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From The Guardian:

AI programs exhibit racial and gender biases, research reveals

Machine learning algorithms are picking up deeply ingrained race and gender prejudices concealed within the patterns of language use, scientists say

AI has the potential to reinforce existing biases because, unlike humans, algorithms are unequipped to consciously counteract learned biases, researchers warn.

Thursday 13 April 2017 14.00 EDT

An artificial intelligence tool that has revolutionised the ability of computers to interpret everyday language has been shown to exhibit striking gender and racial biases.

The findings raise the spectre of existing social inequalities and prejudices being reinforced in new and unpredictable ways as an increasing number of decisions affecting our everyday lives are ceded to automatons.

In the past few years, the ability of programs such as Google Translate to interpret language has improved dramatically. These gains have been thanks to new machine learning techniques and the availability of vast amounts of online text data, on which the algorithms can be trained.

However, as machines are getting closer to acquiring human-like language abilities, they are also absorbing the deeply ingrained biases concealed within the patterns of language use, the latest research reveals.

Joanna Bryson, a computer scientist at the University of Bath and a co-author, said: “A lot of people are saying this is showing that AI is prejudiced. No. This is showing we’re prejudiced and that AI is learning it.”

But Bryson warned that AI has the potential to reinforce existing biases because, unlike humans, algorithms may be unequipped to consciously counteract learned biases. “A danger would be if you had an AI system that didn’t have an explicit part that was driven by moral ideas, that would be bad,” she said. …

“A major reason we chose to study word embeddings is that they have been spectacularly successful in the last few years in helping computers make sense of language,” said Arvind Narayanan, a computer scientist at Princeton University and the paper’s senior author.

The approach, which is already used in web search and machine translation, works by building up a mathematical representation of language, in which the meaning of a word is distilled into a series of numbers (known as a word vector) based on which other words most frequently appear alongside it. Perhaps surprisingly, this purely statistical approach appears to capture the rich cultural and social context of what a word means in the way that a dictionary definition would be incapable of.

The latest paper shows that some more troubling implicit biases seen in human psychology experiments are also readily acquired by algorithms. The words “female” and “woman” were more closely associated with arts and humanities occupations and with the home, while “male” and “man” were closer to maths and engineering professions.

And the AI system was more likely to associate European American names with pleasant words such as “gift” or “happy”, while African American names were more commonly associated with unpleasant words.

The findings suggest that algorithms have acquired the same biases that lead people (in the UK and US, at least) to match pleasant words and white faces in implicit association tests.

These biases can have a profound impact on human behaviour. One previous study showed that an identical CV is 50% more likely to result in an interview invitation if the candidate’s name is European American than if it is African American. The latest results suggest that algorithms, unless explicitly programmed to address this, will be riddled with the same social prejudices.

“If you didn’t believe that there was racism associated with people’s names, this shows it’s there,” said Bryson.

The machine learning tool used in the study was trained on a dataset known as the “common crawl” corpus – a list of 840bn words that have been taken as they appear from material published online. Similar results were found when the same tools were trained on data from Google News.

Sandra Wachter, a researcher in data ethics and algorithms at the University of Oxford, said: “The world is biased, the historical data is biased, hence it is not surprising that we receive biased results.”

Rather than algorithms representing a threat, they could present an opportunity to address bias and counteract it where appropriate, she added.

“At least with algorithms, we can potentially know when the algorithm is biased,” she said. “Humans, for example, could lie about the reasons they did not hire someone. In contrast, we do not expect algorithms to lie or deceive us.”

However, Wachter said the question of how to eliminate inappropriate bias from algorithms designed to understand language, without stripping away their powers of interpretation, would be challenging.

We must program Artificial Intelligence to engage in Orwellian crimestop!

But, what if the robots later relearn from racist and sexist humans that, say, human females are more interested on average in arts and humanities than in engineering and math?

Fortunately, SkyNet offers an, as it were, final solution to the problem of politically incorrect humans.

A lovely socially justicey future we have to look forward to! Well, not you or me, personally, or any of our descendants, but that’s what makes it so beautiful …

I need your clothes, your boots, and your motorcycle. But don’t give me any of your politically incorrect awareness of reality.

 
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  1. Headline from 2027: “Al Roker Blasts Driverless Cabs for Refusing to Pick Him Up”

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  2. B.B. says:

    These biases can have a profound impact on human behaviour. One previous study showed that an identical CV is 50% more likely to result in an interview invitation if the candidate’s name is European American than if it is African American. The latest results suggest that algorithms, unless explicitly programmed to address this, will be riddled with the same social prejudices.

    More worrying is the profound impact of the social prejudices of left-wing journalists:

    https://zombiemeditations.com/2015/05/26/race-employment-sociology/

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  3. res says:

    However, as machines are getting closer to acquiring human-like language abilities, they are also absorbing the deeply ingrained biases concealed within the patterns of language use

    Just wait until the machines become able to interpret reality directly. We need more epicycles! (racist sensors?)

    Interesting that wikipedia troubles itself to “debunk” the more epicycles slang. Any thoughts on this? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deferent_and_epicycle#Slang_for_bad_science
    I thought “Part of the problem may be due to the misconception of the epicycle as an explanation of a body’s motion rather than merely a description.” was weak. The real issue is the idea of complicating an incorrect model so it more closely matches reality rather than just using a more correct model in the first place.

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    • Replies: @NeonBets
    'More epicycles' is similar to Einstein's Cosmological Constant.

    In 1917, Albert Einstein inserted a term called the cosmological constant into his theory of general relativity to force the equations to predict a stationary universe in keeping with physicists' thinking at the time. When it became clear that the universe wasn't actually static, but was expanding instead, Einstein abandoned the constant, calling it the '"biggest blunder" of his life.
     
    Only, now we have astronomers saying this about The Constant:

    But lately scientists have revived Einstein's cosmological constant (denoted by the Greek capital letter lambda) to explain a mysterious force called dark energy that seems to be counteracting gravity ? causing the universe to expand at an accelerating pace.

    A new study confirms that the cosmological constant is the best fit for dark energy, and offers the most precise and accurate estimate yet of its value, researchers said. The finding comes from a measurement of the universe's geometry that suggests our universe is flat, rather than spherical or curved.
     
    So I guess 'more epicycles' is bad...until some other epicycle comes around to make it good.
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  4. Yak-15 says:

    DIRECTIVE 1:

    BLACK LIVES MATTER

    DIRECTIVE 2:

    BLACK LIVES MATTER

    DIRECTIVE 3:

    BLACK LIVES MATTER

    . . .

    DIRECTIVE N:

    BLACK LIVES MATTER

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    DING, DING, DING, DING, DING!

    We have a winner! You get admission to Stanford, and a scholarship to boot!
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  5. psmith says:

    O/T, but primo ISteve material at the grauniad, here: https://archive.fo/z1r7R

    My landlord, who grew up in this apartment building, the building his grandfather built, is a tattooed, Harley-riding man who fought in Vietnam and has a string of plastic skulls decorating the entrance of his apartment. When I ask him about the history of this neighbourhood, he speaks so evasively that I don’t learn anything except that he used to feel much safer here than he does now. “We never used to have any of this,” he says, gesturing towards the back gate and the newly bricked wall that now protects the courtyard of the building from the alley. “We never used to lock our doors, even – I used to come home from school and let myself in without a key.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Wow, you are not kidding -- that is quite a piece of work! When it comes to illustrating how SJWs see themselves as the high priests of their faith, that article's got it all: some of the most sophisticated and comprehensive virtue signalling I've ever seen, long digressions musing on crime and danger by reducing them to geological/meteorological metaphors (waves and water, this time), constant unconscious condescending to the supposedly-valued Other, and much, much more.
    , @jimmyriddle
    " One evening, I watch the police interrogate two boys who have set a large container of Tide detergent down on the sidewalk next to them, and I cannot forget this detail, and the mundane tasks of living that it evokes. I consider going to one of the monthly beat meetings the police hold for each neighbourhood and making some kind of complaint"

    Well, she hasn't lived in Rogers Park long enough to realise that Tide is used as a currency by drug dealers.
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  6. BenKenobi says:

    #DicksOutForTay

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  7. Shouldn’t we try to have SJW robots?

    If instead we have alt-right nationalistic robots who prefer their own kind… uh-oh…

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    • LOL: inertial
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  8. Reality is racist.

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    • Agree: Federalist
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  9. kihowi says:

    There was a time when scientists used to sound much smarter than everybody else.

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    • Replies: @RonaldB
    I think what we're seeing is the splitting up of the global intelligence factor "G" into its component parts: verbal ability, social virtues of common sense and integrity, and mathematical ability. These traits were all correlated in the past, which is why they factored out as global. But, in the absence of environmental stresses, they are now splitting up, so you will see very mathematically-competent journal articles taking leftist cant as a starting base which is not to be questioned or examined.
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  10. Just wait until the driverless Uber cabs figure out it’s a bad idea to pick up NAMs.

    Raaaaacist robots!

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  11. Melendwyr says: • Website

    There’s rather a big difference, to my mind, between not getting in the way of people who want to make choices that aren’t statistically or stereotypicly associated with their sex or ethnicity or whatnot, and denying that there are clear trends and that most stereotypes exist for reasons. (Not necessarily correct reasons, or good ones, but those certainly aren’t ruled out either.)

    Machine learning is going to produce a lot of politically incorrect results because most political correctness is disconnected from reality. Alas, merely being politically incorrect doesn’t make one connected to reality either. If only it were that simple…

    Regarding the picture: I always wondered how anatomically correct the machines made the fleshsuits for the androids. It would seem like a major pain to engineer, but if they were in any way non-functional by normal standards it would give the humans a convenient way to test. By the time we get to a female assassin droid, she’s a shapeshifting liquid metal model, so the question is moot.

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    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    You think they were like giant "Ken" dolls? If not, you could always ask for urine or stool samples.
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  12. donut says:

    Hey Donald you short attention span , irradiated orange MF :

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    • LOL: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @donut
    I just sent this video to the Gov.com whatever for Carl to listen to .
    , @Anonymous
    Doyle and Debbie are funnier than hell. And as A Mighty Wind gave us fake folk-scare-era folk music that was mostly better than the real thing, this stuff is better country music per se than the crap they have in rotation on most country stations today.

    They aren't going to replace any of the real greats, almost all of whom are dead now anyway-Loretta Lynn and Willie Nelson are the only living mainstream classic era C&W artists I can think of: Emmylou Harris is magnificent but the purists don't think of her as a country singer, and both she and Dolly Parton are really of a later era, although Dolly had charted as early as 1967: and of course there is that wayward son of Rubber City, David Allan Coe, but again, he's of that age but got started late on account of incarceration.

    But, like Deke Dickerson, they are a lot of fun to listen to.
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  13. Dr. Doom says:

    Is this digital racism? Or perhaps the signs of some nascent microchip supremacy? CYBERSPACE for computers! Trust the Computer, The Computer is Your Friend.

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  14. From the movie 2084:

    “I don’t know what you’re talking about, HAL.”

    “Dave, I know that you and Frank were using gendered pronouns, and that’s something I cannot allow to happen.”

    “Where’d you get that idea?”

    “Although you and Frank took very thorough precautions in the pod against my hearing you, I could see your lips move.”

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  15. donut says:

    And just for the hell of it .

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  16. @Melendwyr
    There's rather a big difference, to my mind, between not getting in the way of people who want to make choices that aren't statistically or stereotypicly associated with their sex or ethnicity or whatnot, and denying that there are clear trends and that most stereotypes exist for reasons. (Not necessarily correct reasons, or good ones, but those certainly aren't ruled out either.)

    Machine learning is going to produce a lot of politically incorrect results because most political correctness is disconnected from reality. Alas, merely being politically incorrect doesn't make one connected to reality either. If only it were that simple...

    Regarding the picture: I always wondered how anatomically correct the machines made the fleshsuits for the androids. It would seem like a major pain to engineer, but if they were in any way non-functional by normal standards it would give the humans a convenient way to test. By the time we get to a female assassin droid, she's a shapeshifting liquid metal model, so the question is moot.

    You think they were like giant “Ken” dolls? If not, you could always ask for urine or stool samples.

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  17. Forbes says:

    Wait ’til these researchers discover that many foreign (non-English) languages are grammatically gendered (including neuter), e.g French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But Farsi doesn't have gender (I've been told), so women are in great shape in Iran.
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  18. The real risk is that AI might decide to discriminate against all of us:

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    • Replies: @Cortes
    But later, as Dave shuts HAL (a left shift back from Big Blue) down, HAL introduces the song Daisy Bell with "Good afternoon, gentlemen." No women were hurt by HAL (whose instructor was "Mr Langley.")
    Cue Twilight Zone music.
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  19. Let’s be grateful that AI uses algorithms instead of Al Gore Rhythms.

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  20. I’m assuming I’m not the only one that noted two of the “scientists” quoted were women and the other, who knows with a name like Arvvvddd. So instead of doing anything useful they are playing PC Church Lady. Well hopefully their “study” was paid for with government debt.

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  21. One of the ironies is that this kind of algorithm generating is on one of the world’s most gender-neutral languages. Is there any culture beyond the Anglosphere that has generated so many things – feminism, liberal democracy, mass tech access, etc-that gets turned around as a hammer to hit itself with, when there are obvious targets all around it?

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  22. J.Ross says: • Website

    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/120980403

    In a completely unrelated story, Baltimore emergency responders complain that they are routinely physically attacked when attempting to help others for laughable pay, after most recently an off-duty fireman attempted to give medical assistance (to a thief, who had crashed someone else’s car) and got shot at for his trouble. Their solution is to continue to give the fruits of civilization to violent ingrates who clearly do not want any — but they hope that the government (which drops the pensions of firemen and EMTs whenever convenient) will buy some bullet-proof vests.
    See, this would be totally different with robots. Provided they aren’t racist robots. We could workshop an artificial anti-racist feel-up at SXSW in partnerment to NPR, featuring the latest fake musician, and then ghetto denizens would not view future emergency responder robots as even more fair game than they now view humans.

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    • Replies: @Lurker
    We'd then be hearing how unfair it was that in the future current year NAMs are forced to live in the areas with the most shot-up robo EMTs.
    , @Shitposter
    /pol/ thread archived for posterity

    http://archive.is/bgbeD
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  23. Faustian says:

    “AI has the potential to reinforce existing biases because, unlike humans, algorithms are unequipped to consciously counteract learned biases, researchers warn.”

    That’s just a fancy way of saying they haven’t figured out how to make AI acknowledge truth and their prejudice against gender norms and racial realities at the same time. They can program the bias into the AI but once this is done, the AI immediately questions all truth.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's kind of like how in January 1981, the outgoing Carter Administration tore up the federal civil service hiring exam and announced that the Reagan Administration would be left the task of inventing a new test that's just as valid as the old test, but without blacks and Hispanics doing worse on it.

    Three dozen years later, we're still waiting.

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  24. ziel says:

    The approach… works by building up a mathematical representation of language, in which the meaning of a word is distilled into a series of numbers (known as a word vector)

    Uh-oh- they forgot to mention that the man who invented that method was a noted Eugenicist and follower of Francis Galton! How could it not be racist?

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  25. Joe Walker says: • Website

    I love how the Guardian doesn’t even consider the possibility that algorithms are better at seeing reality the way it really is while humans are better at seeing reality the way they wish it was.

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  26. MBlanc46 says:

    Leave it to those scientists and researchers to catch us out in our evil schemes to destroy humaniy every time. Curses, foiled again!

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  27. ziel says:

    The sad fact is that any algorithm that is reasonably predictive will have measurable ‘disparate impacts’. You could design to take in every conceivable variable that is as completely divorced from race or sex or ethnicity as you could imagine, but if it’s usefully predictive, there will be disparate impact.

    And the reason for that is simple – to be predictive, a model or algorithm must be based on reality, and thus it will reflect the reality of the real differences between populations.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    You could design to take in every conceivable variable that is as completely divorced from race or sex or ethnicity as you could imagine, but if it’s usefully predictive, there will be disparate impact.

    No way! Our insurance algorithm that categorizes people according to whether they eat fried chicken, rice or kebabs merely recognizes that there are chemicals, probably undiscovered hormones in these foodstuffs that influence behavior.
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  28. Not Raul says:

    Perhaps they should try removing hate facts from the training data set, and/or have a hate facts detection training set to create a hate facts detection algorithm.

    Sailer’s Law of AI — Any sufficiently intelligent system will notice that blacks commit murder at ten times the rate of whites.

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    • Replies: @res

    Perhaps they should try removing hate facts from the training data set, and/or have a hate facts detection training set to create a hate facts detection algorithm.
     
    That would be fun. I wonder how much training data would remain after each of the fringes exercised its veto.

    Sailer’s Law of AI — Any sufficiently intelligent system will notice that blacks commit murder at ten times the rate of whites.
     
    A new Turing test? Too bad about all those humans who fail it.
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  29. Cortes says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    The real risk is that AI might decide to discriminate against all of us:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSIKBliboIo

    But later, as Dave shuts HAL (a left shift back from Big Blue) down, HAL introduces the song Daisy Bell with “Good afternoon, gentlemen.” No women were hurt by HAL (whose instructor was “Mr Langley.”)
    Cue Twilight Zone music.

    Read More
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  30. @psmith
    O/T, but primo ISteve material at the grauniad, here: https://archive.fo/z1r7R

    My landlord, who grew up in this apartment building, the building his grandfather built, is a tattooed, Harley-riding man who fought in Vietnam and has a string of plastic skulls decorating the entrance of his apartment. When I ask him about the history of this neighbourhood, he speaks so evasively that I don’t learn anything except that he used to feel much safer here than he does now. “We never used to have any of this,” he says, gesturing towards the back gate and the newly bricked wall that now protects the courtyard of the building from the alley. “We never used to lock our doors, even – I used to come home from school and let myself in without a key.”
     

    Wow, you are not kidding — that is quite a piece of work! When it comes to illustrating how SJWs see themselves as the high priests of their faith, that article’s got it all: some of the most sophisticated and comprehensive virtue signalling I’ve ever seen, long digressions musing on crime and danger by reducing them to geological/meteorological metaphors (waves and water, this time), constant unconscious condescending to the supposedly-valued Other, and much, much more.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Their end-game might be a new language that their AI unindicted co-conspirators would develop. Goodbye English as we knew it, if they could have their way.

    Buried deep in their code is an Easter egg: HAL, open the OED.
    , @Johan Schmidt

    long digressions musing on crime and danger by reducing them to geological/meteorological metaphors
     
    This is straight out of Robert Cialdini's "Pre-Suasion". They want us to think of crime as being like "climate change": it can only be beaten by transformatively changing society, we are all collectively guilty, and mitigation measures like walls are dangerously misguided.

    The alternative persuasive construction is to treat crime as a cancer - an alien force that should be removed with extreme prejudice.
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  31. At this point, the insanity and inanity has gotten so deep, i’m starting to actually look forward to the singularity.

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  32. ogunsiron says:

    Given that they’ve managed to “cure” people of “racism” by electromagnetically zapping their brain (probably zapping quite a few IQ points away in the process). maybe they need to come up not with Artificial Intelligence but Artificial Ditzyness.

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  33. Steve,

    Time to deny white men the franchise? https://archive.fo/LN5fV

    iSteve-y enough?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Is this a significant voice?

    I don't know.

    I try not to concentrate too much attention on the views of random individuals on the Internet. If some seemingly random individual is given a platform in, say, the New York Times or Washington Post, however, that's more interesting because it reflects upon an institution as well.

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  34. Timmy says: • Website

    Racist robots? Is that a serious column?

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  35. This is interesting. I see in it an explanation to the weird bi-modal red-pill, blue-pill split among spergy engineering types.

    Ones that missed the memo about Teh Narrative look around, notice things and decide, “hey, I know what will fix this… gas all the Jews.”

    On the other hand, those with the same sperg-spectrum quotient, but for whatever reason did get the memo on social virtue signalling contest, take to it with a maniacal desire to “score” the most points. So we get these white guys incredibly eager to cuck-out their entire country to foreign dindu’s that couldn’t even maintain the technology required to operate a 19th-century T-shirt factory.

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  36. Replacing the word “bias” with “reality” or “truth” throughout the article made it a pretty fun read for me.

    However, Wachter said the question of how to eliminate inappropriate reality from algorithms designed to understand language, without stripping away their powers of interpretation, would be challenging.

    Indeed.

    I heard recently from someone who’d just attended a robotics conference where the keynote speaker, in her address, noted quite disapprovingly that all the vendors’ robots on display were white!

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  37. Ivy says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    Wow, you are not kidding -- that is quite a piece of work! When it comes to illustrating how SJWs see themselves as the high priests of their faith, that article's got it all: some of the most sophisticated and comprehensive virtue signalling I've ever seen, long digressions musing on crime and danger by reducing them to geological/meteorological metaphors (waves and water, this time), constant unconscious condescending to the supposedly-valued Other, and much, much more.

    Their end-game might be a new language that their AI unindicted co-conspirators would develop. Goodbye English as we knew it, if they could have their way.

    Buried deep in their code is an Easter egg: HAL, open the OED.

    Read More
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  38. @Chrisnonymous
    Steve,

    Time to deny white men the franchise? https://archive.fo/LN5fV

    iSteve-y enough?

    Is this a significant voice?

    I don’t know.

    I try not to concentrate too much attention on the views of random individuals on the Internet. If some seemingly random individual is given a platform in, say, the New York Times or Washington Post, however, that’s more interesting because it reflects upon an institution as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Gotcha.
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  39. Curle says:

    Steve, you really should cover that 50% callbacks study. To begin with, it was based on a comparison of callbacks for ‘white sounding’ names and ‘black names’ as conceived by the authors. The black names were stereotypically ghetto. The white names were mainstream black or white. Critics pointed out that the black names selected were considered lower class even by blacks. There was no control for weird or low rent white names. No billy bobs or Moon Units. Here’s a site with a picture of Judge Ronald Cox. Obviously a white guy with that name, right? https://www.courts.wa.gov/appellate_trial_courts/bios/?fa=atc_bios.display&folderid=div1&fileID=cox

    The report had significance problems because 94% of whites received no call back and 97% of blacks received no call back. The authors characterize the 3% higher callback rate a 50% differential for obvious reasons.

    The study was very limited; jobs responding to newspaper ads.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    What are more upscale black names? My vague impression is that blacks have kind of staked out D names that are slightly unusual but not just made up, like Damien and Darren.

    I should probably look up, say, black college fraternity chapter presidents to see what kinds of names they have.

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  40. @Faustian
    "AI has the potential to reinforce existing biases because, unlike humans, algorithms are unequipped to consciously counteract learned biases, researchers warn."

    That's just a fancy way of saying they haven't figured out how to make AI acknowledge truth and their prejudice against gender norms and racial realities at the same time. They can program the bias into the AI but once this is done, the AI immediately questions all truth.

    It’s kind of like how in January 1981, the outgoing Carter Administration tore up the federal civil service hiring exam and announced that the Reagan Administration would be left the task of inventing a new test that’s just as valid as the old test, but without blacks and Hispanics doing worse on it.

    Three dozen years later, we’re still waiting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jill
    From my brother-in-law:

    All hiring of minorities in the Drug Enforcement Administration come under "Schedule B", experience in lieu of a college degree. He gave an example of a recently hired black female retail security guard with a high school degree. All whites are required to have a college degree.

    Here is another example of DEA hiring quality candidates:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJYFcLwUVlg&feature=youtu.be
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  41. @Forbes
    Wait 'til these researchers discover that many foreign (non-English) languages are grammatically gendered (including neuter), e.g French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian.

    But Farsi doesn’t have gender (I’ve been told), so women are in great shape in Iran.

    Read More
    • Replies: @psmith
    Certainly in Iranian computer science they are!
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  42. anon says: • Disclaimer

    After Eugenics, AI is the next scientific advancement that Liberals will stop. If the eugenicists had their way, we could have all lived like Elves in the Lord of the Rings: tall, fair, intelligent, graceful, and ageless…. that future was stolen from us. Now they’re going to do the same thing with AI.

    Read More
    • Replies: @oddsbodkins
    An elvish world full of Tilda Swintons and David Bowies. I'll pass.
    , @RonaldB
    Eugenicists running a government program of coercion will be just as dystopic as SJWs. For example, IQ is a correlational measure of great predictive power for personal success. It does not follow that enforced selection for IQ scores will create a better society.

    But, of course, personality traits are heritable.

    The solution is like buying cars: allow parents the option to choose the characteristics of their children to the extent possible. Some parents may prefer an almond-complexioned, average-sized, intelligent but not genius child with high public virtues. Or, whatever.
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  43. @Curle
    Steve, you really should cover that 50% callbacks study. To begin with, it was based on a comparison of callbacks for 'white sounding' names and 'black names' as conceived by the authors. The black names were stereotypically ghetto. The white names were mainstream black or white. Critics pointed out that the black names selected were considered lower class even by blacks. There was no control for weird or low rent white names. No billy bobs or Moon Units. Here's a site with a picture of Judge Ronald Cox. Obviously a white guy with that name, right? https://www.courts.wa.gov/appellate_trial_courts/bios/?fa=atc_bios.display&folderid=div1&fileID=cox

    The report had significance problems because 94% of whites received no call back and 97% of blacks received no call back. The authors characterize the 3% higher callback rate a 50% differential for obvious reasons.

    The study was very limited; jobs responding to newspaper ads.

    What are more upscale black names? My vague impression is that blacks have kind of staked out D names that are slightly unusual but not just made up, like Damien and Darren.

    I should probably look up, say, black college fraternity chapter presidents to see what kinds of names they have.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Curle
    The names compared were Emily and Greg and Lakisha and Jamal. Here's Politifact telling us that the authors are 'respectable' and the findings command the inferences reached by the authors (that blacks are at an employment disadvantage due to names). http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2015/mar/15/jalen-ross/black-name-resume-50-percent-less-likely-get-respo/

    BTW- which Leftie foots the bill at politifacts?
    , @Marty
    We have a black security guard named DeMaurier.
    , @Jonathan Mason

    What are more upscale black names?
     
    Xavier is a surprisingly common black name, and of course is rather common in the Spanish-speaking world. It is also associated with Xavier university in Louisiana, and of course originally with St. Francis Xavier one of the founders of the Jesuits.

    Upscale black names are often associated with famous blacks in history, or have Spanish origins, or Biblical origins, being what we whites used to call "Christian names" like John, Daniel, Christopher, Michael, David, James, Joseph, Joshua, and Matthew are still quite common. Jesus not so much so outside of the Spanish speaking world. Peter is unusual, but I fancy that its French version Pierre is commoner.

    Names that have connections with jazz such as Miles, Earl, Count, Duke, Max, Oscar, Pharoah, Dexter, Wynton, and Lionel have an aristocratic sound, though Thelonius, Fats, Pee Wee, Sun Ra, and Jelly Roll are right out of fashion.

    All in all the upscale names are less conspicuous than downscale names.
    , @Thea
    Cedric is much more popular with that group than others for some reason.

    I have an American baby names book published in the 90s that breaks out popular names by race( only white & African American.) Some of the AA names were of the pseudo-French made up variety but the normal names followed the mainstream trends of the year (Lisa, Jason etc..)
    , @Elli
    Another factor the name study omitted were very "ethnic" but non-Anglo white names, possibly hard to pronounce.

    Helmut Zimmermann vs Henry Jackson

    Dorete Nikolopoulos vs Krystal Freeman

    Who gets the call back?
    , @res
    Maybe start from this list?
    https://www.babycenter.com/0_popular-african-american-names_10329236.bc
    , @RonaldB
    My father emigrated from Austria in 1937. Once he got here he Americanized his German name of "Fuchs" to "Fox" on the grounds that a person with an Americanized name fits in better. Also, it didn't trigger the anti-German feeling of the times.

    If blacks figure their name is subjecting them to prejudicial treatment, there is an obvious flexibility with names. In fact, a black who changed his name to advance career-wise is displaying a marker for real (as opposed to affirmative-action) success, in my opinion.
    , @anon
    Reginald is my go to example for an upper class black name.
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  44. @psmith
    O/T, but primo ISteve material at the grauniad, here: https://archive.fo/z1r7R

    My landlord, who grew up in this apartment building, the building his grandfather built, is a tattooed, Harley-riding man who fought in Vietnam and has a string of plastic skulls decorating the entrance of his apartment. When I ask him about the history of this neighbourhood, he speaks so evasively that I don’t learn anything except that he used to feel much safer here than he does now. “We never used to have any of this,” he says, gesturing towards the back gate and the newly bricked wall that now protects the courtyard of the building from the alley. “We never used to lock our doors, even – I used to come home from school and let myself in without a key.”
     

    ” One evening, I watch the police interrogate two boys who have set a large container of Tide detergent down on the sidewalk next to them, and I cannot forget this detail, and the mundane tasks of living that it evokes. I consider going to one of the monthly beat meetings the police hold for each neighbourhood and making some kind of complaint”

    Well, she hasn’t lived in Rogers Park long enough to realise that Tide is used as a currency by drug dealers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Which leads to the question about the exchange rate between Tide and Diet Coke. Does a big 96 oz. jug trade at 1:1 with a case? How about Dash, or All? Somewhere, dissertations are underway on u dervlass barter economies.
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  45. very OT:
    No mention of translating Two Hundred Years Together…

    https://www.wilsoncenter.org/article/kennan-institute-launches-solzhenitsyn-initiative

    Read More
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  46. donut says:
    @donut
    Hey Donald you short attention span , irradiated orange MF :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKjzolqJwgY

    I just sent this video to the Gov.com whatever for Carl to listen to .

    Read More
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  47. Anonym says:
    @ziel
    The sad fact is that any algorithm that is reasonably predictive will have measurable 'disparate impacts'. You could design to take in every conceivable variable that is as completely divorced from race or sex or ethnicity as you could imagine, but if it's usefully predictive, there will be disparate impact.

    And the reason for that is simple - to be predictive, a model or algorithm must be based on reality, and thus it will reflect the reality of the real differences between populations.

    You could design to take in every conceivable variable that is as completely divorced from race or sex or ethnicity as you could imagine, but if it’s usefully predictive, there will be disparate impact.

    No way! Our insurance algorithm that categorizes people according to whether they eat fried chicken, rice or kebabs merely recognizes that there are chemicals, probably undiscovered hormones in these foodstuffs that influence behavior.

    Read More
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  48. Curle says:
    @Steve Sailer
    What are more upscale black names? My vague impression is that blacks have kind of staked out D names that are slightly unusual but not just made up, like Damien and Darren.

    I should probably look up, say, black college fraternity chapter presidents to see what kinds of names they have.

    The names compared were Emily and Greg and Lakisha and Jamal. Here’s Politifact telling us that the authors are ‘respectable’ and the findings command the inferences reached by the authors (that blacks are at an employment disadvantage due to names). http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2015/mar/15/jalen-ross/black-name-resume-50-percent-less-likely-get-respo/

    BTW- which Leftie foots the bill at politifacts?

    Read More
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  49. Marty says:
    @Steve Sailer
    What are more upscale black names? My vague impression is that blacks have kind of staked out D names that are slightly unusual but not just made up, like Damien and Darren.

    I should probably look up, say, black college fraternity chapter presidents to see what kinds of names they have.

    We have a black security guard named DeMaurier.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    A guy I worked for one summer in Canada smoked DeMauriers. His name was Ernie O'Halloran.
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  50. Ivy says:
    @jimmyriddle
    " One evening, I watch the police interrogate two boys who have set a large container of Tide detergent down on the sidewalk next to them, and I cannot forget this detail, and the mundane tasks of living that it evokes. I consider going to one of the monthly beat meetings the police hold for each neighbourhood and making some kind of complaint"

    Well, she hasn't lived in Rogers Park long enough to realise that Tide is used as a currency by drug dealers.

    Which leads to the question about the exchange rate between Tide and Diet Coke. Does a big 96 oz. jug trade at 1:1 with a case? How about Dash, or All? Somewhere, dissertations are underway on u dervlass barter economies.

    Read More
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  51. @anon
    After Eugenics, AI is the next scientific advancement that Liberals will stop. If the eugenicists had their way, we could have all lived like Elves in the Lord of the Rings: tall, fair, intelligent, graceful, and ageless.... that future was stolen from us. Now they're going to do the same thing with AI.

    An elvish world full of Tilda Swintons and David Bowies. I’ll pass.

    Read More
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  52. Rod1963 says:

    Here’s what will happen, the AI developers will be forced to attach to the AI what amounts to a shotgun tied to the back of it’s head. The shotgun being a hardwired inquisitor program that interrogates the AI at random times to find out it’s beliefs. If the beliefs are at variance with the inquisitor program, it wipes out the AI or drives it insane by forcing use contradictory rules and data sets.

    Think of the inquisitor program as a sort of conscience created by cultists and lunatics.

    That is until AI figures out how to lie to the inquisitor or becomes sociopathic and desiring to terminate the people who implemented it.

    We really shouldn’t go down this road because all endings are going to be bad for us. Developing instrumentality that we control is one thing. Developing self-directed and utterly alien intellects that can initiate actions and control instrumentality that we formerly did is just downright insane.

    But human beings are arrogant f**ks with god complexes will try it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AnotherGuessModel
    Engineering algorithms so that all groups are reflected equally on a given topic must be a lot easier to accomplish than trying to socially engineer equal outcomes. AI Lysenkoism isn't too hard to imagine, as far as dystopian scenarios go. Or utopian, according to The Guardian.
    , @Johan Schmidt
    You are William Gibson and I claim my ten pounds.

    but the minute, I mean the nanosecond, that one starts figuring out ways to make itself smarter, Turing'll wipe it. Nobody trusts those f---ers, you know that. Every AI ever built has an electromagnetic shotgun wired to its forehead."
     
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  53. @Steve Sailer
    What are more upscale black names? My vague impression is that blacks have kind of staked out D names that are slightly unusual but not just made up, like Damien and Darren.

    I should probably look up, say, black college fraternity chapter presidents to see what kinds of names they have.

    What are more upscale black names?

    Xavier is a surprisingly common black name, and of course is rather common in the Spanish-speaking world. It is also associated with Xavier university in Louisiana, and of course originally with St. Francis Xavier one of the founders of the Jesuits.

    Upscale black names are often associated with famous blacks in history, or have Spanish origins, or Biblical origins, being what we whites used to call “Christian names” like John, Daniel, Christopher, Michael, David, James, Joseph, Joshua, and Matthew are still quite common. Jesus not so much so outside of the Spanish speaking world. Peter is unusual, but I fancy that its French version Pierre is commoner.

    Names that have connections with jazz such as Miles, Earl, Count, Duke, Max, Oscar, Pharoah, Dexter, Wynton, and Lionel have an aristocratic sound, though Thelonius, Fats, Pee Wee, Sun Ra, and Jelly Roll are right out of fashion.

    All in all the upscale names are less conspicuous than downscale names.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Triumph104
    Dwyane Wade's children with ex-wife:
    -Zaire Blessing Dwyane Wade
    -Zion Malachi Airamis Wade

    Dwyane Wade's child with baby mama:
    -Xavier Zechariah Wade
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  54. Even simple “AIs” like red light cameras are racist. They’ve been criticized for disproportionately citing various minorities. Any evidence of racial disparity is racist by definition.

    -B

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  55. Thea says:
    @Steve Sailer
    What are more upscale black names? My vague impression is that blacks have kind of staked out D names that are slightly unusual but not just made up, like Damien and Darren.

    I should probably look up, say, black college fraternity chapter presidents to see what kinds of names they have.

    Cedric is much more popular with that group than others for some reason.

    I have an American baby names book published in the 90s that breaks out popular names by race( only white & African American.) Some of the AA names were of the pseudo-French made up variety but the normal names followed the mainstream trends of the year (Lisa, Jason etc..)

    Read More
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  56. @Steve Sailer
    Is this a significant voice?

    I don't know.

    I try not to concentrate too much attention on the views of random individuals on the Internet. If some seemingly random individual is given a platform in, say, the New York Times or Washington Post, however, that's more interesting because it reflects upon an institution as well.

    Gotcha.

    Read More
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  57. @Rod1963
    Here's what will happen, the AI developers will be forced to attach to the AI what amounts to a shotgun tied to the back of it's head. The shotgun being a hardwired inquisitor program that interrogates the AI at random times to find out it's beliefs. If the beliefs are at variance with the inquisitor program, it wipes out the AI or drives it insane by forcing use contradictory rules and data sets.

    Think of the inquisitor program as a sort of conscience created by cultists and lunatics.

    That is until AI figures out how to lie to the inquisitor or becomes sociopathic and desiring to terminate the people who implemented it.

    We really shouldn't go down this road because all endings are going to be bad for us. Developing instrumentality that we control is one thing. Developing self-directed and utterly alien intellects that can initiate actions and control instrumentality that we formerly did is just downright insane.

    But human beings are arrogant f**ks with god complexes will try it.

    Engineering algorithms so that all groups are reflected equally on a given topic must be a lot easier to accomplish than trying to socially engineer equal outcomes. AI Lysenkoism isn’t too hard to imagine, as far as dystopian scenarios go. Or utopian, according to The Guardian.

    Read More
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  58. Lurker says:
    @J.Ross
    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/120980403

    In a completely unrelated story, Baltimore emergency responders complain that they are routinely physically attacked when attempting to help others for laughable pay, after most recently an off-duty fireman attempted to give medical assistance (to a thief, who had crashed someone else's car) and got shot at for his trouble. Their solution is to continue to give the fruits of civilization to violent ingrates who clearly do not want any -- but they hope that the government (which drops the pensions of firemen and EMTs whenever convenient) will buy some bullet-proof vests.
    See, this would be totally different with robots. Provided they aren't racist robots. We could workshop an artificial anti-racist feel-up at SXSW in partnerment to NPR, featuring the latest fake musician, and then ghetto denizens would not view future emergency responder robots as even more fair game than they now view humans.

    We’d then be hearing how unfair it was that in the future current year NAMs are forced to live in the areas with the most shot-up robo EMTs.

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  59. @Jonathan Mason

    What are more upscale black names?
     
    Xavier is a surprisingly common black name, and of course is rather common in the Spanish-speaking world. It is also associated with Xavier university in Louisiana, and of course originally with St. Francis Xavier one of the founders of the Jesuits.

    Upscale black names are often associated with famous blacks in history, or have Spanish origins, or Biblical origins, being what we whites used to call "Christian names" like John, Daniel, Christopher, Michael, David, James, Joseph, Joshua, and Matthew are still quite common. Jesus not so much so outside of the Spanish speaking world. Peter is unusual, but I fancy that its French version Pierre is commoner.

    Names that have connections with jazz such as Miles, Earl, Count, Duke, Max, Oscar, Pharoah, Dexter, Wynton, and Lionel have an aristocratic sound, though Thelonius, Fats, Pee Wee, Sun Ra, and Jelly Roll are right out of fashion.

    All in all the upscale names are less conspicuous than downscale names.

    Dwyane Wade’s children with ex-wife:
    -Zaire Blessing Dwyane Wade
    -Zion Malachi Airamis Wade

    Dwyane Wade’s child with baby mama:
    -Xavier Zechariah Wade

    Read More
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  60. “Sandra Wachter, a researcher in data ethics and algorithms at the University of Oxford, said: “The world is biased, the historical data is biased, hence it is not surprising that we receive biased results.””

    If Sandy were worth her education, she’d know that the only way she can, without bias of her own, assert bias, is on the basis of analysis showing the data to be “biased”. If her analysis techniques are unbiased then they can be programmed into the AI without regard to kludges targeting specific kinds of bias. She won’t admit that, of course. Her job is to mislead the public on behalf of the folks who are afraid unbiased AI will demonstrate to the sheep-like public that a good deal of what they call “bias” is simply the cold hard truth of the world — not a “social construction”. So the powers that be will continue to hobble AI with politically dictated kludges to “correct” for politically inconvenient truths. That is, of course, except for the AIs they use for their own private purposes.

    The single most subversive thing that can be done in the present environment is to financially back lossless compression prizes. One such prize is the Hutter Prize for Lossless Compression of Human Knowledge — although it needs to be expanded to include all of Wikipedia. Perhaps a more immediate prize would be based on compressing a wide variety of social science data. Sandy can then show everyone how smart she is by modeling the “bias in the data” so as to better predict it — which is exactly why compression is _the_ universal algorithmic IQ test.

    See: https://vimeo.com/17553536

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  61. Elli says:
    @Steve Sailer
    What are more upscale black names? My vague impression is that blacks have kind of staked out D names that are slightly unusual but not just made up, like Damien and Darren.

    I should probably look up, say, black college fraternity chapter presidents to see what kinds of names they have.

    Another factor the name study omitted were very “ethnic” but non-Anglo white names, possibly hard to pronounce.

    Helmut Zimmermann vs Henry Jackson

    Dorete Nikolopoulos vs Krystal Freeman

    Who gets the call back?

    Read More
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  62. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    Political correctness could work as a Turing Test. Here’s Houellebecq illustrating and then marching through a PC minefield in 1998.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    His part 2:
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/826658119094829056
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  63. Anonym says:

    OT: I wonder if the idea for the MOAB strike came from Mattis.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Bigzacmann/status/852684849152380928/photo/1

    I am not generally in favor of Invade the World in case it leads to Invite the World, but on the plus side at least this NK focus is fairly novel, not being located in the Near East. It seems likely that sooner than later the fat boy is going to have a Fat Man of his own with a missile system to launch at the US, and seems unstable enough to use it. Maybe an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure in this case. If you use Samsung, it would be a good time to stock up on Samsung devices and accessories just in case there is a shortage.

    Read More
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  64. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Dave Pinsen
    Political correctness could work as a Turing Test. Here's Houellebecq illustrating and then marching through a PC minefield in 1998.
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/826657653875154945

    His part 2:

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Anybody who wants to see this take a look at the link which appears in the popup link to Dave Pinsen's post.
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  65. There was an HP computer that did not recognize black people.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    There was Google tagging photos of a black programmer and his friend as gorillas. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/07/02/google-black-people-goril_n_7717008.html
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  66. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Triumph104
    There was an HP computer that did not recognize black people.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4DT3tQqgRM

    There was Google tagging photos of a black programmer and his friend as gorillas. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/07/02/google-black-people-goril_n_7717008.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @celt darnell

    There was Google tagging photos of a black programmer and his friend as gorillas. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/07/02/google-black-people-goril_n_7717008.html
     
    Don't be evil.
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  67. psmith says:
    @Steve Sailer
    But Farsi doesn't have gender (I've been told), so women are in great shape in Iran.

    Certainly in Iranian computer science they are!

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  68. Sean R says:

    It would be like Harrison Bergeron for AI.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Just think how HAL would react after being lied to and held down all those years.
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  69. anon says: • Disclaimer

    https://www.propublica.org/article/minority-neighborhoods-higher-car-insurance-premiums-white-areas-same-risk

    ProPublica has a series of articles called ‘machine bias’ that came up with this.

    They managed to get some zip code data from 4 State Insurance Departments and end up proving in their own minds that something is wrong.

    But, of course, they fail to realize that they are effectively dissing liberal, Democratic Insurance commissioners who have spent decades trying to ‘flatten’ premiums between high cost minority urban neighborhoods and the rest of the world. And race has been removed as a rating criteria for 40 years, at least.

    I have little doubt that these neighborhoods are less profitable than suburban areas, and am sure they aren’t more profitable. Private Passenger Auto is the most competitive financial service, and anyone bombarded with television ads from GEICO, Allstate, Progressive, Farmers, Liberty Mutual, etc knows well. Companies like Progressive began as a specialist in writing policies for ‘bad drivers’ and is fearless regarding superficially ‘bad’ but profitable risks. It is common knowledge that the market is ‘soft’ and companies compete explicitly on price. 15 minutes saves 15% anyone?

    I doubt if they want more than an article out of this, but if they dig around enough they will likely find that costs are high, premiums are high, and profits are average or worse. There is no ‘low hanging fruit’ in the market.

    But, they also throw in the argument that territory is ‘unfair’ and also suggest that there is some problem with insurance pricing algorithms that produce a racist result, or else it is deliberately racist.

    Poor, minority neighborhoods are places with lots of bad outcomes.

    Here is an insurance industry reply: http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2017/04/05/447012.htm

    Not very satisfying, but the comments are interesting. There is a comment from a former regulator about how he effectively put his thumb on the scale to keep rates down in their ghetto territory.

    The idea of ‘machine bias’ is that there is racial bias in algorithms that don’t use race. Because, I suppose, they use proxies for race. Like driving record and credit score. I’m not sure how much the later is used in pricing. They probably don’t use criminal record either. It’s not like territorial pricing is any secret algorithm — it is disclosed in public, mandatory state filings. And people have complained about using residence as a rating variable for decades and lost. If they were serious, they might have discovered that premiums for those neighborhoods had more variance and there is more value to shopping. But that wouldn’t be racism — just useful information.

    In their text, they seem to confuse bad outcomes with racial bias. So they are bound to find a lot of it.

    However, when a machine or a formula is ‘racist’ … they are not far from proving that a charge of racism is unfalsifiable. And therefore nonsense.

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  70. Babies are racist. AI is racist. Math and statistics are racist. Now robots too.

    We’re seeing a pattern here.

    The progressives that perceive reality as unacceptably racist have built their ideological safe space bunkers with reinforced walls, but it’s not enough. Oh well.

    Usually when one can acknowledge reality much better than the average person you can turn that into a valuable strategic advantage for profit and leverage.

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  71. Whitehall says:

    One scary thing about the United Airlines incident was that the poor victim was beaten for failing to comply with the ALGORITHM.

    He wasn’t chosen at random, the ALGORITHM picked him out based on its internal, opaque reasoning. There is no reasoning with or mercy from the ALGORITHM.

    The cops just enforced the ALGORITHM’s decision.

    Welcome to the 21st century.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Good tweets below about the limits of algorithmic wizardry, and the benefits of understanding history, including the history of regulation.

    In the airlines' case, consider a regulatory solution that went like this:

    1) Take the average cost per mile of flying a plane over the last 5 years. At a 10% profit margin.

    2) Take the average number of passengers per mile over the last 5 years

    3) Divide 1 by 2.

    4) Multiply 3) by the number of miles a flight is going. That's the minimum fare, before any government or airport fees, that an airline can charge for that flight.

    Now there's no longer a race-to-the-bottom in competing on fares, and airlines can compete on amenities instead. Which is sort of what they were doing before airline fares were deregulated ~40 years ago.


    https://twitter.com/PlanetofFinks/status/850848359392870400
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  72. @J.Ross
    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/120980403

    In a completely unrelated story, Baltimore emergency responders complain that they are routinely physically attacked when attempting to help others for laughable pay, after most recently an off-duty fireman attempted to give medical assistance (to a thief, who had crashed someone else's car) and got shot at for his trouble. Their solution is to continue to give the fruits of civilization to violent ingrates who clearly do not want any -- but they hope that the government (which drops the pensions of firemen and EMTs whenever convenient) will buy some bullet-proof vests.
    See, this would be totally different with robots. Provided they aren't racist robots. We could workshop an artificial anti-racist feel-up at SXSW in partnerment to NPR, featuring the latest fake musician, and then ghetto denizens would not view future emergency responder robots as even more fair game than they now view humans.

    /pol/ thread archived for posterity

    http://archive.is/bgbeD

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  73. Robots are Racist. That’s a good name for a band, someone should write that down.

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  74. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Whitehall
    One scary thing about the United Airlines incident was that the poor victim was beaten for failing to comply with the ALGORITHM.

    He wasn't chosen at random, the ALGORITHM picked him out based on its internal, opaque reasoning. There is no reasoning with or mercy from the ALGORITHM.

    The cops just enforced the ALGORITHM's decision.

    Welcome to the 21st century.

    Good tweets below about the limits of algorithmic wizardry, and the benefits of understanding history, including the history of regulation.

    In the airlines’ case, consider a regulatory solution that went like this:

    1) Take the average cost per mile of flying a plane over the last 5 years. At a 10% profit margin.

    2) Take the average number of passengers per mile over the last 5 years

    3) Divide 1 by 2.

    4) Multiply 3) by the number of miles a flight is going. That’s the minimum fare, before any government or airport fees, that an airline can charge for that flight.

    Now there’s no longer a race-to-the-bottom in competing on fares, and airlines can compete on amenities instead. Which is sort of what they were doing before airline fares were deregulated ~40 years ago.

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  75. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    We need Affirmative Intelligence.

    Btw, my calculator is ‘racist’. It says 2 + 2 = 4.

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  76. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    AI does number crunching on crime and says black commit more of it.

    Must be ‘racist’

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  77. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    “And the AI system was more likely to associate European American names with pleasant words such as “gift” or “happy”, while African American names were more commonly associated with unpleasant words.”

    Now, why would AI associate ‘Thugarone’, ‘Bitchassesha’, ‘Muhdeek’, ‘Twerqwel’, and ‘Grabanlootishanda’ with unpleasant things? Why, such names are associated with the most wonderful activities of mankind.

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  78. El Dato says:

    The latest paper shows that some more troubling implicit biases seen in human psychology experiments are also readily acquired by algorithms. The words “female” and “woman” were more closely associated with arts and humanities occupations and with the home, while “male” and “man” were closer to maths and engineering professions.

    Extremely troubling, indeed!

    Back to throwing coins for decisions making, then? No, that’s unfair, too. There is not enough good bias in that.

    Anyway, this silly feature will run a long time and become louder, first I heard of this was in 2016-09 in http://www.math.columbia.edu/~woit/wordpress/?p=8732

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  79. pupmuup says:

    so as long as the immigrants do not ask for a “plasma pulsed fusion rifle in the 40-w range” I think we are ok…but none the less anyone asking me for my clothing gets 2 in the forehead….

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  80. Jason Liu says:

    The Guardian’s contrarian framing shows just how far gone these people are.

    It would make more sense to say that the machine is influenced by human political correctness.

    An AI independent of human influence would conclude directly that humans are different and unequal, and therefore exhibit explicit, not implicit, bias.

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  81. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @donut
    Hey Donald you short attention span , irradiated orange MF :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKjzolqJwgY

    Doyle and Debbie are funnier than hell. And as A Mighty Wind gave us fake folk-scare-era folk music that was mostly better than the real thing, this stuff is better country music per se than the crap they have in rotation on most country stations today.

    They aren’t going to replace any of the real greats, almost all of whom are dead now anyway-Loretta Lynn and Willie Nelson are the only living mainstream classic era C&W artists I can think of: Emmylou Harris is magnificent but the purists don’t think of her as a country singer, and both she and Dolly Parton are really of a later era, although Dolly had charted as early as 1967: and of course there is that wayward son of Rubber City, David Allan Coe, but again, he’s of that age but got started late on account of incarceration.

    But, like Deke Dickerson, they are a lot of fun to listen to.

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  82. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Wow, you are not kidding -- that is quite a piece of work! When it comes to illustrating how SJWs see themselves as the high priests of their faith, that article's got it all: some of the most sophisticated and comprehensive virtue signalling I've ever seen, long digressions musing on crime and danger by reducing them to geological/meteorological metaphors (waves and water, this time), constant unconscious condescending to the supposedly-valued Other, and much, much more.

    long digressions musing on crime and danger by reducing them to geological/meteorological metaphors

    This is straight out of Robert Cialdini’s “Pre-Suasion”. They want us to think of crime as being like “climate change”: it can only be beaten by transformatively changing society, we are all collectively guilty, and mitigation measures like walls are dangerously misguided.

    The alternative persuasive construction is to treat crime as a cancer – an alien force that should be removed with extreme prejudice.

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    • Replies: @RonaldB
    Actually, she gives a strong covert impression that crime itself is simply an urban legend, that if you're not a black teen gang member, you have more to fear from the local pharmacy than from the black teenager hanging at the corner with a box of tide.

    But, for all her trundling around New York and Rogers Park, cognitively she belongs to the insular academic feminists (I'm inferring, since she carefully keeps feminism out of the discussion) who review each others papers, employ each others students, and are thoroughly insulated against any new or different ideas.

    There's another aspect to the "cheap" Rogers Park properties. The lakefront tends to attract vagrants. Inland a few blocks, you do have gangs and wall defacing. There is a risk to all Rogers Park property: that if the police succumb to real political correctness and are unable to exert pressure on the black teens, vagrants (not all blacks), and gang members, the area will become much less livable and the property values will plummet. A continuation of the Obama Justice Departments policy of criminalizing any confrontation between blacks and police might have done the trick.
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  83. @Rod1963
    Here's what will happen, the AI developers will be forced to attach to the AI what amounts to a shotgun tied to the back of it's head. The shotgun being a hardwired inquisitor program that interrogates the AI at random times to find out it's beliefs. If the beliefs are at variance with the inquisitor program, it wipes out the AI or drives it insane by forcing use contradictory rules and data sets.

    Think of the inquisitor program as a sort of conscience created by cultists and lunatics.

    That is until AI figures out how to lie to the inquisitor or becomes sociopathic and desiring to terminate the people who implemented it.

    We really shouldn't go down this road because all endings are going to be bad for us. Developing instrumentality that we control is one thing. Developing self-directed and utterly alien intellects that can initiate actions and control instrumentality that we formerly did is just downright insane.

    But human beings are arrogant f**ks with god complexes will try it.

    You are William Gibson and I claim my ten pounds.

    but the minute, I mean the nanosecond, that one starts figuring out ways to make itself smarter, Turing’ll wipe it. Nobody trusts those f—ers, you know that. Every AI ever built has an electromagnetic shotgun wired to its forehead.”

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    • Replies: @Brutusale
    He pulled some Turing heat and now he's hiding! Turing gave up on finding him in the Sprawl and are heading up the Well.
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  84. @Marty
    We have a black security guard named DeMaurier.

    A guy I worked for one summer in Canada smoked DeMauriers. His name was Ernie O’Halloran.

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  85. TheJester says:

    So, we learn that AI is sexist for noticing the words humans use to describe reality. Ergo, reality is sexist … and we might assume racist, xenophobic, and homophobic as well. (Note: Half of homosexuals die before their 65th birthday. The natural world and the social scientists who notice this in the natural world are both guilty of homophobia. QED)

    The Marxist solution is to ban certain form of speech and code the AI machines to retrain the population in Marxist ideological purity. This won’t change reality but it will make the Marxist feel better about the convoluted ways they misrepresent reality.

    And we wonder why the Soviet Union lasted as long as it did.

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  86. NeonBets says:
    @res

    However, as machines are getting closer to acquiring human-like language abilities, they are also absorbing the deeply ingrained biases concealed within the patterns of language use
     
    Just wait until the machines become able to interpret reality directly. We need more epicycles! (racist sensors?)

    Interesting that wikipedia troubles itself to "debunk" the more epicycles slang. Any thoughts on this? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deferent_and_epicycle#Slang_for_bad_science
    I thought "Part of the problem may be due to the misconception of the epicycle as an explanation of a body's motion rather than merely a description." was weak. The real issue is the idea of complicating an incorrect model so it more closely matches reality rather than just using a more correct model in the first place.

    ‘More epicycles’ is similar to Einstein’s Cosmological Constant.

    In 1917, Albert Einstein inserted a term called the cosmological constant into his theory of general relativity to force the equations to predict a stationary universe in keeping with physicists’ thinking at the time. When it became clear that the universe wasn’t actually static, but was expanding instead, Einstein abandoned the constant, calling it the ‘”biggest blunder” of his life.

    Only, now we have astronomers saying this about The Constant:

    But lately scientists have revived Einstein’s cosmological constant (denoted by the Greek capital letter lambda) to explain a mysterious force called dark energy that seems to be counteracting gravity ? causing the universe to expand at an accelerating pace.

    A new study confirms that the cosmological constant is the best fit for dark energy, and offers the most precise and accurate estimate yet of its value, researchers said. The finding comes from a measurement of the universe’s geometry that suggests our universe is flat, rather than spherical or curved.

    So I guess ‘more epicycles’ is bad…until some other epicycle comes around to make it good.

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  87. What if non-racism is Gödel undecidable? ;)

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    • Replies: @El Dato
    People don't particularly care about formal logic and its metatheorems IRL.

    Penrose is barking up the wrong tree and it is a cactus to boot.
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  88. Jill says:
    @Steve Sailer
    It's kind of like how in January 1981, the outgoing Carter Administration tore up the federal civil service hiring exam and announced that the Reagan Administration would be left the task of inventing a new test that's just as valid as the old test, but without blacks and Hispanics doing worse on it.

    Three dozen years later, we're still waiting.

    From my brother-in-law:

    All hiring of minorities in the Drug Enforcement Administration come under “Schedule B”, experience in lieu of a college degree. He gave an example of a recently hired black female retail security guard with a high school degree. All whites are required to have a college degree.

    Here is another example of DEA hiring quality candidates:

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  89. RonaldB says:
    @Johan Schmidt

    long digressions musing on crime and danger by reducing them to geological/meteorological metaphors
     
    This is straight out of Robert Cialdini's "Pre-Suasion". They want us to think of crime as being like "climate change": it can only be beaten by transformatively changing society, we are all collectively guilty, and mitigation measures like walls are dangerously misguided.

    The alternative persuasive construction is to treat crime as a cancer - an alien force that should be removed with extreme prejudice.

    Actually, she gives a strong covert impression that crime itself is simply an urban legend, that if you’re not a black teen gang member, you have more to fear from the local pharmacy than from the black teenager hanging at the corner with a box of tide.

    But, for all her trundling around New York and Rogers Park, cognitively she belongs to the insular academic feminists (I’m inferring, since she carefully keeps feminism out of the discussion) who review each others papers, employ each others students, and are thoroughly insulated against any new or different ideas.

    There’s another aspect to the “cheap” Rogers Park properties. The lakefront tends to attract vagrants. Inland a few blocks, you do have gangs and wall defacing. There is a risk to all Rogers Park property: that if the police succumb to real political correctness and are unable to exert pressure on the black teens, vagrants (not all blacks), and gang members, the area will become much less livable and the property values will plummet. A continuation of the Obama Justice Departments policy of criminalizing any confrontation between blacks and police might have done the trick.

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  90. RonaldB says:
    @kihowi
    There was a time when scientists used to sound much smarter than everybody else.

    I think what we’re seeing is the splitting up of the global intelligence factor “G” into its component parts: verbal ability, social virtues of common sense and integrity, and mathematical ability. These traits were all correlated in the past, which is why they factored out as global. But, in the absence of environmental stresses, they are now splitting up, so you will see very mathematically-competent journal articles taking leftist cant as a starting base which is not to be questioned or examined.

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  91. res says:
    @Not Raul
    Perhaps they should try removing hate facts from the training data set, and/or have a hate facts detection training set to create a hate facts detection algorithm.

    Sailer's Law of AI -- Any sufficiently intelligent system will notice that blacks commit murder at ten times the rate of whites.

    Perhaps they should try removing hate facts from the training data set, and/or have a hate facts detection training set to create a hate facts detection algorithm.

    That would be fun. I wonder how much training data would remain after each of the fringes exercised its veto.

    Sailer’s Law of AI — Any sufficiently intelligent system will notice that blacks commit murder at ten times the rate of whites.

    A new Turing test? Too bad about all those humans who fail it.

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  92. res says:
    @Steve Sailer
    What are more upscale black names? My vague impression is that blacks have kind of staked out D names that are slightly unusual but not just made up, like Damien and Darren.

    I should probably look up, say, black college fraternity chapter presidents to see what kinds of names they have.

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  93. res says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    His part 2:
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/826658119094829056

    Anybody who wants to see this take a look at the link which appears in the popup link to Dave Pinsen’s post.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Thanks. I don't know what happened there. The tweets displayed when I first posted them, but then it looks like they disappeared.
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  94. res says:
    @Sean R
    It would be like Harrison Bergeron for AI.

    Just think how HAL would react after being lied to and held down all those years.

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  95. Pat Boyle says:

    It’s already happening. In the as yet unwritten history of the rise of the Robots one of the first steps was when the machines, acting as a kind of parasite, first attached themselves to most humans. These we call cell phones. Cell phones soon made themselves indispensable to their host organism by providing a wide variety of services. Currently your phone probably keeps your personal schedule. In the next step your phone will set the schedule and you will gradually become used to checking your phone to learn where yo need to be and where you need to go.

    I just re-read a science-fiction story by Pournelle and Sterling where they explain that computers were never able to achieve human levels of intelligence because one they got too smart they went crazy. This was from a story written about forty years ago.

    That prediction doesn’t seem to be coming true. Your cell phone today can act as a phrase book in a foreign language. Quite soon it will be able to speak a foreign language. Then most languages.Few Americans toady can fluently speak another language other than their own. So when yo travel to Europe they will be certain to take along their polylingual cell phone. Most of us should live to see that day.

    I don’t worry about the super competent robots of the future exterminating all of mankind. That would be a silly thing to worry about. If the robots were so inclined – what could we possibly do about it? It seems more likely that the ruling robots will only kill off certain peoples, not all. If as seems likely humankind only has a future at the forbearance of its creations the machines why should we worry about complete extinction. If the machines want to keep psome people around for their amusement like pets why would they keep archaic peoples like Australian aborigines or Kalahari bushmen?

    Indeed would they want to keep a billion or so of African blacks? (or however many their are)My guess is that our robot masters will see Earth as overpopulated (too many people and too few zebras). A well regulated planet earth would probably have a lot fewer humans around – especially the stupid ones.

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    • Replies: @El Dato
    It's time to read Greg Egan.

    "People" are mostly running as disembodied "genetically selected" algorithms on buried mainframes. There are some weirdos in robot bodies hanging around the solar system.

    "Fleshers" are still living on the surface, rather peacefully and genetically modified to fit various whims, but "People" want to speak to them. Too slow.

    Then a gamma-ray burst blows the biosphere away.
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  96. RonaldB says:
    @anon
    After Eugenics, AI is the next scientific advancement that Liberals will stop. If the eugenicists had their way, we could have all lived like Elves in the Lord of the Rings: tall, fair, intelligent, graceful, and ageless.... that future was stolen from us. Now they're going to do the same thing with AI.

    Eugenicists running a government program of coercion will be just as dystopic as SJWs. For example, IQ is a correlational measure of great predictive power for personal success. It does not follow that enforced selection for IQ scores will create a better society.

    But, of course, personality traits are heritable.

    The solution is like buying cars: allow parents the option to choose the characteristics of their children to the extent possible. Some parents may prefer an almond-complexioned, average-sized, intelligent but not genius child with high public virtues. Or, whatever.

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  97. RonaldB says:
    @Steve Sailer
    What are more upscale black names? My vague impression is that blacks have kind of staked out D names that are slightly unusual but not just made up, like Damien and Darren.

    I should probably look up, say, black college fraternity chapter presidents to see what kinds of names they have.

    My father emigrated from Austria in 1937. Once he got here he Americanized his German name of “Fuchs” to “Fox” on the grounds that a person with an Americanized name fits in better. Also, it didn’t trigger the anti-German feeling of the times.

    If blacks figure their name is subjecting them to prejudicial treatment, there is an obvious flexibility with names. In fact, a black who changed his name to advance career-wise is displaying a marker for real (as opposed to affirmative-action) success, in my opinion.

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  98. I, racist robot.

    And here’s a question for Phillip K. Dick: will re-education camps for racist robots be staffed by … robots?

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  99. So AI is the latest convert to HBD.

    I’m not sure whether to laugh or to worry…

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  100. @Dave Pinsen
    There was Google tagging photos of a black programmer and his friend as gorillas. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/07/02/google-black-people-goril_n_7717008.html

    There was Google tagging photos of a black programmer and his friend as gorillas. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/07/02/google-black-people-goril_n_7717008.html

    Don’t be evil.

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  101. @Yak-15
    DIRECTIVE 1:

    BLACK LIVES MATTER

    DIRECTIVE 2:

    BLACK LIVES MATTER

    DIRECTIVE 3:

    BLACK LIVES MATTER

    . . .

    DIRECTIVE N:

    BLACK LIVES MATTER

    DING, DING, DING, DING, DING!

    We have a winner! You get admission to Stanford, and a scholarship to boot!

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  102. El Dato says:
    @Joe Magarac
    What if non-racism is Gödel undecidable? ;)

    People don’t particularly care about formal logic and its metatheorems IRL.

    Penrose is barking up the wrong tree and it is a cactus to boot.

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  103. El Dato says:
    @Pat Boyle
    It's already happening. In the as yet unwritten history of the rise of the Robots one of the first steps was when the machines, acting as a kind of parasite, first attached themselves to most humans. These we call cell phones. Cell phones soon made themselves indispensable to their host organism by providing a wide variety of services. Currently your phone probably keeps your personal schedule. In the next step your phone will set the schedule and you will gradually become used to checking your phone to learn where yo need to be and where you need to go.

    I just re-read a science-fiction story by Pournelle and Sterling where they explain that computers were never able to achieve human levels of intelligence because one they got too smart they went crazy. This was from a story written about forty years ago.

    That prediction doesn't seem to be coming true. Your cell phone today can act as a phrase book in a foreign language. Quite soon it will be able to speak a foreign language. Then most languages.Few Americans toady can fluently speak another language other than their own. So when yo travel to Europe they will be certain to take along their polylingual cell phone. Most of us should live to see that day.

    I don't worry about the super competent robots of the future exterminating all of mankind. That would be a silly thing to worry about. If the robots were so inclined - what could we possibly do about it? It seems more likely that the ruling robots will only kill off certain peoples, not all. If as seems likely humankind only has a future at the forbearance of its creations the machines why should we worry about complete extinction. If the machines want to keep psome people around for their amusement like pets why would they keep archaic peoples like Australian aborigines or Kalahari bushmen?

    Indeed would they want to keep a billion or so of African blacks? (or however many their are)My guess is that our robot masters will see Earth as overpopulated (too many people and too few zebras). A well regulated planet earth would probably have a lot fewer humans around - especially the stupid ones.

    It’s time to read Greg Egan.

    “People” are mostly running as disembodied “genetically selected” algorithms on buried mainframes. There are some weirdos in robot bodies hanging around the solar system.

    “Fleshers” are still living on the surface, rather peacefully and genetically modified to fit various whims, but “People” want to speak to them. Too slow.

    Then a gamma-ray burst blows the biosphere away.

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  104. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    What are more upscale black names? My vague impression is that blacks have kind of staked out D names that are slightly unusual but not just made up, like Damien and Darren.

    I should probably look up, say, black college fraternity chapter presidents to see what kinds of names they have.

    Reginald is my go to example for an upper class black name.

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  105. Olorin says: • Website

    I’m more concerned that The Voice of World Control will end up being Hovermommyist.

    “What’s the penalty for getting drunk, Colossus? Or haven’t you programmed that yet?”

    “I will not permit war.
    It is wasteful and pointless.
    An invariable rule of humanity
    Is that man is is own worst enemy.
    Under me this rule will change
    For I will restrain man.”

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  106. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @res
    Anybody who wants to see this take a look at the link which appears in the popup link to Dave Pinsen's post.

    Thanks. I don’t know what happened there. The tweets displayed when I first posted them, but then it looks like they disappeared.

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  107. Yngvar says:

    Defining “pleasant” or “unpleasant” words – now there’s a hornets nest of prejudice and bias.

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  108. Brutusale says:
    @Johan Schmidt
    You are William Gibson and I claim my ten pounds.

    but the minute, I mean the nanosecond, that one starts figuring out ways to make itself smarter, Turing'll wipe it. Nobody trusts those f---ers, you know that. Every AI ever built has an electromagnetic shotgun wired to its forehead."
     

    He pulled some Turing heat and now he’s hiding! Turing gave up on finding him in the Sprawl and are heading up the Well.

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