up the teabaggers.

June 2015: The Bloviating Ignoramus has taken a lead in the polls, but it’s still the silly season. Voters haven’t yet taken a look at the more plausible candidates.

July 2015: The Bane of Humanity has insulted the war hero John McCain. He’s gotten away with his gaffes, insults and vulgarity so far, but this time he’s gone too far.

August 2015: The Clown described our champion as “a low-energy person.” Rather than join Trump in the gutter, Jeb understands voters will quickly tire of Trump’s childish banter.

August 2015: The Dancing Bear draws a crowd of 30,000 in Alabama.

September 2015: The Most Fabulous Whiner in All of American Politics continues to hold his lead in the polls. Fox New analysts are confident that Republican voters will soon get serious.

February 2016: The One-Man Wedge Issue said that George W. Bush lied to get us into Iraq. He’s done it now. Veterans, who revere the former president, are a major bloc in South Carolina.

February 2016: Trump wins New Hampshire and South Carolina, but if all candidates but Rubio drop out and he gets their votes, Trump can be stopped.

November 2016: Donald J. Trump has won the election. National Review publishes a special issues congratulating President Trump, featuring highlights of brilliant campaign. Fox All Stars offer him their counsel and assistance in instituting a true conservative agenda.

 

122 Comments to "Harry Baldwin: Trump's Progress in Headlines, Corsican Ogre-style"

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  1. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    The battle of acronyms.

    BDS vs ADL vs BLM vs LGBT vs EU vs ISIL vs SWPL vs NSA vs SJW.

    I’m really beginning to like Black Lives Matter.

    Destroying SWPL comfy zones.

    Blue vs Blue war.

    I hope BLM disrupt every Lib celebration in 2016.

    http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2016/02/23/black-lives-matter-protesters-interrupt-mag-mile-demonstration-in-support-of-apple/

    Reply More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  2. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    “The best predictor of Trump support isn’t income, education, or age. It’s authoritarianism.”

    http://www.vox.com/2016/2/23/11099644/trump-support-authoritarianism

    In the five days leading up to the South Carolina Republican primary I fielded a survey of 358 likely voters, hoping to better understand who supports Donald Trump, why, and what it may mean for the Republican presidential nominating contest.

    What I found is a trend that has been widely overlooked. A voter’s gender, education, age, ideology, party identification, income, and race simply had no statistical bearing on whether someone supported Trump. Neither, despite predictions to the contrary, did evangelicalism.

    Here is what did: authoritarianism, by which I mean Americans’ inclination to authoritarian behavior. When political scientists use the term authoritarianism, we are not talking about dictatorships but about a worldview. People who score high on the authoritarian scale value conformity and order, protect social norms, and are wary of outsiders. And when authoritarians feel threatened, they support aggressive leaders and policies.

    Authoritarianism and a hybrid variable that links authoritarianism with a personal fear of terrorism were the only two variables that predicted, with statistical significance, support for Trump.

    Put simply, Trump won South Carolina because of the overwhelming, unyielding support of authoritarian voters. This chart shows the predicted relationship between authoritarianism and support for Trump. It is statistically and substantively significant — and, as you can see from the upward plot of the line, stunning.

    • Replies: , , , , , , , , ,
  3. The anti-Trump folks really are getting increasingly desperate to come up with reasons why there’s no way he can possibly win the nomination. I find it pretty funny myself.

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  4. Punditry is the best job in America. You are guaranteed a steady income for always bring wrong. God Bless Donald Trump.

    • Replies:
  5. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    Did somebody say “robot”?

    • Replies:
  6. If Trump is really smart he should create his own Conservative TV channel and magazine, blow the Neocon media out of the water.

    • Replies: ,
  7. Remember Ezra Klein tweeting that The Donald’s entry into the race was the best thing that could happen to Jeb Bush’s candidacy? Yeah, The Donald has schlonged Vox.com before, and will undoubtedly do so again.

    How many of the well known, or sorta well known, national political commentariat has The Donald schlonged at this point? Sailer, Kaus, Coulter & Scott Adams (of Dilbert fame) are the only unsullied ones I can think of off the top of my head, though there must be a few more out there. Really, it’s been quite a sight to see.

    For the record, I don’t know if The Donald can be trusted to do half the things he says, or even if he will do any of the things he says. But given that everyone else he is running against basically all have agendas that I think are more of the same shit we’ve had for the last 20+ years, I don’t see the reason to vote for anyone else. And the one indisputable thing The Donald is doing is pissing off all the right people, really upsetting the apple carts.

    If we can’t have an order that works for us, let’s have chaos instead.

    • Agree: Glossy
    • Replies: , , ,
  8. The headlines appear to be source-able, if not necessarily real for that reason. According to Google Books, they show up in a copy of “Waterloo: Myth and Reality” by Gareth Glover, and here I believe is a link that should hopefully work at pointing into the finicky thing that is internet indexes of books:

    https://books.google.no/books?id=GfpsBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA7 (scroll down a little)

    There, the descriptors appear as follows:
    The Corsican ogre, the tiger, the monster, the tyrant, the usurper, Bonaparte, Napoleon, Emperor Napoleon, His Majesty.

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  9. Hey, Steve:

    Isn’t it funny how Trump called Megyn Kelly a bimbo and so her response was to take a vacation, get a makeover, and come back looking like Donald Trump? He’s an A male in all arenas. Roissy could do something with this (gratuitously related to intercourse, probably) but I’m interested in your take. Here’s a current pic:

    http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/01/dudes-whined-about-megyn-kelly-hair-last-night.html

    • Replies:
  10. Why? He doesn’t even have to…he gets all the coverage he wants from ‘MSM’ outlets.

  11. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    The author of that Vox article, Matthew MacWilliams, isn’t a professional pundit. He’s a PhD student and researcher in political science.

    • Replies:
  12. I wish I commented enough to be able to agree with you.

    • Replies:
  13. Isn’t it funny how Trump called Megyn Kelly a bimbo and so her response was to take a vacation, get a makeover, and come back looking like Donald Trump?

    Now she looks like an extra from the “The Fifth Element” during Chris Tuckers extended otherworldly rap.

  14. Isn’t it funny how Trump called Megyn Kelly a bimbo and so her response was to take a vacation, get a makeover, and come back looking like Donald Trump?

    Explanation number two. Megyn Kelly and her new hair are auditioning for David Bowie’s role in the remake of “The Man Who Fell To Earth”

  15. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/presidential-races/270538-gop-officials-looking-at-irregularities-at-nevada-polls

    There was a lot of voter fraud at the Nevada caucus. Looks like the only voter fraud is being done by white people!

    Looks like trump might not be the winner after all

    • Replies: ,
  16. People who score high on the authoritarian scale value conformity and order, protect social norms, and are wary of outsiders.

    That’s not authoritarian in my dictionary.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies:
  17. Authoritarianism- i.e. being a normal person- has to top Marxism as the most Talmudic of all concepts.

  18. Glover’s book just repeats the headlines, without citation. We already knew that people have been repeating the story for a long time; Glover’s book illustrates the problem: who was the last guy to go back and check on the originals? The relevant source would be the page and volume numbers of the Moniteur articles, or better yet for our purposes, some photographs of the originals. The Moniteur really existed, so this should be vastly easy to check. It’s striking that none of the historians I checked on Google Books who quoted the headlines could provide an academically acceptable citation.

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  19. I saw a book review from 1913 that says the 1815 headlines got pumped up in the retelling. The basic idea is true, but the “Corsican Ogre”-type verbiage might be a later addition. But I don’t know for sure.

    • Replies:
  20. As I think Dave Pinsen will agree, pretty sure I get first dibs on the Napoleon analogy, back in November. If I wasn’t first, I was real, real early.

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  21. Another way Trump is like Napoleon is that both faced opponents who had grown soft, corrupt and complacent. Napoleon tore through the vast patchwork of Italian and German kingdoms, principalities and grand duchies by fighting like he meant it against armies that had grown used to not fighting battles at all or, if they did, fighting them in an almost ritualized way.

    Trump is Napoleonic too for the way he’s welcomed by huge swaths of people sick of living under these stagnant and wormy little kingdoms. Trump blasts through the toll collecting robber barons and their little castles at our political choke-points the way Napoleon blasted through the original robber barons in their castles on the Rhine and Danube.

    One of the titles of the God-Emperor Trump shall be the Grand Vermifuge, for the way he blasts through the parasitic media and political consultant class.

    • Replies:
  22. The central point of the linked Matthew MacWilliams article in Vox makes sense. I’d expect voters who score higher on “authoritarianism” to be more supportive of Trump, all else being equal. (Whatever “authoritarianism” is taken to mean, exactly.)

    On the other hand, that’s a common problem for social scientists like MacWilliams: they don’t know what they mean, or can’t put words to paper that inform a lay readership.

    Google found a scientific-y survey for me, The Right-wing Authoritarianism Scale. My RWAS score: a mere 31%. Other Trump supporters: see how you do with these questions. I doubt many iSteve readers will tip over the 50% mark.

    This is way too complicated for MacWilliams’ conventional academic world-view.

    His graphs in Vox are very smooth, lack data points, and lack error bars. He didn’t bother posting an r^2 . Always amusing to compare highly touted results with Steve’s ignored findings on Affordable Family Formation, and on white woman marriage as a presidential election predictor at the State level.

    • Replies: ,
  23. As I can read French, I can shed a little more light on the issue:
    Search for “Vol de l’aigle” the Eagle’s Flight, from the coast at the Golfe Juan/Baye de San Juan to Grenoble, and “Le Moniteur” – the Monitor, which was the Official government journal of France.

    from http://www.napoleonprisonnier.com/chronologie/vol-de-laigle.html

    Napoleon] “Until Grenoble, I was an adventurer. In Grenoble, I was a prince.”

    [the narrator resumes]: At Lyon, one saw Napoleon acting as sovereign. He was 460 km from Paris. Louis XVIII officially still reigned. And, from Lyon, Napoleon, by the decrees of the 13th of March 1815, extinguished the Royal Authority, abolishing the monarchy of the Bourbons. These decrees were published in the Rhone Journal and the Monitor (le Moniteur) reproduced them in the editions of the 21st and 22nd of March, soon after his entry into Paris.

    Here perhaps the moment to put to rest a legendary simplification.

    “l’Ogre…
    …”

    Who hasn’t heard said and repeated that one could have read in the Monitor (or “in all the papers”) this sequence, cleverly graduating, of titles to measure the advance of Napoleon on Paris?

    I was able to, thanks to the kindness of M. Jean Watelet, director of the Department of Periodicals at the national library, see and make photocopies of the collections of the Parisian newspapers of this time. In certain commentaries, the Emperor is maltreated, called an adventurer, man of nefarious doings, etc, but the legendary sequence of titles never existed.

    *** ***

    So, there you have it.

    « Jusqu’à Grenoble, j’étais un aventurier. A Grenoble, j’étais prince. »

    A Lyon, on voit Napoléon agir en souverain. Il est à 460 km de Paris. Louis XVIII officiellement règne encore. Et, de Lyon, Napoléon, par les décrets du 13 mars 1815, anéantit l’autorité royale, supprime la monarchie des Bourbons. Ces décrets sont publiés dans le Journal du Rhône et le Moniteur les reproduira dans ses numéros des 21 et 22 mars, aussitôt après l’entrée à Paris.

    Voici peut-être le moment de mettre fin à une simplification légendaire.

    - L’Ogre de Corse a débarqué
    - Le tyran abhorré des Français s’avance vers Digne.
    - L’usurpateur semble vouloir marcher sur Paris.
    - Bonaparte est à Grenoble.
    - Napoléon Bonaparte arrive à Tournon.
    - Napoléon couche à Fontainebleau.
    - Sa Majesté l’Empereur est arrivé hier soir aux Tuileries.

    Qui n’a entendu dire et répéter qu’on avait pu lire dans le Moniteur ( ou « dans tous les journaux » ) cette succession, savamment graduée, de titres à mesure de l’avance de Napoléon sur Paris ?

    J’ai pu, grâce à l’obligeance de M. Jean Watelet, directeur du Département des périodiques à la bibliothèque nationale, visionner et faire photocopier les collections des journaux parisiens à cette époque. Dans certains commentaires, l’Empereur est malmené, traité d’aventurier, d’homme néfaste, etc., mais la légendaire succession de titres n’a jamais existé.

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  24. : I may lie at the outside normal edge of iSteve readers, but I am proud of my 81% score.

    It’s always funny to see these surveys based on liberal commie/cuckservative views diametrically opposed on everything that doesn’t actually matter. Obviously no rational person would care about abortion, as long as the right people are having them and the wrong people aren’t. And who cares if ‘authorities’ are doing coercive things or not, as long as they aren’t the Hillary Clinton-esque tyrants who murdered 17 little children at Waco? Of course, the right people aren’t having abortions, and the government was R.N.’d in 2012.

  25. I guess I can stop posting my progression now. Harry’s is much better anyway.

  26. National Review cannot be wrong, it must be evil. After all, its act of lese majeste was committed after Trump was shown to be strong in late polls.

  27. For the record, I don’t know if The Donald can be trusted to do half the things he says, or even if he will do any of the things he says. But given that everyone else he is running against basically all have agendas that I think are more of the same shit we’ve had for the last 20+ years, I don’t see the reason to vote for anyone else. And the one indisputable thing The Donald is doing is pissing off all the right people, really upsetting the apple carts. If we can’t have an order that works for us, let’s have chaos instead.

    That’s exactly how I feel about Trump, Gato. Right now, I’m still a Bernie Bro. But it’s starting to look like the fix is in over on the Dem side, so Trump will be my backup. At this point in history, any change would be better than status quo, even if that change were initially to take an unpleasant form. Somebody’s got to get the ball rolling in Washington. With Hellary and the other Repugs, you know it’s just going to be more of same.

    • Replies:
  28. I now suspect Victor Hugo of having inspired the lines, from Les Miserables (1887)

    Hugo has a character undergo a transformation after reading:

    “[he].. was absent for three days, then he returned to Paris, went straight to the library of the law-school and asked for the files of the Moniteur.

    He read the Moniteur, he read all the histories of the Republic and the Empire, the Memorial de Sainte-Hélène, all the memoirs, all the newspapers, the bulletins, the proclamations; he devoured everything.

    ….

    From that moment forth, all was over; the Ogre of Corsica,—the usurper,—the tyrant,—the monster who was the lover of his own sisters,—the actor who took lessons of Talma,—the poisoner of Jaffa,—the tiger,—Buonaparte,—all this vanished, and gave place in his mind to a vague and brilliant radiance in which shone, at an inaccessible height, the pale marble phantom of Cæsar. ”

    Les Miserables, Part 3, Chapter 6 [P466-467].

    In French:
    “A partir de ce moment, tout fut dit. L’ogre de Corse, – l’usurpateur, – le tyran, – le monstre qui était l’amant de ses soeurs, – l’histrion qui prenait des leçons de Talma, – l’empoisonneur de Jaffa, – le tigre, – Buonaparté, – tout cela s’évanouit…”

    I can only suspect that whomever constructed the sequence of newspaper titles was relying on the phrasing here in Les Miserables.

    • Replies:
  29. Reddit is an invaluable BS detector for things like the Vox post linked to here. Reddit is invaluable because the first comment is usually by someone who knows the research well and can succinctly point out the BS and distortions.

    For instance, the first Reddit comment on this post points to another Vox post that explains:

    Despite Trump’s longevity in the polls, authoritarianism is clearly not the only dynamic going on in the Republican race. In fact, the greatest differences by far in the simple foundation scores are on proportionality….

    One surprise in our data was that Trump supporters were not extreme on any of the foundations. This means that Trump supporters are more centrist than is commonly realized; consequently, Trump’s prospects in the general election may be better than many pundits have thought.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/politics/comments/478ed4/the_best_predictor_of_trump_support_isnt_income/

    About 3/4 of the sensational posts at Reddit are either complete BS or serious distortions.

    • Replies:
  30. […] AS NAPOLEON: Trump’s Progress in Headlines, Corsican Ogre-style. When Napoleon escaped from his exile in Elba and astonished Europe by retaking the throne via […]

  31. Oooooh!

    One of the slimiest slurs in the liberal armoury of national destruction is deployed again at a time of liberal crisis: white gentiles = nazi.

    The Frankfurt School intellectuals repaid the United States for sheltering them from Hitler by discovering that boring white-bread America was proto-fascist. Their absurd 1950 ‘study’ The Authoritarian Personality provided extremely important backing for those who proceeded to disassemble traditional America and replace it with a new people. Trump acts as if TAP had never been written and so obviously = nazi.

    http://www.kevinmacdonald.net/chap5.pdf

    “Horkheimer and Adorno then attempt to explain the role of conformity in fascism. They argue that cohesive gentile group strategies are fundamentally based on a distortion of human nature—a central theme of The Authoritarian Personality.”

    (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Authoritarian_Personality)

    http://www.cepsr.com/clanek.php?ID=328

    “The focus was mainly on the potentially fascist individuals whose personality structure is of such a kind that it makes them easily susceptible to anti-democratic propaganda…

    “The goal was to identify individuals susceptible to prejudices as such individuals are more disposed to succumb to fascist ideology…”

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  32. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    If Trump is really smart he should create his own Conservative TV channel and magazine, blow the Neocon media out of the water.

    He should create his own conservative political party by renaming, reorganizing, and rebuilding the GOP.

    The neocons are always itching for a regime change and they got one in the GOP. Now that Trumpzilla has smashed and destroyed the GOP establishment– he “burned that bitch down”– he should change the name of the GOP and rebuild it into a competely different and viable party. Put the Reagan bullshit to rest. Reagan was a dumb guy who financialized the economy, helped create globalism and Al Qaeda, turned our economy into a debt-based economy, et al. Stop the Reagan BS. Platitudinous people need not apply to this new Trump party.

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  33. Here’s some news on the perception of Trump’s chances:

    At 5Dimes, from Monday to this morning, betting odds have gone from Trump having a 49.3% chance of winning the nomination to a 67.5% probability of winning. You could bet almost even money ($110 to win $100) on Monday; now it would take $240 to win $100.

  34. Wait, my friend! Wait until spring…and summer! If Morty Zuckerman’s bilious broadsheet will Photoshop a clown costume on him now and put it on their front page daily, can a brush mustache and heiling arm-salute be far behind?

    Every day will bring fresh Hitler analogies, occasionally spruced up with Stalin/Napoleon/Saddam/Mephistopheles cautionary cameos. Believe me, you don’t know – none of us do – the meaning, or the depths, of desperation. But we will!

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  35. But he writes for Vox.com, and is therefore completely suspect. See ic1000′s comment above for other reasons to be suspicious.

  36. Your force will always be with me.

    Well, sometimes, maybe….

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  37. “People who score high on the authoritarian scale value conformity and order, protect social norms, and are wary of outsiders”.

    They are using the term to specifically re-define healthy instincts and traditional behavior as authoritarianism instead acknowledging them as nearly universal and fundamental human survival strategies. By any metric the New Left are pushing a far more totalitarian agenda than Trump, but nice try.

  38. Trump finished right about where his Nevada polling numbers have been. Cruz & Rubio look to have finished a little higher. In other words, it’s unlikely that there’s any news of note here.

  39. I find Obama quite authoritarian with his, “If congress won’t act, I’m just going to have to go ahead and do it myself [extra-constitutionally].”

    • Replies: ,
  40. I was already hearing more Nazi bullshit from Rubio supporters on Twitter last night. They’ve apparently got nothing left.

    I’m not at all certain that Trump means what he says (when that’s even clear), but he’s cutting a broad swathe through Establishment, Inc.’s fields of bullshit. For schlonging El Jeffe ¡Jeb! and now Est., Inc., The Donald deserves a vote of thanks from a weary, and very pissed off, nation. Even if he betrays the voters in the end, it’s at least now becoming clear that we don’t want what we’ve been getting.

    Now if Democratic voters can get a clue and overthrow their franchise of Est., Inc…..

    • Replies: ,
  41. When political scientists use the term authoritarianism, we are not talking about dictatorships but about a worldview. People who score high on the authoritarian scale value conformity and order, protect social norms, and are wary of outsiders. And when authoritarians feel threatened, they support aggressive leaders and policies.

    Or you could simplify this and say that Trump voters are not globalists.

  42. Cruz looks like he will win Texas, which is a big place. How much would that impact on the trump campaign?

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  43. Interesting that TAP is essentially the bible of Cultural Marxism, defining any white Euro-American normalcy as deviance, yet it’s not something that typically receives the attention of The Communist Manifesto or Das Kapital, despite likely having more long term negative impact.

  44. George W. Bush, speaking at Southern Methodist University in 2011:

    “What’s interesting about our country, if you study history, is that there are some ‘isms’ that occasionally pop up. One is isolationism and its evil twin protectionism and its evil triplet nativism. So if you study the ’20s, for example, there was an American-first policy that said, ‘Who cares what happens in Europe?’” Bush said. “And there was an immigration policy that I think during this period argued we had too many Jews and too many Italians, therefore we should have no immigrants. And my point is that we’ve been through this kind of period of isolationism, protectionism and nativism. I’m a little concerned that we may be going through the same period. I hope that these ‘isms’ pass.”

    During another segment of the interview, Bush also claimed that he was “through with politics,” and that he wasn’t interested in getting involved with campaigning or fundraising for future candidates.

    Trump’s success is a ringing rebuke to George W. Bush as much as it is to Barack Obama. Contrary to Dubya, the American people would like a lot more Nativism, Protectionism, and Isolationism , and a lot less Open Borders, Globalism, and Invade the World.

    Oh, and as far as “getting involved with campaigning or fundraising for future candidates,” you can thank your brother for keeping it brief.

    • Replies: , ,
  45. I was just thinking of this exact same thing, but searches weren’t turning up the headlines. Thank you Steve.

  46. Interesting too is that GW Bush didn’t mention that the “nativism” of the 1920s led to that horror known as The Great Compression. Imagine, rising wages for all! What could be more terrible than that?!

  47. Gato, above:

    I don’t know if The Donald can be trusted to do half the things he says, or even if he will do any of the things he says. But given that everyone else he is running against basically all have agendas that I think are more of the same shit we’ve had for the last 20+ years, I don’t see the reason to vote for anyone else. And the one indisputable thing The Donald is doing is pissing off all the right people, really upsetting the apple carts.

    Yep. Taking up immigration restriction as his core issue says (1) Trump is on the side of Labor, not Capital, and (2) The U.S. should be governed to benefit American citizens and their descendants. Implicitly or explicitly, the other candidates’ purported beneficiaries are Everybody, Everywhere. Trump’s platform is Nationalist not Globalist.

    So the starting-gate irony is that billionaire Trump’s appeal comes from the fact (or perception) that he is a “traitor to his class.”

    Is Trump “trustworthy”? “wise”? “Presidential in demeanor”? If those are the questions, my answer is, “No, obviously”. But the right question is, “Compared to Whom?”

    Many threads back, an astute iSteve commenter (Lot??) sketched out why a strong Trump showing followed by an electoral defeat would still be an immense positive for our Republic. He has already mobilized voters to ardently support a patriotic immigration-restriction platform. If someone as flawed as Trump can gain this kind of traction, that should get better-qualified candidates to look into the mirror and think hard about 2020.

    As a bonus irony, it’s nice that a billionaire has forced one of the moneyed-dynasty candidates to withdraw, even as the other grinds along from problem to problem.

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  48. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    None of the political candidates could go toe-to-toe with Trump. Some went more rounds than others, but quickly faded and got TKO’d. Cruz has continued in rounds when he shouldn’t and is destroying himself to the point he is now jeopardizing his political viability even in the U.S. Senate. Trump must laugh about how easy the political arena is compared to the high stakes business arena. In the business area he tangled with guys who could match him and go 10 rounds and pull off a split-decision. Guys like Steve Wynn. And it’s interesting how Trump ends up respecting these guys and becoming friends with them. Wynn was at Trump’s wedding and was with Trump at his NV victory speech. Sore losers, egomaniacs, and megalomaniacs don’t act like that. People who love to win and hate to lose act like that. Billionaire businessmen act like that.

  49. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"]
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    It was a caucus … the rules are different.

    Seems like they have already awarded the delegates as well.

  50. One surprise in our data was that Trump supporters were not extreme on any of the foundations. This means that Trump supporters are more centrist than is commonly realized; consequently, Trump’s prospects in the general election may be better than many pundits have thought.

    It seems never to have occurred to most pundits that what is going on now is a reflection of the fact that The Establishment are the extremists.

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  51. Yes, look at all the political pundits who happily show their faces and practice their trade even after being one of the driving forces behind the Iraqi, Libyan, Syrian, Ukrainian, Georgian and Afghan adventures; and that’s not mentioning domestic policies. In any other profession this would be criminal negligence and malpractice. Not only would they be stripped of their credentials, they’d likely be imprisoned, as would the people who oversaw them.

    As I joked above, Trump may be the Grand Verifuge who will cleanse the body politic of this current bunch of pundits we can’t seem to get rid of any other way.

  52. In certain commentaries, the Emperor is maltreated, called an adventurer, man of nefarious doings, etc, but the legendary sequence of titles never existed.

    Well this is certainly disappointing. I suppose the next thing that we find out will be that all that stuff about liberty, equality and fraternity turns out to be a big dead end.

  53. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"]
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    As someone pointed out elsewhere, there are two interesting things about Nevada.

    1. The Democratic turnout was low.

    2. The Republican turnout was high.

    It looks like Middle American whites have finally found someone to vote for, and I think that Steve has pointed out before that whites sitting out the election tends to cause the weird results we have seen in the last two elections.

    Interestingly, as well, Trump seems to be winning Hispanic voters …

  54. “Grand Vermifuge” is what I meant to type.

  55. As commenter StAugustine notes, the sequence of titles looks at least partly fictional, though there is the amusing switch from “Bonaparte” to “his majesty the Emperor”.

    The sequence of titles is mentioned in Alexandre Dumas’s A Year in Florence, 1841:

    “Maintenant, si on veut le suivre dans sa marche victorieuse jusqu’à Paris, on n’a qu’à consulter le Moniteur. Pour guider nos lecteurs dans cette recherche historique, nous allons en donner un extrait assez curieux. On y trouvera la marche graduée de Napoléon vers Paris, avec la modification que son approche produisait dans les opinions du journal.
    - L’anthropophage est sorti de son repaire.
    - L’ogre de Corse vient de débarquer au golfe Juan.
    - Le tigre est arrivé à Gap.
    - Le monstre a couché à Grenoble.
    - Le tyran a traversé Lyon.
    - L’usurpateur a été vu à soixante lieues de la capitale.
    - Bonaparte s’avance à grands pas, mais il n’entrera jamais dans Paris.
    - Napoléon sera demain sous nos remparts.
    - L’empereur est arrivé à Fontainebleau.
    - Sa Majesté Impériale et Royale a fait hier son entrée en son château des Tuileries au milieu de ses fidèles sujets !…
    C’est l’exegi monumentum du journalisme ; il n’aurait rien dû faire depuis, car il ne fera rien de mieux.”

    http://www.dumaspere.com/pages/bibliotheque/chapitre.php?lid=v1&cid=6

  56. As a bonus irony, it’s nice that a billionaire has forced one of the moneyed-dynasty candidates to withdraw….

    Yeah, he’s moneyed, but his house is on the tax rolls at 20% of the figure for Ross Perot’s.

  57. Ragno’s right, the MSM’s hate machine hasn’t even warmed up yet. Wait until the general.

    People who score high on the authoritarian scale value conformity and order, protect social norms, and are wary of outsiders. And when authoritarians feel threatened, they support aggressive leaders and policies.

    I’m supporting Trump because Immigration and Fair Trade, stupid. That said, all of humanity sounds pretty authoritarian, according to those criteria. China, Japan, India, Israel…all authoritarian. Trump’s candidacy sounds like a swing back toward human norms among whites (inter alia), who are profoundly abnormal in this sense.

    I for one am not at all conformist. If Trump was a conformist, he’d be watching the election on TV.

    If Trump is really smart he should create his own Conservative TV channel and magazine, blow the Neocon media out of the water.

    Winning the presidency is a far easier task. IMO, creating a network that truly represents white interests would be the whole battle. IOW, if you can do that (and keep it – the subversive pressures against it would be titanic), it would mean you’ve already won.

    People who score high on the authoritarian scale value conformity and order, protect social norms, and are wary of outsiders.

    That’s not authoritarian in my dictionary.

    The guy even says “not dictators” in his piece, to cover his arse. Of course, the whole point is to charge for a misdemeanor, then sentence for a felony. Just like “racism,” it’s the old have your cake and eat it too trick. In the public’s mind, you make “racism” about killing blacks and gassing Jews. Then you get people thrown into the clink for insufficient deference to blacks or Jews. Nobody will bother with the author’s fine distinctions when using the “authoritarianism” charge against Trump & co.

    The Frankfurt School intellectuals repaid the United States for sheltering them from Hitler by discovering that boring white-bread America was proto-fascist. Their absurd 1950 ‘study’ The Authoritarian Personality provided extremely important backing for those who proceeded to disassemble traditional America and replace it with a new people. Trump acts as if TAP had never been written and so obviously = nazi.

    I seem to remember someone making a great case that Jews actually fit The Authoritarian Personality better than whites do. Can’t remember where, though.

    Many threads back, an astute iSteve commenter (Lot??) sketched out why a strong Trump showing followed by an electoral defeat would still be an immense positive for our Republic.

    Lots of people here have been saying this for months (myself included).

    • Replies:
  58. I seem to remember someone making a great case that Jews actually fit The Authoritarian Personality better than whites do.

    There’s always Israel. I don’t read many stories about mobs of white Americans baying for non-white blood in this century, but I do read them about Jewish mobs going after Arabs in Israel.

  59. Bill B., The “slimiest slur ‘ of being called a Nazi by Liberals. I wonder how many Millennials have an abhorrence to the name Nazi. Sure they are taught about the holocaust in school, but do they really know much about the Nazis. My parent’s generation and the veterans of WWII are quickly dying off, most too old to make the effort to vote. My generation, I am 70, feared the communists., quaking in fear under our school desks as we waited for nuclear annihilation and we could see the communist expansion into Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia. I don’t know if the slur “Nazi” resonates with todays young voters They are more likely to hate the “1%”.

  60. Cool! Many of Obama’s supporters supported authoritarianism, so they will vote for Trump! That is if this guy is right.

  61. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    “What’s interesting about our country, if you study history, is that there are some ‘isms’ that occasionally pop up. One is isolationism and its evil twin protectionism and its evil triplet nativism.

    Amazing, isn’t it, that a past president would have such a condescending view of the American population. Wanting to secure and improve the country for those actually in it is now “evil”. When did this cretin ever actually “study history” anyway? His father GHWB happily presided over a lesbian wedding some year back. These people were supposed to be ‘conservative’? This is the kind of garbage that’s been forced down the throat of the American people for far too many years now. Only years later does the mask come off as to what they were really all about.

  62. Is Trump “trustworthy”? “wise”? “Presidential in demeanor”? If those are the questions, my answer is, “No, obviously”. But the right question is, “Compared to Whom?”

    Exactly. Another thing is that if Trump betrays the people who support him now, it means he will be doing what Est., Inc. wants done. The Est., Inc. types making the argument that he will betray his supporters either haven’t thought out what that means, or they really believe Trump means what he says.

    (And yes, a lot of Trump’s pronouncements have been vague. So what? To the extent that campaigns are specific, they’re usually full of shit.)

  63. 55.68. Felt like the questions were translated from Chinese.

  64. It seems never to have occurred to most pundits that what is going on now is a reflection of the fact that The Establishment are the extremists.

    Most people think they’re moderates.

    As for what people think of Trump supporters, it _IS_ distressing to see it misread by so many. I was looking at a NYTs opinion piece that Pinker had linked to on Twitter this morning. The column concerned the possibility of Trump & Sanders supporters merging into some kind of unified populist front. I didn’t care about the piece that much (in part because I could only access the first few paragraphs), but I looked at the comments.

    The Sanders supporters could not stop themselves from thinking any and all who support Trump do so merely out of a desire to kill the niggers & spics, and all of them have dropped out of kindergarten because they possess single digit IQs.

    This is bad if we actually want to form a broad consensus. I have no idea what to do about it, as my own instinct when confronted by such is to respond in kind. Perhaps those of you with calmer temperaments could do it, but I can’t. But those folks “on the other side” that can be convinced need to understand that the purpose of immigration restriction, trade restriction & the like isn’t some form of new Nazism, but is simply a desire to work for improving the lot of our country as a whole, and our citizens as a whole.

    AND that we have reasons for believing the things we do! Stay away from some of the hot button issues (race & IQ) & focus on some things that actually are less controversial, if still crimethink. E.g., that the more ethnically diverse a society is, the lower the societal trust. People feel this in their bones, and if I understand correctly it is one of the areas of social science where the results have been quite replicable. Talk about how more workers means lower wages for those that get work. Discuss how immigration hurts American workers, from blue collar unskilled labor at the bottom, to skilled IT workers farther up the chain.

    Bring up the fact that we’re at record levels of foreign born people living in the country, and that we’re headed into uncharted waters. Hammer the lack of social cohesion that has developed because of this. If someone mentions the “But I have an Indian doctor & Chinese engineer living on my block and my neighborhood is good” remind that not immigrants fit that bill. (And maybe slyly ask them the last time they really interacted with those families, and how that felt.)

    Explain that the “free trade agreements” are actually managed trade agreements that pick the winners & losers. Ask them who has been winning since we started doing these agreements? Bring up stagnant and falling wages.

    I don’t know. I’ve been trying to do this with people I know for years. This year it meant that friends of my have supported Paul Ryan for Speaker, Ted Cruz & Marco Rubio for President, and so forth. So I’m probably the wrong person to say anything. But goddamn it, I’m tired of being labelled a Klansmen for believing that my government should put its people first instead of everyone else in the world.

    • Replies: , , , ,
  65. It seems never to have occurred to most pundits that what is going on now is a reflection of the fact that The Establishment are the extremists.

    It’s interesting how only ‘cranks’ and those at the bottom notice the extremism of The Establishment until the middle class gets whittled down then it suddenly becomes obvious.

    • Replies:
  66. Re encouraging future candidates: But who would finance them? Trump has the freedom to go his own way because he is paying his own way. For everyone else, he who pays the piper calls the tune.

  67. The Frankfurt School of poor, oppresses scholars coming to America (well, NYC) yearning to be free is the best argument — unanswerable, really — for strict immigration control.

  68. Social scientists don’t want to state the truth: Trump supporters want/expect their POTUS (and those in the other two branches of the Fed government) to represent AMERICANS’ interests. They realize if they say that, however, they’ll make Trump seem like a good choice so they’ve decided to re-name those voters’ demands of a candidate as a “need for totalitarianism.”

    With few exceptions, it explains why most of us here hate “social scientists.” They aren’t scientists at all.

  69. Here is Pat Buchanan’s response to that exact George Bush speech.

    Excerpt:

    Where to begin?

    First, “America First” was the antiwar movement begun in 1940 and backed by the young John F. Kennedy and his brother Joe, Gerald Ford and ex-president Herbert Hoover. It had nothing to do with the 1920s.

    In the Harding-Coolidge decade, America was deeply interested in “what happens in Europe.” It began with Hoover rushing U.S. food aid to the defeated nations of World War I and even to the USSR, for which Lenin personally thanked the Americans.

    In 1921, President Harding called a Washington Naval Conference that produced the greatest disarmament treaty of modern times, in which America, Britain, France, Italy and Japan agreed to deep cuts and severe limits on the strategic weapons of the day, battleships.

    In 1924, Charles G. Dawes advanced the Dawes Plan to ease the reparations burden on Germany, for which he won the Nobel Peace Prize.

    As for “protectionism,” Harding did approve the Fordney-McCumber Tariff Act of 1922, doubling rates to 38 percent. But he also slashed Woodrow Wilson’s income tax rates by two-thirds, back to 25 percent.

    Result: Unemployment, 12 percent when Harding took office, was 3 percent when Calvin Coolidge left. Manufacturing output rose 64 percent in the Roaring Twenties. Between 1923 and 1927, U.S. growth was 7 percent a year. At decade’s end, America produced 42 percent of the world’s goods.

    The rest of the column is not much longer. It’s decent read as he makes his point well. Basically he shows W doesn’t have much of a grasp of history, as if that is a surprise to anyone now.

  70. This is bad if we actually want to form a broad consensus.

    Interesting and thoughtful comment.

    It does appear to be an impossible task. I would just like to point out that there are real racists and Nazis and they would likely flock to your anti-establishment consensus just like many of them support Trump. A broad consensus would have to deal with them.

    • Replies:
  71. Nazi analogies can’t hurt Trump on Twitter, the Childless Single Men ™ have already been promoting Trump = Führer for months now on there

  72. Sanders has had to tack SJW to counter Hillary’s wooing of blacks. (Isn’t her touring with Trayvon Martin’s mother an implicit illegitimizing of the Zimmerman jury?) His prior positions were anti-immigration economic nationalism, and he angered Black Lives Matter by not privileging them. His supporters recently shouted down an O. Hispanic operative (Dolores Huerta) who volunteered to translate from English to Spanish at a meeting: “English only! English only!” They sound like potential Trump voters to me.

  73. An Emerson poll just out today suggests Cruz may be in big trouble in Texas: Link

    Of the three GOP leaders, Rubio is seen most positively, with 64% of likely GOP primary
    voters rating him favorably compared to 29% who view him unfavorably. Cruz’s rating is
    56% favorable to 41% unfavorable. Of all the GOP candidates, Trump is the only one under
    water with a 45% favorable to 50% unfavorable opinion.

    Trump, however, has the most loyal supporters and is at 28% – one point below Cruz, three ahead of Rubio. The rest don’t matter much. So given his favourability rating Rubio seems to have more room to grow than Trump or Cruz, however Trump does have the The Big Mo on his side.

  74. Another Napoleon analogy that regularly comes to mind are the consultants and experts reacting to Trump’s unendorsed, seat-of-his-pants, ground game-less campaign like the defeated Prussian general staff: sure, he clobbered us, but his victory wasn’t Scientific!!!

    • Replies:
  75. I can understand why Republicans would want a Candidate Trump but I still find it implausible that America would want a President Trump.

    I doubt Americans are as frustrated with their government as Republicans are with their party. I think the Bernie Sanders phenomenon is born out of liberal boredom not any real frustration with Obama.

  76. I’ve had thoughts along the same lines. If Donald Trump wants a place in history, even more than being President, he could be the man that built a replacement party for the GOP, or rebuilt the GOP into something quite different. The new party needs to be free of slavish devotion to Ronald Reagan, or maybe even Abraham Lincoln

    A new political party in a country that hasn’t seen that kind of a change since the 1850s–that would be an accomplishment. The only drawback: the 1850s ended with 1861. But some kind of confrontation is probably headed our way in any event, new/reformed GOP or not.

  77. New evidence! Just uncovered! Donald Trump is now believed to be major cause of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and erectile dysfunction in the United States!

    Remember, you heard it hear first!

  78. In Texas, candidates who clear the bar of 20% of the vote get proportional delegates. Trump will clear that bar, so even if he doesn’t come in first in Texas, he’ll get his share of the delegates.

  79. I honestly don’t think they can. The democrat’s system is so dirty that only a party pick will make it through. You get your choice of bologna A or bologna B no steaks or chops for you. I’ve seen their crimes first hand as a kid. They are doomed to be a coalition of the fringes as they’ve explicitly rejected the middle. That means they need to cheat to win. At least for now. If they get the replacement voters they want they can simply pander their way to victory until the collapse.

  80. Exactly. And supporting this as a citizen, why doesn’t that make one “authoritarian”? There are, after all, a negligible few on the left who oppose such executive actions on principle. These are arguably the only people on the left, a tiny fraction, who aren’t “authoritarian”.

    There seems a fundamental problem with our idea of authoritarianism. Is an authoritarian fixated on following the rule of law, whatever it is in a given situation, or someone who favors political authority above the law?
    Seems a lot of it in the mind of lefties has to do with this equally suspect notion of “wary of outsiders”? Certainly many in Germany are/were wary of Muslim “refugees”. Many were probably enraged by the illegality of Merkel’s actions. Others applauded as this political leader for invoking extra-legal authority over law to achieve ends that would otherwise be denied. Who’s authoritarian here?

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  81. Google Books has examples of the Napoleon/Moniteur anecdote that pre-date Hugo; the oldest I noticed was published in 1836. Alexandre Dumas has a version in The Count of Monte Cristo (1844).

  82. I love pointing this out. Not only is our elite currently hysterical while the electorate, despite all the obvious discontent evidenced by Trump and Sanders’ support, relatively calm (aside from the media telling us a guy in a Trump hat flipping off some media hack or other constitutes brown-shirt intimidation), but the elite is presently operating with a belief system–blank slate biology, egalitarianism, critical race theory–as fantastical as any religious belief to come before, but profoundly more destructive. Belief in God and the Bible might have required believing in fantastical legends like Genesis and Jesus, like the idea of God itself, but it didn’t require you to daily misinterpret the on-the-ground reality before you, and to keep doing it despite all evidence because you aren’t allowed to waver at all from the initial article of faith (all are equal).
    Religious tenets are at least recognized as such–secular tenets masquerade as “Science!” Far more dangerous and destructive.

  83. Authority is legitimated power, not just power for its own sake or power from fear.

    Perceived strength in upholding norms.

    Authoritarianism is not totalitarianism. People willingly follow authoritarian figures but follow totalitarian ones out of fear.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies:
  84. If we can’t have an order that works for us, let’s have chaos instead.

    I vacillated between Trump and Cruz, and ended up supporting Cruz even though that may be a losing cause. I just could not stomach the crudeness of Trump even though he says a lot of things I like (e.g. immigration, gun rights, etc.). As a proponent of civilization, and specifically Western civilization, I just couldn’t support someone who exudes and revels in baseness and vulgarity.

    Still, I also empathize with wanting to demolish the current corrupt and ossified political system and bit of chaos reign. But as a (former) historian and subsequently someone who worked in chaotic parts of the world, I should note some caution that chaos is seldom just a “bit,” and is often uncontrollable once unleashed. And it frequently leaves people worse off than before. It’s one of those “be careful what you wish for, you just might get it.”

    Because we have (theoretically anyway) a system of government with distributed and limited powers, the chance of that chaos spiraling out of control is not high, but it’s still something to keep in mind.

    Also, my calculus has changed somewhat since the sudden death of the late Justice Scalia. I am now a bit more amenable to the argument that we need someone who will beat Hillary since at least one SCOTUS seat hangs in the balance.

    • Replies: ,
  85. I adore the Juicebox Mafia. I will be disappointed in them if I don’t see this meme several times today. Is Ezra losing his wasta?

  86. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    The Authoritarian Personality psychologized and pathologized authoritarianism for leftist purposes, but that doesn’t mean authoritarian preferences and inclinations don’t exist.

  87. It looks like the Guardian is changing its tone slightly as Trump moves closer to them in Washington:
    Trump’s victories aren’t mysterious if you understand why people are angry, Jeb Lund

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/feb/24/donald-trump-victory-nevada-caucus-voter-anger

    Lund’s hilariously self-flattering view of what makes journalists tick is worth reading in itself.

  88. I’ve taken up Baldwin’s suggestion and created two videos based on his timeline.

    See on Youtube:

    Pundits Pulverized: Trump Victory Timeline

    &

    Trump’s Victory March through the Pundits

  89. Gato de la Biblioteca said, “But goddamn it, I’m tired of being labelled a Klansmen for believing that my government should put its people first instead of everyone else in the world.”

    Hear, hear!

  90. Leftist conservative [AKA "Trump Kills Last Mosquito, Places Tiny Make America Great Hat On ZikaHead Baby"]
    says:
    • Website     Show CommentNext New Comment

    when future people read TRUMP’s constitution, unz.com will be read like Federalist Papers

  91. Also, my calculus has changed somewhat since the sudden death of the late Justice Scalia. I am now a bit more amenable to the argument that we need someone who will beat Hillary since at least one SCOTUS seat hangs in the balance.

    Whether Scalia died this year or not, that still should have been part of your calculus. Besides Scalia, Ginsberg is currently 82, Kennedy 79 and Breyer is 77. There is a good chance one of them will retire before the next president’s term is up.

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  92. “July 2015: The Bane of Humanity has insulted the war hero John McCain. He’s gotten away with his gaffes, insults and vulgarity so far, but this time he’s gone too far.”

    Well, I must admit that I started off 2015 and the beginning of Trump’s campaign as a complete skeptic, but, when “The Bane of Humanity” started attacking John McCain as a phony war hero, he got my full attention. I became a regular poster on unz.com in July 2015 and devoted many of my posts in that month to Ron Unz’s piece dealing with John McCain phony status as a “war hero.” (I had posted a number of times on that topic on TAC from 2010 to 2014 and before that on Yahoo Finance Message Boards in 2008, when McCain was a candidate for President.) The reason why “The Bane of Humanity”‘s post caught my attention was because it challenged long-established conventional thinking of Washington, D.C. When “The Bane of Humanity” began challenging conventional Washington thinking on illegal immigration and aggressive foreign policy, I quickly became an enthusiastic convert. At this point, I am confident that The “Bane of Humanity” will not only secure the Republican nomination but will go on to defeat Hillary Clinton by a large margin in November. I look forward to “The Bane of Humanity” becoming “The Bane of the Washington Establishment,” which no one with any brains could possibly view as having any relation to Humanity.

  93. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    There’s a popular meme that Obama has issued an unprecedented number of executive orders, but it doesn’t seem to be true:

    http://www.snopes.com/politics/obama/executiveorders.asp

    • Replies:
  94. Maybe the solution is not to get upset about being labelled a Klansman? Water off a duck’s back, and all. Look at Trump. How many epithets have been thrown his way over the last few months, and he only gets more popular?

    I think part of what you can do with SJWs and general goodthinkers (i.e. moderates) is to very gently let them know that not everyone thinks as they do, and they have their reasons. Trying to win them over in one conversation is a fool’s errand. If you can set their mind to begin to probe and unravel the cognitive dissonance that is no doubt present within their minds, that is probably the best you can do.

    A lot of these people are pathologically altruistic. If you can get them caring about the white working class, and direct some of their anger at the donor class who have brought in cheaper foreign labor just to add a few dollars to the bottom line, that can be effective. The white working class, the white IT workers, they have never been given the opportunity to vote on having their jobs replaced. It’s not particularly fair now, is it?

    Another thing common to these people is that they tend to be a little smarter than average, often college educated, and they have been subjected to the full course of PC brainwashing. So, they often have degrees. Are they being paid fairly for their slog through college? If they aren’t, might it not have something to do with the flood of competing college educated product on the market? “You would be earning 20%-40% more if it were not for the donor class and politicians cheapening the market value of your degree, and adding insult to injury by saying that they need more STEM degree holders.”

    Another thing you can do is just let them know that their social status signalling is not working on you.

    • Replies:
  95. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    The executive branch is supposed to be limited and weak. The appeal of Trump is not simply that he will merely enforce the law, which after all is made by Congress, but that by force of personality and will, Trump will use his executive authority and will shape and influence the law in a certain fashion.

  96. I can’t be the only who notices the strange new respect that Salon and nymag show mangyna kellyy

  97. You must go to the Dagobah system, Gato.

    Seriously tho, “Ben Kenobi” is what my buddies in basic training dubbed me back in 2004. Because my first name is Ben, not for any Star Wars fandom. I figured there are worse nicknames to have. It’s been my screen name ever since.

    I considered “AryanBattleAxe1488″ but decided against it.

    • Replies:
  98. I for one am not at all conformist. If Trump was a conformist, he’d be watching the election on TV.

    Wow – is it possible that Gil Scott-Heron might actually . . . be wrong?

  99. But goddamn it, I’m tired of being labelled a Klansmen for believing that my government should put its people first instead of everyone else in the world.

    Get used to it, friend! I’m basically a socialist, but whenever I explain that, in order to guarantee everyone a job and a minimum income, we would need to tightly control and limit immigration, even I sometimes get the RACIST!!! treatment.

    • Replies:
  100. Obama’s executive order are of a different, more substantial nature than those of previous presidents.

  101. How many epithets have been thrown his way over the last few months, and he only gets more popular?

    The Donald can gamely do that because The Donald is worth ten or eleven figures. I’ve been out of work for eight years (and counting) and live in bad neighborhood full of people much less melanin challenged than I am. Getting called a Klansman around black people when you live in a black neighborhood isn’t a good thing for either yourself or your family.

    Another thing you can do is just let them know that their social status signalling is not working on you.

    That’s been done for decades now.

  102. Get used to it, friend! I’m basically a socialist, but whenever I explain that, in order to guarantee everyone a job and a minimum income, we would need to tightly control and limit immigration, even I sometimes get the RACIST!!! treatment.

    And this comment is also directed at Anonym above. (And thank you for the good comment above, Anonym.)

    Besides my living arrangements, I also care about the position being dismissed and made unspeakable by the cheap labeling of “racist”. I guess what I would like to see happen is for the Overton Window to shift even further. (See Education Realist’s blog post on why he’s a Trump supporter for more in this vein.)

  103. I considered “AryanBattleAxe1488″ but decided against it.

    Good call if you’re not actually a Storm Front kind of guy!

    • Replies:
  104. I can understand not liking Trump. Hell, I don’t care for him. But he’s what we’ve got. Everyone else running on the R side is just more of the same thing.

    It’s one of those “be careful what you wish for, you just might get it.”

    If the current direction can’t be changed, it doesn’t matter for me and mine anyway. If we’re going to go extinct, I’d just assume take my chances with pure chaos. At least we might take some of them with us.

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  105. If that robot were Trump, he’d take that the hockey stick from that guy. Might give him a whack with it for good measure.

  106. Authority is legitimated power, not just power for its own sake or power from fear.

    How appropriate for that comment to come from that name.

    “Authority” is from the same root as “author” and carries some of the came connotations. To the extent that Trump appeals to “authoritarians,” it’s likely that appeal arises from the sense that he’s actually created/produced (i.e. “authored”) something with his life, unlike the rest of our current putative ruling class, who exhibit a glaring lack of such accomplishments across the board.

    I think Trump’s secret is that he possesses a baseline level of mere grown-up manliness. Most men learn how to not take/fall for shit by around 22. Somehow our current leadership class, especially the Rs, never got there.

  107. Another Napoleon analogy that regularly comes to mind are the consultants and experts reacting to Trump’s unendorsed, seat-of-his-pants, ground game-less campaign like the defeated Prussian general staff: sure, he clobbered us, but his victory wasn’t Scientific!!!

    Too bad your analogy is completely wrong.

    The Prussian and later the German general staff came into being as a result of the Napoleonic defeat of the traditional Prussian army at the Battle of Jena. In the aftermath of such a catastrophic defeat, far-thinking Prussian military reformers Gneisenau and Scharnhorst, laid the foundation for the general staff, precisely to remediate negative effects of seniority and nepotism and to place men of talent and scientific training in key positions of leadership and strategic planning.

    The result was clear. Not only did the Germans go on to contribute to the defeat of Napoleon, they went on an unbeaten streak for nearly 200 years. And even in defeat, their general staff proved its worth as an enviable institution of excellence.

  108. Whether Scalia died this year or not, that still should have been part of your calculus. Besides Scalia, Ginsberg is currently 82, Kennedy 79 and Breyer is 77. There is a good chance one of them will retire before the next president’s term is up.

    Yes, but, bar perhaps Kennedy the others would not have altered the current tenuous 5-4 (sometimes) constitutionalist majority. Suddenly losing Scalia, the bedrock of that majority, was and is a disaster.

  109. If the current direction can’t be changed, it doesn’t matter for me and mine anyway. If we’re going to go extinct, I’d just assume take my chances with pure chaos.

    That is overblown to say the least. I assume you mean whites by “we,” and, if so, you are not going to go “extinct.”

    At least we might take some of them with us.

    Who is “them” here and what do you mean by “take some of them with us”?

    Moreover, whatever you might have meant, this doesn’t strike me as an attitude that is conducive to preserving, let alone rebuilding, civilization.

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  110. I considered “AryanBattleAxe1488″ but decided against it.

    Good call if you’re not actually a Storm Front kind of guy!

    Only moronic “Storm Front kind of guy” would use “Aryan” in that context… unless he is actually of the Avestani-Iranic stock… which I seriously doubt.

  111. It does appear to be an impossible task. I would just like to point out that there are real racists and Nazis and they would likely flock to your anti-establishment consensus just like many of them support Trump. A broad consensus would have to deal with them.

    That makes no sense whatsoever to anyone who knows what “consensus” means.

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  112. That is overblown to say the least.

    Yes, but what El Gato means is that he would rather die on his feet than live on his knees.

    I understand your sentiment. Trump is an embarrassment in many ways. But we must focus on the essential issue. We are overrun. A pretty and pleasant response won’t work. No one but Trump stands a chance against the entrenched parasites that rule what was once a great country. And Trump’s ugliness may be markedly less objectionable than the alternatives.

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  113. That is overblown to say the least. I assume you mean whites by “we,” and, if so, you are not going to go “extinct.”

    No, you stupid fuck, by “we” I meant my immediate family.

    Not only did the Germans go on to contribute to the defeat of Napoleon, they went on an unbeaten streak for nearly 200 years.

    Yeah, except that the Napoleanic Wars ended in 1815, and in the 200 years since the Germans have lost the two biggest wars ever fought. Quite an enviable record, especially given that they’ve basically only fought in the two wars they lost in the last 102 years. So the “unbeaten streak” was a little more than 100 years.

    Care to try again?

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  114. I was definitely joking, guys.

  115. The “consensus” would be that people with political views like yours would have to go elsewhere. Once people with views similar to yours were sent on their way, the rational 20-30% on the other side could be added to what is a near majority (Trump supporters) on its own.

  116. A pretty and pleasant response won’t work.

    It hasn’t been tried. Trump shows that the potential is there. The emergence of a rational political grouping within the context of the American political system may not be possible, but we don’t know that for sure. The “other side” wins everything by default.

  117. No, you stupid fuck

    I think this outburst says a lot more about you than it does about me.

    by “we” I meant my immediate family.

    You are going to have to clarify considerably about this imminent possibility of extinction of your family and how Trump is going to save you from it.

    Yeah, except that the Napoleanic Wars ended in 1815, and in the 200 years since the Germans have lost the two biggest wars ever fought.

    200 was a typo. I meant 100.

    Since the reforms of Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, the Prussian (and later German) record is as follows:

    1813 Victory over Napoleonic France (the Battle of Leipzig)
    1815 Victory over Napoleonic France (the Battle of Waterloo)
    1864 Victory over Denmark (the Second Schleswig War)
    1866 Victory over Austria and the German Confederation (the Austro-Prussian War)
    1871 Victory over France (the Franco-Prussian War)
    1917 Victory over Russia (World War I Eastern Front; the Dissolution of the Russian Empire)
    1918 Defeat by Allied Powers (World War I Western Front)* The General Staff abolished by the victorious Allies and replaced by Truppenamt (“Troop Office”).
    1936-1939 Victory over Russian proxies (the Spanish Civil War)
    1939 Victory over Poland
    1940 Victory over Denmark and Norway
    1940 Victory over Franco-British Alliance (the Fall of France)
    1941 Victory over Yugoslavia and Greece
    1945 Defeat by Allied Powers

    I should note that after the string of Prussian victories in the late 19th Century, the Prussian general staff became a model for imitation for many nations that tried to build a similar mechanism for strategic planning. And that included the United States.

    And while the Germans were ultimately defeated in World War I and II, largely because of grand strategic errors by the political leadership, the actual operational and tactical successes of the Germans were spectacular. Martin van Creveld, the noted Israeli historian, did an extensive study on the superb performance of the German soldiery over the Allies in “Fighting Power” (http://www.amazon.com/Fighting-Power-Performance-1939-1945-Contributions/dp/0313091579).

    Finally, none of your rantings refutes what I wrote in response to commenter Winthorp’s claim of Trump’s alleged similarity to Napoleon’s victory over the supposedly “scientific” Prussian general staff, which is simply contrary to historical facts. The Prussian general staff came into being in response to the Napoleonic victory as a part of the larger Prussian military reforms. Napoleon did not defeat the German general staff. He defeated the old Prussian army, which derived its refutation from the lucky victory in the Seven Years’ War (Prussia was almost overrun in that war, but its army stayed intact until it was saved by the near miraculous death of Elizabeth of Russia that led to the Russian defection to the Prussian cause).

    Again, blind Trump worship is fine and dandy, but, if you must, use the correct historical analogy. Unless of course you take to heart Trump recent declaration that he “love [s] the poorly educated.”

  118. Yes, but what El Gato means is that he would rather die on his feet than live on his knees.

    It’s not clear what he means.

    As someone who fought on while wounded until the (air) cavalry showed up for rescue, I know more than most on this blog what it means to have the will to die on one’s feet than live on one’s knees.

    That’s not the choice one faces here on the question of whether Trump is or is not a worthy standard bearer for the national restoration.

    Trump is an embarrassment in many ways. But we must focus on the essential issue. We are overrun. A pretty and pleasant response won’t work. No one but Trump stands a chance against the entrenched parasites that rule what was once a great country. And Trump’s ugliness may be markedly less objectionable than the alternatives.

    My problem goes beyond the ugliness of his antics. I don’t trust him. For example, he says a lot of good things about gun rights, but his record says otherwise: https://www.gunsamerica.com/blog/trump-second-amendment-trust/

    Unlike most folks here, I actually grew up partly in NYC and was exposed to the news of Trump’s various antics and behaviors long before his presidential campaign was even an inkling. He has a demonstrated history of making compromises and utilizing unethical methods to benefit HIMSELF rather than serving any cause greater than himself. Notwithstanding his sudden love for blue collar workers, he has shown ZERO history of aiding such people in the past.

    Yes, he says a lot of things about immigration that I support. But if his record on anything else is an indication, such utterances are likely convenient slogans for his own aggrandizement and self-advance rather than any deeply held conviction on his part. I know some of the people whom he tried to enlist early in the campaign and with whom he had significant political discussions, and most of them are of the impression that he’s putting on a performance act to win over the disgruntled blue collar white demographic – for purely election purposes. He may be a clown, but he is not an idiot, and he knows there is a segment of the population that would sign on and forgive him anything if he just went about promising to deport all illegals and calling most illegals are rapists or some such thing (mind you, I say this as someone who has clashed with Mr. Unz on this very site over Hispanic criminality).

    In other words, there is a real danger, in my view, that if and once he is elected, Trump may cut deals with the Democrats for his own benefit, to the detriment of not just the GOP or conservatism, but the country as a whole.

    Even so, I still considered supporting him (it was down to him or Cruz), because I too am utterly disgusted with the current political status quo and cultural decay, but the whole “pussy” thing (and not just the name calling, but the slimy and “politically correct” way he did it) finally turned me off to him for good).

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  119. The Democratic Party cannot be redeemed. The only hope is to split the Republican Party and draw the “rational” 20-30% from the Democrats. This is the Armageddon. This is the last chance.

  120. the toll collecting robber barons and their little castles at our political choke-points the way Napoleon blasted through the original robber barons in their castles on the Rhine and Danube. .

    Really, Napoleon did this? I thought the original robber barons were put out of business by the League of the Rhine and Rudolf I Holy Roman Emperor some 500 years before.

  121. […] הלא תקינות פוליטית עד קיצון. את היחס כלפי טראמפ השווה כבר מזמן לסיפור על כותרות העיתונים שתיארו את […]

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