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Happy 80th Birthday, Pat Buchanan!
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Patrick J. Buchanan turned 80 today.

 
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  1. He looks so much younger than his McLaughlin friends.

  2. Anonymous[138] • Disclaimer says:

    Happy Birthday, Pat.

    More than anyone, you started this current movement of immigration skepticism.

    You’re a legend.

  3. PJB decided two elections , arguably:
    2016 Trump recycled his campaign, and won.

    (If the Left had not insisted on firing PJB from MSNBC in 2012, then they would have had daily keen insight into Trump from PJB and PJB’s playbook from which Trump was deriving his campaign themes of America First etc
    PJB’s presence on Morni’ Joe would have forced the Left’s talking heads to think a little about what was unfolding. ……Instead, well…..)

    2000 Election and Florida
    PJB’s presence on the Florida ballot diverted enough many WPalm Beach votes that would have provided Gore with the margin of victory of Bush 43.

  4. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    1992 was a landmark year.

    Buchanan’s speech was anti-Clinton at the Convention, but his position sounded like Old pro-Democratic Labor while Bill Clinton actually represented the Boomer acceptance of Free Trade Globalism(with backing of GOP and yuppies). In the end, Buchanan was old-style labor populist while Clinton was globo-elitist(not much different from what the Bushes stood for, which is Bushes got along well with Clintons and Obamas). GOP was actually angry at Clinton not so much because he was hard-left but because he ‘stole’ so many ‘conservative’ positions(like Nixon stole a bunch of ‘liberal’ positions in the early 70s in foreign and domestic policy, which is Libs really hated him. Nixon sought to triangulate USSR and Libs both. He used China against USSR and adopted statist policies to undermine appeal of Democrats).

    GOP met their match in Clinton after making fun of Democratic candidates as too naive, do-goody, wussy, and wimpy. McGovern, Carter, Mondale, and Dukakis were made fun of as Too Weak and Too Nice. In contrast, Republican leaders were supposedly tough and willing to play hardball.

    But then Billy Boy comes along to play hardball politics even better than the GOP. And he appeals to middle class by going after crime, and he wins over Wall Street by pushing ‘free trade’. In a way, much of Clintonism was what the GOP always wanted but from a Democrat.

    Buckley and Trump in 1992

  5. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Buchanan was overly hard on environmentalism. Sure, greens can get extreme, but preserving the environment can be a nationalist platform.

    Global Warming is related to Global Swarming. As Third World moves to First World, more fossil fuels are burned.

  6. I have long thought that Mr. Buchanan’s greatest act of self-restraint may be sitting on the set of The McLaughlin Group all those years, across from Eleanor Clift, and never once leaping to his feet and jumping across the set to throttle the life out of her.

    • LOL: songbird
    • Replies: @Xenophon Hendrix
  7. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:

    Happy 80th Birthday, Pat!

  8. @Anon

    But then Billy Boy comes along to play hardball politics even better than the GOP.

    Aggravated rape is definitely a “hardball”.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
  9. God bless Pat Buchanan. Truly one of the greatest men of our age. He has been right on the big issues for the last 50 years. And in the face of vicious attacks from the left and the phony neo-cons, he has remained a consummate gentlemen.

    • Agree: densa
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  10. @Houston 1992

    2000 Election and Florida
    PJB’s presence on the Florida ballot diverted enough many WPalm Beach votes that would have provided Gore with the margin of victory of Bush 43.

    Are you on medical marijuana?

    The Nader effect was exaggerated fivefold– only two-fifths of his voters would have chosen Gore, and another fifth Bush, according to surveys– but it was still enough to throw Florida to Bush.

    But Buchanan? I can’t imagine a single one of Pat’s supporters going for a third Clinton term.

    Pat did throw some states to Gore, like Iowa and New Mexico. Gore carried the latter by 374 votes, and Pat got more than triple that.

  11. J.Ross says: • Website

    Happy Birthday Pat Buchanan, who believes in things, but is not the sort that would force a child to walk across a continent to prove them.

    https://postimg.cc/gwrNH8RQ

  12. Lot says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    We’d have been better with Gore, who would not have invaded Iraq.

  13. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    Those of us that remember the commentary, political cartoons, and satire from before the 2000 election recall the universal complaint being that there was no meaningful difference between Gore and Bush. This complaint originated earlier, in the Clinton-Dole race, and was even the theme of a Simpsons Treehouse Of Horror Story. Then, after the un-Constitutional and illogical Supreme Court one-off election decision, every Democrat was sure that Al Gore was a David Cassidy of runaway devotion, that Ralph Nader stole the votes of loyal DLC supporters and not, say, leftists and independents, and that ChoicePoint admitting under oath before the Florida State Senate that they had invalidated legitimate voters on totally false pretexts just didn’t matter. But yeah it’s the fault of third parties that the monopoly parties are so awful.

  14. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Lot

    Please review the actual record. The reason Clinton stopping deploying was because we got our asses handed to us by Somalis — Somalis — and Gore was a bigger hawk than Clinton every step of the way. We started a war in Europe on false pretenses and bombed everything we thought we could get away with; we bombed a medicine factory in Sudan. What in that suggests a problem with what would surely look to any Pentagon analyst after ten years of sanctions and arbitrary bombings like a “slam dunk”?

  15. snorlax says:
    @Lot

    2000 Democrat platform:

    In Iraq, we are committed to working with our international partners to keep Saddam Hussein boxed in, and we will work to see him out of power. Bill Clinton and Al Gore have stood up to Saddam Hussein time and time again. As President, Al Gore will not hesitate to use America’s military might against Iraq when and where it is necessary.

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Reg Cæsar
  16. @Reg Cæsar

    Reg, how could you forget the infamous (and hilarious) “butterfly ballot”?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2000/11/09/us/2000-elections-palm-beach-ballot-florida-democrats-say-ballot-s-design-hurt-gore.html

    The dispute centers on the peculiar layout of a presidential ballot in Palm Beach County that some Democratic voters say caused them to become confused and mistakenly vote for Patrick J. Buchanan when they had intended to vote for Vice President Al Gore.

    After the final tally, with Mr. Gore trailing Mr. Bush by just 1,784 votes in Florida, several senior Democratic officials said if the ballot had not flummoxed their supporters, Mr. Gore would have won enough votes to win Florida and the presidency.

    Even though he never made even one campaign stop in Palm Beach County, Mr. Buchanan, the Reform Party candidate, finished with 3,704 votes in the staunchly Democratic county — nearly 2,700 more than Mr. Buchanan received in any of Florida’s other 66 counties.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  17. istevefan says:

    If only we had listened to him.

    • Agree: Tyrion 2, Dan Hayes
  18. Happy birthday to Mr. Buchanan. His critics were wrong.

  19. @Anon

    Despite the actual affinity of some modern self-identified “greens” for nature and the environment, the typical “green” platform amounts to an expansion of bureaucracy and technocracy. There is an inherent absurdity here. Failure to recognize this has really been a blindspot of “conservatives” over the past century or so. I guess Teddy R had basically the right intuitions, but perhaps many later Republicans have not adequately perceived the natural world as being threatened, perhaps because many of them live in less urban settings than typical Democratic voters. Probably, a viable environmentalism needs to be tied to some sort of nationalist/localist outlook.

    • Replies: @bomag
  20. Mike O says:

    It’s Pat Buchanan’s world now, we’re just living in it.

  21. JackOH says:

    Happy birthday, Pat, and God bless you and your charming wife.

    I’d met Pat and his wife (Shelley?) at a local shindig when he was running for the Republican nomination, and he was kind enough to respond to a question of mine during the brief Q & A. He’s a superb and deft writer, a courageous political figure, and I think his “ground” (as in Gestalt), that the America of the 1950s was generally a pretty good place, is pretty well-founded. Plus, it seemed always clear to me he regarded ties of blood, community, family, tradition, and so on as important while other pundits were “captured” by exotic ideological flora and special pleading.

  22. @MEH 0910

    Virgin Gore vs. pregnant chad.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  23. Anonymous[212] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    Who says you need a government to provide a military. Somalia is a triumph of anarcho-capitalism over the compromises of libertarianism.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  24. @Reg Cæsar

    In mid-2000, Pat had to have surgery and missed about three months on the campaign trail during a difficult recovery, so he was largely a nonfactor in that election.

  25. @Reg Cæsar

    Certainly looks better than John McLaughlin these days.

  26. @Anon

    The fossil fuel being burned is the least of the problems caused by the current wave of immigrants.

  27. bomag says:
    @SporadicMyrmidon

    Probably, a viable environmentalism needs to be tied to some sort of nationalist/localist outlook.

    Good comment.

    I’ve always thought that there should be some natural common ground between political conservatives and environmentalists, but the Greens have gone full leftist: they embrace the totalitarianism of Stalin/Mao believing that that bureaucracy/technocracy can be harnessed to protect the environment. Sure, the actual Mao and Stalin weren’t friends of clean water, but they were just breaking eggs in service to the omelette; once everything is in place, the cleanup can begin, and that includes marching polluters, aka excess population, off to a gulag. I get the vibe from Greens that they welcome massive immigration ’cause it lets them get more people under their wing for when the real solution gets implemented.

    • Replies: @hooodathunkit
  28. @J.Ross

    Read “Blackhawk Down”. Paul Howe’s thoughts at the end of the battle are different than we usually hear about what happened in Somalia.

  29. bomag says:
    @MEH 0910

    I like to tease Left/Progressives by suggesting the ballot include an IQ test so their side can win without cheating.

    Figuring out that butterfly ballot is a sort of IQ test.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  30. Romanian says: • Website

    The best President you never had, though I guess there is something to be said of the phenomenon of the king would would have been a great hope had he never ruled. All the best to him.

  31. @bomag

    Al Gore was the winner among people who tried to vote in Florida in 2000, but he lost among people competent enough to cast a comprehensible ballot. The NYT had a good article at the time about how the Democrats in Jacksonville did a good job busing lots of poor blacks to the polls. But the Democrats forgot to look at the upcoming ballot, so they advised Democratic voters “to vote for one candidate on each page.” But there were so many Presidential candidates that they spilled over onto a second page, so voters in black/Democratic districts had a high rate of voting for two Presidential candidates (e.g., Gore and somebody else) and getting their ballots disqualified.

    If you are a Jensenite, it’s pretty obvious what the potential screw-up was for the Democrats, but how many Florida Democratic officials are familiar with the research of Arthur Jensen?

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  32. @Reg Cæsar

    Just to be sure MEH and Mr. Errican’s replies explained it to you, lots of the S. Florida D voters complained that the “confusing” ballot caused them to vote for Mr. B instead of Mr I (Internet creator). It’s hard to focus that late at night, say 5 PM, after having gummed down a bowlful of creamed corn at the early bird special.

  33. @Achmed E. Newman

    Oh, and that early-bird special dig was not at all directed at Pat Buchanan at 80 y/o. I wish he’d gotten farther along in 1992, but the Lyin’ Press was already on their game by then. Ross Perot, a smarter proto-Trump, should have gotten my vote that year, but I didn’t understand the Deep-State schenanigans that turned me off when he dropped out, then was back in. George Bush was a non-starter, so I voted L.

    Happy Birthday to Mr. Buchanan. He’s been a fighter for conservatism since 5 decades ago before he enjoyed his stay on the 19th floor of some Washington, FS hotel watching the cops below beat the hell out of some hippies.

    He’s 34, drinking in his honky-tonk
    just kickin’ hippies’ asses and raisin’ hell.

    “Hell, yes, I’m drunk, whaddya think I’m a stunt driver” bumper stickers … haha

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  34. Anon[361] • Disclaimer says:

    A patriot and a gentleman. What more need be said?

    He speaks and writes in such a way that he teaches others how to think. He is careful in his terms, he explains well his logic, he knows history and human nature. He understands government, both at the political (individuals) and international relations (State) levels.

    People on this site often disparage his articles’ depth. Age, of course, takes its toll. But I suspect he rather chooses carefully which seeds for thought to plant in his readers’ mind.

    May he live many more happy, healthy and productive years.

  35. @Achmed E. Newman

    As you rightly point out, the Democrat “get out the vote effort” is certainly complicated by the incidence of senile dementia in one of their prime demographic groups, but we would be remiss to fail to mention the impact of consumption of massive quantities of cannabis on various of the other important demographics and fear of “la Migra” on one in particular.

    Historically, these negative impacts have been offset by the very effective Dem GOTV work done among the dead.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  36. Anon[384] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    MIT prof piece from Thursday on why sex is binary, contrary to what a NY Times opinion piece said last month.

    https://arcdigital.media/is-sex-binary-16bec97d161e

    As Simone de Beauvoir puts it in The Second Sex (the founding text of modern feminism), the sexes “are basically defined by the gametes they produce.” Specifically, females produce large gametes (reproductive cells), and males produce small ones. (Since there are no species with a third intermediate gamete size, there are only two sexes.¹) A glance at the huge variety of females and males across the animal and vegetable kingdoms will confirm that there is nothing else the sexes can be.
    :
    That sex is not binary is evidently something that many progressives dearly wish to believe, but a philosophically sound case for treating everyone with dignity and respect has absolutely no need of it.
    :
    To those struggling with gender identity issues, it might seem liberating and uplifting to be told that biological sex in humans is a glorious rainbow, rather than a square conservatively divided into pink and blue halves. But this feel-good approach is little better than deceiving intersex patients: respect for autonomy demands honesty. And finally, if those advocating for transgender people (or anyone else) rest their case on shaky interpretations of biology, this will ultimately only give succor to their enemies.

    Some hard numbers about intersex in the piece:

    The true figure for intersex conditions (understood as those where the phenotype has both female and male elements — a small subset of DSDs) is closer to 0.018 percent, about 100 times lower than the figure supplied by Fausto-Sterling (see Leonard Sax, “How Common Is Intersex? A Response To Anne Fausto‐Sterling”). Incorporating Hull’s corrections drops that percentage to 0.015. The present point is that even people in this 0.015 percent usually fall within the female/male binary, and that no one clearly falls beyond it.

  37. tyrone says:
    @Lot

    Remember, Gore was a “conservative” democrat,more hawkish ,remember his tobacco spiel,and Tipper cleaning up rap/pop lyrics? The third chakra stuff didn’t play well in Tennessee in those days

  38. Flip says:

    I voted for him for president in 1992 in the Republican primary and then Libertarian in the general.

  39. @contriturated anon

    I’ve read from more than one source that Buchanan is a good natured guy.

  40. Romanian says: • Website

    Off-topic:

    https://www.vox.com/2018/6/1/17396182/jordan-peterson-alt-right-religion-catholicism

    What do you guys say to this? Bronze Age Pervert is also cited. He promised to send the author his manifesto lol.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @J.Ross
  41. @Anon

    “…like Nixon stole a bunch of ‘liberal’ positions in the early 70s in foreign and domestic policy”

    Which is another way of describing an empty suit. In this, Tricky Dick and Slicky Slick were birds of a feather–and why both were (and remain) so despised.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  42. @MEH 0910

    Wonder how many votes the McReynolds/Hollis Socialist ticket got.

  43. countenance says: • Website

    I hope I even make it to the age of 80, knowing family history I probably won’t, and if I do make it to 80, that I’m thinking half as well as PJB is at 80.

    As a native St. Louisan, once again, I have to remind everyone that his first journalism job out of college was in St. Louis, with the old Globe-Democrat, and he still to this day considers St. Louis his second home.

    • Replies: @David In TN
  44. Anon[949] • Disclaimer says:

    Here is a good one , Steve.
    Bangladeshi visa lottery winner Mohammad Achmed scams federal government out of $500,000 via food stamp fraud and uses proceeds to buy real estate and bring in more Bangladeshi immigrants !!!! He was sentenced to ONLY 9 MONTHS in prison by federal judge Avern Cohn who calls him a good person !!! The 3 other Bangladeshi defendants were sentenced to ONE DAY in prison !!!!!!!!

    https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2018/11/03/bangladeshi-food-stamp-cheats-hamtramck/1859452002/

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Lot
  45. GOD BLESS PATRICK JOSEPH BUCHANAN!

    Tweet from 2015:

  46. Knox says:
    @Anon

    Correct…Clinton stole the GOP platform and was able to pass NAFTA (which Bush was never able to accomplish), Clinton also passed welfare reform , cut capital gains taxes , reversed Glass-Steagall and allowed the banks to become too big to fail…Clinton was also tougher on immigration and passed the 1996 Immigration Act which made it far easier to deport aliens, Clinton also doubled the number of border agents and dramatically increased border security and deportations. We were lucky Bush was not elected to a second term, would have had another amnesty and no capital gains reduction , no welfare reform…

  47. Anonymous[346] • Disclaimer says:
    @Romanian

    From that article:

    One of the best books ever written about the appeal of right-wing movements is one that is not explicitly political. It is Muriel Spark’s 1961 The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie.

    Muriel Spark, whose father was Jewish, was a Catholic convert. She died in 2006. But she has been dead to me since the 1999, when she supported the bombing of Serbia on behalf of the Muslim aggressors in Kosovo.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    , @Rosamond Vincy
  48. My late father interviewed Mr. Buchanan on several occasions. The first time, in the fall of 1968, when he had the privilege to interview Presidential candidate for CBS radio (he also interviewed Buchanan as he was then on Nixon’s campaign staff).

    He also interviewed Mr. Buchanan in the 1990′s and early 2000′s, when Pat was running for President as a third party candidate. Dad faithfully read his columns and admired him very much, as do I.

    Happy Birthday, Pat! May the Lord truly bless you, and may your new year be filled with blessings.

  49. JimB says:

    Pat Buchanan is the most reasonable and historically grounded conservative columnist in the business. I fear the time when he is no longer around. He has no equal and no heir.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  50. Lot says:
    @snorlax

    Yes Clinton kept Iraq contained with sanctions and no fly zones for 8 years. No mass American casualties and 5 trillion dollar war and occupation.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  51. Pat is always worth reading. His column writing is a model of lucidity and concision. His books will surely stand the test of time.

  52. Jim Given says:

    How strange it must be for Pat Buchanan to recall in detail the controversies over the Cold War, anti-Communism, etc.; to remember vividly the Presidencies of Eisenhower, JFK, LBJ, Nixon, etc.

    A whole world now completely unknown to most people in America.

    The 1960 Presidential debate figured prominently the “missile gap” and what to do about it. Will a Presidential debate ever again feature a discussion that close to being technical?

    The twentieth century in which Pat formed his views and developed his perspective is gone forever; not simply past but vanished. How strange for him to spend time advising Republican congressmen who remember none of it-

    • Replies: @David In TN
  53. J1234 says:

    Pat is just solid. He was the only well known opinion writer presenting prescient yet unpopular arguments 25+ years ago that are fairly mainstream today. (Immigration, for example.) He’s no longer the lightning rod that he one was, however, because he presents his views (as he has always done) in a civil format and broad context, and almost never lets his exasperation and frustration with leftist policy and ideology get the better of him. Eighty or not, I’d still vote for him for president.

  54. Before anyone says anything nice about Pat Buchanan, I’d like to remind you that David Frum has ruled him out of bounds. There may be grave and lasting consequences for those wishing Pat Buchanan a happy birthday. History will not be kind.

    David Frum holds the exclusive North American rights to both Conservatism© and the Allied war effort during WW2. The poppy on his lapel says you and Mr. Buchanan are bad news!

    • LOL: L Woods
  55. The 1960 Presidential debate figured prominently the “missile gap” and what to do about it. Will a Presidential debate ever again feature a discussion that close to being technical?

    Don’t forget the bit about “Quemoy and Matsu” from the 1960 presidential election.

  56. Anonymous[138] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    What did the Deep State do to Perot?

  57. @Houston 1992

    Does Trump’s rise, Pat’s political heir’s rise, refute Enoch Powell’s paradigm that all political careers end in failure?

    • Replies: @Sam Malone
  58. Mr. Anon says:
    @Prester John

    Which is another way of describing an empty suit. In this, Tricky Dick and Slicky Slick were birds of a feather–and why both were (and remain) so despised.

    True, I think. Nixon believed in Nixon-in-Power just as Clinton believed in Clinton-in-Power. Those were their chief policies. Everything else was negotiable.

  59. @bomag

    I sympathize with the sentiment, but don’t think the two can be reconciled. There can be no common ground between conservatives and environmentalists; just as there can be no common ground between patriots and subversives, or between free enterprise and Marxism.

    The conservative movement’s agenda for conservation was long ago hijacked by environmentalism’s desire for control. Conservatism is a political movement (or party, NY) at the local, state, and national level; environmentalism has always been globalist and authoritarian or totalitarian.

    That said, the aims that most voters think of as ‘a clean environment’ are the original positions of American conservatism (circa 1960) and are worthwhile goals.

  60. @Lot

    We’d have been even better off with Pat!

  61. Mr. Anon says:
    @Lot

    Why isn’t that John Bolton on the right? Old Evil Captain Kangaroo himself?

    Guy holding ballot: “What do you think John? Is that a vote for Gore? Or a vote for Bush?”

    Bolton: “I think we should bomb somebody somewhere. And by the way, have you and the wife ever considered…………swinging?”

    • Replies: @Lot
  62. Mr. Anon says:
    @Lot

    Yes Clinton kept Iraq contained with sanctions and no fly zones for 8 years. No mass American casualties and 5 trillion dollar war and occupation.

    That wasn’t good enough for PNAC. And it didn’t move enough product:

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/capabilities/weapon-systems.html

  63. Mr. Anon says:

    Happy Birthday, Mr. Buchanan. And I wish you many more. You’ve offered good council that your nation would have done well to heed.

  64. BenKenobi says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Now who’s being naive?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  65. Mr. Anon says:
    @J.Ross

    Please review the actual record. The reason Clinton stopping deploying was because we got our asses handed to us by Somalis…………………

    That isn’t true. We lost eighteen men killed vs. – who knows – maybe a thousand Somalis? Nobody ever counted the Somali dead. Nobody cared to, on our side or theirs. Which is not to say it was worth it or that we should have been there. It wasn’t, and we shouldn’t have. Bush the Elder’s deployment of soldiers to Somalia, as a lame duck President in the last days of his administration, was one of the most shamefully irresponsible things he ever did. Clinton should have pulled them out as sson as he was inaugurated.

    Perhaps there was some geo-political deep-state reason for our involvement there, but I’ve never heard a theory advanced.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  66. @Steve Sailer

    In mid-2000, Pat had to have surgery and missed about three months on the campaign trail during a difficult recovery, so he was largely a nonfactor in that election.

    The corporate propaganda apparatus shut out Pat Buchanan and Ralph Nader from coverage for the most part in 2000 campaign. Nader got more coverage in the media and Nader was getting votes from people pissed off about globalizer Bill Clinton.

    NY Times and Wall Street Journal both ran editorials attacking Pat Buchanan and Ralph Nader.

    WSJ supported George W Bush and said Buchanan was a right-wing populist.

    NYT supported Gore and said Nader was a left-wing populist.

    Tweet from 2014:

  67. @Steve Sailer

    In mid-2000, Pat had to have surgery and missed about three months on the campaign trail during a difficult recovery, so he was largely a nonfactor in that election.

    Yes, but New Mexico, Iowa, and maybe another state or two were close enough that he threw them to Gore anyway.

  68. istevefan says:

    Here is Trump’s live stream from Montana on Saturday afternoon.

    Recall he was in Columbia, MO Thursday evening. Yesterday he was in West Virginia and then Indiana. Right now he is in Montana and tonight he will be in Florida. And that just takes us through Saturday.

    Has there ever been another guy who campaigned as much?

  69. I really hoped (against all likelihood) for Buchanan as Trump’s VP. We would laugh in the face of impeachment then. He would also have made an excellent Secretary of State, although I can understand him not wanting to take on that job with Trump as his boss this point.

  70. @snorlax

    More evidence of the party’s anti-Christian bias. Saddam was the only choice the poor Chaldeans had. He even appointed one of them his foreign minister.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast
  71. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Poland had an excellent military that was rarely useful in defending it, because its government was a venal den of bribery, disloyalty, and self-defeating ritual.

  72. songbird says:

    Buchanan was the first presidential candidate that I can remember being called Hitler, but that probably just dates me to within a certain age range.

    Though if Reagan were called the same, (I’m sure he was) I wonder if it went as far down the ladder. Like, would a student in a suburban school have called him Hitler?

    For what it is worth to the study of psychology, I have a fuzzy memory of Saddam being called Hitler by elementary school kids in the lead up to Dessert Storm.

    • Replies: @songbird
    , @Mr. Anon
  73. El Dato says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    “Voting demands minimal IQ.”

    I’m still for the IQ test before a pen is handed out.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  74. songbird says:
    @songbird

    I mean Desert Storm. The other was a tasty op.

  75. anon[140] • Disclaimer says:

    Pat and Steve Sailor have a lot in common. They are both pot stirrers of racial resentment for their Jew masters. To hell with them both.

  76. ATBOTL says:

    I never understood why boomer white male conservatives didn’t embrace Pat. All the conservatives in my high school loved him. He was the only person in mainstream politics talking sense about immigration back in the 90′s. I got the sense at the time boomers didn’t like Pat raining on their imperialist parade.

    The boomer reaction to Pat and their failure to support immigration restrictionists in that era is something we need to talk about more.

  77. Nice guy, good writer, but political failure. Buchanan tried to fight the establishment on too many fronts and achieved little, despite being very articulate and having an appealing political persona. More successful populists like Trump and Salvini have aggressively focused on a narrower range of issues and have achieved a lot more political success.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    , @slumber_j
  78. @Mis(ter)Anthrope

    God bless Pat Buchanan. Truly one of the greatest men of our age. He has been right on the big issues for the last 50 years. And in the face of vicious attacks from the left and the phony neo-cons, he has remained a consummate gentlemen.

    Well said Mis(ter)Anthrope.

    Pat was the wisest politician of our age. Both visionary and an excellent advocate and a political warrior in the truly critical battle for the survival of our nation–who nonetheless kept his good humor and was a gentlemen even in the face of the usual scurrilous attacks.

    Happy Birthday Pat Buchanan. May you be with us for many, many more!

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  79. @Houston 1992

    2000 Election and Florida
    PJB’s presence on the Florida ballot diverted enough many WPalm Beach votes that would have provided Gore with the margin of victory of Bush 43.

    I still don’t have a clear bead on whether that was good or bad.

    On the one hand the path history took, through Bush to Obama, i think it was good to have the disabusement of the “first black president”, to get the insanity of the “multicultural”–i.e. minoritarian–left in full flower, to start waking up white people, and, of course, get Trump as a result. This is more or less the “it had to get worse, to get better”.

    But, along the way Bush did some serious damage to the Republican brand. And Trump–while having tremendous gifts–is so random and ego centric, making himself the issue and a pale shadow of Buchanan in terms of getting to the heart of the issue–the hatred of our current elite for the actual American people. But on the other hand, we were never going to get Pat. And would another Buchanan like figure been able to emerge?

    The other path, with Gore in power for 911, and the minority-mortgage meltdown would have been clarifying politically as those were both the result of left/establishment/Democrat policies–and utopian stupidities. But would that have incubated a true nationalist-conservative political movement and candidates for 2008? It seems likely we would have been saddled with Mitt Romney’s centrist pablum, or worse John McCain!

    Overall right now, i’d have to say it looks like we took the wildler, more painful, but better path. But then whether electing Trump will turn out ot be a great boon, or a disaster–discrediting sane nationalism–for the nation remains unknown. I’m hopeful, but that’s about it.

    • Agree: snorlax
    • Replies: @snorlax
  80. L Woods says:
    @ATBOTL

    Boomers: is there any way in which they’re not terrible? (No).

  81. Anonymous[212] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Bangladeshi visa lottery winner Mohammad Achmed scams federal government out of $500,000 via food stamp fraud and uses proceeds to buy real estate and bring in more Bangladeshi immigrants !!!! He was sentenced to ONLY 9 MONTHS in prison by federal judge Avern Cohn who calls him a good person !!! The 3 other Bangladeshi defendants were sentenced to ONE DAY in prison !!!!!!!!

    That’s just a Cohencidence.

  82. OT – In Sheffield, Former England, with its Somali Lord Mayor, the Coalition Of The Fringes is a tad frayed.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/nov/03/roma-tire-shouldering-blame-boiling-pot-communities

    “Back in Page Hall after the fight at Fir Vale Academy, trouble was brewing. The authorities refused to answer questions about what had caused the fight, but multiple sources have told the Observer it began when a Roma girl pulled off the headscarf of a Yemeni classmate. It was not the first such incident: one father said he was called in to school at the start of term after his Year 7 daughter had her hijab “ripped off” by another Roma pupil.

    Sensing trouble, the school cancelled an open meeting to discuss the incident. So a Neighbourhood Watch meeting in nearby St Cuthbert’s church hall was hijacked instead. Angry Fir Vale parents – most Pakistanis, no Roma – shouted at a panel of wincing white council workers about “them”. Their new Roma neighbours. “David Blunkett was right!” yelled one man. “This is a ticking time bomb. If it goes off, you’re going to need the army.”

    They refused to see the hijab incident as an isolated scrap between teenage girls. “This is not just a school issue… This is ready to blow up. Bang,” warned one man. “We’ve lived here 35, 40 years and you expect us to sit silently,” said another, claiming that he had 60 cousins ready to provide back-up for what he said could be “a riot like you’ve never seen before in your life”. None of them wanted their names published.”

    I think I’ve read about those 60 cousins in other news reports from the area.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  83. Whitney says:

    I grew up with my mother telling me what a horrible bigoted racist terrible person Pat Buchanan was. And even though I know it is not true now intellectually it’s still hard for me to get past that early conditioning. The power of brainwashing is very strong

    “The fresh Cask long keeps its first Tang”. Horace

  84. snorlax says:
    @AnotherDad

    We know the negative effects, so here are the salutary effects of the Bush presidency:

    1) He was never able to get amnesty through Congress. Gore or Kerry might’ve. He also inadvertently did much to harden opposition to amnesty among GOP voters and congressmen, and to a lesser extent the general public.
    2) HUGE: He prevented a far-left SCOTUS majority after Rehnquist’s death. Replaced squish O’Connor with a solid conservative in Alito. Appointed mostly conservatives to lower courts instead of the far-leftists Dems would have.
    3) Permanently discredited neoconnery and the Bush family with the general public.
    4) As you say, indirectly elected Obama, who allowed and encouraged the left to drop its Clintonian fake moderation and show its true colors, and disabused Republican voters of any romantic notions of the First Black President. A FBP Colin Powell or Condi might’ve done a lot of damage. (Of course, so did Obama).
    5) Also as you say, indirectly elected Trump. Or arguably did; this one is pretty tenuous because it relied on a whole lot of random chance and lucky breaks.

  85. This may not be that rare an attribute among Sailer fans, but I have the otherwise rather statistically unusual trait of being able to say that I voted for Patrick J. Buchanan for President on two occasions (the 1996 California Republican primary, and the 2000 general election).

    There’s a new version of The McLaughlin Group that still includes Pat, available for streaming on YouTube. I watched the October 28th episode via Roku last night, and it was essentially indistinguishable from the original (other than for the fact that Tom Rogan is now the host, due to the 2016 death of John McLaughlin). I’m pretty sure my wife has a crush on Tom Rogan….

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  86. @countenance

    When I first heard of Buchanan, sometime in the 1970′s, I thought he was a native of St. Louis due to his first job.

  87. BB753 says:

    A great man and a great thinker!

  88. @Jim Given

    The 1960 JFK-Nixon debates were rerun for the first time in 1976 on PBS. Afterward, several journalists remarked that the debate was more “on the issues” than they remembered.

    Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford debated in 1976, the first debates between major party nominees since 1960. Most thought Kennedy and Nixon were more impressive than Carter and Ford.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  89. @unpc downunder

    It may be that PB was just before his time.

    And it remains to be seen how successful Trump is. Migrant flows to Italy are down 80% (though that’s not all Salvini, the previous govt did a Hail Mary deal with Libya too late to save themselves), migrant flows to the US are still at Obama levels.

    But PB was first in the breach – the place of honour.

  90. @Kevin O'Keeffe

    I wonder what happened. My parents had stopped watching it after it w as put behind a Paywall, but it’s back to free streaming again. Yeah! More Pat!

  91. @Reg Cæsar

    Grant Buchanan another tithe (eight years): time to read Rothbard, Mises, Hoppe, Block, Rockwell, Paul, and co., that he may be roused to a Weltanschauung of practicable freedom and prosperity.

  92. @Steve in Greensboro

    Wasn’t that a band – Dead Can Vote? Out of Chicago, maybe? I had to vote early this year, and that location has 90% black/block voting. It’s really scary to see that long line – came by that location the next day, and there was still a line out the door. Makes me feel that my vote wasn’t worth a bucket of warm spit.

  93. istevefan says:
    @ATBOTL

    I never understood why boomer white male conservatives didn’t embrace Pat. All the conservatives in my high school loved him. He was the only person in mainstream politics talking sense about immigration back in the 90′s. I got the sense at the time boomers didn’t like Pat raining on their imperialist parade.

    The boomer reaction to Pat and their failure to support immigration restrictionists in that era is something we need to talk about more.

    Pat’s Achilles heel was first and foremost his lack of support of Israel. He famously called Capitol Hill, “Israeli occupied territory.” I don’t think he was anti-Israel in the sense he wanted to see harm come to the Jewish state. He just wasn’t on board with the expected 110-percent level of support expected from mainstream politicians. He actually believed the two nations did not necessarily have the same interests.

    Secondarily he made many uncomfortable with his strict stance on social issues.

    That’s unfortunate because his two major issues back in 1992 were immigration and trade. He had been a free trader in the 1980s until he saw what it had wrought on middle America. Those two issues have basically been neglected until the arrival of Trump. Time will tell if that arrival was too late or not.

    Finally, enough with the boomer hate. Keep in mind not all boomers are like the cast of The Big Chill or Thirty-something. And the boomers did not pass the 1965 Immigration Act. The oldest boomers would have been 20 years old when that act passed. It was the so-called Greatest Generation and the remnants of the previous one that gave us that act. And the Greatest Generation were the parents of the boomers. In a lot of cases they did a crappy job of raising the boomers by letting them get away with crap their parents would not have permitted.

  94. @El Dato

    I’m still for the IQ test before a pen is handed out.

    There are no pens. Those things can trip up a lot of people. What are you, some kind of raciss, tryin’ a trip up peoples?

    • Replies: @Dtbb
  95. @ATBOTL

    The boomer reaction to Pat and their failure to support immigration restrictionists in that era is something we need to talk about more.

    Oh, no! Not the CONVERSATION! Anything else, please. Anything! Send me to Detroit!

    Yes, I think it was his lack of imperialist/neocon tendencies (and I imagine the tepid support for Israel per iSteveFan) that kept him from doing better. It’s not like there weren’t many who agreed, but the Lyin’ Press didn’t – that matters a lot. Before the internet, they could just shut you up almost completely with no coverage.

    • Replies: @Prester John
  96. “And the boomers did not pass the 1965 Immigration Act. The oldest boomers would have been 20 years old when that act passed. ”

    Indeed. And I would dare say that MOST boomers weren’t like the casts of “thirtysomething” and “The Big Chill”. A propos of the above, I was 18, just out of high school and about to enter college. With the wisdom of hindsight the Immigration Act turned out to be the camel’s nose under the tent. Only, nobody realized it at the time. The mid-Sixties was a time during which America was awash in Liberal Guilt. The Immigration Act was one several pieces of “we’re sorry–we’ll make it up to ya” legislation including the the Civil and Voting Rights Act–all thanks to the so-called “Greatest Generation”. Some wag –who turned out to be prescient–called the Immigration Act “Hitler’s Revenge.”

    What’s that old saying about the sins of the parents being visited upon the children?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  97. eah says:

    If anyone can say ‘I told you so’, I guess it’s him.

    OT

    ‘Homeland Security’ threat level: White.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Mr. Anon
    , @eah
  98. @Achmed E. Newman

    Especially the Israel thing. Bill Buckley summarily kicked him off the reservation. To Pat’s credit he never backed down, and his description of the US Congress as “Israeli Occupied Territory” remains a hoot even while it may call the feckless politicians within the Beltway as they grovel at the feet of, while taking money from, Israel (via their errand boys, AIPAC).

  99. Dtbb says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    They hand me a pen in order to vote every time here in Fl. now.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  100. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Mr. Anon

    My Somali reference was ignorant and poorly phrased; I am not an expert in Somalia, and will not defend its penguin farms or terrifying volcanoes. My point was that people forget that Democrats are the party of military intervention and perpetual deployment. There is no reason to believe that Gore would be some kind of peacenik.
    What is really interesting would be, who could we have put in power to catch the missing unexplained trillion-with-a-t dollars? And what’s frightening is, maybe we did.

  101. J.Ross says: • Website
    @eah

    Either we recognize it as hype (buoyed by freak one-offs) or we attack innocent people with the full wrath of the federal government. There is no army of Nazis patiently waiting in a rural cult compound for an FBI diversity hire to crack the code, and there never was.

  102. Mr. Anon says:
    @songbird

    Clinton (in private) used to refer to his scheduled meetings with Bob Dole (then Senate majority leader) as “Nazi-time”. Bob Dole – a man who was crippled for life while fighting the Germans in WWII. I can only hope that Dole referred to these meetings as “draft-dodger-rapist-time”.

  103. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Romanian

    >vox
    >jordan petersen
    >”the alt right”
    Not saying you’re a bad person, but how about you go catalog arctic waterfowl for a while?

    • Replies: @Romanian
  104. @Lot

    He wouldn’t have waited until September.

  105. Mr. Anon says:
    @David In TN

    Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford debated in 1976, the first debates between major party nominees since 1960. Most thought Kennedy and Nixon were more impressive than Carter and Ford.

    In 2012, C-SPAN ran some old debates. I saw part of the 1984 debate between Reagan and Mondale. It was how remarkable how intelligent it was, compared to what passes for debate today. The journalist moderators asked thoughtful questions, and both candidates spoke in complete sentences and made logically coherent points, mostly free from slogans and talking points. And they stood behind their respective podiums, rather than wandering around the stage in one of those stupid “town-hall” style travesties.

  106. Mr. Anon says:
    @eah

    It’s funny how the comments mostly seem to be hostile to the premise of the article.

  107. Lot says:
    @Anon

    Hillary’s single best ethnic group were Bangladashis at 90% to Trump’s 4%. Pakistani were a close second.

  108. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    I suspect Gush and Bore were completely fungible: the same people would have made either do what actually happened, albeit with different explanatory verbiage.

    Bill Clinton was a total load, though. If he actually felt the GOP stole the election (I don’t think they did only because the GOPe isn’t smart enough to pull it off on purpose) he should have resigned and let Gore have a footnote in the history books as a POTUS. But then he couldn’t have submarine pardoned the influential Talmudists he did , like Marc Rich, at least not as easily.

    The GOP raged and thundered, correctly, when that happened, but I suggested to whatever cuck Senator I ran into in Kansas that the GOP propose and start on a Constitutional amendment that would restrict the Presidential power of pardon to cease noon Friday before the Tuesday general election so pardons could be widely publicized and the full political price extracted. He looked at me like I crapped on the floor in front of him. I think it was Pat Roberts as I think of it. I met Brownback a couple of times too and I was equally unimpressed. To show what loads I thought both were I can’t even remember whether it was Brownback or Roberts I was talking to.

    Marc Rich (born Marcell David Reich; December 18, 1934 – June 26, 2013) was an international commodities trader, hedge fund manager, financier and businessman.[1] He was best known for founding the commodities company Glencore and for being indicted in the United States on federal charges of tax evasion and making controversial oil deals with Iran during the Iran hostage crisis. He was in Switzerland at the time of the indictment and never returned to the United States.[2] He received a presidential pardon from U.S. President Bill Clinton on January 20, 2001, Clinton’s last day in office.[3]

    Kansas tends to elect morons. It is the politically stupidest state in the Union, by far.

  109. @Prester John

    I am a Boomer and I though both “thirtysomething” and “The Big Chill” blew dead dogs. They were the first of David Brook’s BoBos.

  110. Bubba says:
    @Clifford Brown

    I was watching this live and cheering non-stop, great speech. After it the usual RINO’s came on TV and denounced Mr. Buchanan for a polarizing speech & then relegated him to the crazy attic wing.

    Lee Atwater had died the year earlier and there was no fire or passion in the Republican party (except for Pat Buchanan) for normal Americans.

    So much for the neocon Bush dynasty tripe – “a kindler, gentler America” that has given us 20+ million illegal immigrants and unending wars.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  111. @Anonymous

    What did the Deep State do to Perot?

    Messed with his daughter’s wedding. Or so he said.

  112. @Anonymous

    You can look up lots more than I can remember, Mr. #138, but in July of 1992, in the middle of the campaign, when he had a lot of support built up, Mr. Perot dropped out of the race. He told stories of his daughter’s wedding being threatened (by whom, I never heard), which sounds just kind of lame, but fishy. I think there were big threats of some kind, that Mr. Perot was too scared to even mention. That’s all just my opinion, the deep reason he dropped out. He rejoined the presidential race in October, not long before the election.

    Keep in mind that the internet, at least www, was not used by anybody yet, so all the information came from whatever the Lyin’ Press told us. I shouldn’t have counted this against the man, but I thought it was just that he was flaky. I doubt that now.

    • Replies: @snorlax
  113. slumber_j says:
    @unpc downunder

    Nice guy, good writer, but political failure.

    I suppose that’s right. Nevertheless, I always remember passages in Fear and Loathing On the Campaign Trail ’72 in which Hunter Thompson talks admiringly of Pat Buchanan, with whom he couldn’t have disagreed more politically. Affableness has its rewards.

    I googled it and didn’t find exactly what I was after but did come up with this, from an interview with HST on The Atlantic website, from 1997:

    A lot of times I recognize quality in the enemy. I have, from the very beginning, admired Pat Buchanan, who’s not even a writer. He knows how to use words. I read something the other day, and I totally disagreed with him. But you know, I was about to send him a note saying, “Good!”

    • Replies: @Anon87
  114. @Dtbb

    You should be glad if you have real ballots on paper, Dtbb. The computerized methods can be hacked very easily if you ask me. I don’t mean any specific method, but I can just see a module that contains the day’s worth of votes on one machine just being swapped out. The thing is, that if you suspect this after the fact, how can you prove anything?

    • Replies: @Dtbb
  115. @Anonymous

    I think it was Pat Roberts as I think of it.

    I doubt it. Your descriptions fits Jerry Moran (aka Admiral Akbar) much better.

    It is the politically stupidest state in the Union, by far.

    No, and only an idiot would think so.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  116. @istevefan

    the boomers did not pass the 1965 Immigration Act. The oldest boomers would have been 20 years old when that act passed. It was the so-called Greatest Generation and the remnants of the previous one that gave us that act. And the Greatest Generation were the parents of the boomers. In a lot of cases they did a crappy job of raising the boomers by letting them get away with crap their parents would not have permitted.

    True. But all parents want to smooth the path for their offspring, in order to help. Few understand how adversity benefits character development, even if they know how it helped them. Adversity is painful, and in the worst case, it will kill you.

  117. Mr. Anon says:
    @Bubba

    After it the usual RINO’s came on TV and denounced Mr. Buchanan for a polarizing speech & then relegated him to the crazy attic wing.

    I seem to recall seeing that tool, David Gargan, criticize Buchanan for his speech back in ’92.

    • Replies: @Bubba
  118. Mr. Anon says:
    @Lot

    Come to think of it, “no-talent ass-clown” is a pretty good descriptor for our NSC director.

  119. snorlax says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    He told stories of his daughter’s wedding being threatened (by whom, I never heard), which sounds just kind of lame, but fishy.

    Read the NYT article (non-paywall link) about it; it’s bonkers.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  120. Dtbb says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Paper ballot like a scantron. Computer reads it but paper copy is kept. No internet connection.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  121. I’m sorry, Snorlax, but I won’t click on the NY Times, money or no money. Could you answer a question or two instead? What do you mean by bonkers? Was the NY Times writer, the article itself, or are you saying Mr. Perot was, bonkers?

    • Replies: @snorlax
  122. Bubba says:
    @Mr. Anon

    And the execrable Kevin Phillips too. Gergen & Phillips were front men bought and paid for by the Democrats after their dalliances with the GOP.

    Both of those SOB drama queens left the GOP when it was jettisoning folks like Pat Buchanan and each wholeheartedly supported the liberal Dems when they had a serial rapist in the Oval Office and Ted Kennedy (a.k.a. – “The Stupidest Kennedy”, “Drunken Chappaquiddick Murderer”, “Let Me Show You How to Ruin a Lovely Woman’s Life Like Joan”, etc…”) was lynching Clarence Thomas.

  123. snorlax says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I’ll just copy and paste the article in full then. Probably all three.

    At a time when Ross Perot’s candidacy once again appeared to be transforming the Presidential contest, the Texas billionaire offered a new explanation today for his decision in July to abandon the campaign. He said he had withdrawn after hearing that President Bush’s campaign was scheming to smear his daughter with a computer-altered photograph and to disrupt her wedding.

    Mr. Perot offered no evidence, only quoting friends and an unidentified “top Republican.”

    “I can’t prove any of it today,” he said on tonight’s CBS News program “60 Minutes.” “But it was a risk I did not have to take,” he added, “and a risk I would not take where my daughter is concerned.”

    A spokesman for the President dismissed Mr. Perot’s assertions as “all loony.”

    The accusations of a series of “dirty tricks,” made on “60 Minutes,” in a newspaper interview and in two campaign appearances today, were in stark contrast to the reasons Mr. Perot gave when he withdrew on July 16, a move that engendered much criticism from his supporters.

    He bristled at the idea that many Americans were viewing him as “a quitter,” but the reasons he gave were that he thought the Democratic Party had been revitalized and that he did not want to force the contest to go to the House of Representatives.

    Mr. Perot has often spoken of threats to himself or his family and has embraced conspiracy theorists from both the far left and the far right wings of politics.

    In addition to the accusations about his daughter, Mr. Perot said in an interview with The Boston Herald that he had a videotape of a senior member of the Bush campaign, whom he did not identify, talking to a contract employee of the Central Intelligence Agency in Dallas. He did not say how he got the tape or if he knew what they were discussing. Mr. Perot accused the unidentified C.I.A. employee of being hired to tap into his computerized stock trading program to prevent him from having the money to revive his campaign.

    Marlin Fitzwater, the White House spokesman, told reporters in Billings, Mont.: “It’s all nonsense. There’s nothing to it. I don’t want to attack Perot, but I don’t know where he’s getting it from. I mean, fantastic stories about his daughter and disrupting her wedding and the C.I.A. — it’s all loony.”

    No matter whether any of Mr. Perot’s assertions are proved, they are bound to influence the final stretch of the Presidential campaign. With barely more than a week left, some analysts said the accusations could damage him by creating in the minds of voters a man who is forever imagining plots.

    But the accusations also seemed calculated to feed a perception, fueled by Democrats and earlier in the race by Mr. Perot, that Republicans will do anything to win the White House.

    Mr. Perot did not say today exactly how the Republicans sought to discredit his daughter, Carolyn, and disrupt her wedding. But in an interview last week, Suzanne McGee, another of Mr. Perot’s four daughters, said her father thought Republicans would mount a campaign asserting that Carolyn was a lesbian.

    “We were told that they were planning to destroy her wedding by spreading the story that she was a lesbian,” Ms. McGee said on a flight from Detroit to Lansing, Mich., for the last Presidential debate.

    “It wasn’t true, but they were going to do it anyway and put the story out in the news media to try to embarrass my dad,” she added.

    In his first campaign rallies in months, Mr. Perot today told supporters in New Jersey and Pittsburgh of his new explanation for departing the race.

    “I found myself in a situation where I had three reports that the Republican Party intend to publish a false photograph of my daughter, who was getting married on Aug. 23,” he told a rally in Flemington, N.J., “smear her before her wedding and actually disrupt the wedding ceremony.

    With roars of approval from his supporters, Mr. Perot declared that he did not want to ruin the wedding, saying, “This is one of the most important days of her life, and I love her too much to have her hurt.”

    The assertions marked a surprising turn that comes as polls showed over the weekend that Mr. Perot had gained ground with voters last week in the aftermath of the Presidential debates and amid his blitz of television advertising, although he was still well behind Mr. Clinton and Mr. Bush.

    Mr. Perot’s accusations were all the more unusual because many analysts had speculated that he withdrew from the race initially because of news reports saying he had employed private investigators to uncover information that could embarrass Mr. Bush and his family.

    In the interviews and in the appearances today, Mr. Perot described what sounded more like a shadowy underworld than a Presidential campaign.

    “I couldn’t believe that anyone representing the President of the United States would stoop to these lows,” he said on “60 Minutes,” referring to a purported scheme to wiretap his office.

    He said Republican plotters planned to alter a photograph of his daughter, Carolyn, using computer techniques to”put a head on another body,” and that this would be given to supermarket tabloids. He was not specific about what the photo would show.

    He told The Boston Herald that the plotters were “actually going to have people in the church to disrupt her wedding.” Mr. Perot did not say what the disruption would consist of, but he took no chances when the ceremony was actually held, in August. “We had to have extraordinary precautions at the wedding,” he told “60 Minutes.”

    Mr. Perot said that even after he left the race the Bush campaign cooked up a plan to install eavesdropping devices in his business office in Dallas. He said “a source” sent him “a floor plan, layout of my floor, and telephone numbers they wanted to tap.”

    Mr. Perot said he turned the material over to the law-enforcement authorities, who then asked him to make a tape recording of his own voice to use as bait for a trap.

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation confirmed in August that it was investigating accusations that someone had bugged Mr. Perot’s office telephone and then had offered the tapes to Mr. Bush’s campaign chairman in Texas. The Bush campaign chairman refused the tapes and notified the F.B.I., Federal officials said.

    A senior law-enforcement official said today that the bureau’s Dallas office investigated Mr. Perot’s accusations but came up with no evidence of wrongdoing. Officials also confirmed that Mr. Perot had been asked to make the tape.

    After he withdrew from the race, Mr. Perot said, he was scheduled to meet with the President, but when he let it be known through aides that he intended to confront Mr. Bush with his suspicions “of dirty tricks, the meeting was canceled.” Later, he did meet with James A. Baker 3d, Mr. Bush’s chief of staff, and laid out his accusations, Mr. Perot told The Herald.

    He suggested that the lack of direct White House denials at the time was suspicious. “I just find it fascinating,” he told the newspaper, “that neither George Bush nor Jim Baker would ever come back and say: ‘Perot, you’re crazy. We didn’t do this.’ ”

    The only source that Mr. Perot would identify for his accusations was Scott Barnes, a former Inglewood, Calif., police officer who for years has been accused of fabricating stories about undercover plots and dirty tricks.

    Mr. Perot said in the “60 Minutes” interview that Mr. Barnes was one of those who told him of the doctored photograph. Mr. Barnes had a dress shop in Prescott, Ariz., but it is now closed. He could not be reached today for comment.

    Mr. Perot said he would not have dropped out of the race if Mr. Barnes were his only source. Two “longtime friends” also talked to him “totally independently from Scott Barnes,” he said.

    Mr. Perot said that among the people he told of the dirty tricks at the time was James Squires, his press secretary. Mr. Squires said in a telephone interview this evening that the night before Mr. Perot dropped out, “he gave me six or seven reasons why he was going to quit the next day — this was one he asked me to not say anything about.”

    Mr. Squires said that while Mr. Perot told him of a doctored photograph, “I never did get the nature of the photograph.”

    While Mr. Perot refused to identify any Republicans behind the efforts, Mr. Perot said: “This is at the top. This was run at the top. You know, everybody up there panicked in May and June when I was leading everybody in the polls. And they went crazy and they lost their good sense, and they started doing things like this.”

    The Bush campaign dismissed the accusations today “With just 10 days to go before the election,” its statement said, “it is the height of irresponsibility for ’60 Minutes’ to air these unsubstantiated charges.”

    Margaret Tutwiler, a ranking aide to Mr. Baker, confirmed today that after Mr. Perot dropped out he had two meetings with Mr. Baker. During one meeting, she said, he raised the general subject of “Republican dirty tricks.”

    Ms. Tutwiler added: “There was no evidence presented. It was a conclusive type of statement. Baker thought it was far-fetched.”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  124. Dan Hayes says:
    @snorlax

    snorlax:

    Scuttlebuck at the time was that Perot had a nervous breakdown. Not inconsistent with the NYT report.

  125. eah says:
    @eah

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  126. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    It is the politically stupidest state in the Union, by far.

    No, and only an idiot would think so.

    Kansas is very stupid in the sense that it does not effectively get the value of what electoral votes and representation it has. Iowa, by contrast, is supremely effective. Small as it is it wields a lot of power. Consider ethanol, a monumentally stupid and cost-ineffective fuel program. The whole country is saddled with it and it is not going away even though much better ideas can get zero traction. It benefits corn farmers and BNSF and no one else.

    Remember when Beech, Cessna and the rest of the GA industry could not make light airplanes because pwoduct wiability? It took Kansas nearly ten years to get the milquetoast General Aviation Revitalization Act put through. The unions, UAW and Teamsters were nominally in favor of it but weren’t going to burn any political capital against the trial lawyers because Kansas is a scab state. Kansas has many pro-employer, anti-employee labor laws, decent business taxation, still doesn’t attract many desirable businesses because nobody high up wants to live in Kansas. Kansas would be smarter to vote 50/50, or at least 51/49, instead of giving its vote away to the GOPe the way Negroes give theirs to the Dems.

    If you’re in Kansas, it’s because you are doing something where its central location and legacy railroad right of way nexus( and hence telecom, see Sprint) form a strong business case for it. Might as well get something out of it.

    And only an idiot would not realize that Jerry Moran, despite being indeed “Admiral Ackbar” , was not in the Senate until much later.

  127. Several things about PB from a liberal point of view:

    1. PB has a reputation as being a likeable guy. There are stories if younger liberals who appeared on TV shows with him being quite fond of him. He apparently has an avuncular way of dealing with people.

    2. Related to his affability, he worked with people on the left on certain issues. He and Ralph Nader had a close working relationship on trade issues, etc. to the point where Nader was calling for a left-right coalition, which Pat endorsed. That says a lot, since Nader has a reputation for being rather thin-skinned at best.

    3. As others have mentioned, the very liberal Hunter Thompson had a great deal of respect for Pat B based on respect for his ability.

    4. Yes, many liberals did NOT like him at all, calling him a fascist or even a Nazi. Some of this was based on his 1992 GOP Convention speech which many people found rather authoritarian and frightening, with talk of standing down rioters with guns.

    As for myself, I have read a lot of his stuff. Pat B strikes me as being far more socially conservative than myself, but far from a fascist. Although he and I disagree about many issues, we agree on some. We are both patriots with a deep concern for the common man. As far as other Republicans go, I would’ve preferred him over the Bushes or Trump.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Anon87
  128. Romanian says: • Website
    @J.Ross

    Heh? Was that a dig at me? I just supplied the off-topic that the voxers approached the topic and I had not seen the link elsewhere around here.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  129. Romanian says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Leaving aside the author’s biases and references which I do not get like the Muriel Spark thing (thank you for that), my problem is that the article is so damn long, as are many article in the mainstream media. And this one is nothing compared to some of the doozies at the NYT. It’s like they’re trying to attrition our attention spans.

  130. @Steve Sailer

    In New Jersey it is literally impossible to vote for more candidates than offices because of electronic voting. For all of the Chicken Little I hear about it, it has made administering elections much more simple.

  131. @snorlax

    Thanks, Snorlax, and that jibes with whatever I do remember about the summer of 1992 in politics. I’ll believe a hard-working CEO of an electronics (HARDWARE) company over the Lyin’ Press of even 1992. Who say’s that Mr. Perot was able to safely tell the true story? He is/was a good man, from everything I knew about him.

    BTW, just about that campaign, I did a little bit to support the Paul Tsongas campaign – yep he had a D by his name, but the guy was talking about how important manufacturing was to the country’s economy. This was 1992, mind you. Not much at K-mart and Target said “Made in China” yet. Once Bill Clinton won the S Carolina primary in the spring, that kind of knocked him and a few others out of the race pretty quickly. Manufacturing took the biggest hit from that sleazebag, but it took a while to feel the effects. That’s where we stand today.

    • Replies: @snorlax
  132. @eah

    Yeah, there’s a lot of apps I’d like to have or make, but if I give any hints, I’ll get whimmed again.

  133. @Paleo Liberal

    As far as other Republicans go, I would’ve preferred him over the Bushes or Trump.

    I don’t agree with all you write here, P.L. cough, Socialism, cough, cough, but not only do I agree with this one, I’d bet 25,000 Schrute Bucks that 80% of the commenters here would agree with you.

    (If Trump really did what he’s promised, then I’d have to put more thought into that statement. As it stands now, I can see that Trump talks the talk, but doesn’t walk the walk much. Mr. Buchanan has so much experience along with his policy goals and wisdom, that he could devise a strategy to get lots more done than Trump has.)

  134. @Dtbb

    Paper ballot like a scantron.

    Yeah, OK, I still thought those were done by punching out chads – you do remember chads, I’m sure! (If nothing else from TV all of the holiday season of 2000) I didn’t get the pen requirement, with the exception of signing your name, as I had thought that most used pencil to allow changes. However that would indeed allow for some more hanky-panky, but it’d be very visible between your marking it and the scanner machine.

    Having a copy of each vote that some group of auditing voters or UN commission (haha, it’s getting about that way!) could see with their eyes is the key. With a secret ballot, along with electronics, not much is provable after the face. It’s scary what can be done.

  135. Anon87 says:
    @slumber_j

    HST and Pat could also have friendly chats over the NFL. Today Hunter would be nagged on social media into “disavowing” and even acknowledging Pat exists.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  136. Anon87 says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    We should all strive to have as much class as Pat does.

    “There’s no need to take my word about Buchanan’s decency. When Buchanan was fired by MSNBC for an earlier transgression against political correctness, Andrew Sullivan, who had often sparred with Buchanan, wrote that Buchanan is “a compassionate and decent man in private and an honest intellectual in public.” Sullivan told his readers that he was “moved beyond words” when Buchanan sent him a hand-written note assuring him of his prayers after Sullivan had been diagnosed with AIDS. As Sullivan noted, at the time a diagnosis of AIDS was seen as a death sentence, and only one other Washington figure bothered to extend to Sullivan the type of sentiment Buchanan did. It is not hard to find tributes to Buchanan’s decency from political opponents, if one is inclined to look for them.”

  137. @YetAnotherAnon

    Shades of that O’Henry story where a girl brings an Italian date to an Irish dance and almost causes a riot.

    Contrary to the cuddly steerage scenes in Titanic, immigrants from different groups frequently detest each other.

  138. @Anonymous

    All Fascist movements need their Jew/Black/Capitalist/Communist so the members will know how they are not to define themselves. In the case of Miss Brodie, that role is involuntarily filled by Mary MacGregor, a girl with intelligence so limited it may actually qualify as a disability. Miss Brodie blames everything on Mary, even if other girls have been doing the same things, and treats her with open contempt that encourages the other girls to bully her too–to an extent that Sandy feels guilty if she does not bully her.

    Her type is not unusual among Education majors, unfortunately. These days, however, it might not be the slow student who gets the treatment: it might be the bright student who corrects the teacher, the kid with known Conservative parents, or just a kid who’s viewed as “privileged.”

    NR’s Jonah Goldberg popularized (if not coined) the term “Liberal Fascism,” and you will find plenty of that type in our school system. Kids may not learn how to do their taxes or compute tax or tips on a check; they may not learn how to write a correct sentence. But by golly, they’ll either know how to feel superior to other people or how to feel guilty because of their supposed “privilege.”

  139. @Lot

    We would have been better with Buchanan.

    The Democrat foreign policy of regime change via delegitimization, economic sanctions, proxy war and air war is a catastrophic failure.

    It wastes American taxpayer money and squanders American export opportunities, costing American jobs.

    It benefits our real enemies, radical Sunni jihadists such as Al-Qaeda.

    It creates chaos, which in turn provides a pretext for mass migration, causes the ethnic cleansing of the world’s oldest Christian communities from the region where Christianity originated, and causes humanitarian disasters which are unjustly blamed on the American people, who have in reality lost control of their own foreign policy.

  140. Anon87 says:

    Pat’s birthday is pointed out on the latest McLaughlin Group (free on YouTube), and Clarence Page admits his wife is an uberliberal but still can’t help liking Pat.

    Without Pat creating The American Conservative, I may not have never heard of Mr. Sailer. So another thing to be thankful for him having 80 great years on earth. If he retains his pugnacious spirit I hope he’s around for as many more as possible. I’m pretty sure we will never have to suffer a “strange new respect” phase of his career either, for which I am extremely thankful.

  141. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Romanian

    Well then, it is worth noting that United Nations project contributor and New York Times designated Permitted Dissident Jordan Petersen was able to get airtime from an establishment-aligned media organ.

    • Replies: @Romanian
  142. Dave B. says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    He’s talking about the Butterfly Ballot.

  143. @MEH 0910

    This was blown up to the point of being fake news. Many of those “extra” Buchanan votes could easily have come from those intending to vote for Bush. The Buchanan circle is clearly on the extention of the line between them.

    So, as with the Nader vote, it probably worked against Gore, but nowhere nearly to the extent of throwing the election.

    One advantage Bush did have is that only one candidate sat across from his rectangle, while Gore was faced with two. How many Gore voters chose McReynolds instead? I don’t remember hearing that name at all in 2000.

  144. @Houston 1992

    “Does Trump’s rise, Pat’s political heir’s rise, refute Enoch Powell’s paradigm that all political careers end in failure?”

    Maybe, but there have always been exceptions to that rule, like Eisenhower (as Pat would be the first to tell you) and Reagan to name just two. Maybe FDR would count as another (unfortunately)?

    But yes, Buchanan is amazing. I’ll never forget seeing him on some MSNBC panel one evening way back in December 2001 discussing mass immigration and him saying articulately and with passion to his co-panelist (maybe it was Larry Kudlow, or another of those financial/money/economy-centered people) that a country was a national home, that it was more than just a matter of what was best for GDP.

    He was a pioneer in bringing this viewpoint to a platform of some prominence.

  145. @Anon87

    One time President Nixon chose Hunter Thompson out of all the reporters to share a ride with. They spent the entire ride talking football. According to HT, Nixon really knew football well.

    As far as whether Thompson would be pressured to disavow Pat B, well, Thompson marched to his own drummer. He wouldn’t ever do anything because of pressure.

    Just suffice it to say I was a huge fan of HT, although the drugs did get to him after a while. Contrast his brilliant writing about Hell’s Angels with his drug addled drivel in Fear and Loathing in Los Vegas

    • Replies: @Marty
  146. @BenKenobi

    Now who’s being naive?

    Juanita.

  147. Marty says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    What percentage of what HST wrote was true? After all, he once wrote that he “split a cap of black acid with John Chancellor” in the crow’s nest of the Queen Mary. My guess is Nixon didn’t know dick about football.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  148. Romanian says: • Website
    @J.Ross

    I thought he was a gateway to other forms of crimethink. You are thinking that he is a pressure valve and that is why he is given a wider berth than the truly subversive types, who are only ever attacked? Vox and outlets like it need to at least address their issues with the appearance of evenhandedness before reassuring their audience as to the continued validity of the narrative, but that does not mean that Petersen is controlled opposition. Rather a crack in the Overton window that they cannot ignore.

  149. @Marty

    Nixon was a very big football fan.

    In fact, he would even send in plays for Redskins practices. Nixon and George Allen were longtime friends, and Nixon would attend practices as well as games.

    Legend has it Nixon called in a play during a playoff game, with disastrous results. Billy Kilmer says it happened. George Allen’s son says it never happened. In any case, the Redskins lost the game.

  150. snorlax says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I don’t think Perot’s story was true (or made any sense), but I wouldn’t be surprised if the Bush people pulled a Nixonian dirty trick on him to make him think it was true.

    Tsongas was one of the last good Dems. The 1992 election feels like one of the biggest missed opportunities—out of all the people who had a shot to win it, we got by far the worst.

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