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In Slate, a 5,000 world article by a black woman with dyed blonde hair about how anti-whiteness white lady Robin DiAngelo may claim to be anti-white but she is really just a huge Becky:

What’s Missing From “White Fragility”


Robin DiAngelo’s idea changed how white progressives talk about themselves—and little else.

By LAUREN MICHELE JACKSON

SEPT 04, 20198:00 PM

Robin DiAngelo knows how to work a crowd. The author of White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism is confident without crowing, rehearsed yet sensitive to the audience at hand, funny and smirking and cajoling. “Seeing the Racial Waters,” DiAngelo’s touring half-day workshop, promises to “explore topics including white socialization, systemic racism, white solidarity, the specific ways racism manifests for white progressives, safety versus comfort, [and] the politics of emotions.” She would, she warned us, “say the word white … about 100 times” in a span of three and a half hours—a joke and a pledge. “You’re all gonna be fine,” she said. We laughed. The work had officially begun.

… The audience demographics were about as expected for an event on racial literacy: some black women besides myself, some other women of color, some men of color, a few white men, and a huge number of white women, in a range of ages and haircuts. …

Virality led to a book contract, and White Fragility has yet to leave the New York Times bestseller list since its debut in June 2018, making it the fastest-selling book in the history of Beacon Press (our shared publisher). …

Pulling out the paperback in public, I soon realized, was an invitation for comment. “Love that book,” a white hairstylist told me, passing by as I sat under the dryer. The colorist, black, later asked me what I thought of it. …

Note: Lauren Michele Jackson’s colorist issued a statement to the press: “Don’t blame me, she made me do it! Lauren told me, “If I have only one life to live, I want to live it as a blonde. BLONDE ME NOW!'”

“White progressives,” as DiAngelo calls them in her book, are also the group most responsible for the social exhaustion that people of color experience on a daily basis. They are the hair touchers, the “you go, girlfriend!” cheerleaders, the “not even water?” inquirers, the “this is not my America” mourners.

Lauren Michele Jackson is the author of the soon-to-be-released hair-intensive book:

White Negroes: When Cornrows Were in Vogue … and Other Thoughts on Cultural Appropriation.

Judging from its publicity material, this sounds like an iSteve parody come to life on my theme that post-2008 what black activists want is to collect a monthly intellectual property royalty check for blackness:

Exposes the new generation of whiteness thriving at the expense and borrowed ingenuity of black people–and explores how this intensifies racial inequality.

American culture loves blackness. From music and fashion to activism and language, black culture constantly achieves worldwide influence. Yet, when it comes to who is allowed to thrive from black hipness, the pioneers are usually left behind as black aesthetics are converted into mainstream success–and white profit.

Weaving together narrative, scholarship, and critique, Lauren Michele Jackson reveals why cultural appropriation–something that’s become embedded in our daily lives–deserves serious attention. It is a blueprint for taking wealth and power, and ultimately exacerbates the economic, political, and social inequity that persists in America. She unravels the racial contradictions lurking behind American culture as we know it–from shapeshifting celebrities and memes gone viral to brazen poets, loveable potheads, and faulty political leaders.

An audacious debut, White Negroes brilliantly summons a re-interrogation of Norman Mailer’s infamous 1957 essay of a similar name. It also introduces a bold new voice in Jackson. Piercing, curious, and bursting with pop cultural touchstones, White Negroes is a dispatch in awe of black creativity everywhere and an urgent call for our thoughtful consumption.

I can understand this urge.

I presume that Holland-Dozier-Holland get checks for the Motown songs they wrote in the 1960s like “Heat Wave,” “Where Did Our Love Go?,” “Stop! In the Name of Love,” “Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch;” and “Band of Gold.”

Or how about Whitfield-Strong? “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” (OK, Whitfield and one of the Hollands), “I Heard It Through the Grapevine”, “War”, “Ball of Confusion (That’s What the World Is Today)“, “Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)”, and “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone”.

But were they individual geniuses or were they getting rewarded for their race’s knack for rhythm and blues? Why should some blacks make tons of money for Being Black while most blacks don’t?

Of course, it’s never quite phrased like this because, obviously, the total amount of money that can be looted from the Temptations is less that that that can be looted from the Rolling Stones, much less from Apple or Exxon.

Similarly, I’m as white as Page and Brin so why didn’t I get a check from their patent upon “Method for node ranking in a linked database“?

 
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  1. Does the hair touching alert sound like this?
    HOOOONKY! HOOOONKY!HOOOONKY!

    • LOL: Kyle
  2. The audience demographics were about as expected for an event on racial literacy: some black women besides myself, some other women of color, some men of color, a few white men, and a huge number of white women, in a range of ages and haircuts.

    LOL.

    “White progressives,” as DiAngelo calls them in her book, are also the group most responsible for the social exhaustion that people of color experience on a daily basis.

    Exhausting! Socially!

  3. lanskrim says:

    a huge number of white women, in a range of ages and haircuts

    LOL

  4. RobUK says:

    social exhaustion

    Soon to be a medical diagnosis and then a valid reason for a disability pension for life.

    • Agree: bomag
  5. the “not even water?” inquirers

    I feel like knowing what this is about will only increase my disgust, but I’ll ask anyhoo.

  6. Danindc says:

    Good for Ms. Jackson. Who the F this white bitch think she is horning in on her grievance racket??

    • Replies: @guest
  7. ‘White Fragility’ has yet to leave the New York Times bestseller list since its debut in June 2018, making it the fastest-selling book in the history of Beacon Press

    Quoted because many people here like to entertain the notion that we’re just about to turn the corner and regain control of the cultural narrative, any day now.

    The NYT is in its second or third reprinting of the special ‘1619’ issue of the Magazine. They keep selling out.

    ETA: Aww crap, it’s sold out again. Whatever will we do?
    https://store.nytimes.com/products/the-1619-project

    • Agree: SunBakedSuburb
    • Replies: @Forbes
    , @International Jew
  8. Danindc says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    Not sure but I would guess to clean their hair they don’t even use water…

  9. El Dato says:

    OT: Don’t put your dick into unstable women, especially if you have a bad case of White Male Fragility (WMF).

    ‘Adorkable’ or rapist? Uncovered documents challenge Zoe Quinn’s abuse story (but #MeToo won’t care)

    Practically the mugshot of platonic crazy.

    • Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager
  10. Wow, Don King in drag.

    Well, King looked better and Happier as a man.

  11. El Dato says:

    Pulling out the paperback in public, I soon realized, was an invitation for comment. “Love that book,” a white hairstylist told me, passing by as I sat under the dryer. The colorist, black, later asked me what I thought of it.

    Proletariat power selling!

    Virality led to a book contract, and White Fragility has yet to leave the New York Times bestseller list since its debut in June 2018

    Sells like Tupperware!

    “White progressives,” as DiAngelo calls them in her book, are also the group most responsible for the social exhaustion that people of color experience on a daily basis.

    I can see it now…

    The hallway smelt of boiled cabbage and old rag mats. At one end of it a coloured poster, too large for indoor display, had been tacked to the wall. It depicted simply an enormous face, more than a metre wide: the face of a white progressive of about forty-five, wide-eyed, rendered bony and haggard by the daily stress of world improvement, with colored hair, what they used to call “problem glasses” and a nose ring. Winston made for the stairs. It was no use trying the lift. Even at the best of times it was seldom working, and at present the electric current was cut off during daylight hours. It was part of the economy drive in preparation for New Green Deal Week. The flat was seven flights up, and Winston, who was thirty-nine and had a varicose ulcer above his right ankle, went slowly, resting several times on the way. On each landing, opposite the lift-shaft, the poster with the enormous face gazed from the wall. It was one of those pictures which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG SISTER IS TOUCHING YOUR HAIR, the caption beneath it ran.

    • LOL: bomag, RobUK
    • Replies: @Kylie
  12. El Dato says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    I have just come up with the movie Halal Gurls – Not Even Water”

    When Mouna misses ‘suhoor’ (morning meal) during Ramadan, her limits are tested when she’s tasked with buying a new outfit to meet Tarek’s parents and comes up against a gossiping group of Hijabis while absolutely starving.

  13. RobUK says:

    This is what happens when women dominate the media – long, rambling bitch-fights over utter trivia.

    • Agree: William Badwhite
    • Replies: @Kylie
  14. guest says:

    Does “social exhaustion” stand for not having actual exhaustion but wanting to pretend you do? Or are black folk the sort of pissy-pants who think “hell is other people?”

    “This is not my America” is never said by a white progressive except in reference to things black women also hate (or pretend to) like Trump.

    If they ask to touch black hair, I’ll eat my hat. In fact, if black people are getting asked for a hair-touch “on the regular,” either they’re in some third-world country where no one ever saw a black or they’re lying.

    I neither know nor care about the water thing.

    • Replies: @bomag
  15. guest says:
    @Danindc

    She isn’t, really. This is reverse-grievance at best. The problem is simply that there’s only so much money, fame, and power in the White Man Bad game, and if you’re not lucky enough to write a bestseller ya gots ta kick the supports out from under those above.

    • Replies: @Danindc
    , @Paleo Liberal
  16. NickG says:

    Lauren Michele Jackson would appear to have culturally appropriated her hair colour.

    The style appears inspired by van der graaf

  17. Robin can’t hold a candle to Kathleen Belew for whiteness, or for selling whites out:

    https://history.uchicago.edu/directory/kathleen-belew

    But Robin beats her on anagrams:

    Kathleen Belew =

    A week hellbent.
    Blew ‘neath keel.
    Waken the belle.

    Robin DiAngelo =

    Doable ironing.
    Ignored albino.
    Booing Ireland.

    Roil in bondage.
    Oil, gin on beard.
    A blonde origin.

    Go braid online!

  18. guest says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    The only thing I can think of is Muslim fasting during Ramadan, but that’s obviously a Muslim thing not a black thing. And there are white Muslims.

    Apparently Muslims don’t like to explain that they abstain from water (which I don’t really believe anyway). Which, you know, it’s a basic human need. Right below breathing and close to sleep. If you want everyone to understand you could go live in a Muslim country.

  19. Kronos says:

    Looks like Jackson is going for that Cornel West (God blew on Moses’s hair blow dry) look.

    Maybe she’s trying to make her head (and thus cranium/intelligence) look bigger? I’ve seen West perform at my University (it was free extra credit) and he is one hell of a performer.

  20. Amourski says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    I believe it’s a reference to fasting during Ramadan.

  21. I assumed this Kennedy was black. But the picture at bottom suggests naturally straight hair.

    ‘We Charge Genocide’: Still, no justice

    How can we get the U.N. to declare our continued occupation of Puerto Rico to be genocide?

    • Replies: @bomag
  22. anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:

    I saw some hair-touching paranoia in the wild recently.

    group of people outside a bar (all of whom were pretty drunk) and a white woman sitting with two other white women shouted to a black woman several yards away that she loved her hair.
    “Alright fine. Go ahead and touch it.” And she marched over to the sitting white women and shoved her hair in their faces while the original giver of the compliment stuttered in bemusement.

    What are the chances the black woman has been bitching about those women demanding to touch her hair ever since?

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
  23. @Reg Cæsar

    Women need to be locked in cages.

    Is there a SINGLE boomercon who understands the woman question? They’re just as bad on this as they are on the JQ.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  24. eugyppius says:

    As we type, this paragon of academic achievement is teaching English 366 at Northwestern, where she is a “College Fellow” (this apparently means she offers a single course and gets to claim academic affiliation on her publicity materials). I quote the description (from https://www.english.northwestern.edu/courses/2019-2020/course-descriptions):

    This course introduces and investigates the matter of black feeling. Does blackness have a feeling? What emotional baggage accompanies racial difference? How do emotions inform, distort, and even precede our notions of race and culture? And how do all types of feelings, personal and public, shape or interrogate the project of racial representation? Drawing together seminal and lesser-known works in African American literature with secondary texts from affect theory, black studies, postcolonial theory, and Afro-pessimism, we will explore the messy entwinement of blackness and emotion and identify how this entwinement is variously represented across the African American literary tradition.

    One is happy to read that”Afro-pessimism” is a thing. I have not been reading Unz very long but I feel at home here among what seem to be many fellow Afro-pessimists.

    The blonde finger-in-light-socket look is for the media and says “social activism”. Her faculty profile pic (not sure if linking that would count as doxxing but it is easily found) is rather more staid, according to the “minority paragon of wisdom” aesthetic. She advertises academic talks with the same picture (i.e. https://www.semcoop.com/event/lauren-michele-jackson-white-negroes).

    All social justice talks from minorities on all campuses everywhere have to feature the Minority Paragon of Wisdom portrait (or the slightly more aggressive variant: Minority Scholar Perceiving Injustice portrait). At my old school I clandestinely collected all posters after this model. I had the idea of developing a parodic typology and starting a blog chronicle, but there are only so many hours in a day and the material was honestly overwhelming.

    • Replies: @guest
  25. bomag says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Robin can’t hold a candle to Kathleen Belew for whiteness, or for selling whites out

    That reads like a parody:

    Her award-winning teaching centers on the broad themes of conservatism, race, gender, violence, identity, and the meaning of war.

    LOL. All the bases covered.

    She earned her AB in the comparative history of ideas from the University of Washington in 2005, where she was named Dean’s Medalist in the Humanities.

    I wondered if she reflected on this idea.

  26. Ano says:

    …white women, in a range of ….haircuts. …

    I can just picture Ms Jackson at the workshop, glowering with resentful envy as her narrowed eyes rake over the audience of good-haired nice white ladies- especially the natural blondes.

    Plus, I can’t help picturing all the cats left home alone whenever Ms DiAngelo’s workshop is in town.

  27. bomag says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    We Charge Genocide…

    …all with inarguable evidence

    So there.

    Let me recast this 1951 document for today’s world:

    [genocide is] “the deliberate intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial, or religious group,” and concludes that “the oppressed White citizens of the United States, segregated, discriminated against, and long the target of violence, suffer from genocide as the result of the consistent, conscious, unified policies of every branch of government.

  28. black sea says:

    In the future, everyone will be audacious for fifteen minutes.

  29. TTSSYF says:

    There’s simply no appeasing a large subset (majority?) of these people. I think the best approach is to avoid them completely to the extent possible (it’s why I chose the profession I did) and, when given the opportunity, refuse to grant them, and their white liberal enablers, with the honor of any conversation other than “hello,”, “thank you”, or “have a nice day.”

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  30. It all started when Barack Obama said, “You didn’t build that!”

  31. Steve, why would you put up photos of these two authors?

    Now how am I supposed to contribute???

  32. bomag says:
    @guest

    Does “social exhaustion” stand for not having actual exhaustion but wanting to pretend you do?

    Almost all the grievance industry runs on lies.

  33. Arclight says:

    I think a lot of this is people like Lauren Michelle Jackson are picking up on the fact that white progressives find black people interesting in the same way exotic animals at the zoo are – fun to look at and learn about at a distance, but you don’t really want them in your backyard.

  34. Danindc says:
    @guest

    Aren’t they competing for the limited $$/attention of idiot progressives? They’re both Grievance industry authors, no?

    • Replies: @guest
  35. grovelers will never be respected.

  36. @bomag

    In the long run…we are all dead…..

    However, the Democratic Party with all its talk about Trump being Putin’s bitch has brought us closer to 12 am…precisely one second to midnight-on the Doomsday Clock….Seriously, how easy would it be to destroy Kathleen Belew in a debate…After destroying her in a debate…I would top it off with:”Enjoy your career as a future Cat Lady….you should talk to Robin DeAngelo for advice on a career as a White childless cat lady…or will the Democratic Party’s dream of nuclear war with Christian Russia come first….”

  37. Forbes says:
    @Mr McKenna

    I just finished reading “Debunking Howard Zinn” by Mary Grabar. The NYT’s 1619 project looks to be taken straight from Zinn’s narrative propaganda of colonialism/imperialism/racism/slavery for US history.

  38. peterike says:

    From Ms. DiAngelo’s “About Me”:

    “I grew up poor and white.”

    Then we see Jackson’s reference to “DiAngelo’s touring half-day workshop.” A workshop! What does THAT cost? Well her San Francisco workshop cost:

    SLIDING SCALE $ 130-160, $65 for youth (21 and under)

    But that’s not all her take. Some of it apparently goes to scholarships and LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS THAT SUPPORT COMMUNITIES OF COLOR (their caps).

    So goodie for her, she managed to turn her “poor and white” background into a dead-easy grifting racket. And she has perfected her academic nonsense speech:

    “I have gained deeper insight by placing race in the center of my analysis and asking how each of my other group locations have socialized me to collude with racism. In so doing, I have been able to address in greater depth my multiple locations and how they function together to hold racism in place.”

    Short version: sure, I’ll sell out my own people for bank and laudatory attention from the media. Wouldn’t you?

    Meanwhile, Ms. Jackson is driven by — what else? — envy:

    “Virality led to a book contract, and White Fragility has yet to leave the New York Times bestseller list since its debut in June 2018, making it the fastest-selling book in the history of Beacon Press (our shared publisher).”

    Ahhh you see? They both have the same publisher, but that damn BECKY has a best-seller while my book languishes in racist-driven obscurity!!

    Amazon ranking for Ms. Becky DiAngelo’s book: #146
    Amazon ranking for Ms. Jackson’s book: #452,887

    You see the difference there? Do you know the difference between 452,887 and 146? The difference is RACISM.

    Bottom line, for all the professional SJW types, it’s all just a big grift, and money envy is a huge driver of these little internecine feuds. To say nothing of the fact that DiAngelo is kinda cute and Jackson is just plain unattractive.

    There are lots of articles and videos on DiAngelo’s web site, but I don’t have the time. Knock yourselves out:

    https://robindiangelo.com/

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  39. guest says:
    @eugyppius

    Always catching my feelings interrogating projects. And I’m like, “Hey, did you read the projects their rights? You’re always getting carried away, feelings.”

  40. EdwardM says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    A black woman “novelist” plopping down with her laptop at a four-person table at Starbucks and not buying anything?

  41. fish says:

    I think a lot of this is people like Lauren Michelle Jackson are picking up on the fact that white progressives find black people interesting in the same way exotic animals at the zoo are – fun to look at and learn about at a distance, but you don’t really want them in your backyard.

    ….pretty much!

    The exotic animals complain quite a lot less!

  42. J.Ross says:

    Look at the photos and the blacker woman is the one who has made herself whiter.

  43. Schadenfreude wells within me whenever these cultural Marxists cannibalize each other. The black blonde bombshell of course lacks the ability to think in the abstract when using the term “social exhaustion”. In non-black reality, social exhaustion is what blacks inflict upon everyone else.

  44. @bomag

    I bet goodwhitebecky Kathleen Belew is a childless “dog-mom.”

  45. @Arclight

    White progressives find virtue in sacralizing blacks. Their game is obvious by now.

  46. Anonymous[172] • Disclaimer says:

    Forget blacks having any real agency. With them folks, urgency overrules agency. They are slaves(albeit masterful ones) to their base instincts, desires, and egotism. Their junglomaniacal emotions override any potential for reason and reflection. When urgency rules, agency takes the backseat.

  47. Spangel says:
    @Arclight

    That might be the case for some people, and I don’t blame them for being irritated. But Lauren Michele Jackson’s frequent pictures in blonde hair suggests that the entirety of her wholeness is based on an extreme and visceral envy of white womens hair.

  48. J.Ross says:
    @TTSSYF

    My second named law is that, as a result of generations of dishonest intertribal relations, grievances from certain people are not really grievances but negotiation skirmishing, and they can be ignored without moral hazard. It’s not racism or callousness, it’s more like rolling your eyes at a guy who insists that his member is impressively large. It’s not even unfriendly: they might feel compelled to come back with a better offer.
    If we could see the past of African Tribe A and African Tribe B, we would see them bickering about who killed more of who at the Battle of C, and each would logically conclude that, given the compelling and relevant mythohistorical massacre, the speaker was owed goods or privileges by the listener. But we would also see that neither was really going to pick up a spear any time soon, that neither particularly expected to be believed, and we would hear other negotiations resorted to until there was a temporary solution.
    This constant whining is how they talk to each other, they have grown immune to it, and then they happened upon us, who are dumb enough to take them seriously.

    • Agree: TTSSYF
  49. J.Ross says:
    @anonymous2space

    Based and jokerpilled my fellow normal American teenaged person such as myself. By the way, would you like to discuss synagogue shooting plans and illegal rifle modifications? As a normal American teenaged (and, in no way, federal) person, such as yourself, I find that discussing synagogue shooting plans and illegal rifle modifications with folks online (who are in no way federal) is very relaxing. You are assured that the full complement of your peer group is already doing it, so why not join along? I will tell you plenty of plans and mods.
    You go first.

  50. nymom says:

    Well if you are going to look at it from that perspective what about sports millionaires????

    Shouldn’t they be forced to share their earnings with the wider black community as well…

    After all it takes a village!

  51. @Mr McKenna

    Probably being sold to schools and libraries.

  52. @anonymous

    I saw a black woman in line at the checkout. She had a baby in a carriage. Behind her,a white woman made a great show of being impressed by how incredibly cute that baby was. I found the performance well done and very amusing.

  53. tyrone says:

    I’ve never known anybody that wanted to touch that stuff ……maybe the Brahmins have a point

  54. Ian Smith says:
    @Arclight

    This!

    I’ve never witnessed hair touching, but I have noticed that naive liberal white women love to compliment black women on their hair. This probably makes the black women self conscious and patronized.

  55. @Reg Cæsar

    I heard her interviewed about her book Bring the War Home. Prog? Sure. Fanatical? Didn’t come across that way. Sounded moderately fair-minded to me.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  56. White Negroes: When Cornrows Were in Vogue … and Other Thoughts on Cultural Appropriation

    I would have guessed that that was a Steve parody title.

    • Agree: fish
  57. anon[246] • Disclaimer says:

    Sry for the worthless comment, but Steve, I don’t understand how you can bear to deep-dive this crap. I can’t even make it a quarter way through your critique or the comments.

    It’s ridiculous low-brow pablum, who gives? Pink ghetto stuff. Utterly inconsequential even in a Dem primaries context.

  58. @El Dato

    Anyone tempted to put anything in that monstrosity is beyond mere good advice.

  59. Kylie says:
    @RobUK

    Now you know why I hang out with you guys.

    Having to listen to what most women talk and gossip about is absolutely maddening.

  60. @guest

    Maybe.

    But look at it this way—

    The two people making the most $$$$$ out of lecturing whites about white privilege are whites.

    It’s almost as if the white Woke don’t like being yelled at by black women.

    So if you ever run across a white person making money off of their supposed anti-racism, tell them what they are doing is proof of them profiting from their white privilege.

    QED?

    • Replies: @guest
  61. @peterike

    Black people feel they’re entitled to any money that can be made by complaining about white people. why should Ms. DiAngelo, a white person, make more money complaining about white people than Ms. Jackson, a black person. It just ain’t right!

  62. @Percy Gryce

    Maybe she’s restrained in person. She’s coming to town to speak at a prominent Presbyterian church. I walked miles to see Amy Chua speak about World on Fire in this same series years ago. (Long before Tiger Mom.) I’m not going to drive 70+ miles to Prof. Belew.

    Her calling cards don’t come off as “fair-minded”. Are they just bait? Is she another Carol Swain?

  63. guest says:
    @Danindc

    But the white one has a grievance against herself, with is different.

    • Replies: @Danindc
  64. guest says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    It’s sorta like black folk complaining about civil rights movies with white protagonists. Well, it was a white country and the civil rights movement was mostly about white people. Their decisions, their laws, their votes, their National Guard.

    If you want to make a movie specifically about blacks during the civil rights movement, okay. But don’t act like you own the subject.

  65. guest says:
    @altan ibn goldman

    Okay, so they don’t say “race.” What do they say instead? Breed? Bloogle-bloggle?

  66. unit472 says:

    Everybody remember the ‘class clown’? Most every classroom had one. I even auditioned for the role. You got laughs and some of the girls thought you were ‘cool’ but the authorities didn’t appreciate you and, unless you were the one a million who could actually write jokes for Johnny Carson, it didn’t have a lot career promise.

    This is the essence of negro creativity today. Mocking authority, vulgarity, spewing doggerel and thinking its art. As noted, there was a time when negroes had to be accomplished musicians to be taken seriously. Nat King Cole didn’t get a NBC TV show ( in 1956!) because he was abrasive or because of ‘affirmative action’, rather, it was because the man could pound piano keys, compose and entertain. It was his daughter who only could warble.

  67. “…when it comes to who is allowed to thrive from black hipness, the pioneers are usually left behind as black aesthetics are converted into mainstream success–and white profit.”

    This woman is one of those self sabotaging types I like to call Black Underminers. She says that Blacks are productive citizens who make great contributions to society, and we all know that’s true. But then she insinuates that Blacks need to be protected or they’ll get outsmarted and lose their money. Is that really the message she wants to send? She sounds like structural racism has turned her into someone who subconsciously undermines the oppressed, underprivileged members of society.

  68. “Cultural appropriation”? Absent Western medicine, and the fortuitous (for her) diversion of her ancestors to Anglo-Saxon America, Ms. Jackson’s body in African space space died at the age of 31 on the dirt floor of her mud hut after bleeding out while giving birth to her 11th child, her nearsighted eyes staring in agony at the fronded ceiling, unknown to posterity and even to the villagers in the next gaggle of mud huts a mile or so distant.

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