The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Guardian: America's Future Is Boulder, Colorado
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From The Guardian:

Flirting with Trump? No, the US will vote for a Boulder solution
Will Hutton

Boulder, Colorado, has been voted the US’s happiest city, thanks to its urban planning, high level of healthcare and burgeoning service jobs

What Americans will look like in the future, unless Trump wins

A bar in Boulder, Colorado, where the hippy culture of the 1960s meets the digital revolution.
Photograph: Alamy
Saturday 21 May 2016 19.21 EDT

The future is here and it works. Importantly, it is not a conservative future. Boulder, Colorado, is not as famous as San Francisco or even Palo Alto – but this city of some 100,000, where the high plains end and the Rocky Mountains begin, is the leading American urban area of the 21st century. It is a bewildering alchemy of 1960s hippy culture, frontier technologies, thoughtful urban planning and burgeoning service jobs ranging from diet counselling to advanced road bike maintenance. Boulder has become the exemplar of how rich and satisfying urban life can be. It is also a Democrat stronghold.

It has been voted the US’s brainiest city, its happiest city, the country’s foodiest place and the number one city for health. It is a standing reproach to Donald Trump, and indeed Britain’s rightwing Brexiteers who ape his thinking. The place is booming around values and principles to which they are hostile – but attracting families, entrepreneurs and innovators from all round the US because it is such a delightful place in which to live and work.

Who wants to be in neighbourhoods that incorporate the values of Trump-style populists or their first cousins, the Brexiteers, where intolerance and hostility to others are the new normal?

If Boulder is the future, where are all the white people going to come from (as in all seven in the Guardian’s photo illustrating this essay)?

In the 2010 Census, Boulder was 0.9% black, 8.7% Hispanic (in a state that is 20.7% Hispanic), and 4.7% Asian. Boulder today is about as white as the United States was in the 1950s, and far less black than during Eisenhower’s days.

 
Hide 448 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. “Who wants to be in neighbourhoods that incorporate the values of Trump-style populists or their first cousins, the Brexiteers, where intolerance and hostility to others are the new normal?”

    Who wants to be in neighborhoods that AREN’T 88 percent white? If Boulderites are so tolerant and friendly, you’d think they’d wanna share their wondrous dirt with less-fortunate, occasionally barbaric American urban fauna and vibrant enrichers from all the cargo-cult superpowers of the world.

    • Replies: @guest
    Intolerance I get, because Trump doesn't appear to tolerate the presence of illegal immigrants nor the free entry of certain types of otherwise legal immigrants. Although he probably would tolerate a certain amount of illegals. We're probably not going to see 30 million or however many deportations it'd require to get back to zero.

    But I dispute this terminology. Do we call Clinton "intolerant" for not tolerating gun owners, for instance? Why does that word only get trotted out for the type of policies that adversely impact discreet minorities? Because those in power say so.

    As for hostility, Trump's opponents appear obviously more hostile than he. But it's okay, because they're being hostile to an intolerant person, so it's not really hostile. Because they say so.
  2. “If Boulder is the future, where are all the white people going to come from”

    The Spanish speaking Caribbean, Central America, South America, The Middle East, and North Africa.

    Don’t forget how broad The U.S census definition of “White” is.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I'm so, so sorry the census definition of white is too inclusive for you. Take a tissue.
    , @Olorin
    Arabs are white. Doesn't that make any Muslim white?

    So there ya go. Easy peasy.
    , @ChaseBizzy
    If sperglords like you got your way it would also include North-East Asians.
    , @Mark Caplan
    The U.S. Census Bureau doesn't define race. Race and Hispanic origin are self-reported by the person in the household who fills out the census form.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Don’t forget how broad The U.S census definition of “White” is.
     
    And flexible. Q: How many nonwhites will be needed to make whites a minority? And what will the total sum be?

    And what will the carbon footprint be?

    Watch the definition of "white" do a dance around the classroom. Or pressroom.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Don’t forget how broad The U.S census definition of “White” is.
     
    And flexible. Q: How many nonwhites will be needed to make whites a minority? And what will the total sum be?

    And what will the carbon footprint be?

    Watch the definition of "white" do a dance around the classroom. Or pressroom.
  3. There are four (4) Nobel Prize winners in Physics, associated with Boulder:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Wieman
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Allin_Cornell
    (2001, first observation of Bose-Einstein condensation of atoms)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_L._Hall
    (2005, stabilization of femtosecond lasers to provide dramatic advances in optical frequency metrology)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_J._Wineland
    (2012, ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems.)

    • Replies: @D. K.
    There are two Nobel Prize winners in Economic Sciences-- the late Paul Samuelson, in 1970, and Joseph Stiglitz, of Columbia University, in 2001-- that are fellow natives of my birthplace, Gary, Indiana. Helluva lotta good that has done for our birthplace, these past fifteen or fifty years!
  4. If this Guardian piece was an intentional parody a la Onion, i.e. someone saying “the recipe for a happy U.S. is a place with 88% whites and 1% blacks”, everyone would be screaming from the top of their lungs that you can’t be so racist, oblivious and insensitive. But apparently if you are the Guardian you can be as oblivious as you like, so long as you take snipes at the Donald.

    You couldn’t make up this stuff.

    • Replies: @Thomas Fuller
    The Guardian is the daily scripture for the sort of sneering, metropolitan lefties who, together with the Muslim block vote, have hijacked the Labour Party. Said lefties mostly seem to live in Islington (a borough in north London that has supplanted Hampstead as the lefty's preferred habitat) and are exemplified by one Jeremy (!) Corbyn, Labour Leader.

    As such, the paper is a rich source of lunacy:

    https://www.facebook.com/peakguardian

    It has a severely dwindling paper circulation and is only taken any notice of because it functions as the newsfeed for the BBC, itself populated by lefties of the kind aforementioned. Hence Mr Sailer has been led somewhat up a cul-de-sac if he believes that anything appearing in the Groaniad has the slightest contact with reality. For any who doubt this, check out the vituperations of, say, Jessica Valenti or Laurie Penny.
    , @Ragno
    Though still ignorant of the who-what-where & when, the moment I read Importantly, it is not a conservative future... right in the first paragraph, I grasped at once the why of whatever it was I was about to read.

    That happens an awful lot these days, though.

  5. This is hilarious. Boulder is absurdly expensive, rabidly leftist/socialist, and looney bin crazy. You can stroll the main pedestrian shopping drag downtown, buy a $500 ski parka, then catch a $500 fine if you spark up a cigarette (but not a joint) outside (or even in your own car). Trustafarians abound (like in Vail). Traffic is horrible. Not too long ago you could swiftly escape to a more authentic hippie culture up the canyon in Nederland, but lately that too has become increasingly trustafarian. Every other storefront is selling wildly overpriced “art” or crystals and related new age crap from white people in dreadlocks.

    From my perspective, the only redemption comes from ripping down the canyon with no opposing traffic in a sports car (i.e. Left Hand Canyon), but Boulder is far from the only place in the Colorado Rockies where there are spectacular enthusiast driving roads. That pretty much leaves us with the overwhelmingly white and low crime population and springtime rafting.

    • Replies: @Flinders Petrie

    That pretty much leaves us with the overwhelmingly white and low crime population and springtime rafting.
     
    There was the case of the stolen Montbell bear on Pearl Street. The life-sized stuffed bear was found by the police three days later at a campsite, where he had been carried by several groups of hikers who got a thrill out of hiking with a bear on their back.

    It's worth noting that almost all of the non-whites in the Boulder census are students obtained by U. Colo. diversity incentives. I've never seen a nonwhite outside of the campus, or Pearl Street mall. And when I've seen them, they are surrounded by crowds of adoring dreadlocked trust fund millennials who appear desperate to have some of that cool blackness rub off on them.
    , @27 year old
    That is sad to hear about Ned.
    , @anonymous
    You nailed builder. Although it appears to be a racial paradise, the trustafarians will be the first to lecture you on the benefit of more Mexicans (see, they have Mexican nannies and gardeners).

    There are few middle class whites, and the Mexicans and professors live in apartments outside of the city.
    , @Olorin
    In the early 1980s I passed through Boulder on the way from some high country backpacking trip. I stopped for a post-trek guzzle and chomp at the least fern-bar-looking bar. Walked in, and they had "specialty brews" listed on the chalkboard, including Rolling Rock for $5 a pony bottle.

    At that time I bought glasses of it for 35 cents in my neighborhood tap room (Italian working class). It took me funny somehow, I started laughing and couldn't stop. It was one of those little signs that I ought never go anywhere near Boulder again, an attitude that three subsequent decades' experience has only underscored with a very thick black Sharpie.

    Though a city of 100,000 with only 900 blacks does sound tempting on paper.
    , @Luke Lea
    Notice seen on community bulletin board in local Safeway: Astral Support Group
  6. Boulder is nice. It ain’t diverse. The open borders crowd should look at Commerce City if they want a look at what their policies lead to. Less nice.

  7. Boulder IS awesome – even if you don’t subscribe to the left wing politics of the place, it’s got nature in spades, safety, lots of smart people, and decent culture and dining. Of course as Steve points out, the author glaringly omits the key characteristics of who lives there and who doesn’t, because readers might accidentally think that high concentrations of educated white people tend to result in really high quality of all around living as opposed to vibrant diversity all over the place being the highest good.

    I’d probably toss Madison, Wisconsin in there as well – love it and could live there even as a huge political outlier because everything else about it is pretty great.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I've always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc...

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.
    , @pyrrhus
    Got to disagree about Madison, having spent some time there. Restaurants are lousy, housing stock is weirdly inadequate, with very few single family homes available, due to regulation. Students are annoying...
  8. @Immigrant from former USSR
    There are four (4) Nobel Prize winners in Physics, associated with Boulder:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Wieman
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Allin_Cornell
    (2001, first observation of Bose-Einstein condensation of atoms)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_L._Hall
    (2005, stabilization of femtosecond lasers to provide dramatic advances in optical frequency metrology)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_J._Wineland
    (2012, ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems.)

    There are two Nobel Prize winners in Economic Sciences– the late Paul Samuelson, in 1970, and Joseph Stiglitz, of Columbia University, in 2001– that are fellow natives of my birthplace, Gary, Indiana. Helluva lotta good that has done for our birthplace, these past fifteen or fifty years!

    • Replies: @Immigrant from former USSR
    Dear D.K.:
    Thank you for your reaction.

    Wieman was born in Corvallis, Oregon ,
    Cornell was born in Palo Alto, California,
    Hall was born in Denver, Colorado,
    Wineland was born in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin.

    My best wishes to Gary, Indiana,
    and separately --- to Purdue University - Indiana's Land Grant University !!!
    , @Father O'Hara
    I admit to being much more impressed by your Michael Jackson.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Fake Nobel Prize winners, that is. There is no Nobel Prize in economics.
  9. So comment is not allowed? Or am I just incompetent?

    This is piece is flush with a smug pomposity while being among the flat out most clueless pieces I’ve ever read. (BTW, I have this vague feeling that US mainstream journalist pieces now tend to steer clear of this sort of cheerleading without mentioning the diversity deficit. This is more what you’d get from the clueless follower.)

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    Don't worry AnotherDad, it's them, not you.
    The Grauniad had to close its notorious Komment Macht Frei section due to "moderation difficulties". There was a long drivelling announcement a few months back from Mary? Thing? (the editrix) blaming "trolls" (but not necromancers) and so on.
    Real reason? I suspect their herds of outsourced "moderators" could no longer suppress the real opinions of the readership by seeking out crimethink and deleting the errant, and were becoming an expensive liability, since nobody buys the paper anymore.

    tl;dr - nobody in Britain, apart from a few expensive boho streets in North London, and the BBC management of course, cares what the Guardian thinks about anything anymore. They seem to exist in an alternate universe to the rest of us:
    c.f. the "Labour" (=wealthy public-sector professionals' ) Party. Went into foetal position shock when forced to hobnob with the lieges for their votes recently. "The first person I meet is a horrible racist! I'm never coming back to wherever this is!"
    , @5371
    All you need to do is look at Hutton's photo to tell he's a spectacularly pompous, pea-brained git.
  10. Hepp says:

    It has 100K people, with a university that enrolls 30K students. Probably half the city is either attending the university or employed by it.

    In other words, they don’t have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids. Of course it’s a nice place to live.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Aspen is pretty nice too.
    , @Immigrant from former USSR
    You wrote:

    In other words, they don’t have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids.
     
    FYI, they produced all the basic science of time measurement, so important for GPS and for guiding rockets, including ICBMs (Inter-Continental Ballistic Missiles) and space rockets.
    Boulder division of NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology):
    that is where Wineland works.

    JILA (Joint Institute of Laboratory Astrophysics) --- joint
    between NIST and U. Colorado, campus Boulder.
    Weiman, Cornell and Hall made their discoveries in JILA;
    Cornell and Hall still work in Boulder, Weiman moved to Stanford University.

    Quantum computing, quantum cryptography, hyper-accurate gyroscopes for submarines --- that is what Bose-Einstein condensate is good for.

    Sure, that is subsidized by Federal Government money.

    Please, have some humility.

    Good occasion to tell Dan Quayle joke.
    Bush 41 tells Dan Quayle:
    --- I just signed the treaty with Gorbachev to eliminate all ICBMs.
    Dan Quayle:
    --- But can I keep my Mackintosh ?

    , @Wilkey
    "In other words, they don’t have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids."

    This fairly well sums it up. CU Boulder is also the flagship state university in a state with no strong private or public alternatives. Boulder gets the richest kids in the state, and it's economy is either entirely reliant on direct government spending or on businesses born of that spending.
    , @Bill
    Saratoga, CA, though, that's nice because of all the capitalism pulsing through it.
  11. There is a ready answer to this sort of smug, pompous windbaggery:

    “Fine. We’re happy to let your voters live in your tolerant, progressive, open-borders, socialist utopia … just let our voters live in our “backward”, “xenophobic”, “racist”, close-border hell-hole. And we’ll live our lives without bothering each other and let “history” decide which society was better–more pleasant, more prosperous, more free.”

    This is of course precisely what the left will never do, because they know–but never admit–that they are essentially *parasitic* on the very people they trash and despise.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    There is a ready answer to this sort of smug, pompous windbaggery:

    “Fine. We’re happy to let your voters live in your tolerant, progressive, open-borders, socialist utopia … just let our voters live in our “backward”, “xenophobic”, “racist”, close-border hell-hole. And we’ll live our lives without bothering each other and let “history” decide which society was better–more pleasant, more prosperous, more free.”

    This is of course precisely what the left will never do, because they know–but never admit–that they are essentially *parasitic* on the very people they trash and despise.
     
    Exactly right.
  12. I went to grad school in Boulder. It wasn’t bad 35 years ago but since then the traffic has gotten really horrible and plenty of people avoid it for that reason.

    Money’s pretty flush because it has a lot of government facilities in addition to CU:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boulder,_Colorado#Economy_and_industry (scroll up a little).

    • Replies: @Olorin
    As Prof. Al Bartlett used to say, if you want to know what Boulder will look like in 50 years, look at San Diego today.
  13. “burgeoning service jobs ranging from diet counselling to advanced road bike maintenance.”

    So I tune up your $2500 bicycle, you tell me to go vegan, and wealth is created!

    do you feel feel the burgeon!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    $2500? You prole, if it's less than $4000 you're not even trying: http://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/previews/16-for-2016-the-best-new-mountain-bikes-of-2016
    , @rod1963
    Why yes, in advanced societies no one produces anything except recreational drugs and everyone gets rich selling each other "services".

    It's right out of "Erewhon".

    Heck if the Feds cut off funding to all the labs, centers and schools, it would be a ghost town in six months. It doesn't manufacture or produce anything, it's a company town in many respects.
  14. @Hepp
    It has 100K people, with a university that enrolls 30K students. Probably half the city is either attending the university or employed by it.

    In other words, they don't have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids. Of course it's a nice place to live.

    Aspen is pretty nice too.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    http://abc7news.com/news/millbrae-man-ex-gf-suspected-in-his-death-had-bitter-break-up/1352611/

    Off topic, but this story is too isteve-y to ignore. No chechens but still.
  15. @Stan d Mute
    This is hilarious. Boulder is absurdly expensive, rabidly leftist/socialist, and looney bin crazy. You can stroll the main pedestrian shopping drag downtown, buy a $500 ski parka, then catch a $500 fine if you spark up a cigarette (but not a joint) outside (or even in your own car). Trustafarians abound (like in Vail). Traffic is horrible. Not too long ago you could swiftly escape to a more authentic hippie culture up the canyon in Nederland, but lately that too has become increasingly trustafarian. Every other storefront is selling wildly overpriced "art" or crystals and related new age crap from white people in dreadlocks.

    From my perspective, the only redemption comes from ripping down the canyon with no opposing traffic in a sports car (i.e. Left Hand Canyon), but Boulder is far from the only place in the Colorado Rockies where there are spectacular enthusiast driving roads. That pretty much leaves us with the overwhelmingly white and low crime population and springtime rafting.

    That pretty much leaves us with the overwhelmingly white and low crime population and springtime rafting.

    There was the case of the stolen Montbell bear on Pearl Street. The life-sized stuffed bear was found by the police three days later at a campsite, where he had been carried by several groups of hikers who got a thrill out of hiking with a bear on their back.

    It’s worth noting that almost all of the non-whites in the Boulder census are students obtained by U. Colo. diversity incentives. I’ve never seen a nonwhite outside of the campus, or Pearl Street mall. And when I’ve seen them, they are surrounded by crowds of adoring dreadlocked trust fund millennials who appear desperate to have some of that cool blackness rub off on them.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    It’s worth noting that almost all of the non-whites in the Boulder census are students obtained by U. Colo. diversity incentives. I’ve never seen a nonwhite outside of the campus, or Pearl Street mall. And when I’ve seen them, they are surrounded by crowds of adoring dreadlocked trust fund millennials who appear desperate to have some of that cool blackness rub off on them.
     
    You just reminded me of Bill McCartney, his daughter, and Sal Aunese, and I now feel sick.
    , @TheJester
    Stan de Mute, you beat me to the observation that Boulder's culture is derived from large numbers of trust fund millennials.

    Boulder "is" the University of Colorado, which has a reputation as a premier and expensive "play" school ... fun on the slopes, hiking mountain trails, an extravagant avant garde lifestyle, and now it is legal to smoke marijuana. It is the good life lived by privileged and subsidized youth who don't have to worry about the consequences of their actions or their futures. Besides, Vail is right up the road. They can visit their parents on weekends.
  16. “It has been voted the US’s brainiest city, its happiest city, the country’s foodiest place and the number one city for health.”

    Why is Boulder more brainy, happy, & healthy than Ferguson and San Bernardino for example? Isn’t diversity suppose to be our strength?

  17. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Arclight
    Boulder IS awesome - even if you don't subscribe to the left wing politics of the place, it's got nature in spades, safety, lots of smart people, and decent culture and dining. Of course as Steve points out, the author glaringly omits the key characteristics of who lives there and who doesn't, because readers might accidentally think that high concentrations of educated white people tend to result in really high quality of all around living as opposed to vibrant diversity all over the place being the highest good.

    I'd probably toss Madison, Wisconsin in there as well - love it and could live there even as a huge political outlier because everything else about it is pretty great.

    I’ve always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc…

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    Burlington , VT was also great in that way.
    , @fnn
    Munich was notable for its right-wing Bohemians/intellectuals (e.g., Stefan George) and even right-wing folk singers in the early part of the last century. Of course also a diverse collection of right-wing literary figures in Paris before 1945. Stuff that's hard to believe today.
    , @Neil Templeton
    Fallacies of scale. An "ironic" definition in software engineering context.

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20140914212529-56699267-fallacies-of-scale
    , @Arclight
    I don't want to be around only people that are basically political and cultural clones of myself, but having lived in for an extended period in a city that is only slightly to the right of San Francisco, it's not any fun to experience liberal fascism first hand. And heaven forbid you actually vocalize your disagreement with some bit of their dogma, you'll find yourself arguing with 30 people at a time at dinner parties or just not invited anymore, period.

    So yes, if you live in an area where there is some check on the worst impulses of the progressives I think it can generally be pretty great. But when you live in a one-party state, it's pretty aggravating.
    , @Big Bill
    Don't forget Ann Arbor, MI and Madison, WI!
    , @Dr. X
    All those college towns (and many others) are great places to live because they're all Disneylands. They're not real.

    Living in a college town is like eating caviar in a tuxedo in the first-class dining room on the Titanic while hundreds of grimy stokers are shoveling coal into the engines ten decks below. When the thing hits an iceberg, the people in first class won't feel a thing but the guys in the engine room are all goners.

    The point is that college towns are the cherry on top of the sundae. The society that pays for those college towns is comprised of people doing real work, having real problems, and competing with real Mexicans, real Chinese, and real blacks trying to rob them. The idea that college towns are "the future" is ridiculous. Colleges are dependent on significant artificial support from the government -- no property taxes, no income taxes, tax-free endowments, direct subsidies, student loans and grants. College towns would be significantly different if colleges were treated like other industries.
    , @James O'Meara
    Liberals love to live in rural/working class areas that have been purged of nasty rural/small town White folks. The latter build the lovely towns, then are driven out when rich folks move in. No need to post "Don't let the sun set on you" signs since money is the entrance ticket, so everyone basks in how tolerant they are.

    It's James Kunstler's whole mindset, but funnily enough he doesn't see it at all.

    I discuss this in my article "The Gilmore Girls Occupy Wall. St." here: http://www.counter-currents.com/2011/11/the-gilmore-girls-occupy-wall-street/
    , @Seamus Padraig

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc… The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.
     
    Liberals are good at running counter-cultures, just not cultures themselves.
    , @RadicalCenter
    How about a State with Texas policies on guns and taxes (stand your ground and carry concealed or openly, no income tax), Colorado marijuana policy (legal and plentiful), and an overwhelmingly white/Asian population so our kids will be safe? That's my dream right there.
    , @MoodyMillennial
    Neighbourhoods or cities that are generally lefty liberal can be fun places to live--if the denizens aren't very involved with politics and social ideas. Unfortunately, many lefty liberals are more similar to vindictive, judgemental puritans than to devil-may-care, go-with-the-flow hippies. The latter are generally easy to get along with, if somewhat brain dead, while the former will make life cloistered and small for people with a nonconformist personality.

    I live in Toronto and have found that the overwhelming majority of (White) people whom I've encountered here are very much lefty liberal. They're also not very fun: uptight, prudish and reserved to the point of reticent and awkward. They'll judge people in that hyperbolic and contrived SJW way too. Hitting on women is essentially rape, for example. (Never mind that most women I've known that have complained to me about aggressive, strange men hitting on them were speaking about men from, erm, aggressive, strange cultures while complaining that White guys were too timid to make a move.)

    Many regions of the Northernish Easternish North America have effectively traded puritanical Protestantism for Liberalism. Plus ca change.
  18. @Stan d Mute
    This is hilarious. Boulder is absurdly expensive, rabidly leftist/socialist, and looney bin crazy. You can stroll the main pedestrian shopping drag downtown, buy a $500 ski parka, then catch a $500 fine if you spark up a cigarette (but not a joint) outside (or even in your own car). Trustafarians abound (like in Vail). Traffic is horrible. Not too long ago you could swiftly escape to a more authentic hippie culture up the canyon in Nederland, but lately that too has become increasingly trustafarian. Every other storefront is selling wildly overpriced "art" or crystals and related new age crap from white people in dreadlocks.

    From my perspective, the only redemption comes from ripping down the canyon with no opposing traffic in a sports car (i.e. Left Hand Canyon), but Boulder is far from the only place in the Colorado Rockies where there are spectacular enthusiast driving roads. That pretty much leaves us with the overwhelmingly white and low crime population and springtime rafting.

    That is sad to hear about Ned.

  19. @D. K.
    There are two Nobel Prize winners in Economic Sciences-- the late Paul Samuelson, in 1970, and Joseph Stiglitz, of Columbia University, in 2001-- that are fellow natives of my birthplace, Gary, Indiana. Helluva lotta good that has done for our birthplace, these past fifteen or fifty years!

    Dear D.K.:
    Thank you for your reaction.

    Wieman was born in Corvallis, Oregon ,
    Cornell was born in Palo Alto, California,
    Hall was born in Denver, Colorado,
    Wineland was born in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin.

    My best wishes to Gary, Indiana,
    and separately — to Purdue University – Indiana’s Land Grant University !!!

    • Replies: @D. K.
    When I was born, a few months after its fiftieth anniversary, Gary's population was burgeoning-- it went from about 134,000 to about 178,000, between the 1950 and 1960 censuses, courtesy of the Baby Boom (with my mother contributing seven live births, during that decade). Today, it is well under 80,000.

    When I was born, Purdue's enrollment was just under 12,000. When I transfered there, forty years ago come August, it was just past 30,000, for the first time ever. Several years ago, it passed 40,000! It has recently ebbed to a little under 39,000.

    I have not been back down to visit, nor even driven through, West Lafayette since August 1985. I may assure anyone, however, that it is an infinitely more desirable destination than my moribund birthplace. All a matter of magic dirt, I think the agronomists at Purdue University would concede....
  20. @Jefferson
    "If Boulder is the future, where are all the white people going to come from"

    The Spanish speaking Caribbean, Central America, South America, The Middle East, and North Africa.

    Don't forget how broad The U.S census definition of "White" is.

    I’m so, so sorry the census definition of white is too inclusive for you. Take a tissue.

  21. Boulder, CO is like Madison, WI and Portland, OR – but whiter.

    • Replies: @gruff
    Yes it sounds a lot like Portland. Central PDX is a bubble. Just the other day a woman was talking to me about her daughter's elementary school - "I LOVE the diversity! Love love love it! There's even a Muslim girl with the headscarf, some black kids etc....that's hard to find in this city." I asked her what it was about the diversity she loved, and she said that it will show her daughter that there's so much more out there, a wider world.
    , @Anonymous
    Boulder, CO is like Martha's Vineyard but mountainier.
    , @Big Bill
    Pity. Madison has been deliberately importing Negros from the ghetto. Murder, rapes and street crime have made it much more unpleasant over the last 30 years.
  22. Goodbye, Colorado Springs, it’s been good to read about you. These press pieces of praise only guarantee that you will be deluged with eager youth and old fart liberals searching for a new place to destroy in their lustful zest to bring the wonders of diverse cultures and peoples to your neighborhoods. Peace, begone; terror, welcome!

    Move, sure you can, but it will be more of a retreat than a strategic maneuver, for the forces of diversity – like the hordes of zombies in World War Z – will batter the walls of your new fortresses, probably about the time you let out a sigh of relief, thinking you’ve found safe refuge.

    Diversity is bringing on the New Dark Ages, not the New World of Milk and Honey.

    • Replies: @Hubbub
    Yeah, and Boulder, too!
    , @athEIst
    Imagine how the diversity of the Roman Empire peaked as Franks, Visigoths, Vandals and Ostrogoths poured across the borders.
  23. This piece of precious prissiness is hilarious.

    I worked in Boulder 25 years ago. I was stunned at how white it was. Coming from a region with a large black population, with numerous other ethnicities represented, I had never seen anything like it. It was certainly hippiesh, but you could see it dying even then. Boulder was where whatever hippies were left in the area would go to do drug exchanges. The street vibe was already pretty yuppied (another cultural thing I was new to). And it was expensive. You could go and see the leftovers of the beat scene draw modest checks for performing/scenstering at Allan Ginsburg’s Naropa Institute (subject of a hilarious takedown by poet Tom Clark in the The Great Naropa Poetry Wars) and do nice day hikes, but everything else cost a lot of money. Culturally, it was white bread liberal, with that typical veneer of exotica wrapped in a Patagonia outfit. There was absolutely nothing speaking of anything authentic or “diverse”.

    A year ago, I spent a week there doing some technical training. Things had taken their course and Boulder had become the complete sterile utopia that it was heading toward, and it was as white as ever.

    This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don’t know where to begin. The idea that this town represents the future is absurd. First of all, this country will soon be minority majority, and if he has the least bit of intelligence, he would know that the culture of Boulder is not their culture. A city that is 0.9% black represents the past more than anything Donald Trump represents.

    Any journalist who attempts to use a rich college town as representative of anything general about America should be automatically fired. If this town represents anything of America’s future, it is white flight via high property values and zoning laws.

    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Olorin

    "This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don’t know where to begin. The idea that this town represents the future is absurd."
     
    My guess is that perspectives like this Guardianista's parse as: "I'd like to retire here someday."
    , @Frau Katze
    The journos are getting desperate. Simple logic is beyond them now. (Maybe it always was, in fact),

    They're panicking over Trump.

    NYT has a piece saying diversity doesn't cause distrust.

    Those low trust ethnicities are only low trust because they're poor and disadvantaged.

    So, skim off the best of those ethnicities, and you'll get along fine with them. Maybe. It's speculative.

    Plus, no discussion about what to do about the low trust leftovers, the perennial poor.
    , @Expletive Deleted

    This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don’t know where to begin.
     
    Well spotted. Will Hutton is an old bald boomer who regards himself as a bit of a hippy rebel, standing up for the little people, soixante-huitard etc.
    Made his name writing turgid emo books on the subject.
    In reality he's a wealthy Hampstead liberal, dinner-party bore and Newsnight talking head, with the requisite buy-to-let(= people-farming, by leverage of liar loans and tax-avoidance (NB. avoidance, I said, not evasion)) property portfolio via his recently deceased posh wife, fully-paid-up and ruthlessly fanatical NuLaba Blairite, EU zealot, and all round windbag. Establishment man to his soft, clammy fingertips. Makes Andrew Neil look intellectually curious and principled.
    , @RadicalCenter
    The future of the USA is NOT African, it's Mexican. After the Mexicans get through with them, there will be more places than ever in the USA that are zero to one percent black.
    , @Jack Strocchi

    Any journalist who attempts to use a rich college town as representative of anything general about America should be automatically fired.
    The idea that this town represents the future is absurd...this country will soon be minority majority, and if he has the least bit of intelligence, he would know that the culture of Boulder is not their culture. A city that is 0.9% black represents the past more than anything Donald Trump represents.

    If this town represents anything of America’s future, it is white flight via high property values and zoning laws.

     



    Gentrification is an economic form of ethnic cleansing. The post-Cold War history of US political economy is the elite attempt to push poorer ethnic dregs out of desirable urban locations and replace them with richer white elites (or richer ethnic elites from the RoW).

    Chicago appears to be the only city that's holding out from this process. Which is why Ralph Emmanuel was called in to fix it. Any guy that can punch his teenage son into line can probably manage the South Side transition.
  24. @Anonymous
    I've always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc...

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    Burlington , VT was also great in that way.

  25. Boulder real estate hits top 1 percent of country’s most expensive markets
    http://www.denverpost.com/2015/11/11/boulder-real-estate-hits-top-1-percent-of-countrys-most-expensive-markets/

    I live near Boulder but as a person who has to work for living I live in a formerly affordable area in Denver between the barrio and Pho City. One of my favorite Boulder jokes is “The vegan trust funders look like Auschwitz survivors, except they have tans”

    • Replies: @dr kill
    Our eldest recently purchased a starter home in Boulder city limits. 550 k. and the realtor said the value rose 20k during the time between signing and closing. God Bless America!!!!
    , @jon
    Just did a quick Zillow search for homes under $300,000 in Boulder. The only listing is a 1 bedroom condo: http://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Boulder-CO/house_type/2098886406_zpid/30543_rid/0-300000_price/0-1074_mp/any_days/globalrelevanceex_sort/40.297333,-104.878922,39.738874,-105.749589_rect/9_zm/0_mmm/

    I almost moved there awhile back. I remember looking for houses in the $300,000 or less range - the only thing available was "low-income housing" that you had to qualify for. Unbelievable.
    , @woodNfish
    You have to realize that leftists are liars, racists and bigots and most of all hypocrites. They say they want to help other races and "lower classes", but they don't want to live with them. Along with what leftists are, remember what they are not; liberal or progressive. They are regressive authoritarians.
  26. So, we should all hope that a major state flagship public research university just lands in our back yards, then we’ll all be happy.

    • Agree: Alec Leamas
  27. Meanwhile, in formerly white Saint Paul, Minnesota:

    A 55-year-old man suffered a traumatic brain injury and was in the hospital’s intensive care unit [after he] saw two men dumping trash from their vehicle onto the ground near the gas pumps… When the victim said, “Really, guys?,” the two men attacked him.

    http://www.twincities.com/2016/05/23/snelling-avenue-gas-station-assault/

    Really, guys?

    • Replies: @Romanian
    Famous liberal last words!
    , @Jefferson
    "Meanwhile, in formerly white Saint Paul, Minnesota:"

    Black people in that state can't seem to assimilate into the Minnesota nice culture.
  28. OT:

    Uber has a revolutionary idea to help with traffic congestion: carpooling. What amazing high-tech innovation by some of the country’s (the world’s?) greatest minds!

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-23/the-uber-commute-is-next-frontier-for-ceo-kalanick

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "OT:

    Uber has a revolutionary idea to help with traffic congestion: carpooling. What amazing high-tech innovation by some of the country’s (the world’s?) greatest minds!"

    Indeed. A truly revolutionay 1970s idea.
    , @Dirk Dagger
    OT:
    They're lynching middle-schoolers in Texas!

    A Waco mother is demanding answers after her 12-year-old daughter came home from an overnight school trip with severe rope burns around her neck. Sandy Rougely said her daughter returned from the April 28 camping trip to a ranch with the injury covering the front half of her neck, ABC News reports. Many questions concerning the incident remain unanswered, but the gruesome laceration has Rougely thinking her child was the victim of racially motivated bullying from classmates. Her daughter was one of two Black students on the trip, The Dallas Morning News reports.
     
    , @Psmith
    I'm not sure why this is a source of amusement. You would prefer Segways? High-speed rail?

    I dunno, I guess I don't see anything wrong with trying simple, obvious, low-tech solutions.
  29. This article is smug even by the Guardian’s standards.

    Boulder is indeed a nice place but it’s very expensive and very white. These are not unrelated phenomenon.

    I’m not really sure what the endgame for these anti-white neoleftists is. Elysium?

    “The place is booming around values and principles to which [Trump supporters] are hostile”

    Is it? As Arclight points out, Boulder can be a lovely place to live even if you don’t subscribe to leftist delusions. I have many “liberal” tastes and beliefs. I am all about good food, intellectualism, open-mindedness, environmental preservation, hiking and sustainability. I am interested in other cultures. I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers. But I still like Trump, for the reasons that most Trump fans do. Could the author of this piece wrap his puny intellect around this non-contradiction?

    • Replies: @newrouter
    >and sustainability.<

    fission nuclear power: yes or no?
    , @newrouter
    >I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers.<

    so you don't like "man made" climate change folks and proggtards?
    , @Captain Tripps

    I’m not really sure what the endgame for these anti-white neoleftists is. Elysium?
     
    Nah; Its Capital City and the 13 Districts; just don't get caught in one of the Districts...you'll be assigned to your slave labor job.
    , @Camlost
    I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers.

    And if you actually knew anything about such people it would have occurred to you that they don't want to live in close proximity to you, either. (or to anyone at all)

    High population density is not their thing. Even if you lived in a county of 100% bible beaters they'd never bother you a bit.
    , @Marcus

    I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers.
     
    Meanwhile, the nice white liberals would self-righteously denounce you if they found out about your un-PC beliefs; whereas "rednecks" (who btw do actual work that makes civilization possible) wouldn't care about your liberal beliefs as long as you didn't bother them.
  30. @Anonymous
    I've always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc...

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    Munich was notable for its right-wing Bohemians/intellectuals (e.g., Stefan George) and even right-wing folk singers in the early part of the last century. Of course also a diverse collection of right-wing literary figures in Paris before 1945. Stuff that’s hard to believe today.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Coming up with a list of conservative literary figures is an almost absurdly easy exercise: Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, Henry James, TS Eliot, Ambrose Bierce, Evelyn Waugh, James Gould Cozzens, William Faulkner, Allen Tate, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Sir Walter Scott, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, etc, etc
  31. @Jefferson
    "If Boulder is the future, where are all the white people going to come from"

    The Spanish speaking Caribbean, Central America, South America, The Middle East, and North Africa.

    Don't forget how broad The U.S census definition of "White" is.

    Arabs are white. Doesn’t that make any Muslim white?

    So there ya go. Easy peasy.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Given that (1) Arabs are not white / European and (2) the great majority of Muslims are not Arabs, well, NO.

    Most Muslims in the world live in and come from Indonesia, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan -- not a one of them Arab.

  32. @Hepp
    It has 100K people, with a university that enrolls 30K students. Probably half the city is either attending the university or employed by it.

    In other words, they don't have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids. Of course it's a nice place to live.

    You wrote:

    In other words, they don’t have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids.

    FYI, they produced all the basic science of time measurement, so important for GPS and for guiding rockets, including ICBMs (Inter-Continental Ballistic Missiles) and space rockets.
    Boulder division of NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology):
    that is where Wineland works.

    JILA (Joint Institute of Laboratory Astrophysics) — joint
    between NIST and U. Colorado, campus Boulder.
    Weiman, Cornell and Hall made their discoveries in JILA;
    Cornell and Hall still work in Boulder, Weiman moved to Stanford University.

    Quantum computing, quantum cryptography, hyper-accurate gyroscopes for submarines — that is what Bose-Einstein condensate is good for.

    Sure, that is subsidized by Federal Government money.

    Please, have some humility.

    Good occasion to tell Dan Quayle joke.
    Bush 41 tells Dan Quayle:
    — I just signed the treaty with Gorbachev to eliminate all ICBMs.
    Dan Quayle:
    — But can I keep my Mackintosh ?

    • Replies: @CAL
    No one is denying basic science is important or that research contributes to the economy. However, using a city that is based on gov't largess and trust fund kiddies is not a good example of American success.

    Research only counts if you have a society that can actually apply what is learned to the production part of the economy. Otherwise you are simply performing the research task for someone else to exploit.
    , @iSteveFan

    FYI, they produced all the basic science of time measurement,...
     
    Did Boulder really matter in producing the items you listed, or was it due to the fact that the state of Colorado decided to place its flagship university in Boulder, and the federal government gave CU some choice contract work?

    I think what the previous commenter you were in discussion with was trying to communicate was that Boulder was lucky to have been chosen as the location for a flagship university. Had CU been located in any other Colorado town, that town would probably be better off like Boulder is today. All across the US the college towns of flagship schools seem to be little oases. Just visit Austin,TX; Lawrence, KS; Lincoln, NE; etc.

    , @Karl
    >>> FYI, they produced all the basic science of time measurement


    no, they just collated it.

    Lorenz ==had== relativistic time & space dilation.... Einstein just used those to make test-able predictions.

    Which is why "anthropomorphic climate change" is NOT science..... it makes no testable predictions.
  33. Great used book store, “The Bookworm.” Lots of aged hippies. Everybody seems to be either rich or homeless, nothing in between. The term “pet” is sort of outlawed there. You have to say “animal companion.” Animal companions aren’t allowed on Pearl Street Mall. Street performers. Girl playing bagpipes. Some guy on a unicycle. Jamaican blowing his nose onto the sidewalk, everybody thrilling at his authenticity. Nice place to live, if you can keep a straight face. Fred Reed used to be there, I understand. A cop there ticketed me once because my side windows weren’t transparent enough. Cops ride around on bicycles in shorts — the cops, not the bicycles. The still haven’t figured out who killed JonBenét Ramsey. And so it goes.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    A girl playing bagpipes on a unicyle - that would be even more impressive!
    , @Tony
    Yeah old Fred likes seeing cops riding around in shorts.
  34. The left’s fetishization of Boulder isn’t a new thing. I remember Stephen King chose it as the Gondor-equivalent where all the “good people” gather after the plague in The Stand.

    Meanwhile the “bad people” gather in Las Vegas. Of the two cities, whose growth has been promoted more by 21st century governmental policy?

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Love Stephen King's books, but he is just another smarmy unrealistic naïve annoying lefty dick who doesn't practice what he preaches. He's all for diversity, which is, presumably, why he maintains a home in Maine, one of the few solidly-white States left.
  35. AP says:

    Spent a day in Boulder. Hippies there are fake ones – rather rude and unpleasant, suggesting that they are unhappy. Perhaps they are from wealthier backgrounds and hate their parents, are arrogant transplanted northern Californians, or both. A young family friend spent a semester there and returned East, with a very similar negative impression. Regular Colorodans are nice people though.

    Boulder is beautiful but so is the entire state.

  36. Well that’s funny. My son moved to Boulder last year after getting an associate’s degree and found a decent tech job but could not afford the cost of living. Crap single room apartment for $1400-1600 month. Living outside Boulder and commuting was also prohibitive.

    He hated it and is moving to Texas in a couple weeks. Too many hipsters and lesbians. As for the service jobs, if he struggled at $18/hr (not bad for a new grad in electronics) how the hell can fast-food workers survive? He also complained about their insufferable attitudes when he just wanted to get a damn burger.

    So he will stay with us for a few months until he and his bros can get a place in…Austin.

  37. This is the sort of article that can only be produced by a group of Guardian writers coming together to circle jerk. SWPL to the nth degree.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    It's the Guardian. That'll be "circle-flick", soldier.
  38. Not only is Boulder white, it is a university town and mostly upper middle-class. We had a section-8 renter once. She was a hippy chick single-Mom with a BA who didn’t like working.

  39. A similar bit of nondiverse cluelessness:

  40. Don’t forget, Boulder is also the home of Soldier of Fortune magazine and Paladin Press, publisher of such titles as Hit Man: A Technical Manual for Independent Contractors.

    • Replies: @Psmith
    Fred Reed on his Soldier of Fortune days, recommended: http://www.fredoneverything.net/PlayboySOF.shtml
    , @antipater_1
    About 20? years ago, Paladin Press published a book or small series of books with titles just like Hit Man: A Technical Manual for Independent Contractors. The author had some hard ass name like colonel rock or something. But as it turned out, the books were written by some old lady!
  41. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Stan d Mute
    This is hilarious. Boulder is absurdly expensive, rabidly leftist/socialist, and looney bin crazy. You can stroll the main pedestrian shopping drag downtown, buy a $500 ski parka, then catch a $500 fine if you spark up a cigarette (but not a joint) outside (or even in your own car). Trustafarians abound (like in Vail). Traffic is horrible. Not too long ago you could swiftly escape to a more authentic hippie culture up the canyon in Nederland, but lately that too has become increasingly trustafarian. Every other storefront is selling wildly overpriced "art" or crystals and related new age crap from white people in dreadlocks.

    From my perspective, the only redemption comes from ripping down the canyon with no opposing traffic in a sports car (i.e. Left Hand Canyon), but Boulder is far from the only place in the Colorado Rockies where there are spectacular enthusiast driving roads. That pretty much leaves us with the overwhelmingly white and low crime population and springtime rafting.

    You nailed builder. Although it appears to be a racial paradise, the trustafarians will be the first to lecture you on the benefit of more Mexicans (see, they have Mexican nannies and gardeners).

    There are few middle class whites, and the Mexicans and professors live in apartments outside of the city.

  42. Boulder probably does represent America’s future. A haven for a rich white and Asian people, with a few of their Hispanic servants living conveniently near at hand. The rest of their servants, as well as blacks, Muslim immigrants, the less useful sort of Hispanics, and non-rich white people will live elsewhere, out of sight.

    • Replies: @27 year old
    Or optimistically, it could be the future for every town, if we make America White again
    , @George Taylor
    You may be correct that Boulder will continue to be a haven for rich Whites. The United States is becoming more and more like Brazil, private security protected enclaves for the affluent, where the residents have noticeably lighter skin. Boulder managed to surround the city with permanent open space, ostensibly for environmental reasons, but it sure helps in keeping the riff raff away. The preserved open spaces have the same effect as oceans do for the lucky few who reside within the city limits or in the case of the California residents who are near the beach.
  43. Good alternative headline for this story: White Supremacists Plan “Boulder” Solution for America:
    http://neoreactionary.blogspot.com/2016/05/zoning-out-white-supremacists-plan.html

  44. “thoughtful urban planning” – Very thoughtful. Keep everyone out, unless theyre rich.

    Trump is massively more inclusive than Boulder. Maybe if he was more into chakras and chai and micro-brews he’d be more accepted.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    I'm pretty sure Trump Towers are even more rich and exclusive than Boulder....
  45. CAL says:
    @Immigrant from former USSR
    You wrote:

    In other words, they don’t have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids.
     
    FYI, they produced all the basic science of time measurement, so important for GPS and for guiding rockets, including ICBMs (Inter-Continental Ballistic Missiles) and space rockets.
    Boulder division of NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology):
    that is where Wineland works.

    JILA (Joint Institute of Laboratory Astrophysics) --- joint
    between NIST and U. Colorado, campus Boulder.
    Weiman, Cornell and Hall made their discoveries in JILA;
    Cornell and Hall still work in Boulder, Weiman moved to Stanford University.

    Quantum computing, quantum cryptography, hyper-accurate gyroscopes for submarines --- that is what Bose-Einstein condensate is good for.

    Sure, that is subsidized by Federal Government money.

    Please, have some humility.

    Good occasion to tell Dan Quayle joke.
    Bush 41 tells Dan Quayle:
    --- I just signed the treaty with Gorbachev to eliminate all ICBMs.
    Dan Quayle:
    --- But can I keep my Mackintosh ?

    No one is denying basic science is important or that research contributes to the economy. However, using a city that is based on gov’t largess and trust fund kiddies is not a good example of American success.

    Research only counts if you have a society that can actually apply what is learned to the production part of the economy. Otherwise you are simply performing the research task for someone else to exploit.

  46. @Immigrant from former USSR
    Dear D.K.:
    Thank you for your reaction.

    Wieman was born in Corvallis, Oregon ,
    Cornell was born in Palo Alto, California,
    Hall was born in Denver, Colorado,
    Wineland was born in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin.

    My best wishes to Gary, Indiana,
    and separately --- to Purdue University - Indiana's Land Grant University !!!

    When I was born, a few months after its fiftieth anniversary, Gary’s population was burgeoning– it went from about 134,000 to about 178,000, between the 1950 and 1960 censuses, courtesy of the Baby Boom (with my mother contributing seven live births, during that decade). Today, it is well under 80,000.

    When I was born, Purdue’s enrollment was just under 12,000. When I transfered there, forty years ago come August, it was just past 30,000, for the first time ever. Several years ago, it passed 40,000! It has recently ebbed to a little under 39,000.

    I have not been back down to visit, nor even driven through, West Lafayette since August 1985. I may assure anyone, however, that it is an infinitely more desirable destination than my moribund birthplace. All a matter of magic dirt, I think the agronomists at Purdue University would concede….

    • Replies: @Boomstick
    Rural university towns are great places to live. Often they have affordable housing nearby, have outstanding schools, and are usually free of serious crime.
  47. @Hubbub
    Goodbye, Colorado Springs, it's been good to read about you. These press pieces of praise only guarantee that you will be deluged with eager youth and old fart liberals searching for a new place to destroy in their lustful zest to bring the wonders of diverse cultures and peoples to your neighborhoods. Peace, begone; terror, welcome!

    Move, sure you can, but it will be more of a retreat than a strategic maneuver, for the forces of diversity - like the hordes of zombies in World War Z - will batter the walls of your new fortresses, probably about the time you let out a sigh of relief, thinking you've found safe refuge.

    Diversity is bringing on the New Dark Ages, not the New World of Milk and Honey.

    Yeah, and Boulder, too!

  48. There are more than a few such places in the US. Upper income ghettos inhabited by people who insulate themselves from the rest of society. That most of these people would vote Democratic is all one need know about the direction the Democrat Party has taken over the years. Having long since eschewed any connection with blue-collar America, the party’s key constituents tend to be highly educated, economically conservative and socially liberal. It is the Boulders of America that drive the Democrat Party–and who are bankrolling the Clinton campaign.

  49. @Stan d Mute
    This is hilarious. Boulder is absurdly expensive, rabidly leftist/socialist, and looney bin crazy. You can stroll the main pedestrian shopping drag downtown, buy a $500 ski parka, then catch a $500 fine if you spark up a cigarette (but not a joint) outside (or even in your own car). Trustafarians abound (like in Vail). Traffic is horrible. Not too long ago you could swiftly escape to a more authentic hippie culture up the canyon in Nederland, but lately that too has become increasingly trustafarian. Every other storefront is selling wildly overpriced "art" or crystals and related new age crap from white people in dreadlocks.

    From my perspective, the only redemption comes from ripping down the canyon with no opposing traffic in a sports car (i.e. Left Hand Canyon), but Boulder is far from the only place in the Colorado Rockies where there are spectacular enthusiast driving roads. That pretty much leaves us with the overwhelmingly white and low crime population and springtime rafting.

    In the early 1980s I passed through Boulder on the way from some high country backpacking trip. I stopped for a post-trek guzzle and chomp at the least fern-bar-looking bar. Walked in, and they had “specialty brews” listed on the chalkboard, including Rolling Rock for $5 a pony bottle.

    At that time I bought glasses of it for 35 cents in my neighborhood tap room (Italian working class). It took me funny somehow, I started laughing and couldn’t stop. It was one of those little signs that I ought never go anywhere near Boulder again, an attitude that three subsequent decades’ experience has only underscored with a very thick black Sharpie.

    Though a city of 100,000 with only 900 blacks does sound tempting on paper.

  50. @Immigrant from former USSR
    You wrote:

    In other words, they don’t have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids.
     
    FYI, they produced all the basic science of time measurement, so important for GPS and for guiding rockets, including ICBMs (Inter-Continental Ballistic Missiles) and space rockets.
    Boulder division of NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology):
    that is where Wineland works.

    JILA (Joint Institute of Laboratory Astrophysics) --- joint
    between NIST and U. Colorado, campus Boulder.
    Weiman, Cornell and Hall made their discoveries in JILA;
    Cornell and Hall still work in Boulder, Weiman moved to Stanford University.

    Quantum computing, quantum cryptography, hyper-accurate gyroscopes for submarines --- that is what Bose-Einstein condensate is good for.

    Sure, that is subsidized by Federal Government money.

    Please, have some humility.

    Good occasion to tell Dan Quayle joke.
    Bush 41 tells Dan Quayle:
    --- I just signed the treaty with Gorbachev to eliminate all ICBMs.
    Dan Quayle:
    --- But can I keep my Mackintosh ?

    FYI, they produced all the basic science of time measurement,…

    Did Boulder really matter in producing the items you listed, or was it due to the fact that the state of Colorado decided to place its flagship university in Boulder, and the federal government gave CU some choice contract work?

    I think what the previous commenter you were in discussion with was trying to communicate was that Boulder was lucky to have been chosen as the location for a flagship university. Had CU been located in any other Colorado town, that town would probably be better off like Boulder is today. All across the US the college towns of flagship schools seem to be little oases. Just visit Austin,TX; Lawrence, KS; Lincoln, NE; etc.

    • Replies: @Immigrant from former USSR
    First, small correction to your comment: there are four different campuses of the University of Colorado system:
    CU Boulder
    CU Colorado Springs
    CU Denver
    CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    I agree with you that particular placement of the top science community has element of randomness. But after that community is established, it is developing by its own laws.

    Well before present day efforts by NIST in Boulder, really great scientist George Gamow
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Gamow
    (1904-1968) came to CU Boulder.
    In 1956, Gamow moved to the University of Colorado Boulder, where he remained for the rest of his career. In 1956, Gamow became one of the founding members of the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC), which later reformed teaching of high-school physics in the post-Sputnik years.

    In the early 20th century, radioactive materials were known to have characteristic exponential decay rates, or half-lives. At the same time, radiation emissions were known to have certain characteristic energies. By 1928, Gamow had solved the theory of the alpha decay of a nucleus via tunnelling, with mathematical help from Nikolai Kochin. The problem was also solved independently by Ronald W. Gurney and Edward U. Condon. Gurney and Condon did not, however, achieve the quantitative results achieved by Gamow.

    George Gamow was the father of the hot "big bang" theory of the expanding universe
    (see the article above from Wikipedia.)

    After the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1953 by Francis Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin, Gamow attempted to solve the problem of how the order of the four different kinds of bases (adenine, cytosine, thymine and guanine) in DNA chains could control the synthesis of proteins from amino acids. Crick has said[30] that Gamow's suggestions helped him in his own thinking about the problem. As related by Crick,[31] Gamow suggested that the twenty combinations of four DNA bases taken three at a time corresponded to the twenty amino acids that form proteins. This led Crick and Watson to enumerate the twenty amino acids common to proteins. Gamow's contribution to solving the problem of genetic coding gave rise to important models of biological degeneracy.

    Time standards in Boulder:

    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=nist%20colorado&tbs=lf:1,lf_ui:3&rflfq=1&rlha=0&rllag=40336485,-105149230,39255&tbm=lcl&rlfi=hd:;si:636967670422965816

    I am also fan of Steve Sailer. My best to you.

  51. @Flemur
    I went to grad school in Boulder. It wasn't bad 35 years ago but since then the traffic has gotten really horrible and plenty of people avoid it for that reason.

    Money's pretty flush because it has a lot of government facilities in addition to CU:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boulder,_Colorado#Economy_and_industry (scroll up a little).

    As Prof. Al Bartlett used to say, if you want to know what Boulder will look like in 50 years, look at San Diego today.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "As Prof. Al Bartlett used to say, if you want to know what Boulder will look like in 50 years, look at San Diego today."

    San Diego is one of the more pleasant big cities in The U.S to live in. You can't go wrong with a big city that has over 1 million people and at the same time is still only 6 percent Black.

    San Diego dodged a bullet during the great Black migration out of the South when Blacks were looking for jobs elsewhere, not many chose the 619 as their final destination.

    Even London and Paris are Blacker than San Diego.

  52. @yaqub the mad scientist
    This piece of precious prissiness is hilarious.

    I worked in Boulder 25 years ago. I was stunned at how white it was. Coming from a region with a large black population, with numerous other ethnicities represented, I had never seen anything like it. It was certainly hippiesh, but you could see it dying even then. Boulder was where whatever hippies were left in the area would go to do drug exchanges. The street vibe was already pretty yuppied (another cultural thing I was new to). And it was expensive. You could go and see the leftovers of the beat scene draw modest checks for performing/scenstering at Allan Ginsburg's Naropa Institute (subject of a hilarious takedown by poet Tom Clark in the The Great Naropa Poetry Wars) and do nice day hikes, but everything else cost a lot of money. Culturally, it was white bread liberal, with that typical veneer of exotica wrapped in a Patagonia outfit. There was absolutely nothing speaking of anything authentic or "diverse".

    A year ago, I spent a week there doing some technical training. Things had taken their course and Boulder had become the complete sterile utopia that it was heading toward, and it was as white as ever.

    This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don't know where to begin. The idea that this town represents the future is absurd. First of all, this country will soon be minority majority, and if he has the least bit of intelligence, he would know that the culture of Boulder is not their culture. A city that is 0.9% black represents the past more than anything Donald Trump represents.

    Any journalist who attempts to use a rich college town as representative of anything general about America should be automatically fired. If this town represents anything of America's future, it is white flight via high property values and zoning laws.

    “This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don’t know where to begin. The idea that this town represents the future is absurd.”

    My guess is that perspectives like this Guardianista’s parse as: “I’d like to retire here someday.”

  53. @George Taylor
    Boulder real estate hits top 1 percent of country’s most expensive markets
    http://www.denverpost.com/2015/11/11/boulder-real-estate-hits-top-1-percent-of-countrys-most-expensive-markets/

    I live near Boulder but as a person who has to work for living I live in a formerly affordable area in Denver between the barrio and Pho City. One of my favorite Boulder jokes is "The vegan trust funders look like Auschwitz survivors, except they have tans"

    Our eldest recently purchased a starter home in Boulder city limits. 550 k. and the realtor said the value rose 20k during the time between signing and closing. God Bless America!!!!

  54. @BenKenobi
    "burgeoning service jobs ranging from diet counselling to advanced road bike maintenance."

    So I tune up your $2500 bicycle, you tell me to go vegan, and wealth is created!

    do you feel feel the burgeon!

    $2500? You prole, if it’s less than $4000 you’re not even trying: http://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/previews/16-for-2016-the-best-new-mountain-bikes-of-2016

  55. @Officious intermeddler
    Boulder probably does represent America's future. A haven for a rich white and Asian people, with a few of their Hispanic servants living conveniently near at hand. The rest of their servants, as well as blacks, Muslim immigrants, the less useful sort of Hispanics, and non-rich white people will live elsewhere, out of sight.

    Or optimistically, it could be the future for every town, if we make America White again

  56. @Anonymous
    I've always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc...

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    Fallacies of scale. An “ironic” definition in software engineering context.

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20140914212529-56699267-fallacies-of-scale

  57. @Anonymous
    I've always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc...

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    I don’t want to be around only people that are basically political and cultural clones of myself, but having lived in for an extended period in a city that is only slightly to the right of San Francisco, it’s not any fun to experience liberal fascism first hand. And heaven forbid you actually vocalize your disagreement with some bit of their dogma, you’ll find yourself arguing with 30 people at a time at dinner parties or just not invited anymore, period.

    So yes, if you live in an area where there is some check on the worst impulses of the progressives I think it can generally be pretty great. But when you live in a one-party state, it’s pretty aggravating.

  58. “Boulder today is about as white as the United States was in the 1950s, and far less black than during Eisenhower’s days.”

    So the Guardian is saying the future will be like the past, only more so.

  59. @iSteveFan

    FYI, they produced all the basic science of time measurement,...
     
    Did Boulder really matter in producing the items you listed, or was it due to the fact that the state of Colorado decided to place its flagship university in Boulder, and the federal government gave CU some choice contract work?

    I think what the previous commenter you were in discussion with was trying to communicate was that Boulder was lucky to have been chosen as the location for a flagship university. Had CU been located in any other Colorado town, that town would probably be better off like Boulder is today. All across the US the college towns of flagship schools seem to be little oases. Just visit Austin,TX; Lawrence, KS; Lincoln, NE; etc.

    First, small correction to your comment: there are four different campuses of the University of Colorado system:
    CU Boulder
    CU Colorado Springs
    CU Denver
    CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    I agree with you that particular placement of the top science community has element of randomness. But after that community is established, it is developing by its own laws.

    Well before present day efforts by NIST in Boulder, really great scientist George Gamow
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Gamow
    (1904-1968) came to CU Boulder.
    In 1956, Gamow moved to the University of Colorado Boulder, where he remained for the rest of his career. In 1956, Gamow became one of the founding members of the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC), which later reformed teaching of high-school physics in the post-Sputnik years.

    In the early 20th century, radioactive materials were known to have characteristic exponential decay rates, or half-lives. At the same time, radiation emissions were known to have certain characteristic energies. By 1928, Gamow had solved the theory of the alpha decay of a nucleus via tunnelling, with mathematical help from Nikolai Kochin. The problem was also solved independently by Ronald W. Gurney and Edward U. Condon. Gurney and Condon did not, however, achieve the quantitative results achieved by Gamow.

    George Gamow was the father of the hot “big bang” theory of the expanding universe
    (see the article above from Wikipedia.)

    After the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1953 by Francis Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin, Gamow attempted to solve the problem of how the order of the four different kinds of bases (adenine, cytosine, thymine and guanine) in DNA chains could control the synthesis of proteins from amino acids. Crick has said[30] that Gamow’s suggestions helped him in his own thinking about the problem. As related by Crick,[31] Gamow suggested that the twenty combinations of four DNA bases taken three at a time corresponded to the twenty amino acids that form proteins. This led Crick and Watson to enumerate the twenty amino acids common to proteins. Gamow’s contribution to solving the problem of genetic coding gave rise to important models of biological degeneracy.

    Time standards in Boulder:

    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=nist%20colorado&tbs=lf:1,lf_ui:3&rflfq=1&rlha=0&rllag=40336485,-105149230,39255&tbm=lcl&rlfi=hd:;si:636967670422965816

    I am also fan of Steve Sailer. My best to you.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Boulder is at 5,430 feet elevation, which isn't as high as some other small scenic cities, like Aspen at 7900 feet and Santa Fe at 7200 feet or Jackson Hole at 6200 feet.

    Aspen attracts lots of vigorous millionaires, but it's easier to grow old at 5500 feet than at 7900 feet.
    , @jon

    the University of Colorado system:
    CU Boulder
    CU Colorado Springs
    CU Denver
    CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
     
    Minor pet peeve, but why is the University of Colorado referred to as CU. It's UC dammit!
    , @5371
    Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics.
  60. Leftist BoBos demand diversity and idolize people of color?

    Let ’em have it, good and hard.

    When our cultural revolution comes, banish ’em to Ferguson, Baltimore, Detroit or Chi-raq.

    They’ll learn how very much they have in common with their “cousins” in the ‘hood who are sure to be fellow connoisseurs of precious earnest pixie singer-songwriters, artisanal organic foods, craft beers, efficient hybrid vehicles and fixed-gear bicycles.

    If we must be building walls, let’s build them there first.

  61. Dee says:

    Ann Arbor, Michigan is another oasis; got more blacks cause DEEtroit is only 20 miles away. But there’s lots of upscale living going on, anybody that works for UofM is set financially. No layoffs, RIFs, right sizing there. Probably gets a bigger share of runaways and such, no place else in that part of the upper Midwest is like that.Maybe Madison is as crazy.

    The Guardian writer, he don’t know squat about facts on the ground in Boulder; he’s from England and his sources are other left wing agit-prop and watching Mork and Mindy reruns….they like their US television shows in the UK.

  62. ‘… If Boulder is the future, where are all the white people going to come from…’

    Maybe from the state immediately to the West? 86% White with America’s highest birthrate.

    How do you write ‘we need room’ in ‘Reformed Egyptian’?

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    Hispanics are outbreeding whites even in Utah, and the Mormon Church is fully signed on to the immivasion/race replacement ideology, and has backed that position for well over a decade now. The Mormon Church was once just ridiculous. It is now ridiculous and evil.
  63. @Anonymous
    I've always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc...

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    Don’t forget Ann Arbor, MI and Madison, WI!

  64. @Anonymous
    Boulder, CO is like Madison, WI and Portland, OR - but whiter.

    Yes it sounds a lot like Portland. Central PDX is a bubble. Just the other day a woman was talking to me about her daughter’s elementary school – “I LOVE the diversity! Love love love it! There’s even a Muslim girl with the headscarf, some black kids etc….that’s hard to find in this city.” I asked her what it was about the diversity she loved, and she said that it will show her daughter that there’s so much more out there, a wider world.

    • Replies: @e
    “I LOVE the diversity! Love love love it! There’s even a Muslim girl with the headscarf, some black kids etc….that’s hard to find in this city.” I asked her what it was about the diversity she loved, and she said that it will show her daughter that there’s so much more out there, a wider world.

    Ah, yes, the ole "taste of," in this case, diversity. Perhaps you could have asked her if she'd like several mouthfuls of said diversity. Then, entire dinners.
  65. @Arclight
    Boulder IS awesome - even if you don't subscribe to the left wing politics of the place, it's got nature in spades, safety, lots of smart people, and decent culture and dining. Of course as Steve points out, the author glaringly omits the key characteristics of who lives there and who doesn't, because readers might accidentally think that high concentrations of educated white people tend to result in really high quality of all around living as opposed to vibrant diversity all over the place being the highest good.

    I'd probably toss Madison, Wisconsin in there as well - love it and could live there even as a huge political outlier because everything else about it is pretty great.

    Got to disagree about Madison, having spent some time there. Restaurants are lousy, housing stock is weirdly inadequate, with very few single family homes available, due to regulation. Students are annoying…

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    You're right, if one is going to put up with high income tax and gun "control" plus smarmy, annoying, unrealistic little lefty dickheads who've never been married, never raised children, never paid meaningful taxes, and yet have opinions and advice on EVERYTHING -- and usually wrong -- why be cold in Madison? Just move to California and at least have the beautiful weather and the (effectively) legal, ample, wonderful W-E-E-D -- yeah, it's got more than a college campus does....
  66. @Anonymous
    Boulder, CO is like Madison, WI and Portland, OR - but whiter.

    Boulder, CO is like Martha’s Vineyard but mountainier.

  67. @Olorin
    As Prof. Al Bartlett used to say, if you want to know what Boulder will look like in 50 years, look at San Diego today.

    “As Prof. Al Bartlett used to say, if you want to know what Boulder will look like in 50 years, look at San Diego today.”

    San Diego is one of the more pleasant big cities in The U.S to live in. You can’t go wrong with a big city that has over 1 million people and at the same time is still only 6 percent Black.

    San Diego dodged a bullet during the great Black migration out of the South when Blacks were looking for jobs elsewhere, not many chose the 619 as their final destination.

    Even London and Paris are Blacker than San Diego.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Even London and Paris are Blacker than San Diego.

    That's not saying much. The black/African population of Paris alone is huge.
  68. @Officious intermeddler
    Boulder probably does represent America's future. A haven for a rich white and Asian people, with a few of their Hispanic servants living conveniently near at hand. The rest of their servants, as well as blacks, Muslim immigrants, the less useful sort of Hispanics, and non-rich white people will live elsewhere, out of sight.

    You may be correct that Boulder will continue to be a haven for rich Whites. The United States is becoming more and more like Brazil, private security protected enclaves for the affluent, where the residents have noticeably lighter skin. Boulder managed to surround the city with permanent open space, ostensibly for environmental reasons, but it sure helps in keeping the riff raff away. The preserved open spaces have the same effect as oceans do for the lucky few who reside within the city limits or in the case of the California residents who are near the beach.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    A nonprofit group in the city where I live raised millions of dollars to buy almost 500 acres of forested land next to an amazing park, and then they donated the land to the park, which just happens to abut the ritziest, most old-money area of our city. Can you say buffer?
    , @Anonymous
    America will not become like Brazil because white Americans like marrying brown immigrants.

    Take Jeb Bush, most upper crust man in America. He marries a brown Mexican girl he met on a school trip from Andover.
    , @Jefferson
    "The United States is becoming more and more like Brazil, private security protected enclaves for the affluent, where the residents have noticeably lighter skin."

    Most of Brazil's wealthy millionaire and billionaire elite are not just light skin, most of Brazil's wealthy elite are straight up White. The wealthiest Brazilian person in the world is a guy named Jorge Lemann, who has blue eyes and is of German Swiss ancestry just like Steve Sailer.
  69. It has been voted the US’s brainiest city, its happiest city, the country’s foodiest place and the number one city for health.

    Oh really?

    Who votes on such matters?
    What are the criteria?

    Ah!

  70. I think that Boulder is the ideal place to settle refugees from Syria and Somalia. It’s a high income place with lots of liberals and loads of potential were it only to be less white. It probably has a great school system too that can help lots of subsistence farmers from central Africa.

    I think an infusion of diversity would do wonders for the local environment and the local economy. I will write my state senator and see if he can help make it happen.

    I look forward to their local government fast-tracking approve my proposal. Once they have 50,000 boat people from be Medditerranean they will finally live in the Utopian they have always wanted and voted for.

    • Replies: @Wally
    Great point.

    If those in Boulder or in any other 'white liberal' city or neighborhood were told that Section 8 housing, aka: 'projects' were going to be built next to their house the entire situation would change in a heartbeat.

    Most 'white liberals' live nowhere close to blacks or browns. And that's the way 'white liberals' like it. Obviously so.

    Just look around.

    , @duncsbaby
    Yes, let's ship all the Somalis & other assorted Africans that Minnesota has kindly passed onto North Dakota down to Boulder. This country has gone fuckin' insane.
  71. @Jefferson
    "As Prof. Al Bartlett used to say, if you want to know what Boulder will look like in 50 years, look at San Diego today."

    San Diego is one of the more pleasant big cities in The U.S to live in. You can't go wrong with a big city that has over 1 million people and at the same time is still only 6 percent Black.

    San Diego dodged a bullet during the great Black migration out of the South when Blacks were looking for jobs elsewhere, not many chose the 619 as their final destination.

    Even London and Paris are Blacker than San Diego.

    Even London and Paris are Blacker than San Diego.

    That’s not saying much. The black/African population of Paris alone is huge.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "That’s not saying much. The black/African population of Paris alone is huge."

    That is saying a lot , because European cities are not suppose to be Blacker than American cities.
  72. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @George Taylor
    You may be correct that Boulder will continue to be a haven for rich Whites. The United States is becoming more and more like Brazil, private security protected enclaves for the affluent, where the residents have noticeably lighter skin. Boulder managed to surround the city with permanent open space, ostensibly for environmental reasons, but it sure helps in keeping the riff raff away. The preserved open spaces have the same effect as oceans do for the lucky few who reside within the city limits or in the case of the California residents who are near the beach.

    A nonprofit group in the city where I live raised millions of dollars to buy almost 500 acres of forested land next to an amazing park, and then they donated the land to the park, which just happens to abut the ritziest, most old-money area of our city. Can you say buffer?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Sounds like a really effective buffer, since I've been hearing lately that blacks are terrified of trees because lynching and therefore won't brave forested areas such as national parks.
  73. e says:
    @gruff
    Yes it sounds a lot like Portland. Central PDX is a bubble. Just the other day a woman was talking to me about her daughter's elementary school - "I LOVE the diversity! Love love love it! There's even a Muslim girl with the headscarf, some black kids etc....that's hard to find in this city." I asked her what it was about the diversity she loved, and she said that it will show her daughter that there's so much more out there, a wider world.

    “I LOVE the diversity! Love love love it! There’s even a Muslim girl with the headscarf, some black kids etc….that’s hard to find in this city.” I asked her what it was about the diversity she loved, and she said that it will show her daughter that there’s so much more out there, a wider world.

    Ah, yes, the ole “taste of,” in this case, diversity. Perhaps you could have asked her if she’d like several mouthfuls of said diversity. Then, entire dinners.

    • Replies: @gruff
    She's a colleague of mine for reasons unrelated to diversity. It's not smart to blow up connections for the sake of scoring a transient political point.

    Anyway, I expect the near future to change a lot of people's minds.
    , @jon

    Ah, yes, the ole “taste of,” in this case, diversity.
     
    Most people like tokenism, but few actually like true diversity.
    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Diversity is like red pepper flakes on your pizza. A little goes a long way and too much can be painful.
  74. @Anonymous
    I've always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc...

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    All those college towns (and many others) are great places to live because they’re all Disneylands. They’re not real.

    Living in a college town is like eating caviar in a tuxedo in the first-class dining room on the Titanic while hundreds of grimy stokers are shoveling coal into the engines ten decks below. When the thing hits an iceberg, the people in first class won’t feel a thing but the guys in the engine room are all goners.

    The point is that college towns are the cherry on top of the sundae. The society that pays for those college towns is comprised of people doing real work, having real problems, and competing with real Mexicans, real Chinese, and real blacks trying to rob them. The idea that college towns are “the future” is ridiculous. Colleges are dependent on significant artificial support from the government — no property taxes, no income taxes, tax-free endowments, direct subsidies, student loans and grants. College towns would be significantly different if colleges were treated like other industries.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    " The idea that college towns are “the future” is ridiculous."

    Especially since most Hispanics do not even graduate from community colleges, let alone 4 year universities. And the Left is always telling us that Hispanics are the future of America, because they are going to change the diapers of 200 year old White Gringos.
    , @Name Withheld
    Exactly, look at Ithaca NY. It would be a tiny tourist town desperately hanging on with the rest of Upstate NY if it were not for the two colleges.
    , @Clyde

    All those college towns (and many others) are great places to live because they’re all Disneylands. They’re not real.
     
    Taxpayer supported Disneylands, State and Federal taxes pour into them. Federal student loans as you mention. Federal gov't research money and so on. Twelve percent of US millionaires are educators. It's a great biz to be in.
    ______

    Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators (Video)
    www.thegatewaypundit.com/2012/03/12-of-us-millionaires-are-educators
    Mar 12, 2012 · ... deprived teachers now make up 12% of US millionaires. And ... Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators ... budget is over thirty percent of the ..
    , @Jack D
    Even so called "private" universities receive lots of government funding and subsidies, but the University of Colorado at Boulder is a state university, so it's even worse - a large part of its budget comes directly from the taxpayers.
  75. @Anonymous
    Boulder, CO is like Madison, WI and Portland, OR - but whiter.

    Pity. Madison has been deliberately importing Negros from the ghetto. Murder, rapes and street crime have made it much more unpleasant over the last 30 years.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    People here who use the term Negros because of their dislike for blacks sound childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate.
  76. @Anonymous
    I've always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc...

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    Liberals love to live in rural/working class areas that have been purged of nasty rural/small town White folks. The latter build the lovely towns, then are driven out when rich folks move in. No need to post “Don’t let the sun set on you” signs since money is the entrance ticket, so everyone basks in how tolerant they are.

    It’s James Kunstler’s whole mindset, but funnily enough he doesn’t see it at all.

    I discuss this in my article “The Gilmore Girls Occupy Wall. St.” here: http://www.counter-currents.com/2011/11/the-gilmore-girls-occupy-wall-street/

    • Replies: @celt darnell
    OK, I admit it's a while since I read Kustler, but doesn't he claim we're about to run out of oil and thus plunge into a new Stone Age? (I paraphrase).

    That doesn't sound like he sees much of a future for small, wealthy white towns......
    , @Mike Zwick
    Lately James Kunstler has been bashing the Black Lives Matter group and has gotten into trouble with the SJW's for it.
  77. @D. K.
    There are two Nobel Prize winners in Economic Sciences-- the late Paul Samuelson, in 1970, and Joseph Stiglitz, of Columbia University, in 2001-- that are fellow natives of my birthplace, Gary, Indiana. Helluva lotta good that has done for our birthplace, these past fifteen or fifty years!

    I admit to being much more impressed by your Michael Jackson.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    I am confused!?! I do not do Michael Jackson. I do a lot of other folks, including 'Satchmo' and LBJ, though....
  78. Should be noted that Boulder has a “wall” around it – a huge area of open space the city was wise enough to buy and declare off limits for development. At this point Denver basically connects to Boulder via suburbs, until you get over the hill on highway 36 and see the beautiful space in fro t of the city in front of the flatirons.

    It really is a site to behold on a crisp October Saturday. Unfortunately it’s much more watchable than the football team…

  79. @e
    “I LOVE the diversity! Love love love it! There’s even a Muslim girl with the headscarf, some black kids etc….that’s hard to find in this city.” I asked her what it was about the diversity she loved, and she said that it will show her daughter that there’s so much more out there, a wider world.

    Ah, yes, the ole "taste of," in this case, diversity. Perhaps you could have asked her if she'd like several mouthfuls of said diversity. Then, entire dinners.

    She’s a colleague of mine for reasons unrelated to diversity. It’s not smart to blow up connections for the sake of scoring a transient political point.

    Anyway, I expect the near future to change a lot of people’s minds.

  80. @anonymous
    Even London and Paris are Blacker than San Diego.

    That's not saying much. The black/African population of Paris alone is huge.

    “That’s not saying much. The black/African population of Paris alone is huge.”

    That is saying a lot , because European cities are not suppose to be Blacker than American cities.

  81. @Immigrant from former USSR
    First, small correction to your comment: there are four different campuses of the University of Colorado system:
    CU Boulder
    CU Colorado Springs
    CU Denver
    CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    I agree with you that particular placement of the top science community has element of randomness. But after that community is established, it is developing by its own laws.

    Well before present day efforts by NIST in Boulder, really great scientist George Gamow
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Gamow
    (1904-1968) came to CU Boulder.
    In 1956, Gamow moved to the University of Colorado Boulder, where he remained for the rest of his career. In 1956, Gamow became one of the founding members of the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC), which later reformed teaching of high-school physics in the post-Sputnik years.

    In the early 20th century, radioactive materials were known to have characteristic exponential decay rates, or half-lives. At the same time, radiation emissions were known to have certain characteristic energies. By 1928, Gamow had solved the theory of the alpha decay of a nucleus via tunnelling, with mathematical help from Nikolai Kochin. The problem was also solved independently by Ronald W. Gurney and Edward U. Condon. Gurney and Condon did not, however, achieve the quantitative results achieved by Gamow.

    George Gamow was the father of the hot "big bang" theory of the expanding universe
    (see the article above from Wikipedia.)

    After the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1953 by Francis Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin, Gamow attempted to solve the problem of how the order of the four different kinds of bases (adenine, cytosine, thymine and guanine) in DNA chains could control the synthesis of proteins from amino acids. Crick has said[30] that Gamow's suggestions helped him in his own thinking about the problem. As related by Crick,[31] Gamow suggested that the twenty combinations of four DNA bases taken three at a time corresponded to the twenty amino acids that form proteins. This led Crick and Watson to enumerate the twenty amino acids common to proteins. Gamow's contribution to solving the problem of genetic coding gave rise to important models of biological degeneracy.

    Time standards in Boulder:

    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=nist%20colorado&tbs=lf:1,lf_ui:3&rflfq=1&rlha=0&rllag=40336485,-105149230,39255&tbm=lcl&rlfi=hd:;si:636967670422965816

    I am also fan of Steve Sailer. My best to you.

    Boulder is at 5,430 feet elevation, which isn’t as high as some other small scenic cities, like Aspen at 7900 feet and Santa Fe at 7200 feet or Jackson Hole at 6200 feet.

    Aspen attracts lots of vigorous millionaires, but it’s easier to grow old at 5500 feet than at 7900 feet.

    • Replies: @vinny
    Don't forget Ketchum, Idaho: christened with the blood of Papa himself, elevation 5,800ft.
    , @RadicalCenter
    We used to live in a town in SE Colorado that was all between 6,000 and 7,000 feet high. We knew elderly people there, including a fellow who still walked regularly in his late 70s, and there is apparently no problem living at that altitude at any age, it seems, if your body and lungs are long accustomed to it.

    Add another thousand feet of altitude, though, and you may be right.
    , @Yngvar
    I remember that a couple of decades back Santa Fe was supposed to be the new 'it' place, like Boulder is now. Turned out to be a Fanta Se (no joke).
  82. @Dr. X
    All those college towns (and many others) are great places to live because they're all Disneylands. They're not real.

    Living in a college town is like eating caviar in a tuxedo in the first-class dining room on the Titanic while hundreds of grimy stokers are shoveling coal into the engines ten decks below. When the thing hits an iceberg, the people in first class won't feel a thing but the guys in the engine room are all goners.

    The point is that college towns are the cherry on top of the sundae. The society that pays for those college towns is comprised of people doing real work, having real problems, and competing with real Mexicans, real Chinese, and real blacks trying to rob them. The idea that college towns are "the future" is ridiculous. Colleges are dependent on significant artificial support from the government -- no property taxes, no income taxes, tax-free endowments, direct subsidies, student loans and grants. College towns would be significantly different if colleges were treated like other industries.

    ” The idea that college towns are “the future” is ridiculous.”

    Especially since most Hispanics do not even graduate from community colleges, let alone 4 year universities. And the Left is always telling us that Hispanics are the future of America, because they are going to change the diapers of 200 year old White Gringos.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    One doesn't need a college degree, to be employed by the college as a janitor. Of course, with degrees being devalued, its not hard to imagine credential creep reaching down even more.
  83. @fnn
    Munich was notable for its right-wing Bohemians/intellectuals (e.g., Stefan George) and even right-wing folk singers in the early part of the last century. Of course also a diverse collection of right-wing literary figures in Paris before 1945. Stuff that's hard to believe today.

    Coming up with a list of conservative literary figures is an almost absurdly easy exercise: Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, Henry James, TS Eliot, Ambrose Bierce, Evelyn Waugh, James Gould Cozzens, William Faulkner, Allen Tate, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Sir Walter Scott, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, etc, etc

    • Replies: @fnn
    I was referring to "environments" or communities (and ones not too distant in time.) The guy I was responding to was talking about how lefties create interesting/stimulating communities.
    , @syonredux
    And, once upon a time, one could even find conservatives in the film industry: DW Griffith, Howard Hawks, John Ford, Barbara Stanwyck, Frank Capra, Michael Powell, ....
  84. OT: Ralston has been taking a lot of flak from Sanders people over being the/one of the alleged source(s) for the “Bernie supporters were throwing chairs!” story out of NV last week. This week, he takes cover behind WWT:

    https://www.ralstonreports.com/blog/child-i-love

  85. @Rex May
    Great used book store, "The Bookworm." Lots of aged hippies. Everybody seems to be either rich or homeless, nothing in between. The term "pet" is sort of outlawed there. You have to say "animal companion." Animal companions aren't allowed on Pearl Street Mall. Street performers. Girl playing bagpipes. Some guy on a unicycle. Jamaican blowing his nose onto the sidewalk, everybody thrilling at his authenticity. Nice place to live, if you can keep a straight face. Fred Reed used to be there, I understand. A cop there ticketed me once because my side windows weren't transparent enough. Cops ride around on bicycles in shorts — the cops, not the bicycles. The still haven't figured out who killed JonBenét Ramsey. And so it goes.

    A girl playing bagpipes on a unicyle – that would be even more impressive!

  86. @Rex May
    Great used book store, "The Bookworm." Lots of aged hippies. Everybody seems to be either rich or homeless, nothing in between. The term "pet" is sort of outlawed there. You have to say "animal companion." Animal companions aren't allowed on Pearl Street Mall. Street performers. Girl playing bagpipes. Some guy on a unicycle. Jamaican blowing his nose onto the sidewalk, everybody thrilling at his authenticity. Nice place to live, if you can keep a straight face. Fred Reed used to be there, I understand. A cop there ticketed me once because my side windows weren't transparent enough. Cops ride around on bicycles in shorts — the cops, not the bicycles. The still haven't figured out who killed JonBenét Ramsey. And so it goes.

    Yeah old Fred likes seeing cops riding around in shorts.

  87. As a Brit, allow me to apologise for The Guardian.

  88. @syonredux
    Coming up with a list of conservative literary figures is an almost absurdly easy exercise: Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, Henry James, TS Eliot, Ambrose Bierce, Evelyn Waugh, James Gould Cozzens, William Faulkner, Allen Tate, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Sir Walter Scott, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, etc, etc

    I was referring to “environments” or communities (and ones not too distant in time.) The guy I was responding to was talking about how lefties create interesting/stimulating communities.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    I was referring to “environments” or communities (and ones not too distant in time.) The guy I was responding to was talking about how lefties create interesting/stimulating communities.
     
    For an example of that kind of thing, the Nashville Agrarians come to mind: John Crowe Ransom, Allen Tate, Robert Penn Warren, Donald Davidson, Cleanth Brooks, .....
  89. @syonredux
    Coming up with a list of conservative literary figures is an almost absurdly easy exercise: Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, Henry James, TS Eliot, Ambrose Bierce, Evelyn Waugh, James Gould Cozzens, William Faulkner, Allen Tate, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Sir Walter Scott, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, etc, etc

    And, once upon a time, one could even find conservatives in the film industry: DW Griffith, Howard Hawks, John Ford, Barbara Stanwyck, Frank Capra, Michael Powell, ….

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "And, once upon a time, one could even find conservatives in the film industry: DW Griffith, Howard Hawks, John Ford, Barbara Stanwyck, Frank Capra, Michael Powell, …."

    The late Francis Capra was a Republican.
    , @Soonertroll
    John Ford was a liberal Democrat, albeit the nearly extinct patriotic anti-communist type of liberalism.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Adolphe Menjou used to infuriate Katherine Hepburn on the set with his reactionary views. I like Adolphe.
  90. @James O'Meara
    Liberals love to live in rural/working class areas that have been purged of nasty rural/small town White folks. The latter build the lovely towns, then are driven out when rich folks move in. No need to post "Don't let the sun set on you" signs since money is the entrance ticket, so everyone basks in how tolerant they are.

    It's James Kunstler's whole mindset, but funnily enough he doesn't see it at all.

    I discuss this in my article "The Gilmore Girls Occupy Wall. St." here: http://www.counter-currents.com/2011/11/the-gilmore-girls-occupy-wall-street/

    OK, I admit it’s a while since I read Kustler, but doesn’t he claim we’re about to run out of oil and thus plunge into a new Stone Age? (I paraphrase).

    That doesn’t sound like he sees much of a future for small, wealthy white towns……

    • Replies: @Dirk Dagger
    James Howard Kunstler was also a big Y2K scaremonger, but you have to dig deep to find that out about him:

    Kunstler, who has no formal training in the fields in which he prognosticates, made similar dire predictions for Y2K as he makes for peak oil. Kunstler responds to this criticism by saying that a Y2K-related catastrophe was averted precisely because of the billions of dollars that were spent fixing the problem. As with acid rain and ozone depletion in the '90s, a resoundingly successful, well-coordinated international response had the ironic side effect of discrediting the very worst-case scenarios that inspired the efforts in the first place. from The Full Wiki

     

    He or his acolytes zealously guard his Libtardopedia page so that no mention of Y2K is ever found. That tells me he is a worthless deceitful asshole.
    , @Jim Lahey
    Kunstler's fiction series "World Made by Hand" has a strong small-white-town vibe. It's a technological dystopia (no cars, no electricity, no mass produced goods) but a social utopia (close networks of neighbors, strong families, small business owners - e.g., barber/doctor with a black medical bag, brewer using a handmade oaken barrel...). It's set in 1890, technologically speaking, but 2025 in terms of zeitgeist. Race/ethnicity conflicts don't play a major role in the books, although I think they are mentioned as having taken place in far away places like LA or Atlanta, while the book is set in upstate NY in a traditional mill town.
    , @rod1963
    Kunstler is a nasty, anti-white piece of trash who had a good gimmick with his peak oil mantra. I myself bought it but was soon turned off by his relentless attacks against conservative whites and whites in general whom he blamed for everything.

    The amusing thing is most of our nation's moral and mental idiocy and decay of our cities he blames on whites can be put on the shoulders of his tribe. They rammed the 1965 immigration act down our throats, CRA, forced busing, the "Great Society" programs, turned our public schools into social engineering centers, etc.

    The only thing good is his skewering on modern architecture and art. Both of which deserve to end up in some land fill. Both truly expose our era to be bankrupt of style, taste and class. Shamir called us "Generation X".

    Haven't been to a MOA that didn't deserve to be closed down for being a source ugliness. I'd start with the Guggenheim and Annie Sprinkle.

    His May 2016 Eye Sore of the Month is San Fran's MOA. God it looks like a pile of flapjacks that are collapsing.
  91. @yaqub the mad scientist
    This piece of precious prissiness is hilarious.

    I worked in Boulder 25 years ago. I was stunned at how white it was. Coming from a region with a large black population, with numerous other ethnicities represented, I had never seen anything like it. It was certainly hippiesh, but you could see it dying even then. Boulder was where whatever hippies were left in the area would go to do drug exchanges. The street vibe was already pretty yuppied (another cultural thing I was new to). And it was expensive. You could go and see the leftovers of the beat scene draw modest checks for performing/scenstering at Allan Ginsburg's Naropa Institute (subject of a hilarious takedown by poet Tom Clark in the The Great Naropa Poetry Wars) and do nice day hikes, but everything else cost a lot of money. Culturally, it was white bread liberal, with that typical veneer of exotica wrapped in a Patagonia outfit. There was absolutely nothing speaking of anything authentic or "diverse".

    A year ago, I spent a week there doing some technical training. Things had taken their course and Boulder had become the complete sterile utopia that it was heading toward, and it was as white as ever.

    This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don't know where to begin. The idea that this town represents the future is absurd. First of all, this country will soon be minority majority, and if he has the least bit of intelligence, he would know that the culture of Boulder is not their culture. A city that is 0.9% black represents the past more than anything Donald Trump represents.

    Any journalist who attempts to use a rich college town as representative of anything general about America should be automatically fired. If this town represents anything of America's future, it is white flight via high property values and zoning laws.

    The journos are getting desperate. Simple logic is beyond them now. (Maybe it always was, in fact),

    They’re panicking over Trump.

    NYT has a piece saying diversity doesn’t cause distrust.

    Those low trust ethnicities are only low trust because they’re poor and disadvantaged.

    So, skim off the best of those ethnicities, and you’ll get along fine with them. Maybe. It’s speculative.

    Plus, no discussion about what to do about the low trust leftovers, the perennial poor.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "NYT has a piece saying diversity doesn’t cause distrust."

    How would the NYT know that? When none of them live in New York City neighborhoods where White people are in the Minority. None of them in NYC neighborhoods that look like New Jack City.
    , @Anoni
    God was that terrible. They advanced an argument with zero support and without addressing the key conclusion from the putnam research, which was that whites trusted each other less around minorities. That was the killer conclusion. They are trying to make an ecological fallacy argument, but never address the most important putnam points.

    Sociology should be closed down.
  92. @Steve Sailer
    Boulder is at 5,430 feet elevation, which isn't as high as some other small scenic cities, like Aspen at 7900 feet and Santa Fe at 7200 feet or Jackson Hole at 6200 feet.

    Aspen attracts lots of vigorous millionaires, but it's easier to grow old at 5500 feet than at 7900 feet.

    Don’t forget Ketchum, Idaho: christened with the blood of Papa himself, elevation 5,800ft.

    • Replies: @vinny
    But Boulder is kind of unique because it's both mountain adjacent and big enough that a middle class person could, with the right amount of luck, make a living there (or at least in nearby Longmont, Mr. Money Mustache style).

    Aspen and Jackson and Ketchum are billionaire havens.

    I do know of a few other western whiteopias (in one of which I used to live and dated an extremely Republican, Spanish-fluent girl who was reared in Boulder) where your average joe can live, but I'll keep them to myself for now.

    The trouble that many of these blueish towns in red states have is that state governments are now extremely anti-urban. If you want things that contribute highly to quality of urban public life, like traffic calming or bike lanes or improved mass transit, the very republican state governments will do everything they can to stop it (no matter what they say about local control), which keeps these places far crappier with far less traffic than they should be.
  93. @Dr. X
    All those college towns (and many others) are great places to live because they're all Disneylands. They're not real.

    Living in a college town is like eating caviar in a tuxedo in the first-class dining room on the Titanic while hundreds of grimy stokers are shoveling coal into the engines ten decks below. When the thing hits an iceberg, the people in first class won't feel a thing but the guys in the engine room are all goners.

    The point is that college towns are the cherry on top of the sundae. The society that pays for those college towns is comprised of people doing real work, having real problems, and competing with real Mexicans, real Chinese, and real blacks trying to rob them. The idea that college towns are "the future" is ridiculous. Colleges are dependent on significant artificial support from the government -- no property taxes, no income taxes, tax-free endowments, direct subsidies, student loans and grants. College towns would be significantly different if colleges were treated like other industries.

    Exactly, look at Ithaca NY. It would be a tiny tourist town desperately hanging on with the rest of Upstate NY if it were not for the two colleges.

  94. @syonredux
    And, once upon a time, one could even find conservatives in the film industry: DW Griffith, Howard Hawks, John Ford, Barbara Stanwyck, Frank Capra, Michael Powell, ....

    “And, once upon a time, one could even find conservatives in the film industry: DW Griffith, Howard Hawks, John Ford, Barbara Stanwyck, Frank Capra, Michael Powell, ….”

    The late Francis Capra was a Republican.

  95. The Guardian touts a bluetopia of course.

    A couple months ago, Ted Cruz-lovin’ Oostberg, Wisconsin, which is even less NAM than Boulder, got similar fawning coverage as a cucktopia.

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/in-americas-strong-small-towns-trumps-anger-fails-to-resonate/article/2587775

    One more “anti-Trumptopia” (secret sauce: segregation) puff piece and it becomes a trend!

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks for the link to the story about Oostburg, Fiddlesticks. It's indeed just like Sioux County, Iowa -- and the article writer explicitly recognizes the parallel. I wonder if he's been looking around this site; much of the language in the article could have come straight from Steve's observations and many of the comments here.
    , @Anonymous
    The not-so-subtext of that article was that Oostberg was jonesing for cheap farm helots. Those sanctimonious cloth-coat scolds will get their deserts soon enough. Just watch when the Spanish AM stations sprout between the dawn-to-dusk cuck-talk programming.
  96. @vinny
    Don't forget Ketchum, Idaho: christened with the blood of Papa himself, elevation 5,800ft.

    But Boulder is kind of unique because it’s both mountain adjacent and big enough that a middle class person could, with the right amount of luck, make a living there (or at least in nearby Longmont, Mr. Money Mustache style).

    Aspen and Jackson and Ketchum are billionaire havens.

    I do know of a few other western whiteopias (in one of which I used to live and dated an extremely Republican, Spanish-fluent girl who was reared in Boulder) where your average joe can live, but I’ll keep them to myself for now.

    The trouble that many of these blueish towns in red states have is that state governments are now extremely anti-urban. If you want things that contribute highly to quality of urban public life, like traffic calming or bike lanes or improved mass transit, the very republican state governments will do everything they can to stop it (no matter what they say about local control), which keeps these places far crappier with far less traffic than they should be.

  97. @Frau Katze
    The journos are getting desperate. Simple logic is beyond them now. (Maybe it always was, in fact),

    They're panicking over Trump.

    NYT has a piece saying diversity doesn't cause distrust.

    Those low trust ethnicities are only low trust because they're poor and disadvantaged.

    So, skim off the best of those ethnicities, and you'll get along fine with them. Maybe. It's speculative.

    Plus, no discussion about what to do about the low trust leftovers, the perennial poor.

    “NYT has a piece saying diversity doesn’t cause distrust.”

    How would the NYT know that? When none of them live in New York City neighborhoods where White people are in the Minority. None of them in NYC neighborhoods that look like New Jack City.

  98. The real test for how precious this Boulder, Colorado pleasure dome is, is how many microbreweries it has. My guess is ten.
    Just checked and Google says twenty two or so http://bit.ly/1YTWUu8
    Tour Boulders microbreweries! http://boulderbrewtours.com/

    I wouldn’t last long there. Too cutsie pie for me

  99. Boulder is beautiful; no doubt about it. But, it is a college town…forever levitating between reality and real life since the 70’s.

    College towns will NEVER solve the problems of the world because: THE LARGEST DEMOGRAPHIC in Boulder is: 18-23 yr olds! College towns will not “civilize” the non-college-non-education-interested. College towns are not universal or typical: one size does not fit all regions – otherwise, campuses in Kentucky or Arkansas would make the list.

    Boulder, thought of as serious, just…just…is…, I can’t even.

    I will always remember Boulder with deep, deep scents of marijuana wafting over the sidewalks of all the businesses mentioned in the post. At a restaurant in the late 90’s, I couldn’t even savor the taste of my meal because the noxious smell of pot was so overwhelming. Full disclosure: I don’t like pot – never did.

    I have friends who are professors there…and children of friends who have been (are there now) graduated from UC, but, ….na-a-a-h, this is not SV or some other hub of the “next big ‘magic dirt’ area”. Boulder will not be SV…there are small start ups, but the real estate is too costly for kids working on minimum wage to stay there. It is a baby-boomer’s retirement paradise, however – but you still gotta be rich to buy a condo there today.

    UC will always be known as a party town-college town…with world-class alpine skiing minutes away. Who would not want to go (should have gone to) there for their college years?

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    I can't fathom how you are averse to marijuana, but it is indeed characteristically rude, childish, and in-your-face -- literally -- for the lefty kiddies in Boulder to smoke where people need to breathe the smoke who don't want to. Obnoxious. The rest of us have no problem being considerate civilized adults and smoking on our own property without imposing on anyone else.

    Here in LA, too, there's plenty of marijuana, and more often tobacco, wafting into the faces of our toddlers and baby as we walk around the sidewalks. What tolerant and "liberal" people, eh?

    , @Lagertha
    Where Do I Start?: I am old enough to be your mother. The reality is, pot is not, so not, my bag (allergies) ...and, I DO hate the smell. I don't like the "rockiness" that pot does to my head. And, because pot makes me sick (like seasick), I stopped smoking/more like tryin' it again since 1983 in Jersey. I tried to love it in 1993 in Utah; same deal; I got paranoid and felt nauseous like most people (those who are not sailors) would feel below deck.

    I have been a poster on Steve's Squad for 2+ years now, so the "regulars," including the guys who hate me; know, so know; I am not into dope and I am a sailor, in the nautical sense. I am not as composed and as erudite as his usual posters, but, I have my own voice - So, I was foolish to respond to a random person like you, but, in a weird way, I want you to understand that people born before 1962 are still intensely following this election. You can't write-off people. And, there are strange/unexpected allegiances now and forming, everywhere. 1984 was a book I loved.
  100. @AndrewR
    This article is smug even by the Guardian's standards.

    Boulder is indeed a nice place but it's very expensive and very white. These are not unrelated phenomenon.

    I'm not really sure what the endgame for these anti-white neoleftists is. Elysium?

    "The place is booming around values and principles to which [Trump supporters] are hostile"

    Is it? As Arclight points out, Boulder can be a lovely place to live even if you don't subscribe to leftist delusions. I have many "liberal" tastes and beliefs. I am all about good food, intellectualism, open-mindedness, environmental preservation, hiking and sustainability. I am interested in other cultures. I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers. But I still like Trump, for the reasons that most Trump fans do. Could the author of this piece wrap his puny intellect around this non-contradiction?

    >and sustainability.<

    fission nuclear power: yes or no?

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Fukushima scared me but then again Japan hasa long history of big earthquakes.

    I guess it depends.
    , @JSM
    LFTR, yes! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2vzotsvvkw
  101. @Dr. X
    All those college towns (and many others) are great places to live because they're all Disneylands. They're not real.

    Living in a college town is like eating caviar in a tuxedo in the first-class dining room on the Titanic while hundreds of grimy stokers are shoveling coal into the engines ten decks below. When the thing hits an iceberg, the people in first class won't feel a thing but the guys in the engine room are all goners.

    The point is that college towns are the cherry on top of the sundae. The society that pays for those college towns is comprised of people doing real work, having real problems, and competing with real Mexicans, real Chinese, and real blacks trying to rob them. The idea that college towns are "the future" is ridiculous. Colleges are dependent on significant artificial support from the government -- no property taxes, no income taxes, tax-free endowments, direct subsidies, student loans and grants. College towns would be significantly different if colleges were treated like other industries.

    All those college towns (and many others) are great places to live because they’re all Disneylands. They’re not real.

    Taxpayer supported Disneylands, State and Federal taxes pour into them. Federal student loans as you mention. Federal gov’t research money and so on. Twelve percent of US millionaires are educators. It’s a great biz to be in.
    ______

    Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators (Video)
    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2012/03/12-of-us-millionaires-are-educators
    Mar 12, 2012 · … deprived teachers now make up 12% of US millionaires. And … Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators … budget is over thirty percent of the ..

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Taxpayer supported Disneylands, State and Federal taxes pour into them. Federal student loans as you mention. Federal gov’t research money and so on. Twelve percent of US millionaires are educators. It’s a great biz to be in.
    ______

    Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators (Video)
    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2012/03/12-of-us-millionaires-are-educators
    Mar 12, 2012 · … deprived teachers now make up 12% of US millionaires. And … Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators … budget is over thirty percent of the .."

    Yet the Left still says that educators in this country are underpaid.
  102. @AndrewR
    This article is smug even by the Guardian's standards.

    Boulder is indeed a nice place but it's very expensive and very white. These are not unrelated phenomenon.

    I'm not really sure what the endgame for these anti-white neoleftists is. Elysium?

    "The place is booming around values and principles to which [Trump supporters] are hostile"

    Is it? As Arclight points out, Boulder can be a lovely place to live even if you don't subscribe to leftist delusions. I have many "liberal" tastes and beliefs. I am all about good food, intellectualism, open-mindedness, environmental preservation, hiking and sustainability. I am interested in other cultures. I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers. But I still like Trump, for the reasons that most Trump fans do. Could the author of this piece wrap his puny intellect around this non-contradiction?

    >I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers.<

    so you don't like "man made" climate change folks and proggtards?

    • Replies: @Nico
    I don't consider myself liberal or progressive at all, and I can't speak for AndrewR, but this guy echos my thoughts on the matter fairly succinctly:

    I give SWPLs a lot of shit for their hypocrisy, sanctimony and status whoring, but I wouldn’t want to live, for example, a prole lifestyle in a redneck neighborhood where COPS isn’t just a show on TV. The lower classes are crass, boorish and often thoughtlessly impulsive. Their kids are snot-nosed brats and bullies. When they speak their rudimentary patois, you will cringe. Their abysmal taste in the finer pleasures of life is a perpetual turn-off for those who would be their natural political allies. But they already get so much shit from the MSM that I don’t feel an urge to pile on them. I prefer to hunt the hunters.
     
    , @AndrewR
    I trust the climatologists but I get why some don't.
  103. jon says:
    @George Taylor
    Boulder real estate hits top 1 percent of country’s most expensive markets
    http://www.denverpost.com/2015/11/11/boulder-real-estate-hits-top-1-percent-of-countrys-most-expensive-markets/

    I live near Boulder but as a person who has to work for living I live in a formerly affordable area in Denver between the barrio and Pho City. One of my favorite Boulder jokes is "The vegan trust funders look like Auschwitz survivors, except they have tans"

    Just did a quick Zillow search for homes under $300,000 in Boulder. The only listing is a 1 bedroom condo: http://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sale/Boulder-CO/house_type/2098886406_zpid/30543_rid/0-300000_price/0-1074_mp/any_days/globalrelevanceex_sort/40.297333,-104.878922,39.738874,-105.749589_rect/9_zm/0_mmm/

    I almost moved there awhile back. I remember looking for houses in the $300,000 or less range – the only thing available was “low-income housing” that you had to qualify for. Unbelievable.

  104. @D. K.
    There are two Nobel Prize winners in Economic Sciences-- the late Paul Samuelson, in 1970, and Joseph Stiglitz, of Columbia University, in 2001-- that are fellow natives of my birthplace, Gary, Indiana. Helluva lotta good that has done for our birthplace, these past fifteen or fifty years!

    Fake Nobel Prize winners, that is. There is no Nobel Prize in economics.

    • Agree: Bill Jones
    • Replies: @D. K.
    "The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (officially Swedish: Sveriges riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne, or the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel), commonly referred to as the Nobel Prize in Economics,[1] is an award for outstanding contributions to the field of economics, and generally regarded as the most prestigious award for that field.[2]"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nobel_Memorial_Prize_in_Economic_Sciences
  105. @Anonymous
    OT:

    Uber has a revolutionary idea to help with traffic congestion: carpooling. What amazing high-tech innovation by some of the country's (the world's?) greatest minds!

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-23/the-uber-commute-is-next-frontier-for-ceo-kalanick

    “OT:

    Uber has a revolutionary idea to help with traffic congestion: carpooling. What amazing high-tech innovation by some of the country’s (the world’s?) greatest minds!”

    Indeed. A truly revolutionay 1970s idea.

  106. @Fiddlesticks
    The Guardian touts a bluetopia of course.

    A couple months ago, Ted Cruz-lovin' Oostberg, Wisconsin, which is even less NAM than Boulder, got similar fawning coverage as a cucktopia.

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/in-americas-strong-small-towns-trumps-anger-fails-to-resonate/article/2587775

    One more "anti-Trumptopia" (secret sauce: segregation) puff piece and it becomes a trend!

    Thanks for the link to the story about Oostburg, Fiddlesticks. It’s indeed just like Sioux County, Iowa — and the article writer explicitly recognizes the parallel. I wonder if he’s been looking around this site; much of the language in the article could have come straight from Steve’s observations and many of the comments here.

  107. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    People have mentioned the benefits of a college town with a good university.

    Something that might be worth noting is that Boulder is a 30 minute drive from the US’s alternate/fallback/logistics/spillover Washington, DC, the Denver Federal Center:

    “…The Denver Federal Center encompasses an area of about 670 acres (2.7 km2) and has 90 buildings comprising over 4,000,000 square feet (400,000 m2) of office, warehouse, lab and special use space. There are 26 different Federal agencies on-site, making it the largest concentration of Federal agencies outside of Washington, D.C.

    Bound to be good for research contracts and the like, in particular since many of the more technical Federal departments ended up there. Also where they stored all the paperclips and forms; no need to use a lot of space in Washington DC for that. Good central location, and back in the early days close to all that gold in Pike’s Peak…

  108. @Immigrant from former USSR
    First, small correction to your comment: there are four different campuses of the University of Colorado system:
    CU Boulder
    CU Colorado Springs
    CU Denver
    CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    I agree with you that particular placement of the top science community has element of randomness. But after that community is established, it is developing by its own laws.

    Well before present day efforts by NIST in Boulder, really great scientist George Gamow
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Gamow
    (1904-1968) came to CU Boulder.
    In 1956, Gamow moved to the University of Colorado Boulder, where he remained for the rest of his career. In 1956, Gamow became one of the founding members of the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC), which later reformed teaching of high-school physics in the post-Sputnik years.

    In the early 20th century, radioactive materials were known to have characteristic exponential decay rates, or half-lives. At the same time, radiation emissions were known to have certain characteristic energies. By 1928, Gamow had solved the theory of the alpha decay of a nucleus via tunnelling, with mathematical help from Nikolai Kochin. The problem was also solved independently by Ronald W. Gurney and Edward U. Condon. Gurney and Condon did not, however, achieve the quantitative results achieved by Gamow.

    George Gamow was the father of the hot "big bang" theory of the expanding universe
    (see the article above from Wikipedia.)

    After the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1953 by Francis Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin, Gamow attempted to solve the problem of how the order of the four different kinds of bases (adenine, cytosine, thymine and guanine) in DNA chains could control the synthesis of proteins from amino acids. Crick has said[30] that Gamow's suggestions helped him in his own thinking about the problem. As related by Crick,[31] Gamow suggested that the twenty combinations of four DNA bases taken three at a time corresponded to the twenty amino acids that form proteins. This led Crick and Watson to enumerate the twenty amino acids common to proteins. Gamow's contribution to solving the problem of genetic coding gave rise to important models of biological degeneracy.

    Time standards in Boulder:

    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=nist%20colorado&tbs=lf:1,lf_ui:3&rflfq=1&rlha=0&rllag=40336485,-105149230,39255&tbm=lcl&rlfi=hd:;si:636967670422965816

    I am also fan of Steve Sailer. My best to you.

    the University of Colorado system:
    CU Boulder
    CU Colorado Springs
    CU Denver
    CU Anschutz Medical Campus.

    Minor pet peeve, but why is the University of Colorado referred to as CU. It’s UC dammit!

    • Replies: @Immigrant from former USSR
    Dear jon:
    Thank you for your reaction.
    I do not accept your damnation. This is how the system of University of Colorado labels itself,
    see http://www.cu.edu/

    UC is University of California, e.g. UCSF --- UC San Francisco.
    Disclosure: I live and work neither in Colorado, nor in California.
    My best, I.f.f.U.

    , @Forbes
    You can take comfort in the fact that the (private) University of Denver is referred to as DU.
    , @iSteveFan

    but why is the University of Colorado referred to as CU
     
    Personal recollection here: Back when the Big 8 conference existed all the states schools went by similar designations that seemed backwards. You had the University of Colorado going by CU. You had the University of Kansas going by KU. You had the University of Missouri going by MU. You had the University of Oklahoma going by OU.

    I don't know why they did that. Kentucky and other schools like Tennessee in the Southeast Conference went by UK and UT. But the Big8 schools all seemed to go by a different designation.
  109. @Father O'Hara
    I admit to being much more impressed by your Michael Jackson.

    I am confused!?! I do not do Michael Jackson. I do a lot of other folks, including ‘Satchmo’ and LBJ, though….

  110. Ok, I truly don’t understand why a semi-interesting Guardian profile on Boulder, CO has to make a larger theme to bash Trump. If they wanted to draw some contrasts and comparisons, why not include Bernie Sanders and make mention that Boulder, like Portlandia, SWPL, Whitopia, etc. is part of Bernie nation, or something along those lines?

    I mean, for 2016, the major way for media to insure online looks and clicks is to turn virtually every story into an anti-Trump piece, even when there’s no direct connection to do so?

    So for next week: when the NBA finals between East and West begin will one of the main Sports Illustrated columnists covering the championship tournament decide to “write about a new angle” and show how “Most NBA fans really despise Donald Trump. The Reason? He hates basketball and the diversity culture that helped make it strong and a success (e.g. Most of the players tend to be black while most of the attendees at the events, particularly in the courtside 1,200k and upwards, tend to be white). And of course that sort of virtue-signaling by Trump bashing in the most unlikely of places would be considered quite bold, visionary, even courageous by the editors and perhaps the publishers.

    But still not seeing what the fuss is about. Remove the Trump angle in the Guardian story and it reads no different than it would in profiling Boulder back in 2006 or in 2011.

  111. @e
    “I LOVE the diversity! Love love love it! There’s even a Muslim girl with the headscarf, some black kids etc….that’s hard to find in this city.” I asked her what it was about the diversity she loved, and she said that it will show her daughter that there’s so much more out there, a wider world.

    Ah, yes, the ole "taste of," in this case, diversity. Perhaps you could have asked her if she'd like several mouthfuls of said diversity. Then, entire dinners.

    Ah, yes, the ole “taste of,” in this case, diversity.

    Most people like tokenism, but few actually like true diversity.

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Yep. Liberal love blacks, browns and Muslims so long as they act just like white liberals. Otherwise, liberals get very frustrated and, most often, move to a less diverse neighborhood. Funny that.
  112. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    A 35 minute drive from Boulder was where they decided to put:

    “…Building 710 is an underground bunker complex designed to withstand a nuclear blast. …completed in 1969 and has a total space of 36,000 square feet (3,300 m2). It was intended as a base for federal operations during a nuclear attack and was designed to house 300 people for up to 30 days in the event of a nuclear war. …Today Building 710 houses the Region VIII Office of the Federal Emergency Management Agency…”

    Lots of government types around makes for the expected politics.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    The extraordinary effort made to ensure the survival of the federal government in the event of an all-out nuclear war is kind of odd. You'd think that none of the survivors would want to revive the government that presided over the catastrophe.
    , @Bill
    Back when preppers were survivalists, Colorado was on the list of places not to live. Government facilities, Colorado Springs, choke points for highways, telephone trunk lines, railroads. Place was a magnet for hydrogen bombs. Of course, back then, there was some story for why every place was a magnet for hydrogen bombs. Except Mississippi. And East Tennessee.
  113. @celt darnell
    OK, I admit it's a while since I read Kustler, but doesn't he claim we're about to run out of oil and thus plunge into a new Stone Age? (I paraphrase).

    That doesn't sound like he sees much of a future for small, wealthy white towns......

    James Howard Kunstler was also a big Y2K scaremonger, but you have to dig deep to find that out about him:

    Kunstler, who has no formal training in the fields in which he prognosticates, made similar dire predictions for Y2K as he makes for peak oil. Kunstler responds to this criticism by saying that a Y2K-related catastrophe was averted precisely because of the billions of dollars that were spent fixing the problem. As with acid rain and ozone depletion in the ’90s, a resoundingly successful, well-coordinated international response had the ironic side effect of discrediting the very worst-case scenarios that inspired the efforts in the first place. from The Full Wiki

    He or his acolytes zealously guard his Libtardopedia page so that no mention of Y2K is ever found. That tells me he is a worthless deceitful asshole.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I was at a conference in '99 when someone asked the presenter, an economist, if they should be worried about Y2K. He said, if you've been hearing about it, experts are dealing with it. Worry about what you're not hearing about.
    , @antipater_1
    "That tells me he is a worthless deceitful asshole."

    Yes. Kunstler is just a charlatan. But he has been a successful charlatan with his book sales.
  114. @Anonymous
    A nonprofit group in the city where I live raised millions of dollars to buy almost 500 acres of forested land next to an amazing park, and then they donated the land to the park, which just happens to abut the ritziest, most old-money area of our city. Can you say buffer?

    Sounds like a really effective buffer, since I’ve been hearing lately that blacks are terrified of trees because lynching and therefore won’t brave forested areas such as national parks.

  115. Wally says: • Website
    @Yak-15
    I think that Boulder is the ideal place to settle refugees from Syria and Somalia. It's a high income place with lots of liberals and loads of potential were it only to be less white. It probably has a great school system too that can help lots of subsistence farmers from central Africa.

    I think an infusion of diversity would do wonders for the local environment and the local economy. I will write my state senator and see if he can help make it happen.

    I look forward to their local government fast-tracking approve my proposal. Once they have 50,000 boat people from be Medditerranean they will finally live in the Utopian they have always wanted and voted for.

    Great point.

    If those in Boulder or in any other ‘white liberal’ city or neighborhood were told that Section 8 housing, aka: ‘projects’ were going to be built next to their house the entire situation would change in a heartbeat.

    Most ‘white liberals’ live nowhere close to blacks or browns. And that’s the way ‘white liberals’ like it. Obviously so.

    Just look around.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Most ‘white liberals’ live nowhere close to blacks or browns. And that’s the way ‘white liberals’ like it. Obviously so."

    Jim Goad has said that whenever White Liberals call him a racist, he responds by saying he lives in 75 percent Black Stone Mountain, Georgia and than he asks them what percentage of their neighborhood or suburb that they live in is Black?

    Stone Mountain would scare the shit out of most White Liberals, especially since most Blacks in Stone Mountain are lot less Whitewashed than Obama in how they speak and dress. Stone Mountain has a lot of World Star Hip Hop culture.

  116. @Clyde

    All those college towns (and many others) are great places to live because they’re all Disneylands. They’re not real.
     
    Taxpayer supported Disneylands, State and Federal taxes pour into them. Federal student loans as you mention. Federal gov't research money and so on. Twelve percent of US millionaires are educators. It's a great biz to be in.
    ______

    Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators (Video)
    www.thegatewaypundit.com/2012/03/12-of-us-millionaires-are-educators
    Mar 12, 2012 · ... deprived teachers now make up 12% of US millionaires. And ... Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators ... budget is over thirty percent of the ..

    “Taxpayer supported Disneylands, State and Federal taxes pour into them. Federal student loans as you mention. Federal gov’t research money and so on. Twelve percent of US millionaires are educators. It’s a great biz to be in.
    ______

    Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators (Video)
    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2012/03/12-of-us-millionaires-are-educators
    Mar 12, 2012 · … deprived teachers now make up 12% of US millionaires. And … Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators … budget is over thirty percent of the ..”

    Yet the Left still says that educators in this country are underpaid.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    Ignore teacher whining about how hard they have it, particularly members of big city unions.
    We were once watching the Suze Ormond financial show and a NYC elementary school teacher called to the "Can I Afford it Segment" to ask if she could afford to buy a lakefront condo in rural New York. The lady was about to hit 60 and be forced to retire, and would still be too young for Social Security, so her income would drop to a $108,000 a year teachers pension until SS kicked in to supplement it. She could not afford to keep living in the City in the manner she wanted on $108,000 year.
  117. @fnn
    I was referring to "environments" or communities (and ones not too distant in time.) The guy I was responding to was talking about how lefties create interesting/stimulating communities.

    I was referring to “environments” or communities (and ones not too distant in time.) The guy I was responding to was talking about how lefties create interesting/stimulating communities.

    For an example of that kind of thing, the Nashville Agrarians come to mind: John Crowe Ransom, Allen Tate, Robert Penn Warren, Donald Davidson, Cleanth Brooks, …..

  118. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    College towns are what you would expect to get with massive wealth transfer from the real economy to Higher Learningness which is next to godliness for most correct libs, since they long ago got the run of said vibrantopolis and the influx of state, federal, & foundation subsidy that both inflates property values and protects them from the consequences of fashion-statement liberalism. Was a bit surprised to see Lincoln, Neb. mentioned, which is terminally blah despite having one of the older land-grant universities, but you could make a case for the perfumed diversity of Athens, Ga. too. Or Chapel Hill, N.C.; or Lexington, Ky… Know what’s another really kickass burg? Berkeley

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Just look up the widest racial gaps in test scores and you'll find the college towns.
  119. Boulder’s venture capitalist, Brad Feld, is an immigration extremist. He funneled his outrage about the laws-on-the-books into a campaign for the “Startup Visa” as if the O-1 weren’t available.

    Mr. Feld and wife (childless) sometimes tire of the overwhelming 88% whiteness of Boulder and vacation in New Orleans. Just kidding – they vacation in Homer, Alaska (90% white).

    Feld’ll tell you all about it on his famous VC blog. Importing unlimited 3rd-worlders to dump on his blue- and white-collar countrymen seems fair to Feld, from the safe distance of his 88% white and 90% white towns. If his countrymen (probably proto-Nazis) don’t like it, they should learn to code, or something.

    Feld’s also a pioneering VC anti-sexist. What a mensch.

  120. @Fiddlesticks
    The Guardian touts a bluetopia of course.

    A couple months ago, Ted Cruz-lovin' Oostberg, Wisconsin, which is even less NAM than Boulder, got similar fawning coverage as a cucktopia.

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/in-americas-strong-small-towns-trumps-anger-fails-to-resonate/article/2587775

    One more "anti-Trumptopia" (secret sauce: segregation) puff piece and it becomes a trend!

    The not-so-subtext of that article was that Oostberg was jonesing for cheap farm helots. Those sanctimonious cloth-coat scolds will get their deserts soon enough. Just watch when the Spanish AM stations sprout between the dawn-to-dusk cuck-talk programming.

  121. @Anonymous
    OT:

    Uber has a revolutionary idea to help with traffic congestion: carpooling. What amazing high-tech innovation by some of the country's (the world's?) greatest minds!

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-23/the-uber-commute-is-next-frontier-for-ceo-kalanick

    OT:
    They’re lynching middle-schoolers in Texas!

    A Waco mother is demanding answers after her 12-year-old daughter came home from an overnight school trip with severe rope burns around her neck. Sandy Rougely said her daughter returned from the April 28 camping trip to a ranch with the injury covering the front half of her neck, ABC News reports. Many questions concerning the incident remain unanswered, but the gruesome laceration has Rougely thinking her child was the victim of racially motivated bullying from classmates. Her daughter was one of two Black students on the trip, The Dallas Morning News reports.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "OT:
    They’re lynching middle-schoolers in Texas!"

    Why hasn't Steve done a blog on this new latest hate hoax committed by another Negro with mental illness?

    I truly believe that Blacks who stage fake hate crimes need to see a shrink. As Speedy Gonzalez would say, they are loco in the cabeza.

  122. @Steve Sailer
    Aspen is pretty nice too.

    http://abc7news.com/news/millbrae-man-ex-gf-suspected-in-his-death-had-bitter-break-up/1352611/

    Off topic, but this story is too isteve-y to ignore. No chechens but still.

  123. A black man in Boulder, that rarest of rarities, raped my girlfriend. I’ve mentioned that little fact here before.

    I lived there a long time, hiked all the trails, lived a great bachelor life, etc.

    Eventually Boulder didn’t seem cool anymore, and I left to make money in the real world. That was a good move, and it was a long time ago. I visit from time to time, and I notice that it has become a crowded parody of itself.

    Lots of other commenters here have pretty well summed up the place and the smug cluelessness of the Guardian article about it.

    Saying that Boulder is the future is like saying that every day of the year will be like your New Year’s Eve party.

  124. The future of America indeed: skyrocketing rent, fast-casual restaurants that serve “house ferments” (pickles) for breakfast, insufferable students, and a pervasive NIMBY attitude. Plus all the racial demographics everyone else has pointed out.

    One of my friends in graduate school bought a condo through the City of Boulder’s affordable housing program. So if you can pull strings and have wealthy parents, you can still live in the city limits.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if Boulder were one of the top towns for per capita iSteve readership. Like Cambridge, it has a high number of educated whites that can’t express their interest in HBD in public.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "I wouldn’t be surprised if Boulder were one of the top towns for per capita iSteve readership."

    That would be interesting to get a report on. But my programmer is busy running for the U.S. Senate, so it'll have to wait.

    , @Steve Sailer
    "I wouldn’t be surprised if Boulder were one of the top towns for per capita iSteve readership."

    That would be interesting to get a report on. But my programmer is busy running for the U.S. Senate, so it'll have to wait.

  125. It has been voted the US’s brainiest city, its happiest city, the country’s foodiest place and the number one city for health. It is a standing reproach to Donald Trump, and indeed Britain’s rightwing Brexiteers who ape his thinking. The place is booming around values and principles to which they are hostile….

    100% ass-backwards analysis.

    Who wants to be in neighbourhoods that incorporate the values of Trump-style populists or their first cousins, the Brexiteers….

    The residents of Boulder! Boulder is an example of what Trump-style populists produce.

  126. @Hepp
    It has 100K people, with a university that enrolls 30K students. Probably half the city is either attending the university or employed by it.

    In other words, they don't have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids. Of course it's a nice place to live.

    “In other words, they don’t have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids.”

    This fairly well sums it up. CU Boulder is also the flagship state university in a state with no strong private or public alternatives. Boulder gets the richest kids in the state, and it’s economy is either entirely reliant on direct government spending or on businesses born of that spending.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    "CU Boulder is also the flagship state university in a state with no strong private or public alternatives"

    Colorado School of Mines is very good in STEM.
    , @ATX Hipster
    I knew a decent number of middle class kids in Boulder (granted, usually upper-middle), but the demographics of the in-state students are probably wealthier overall than CSU.

    Where CU really does well is the out-of-state students, who are 37% of its student body. You can't throw a rock on campus without hitting a Californian. Out-of-state tuition for the upcoming school year starts at $16,658 per semester.
  127. @Reginald Maplethorp
    The future of America indeed: skyrocketing rent, fast-casual restaurants that serve "house ferments" (pickles) for breakfast, insufferable students, and a pervasive NIMBY attitude. Plus all the racial demographics everyone else has pointed out.

    One of my friends in graduate school bought a condo through the City of Boulder's affordable housing program. So if you can pull strings and have wealthy parents, you can still live in the city limits.

    I wouldn't be surprised if Boulder were one of the top towns for per capita iSteve readership. Like Cambridge, it has a high number of educated whites that can't express their interest in HBD in public.

    “I wouldn’t be surprised if Boulder were one of the top towns for per capita iSteve readership.”

    That would be interesting to get a report on. But my programmer is busy running for the U.S. Senate, so it’ll have to wait.

  128. @Reginald Maplethorp
    The future of America indeed: skyrocketing rent, fast-casual restaurants that serve "house ferments" (pickles) for breakfast, insufferable students, and a pervasive NIMBY attitude. Plus all the racial demographics everyone else has pointed out.

    One of my friends in graduate school bought a condo through the City of Boulder's affordable housing program. So if you can pull strings and have wealthy parents, you can still live in the city limits.

    I wouldn't be surprised if Boulder were one of the top towns for per capita iSteve readership. Like Cambridge, it has a high number of educated whites that can't express their interest in HBD in public.

    “I wouldn’t be surprised if Boulder were one of the top towns for per capita iSteve readership.”

    That would be interesting to get a report on. But my programmer is busy running for the U.S. Senate, so it’ll have to wait.

    • Replies: @Reginald Maplethorp
    I'm a patient man, but I can't wait an entire Senate term (or two)!

    Thinking about Boulder some more, it is a town Hank Scorpio would be proud of: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foU9W7AkKSY . Cypress Creek: The Future of America!

    In Boulder on Memorial Day, there is actually a town-wide "fun run" with tens of thousands of people running by your front door for several hours. And there is a new Globex--I mean, Google--office (increasing from 350 employees to 1500 employees) opening there soon.
  129. @anony-mouse
    '... If Boulder is the future, where are all the white people going to come from...'

    Maybe from the state immediately to the West? 86% White with America's highest birthrate.

    How do you write 'we need room' in 'Reformed Egyptian'?

    Hispanics are outbreeding whites even in Utah, and the Mormon Church is fully signed on to the immivasion/race replacement ideology, and has backed that position for well over a decade now. The Mormon Church was once just ridiculous. It is now ridiculous and evil.

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    I would question if fertility rate disparities are connected to levels of welfare statism. Utah's state government isn't a good example of Conservatism Inc's presumed fiscal preferences in action. Though it is exactly where the nonservatives stand on Le Grand Remplacement.

    There is a country where the trends are moving in a majoritarian direction, Israel.

    If low-trust ethnicities had no Nordic welfare system to draw from, I would guess many would go home.

    Also look at Puerto Rico's collapsing TFR.
    , @Nico

    The Mormon Church was once just ridiculous. It is now ridiculous and evil.
     
    I realize there are also a lot of cucks carrying the banner of evangelical Protestantism or Roman Catholicism (my denomination) but I like to smugly point out these days that I have been warning people about "Latter Day Saints" for a number of years running.
  130. @Anonymous
    College towns are what you would expect to get with massive wealth transfer from the real economy to Higher Learningness which is next to godliness for most correct libs, since they long ago got the run of said vibrantopolis and the influx of state, federal, & foundation subsidy that both inflates property values and protects them from the consequences of fashion-statement liberalism. Was a bit surprised to see Lincoln, Neb. mentioned, which is terminally blah despite having one of the older land-grant universities, but you could make a case for the perfumed diversity of Athens, Ga. too. Or Chapel Hill, N.C.; or Lexington, Ky... Know what's another really kickass burg? Berkeley

    Just look up the widest racial gaps in test scores and you’ll find the college towns.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    There are several obvious and realistic solutions to gap lowering in these liberal oases, that all involve the children of white privelege, and of course those of Asian privelege, which is like white privelege on steroids. Politically these measures may be difficult to get across the line but hey, I'm just a wonk.

    1. Sensory deprivation tanks from k-6.
    2. Lead enriched school lunches.
    3. Frontal lobotomies for the older children, as they already know too much.
  131. @AnotherDad
    There is a ready answer to this sort of smug, pompous windbaggery:

    "Fine. We're happy to let your voters live in your tolerant, progressive, open-borders, socialist utopia ... just let our voters live in our "backward", "xenophobic", "racist", close-border hell-hole. And we'll live our lives without bothering each other and let "history" decide which society was better--more pleasant, more prosperous, more free."

    This is of course precisely what the left will never do, because they know--but never admit--that they are essentially *parasitic* on the very people they trash and despise.

    There is a ready answer to this sort of smug, pompous windbaggery:

    “Fine. We’re happy to let your voters live in your tolerant, progressive, open-borders, socialist utopia … just let our voters live in our “backward”, “xenophobic”, “racist”, close-border hell-hole. And we’ll live our lives without bothering each other and let “history” decide which society was better–more pleasant, more prosperous, more free.”

    This is of course precisely what the left will never do, because they know–but never admit–that they are essentially *parasitic* on the very people they trash and despise.

    Exactly right.

  132. @BenKenobi
    "burgeoning service jobs ranging from diet counselling to advanced road bike maintenance."

    So I tune up your $2500 bicycle, you tell me to go vegan, and wealth is created!

    do you feel feel the burgeon!

    Why yes, in advanced societies no one produces anything except recreational drugs and everyone gets rich selling each other “services”.

    It’s right out of “Erewhon”.

    Heck if the Feds cut off funding to all the labs, centers and schools, it would be a ghost town in six months. It doesn’t manufacture or produce anything, it’s a company town in many respects.

  133. @Flinders Petrie

    That pretty much leaves us with the overwhelmingly white and low crime population and springtime rafting.
     
    There was the case of the stolen Montbell bear on Pearl Street. The life-sized stuffed bear was found by the police three days later at a campsite, where he had been carried by several groups of hikers who got a thrill out of hiking with a bear on their back.

    It's worth noting that almost all of the non-whites in the Boulder census are students obtained by U. Colo. diversity incentives. I've never seen a nonwhite outside of the campus, or Pearl Street mall. And when I've seen them, they are surrounded by crowds of adoring dreadlocked trust fund millennials who appear desperate to have some of that cool blackness rub off on them.

    It’s worth noting that almost all of the non-whites in the Boulder census are students obtained by U. Colo. diversity incentives. I’ve never seen a nonwhite outside of the campus, or Pearl Street mall. And when I’ve seen them, they are surrounded by crowds of adoring dreadlocked trust fund millennials who appear desperate to have some of that cool blackness rub off on them.

    You just reminded me of Bill McCartney, his daughter, and Sal Aunese, and I now feel sick.

    • Replies: @dr kill
    I remember that story. Seems like the kid turned out OK.
    , @Triumph104
    McCartney's daughter later had a son with a black player, Shannon Clavelle. Their son Derek plays football for CU. His older brother T.C. played at LSU, was a graduate assistant at CU, and now works for the Cleveland Browns. The kids seem to be heavy into Christianity and Promise Keepers.


    http://www.cubuffs.com/ViewArticle.dbml?ATCLID=209225317
  134. Boulder is also home to units of the Omni Consumer Products Lockheed-Martin Corporation. Lockmart, in addition to being one of the largest defence contractors in the world (perhaps the largest in the US) has been riding the Homeland Security gravy train as well, and has been branching out into spying:

    Walmart hired Lockheed Martin to spy on employees

    F-35s, Trident missiles, and data-mining are all, I am sure, sustainable green industries.

  135. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    ‘Right wing Brexiteers’.

    Gosh, how that trite little phrase makes me wince.

    For starters, it was Labour Party policy right up to 1988, for Britain to withdraw from the EU.
    The significant voice to leave the EU in the Labour Party was from the hard, Marxist inclined left. Tony Benn was the main anti-EU ringleader.
    In fact, the right wing of the Labour Party largely – and disastrously – hived off to form the ill-fated SDP back in ’81, over the issue of Europe.

    Jeremy Corbyn, Labour’s lefty leader really has little time for the EU. He’s only playing a tactical game to harm the Tories.

  136. @Frau Katze
    The journos are getting desperate. Simple logic is beyond them now. (Maybe it always was, in fact),

    They're panicking over Trump.

    NYT has a piece saying diversity doesn't cause distrust.

    Those low trust ethnicities are only low trust because they're poor and disadvantaged.

    So, skim off the best of those ethnicities, and you'll get along fine with them. Maybe. It's speculative.

    Plus, no discussion about what to do about the low trust leftovers, the perennial poor.

    God was that terrible. They advanced an argument with zero support and without addressing the key conclusion from the putnam research, which was that whites trusted each other less around minorities. That was the killer conclusion. They are trying to make an ecological fallacy argument, but never address the most important putnam points.

    Sociology should be closed down.

  137. @Mr. Anon
    Fake Nobel Prize winners, that is. There is no Nobel Prize in economics.

    The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (officially Swedish: Sveriges riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne, or the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel), commonly referred to as the Nobel Prize in Economics,[1] is an award for outstanding contributions to the field of economics, and generally regarded as the most prestigious award for that field.[2]”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nobel_Memorial_Prize_in_Economic_Sciences

    • Replies: @Grumpy
    Yes, D.K., but the economics prize was not established by Alfred Nobel's will. It was something that the Bank of Sweden came up with later. That's why Steve Sailer sometimes calls it the "quasi-Nobel." Last year, I met a member of the Swedish Academy (which awards the prize in literature) who thinks the economics prize is a travesty.
    , @Bill Jones
    But what does it have to do with Nobel?
  138. @Dirk Dagger
    OT:
    They're lynching middle-schoolers in Texas!

    A Waco mother is demanding answers after her 12-year-old daughter came home from an overnight school trip with severe rope burns around her neck. Sandy Rougely said her daughter returned from the April 28 camping trip to a ranch with the injury covering the front half of her neck, ABC News reports. Many questions concerning the incident remain unanswered, but the gruesome laceration has Rougely thinking her child was the victim of racially motivated bullying from classmates. Her daughter was one of two Black students on the trip, The Dallas Morning News reports.
     

    “OT:
    They’re lynching middle-schoolers in Texas!”

    Why hasn’t Steve done a blog on this new latest hate hoax committed by another Negro with mental illness?

    I truly believe that Blacks who stage fake hate crimes need to see a shrink. As Speedy Gonzalez would say, they are loco in the cabeza.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    They don't need a psychiatrist, they need a prison sentence for the harm they inflict through their vicious defamatory lies.
  139. @D. K.
    "The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (officially Swedish: Sveriges riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne, or the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel), commonly referred to as the Nobel Prize in Economics,[1] is an award for outstanding contributions to the field of economics, and generally regarded as the most prestigious award for that field.[2]"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nobel_Memorial_Prize_in_Economic_Sciences

    Yes, D.K., but the economics prize was not established by Alfred Nobel’s will. It was something that the Bank of Sweden came up with later. That’s why Steve Sailer sometimes calls it the “quasi-Nobel.” Last year, I met a member of the Swedish Academy (which awards the prize in literature) who thinks the economics prize is a travesty.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    So, Professor Stiglitz' award, in 2001, was "a travesty," while President Obama's award, in 2009, was . . . what, exactly?!? As for the recent Literature laureates....
    , @Blobby5
    Great point, it is a bank prize. Hence, Paul 'studies say' Krugman is a beneficiary with his pro- central bank agenda.
    , @Bill

    I met a member of the Swedish Academy (which awards the prize in literature) who thinks the economics prize is a travesty.
     
    I'm sure he thought he was critiquing the Economics Nobel as he said so.
  140. OT: White house negro signs oriental-written bill banning government from using terms “negro” and “oriental”.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/05/22/obama-signs-bill-banning-negro-oriental/

    Forgot the link.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
  141. The article’s touting of Boulder as “the liberal future” and it’s awkward whiteness reminds me of an old joke: Why are there no Arabs in Star Trek? Because it’s set in the future.

  142. Give me access to your data and I’ll crunch the numbers.

  143. @Jefferson
    " The idea that college towns are “the future” is ridiculous."

    Especially since most Hispanics do not even graduate from community colleges, let alone 4 year universities. And the Left is always telling us that Hispanics are the future of America, because they are going to change the diapers of 200 year old White Gringos.

    One doesn’t need a college degree, to be employed by the college as a janitor. Of course, with degrees being devalued, its not hard to imagine credential creep reaching down even more.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    Ben Affleck was born in Berkeley, CA and grew up in Cambridge, MA. His father was a janitor at Harvard. Not sure if his father ever earned a degree, but his mother did and was a school teacher. Ben had a very high SAT score but was lazy.
  144. @Steve Sailer
    Just look up the widest racial gaps in test scores and you'll find the college towns.

    There are several obvious and realistic solutions to gap lowering in these liberal oases, that all involve the children of white privelege, and of course those of Asian privelege, which is like white privelege on steroids. Politically these measures may be difficult to get across the line but hey, I’m just a wonk.

    1. Sensory deprivation tanks from k-6.
    2. Lead enriched school lunches.
    3. Frontal lobotomies for the older children, as they already know too much.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    ...Asian privelege, which is like white privelege on steroids.
     
    And we all know what steroids do to you down there.
  145. @Anonym
    OT: White house negro signs oriental-written bill banning government from using terms "negro" and "oriental".
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "“Many Americans may not be aware that the word ‘Oriental’ is derogatory,” said Rep. Grace Meng of New York and one of the bill’s original sponsors."

    That's because it isn't. Yet another example of minorities trying to wield power over whites by dictating what we may and may not say - which magic words will be forbidden to us.

    And this from a people who call us gwailo and round-eye. How many times, I wonder has Grace Meng used one of these terms? Why is "oriental" derogatory but not "occidental"?

    But, times change, and one must keep up with them. From now on I will be sensitive to their concerns and only refer to them as inscruitable slope-eyed yellow asians.
  146. @Wilkey
    Hispanics are outbreeding whites even in Utah, and the Mormon Church is fully signed on to the immivasion/race replacement ideology, and has backed that position for well over a decade now. The Mormon Church was once just ridiculous. It is now ridiculous and evil.

    I would question if fertility rate disparities are connected to levels of welfare statism. Utah’s state government isn’t a good example of Conservatism Inc’s presumed fiscal preferences in action. Though it is exactly where the nonservatives stand on Le Grand Remplacement.

    There is a country where the trends are moving in a majoritarian direction, Israel.

    If low-trust ethnicities had no Nordic welfare system to draw from, I would guess many would go home.

    Also look at Puerto Rico’s collapsing TFR.

  147. @George Taylor
    You may be correct that Boulder will continue to be a haven for rich Whites. The United States is becoming more and more like Brazil, private security protected enclaves for the affluent, where the residents have noticeably lighter skin. Boulder managed to surround the city with permanent open space, ostensibly for environmental reasons, but it sure helps in keeping the riff raff away. The preserved open spaces have the same effect as oceans do for the lucky few who reside within the city limits or in the case of the California residents who are near the beach.

    America will not become like Brazil because white Americans like marrying brown immigrants.

    Take Jeb Bush, most upper crust man in America. He marries a brown Mexican girl he met on a school trip from Andover.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    Right, Jeb Bush is just typical of upper-crust men in America, in recent generations, always marrying those little, brown immigrants from south of the border. 'Tis a wonder that there are any upper-crust Whites left in the United States, in 2016, at all....
    , @P
    Jeb is the only upper crust man I know to have done that. Family Guy did a pretty savage joke about it.
    , @AndrewR
    ...what?

    The US will not become like Brazil (arguably the most pro-miscegenation society on earth) because Americans miscegenate too much? I'm not following.
    , @BB753
    http://youtu.be/UNmMXlE-rPo
  148. @Big Bill
    Pity. Madison has been deliberately importing Negros from the ghetto. Murder, rapes and street crime have made it much more unpleasant over the last 30 years.

    People here who use the term Negros because of their dislike for blacks sound childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    What do people, anywhere, who insist upon calling Blacks "African Americans," while at the same time inevitably referring to European Americans as "Whites," sound like to you?
    , @Jack D
    In my lifetime, the politically correct term for black people has changed maybe four or five times, from colored people to Negroes to black to African-American to people of color (which is good but colored people is bad - go figure). I may have missed a couple in there - I think there may have been a short period where it was Afro-American instead of African-American. A lot of this is just shit testing for loyalty to the party line - the powers that be change the acceptable name and you have to signal your virtue and hipness by following the party line that is current this week. Maybe next week the correct term for blacks will be "sun people". If you don't follow along with this, you can be accused of being racis', not to mention "childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate". Maybe some people don't want to play this game anymore.
    , @Bill
    Your insults would improve if you became less stupid and ignorant.
    , @Dr. X
    "Negro" is historically the proper term. It is derived from the Latin "nigra," meaning "black," and is used in Romance languages such as Spanish.

    I refuse to use the term "African American" because we're not talking about Egyptian-Americans, Berber-Americans, Moroccan-Americans, or whites born in South Africa who emigrated to the U.S., are we?

    We're talking about sub-Saharan Bantus here. Perhaps "Bantu" is a more accurate word than "Negro," then???
    , @RadicalCenter
    Agreed that it is unnecessary and sounds strange to say "Negro."
  149. @anonymous
    A 35 minute drive from Boulder was where they decided to put:


    "...Building 710 is an underground bunker complex designed to withstand a nuclear blast. ...completed in 1969 and has a total space of 36,000 square feet (3,300 m2). It was intended as a base for federal operations during a nuclear attack and was designed to house 300 people for up to 30 days in the event of a nuclear war. ...Today Building 710 houses the Region VIII Office of the Federal Emergency Management Agency..."

     

    Lots of government types around makes for the expected politics.

    The extraordinary effort made to ensure the survival of the federal government in the event of an all-out nuclear war is kind of odd. You’d think that none of the survivors would want to revive the government that presided over the catastrophe.

  150. @Dirk Dagger
    James Howard Kunstler was also a big Y2K scaremonger, but you have to dig deep to find that out about him:

    Kunstler, who has no formal training in the fields in which he prognosticates, made similar dire predictions for Y2K as he makes for peak oil. Kunstler responds to this criticism by saying that a Y2K-related catastrophe was averted precisely because of the billions of dollars that were spent fixing the problem. As with acid rain and ozone depletion in the '90s, a resoundingly successful, well-coordinated international response had the ironic side effect of discrediting the very worst-case scenarios that inspired the efforts in the first place. from The Full Wiki

     

    He or his acolytes zealously guard his Libtardopedia page so that no mention of Y2K is ever found. That tells me he is a worthless deceitful asshole.

    I was at a conference in ’99 when someone asked the presenter, an economist, if they should be worried about Y2K. He said, if you’ve been hearing about it, experts are dealing with it. Worry about what you’re not hearing about.

  151. @Wilkey
    "In other words, they don’t have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids."

    This fairly well sums it up. CU Boulder is also the flagship state university in a state with no strong private or public alternatives. Boulder gets the richest kids in the state, and it's economy is either entirely reliant on direct government spending or on businesses born of that spending.

    “CU Boulder is also the flagship state university in a state with no strong private or public alternatives”

    Colorado School of Mines is very good in STEM.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    The MIT to CU Boulder's Harvard. Which school do the children of privilege tend to prefer?
  152. @Anonymous
    People here who use the term Negros because of their dislike for blacks sound childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate.

    What do people, anywhere, who insist upon calling Blacks “African Americans,” while at the same time inevitably referring to European Americans as “Whites,” sound like to you?

    • Replies: @Forbes
    The relatively incompetent CEO of Xerox is Ursula Burns, who is one of the very few Blacks actually referred to as such in the media--Wikipedia calls her 'black-American' (yes, lower case "b"), while born in the US, her parents were from Panama. So that African American moniker doesn't work.
  153. @Grumpy
    Yes, D.K., but the economics prize was not established by Alfred Nobel's will. It was something that the Bank of Sweden came up with later. That's why Steve Sailer sometimes calls it the "quasi-Nobel." Last year, I met a member of the Swedish Academy (which awards the prize in literature) who thinks the economics prize is a travesty.

    So, Professor Stiglitz’ award, in 2001, was “a travesty,” while President Obama’s award, in 2009, was . . . what, exactly?!? As for the recent Literature laureates….

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    That isn't the point. The point is that it is not actually a prize that was provided for in Alfred Nobel's bequest. Economics is not something that Nobel considered worthy of a prize. Those bankers had no right to glom on to another man's legacy and hijack the name for thier own purposes.

    Would you like a "Victoria Cross" for extraordinary valor in online multiplayer gaming? A "Fields Medal" for Sudoku? A "Wolf Prize" for exceptional accomplishment in lawn mowing? I have my own that I award, and you can have one for a modest financial consideration. I can sell you a "Rolex" too.
    , @guest
    More than one thing can be a travesty, and there are different types of travesties.
  154. @Anonymous
    America will not become like Brazil because white Americans like marrying brown immigrants.

    Take Jeb Bush, most upper crust man in America. He marries a brown Mexican girl he met on a school trip from Andover.

    Right, Jeb Bush is just typical of upper-crust men in America, in recent generations, always marrying those little, brown immigrants from south of the border. ‘Tis a wonder that there are any upper-crust Whites left in the United States, in 2016, at all….

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Lots of interracial marriage among powerful families in America in the latest generation.

    John Boehner's daughter - black man
    John McCain's son - black woman
    Al Gore's daughter - Asian man
    Barbara Bush - brown guy from Panama
  155. Nico says:
    @Wilkey
    Hispanics are outbreeding whites even in Utah, and the Mormon Church is fully signed on to the immivasion/race replacement ideology, and has backed that position for well over a decade now. The Mormon Church was once just ridiculous. It is now ridiculous and evil.

    The Mormon Church was once just ridiculous. It is now ridiculous and evil.

    I realize there are also a lot of cucks carrying the banner of evangelical Protestantism or Roman Catholicism (my denomination) but I like to smugly point out these days that I have been warning people about “Latter Day Saints” for a number of years running.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    I think liberals actually like Mormons now.

    I made a joke about Mormons and my very liberal friends jumped to their defense and implied I was being bigoted...

    Of course they make jokes about rednecks, Baptists, Catholics, and poor people.

    It's weird when you can't even make light of people eschewing caffeine and having a history of polygamy.
    , @dr kill
    I remember asking if the commenters at AoS knew what Mormons believed, and was immediately beset by calls for banning. Well, do you know what they profess to believe?
  156. Intolerance and hostility are definitely my values. Specifically, intolerance and hostlity towards foodies.

    • Agree: Nico, Kylie
  157. And, of course, the comments are “closed” at The Guardian (I wonder why?), so we can’t point out the white homogeneity of the Boulder population, allowing it to be a happy and prosperous region. Leftists make me sick, as their goal is to obfuscate rather than inform.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    As so often they guard the borders of a mere website with far more zeal than they would advocate for the borders of a (white) nation state.
  158. @Grumpy
    Meanwhile, in formerly white Saint Paul, Minnesota:

    A 55-year-old man suffered a traumatic brain injury and was in the hospital’s intensive care unit [after he] saw two men dumping trash from their vehicle onto the ground near the gas pumps... When the victim said, “Really, guys?,” the two men attacked him.
     
    http://www.twincities.com/2016/05/23/snelling-avenue-gas-station-assault/

    Really, guys?

    Famous liberal last words!

    • Replies: @5371
    Or a future reaction to the proclamation of the Islamic Emirate of London.
  159. @Jefferson
    "If Boulder is the future, where are all the white people going to come from"

    The Spanish speaking Caribbean, Central America, South America, The Middle East, and North Africa.

    Don't forget how broad The U.S census definition of "White" is.

    If sperglords like you got your way it would also include North-East Asians.

  160. @George Taylor
    You may be correct that Boulder will continue to be a haven for rich Whites. The United States is becoming more and more like Brazil, private security protected enclaves for the affluent, where the residents have noticeably lighter skin. Boulder managed to surround the city with permanent open space, ostensibly for environmental reasons, but it sure helps in keeping the riff raff away. The preserved open spaces have the same effect as oceans do for the lucky few who reside within the city limits or in the case of the California residents who are near the beach.

    “The United States is becoming more and more like Brazil, private security protected enclaves for the affluent, where the residents have noticeably lighter skin.”

    Most of Brazil’s wealthy millionaire and billionaire elite are not just light skin, most of Brazil’s wealthy elite are straight up White. The wealthiest Brazilian person in the world is a guy named Jorge Lemann, who has blue eyes and is of German Swiss ancestry just like Steve Sailer.

    • Replies: @neon2
    You know, when I read things like this, I wonder if Brazil is such a bad model for our future after all.
    Lots of them at the bottom, a few of us at the top. Sounds enviable, and they've kept it that way for 500 years.
  161. @AndrewR
    This article is smug even by the Guardian's standards.

    Boulder is indeed a nice place but it's very expensive and very white. These are not unrelated phenomenon.

    I'm not really sure what the endgame for these anti-white neoleftists is. Elysium?

    "The place is booming around values and principles to which [Trump supporters] are hostile"

    Is it? As Arclight points out, Boulder can be a lovely place to live even if you don't subscribe to leftist delusions. I have many "liberal" tastes and beliefs. I am all about good food, intellectualism, open-mindedness, environmental preservation, hiking and sustainability. I am interested in other cultures. I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers. But I still like Trump, for the reasons that most Trump fans do. Could the author of this piece wrap his puny intellect around this non-contradiction?

    I’m not really sure what the endgame for these anti-white neoleftists is. Elysium?

    Nah; Its Capital City and the 13 Districts; just don’t get caught in one of the Districts…you’ll be assigned to your slave labor job.

  162. The answer to your question is they will be refugees spilling in from the more diverse and less livable parts of what remains of the country. At some point Boulder will become its own little enclave like San Marino.

  163. @newrouter
    >I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers.<

    so you don't like "man made" climate change folks and proggtards?

    I don’t consider myself liberal or progressive at all, and I can’t speak for AndrewR, but this guy echos my thoughts on the matter fairly succinctly:

    I give SWPLs a lot of shit for their hypocrisy, sanctimony and status whoring, but I wouldn’t want to live, for example, a prole lifestyle in a redneck neighborhood where COPS isn’t just a show on TV. The lower classes are crass, boorish and often thoughtlessly impulsive. Their kids are snot-nosed brats and bullies. When they speak their rudimentary patois, you will cringe. Their abysmal taste in the finer pleasures of life is a perpetual turn-off for those who would be their natural political allies. But they already get so much shit from the MSM that I don’t feel an urge to pile on them. I prefer to hunt the hunters.

    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Lol he calls Steve Sailer "SWPL"
    , @ben tillman

    I give SWPLs a lot of shit for their hypocrisy, sanctimony and status whoring, but I wouldn’t want to live, for example, a prole lifestyle in a redneck neighborhood where COPS isn’t just a show on TV.
     
    Do such neighborhoods exist?
    , @Marcus
    No. SWPL's are self-righteous limp wrists who deserve all the hate they get from rightists (which is tiny compared to what's reserved in the media for "rednecks"). Rednecks do actual work that's necessary for maintaining civilization, not taking out thousands of dollars in loans for gender studies, also they're friendlier and, contra pompous nitwits who form their impression from reality/exploitation shows, not criminally-inclined.
  164. @jon

    the University of Colorado system:
    CU Boulder
    CU Colorado Springs
    CU Denver
    CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
     
    Minor pet peeve, but why is the University of Colorado referred to as CU. It's UC dammit!

    Dear jon:
    Thank you for your reaction.
    I do not accept your damnation. This is how the system of University of Colorado labels itself,
    see http://www.cu.edu/

    UC is University of California, e.g. UCSF — UC San Francisco.
    Disclosure: I live and work neither in Colorado, nor in California.
    My best, I.f.f.U.

  165. @newrouter
    >and sustainability.<

    fission nuclear power: yes or no?

    Fukushima scared me but then again Japan hasa long history of big earthquakes.

    I guess it depends.

  166. @newrouter
    >I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers.<

    so you don't like "man made" climate change folks and proggtards?

    I trust the climatologists but I get why some don’t.

    • Replies: @Nico
    The problem isn't the actual credentialed climatologists so much as the stupid green hippy activists they aid and abet. If I hear one more tree-hugging SJW complain that "'Global warming' is a misnomer; the real problem is climate change!" and then accuse libertarian right-wingers and pro-life or creationist Christians of being "anti-science" I think I am going to scream.
    , @JSM
    Which climatologists? The fellow that started The Weather Channel? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHqPF30jg2w
  167. @Nico
    I don't consider myself liberal or progressive at all, and I can't speak for AndrewR, but this guy echos my thoughts on the matter fairly succinctly:

    I give SWPLs a lot of shit for their hypocrisy, sanctimony and status whoring, but I wouldn’t want to live, for example, a prole lifestyle in a redneck neighborhood where COPS isn’t just a show on TV. The lower classes are crass, boorish and often thoughtlessly impulsive. Their kids are snot-nosed brats and bullies. When they speak their rudimentary patois, you will cringe. Their abysmal taste in the finer pleasures of life is a perpetual turn-off for those who would be their natural political allies. But they already get so much shit from the MSM that I don’t feel an urge to pile on them. I prefer to hunt the hunters.
     

    Lol he calls Steve Sailer “SWPL”

    • Replies: @Nico
    It seems intuitively ironic, though on reflection to the extent that there is a case to be made for a spectral classification of American whites between "SWPL" and "prole" poles (and I think such a case does, with qualifications, make more than a little bit of sense) Sailer is definitely closer to the former than to the latter.
  168. @AnotherDad
    So comment is not allowed? Or am I just incompetent?

    This is piece is flush with a smug pomposity while being among the flat out most clueless pieces I've ever read. (BTW, I have this vague feeling that US mainstream journalist pieces now tend to steer clear of this sort of cheerleading without mentioning the diversity deficit. This is more what you'd get from the clueless follower.)

    Don’t worry AnotherDad, it’s them, not you.
    The Grauniad had to close its notorious Komment Macht Frei section due to “moderation difficulties”. There was a long drivelling announcement a few months back from Mary? Thing? (the editrix) blaming “trolls” (but not necromancers) and so on.
    Real reason? I suspect their herds of outsourced “moderators” could no longer suppress the real opinions of the readership by seeking out crimethink and deleting the errant, and were becoming an expensive liability, since nobody buys the paper anymore.

    tl;dr – nobody in Britain, apart from a few expensive boho streets in North London, and the BBC management of course, cares what the Guardian thinks about anything anymore. They seem to exist in an alternate universe to the rest of us:
    c.f. the “Labour” (=wealthy public-sector professionals’ ) Party. Went into foetal position shock when forced to hobnob with the lieges for their votes recently. “The first person I meet is a horrible racist! I’m never coming back to wherever this is!”

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    During the previous Cris de Comment at the Grauniad I posted the following:

    " The astonishingly large number of comments deleted is indicative a sizable community of people who disagree with the leftist drivel. Why don't the Moderators push off and form their own community and leave ours alone"

    It was, of course, deleted and for such lèse–majesté I was sentenced to pre-approval for a month
  169. @Grumpy
    Yes, D.K., but the economics prize was not established by Alfred Nobel's will. It was something that the Bank of Sweden came up with later. That's why Steve Sailer sometimes calls it the "quasi-Nobel." Last year, I met a member of the Swedish Academy (which awards the prize in literature) who thinks the economics prize is a travesty.

    Great point, it is a bank prize. Hence, Paul ‘studies say’ Krugman is a beneficiary with his pro- central bank agenda.

  170. @Yak-15
    I think that Boulder is the ideal place to settle refugees from Syria and Somalia. It's a high income place with lots of liberals and loads of potential were it only to be less white. It probably has a great school system too that can help lots of subsistence farmers from central Africa.

    I think an infusion of diversity would do wonders for the local environment and the local economy. I will write my state senator and see if he can help make it happen.

    I look forward to their local government fast-tracking approve my proposal. Once they have 50,000 boat people from be Medditerranean they will finally live in the Utopian they have always wanted and voted for.

    Yes, let’s ship all the Somalis & other assorted Africans that Minnesota has kindly passed onto North Dakota down to Boulder. This country has gone fuckin’ insane.

  171. @yaqub the mad scientist
    This piece of precious prissiness is hilarious.

    I worked in Boulder 25 years ago. I was stunned at how white it was. Coming from a region with a large black population, with numerous other ethnicities represented, I had never seen anything like it. It was certainly hippiesh, but you could see it dying even then. Boulder was where whatever hippies were left in the area would go to do drug exchanges. The street vibe was already pretty yuppied (another cultural thing I was new to). And it was expensive. You could go and see the leftovers of the beat scene draw modest checks for performing/scenstering at Allan Ginsburg's Naropa Institute (subject of a hilarious takedown by poet Tom Clark in the The Great Naropa Poetry Wars) and do nice day hikes, but everything else cost a lot of money. Culturally, it was white bread liberal, with that typical veneer of exotica wrapped in a Patagonia outfit. There was absolutely nothing speaking of anything authentic or "diverse".

    A year ago, I spent a week there doing some technical training. Things had taken their course and Boulder had become the complete sterile utopia that it was heading toward, and it was as white as ever.

    This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don't know where to begin. The idea that this town represents the future is absurd. First of all, this country will soon be minority majority, and if he has the least bit of intelligence, he would know that the culture of Boulder is not their culture. A city that is 0.9% black represents the past more than anything Donald Trump represents.

    Any journalist who attempts to use a rich college town as representative of anything general about America should be automatically fired. If this town represents anything of America's future, it is white flight via high property values and zoning laws.

    This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don’t know where to begin.

    Well spotted. Will Hutton is an old bald boomer who regards himself as a bit of a hippy rebel, standing up for the little people, soixante-huitard etc.
    Made his name writing turgid emo books on the subject.
    In reality he’s a wealthy Hampstead liberal, dinner-party bore and Newsnight talking head, with the requisite buy-to-let(= people-farming, by leverage of liar loans and tax-avoidance (NB. avoidance, I said, not evasion)) property portfolio via his recently deceased posh wife, fully-paid-up and ruthlessly fanatical NuLaba Blairite, EU zealot, and all round windbag. Establishment man to his soft, clammy fingertips. Makes Andrew Neil look intellectually curious and principled.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Like a good soixant-retard, he shills for globalist plutocracy while pretending to care about the "little folks", or at least the "little folks" "of color"
  172. @Anonym
    This is the sort of article that can only be produced by a group of Guardian writers coming together to circle jerk. SWPL to the nth degree.

    It’s the Guardian. That’ll be “circle-flick”, soldier.

  173. @AnotherDad
    So comment is not allowed? Or am I just incompetent?

    This is piece is flush with a smug pomposity while being among the flat out most clueless pieces I've ever read. (BTW, I have this vague feeling that US mainstream journalist pieces now tend to steer clear of this sort of cheerleading without mentioning the diversity deficit. This is more what you'd get from the clueless follower.)

    All you need to do is look at Hutton’s photo to tell he’s a spectacularly pompous, pea-brained git.

  174. @Anonymous
    I've always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc...

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc… The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    Liberals are good at running counter-cultures, just not cultures themselves.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    I'd say something similar about Catholicism. As a state religion, not so wonderful. As a reaction to a godless, vulgar, materialist culture, really valuable.
  175. @Flinders Petrie

    That pretty much leaves us with the overwhelmingly white and low crime population and springtime rafting.
     
    There was the case of the stolen Montbell bear on Pearl Street. The life-sized stuffed bear was found by the police three days later at a campsite, where he had been carried by several groups of hikers who got a thrill out of hiking with a bear on their back.

    It's worth noting that almost all of the non-whites in the Boulder census are students obtained by U. Colo. diversity incentives. I've never seen a nonwhite outside of the campus, or Pearl Street mall. And when I've seen them, they are surrounded by crowds of adoring dreadlocked trust fund millennials who appear desperate to have some of that cool blackness rub off on them.

    Stan de Mute, you beat me to the observation that Boulder’s culture is derived from large numbers of trust fund millennials.

    Boulder “is” the University of Colorado, which has a reputation as a premier and expensive “play” school … fun on the slopes, hiking mountain trails, an extravagant avant garde lifestyle, and now it is legal to smoke marijuana. It is the good life lived by privileged and subsidized youth who don’t have to worry about the consequences of their actions or their futures. Besides, Vail is right up the road. They can visit their parents on weekends.

    • Agree: Triumph104
  176. @Dirk Dagger
    James Howard Kunstler was also a big Y2K scaremonger, but you have to dig deep to find that out about him:

    Kunstler, who has no formal training in the fields in which he prognosticates, made similar dire predictions for Y2K as he makes for peak oil. Kunstler responds to this criticism by saying that a Y2K-related catastrophe was averted precisely because of the billions of dollars that were spent fixing the problem. As with acid rain and ozone depletion in the '90s, a resoundingly successful, well-coordinated international response had the ironic side effect of discrediting the very worst-case scenarios that inspired the efforts in the first place. from The Full Wiki

     

    He or his acolytes zealously guard his Libtardopedia page so that no mention of Y2K is ever found. That tells me he is a worthless deceitful asshole.

    “That tells me he is a worthless deceitful asshole.”

    Yes. Kunstler is just a charlatan. But he has been a successful charlatan with his book sales.

    • Replies: @Mark Caplan
    I enjoy Kunstler's demolition of sacrosanct, modernist architects, such as I. M Pei. Kunstler's architectural or urban design "Eyesore of the Month" website, which he no longer updates, also served the public's interest.
  177. Why that’s a nice little community you’ve got there, Boulder. It’d be a shame if anything were to happen to it.

    C:\Section_8.exe
    C:\Refugee_Resettlement\Import_Kebab.exe

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Why that’s a nice little community you’ve got there, Boulder. It’d be a shame if anything were to happen to it.

    C:\Section_8.exe
    C:\Refugee_Resettlement\Import_Kebab.ex"

    That's the same threat George Lucas used on his affluent White Marin County neighbors. He threatens them with creating Section 8 underclass diversity like it was a grenade.
    , @Jefferson
    "Why that’s a nice little community you’ve got there, Boulder. It’d be a shame if anything were to happen to it.

    C:\Section_8.exe
    C:\Refugee_Resettlement\Import_Kebab.ex"

    That's the same threat George Lucas used on his affluent White Marin County neighbors. He threatens them with creating Section 8 underclass diversity like it was a grenade rather than a blessing.
  178. @Stan d Mute
    This is hilarious. Boulder is absurdly expensive, rabidly leftist/socialist, and looney bin crazy. You can stroll the main pedestrian shopping drag downtown, buy a $500 ski parka, then catch a $500 fine if you spark up a cigarette (but not a joint) outside (or even in your own car). Trustafarians abound (like in Vail). Traffic is horrible. Not too long ago you could swiftly escape to a more authentic hippie culture up the canyon in Nederland, but lately that too has become increasingly trustafarian. Every other storefront is selling wildly overpriced "art" or crystals and related new age crap from white people in dreadlocks.

    From my perspective, the only redemption comes from ripping down the canyon with no opposing traffic in a sports car (i.e. Left Hand Canyon), but Boulder is far from the only place in the Colorado Rockies where there are spectacular enthusiast driving roads. That pretty much leaves us with the overwhelmingly white and low crime population and springtime rafting.

    Notice seen on community bulletin board in local Safeway: Astral Support Group

  179. @Immigrant from former USSR
    First, small correction to your comment: there are four different campuses of the University of Colorado system:
    CU Boulder
    CU Colorado Springs
    CU Denver
    CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
    I agree with you that particular placement of the top science community has element of randomness. But after that community is established, it is developing by its own laws.

    Well before present day efforts by NIST in Boulder, really great scientist George Gamow
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Gamow
    (1904-1968) came to CU Boulder.
    In 1956, Gamow moved to the University of Colorado Boulder, where he remained for the rest of his career. In 1956, Gamow became one of the founding members of the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC), which later reformed teaching of high-school physics in the post-Sputnik years.

    In the early 20th century, radioactive materials were known to have characteristic exponential decay rates, or half-lives. At the same time, radiation emissions were known to have certain characteristic energies. By 1928, Gamow had solved the theory of the alpha decay of a nucleus via tunnelling, with mathematical help from Nikolai Kochin. The problem was also solved independently by Ronald W. Gurney and Edward U. Condon. Gurney and Condon did not, however, achieve the quantitative results achieved by Gamow.

    George Gamow was the father of the hot "big bang" theory of the expanding universe
    (see the article above from Wikipedia.)

    After the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1953 by Francis Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin, Gamow attempted to solve the problem of how the order of the four different kinds of bases (adenine, cytosine, thymine and guanine) in DNA chains could control the synthesis of proteins from amino acids. Crick has said[30] that Gamow's suggestions helped him in his own thinking about the problem. As related by Crick,[31] Gamow suggested that the twenty combinations of four DNA bases taken three at a time corresponded to the twenty amino acids that form proteins. This led Crick and Watson to enumerate the twenty amino acids common to proteins. Gamow's contribution to solving the problem of genetic coding gave rise to important models of biological degeneracy.

    Time standards in Boulder:

    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=nist%20colorado&tbs=lf:1,lf_ui:3&rflfq=1&rlha=0&rllag=40336485,-105149230,39255&tbm=lcl&rlfi=hd:;si:636967670422965816

    I am also fan of Steve Sailer. My best to you.

    Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics."

    In what sense was Einstein "not very good at mathematics"?
    , @Immigrant from former USSR
    Dear 5371:
    Commenting about Einstein's sophistication in mathematics is above my pay grade.
    I knew (back in USSR) people, who technically interacted with Gamov
    in 1920-1930s.
    None of them ever gave a hint that his mastering of mathematics was
    "not very good."
    My best to you, 5371! [which is approximately 10^(1770) ].
    P.S. Microsoft Windows calculator gave me overflow for (5371)! ,
    so I had to use asymptotic Simpson formula for n!.
    , @syonredux

    Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics.
     
    They can't all be Isaac Newton.....
    , @ATX Hipster
    I don't understand why people say this. If the math you're stuck on requires someone like Minkowski to help you out it means you're good at math, not bad at it.
    , @Immigrant from former USSR
    Hello, 5371 ! = 10^(17704)
    Einstein once said (no exact citation):
    "I am ready to accept that, may be, some day in the future
    Special Relativity Theory will be (not disproved) modified.
    I am rather sure that
    Theory of Universe as based on General Relativity Theory will be modified.
    I am absolutely sure that Quantum Mechanics will be changed.
    But the thermodynamics, based on statistical physics, will stay there forever."
    This was the emphasis he put into his 1905 theory of Brownian motion,
    see http://www.unz.com/isteve/guardian-americas-future-is-boulder-colorado/#comment-1430782
    My best to you.
  180. @Mark Eugenikos
    If this Guardian piece was an intentional parody a la Onion, i.e. someone saying "the recipe for a happy U.S. is a place with 88% whites and 1% blacks", everyone would be screaming from the top of their lungs that you can't be so racist, oblivious and insensitive. But apparently if you are the Guardian you can be as oblivious as you like, so long as you take snipes at the Donald.

    You couldn't make up this stuff.

    The Guardian is the daily scripture for the sort of sneering, metropolitan lefties who, together with the Muslim block vote, have hijacked the Labour Party. Said lefties mostly seem to live in Islington (a borough in north London that has supplanted Hampstead as the lefty’s preferred habitat) and are exemplified by one Jeremy (!) Corbyn, Labour Leader.

    As such, the paper is a rich source of lunacy:

    https://www.facebook.com/peakguardian

    It has a severely dwindling paper circulation and is only taken any notice of because it functions as the newsfeed for the BBC, itself populated by lefties of the kind aforementioned. Hence Mr Sailer has been led somewhat up a cul-de-sac if he believes that anything appearing in the Groaniad has the slightest contact with reality. For any who doubt this, check out the vituperations of, say, Jessica Valenti or Laurie Penny.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    Couldn't have said it better. The UK that you lot hear about, and scorn, is not the one the Brits actually inhabit. You're not dealing with just a few malcontents who haunt Alt-R comments sections, it's mainstream, but completely opaque to outsiders, due to rigid, programmatic exclusion from the Great Liberal Discourse.
    It's like enduring the simpering chatter of the petites bergères at Versailles, and reporting to Washington that all is quiet on the eastern front, and the natives are not restless.
    , @berserker
    Progressives suffer from a remarkable inability to compare apples with apples. How is the claim that "attracting families, entrepreneurs and innovators from all round the US" comparable to the issue of Brexit?
    - And they do such silly comparisons all the time and feel smug about it.
  181. @James O'Meara
    Liberals love to live in rural/working class areas that have been purged of nasty rural/small town White folks. The latter build the lovely towns, then are driven out when rich folks move in. No need to post "Don't let the sun set on you" signs since money is the entrance ticket, so everyone basks in how tolerant they are.

    It's James Kunstler's whole mindset, but funnily enough he doesn't see it at all.

    I discuss this in my article "The Gilmore Girls Occupy Wall. St." here: http://www.counter-currents.com/2011/11/the-gilmore-girls-occupy-wall-street/

    Lately James Kunstler has been bashing the Black Lives Matter group and has gotten into trouble with the SJW’s for it.

  182. @Jefferson
    "If Boulder is the future, where are all the white people going to come from"

    The Spanish speaking Caribbean, Central America, South America, The Middle East, and North Africa.

    Don't forget how broad The U.S census definition of "White" is.

    The U.S. Census Bureau doesn’t define race. Race and Hispanic origin are self-reported by the person in the household who fills out the census form.

  183. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    Why that's a nice little community you've got there, Boulder. It'd be a shame if anything were to happen to it.

    C:\Section_8.exe
    C:\Refugee_Resettlement\Import_Kebab.exe

    “Why that’s a nice little community you’ve got there, Boulder. It’d be a shame if anything were to happen to it.

    C:\Section_8.exe
    C:\Refugee_Resettlement\Import_Kebab.ex”

    That’s the same threat George Lucas used on his affluent White Marin County neighbors. He threatens them with creating Section 8 underclass diversity like it was a grenade.

    • Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown

    George Lucas used on his affluent White Marin County neighbors.
     
    lolz. I remember that. It was one of the most schadenfreude-laden posts in all iStevery.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Grenade? No. Tactical nuclear weapon? Yes.
  184. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    Why that's a nice little community you've got there, Boulder. It'd be a shame if anything were to happen to it.

    C:\Section_8.exe
    C:\Refugee_Resettlement\Import_Kebab.exe

    “Why that’s a nice little community you’ve got there, Boulder. It’d be a shame if anything were to happen to it.

    C:\Section_8.exe
    C:\Refugee_Resettlement\Import_Kebab.ex”

    That’s the same threat George Lucas used on his affluent White Marin County neighbors. He threatens them with creating Section 8 underclass diversity like it was a grenade rather than a blessing.

  185. Where is all of the money for the white people going to come from. An economy can’t go on forever relying on service jobs. That is just recycled money, not new money that manufacturing provides. It is the proverbial “everybody washes everybody else’s clothes” economy. Eventually Boulder would look like Galesburg, Illinois, a fairly liberal city with a large LGBT population for its size. (it is known as Gay-Les-Burg) Galesburg’s Knox College gave President Obama an honorary degree before he was president, as well as giving degrees to Bill Clinton, Stephen Colbert, and Madeline Albright. It is also Obama’s pet city whenever he wants to bring up a city on the skids due to offshoring jobs. Galesburg was once the place where Maytag appliances were built but now that the production went to Mexico, the town is hurting and looks more and more run down each day.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Where is all of the money for the white people going to come from.
     
    The same place it comes from now: petroleum.

    Until it runs out, that is.
  186. @Romanian
    Famous liberal last words!

    Or a future reaction to the proclamation of the Islamic Emirate of London.

  187. @Wally
    Great point.

    If those in Boulder or in any other 'white liberal' city or neighborhood were told that Section 8 housing, aka: 'projects' were going to be built next to their house the entire situation would change in a heartbeat.

    Most 'white liberals' live nowhere close to blacks or browns. And that's the way 'white liberals' like it. Obviously so.

    Just look around.

    “Most ‘white liberals’ live nowhere close to blacks or browns. And that’s the way ‘white liberals’ like it. Obviously so.”

    Jim Goad has said that whenever White Liberals call him a racist, he responds by saying he lives in 75 percent Black Stone Mountain, Georgia and than he asks them what percentage of their neighborhood or suburb that they live in is Black?

    Stone Mountain would scare the shit out of most White Liberals, especially since most Blacks in Stone Mountain are lot less Whitewashed than Obama in how they speak and dress. Stone Mountain has a lot of World Star Hip Hop culture.

  188. @celt darnell
    OK, I admit it's a while since I read Kustler, but doesn't he claim we're about to run out of oil and thus plunge into a new Stone Age? (I paraphrase).

    That doesn't sound like he sees much of a future for small, wealthy white towns......

    Kunstler’s fiction series “World Made by Hand” has a strong small-white-town vibe. It’s a technological dystopia (no cars, no electricity, no mass produced goods) but a social utopia (close networks of neighbors, strong families, small business owners – e.g., barber/doctor with a black medical bag, brewer using a handmade oaken barrel…). It’s set in 1890, technologically speaking, but 2025 in terms of zeitgeist. Race/ethnicity conflicts don’t play a major role in the books, although I think they are mentioned as having taken place in far away places like LA or Atlanta, while the book is set in upstate NY in a traditional mill town.

  189. @Thomas Fuller
    The Guardian is the daily scripture for the sort of sneering, metropolitan lefties who, together with the Muslim block vote, have hijacked the Labour Party. Said lefties mostly seem to live in Islington (a borough in north London that has supplanted Hampstead as the lefty's preferred habitat) and are exemplified by one Jeremy (!) Corbyn, Labour Leader.

    As such, the paper is a rich source of lunacy:

    https://www.facebook.com/peakguardian

    It has a severely dwindling paper circulation and is only taken any notice of because it functions as the newsfeed for the BBC, itself populated by lefties of the kind aforementioned. Hence Mr Sailer has been led somewhat up a cul-de-sac if he believes that anything appearing in the Groaniad has the slightest contact with reality. For any who doubt this, check out the vituperations of, say, Jessica Valenti or Laurie Penny.

    Couldn’t have said it better. The UK that you lot hear about, and scorn, is not the one the Brits actually inhabit. You’re not dealing with just a few malcontents who haunt Alt-R comments sections, it’s mainstream, but completely opaque to outsiders, due to rigid, programmatic exclusion from the Great Liberal Discourse.
    It’s like enduring the simpering chatter of the petites bergères at Versailles, and reporting to Washington that all is quiet on the eastern front, and the natives are not restless.

    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    A Brit condescendingly informed me that I "have no sense of cultural relativity" after I voiced the opinion that Muslims agitating to live under a separate Sharia court system in the West probably shouldn't be allowed to live in the West. The scary thing is he was an infantryman.
  190. @Grumpy
    Meanwhile, in formerly white Saint Paul, Minnesota:

    A 55-year-old man suffered a traumatic brain injury and was in the hospital’s intensive care unit [after he] saw two men dumping trash from their vehicle onto the ground near the gas pumps... When the victim said, “Really, guys?,” the two men attacked him.
     
    http://www.twincities.com/2016/05/23/snelling-avenue-gas-station-assault/

    Really, guys?

    “Meanwhile, in formerly white Saint Paul, Minnesota:”

    Black people in that state can’t seem to assimilate into the Minnesota nice culture.

    • Replies: @Dirk Dagger
    "Three Minneapolis men" on trial.

    http://www.startribune.com/local/minneapolis/380543261.html
  191. 3 Black guys created a dating app strictly for Black people called Bae.
    http://time.com/4316495/bae-dating-app-tinder/

    They say Tinder is too White and not racially diverse enough. But I guarantee Tinder is way more racially diverse than a more racially exclusive app like Bae.

    They remind me of Blacks who say Detroit is racially diverse, but San Francisco is not.

    .

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    With them on that site instead of Tinder, normal people using Tinder won't have to wade through so many irrelevant, undesireable Bantu profiles....
  192. @Thomas Fuller
    The Guardian is the daily scripture for the sort of sneering, metropolitan lefties who, together with the Muslim block vote, have hijacked the Labour Party. Said lefties mostly seem to live in Islington (a borough in north London that has supplanted Hampstead as the lefty's preferred habitat) and are exemplified by one Jeremy (!) Corbyn, Labour Leader.

    As such, the paper is a rich source of lunacy:

    https://www.facebook.com/peakguardian

    It has a severely dwindling paper circulation and is only taken any notice of because it functions as the newsfeed for the BBC, itself populated by lefties of the kind aforementioned. Hence Mr Sailer has been led somewhat up a cul-de-sac if he believes that anything appearing in the Groaniad has the slightest contact with reality. For any who doubt this, check out the vituperations of, say, Jessica Valenti or Laurie Penny.

    Progressives suffer from a remarkable inability to compare apples with apples. How is the claim that “attracting families, entrepreneurs and innovators from all round the US” comparable to the issue of Brexit?
    – And they do such silly comparisons all the time and feel smug about it.

    • Replies: @Forbes

    the claim that “attracting families, entrepreneurs and innovators from all round the US” ...
     
    ...is really one silly claim. Boulder was one of the first 'zero growth' places in America. It's population has been basically fixed at 100,000 for 40 years. The green belt around the city is its virtual wall. Imagine the uproar if Trump said immigration to the US will be conditioned on emigration from the US.

    It's the Boulder mind set that cancelled Colorado hosting the 1976 Winter Olympics, at the 11th hour (long before the Olympics turned into the money pit political boondoggle it is today).
    , @woodNfish
    They are not progressive, they are regressive. And if you think I'm just playing at words, name one thing progressive about leftists.
  193. @Nico

    The Mormon Church was once just ridiculous. It is now ridiculous and evil.
     
    I realize there are also a lot of cucks carrying the banner of evangelical Protestantism or Roman Catholicism (my denomination) but I like to smugly point out these days that I have been warning people about "Latter Day Saints" for a number of years running.

    I think liberals actually like Mormons now.

    I made a joke about Mormons and my very liberal friends jumped to their defense and implied I was being bigoted…

    Of course they make jokes about rednecks, Baptists, Catholics, and poor people.

    It’s weird when you can’t even make light of people eschewing caffeine and having a history of polygamy.

    • Replies: @Nico

    I think liberals actually like Mormons now... It’s weird when you can’t even make light of people eschewing caffeine and having a history of polygamy.
     
    Replace "caffeine" with "alcohol" and you may as well have said "Muslims." Of course Mormons are teetotalers as well.
    , @Grandpa Jack
    Stick to making liberal jokes- or better yet, point out how their beliefs and behaviors write their own jokes.
  194. Boulder, Colorado, has been voted the US’s happiest city

    Because they’re a bunch of stoned college kids.

    • Agree: Nico
    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    The happiness, opinions, and politics of college kids don't and shouldn't matter, for the same reasons I argue that absolutely no tears should be shed for them being "excluded" from voting because they won't pick whether to domicile themselves in their new town or drive back to wherever they're from on voting day. Election day is 90 percent for offices that are local or regional, offices in whose discharge of power they are barely vested- in terms of taxes, finances, profession, family, or community. College is the one time where they are liberated from the weight of petty, everyday responsibilities or concerns- not having to give a shit about who is your tax assessor should be liberating to them.

    It's no different in looking to an exemplary model of a community. People who think so have never put real skin in the game, like this writer.
  195. @D. K.
    So, Professor Stiglitz' award, in 2001, was "a travesty," while President Obama's award, in 2009, was . . . what, exactly?!? As for the recent Literature laureates....

    That isn’t the point. The point is that it is not actually a prize that was provided for in Alfred Nobel’s bequest. Economics is not something that Nobel considered worthy of a prize. Those bankers had no right to glom on to another man’s legacy and hijack the name for thier own purposes.

    Would you like a “Victoria Cross” for extraordinary valor in online multiplayer gaming? A “Fields Medal” for Sudoku? A “Wolf Prize” for exceptional accomplishment in lawn mowing? I have my own that I award, and you can have one for a modest financial consideration. I can sell you a “Rolex” too.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, Bill Jones
    • Replies: @D. K.
    Alfred Nobel was just a rich inventor with a guilty conscience, who was looking to assuage the same, and to have people later remember him fondly and gratefully, rather than resentfully or hatefully. He was not the Second Coming of the Christ! His award has the stature that it does because of the track record that it established of choosing deserving recipients. The notion that the caliber of the people chosen for the Nobel Peace Prize, such as Barack Obama, is more worthy of our recognition and praise than the likes of Nobel laureates in the Economic Sciences, such as Paul Samuelson and Joseph Stiglitz , is a notion that I do not hold. The esteem of an award has to be based upon the collective quality of its recipients-- not the other way around!
  196. @Dr. X
    All those college towns (and many others) are great places to live because they're all Disneylands. They're not real.

    Living in a college town is like eating caviar in a tuxedo in the first-class dining room on the Titanic while hundreds of grimy stokers are shoveling coal into the engines ten decks below. When the thing hits an iceberg, the people in first class won't feel a thing but the guys in the engine room are all goners.

    The point is that college towns are the cherry on top of the sundae. The society that pays for those college towns is comprised of people doing real work, having real problems, and competing with real Mexicans, real Chinese, and real blacks trying to rob them. The idea that college towns are "the future" is ridiculous. Colleges are dependent on significant artificial support from the government -- no property taxes, no income taxes, tax-free endowments, direct subsidies, student loans and grants. College towns would be significantly different if colleges were treated like other industries.

    Even so called “private” universities receive lots of government funding and subsidies, but the University of Colorado at Boulder is a state university, so it’s even worse – a large part of its budget comes directly from the taxpayers.

  197. @jon

    the University of Colorado system:
    CU Boulder
    CU Colorado Springs
    CU Denver
    CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
     
    Minor pet peeve, but why is the University of Colorado referred to as CU. It's UC dammit!

    You can take comfort in the fact that the (private) University of Denver is referred to as DU.

  198. @asdf
    "thoughtful urban planning" - Very thoughtful. Keep everyone out, unless theyre rich.

    Trump is massively more inclusive than Boulder. Maybe if he was more into chakras and chai and micro-brews he'd be more accepted.

    I’m pretty sure Trump Towers are even more rich and exclusive than Boulder….

  199. @Anonymous
    OT:

    Uber has a revolutionary idea to help with traffic congestion: carpooling. What amazing high-tech innovation by some of the country's (the world's?) greatest minds!

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-23/the-uber-commute-is-next-frontier-for-ceo-kalanick

    I’m not sure why this is a source of amusement. You would prefer Segways? High-speed rail?

    I dunno, I guess I don’t see anything wrong with trying simple, obvious, low-tech solutions.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    The amusement stems from the fact that it is nothing new. Carpooling became common in the 1970s, during the oil shock. And it could undoubtedly be arranged today in a way that would not require people to give money to Uber. Like, for example, a sign-up sheet on a bulletin board at your place of work. That's pretty obvious and low-tech.
    , @Anonymous
    I like obvious, simple solutions. However, I guess I just find it a bit funny that a high tech Silicon Valley's new idea is carpooling, something people used to be able to arrange on their own, but as a society I guess we've become so fragmented and disconnected from one another that we need a Silicon Valley company to help us arrange carpooling now.
    , @Bill
    It's not that it is a bad idea, necessarily, it's that it is not an innovative idea. Gypsy cabs + carpooling is a libertarian idea dating back to the 1970s at least. I can't remember, was it David Friedman or Milton Friedman or someone else, but the idea back then was that people and cars would congregate in suburban parking lots where there would be some mechanism like a bunch of blackboards for the spot market in rides to work to clear. The longer term market would work via classified ads or something. Libertarians officially believed that this didn't just spontaneously happen because it was illegal.

    It's kind of weird how 1970s things are recently. Still no Space 1999, though.
    , @Mr. Anon
    "I’m not sure why this is a source of amusement. You would prefer Segways? High-speed rail?"

    Laser-powered, high-speed, super-conducting, mag-lev segways! That is the mass transportation mode of the future!
  200. @Harry Baldwin
    Don't forget, Boulder is also the home of Soldier of Fortune magazine and Paladin Press, publisher of such titles as Hit Man: A Technical Manual for Independent Contractors.

    Fred Reed on his Soldier of Fortune days, recommended: http://www.fredoneverything.net/PlayboySOF.shtml

  201. @Anonym
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/05/22/obama-signs-bill-banning-negro-oriental/

    Forgot the link.

    ““Many Americans may not be aware that the word ‘Oriental’ is derogatory,” said Rep. Grace Meng of New York and one of the bill’s original sponsors.”

    That’s because it isn’t. Yet another example of minorities trying to wield power over whites by dictating what we may and may not say – which magic words will be forbidden to us.

    And this from a people who call us gwailo and round-eye. How many times, I wonder has Grace Meng used one of these terms? Why is “oriental” derogatory but not “occidental”?

    But, times change, and one must keep up with them. From now on I will be sensitive to their concerns and only refer to them as inscruitable slope-eyed yellow asians.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    They've got a helluva nerve.
    , @AndrewR
    Has Ms. Meng ever been shown to have used "gwailo" or "round-eye" in a derogatory fashion?

    Has anyone ever used the term "occidental" to refer to a human?

    I concur that "oriental" seems more archaic than derogatory per se, but your overreaction here is embarrassing for you.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson

    inscrutable slope-eyed yellow asians.
     
    Okay, I hate to admit it, but your absurdity made me laugh - just for a pico-second. But hey, I didn't spew any liquid this time.
  202. @Seamus Padraig

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc… The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.
     
    Liberals are good at running counter-cultures, just not cultures themselves.

    I’d say something similar about Catholicism. As a state religion, not so wonderful. As a reaction to a godless, vulgar, materialist culture, really valuable.

  203. @5371
    Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics.

    “Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics.”

    In what sense was Einstein “not very good at mathematics”?

    • Replies: @5371
    He needed his friend Marcel Grossman's help every step of the way, in acquiring enough differential geometry to develop Einstein gravity. Nor, in his studies, had he shone in the subject.
    , @utu
    It's a common belief that Einstein was pretty bad in math. He always surrounded himself with a very good mathematicians whom he later never (with few exceptions) credited in his papers.

    Ludwig Hopf
    Nathan Rosen
    Walther Mayer
    Valentine Bargmann
    Bruria Kaufman
    Otto Stern
    Cornelius Lanczos
    Jakob Grommer
    Banesh Hoffman
    Herman Müntz
    Marcel Grossmann

    Some say that his wife was instrumental in his canonical 1905 paper.
  204. @antipater_1
    "That tells me he is a worthless deceitful asshole."

    Yes. Kunstler is just a charlatan. But he has been a successful charlatan with his book sales.

    I enjoy Kunstler’s demolition of sacrosanct, modernist architects, such as I. M Pei. Kunstler’s architectural or urban design “Eyesore of the Month” website, which he no longer updates, also served the public’s interest.

    • Replies: @anon
    He still updates it: http://kunstler.com/featured-eyesore-of-the-month/
  205. @Anonymous
    America will not become like Brazil because white Americans like marrying brown immigrants.

    Take Jeb Bush, most upper crust man in America. He marries a brown Mexican girl he met on a school trip from Andover.

    Jeb is the only upper crust man I know to have done that. Family Guy did a pretty savage joke about it.

    • Replies: @Marcus
    Did he meet her when she was cleaning his hotel room?
    , @RadicalCenter
    I know upper-middle-income white men who are married to Filipinas, including me, my best friend, and two acquaintances from our children's preschool.

    But I don't think any of us earns a high enough annual income or has a high enough net worth to be considered "upper crust", and none of the four comes from a wealthy family background.
  206. @D. K.
    What do people, anywhere, who insist upon calling Blacks "African Americans," while at the same time inevitably referring to European Americans as "Whites," sound like to you?

    The relatively incompetent CEO of Xerox is Ursula Burns, who is one of the very few Blacks actually referred to as such in the media–Wikipedia calls her ‘black-American’ (yes, lower case “b”), while born in the US, her parents were from Panama. So that African American moniker doesn’t work.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    OK then, PanAmerican it is. I believe that domain's up for grabs now.
    , @Jack D
    It seems to me that appointing a black and/or female CEO is the kiss of death for any large corporation and yet they keep getting appointed. I understand why this happens in government when the people in charge are using OPM (other people's money) (and I understand that modern corporate governance of publicly held companies is also SOMEWHAT if not entirely decoupled from economic interest - Sumner Redstone would have to be TEN times more senile than he already is to appoint the likes of Ursula to run Viacom) but you would think that we are not that far gone that we would let AA appointees run our economic jewels into the ground in the name of political correctness- this has real consequences and not just for Wall Street - people lose their jobs, widows and orphans lose their pension money. But I guess not.
    , @D. K.
    One of Fox News Channel's token liberals is one of its celebrity Blacks, Juan Williams. He is actually an immigrant from Panama! Nonetheless, he is usually referred to as "African American"-- as are people like Colin Powell, whose parents were from the Caribbean. Juan Williams is actually a Black Hispanic, or an Hispanic Black, but I never have heard anyone refer to him as such.

    My problem, however, is not with immigrants who are naturalized, much less the native-born children of immigrants, being called "African American" (i.e., despite their not having any ancestors who were slaves in America). My problem is primarily with people exchanging two words with seven syllables for a single, monosyllabic word-- even though they call the majority "White" instead of "European American." In the words of 'Judas Iscariot': "It doesn't help us if you're inconsistent!"

    Actually, I find "African American" more objectionable than its mere length: It also is inaccurate, in that the natives of northern Africa are not black (negroid), and are (for the moment, at least) classified as "White or Caucasian" by the government itself. Even worse, of course, is the moronic use of "Asian" as a "racial" designator, as if Afghanis and Japanese were of the same race. Sigh....

    , @ben tillman

    The relatively incompetent CEO of Xerox is Ursula Burns, who is one of the very few Blacks actually referred to as such in the media–Wikipedia calls her ‘black-American’ (yes, lower case “b”), while born in the US, her parents were from Panama. So that African American moniker doesn’t work.
     
    That doesn't make sense. It works just as it does for all the other millions of "African-Americans" whose parents weren't born in Africa.
  207. @Mr. Anon
    "Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics."

    In what sense was Einstein "not very good at mathematics"?

    He needed his friend Marcel Grossman’s help every step of the way, in acquiring enough differential geometry to develop Einstein gravity. Nor, in his studies, had he shone in the subject.

  208. @Psmith
    I'm not sure why this is a source of amusement. You would prefer Segways? High-speed rail?

    I dunno, I guess I don't see anything wrong with trying simple, obvious, low-tech solutions.

    The amusement stems from the fact that it is nothing new. Carpooling became common in the 1970s, during the oil shock. And it could undoubtedly be arranged today in a way that would not require people to give money to Uber. Like, for example, a sign-up sheet on a bulletin board at your place of work. That’s pretty obvious and low-tech.

  209. @berserker
    Progressives suffer from a remarkable inability to compare apples with apples. How is the claim that "attracting families, entrepreneurs and innovators from all round the US" comparable to the issue of Brexit?
    - And they do such silly comparisons all the time and feel smug about it.

    the claim that “attracting families, entrepreneurs and innovators from all round the US” …

    …is really one silly claim. Boulder was one of the first ‘zero growth’ places in America. It’s population has been basically fixed at 100,000 for 40 years. The green belt around the city is its virtual wall. Imagine the uproar if Trump said immigration to the US will be conditioned on emigration from the US.

    It’s the Boulder mind set that cancelled Colorado hosting the 1976 Winter Olympics, at the 11th hour (long before the Olympics turned into the money pit political boondoggle it is today).

  210. Nico says:
    @AndrewR
    Lol he calls Steve Sailer "SWPL"

    It seems intuitively ironic, though on reflection to the extent that there is a case to be made for a spectral classification of American whites between “SWPL” and “prole” poles (and I think such a case does, with qualifications, make more than a little bit of sense) Sailer is definitely closer to the former than to the latter.

  211. Nico says:
    @AndrewR
    I trust the climatologists but I get why some don't.

    The problem isn’t the actual credentialed climatologists so much as the stupid green hippy activists they aid and abet. If I hear one more tree-hugging SJW complain that “‘Global warming’ is a misnomer; the real problem is climate change!” and then accuse libertarian right-wingers and pro-life or creationist Christians of being “anti-science” I think I am going to scream.

  212. @Mr. Anon
    "“Many Americans may not be aware that the word ‘Oriental’ is derogatory,” said Rep. Grace Meng of New York and one of the bill’s original sponsors."

    That's because it isn't. Yet another example of minorities trying to wield power over whites by dictating what we may and may not say - which magic words will be forbidden to us.

    And this from a people who call us gwailo and round-eye. How many times, I wonder has Grace Meng used one of these terms? Why is "oriental" derogatory but not "occidental"?

    But, times change, and one must keep up with them. From now on I will be sensitive to their concerns and only refer to them as inscruitable slope-eyed yellow asians.

    They’ve got a helluva nerve.

  213. Researchers have recently discovered a subtype of magic dirt (sanctimonious diversophiliaus) that attracts wealthy Whites who love, love, love diversity, while at the same time repelling Blacks (although football skill does seem to provide some degree of immunity). What better place for could there be for our new immigrant friends to be embraced and blossom?

  214. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Psmith
    I'm not sure why this is a source of amusement. You would prefer Segways? High-speed rail?

    I dunno, I guess I don't see anything wrong with trying simple, obvious, low-tech solutions.

    I like obvious, simple solutions. However, I guess I just find it a bit funny that a high tech Silicon Valley’s new idea is carpooling, something people used to be able to arrange on their own, but as a society I guess we’ve become so fragmented and disconnected from one another that we need a Silicon Valley company to help us arrange carpooling now.

  215. @Steve Sailer
    "I wouldn’t be surprised if Boulder were one of the top towns for per capita iSteve readership."

    That would be interesting to get a report on. But my programmer is busy running for the U.S. Senate, so it'll have to wait.

    I’m a patient man, but I can’t wait an entire Senate term (or two)!

    Thinking about Boulder some more, it is a town Hank Scorpio would be proud of:

    . Cypress Creek: The Future of America!

    In Boulder on Memorial Day, there is actually a town-wide “fun run” with tens of thousands of people running by your front door for several hours. And there is a new Globex–I mean, Google–office (increasing from 350 employees to 1500 employees) opening there soon.

  216. @B.A.D.me
    And, of course, the comments are "closed" at The Guardian (I wonder why?), so we can't point out the white homogeneity of the Boulder population, allowing it to be a happy and prosperous region. Leftists make me sick, as their goal is to obfuscate rather than inform.

    As so often they guard the borders of a mere website with far more zeal than they would advocate for the borders of a (white) nation state.

  217. I liked this comment :

    “Boulder, Colorado is far from being a “solution” to the problems that the Trump campaign is addressing? On the contrary, by way of showing how things used to be, it’s an illustration of the problem. The city is a time-warped example of the what the West was like prior to the new wave of immigration from Latin America. Its demographics are thus: nearly 90% white, nearly 5% Asian, average household income $113k. Crime is low, and relaxed prosperity is all around. It’s what California looked like once upon a time — before the southern border ceased to exist.”

    OT – I mentioned the other day the Turkish guy who ‘randomly’ stabbed four white women at a supermarket in the relatively upmarket suburb of Hampton, London.

    http://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/hampton-stabbing-family-of-victim-tell-of-her-terror-a3254376.html

    A Somali guy is on trial at present for ‘randomly’ stabbing four people and attempting to behead a fifth in East London.

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/leytonstone-tube-stabbing-taxi-driver-8037275

    “A former taxi driver has admitted trying to stab four commuters at a Tube station but denies attempting to behead a fifth. Muhiddin Mire, 30, appeared at the Old Bailey today to enter pleas to five charges over the incident at Leytonstone underground station.

    But being East London, a random sample of white people looks like this – “Mire, who is of Somalian origin, pleaded guilty to four charges of attempted wounding of David Pethers, Daniel Bielinski, Serena Valori and Andrius Sabaliauskas.”

    Naturally in neither case has the issue of Sudden Jihad Syndrome been mentioned.

  218. @Expletive Deleted

    This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don’t know where to begin.
     
    Well spotted. Will Hutton is an old bald boomer who regards himself as a bit of a hippy rebel, standing up for the little people, soixante-huitard etc.
    Made his name writing turgid emo books on the subject.
    In reality he's a wealthy Hampstead liberal, dinner-party bore and Newsnight talking head, with the requisite buy-to-let(= people-farming, by leverage of liar loans and tax-avoidance (NB. avoidance, I said, not evasion)) property portfolio via his recently deceased posh wife, fully-paid-up and ruthlessly fanatical NuLaba Blairite, EU zealot, and all round windbag. Establishment man to his soft, clammy fingertips. Makes Andrew Neil look intellectually curious and principled.

    Like a good soixant-retard, he shills for globalist plutocracy while pretending to care about the “little folks”, or at least the “little folks” “of color”

  219. @Mr. Anon
    "“Many Americans may not be aware that the word ‘Oriental’ is derogatory,” said Rep. Grace Meng of New York and one of the bill’s original sponsors."

    That's because it isn't. Yet another example of minorities trying to wield power over whites by dictating what we may and may not say - which magic words will be forbidden to us.

    And this from a people who call us gwailo and round-eye. How many times, I wonder has Grace Meng used one of these terms? Why is "oriental" derogatory but not "occidental"?

    But, times change, and one must keep up with them. From now on I will be sensitive to their concerns and only refer to them as inscruitable slope-eyed yellow asians.

    Has Ms. Meng ever been shown to have used “gwailo” or “round-eye” in a derogatory fashion?

    Has anyone ever used the term “occidental” to refer to a human?

    I concur that “oriental” seems more archaic than derogatory per se, but your overreaction here is embarrassing for you.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "Has Ms. Meng ever been shown to have used “gwailo” or “round-eye” in a derogatory fashion?"

    Has she been shown not to? Who knows what she says in chinese?

    "Has anyone ever used the term “occidental” to refer to a human?"

    Yes. Read more widely.

    "I concur that “oriental” seems more archaic than derogatory per se, but your overreaction here is embarrassing for you."

    Stuff it, twerp. You can be embarrased for youself, if you like, and perhaps you should be, given that you are willing to grant other people veto power over your use of your own goddamned language. Oriental is only archaic because a few ethnic greivance mongers raised a stink about it, and demanded that we use the non-specific and less accurate "asian"."

    I object to your use of the word "overreaction", and also "archaic" and "derogatory". I find them offensive, and I demand that you stop using them. Are you going to comply?
    , @Chrisnonymous
    Most commenters on iSteve overreact and embarrass themselves at some point.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    Most commenters on iSteve overreact and embarrass themselves at some point.
    , @Mr. Anon
    "Has Ms. Meng ever been shown to have used “gwailo” or “round-eye” in a derogatory fashion?"

    Who knows what she says when she says it in chinese? I think it very likely that she has used such terms, in chinese in conversation with other chinese people.

    "Has anyone ever used the term “occidental” to refer to a human?"

    Yes. Perhaps you should read more. Or just consult a dictionary.

    If you want to give other people veto power over your use of your own language, knock yourself out. I don't. Such concessions on your part I would characterize as "embarrassing".

  220. @Anonymous
    America will not become like Brazil because white Americans like marrying brown immigrants.

    Take Jeb Bush, most upper crust man in America. He marries a brown Mexican girl he met on a school trip from Andover.

    …what?

    The US will not become like Brazil (arguably the most pro-miscegenation society on earth) because Americans miscegenate too much? I’m not following.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    In Brazil whites are very self conscious about maintaining status through being white. They would like for their kids to look white.

    In America arguably one of the least racist societies in the world, the barriers to miscegenation have fallen. SJW thinks its cool to have brown babies and their parents have no vocal or strong objection to brown babies.

    And even normal people are not at all repulsed by brown babies.

    America will not be like Brazil because the white majority is larger than the browns and will absorb them totally.
  221. @Nico
    I don't consider myself liberal or progressive at all, and I can't speak for AndrewR, but this guy echos my thoughts on the matter fairly succinctly:

    I give SWPLs a lot of shit for their hypocrisy, sanctimony and status whoring, but I wouldn’t want to live, for example, a prole lifestyle in a redneck neighborhood where COPS isn’t just a show on TV. The lower classes are crass, boorish and often thoughtlessly impulsive. Their kids are snot-nosed brats and bullies. When they speak their rudimentary patois, you will cringe. Their abysmal taste in the finer pleasures of life is a perpetual turn-off for those who would be their natural political allies. But they already get so much shit from the MSM that I don’t feel an urge to pile on them. I prefer to hunt the hunters.
     

    I give SWPLs a lot of shit for their hypocrisy, sanctimony and status whoring, but I wouldn’t want to live, for example, a prole lifestyle in a redneck neighborhood where COPS isn’t just a show on TV.

    Do such neighborhoods exist?

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    There are, and I've lived in them.
    , @NOTA
    Fishtown?
  222. @Forbes
    The relatively incompetent CEO of Xerox is Ursula Burns, who is one of the very few Blacks actually referred to as such in the media--Wikipedia calls her 'black-American' (yes, lower case "b"), while born in the US, her parents were from Panama. So that African American moniker doesn't work.

    OK then, PanAmerican it is. I believe that domain’s up for grabs now.

    • Agree: Forbes
  223. @Mike Zwick
    Where is all of the money for the white people going to come from. An economy can't go on forever relying on service jobs. That is just recycled money, not new money that manufacturing provides. It is the proverbial "everybody washes everybody else's clothes" economy. Eventually Boulder would look like Galesburg, Illinois, a fairly liberal city with a large LGBT population for its size. (it is known as Gay-Les-Burg) Galesburg's Knox College gave President Obama an honorary degree before he was president, as well as giving degrees to Bill Clinton, Stephen Colbert, and Madeline Albright. It is also Obama's pet city whenever he wants to bring up a city on the skids due to offshoring jobs. Galesburg was once the place where Maytag appliances were built but now that the production went to Mexico, the town is hurting and looks more and more run down each day.

    Where is all of the money for the white people going to come from.

    The same place it comes from now: petroleum.

    Until it runs out, that is.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    I don't think the source of 100% of white wealth is oil. Far from it. There are European countries (e.g. Germany) that have no oil and yet are quite wealthy.
  224. @5371
    Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics.

    Dear 5371:
    Commenting about Einstein’s sophistication in mathematics is above my pay grade.
    I knew (back in USSR) people, who technically interacted with Gamov
    in 1920-1930s.
    None of them ever gave a hint that his mastering of mathematics was
    not very good.”
    My best to you, 5371! [which is approximately 10^(1770) ].
    P.S. Microsoft Windows calculator gave me overflow for (5371)! ,
    so I had to use asymptotic Simpson formula for n!.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    It's not unusual for physicists to get help with their math from mathematicians. There's no shame in this. Obviously to be a physicist you have to be fairly good at math (maybe better than 99% of the population) , but mathematicians are specialists and are even better (maybe better than 99.9% of the population). Sometimes (Feynman) you get people who are equally good at both, but this is pretty rare. Very often a brilliant physicist will have a groundbreaking insight into what is happening (e.g. Einstein's intuitive understanding that gravity results in the warping of space/time) but will need to work a little with a mathematician in order to turn his theory into hard numbers and equations. Even though the mathematician may be better at math, he could never have come up with the original insight on his own.
    , @5371
    In Gamow's autobiography, "My World Line", (fragmentary, but warmly recommended) he has several laughs at the expense of his own mathematical prowess.
  225. @ben tillman

    I give SWPLs a lot of shit for their hypocrisy, sanctimony and status whoring, but I wouldn’t want to live, for example, a prole lifestyle in a redneck neighborhood where COPS isn’t just a show on TV.
     
    Do such neighborhoods exist?

    There are, and I’ve lived in them.

  226. @Nico
    I don't consider myself liberal or progressive at all, and I can't speak for AndrewR, but this guy echos my thoughts on the matter fairly succinctly:

    I give SWPLs a lot of shit for their hypocrisy, sanctimony and status whoring, but I wouldn’t want to live, for example, a prole lifestyle in a redneck neighborhood where COPS isn’t just a show on TV. The lower classes are crass, boorish and often thoughtlessly impulsive. Their kids are snot-nosed brats and bullies. When they speak their rudimentary patois, you will cringe. Their abysmal taste in the finer pleasures of life is a perpetual turn-off for those who would be their natural political allies. But they already get so much shit from the MSM that I don’t feel an urge to pile on them. I prefer to hunt the hunters.
     

    No. SWPL’s are self-righteous limp wrists who deserve all the hate they get from rightists (which is tiny compared to what’s reserved in the media for “rednecks”). Rednecks do actual work that’s necessary for maintaining civilization, not taking out thousands of dollars in loans for gender studies, also they’re friendlier and, contra pompous nitwits who form their impression from reality/exploitation shows, not criminally-inclined.

    • Replies: @Nico
    While I agree with you in principle, the premise of the article seems to be that any American white can be fitted somewhere on a spectrum between "prole" and "SWPL" poles, the extremes of either end being "trailer trash" and "yuppie SJW." Maybe that's not the most useful or most all-explicative framework for describing white American society but I do think it has its merits.
  227. @George Taylor
    Boulder real estate hits top 1 percent of country’s most expensive markets
    http://www.denverpost.com/2015/11/11/boulder-real-estate-hits-top-1-percent-of-countrys-most-expensive-markets/

    I live near Boulder but as a person who has to work for living I live in a formerly affordable area in Denver between the barrio and Pho City. One of my favorite Boulder jokes is "The vegan trust funders look like Auschwitz survivors, except they have tans"

    You have to realize that leftists are liars, racists and bigots and most of all hypocrites. They say they want to help other races and “lower classes”, but they don’t want to live with them. Along with what leftists are, remember what they are not; liberal or progressive. They are regressive authoritarians.

    • Agree: Kylie
  228. @berserker
    Progressives suffer from a remarkable inability to compare apples with apples. How is the claim that "attracting families, entrepreneurs and innovators from all round the US" comparable to the issue of Brexit?
    - And they do such silly comparisons all the time and feel smug about it.

    They are not progressive, they are regressive. And if you think I’m just playing at words, name one thing progressive about leftists.

    • Replies: @guest
    "name one thing progressive about leftists"

    They get stupider and stupider.

  229. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve been living in Boulder for 25 years. Yes, the university and federal labs are a big economic driver. But the biggest employer in town is IBM, and it is a tech hub not least of which due to ex-IBMers starting the next new tech thing. Google employs 300 in town, and is building a campus that will provide jobs for 1,500. Also, Boulder is the capital of the alternative universe – everything from new age and hippie pursuits to the natural products industry. On this latter point, it is a hub of entrepreneurial activity for all things natural and organic. Just last week, Justin’s Nut Butter sold to Hormel for $286 million. It is crazy expensive. Traffic is worse than it was but you can still easily get across town any time (though getting out of town at rush hour can suck), and lots of dedicated bike paths and a good mass transit system. Great microbrews and world-class weed ain’t bad either. The thing that makes Boulder great, though, is nature. The Rocky Mountains explode from the Great Plains right at the edge of Boulder, and the mountains that lord over the town chill everybody out. Clearly, most posters here could use some of that.

  230. @jon

    the University of Colorado system:
    CU Boulder
    CU Colorado Springs
    CU Denver
    CU Anschutz Medical Campus.
     
    Minor pet peeve, but why is the University of Colorado referred to as CU. It's UC dammit!

    but why is the University of Colorado referred to as CU

    Personal recollection here: Back when the Big 8 conference existed all the states schools went by similar designations that seemed backwards. You had the University of Colorado going by CU. You had the University of Kansas going by KU. You had the University of Missouri going by MU. You had the University of Oklahoma going by OU.

    I don’t know why they did that. Kentucky and other schools like Tennessee in the Southeast Conference went by UK and UT. But the Big8 schools all seemed to go by a different designation.

    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    That's interesting. I'd always assumed it was just to avoid confusion with the much more famous University of California system.
  231. We have a saying in England:

    The Guardian. Wrong about everything. All the time.

  232. @San Fernando Curt
    "Who wants to be in neighbourhoods that incorporate the values of Trump-style populists or their first cousins, the Brexiteers, where intolerance and hostility to others are the new normal?"

    Who wants to be in neighborhoods that AREN'T 88 percent white? If Boulderites are so tolerant and friendly, you'd think they'd wanna share their wondrous dirt with less-fortunate, occasionally barbaric American urban fauna and vibrant enrichers from all the cargo-cult superpowers of the world.

    Intolerance I get, because Trump doesn’t appear to tolerate the presence of illegal immigrants nor the free entry of certain types of otherwise legal immigrants. Although he probably would tolerate a certain amount of illegals. We’re probably not going to see 30 million or however many deportations it’d require to get back to zero.

    But I dispute this terminology. Do we call Clinton “intolerant” for not tolerating gun owners, for instance? Why does that word only get trotted out for the type of policies that adversely impact discreet minorities? Because those in power say so.

    As for hostility, Trump’s opponents appear obviously more hostile than he. But it’s okay, because they’re being hostile to an intolerant person, so it’s not really hostile. Because they say so.

  233. @Immigrant from former USSR
    Dear 5371:
    Commenting about Einstein's sophistication in mathematics is above my pay grade.
    I knew (back in USSR) people, who technically interacted with Gamov
    in 1920-1930s.
    None of them ever gave a hint that his mastering of mathematics was
    "not very good."
    My best to you, 5371! [which is approximately 10^(1770) ].
    P.S. Microsoft Windows calculator gave me overflow for (5371)! ,
    so I had to use asymptotic Simpson formula for n!.

    It’s not unusual for physicists to get help with their math from mathematicians. There’s no shame in this. Obviously to be a physicist you have to be fairly good at math (maybe better than 99% of the population) , but mathematicians are specialists and are even better (maybe better than 99.9% of the population). Sometimes (Feynman) you get people who are equally good at both, but this is pretty rare. Very often a brilliant physicist will have a groundbreaking insight into what is happening (e.g. Einstein’s intuitive understanding that gravity results in the warping of space/time) but will need to work a little with a mathematician in order to turn his theory into hard numbers and equations. Even though the mathematician may be better at math, he could never have come up with the original insight on his own.

    • Agree: Anonym
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Quite true. Einstein actually became a worse physicist as he became a better mathematician, because he lost his physical perspective grounded in mechanism and measurement. Of course he had accomplished quite a lot by then, so he could afford to coast. Although, it is also the case that very little ground-breaking physics of that kind has ever been done by people older than forty.
  234. @ben tillman

    Where is all of the money for the white people going to come from.
     
    The same place it comes from now: petroleum.

    Until it runs out, that is.

    I don’t think the source of 100% of white wealth is oil. Far from it. There are European countries (e.g. Germany) that have no oil and yet are quite wealthy.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    I don’t think the source of 100% of white wealth is oil. Far from it. There are European countries (e.g. Germany) that have no oil and yet are quite wealthy.
     
    Perhaps I should have referred to fossil fuels more broradly, but it really doesn't matter. The division of labor is such that the people who pull petroleum out of the ground are not able to turn it into the things they need: food, shelter, clothes, drilling equipment, etc. They have to trade petroleum for these things (or for a medium of exchange that can be traded for those things), and the people with the relevant resources enabling them to produce these things do so and acquire wealth through trade.
  235. @D. K.
    So, Professor Stiglitz' award, in 2001, was "a travesty," while President Obama's award, in 2009, was . . . what, exactly?!? As for the recent Literature laureates....

    More than one thing can be a travesty, and there are different types of travesties.

  236. @Maj. Kong
    One doesn't need a college degree, to be employed by the college as a janitor. Of course, with degrees being devalued, its not hard to imagine credential creep reaching down even more.

    Ben Affleck was born in Berkeley, CA and grew up in Cambridge, MA. His father was a janitor at Harvard. Not sure if his father ever earned a degree, but his mother did and was a school teacher. Ben had a very high SAT score but was lazy.

  237. @Mark Eugenikos
    If this Guardian piece was an intentional parody a la Onion, i.e. someone saying "the recipe for a happy U.S. is a place with 88% whites and 1% blacks", everyone would be screaming from the top of their lungs that you can't be so racist, oblivious and insensitive. But apparently if you are the Guardian you can be as oblivious as you like, so long as you take snipes at the Donald.

    You couldn't make up this stuff.

    Though still ignorant of the who-what-where & when, the moment I read Importantly, it is not a conservative future… right in the first paragraph, I grasped at once the why of whatever it was I was about to read.

    That happens an awful lot these days, though.

  238. Since most of the whites in Boulder are liberal, I’d love to see 20,000 blacks moved there for diversity’s sake.

    • Replies: @fish

    Since most of the whites in Boulder are liberal, I’d love to see 20,000 blacks moved there for diversity’s sake.
     



    Truckee, California too!
  239. @Anonymous
    People here who use the term Negros because of their dislike for blacks sound childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate.

    In my lifetime, the politically correct term for black people has changed maybe four or five times, from colored people to Negroes to black to African-American to people of color (which is good but colored people is bad – go figure). I may have missed a couple in there – I think there may have been a short period where it was Afro-American instead of African-American. A lot of this is just shit testing for loyalty to the party line – the powers that be change the acceptable name and you have to signal your virtue and hipness by following the party line that is current this week. Maybe next week the correct term for blacks will be “sun people”. If you don’t follow along with this, you can be accused of being racis’, not to mention “childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate”. Maybe some people don’t want to play this game anymore.

    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    I agree.

    And before they were known as coloreds and negroes, they were known as blacks.

    And they were known as blacks again during the 70s, 80s, and most of the 90s.

    Just as colored and negro became embarrassing before actually being banned, I expect African-American will be dropped in favor of black, sometime in the future.
    , @SPMoore8
    The reason these names keep changing is because a word designates an object, and if an object accrues bad associations, then by re-naming the object, it is thought that you remove the bad associations. But the bad associations always come right back, because it is the object, not the word, that is creating the problem. The first person I know to point this out was Schopenhauer, 150 years ago (Section 285a in the Parerga and Paralipomena).

    All social justice re-naming (including the current jihad against "oriental") is similarly motivated and will require similar re-naming every cycle.

    There's an amusing anecdote from the Falkland Island War that recaps this: Supposedly the British troops began referring to Falkland Island natives as "Bennies", which was a way of calling them idiots, and the high command got word of this and commanded that they stop using that word. So they started calling them "NB's" with the same disparaging tone. A commander asked, "what does NB stand for?" "Not Bennies" replied the soldier.
    , @WowJustWow
    At the same time, it's important to keep the non-preferred nomenclature in the names of institutions like UNCF and NAACP as a honeypot for naive white marks who dare to utter the contents of those acronyms: http://gawker.com/5152367/msnbc-host-sorry-he-called-you-people-colored
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    And what are they going to call Brazil nuts next?
  240. @Jefferson
    "Why that’s a nice little community you’ve got there, Boulder. It’d be a shame if anything were to happen to it.

    C:\Section_8.exe
    C:\Refugee_Resettlement\Import_Kebab.ex"

    That's the same threat George Lucas used on his affluent White Marin County neighbors. He threatens them with creating Section 8 underclass diversity like it was a grenade.

    George Lucas used on his affluent White Marin County neighbors.

    lolz. I remember that. It was one of the most schadenfreude-laden posts in all iStevery.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "lolz. I remember that. It was one of the most schadenfreude-laden posts in all iStevery."

    In this case Left Wing George Lucas used diversity like it was a death threat rather than a strength. You fuck with me and I will turn this whole Goddam neighborhood into The Wire. Don't make me wipe this Whitopia off the face of the earth, don't ever disrespect me again.

    Even limousine Left Wingers don't believe their own bullshit that diversity is our strength. It's just a political talking point for them, so that they can keep getting invited to rich liberal cocktail parties.
  241. @ben tillman

    I give SWPLs a lot of shit for their hypocrisy, sanctimony and status whoring, but I wouldn’t want to live, for example, a prole lifestyle in a redneck neighborhood where COPS isn’t just a show on TV.
     
    Do such neighborhoods exist?

    Fishtown?

  242. @Jack D
    In my lifetime, the politically correct term for black people has changed maybe four or five times, from colored people to Negroes to black to African-American to people of color (which is good but colored people is bad - go figure). I may have missed a couple in there - I think there may have been a short period where it was Afro-American instead of African-American. A lot of this is just shit testing for loyalty to the party line - the powers that be change the acceptable name and you have to signal your virtue and hipness by following the party line that is current this week. Maybe next week the correct term for blacks will be "sun people". If you don't follow along with this, you can be accused of being racis', not to mention "childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate". Maybe some people don't want to play this game anymore.

    I agree.

    And before they were known as coloreds and negroes, they were known as blacks.

    And they were known as blacks again during the 70s, 80s, and most of the 90s.

    Just as colored and negro became embarrassing before actually being banned, I expect African-American will be dropped in favor of black, sometime in the future.

  243. @Jefferson
    "Meanwhile, in formerly white Saint Paul, Minnesota:"

    Black people in that state can't seem to assimilate into the Minnesota nice culture.
  244. @S. Anonyia
    I think liberals actually like Mormons now.

    I made a joke about Mormons and my very liberal friends jumped to their defense and implied I was being bigoted...

    Of course they make jokes about rednecks, Baptists, Catholics, and poor people.

    It's weird when you can't even make light of people eschewing caffeine and having a history of polygamy.

    I think liberals actually like Mormons now… It’s weird when you can’t even make light of people eschewing caffeine and having a history of polygamy.

    Replace “caffeine” with “alcohol” and you may as well have said “Muslims.” Of course Mormons are teetotalers as well.

  245. @ben tillman

    It’s worth noting that almost all of the non-whites in the Boulder census are students obtained by U. Colo. diversity incentives. I’ve never seen a nonwhite outside of the campus, or Pearl Street mall. And when I’ve seen them, they are surrounded by crowds of adoring dreadlocked trust fund millennials who appear desperate to have some of that cool blackness rub off on them.
     
    You just reminded me of Bill McCartney, his daughter, and Sal Aunese, and I now feel sick.

    I remember that story. Seems like the kid turned out OK.

  246. Dee says:

    That pissing contest about ‘who’s the best at math’ has been raging for at least 50 years. Back then it was the STEM majors like the engineers, physicists, astronomers, astro-physicists, and the like, dissing any other groups like the economists, geologists, civil engineers that didn’t use a lot of math past algebra. So now a geologist sits in a cubicle and comes up with an equation that describes some kind of earth movement instead of doing field research every summer in some interesting locale like Italy or Greece.

    Or the ‘dismal science’ trying to find an equation that describes the law of supply and demand so only people with higher math skills can understand it.

    My dentist’s dad is a Civil Engineer, and when I mentioned this topic about the math to my dentist, he went on for about 10 minutes about how bitter his dad was about getting no respect for his ability.

    And like Jack D. says, you can be 99% in math, but the guy that’s 99.9999% is going to clean your clock…

  247. @Nico

    The Mormon Church was once just ridiculous. It is now ridiculous and evil.
     
    I realize there are also a lot of cucks carrying the banner of evangelical Protestantism or Roman Catholicism (my denomination) but I like to smugly point out these days that I have been warning people about "Latter Day Saints" for a number of years running.

    I remember asking if the commenters at AoS knew what Mormons believed, and was immediately beset by calls for banning. Well, do you know what they profess to believe?

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    Well I don't know about the other guy, but I was raised in the LDS Church, was a (more or less) faithful member for 20 years, and went on a mission (the best 4 months of my life!) before checking out. So yes, I know what they believe. I may have to read Doctrines of the Gospel or Jesus the Christ or any of the other 8 million are-they-or-aren't-they-scripture books by every random apostle, but I know all the basics.

    What church-going Mormons believe is less relevant to me than what the leadership is telling them to do and doing on their behalf via lobbying they're not always forthcoming about. The LDS leadership has been pushing amnesty, immivasion, and open borders for over 15 years. They have never fully acknowledged that, but anyone paying attention to the editorial positions of church-owned news media (KSL Radio, the Deseret News, etc.) will have noticed. They have been angrily and consistently pro-amnesty since the issue started heating up in the early 2000s.

    And in just this last General Conference the leadership went all out in support of the Muslim invasion of Europe.

    As I said, the LDS Church has gone from sometimes well-meaning but ridiculous doctrines and has become outright evil.
  248. If people in middle America could just get their shit together and learn to appreciate double IPAs, maybe we wouldn’t have to worry about Britain leaving the EU.

  249. @Anonymous
    I've always felt like the best place in the world to live would be a liberal city inside a conservative state & country. Like Boulder, or Austin.

    In a small, concentrated group, lefties can really contribute to quality of life: They tend to produce good food, coffee shops, music scenes, a literary element, etc...

    The trouble is when they get to be in charge of the larger society. Then they ruin everything.

    How about a State with Texas policies on guns and taxes (stand your ground and carry concealed or openly, no income tax), Colorado marijuana policy (legal and plentiful), and an overwhelmingly white/Asian population so our kids will be safe? That’s my dream right there.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    That would ALMOST be Vermont. Gun laws there are more lax than in Texas, and marijuana is decriminalized, just not totally legal. Vermont is 96% white.
  250. @Forbes
    The relatively incompetent CEO of Xerox is Ursula Burns, who is one of the very few Blacks actually referred to as such in the media--Wikipedia calls her 'black-American' (yes, lower case "b"), while born in the US, her parents were from Panama. So that African American moniker doesn't work.

    It seems to me that appointing a black and/or female CEO is the kiss of death for any large corporation and yet they keep getting appointed. I understand why this happens in government when the people in charge are using OPM (other people’s money) (and I understand that modern corporate governance of publicly held companies is also SOMEWHAT if not entirely decoupled from economic interest – Sumner Redstone would have to be TEN times more senile than he already is to appoint the likes of Ursula to run Viacom) but you would think that we are not that far gone that we would let AA appointees run our economic jewels into the ground in the name of political correctness- this has real consequences and not just for Wall Street – people lose their jobs, widows and orphans lose their pension money. But I guess not.

    • Agree: Forbes
    • Replies: @Forbes
    Corporate America is full on-board with the diversity craze. SJW activists demand every rainbow flavor on the board and in management, and companies prefer not spend any time debating such 'political' topics, so a black woman is a twofer. And Xerox got to blow its horn by claiming to be the first Fortune 500 company to have a woman CEO succeed a woman CEO (Ann Mulcahy)--the kind of trivial data point that puts ESPN sports broadcasts to shame.
    , @Alfa158
    In the particular case of Xerox, the competence of the CEO is somewhat irrelevant. The company decided sometime ago that making things is a bad business to be in and is essentially winding itself down. They had several large buildings in the South Bay Area of LA, including a huge manufacturing plant, that are now deserted and displaying the ubiquitous "Creative spaces for lease" signs.
    If you are bulldozing a house instead of building one it doesn't matter as much whether or not you are a master craftsman. When companies are on the rise no one picks the management by affirmitive action.
  251. @yaqub the mad scientist
    This piece of precious prissiness is hilarious.

    I worked in Boulder 25 years ago. I was stunned at how white it was. Coming from a region with a large black population, with numerous other ethnicities represented, I had never seen anything like it. It was certainly hippiesh, but you could see it dying even then. Boulder was where whatever hippies were left in the area would go to do drug exchanges. The street vibe was already pretty yuppied (another cultural thing I was new to). And it was expensive. You could go and see the leftovers of the beat scene draw modest checks for performing/scenstering at Allan Ginsburg's Naropa Institute (subject of a hilarious takedown by poet Tom Clark in the The Great Naropa Poetry Wars) and do nice day hikes, but everything else cost a lot of money. Culturally, it was white bread liberal, with that typical veneer of exotica wrapped in a Patagonia outfit. There was absolutely nothing speaking of anything authentic or "diverse".

    A year ago, I spent a week there doing some technical training. Things had taken their course and Boulder had become the complete sterile utopia that it was heading toward, and it was as white as ever.

    This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don't know where to begin. The idea that this town represents the future is absurd. First of all, this country will soon be minority majority, and if he has the least bit of intelligence, he would know that the culture of Boulder is not their culture. A city that is 0.9% black represents the past more than anything Donald Trump represents.

    Any journalist who attempts to use a rich college town as representative of anything general about America should be automatically fired. If this town represents anything of America's future, it is white flight via high property values and zoning laws.

    The future of the USA is NOT African, it’s Mexican. After the Mexicans get through with them, there will be more places than ever in the USA that are zero to one percent black.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    I think that's true.
    On one of my last visits to Pebble Beach while my father was still alive, say about ten years ago, he opined that the really scary, the really tough berserkers were the Mexicans who had been flooding in to Salinas and areas round about. He said that "even the blacks" were afraid of them.
  252. @Olorin
    Arabs are white. Doesn't that make any Muslim white?

    So there ya go. Easy peasy.

    Given that (1) Arabs are not white / European and (2) the great majority of Muslims are not Arabs, well, NO.

    Most Muslims in the world live in and come from Indonesia, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan — not a one of them Arab.

  253. @Jokah Macpherson
    The left's fetishization of Boulder isn't a new thing. I remember Stephen King chose it as the Gondor-equivalent where all the "good people" gather after the plague in The Stand.

    Meanwhile the "bad people" gather in Las Vegas. Of the two cities, whose growth has been promoted more by 21st century governmental policy?

    Love Stephen King’s books, but he is just another smarmy unrealistic naïve annoying lefty dick who doesn’t practice what he preaches. He’s all for diversity, which is, presumably, why he maintains a home in Maine, one of the few solidly-white States left.

  254. @pyrrhus
    Got to disagree about Madison, having spent some time there. Restaurants are lousy, housing stock is weirdly inadequate, with very few single family homes available, due to regulation. Students are annoying...

    You’re right, if one is going to put up with high income tax and gun “control” plus smarmy, annoying, unrealistic little lefty dickheads who’ve never been married, never raised children, never paid meaningful taxes, and yet have opinions and advice on EVERYTHING — and usually wrong — why be cold in Madison? Just move to California and at least have the beautiful weather and the (effectively) legal, ample, wonderful W-E-E-D — yeah, it’s got more than a college campus does….

  255. @Grumpy
    Yes, D.K., but the economics prize was not established by Alfred Nobel's will. It was something that the Bank of Sweden came up with later. That's why Steve Sailer sometimes calls it the "quasi-Nobel." Last year, I met a member of the Swedish Academy (which awards the prize in literature) who thinks the economics prize is a travesty.

    I met a member of the Swedish Academy (which awards the prize in literature) who thinks the economics prize is a travesty.

    I’m sure he thought he was critiquing the Economics Nobel as he said so.

  256. @Steve Sailer
    Boulder is at 5,430 feet elevation, which isn't as high as some other small scenic cities, like Aspen at 7900 feet and Santa Fe at 7200 feet or Jackson Hole at 6200 feet.

    Aspen attracts lots of vigorous millionaires, but it's easier to grow old at 5500 feet than at 7900 feet.

    We used to live in a town in SE Colorado that was all between 6,000 and 7,000 feet high. We knew elderly people there, including a fellow who still walked regularly in his late 70s, and there is apparently no problem living at that altitude at any age, it seems, if your body and lungs are long accustomed to it.

    Add another thousand feet of altitude, though, and you may be right.

  257. @Lagertha
    Boulder is beautiful; no doubt about it. But, it is a college town...forever levitating between reality and real life since the 70's.

    College towns will NEVER solve the problems of the world because: THE LARGEST DEMOGRAPHIC in Boulder is: 18-23 yr olds! College towns will not "civilize" the non-college-non-education-interested. College towns are not universal or typical: one size does not fit all regions - otherwise, campuses in Kentucky or Arkansas would make the list.

    Boulder, thought of as serious, just...just...is..., I can't even.

    I will always remember Boulder with deep, deep scents of marijuana wafting over the sidewalks of all the businesses mentioned in the post. At a restaurant in the late 90's, I couldn't even savor the taste of my meal because the noxious smell of pot was so overwhelming. Full disclosure: I don't like pot - never did.

    I have friends who are professors there...and children of friends who have been (are there now) graduated from UC, but, ....na-a-a-h, this is not SV or some other hub of the "next big 'magic dirt' area". Boulder will not be SV...there are small start ups, but the real estate is too costly for kids working on minimum wage to stay there. It is a baby-boomer's retirement paradise, however - but you still gotta be rich to buy a condo there today.

    UC will always be known as a party town-college town...with world-class alpine skiing minutes away. Who would not want to go (should have gone to) there for their college years?

    I can’t fathom how you are averse to marijuana, but it is indeed characteristically rude, childish, and in-your-face — literally — for the lefty kiddies in Boulder to smoke where people need to breathe the smoke who don’t want to. Obnoxious. The rest of us have no problem being considerate civilized adults and smoking on our own property without imposing on anyone else.

    Here in LA, too, there’s plenty of marijuana, and more often tobacco, wafting into the faces of our toddlers and baby as we walk around the sidewalks. What tolerant and “liberal” people, eh?

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Pot makes me feel woozy ( I am a life-long sailer) where I can't get control of my immediate space. Feeling nauseous is the worst. Pot also makes me extremely paranoid...often in English and Finnish...so, sometimes. "lost in translation," especially, if I am with people. I also get a high heart rate...and the beating is especially intense in my ears - I do have sh*tty ears ( too much water in my lifetime) but, I can't stand listening to my heart beat in my head. Weed does not seem to suit me - it is a visceral and atavistic reaction for me.
  258. Boulder is Belmont because the Belmontese cognitive elite feathered it to be one of their Belmont nests, whose denizens preach to the rest of us in Fishtown that we must obey what the Belmontese preach, including that we Fishtown serfs must not criticize the We Know What’s Best For Everyone Belmontese or support any candidate or form any movement that might look out for the interests of us Fishtowners, but merely obey Belmontese dictates and never have the insolence to live in or frequent Belmont.

  259. @Expletive Deleted
    Don't worry AnotherDad, it's them, not you.
    The Grauniad had to close its notorious Komment Macht Frei section due to "moderation difficulties". There was a long drivelling announcement a few months back from Mary? Thing? (the editrix) blaming "trolls" (but not necromancers) and so on.
    Real reason? I suspect their herds of outsourced "moderators" could no longer suppress the real opinions of the readership by seeking out crimethink and deleting the errant, and were becoming an expensive liability, since nobody buys the paper anymore.

    tl;dr - nobody in Britain, apart from a few expensive boho streets in North London, and the BBC management of course, cares what the Guardian thinks about anything anymore. They seem to exist in an alternate universe to the rest of us:
    c.f. the "Labour" (=wealthy public-sector professionals' ) Party. Went into foetal position shock when forced to hobnob with the lieges for their votes recently. "The first person I meet is a horrible racist! I'm never coming back to wherever this is!"

    During the previous Cris de Comment at the Grauniad I posted the following:

    ” The astonishingly large number of comments deleted is indicative a sizable community of people who disagree with the leftist drivel. Why don’t the Moderators push off and form their own community and leave ours alone”

    It was, of course, deleted and for such lèse–majesté I was sentenced to pre-approval for a month

  260. @Jefferson
    "Taxpayer supported Disneylands, State and Federal taxes pour into them. Federal student loans as you mention. Federal gov’t research money and so on. Twelve percent of US millionaires are educators. It’s a great biz to be in.
    ______

    Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators (Video)
    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2012/03/12-of-us-millionaires-are-educators
    Mar 12, 2012 · … deprived teachers now make up 12% of US millionaires. And … Good Grief. 12% of US Millionaires Are Educators … budget is over thirty percent of the .."

    Yet the Left still says that educators in this country are underpaid.

    Ignore teacher whining about how hard they have it, particularly members of big city unions.
    We were once watching the Suze Ormond financial show and a NYC elementary school teacher called to the “Can I Afford it Segment” to ask if she could afford to buy a lakefront condo in rural New York. The lady was about to hit 60 and be forced to retire, and would still be too young for Social Security, so her income would drop to a $108,000 a year teachers pension until SS kicked in to supplement it. She could not afford to keep living in the City in the manner she wanted on $108,000 year.

  261. @syonredux
    And, once upon a time, one could even find conservatives in the film industry: DW Griffith, Howard Hawks, John Ford, Barbara Stanwyck, Frank Capra, Michael Powell, ....

    John Ford was a liberal Democrat, albeit the nearly extinct patriotic anti-communist type of liberalism.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Like "Grapes of Wrath."
    , @syonredux

    John Ford was a liberal Democrat, albeit the nearly extinct patriotic anti-communist type of liberalism.
     
    But also a strong social conservative, as evidenced by his love of ritual and community.
  262. @Jack D
    In my lifetime, the politically correct term for black people has changed maybe four or five times, from colored people to Negroes to black to African-American to people of color (which is good but colored people is bad - go figure). I may have missed a couple in there - I think there may have been a short period where it was Afro-American instead of African-American. A lot of this is just shit testing for loyalty to the party line - the powers that be change the acceptable name and you have to signal your virtue and hipness by following the party line that is current this week. Maybe next week the correct term for blacks will be "sun people". If you don't follow along with this, you can be accused of being racis', not to mention "childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate". Maybe some people don't want to play this game anymore.

    The reason these names keep changing is because a word designates an object, and if an object accrues bad associations, then by re-naming the object, it is thought that you remove the bad associations. But the bad associations always come right back, because it is the object, not the word, that is creating the problem. The first person I know to point this out was Schopenhauer, 150 years ago (Section 285a in the Parerga and Paralipomena).

    All social justice re-naming (including the current jihad against “oriental”) is similarly motivated and will require similar re-naming every cycle.

    There’s an amusing anecdote from the Falkland Island War that recaps this: Supposedly the British troops began referring to Falkland Island natives as “Bennies”, which was a way of calling them idiots, and the high command got word of this and commanded that they stop using that word. So they started calling them “NB’s” with the same disparaging tone. A commander asked, “what does NB stand for?” “Not Bennies” replied the soldier.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Yes, you see the same thing going on with the various names for the retarded and crippled, which also get changed every few years.

    Conversely, white people are always white people, or at least (according to Genius T. Coates) people who think that they are white. Though I guess the pseudo-scientific sounding Caucasian had a run and faded.
  263. @Jack D
    It seems to me that appointing a black and/or female CEO is the kiss of death for any large corporation and yet they keep getting appointed. I understand why this happens in government when the people in charge are using OPM (other people's money) (and I understand that modern corporate governance of publicly held companies is also SOMEWHAT if not entirely decoupled from economic interest - Sumner Redstone would have to be TEN times more senile than he already is to appoint the likes of Ursula to run Viacom) but you would think that we are not that far gone that we would let AA appointees run our economic jewels into the ground in the name of political correctness- this has real consequences and not just for Wall Street - people lose their jobs, widows and orphans lose their pension money. But I guess not.

    Corporate America is full on-board with the diversity craze. SJW activists demand every rainbow flavor on the board and in management, and companies prefer not spend any time debating such ‘political’ topics, so a black woman is a twofer. And Xerox got to blow its horn by claiming to be the first Fortune 500 company to have a woman CEO succeed a woman CEO (Ann Mulcahy)–the kind of trivial data point that puts ESPN sports broadcasts to shame.

  264. @5371
    Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics.

    Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics.

    They can’t all be Isaac Newton…..

    • Replies: @Anonym
    They can’t all be Isaac Newton….

    ...but when they are they set the standard by which all other physicists are judged.
  265. @D. K.
    "The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (officially Swedish: Sveriges riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne, or the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel), commonly referred to as the Nobel Prize in Economics,[1] is an award for outstanding contributions to the field of economics, and generally regarded as the most prestigious award for that field.[2]"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nobel_Memorial_Prize_in_Economic_Sciences

    But what does it have to do with Nobel?

  266. @Anonym
    OT: White house negro signs oriental-written bill banning government from using terms "negro" and "oriental".
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Ramen noodles are racist.
     
    Darkie Toothpaste will get them off your teeth.
  267. AmericanaCON [AKA "Jumperliberal"] says:

    There is something deeply wrong with liberals. They love ethnic diversity but they don’t want to live in it. Who is marrying women of colour? Well, it is mostly white working and middle class men who hold strong conservative believes. The same people are viewed as “racists” by liberals. Why? Well, conservatives do not see people of colour as their pets, social project or some Zoo animal they can securely visit once a year. Look what the liberals have done to Near North Side (Chicago), Brooklyn and San Francisco. The liberals have turned it white. Liberalism is basically an ideology for white rich people.

    I wonder if the African-American, which vote for Hillary, knows that she views them as bricks in a game against the white working class. I wonder if they care that in her society these people end up in a Favela. I have many friends and relatives (in fact most of them) who are urban upper-middle class liberals. In fact I even grow up around them and was one of them until I left the university and stirred the reality in the eye. There is something really disturbing with them. They simply don’t care about the society outside their bubble. Next financial crisis will really hurt many of these indebted liberals and I don’t think they will be happy.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Mostly white working-class and middle-class men are marrying "women of color"? If you are referring to black women, there are very few white men of any type marrying them, even today, thank God.

    The only white guy we know who's married to a black woman is an intellectual, a lefty academic, though his modest income might fit your generalization.
  268. @Hepp
    It has 100K people, with a university that enrolls 30K students. Probably half the city is either attending the university or employed by it.

    In other words, they don't have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids. Of course it's a nice place to live.

    Saratoga, CA, though, that’s nice because of all the capitalism pulsing through it.

  269. @Jack D
    I don't think the source of 100% of white wealth is oil. Far from it. There are European countries (e.g. Germany) that have no oil and yet are quite wealthy.

    I don’t think the source of 100% of white wealth is oil. Far from it. There are European countries (e.g. Germany) that have no oil and yet are quite wealthy.

    Perhaps I should have referred to fossil fuels more broradly, but it really doesn’t matter. The division of labor is such that the people who pull petroleum out of the ground are not able to turn it into the things they need: food, shelter, clothes, drilling equipment, etc. They have to trade petroleum for these things (or for a medium of exchange that can be traded for those things), and the people with the relevant resources enabling them to produce these things do so and acquire wealth through trade.

  270. My bad Steve, this bit got rolled into a comment on another thread by mistake:

    America will not become like Brazil because white Americans like marrying brown immigrants.

    Yes, none of those white Portugee ever married any brown people. WTF?

    People here who use the term Negros because of their dislike for blacks sound childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate.

    Bothers you that much, does it? ZFG.

    “Effeminate,” lol. Nothing says macho like political correctness and the religious use of “African American.”

  271. @Jack D
    It seems to me that appointing a black and/or female CEO is the kiss of death for any large corporation and yet they keep getting appointed. I understand why this happens in government when the people in charge are using OPM (other people's money) (and I understand that modern corporate governance of publicly held companies is also SOMEWHAT if not entirely decoupled from economic interest - Sumner Redstone would have to be TEN times more senile than he already is to appoint the likes of Ursula to run Viacom) but you would think that we are not that far gone that we would let AA appointees run our economic jewels into the ground in the name of political correctness- this has real consequences and not just for Wall Street - people lose their jobs, widows and orphans lose their pension money. But I guess not.

    In the particular case of Xerox, the competence of the CEO is somewhat irrelevant. The company decided sometime ago that making things is a bad business to be in and is essentially winding itself down. They had several large buildings in the South Bay Area of LA, including a huge manufacturing plant, that are now deserted and displaying the ubiquitous “Creative spaces for lease” signs.
    If you are bulldozing a house instead of building one it doesn’t matter as much whether or not you are a master craftsman. When companies are on the rise no one picks the management by affirmitive action.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Ursula is toast, kicked upstairs.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/23/business/ursula-m-burns-will-not-be-chief-executive-of-xerox-after-split.html

    Carl Icahn is not an AA kind of guy.
  272. RE the group of a thousand names, I think the main thing is connotation. They want to keep the name a moving target, so the negative connotations can be ditched for a while. It’s like if Chipotle (was having much bigger problems and) changed their name and brand. It wouldn’t really promise anything new of substance, but a lot of people would fall for it. Eventually, every name given to blacks becomes a word a certain type of non-black spits. When that type hits a certain critical mass, it’s time for a brand change. African American might have staying power, because it’s long enough to appeal to blacks’ grandiose tendencies.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I think it's more of a hazing ritual: "You use this 7-syllable phrase; we'll keep using a 1-syllable word".
  273. @Gunnar von Cowtown

    George Lucas used on his affluent White Marin County neighbors.
     
    lolz. I remember that. It was one of the most schadenfreude-laden posts in all iStevery.

    “lolz. I remember that. It was one of the most schadenfreude-laden posts in all iStevery.”

    In this case Left Wing George Lucas used diversity like it was a death threat rather than a strength. You fuck with me and I will turn this whole Goddam neighborhood into The Wire. Don’t make me wipe this Whitopia off the face of the earth, don’t ever disrespect me again.

    Even limousine Left Wingers don’t believe their own bullshit that diversity is our strength. It’s just a political talking point for them, so that they can keep getting invited to rich liberal cocktail parties.

    • Replies: @Ragno
    I had suspected Lucas of turning supervillain on us once he'd evolved beyond the need for a neck.

    http://i.imgur.com/bzEUb.jpg

  274. @Immigrant from former USSR
    Dear 5371:
    Commenting about Einstein's sophistication in mathematics is above my pay grade.
    I knew (back in USSR) people, who technically interacted with Gamov
    in 1920-1930s.
    None of them ever gave a hint that his mastering of mathematics was
    "not very good."
    My best to you, 5371! [which is approximately 10^(1770) ].
    P.S. Microsoft Windows calculator gave me overflow for (5371)! ,
    so I had to use asymptotic Simpson formula for n!.

    In Gamow’s autobiography, “My World Line”, (fragmentary, but warmly recommended) he has several laughs at the expense of his own mathematical prowess.

  275. @P
    Jeb is the only upper crust man I know to have done that. Family Guy did a pretty savage joke about it.

    Did he meet her when she was cleaning his hotel room?

  276. @Wilkey
    "In other words, they don’t have to actually produce anything, and are completely subsidized by the government and rich parents sending money to their kids."

    This fairly well sums it up. CU Boulder is also the flagship state university in a state with no strong private or public alternatives. Boulder gets the richest kids in the state, and it's economy is either entirely reliant on direct government spending or on businesses born of that spending.

    I knew a decent number of middle class kids in Boulder (granted, usually upper-middle), but the demographics of the in-state students are probably wealthier overall than CSU.

    Where CU really does well is the out-of-state students, who are 37% of its student body. You can’t throw a rock on campus without hitting a Californian. Out-of-state tuition for the upcoming school year starts at $16,658 per semester.

    • Replies: @Marc
    I went to Colorado State University in the late 1980's, and even then it had a noticeably less affluent student body than the University of Colorado. CSU attracted a lot of engineering, veterinary and assorted AG students, and wasn't a place you met a lot of liberal arts majors. There was a significant anti-Boulder bias from the majority of in-state students that had little to do with school rivalries.
  277. @jon

    Ah, yes, the ole “taste of,” in this case, diversity.
     
    Most people like tokenism, but few actually like true diversity.

    Yep. Liberal love blacks, browns and Muslims so long as they act just like white liberals. Otherwise, liberals get very frustrated and, most often, move to a less diverse neighborhood. Funny that.

  278. @e
    “I LOVE the diversity! Love love love it! There’s even a Muslim girl with the headscarf, some black kids etc….that’s hard to find in this city.” I asked her what it was about the diversity she loved, and she said that it will show her daughter that there’s so much more out there, a wider world.

    Ah, yes, the ole "taste of," in this case, diversity. Perhaps you could have asked her if she'd like several mouthfuls of said diversity. Then, entire dinners.

    Diversity is like red pepper flakes on your pizza. A little goes a long way and too much can be painful.

  279. @Forbes
    The relatively incompetent CEO of Xerox is Ursula Burns, who is one of the very few Blacks actually referred to as such in the media--Wikipedia calls her 'black-American' (yes, lower case "b"), while born in the US, her parents were from Panama. So that African American moniker doesn't work.

    One of Fox News Channel’s token liberals is one of its celebrity Blacks, Juan Williams. He is actually an immigrant from Panama! Nonetheless, he is usually referred to as “African American”– as are people like Colin Powell, whose parents were from the Caribbean. Juan Williams is actually a Black Hispanic, or an Hispanic Black, but I never have heard anyone refer to him as such.

    My problem, however, is not with immigrants who are naturalized, much less the native-born children of immigrants, being called “African American” (i.e., despite their not having any ancestors who were slaves in America). My problem is primarily with people exchanging two words with seven syllables for a single, monosyllabic word– even though they call the majority “White” instead of “European American.” In the words of ‘Judas Iscariot’: “It doesn’t help us if you’re inconsistent!”

    Actually, I find “African American” more objectionable than its mere length: It also is inaccurate, in that the natives of northern Africa are not black (negroid), and are (for the moment, at least) classified as “White or Caucasian” by the government itself. Even worse, of course, is the moronic use of “Asian” as a “racial” designator, as if Afghanis and Japanese were of the same race. Sigh….

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "One of Fox News Channel’s token liberals is one of its celebrity Blacks, Juan Williams. He is actually an immigrant from Panama! Nonetheless, he is usually referred to as “African American”– as are people like Colin Powell, whose parents were from the Caribbean. Juan Williams is actually a Black Hispanic, or an Hispanic Black, but I never have heard anyone refer to him as such."

    Panama shares a border with the Colombian state of Choco, which is basically the Detroit of Colombia.
    , @PerezHBD
    During the Winter Olympics a few years back when a Jamaican won a medal in some sport the NBC commentator described her as being "the first African American, from any country, to win a medal".
    , @Triumph104
    African American is a treadmill euphemism. When a group can't meet societal norms they simply change their name hoping that will alleviate the stigma of belonging to the group. There is no use examining the term "African American" because it will soon fall out of favor and some other term will take its place. The New York Times now asks people, or blacks at least, how they describe themselves. In one article five people of African descent are described as black, African American, Afro Caribbean, Tunisian and Egyptian, or mother from Barbados. LINK.

    The terms idiot, imbecile, and moron changed to mentally retarded which changed to special needs and in many places is now called exceptional.

  280. @Marcus

    Boulder, Colorado, has been voted the US’s happiest city
     
    Because they're a bunch of stoned college kids.

    The happiness, opinions, and politics of college kids don’t and shouldn’t matter, for the same reasons I argue that absolutely no tears should be shed for them being “excluded” from voting because they won’t pick whether to domicile themselves in their new town or drive back to wherever they’re from on voting day. Election day is 90 percent for offices that are local or regional, offices in whose discharge of power they are barely vested- in terms of taxes, finances, profession, family, or community. College is the one time where they are liberated from the weight of petty, everyday responsibilities or concerns- not having to give a shit about who is your tax assessor should be liberating to them.

    It’s no different in looking to an exemplary model of a community. People who think so have never put real skin in the game, like this writer.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    You are right to note that college students are typically "barely vested - in terms of taxes, finances, profession, family, or community."

    American college students aged 18-22, on balance, have less practical life experience and work experience than that age group did 50 years ago, let alone 100 or more years ago.

    They are very rarely married and very rarely have children, which was not the case of 18-22-year-old Americans 50 and 100 years ago.

    They usually have never paid ANY federal income tax (they get back whatever they pay) and have never paid any substantial taxes of any kind to any level of government, yet they have all sorts of ideas about how the gov should take and spend OUR earnings while we are trying to raise our families and provide for the future of our nation.

    They are far less mature, realistic, and reasonable than people of their age in earlier American generations -- and that description applied somewhat to me at age 18-22, too.

    Nixon et al. never should have lowered the voting age from 21 to 18.

    Rather, the voting age should be raised higher than it was, say to 25 minimum. Know it won't happen, just saying that you're right about college students voting, and then some.

  281. Bill says:
    @Psmith
    I'm not sure why this is a source of amusement. You would prefer Segways? High-speed rail?

    I dunno, I guess I don't see anything wrong with trying simple, obvious, low-tech solutions.

    It’s not that it is a bad idea, necessarily, it’s that it is not an innovative idea. Gypsy cabs + carpooling is a libertarian idea dating back to the 1970s at least. I can’t remember, was it David Friedman or Milton Friedman or someone else, but the idea back then was that people and cars would congregate in suburban parking lots where there would be some mechanism like a bunch of blackboards for the spot market in rides to work to clear. The longer term market would work via classified ads or something. Libertarians officially believed that this didn’t just spontaneously happen because it was illegal.

    It’s kind of weird how 1970s things are recently. Still no Space 1999, though.

  282. @Anonymous
    People here who use the term Negros because of their dislike for blacks sound childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate.

    Your insults would improve if you became less stupid and ignorant.

  283. @Expletive Deleted
    Couldn't have said it better. The UK that you lot hear about, and scorn, is not the one the Brits actually inhabit. You're not dealing with just a few malcontents who haunt Alt-R comments sections, it's mainstream, but completely opaque to outsiders, due to rigid, programmatic exclusion from the Great Liberal Discourse.
    It's like enduring the simpering chatter of the petites bergères at Versailles, and reporting to Washington that all is quiet on the eastern front, and the natives are not restless.

    A Brit condescendingly informed me that I “have no sense of cultural relativity” after I voiced the opinion that Muslims agitating to live under a separate Sharia court system in the West probably shouldn’t be allowed to live in the West. The scary thing is he was an infantryman.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    ".. no sense of cultural relativity"
    Eurgh! I can't think of a more profoundly unbritish statement.
    Well, un-English, that is. Sooner drink freezing-cold weak ale.
    I'd lock the nitwit up in St Mary Putney with transcripts of the Debates, Blackstone's Books, Magna Carta etc. and wouldn't let him out till he'd handed in an essay based on his readings.

    Even the "lesser breeds without the Law" have noticed

    "The Englishman walks before the law like a trained horse in a circus. He has the sense of legality in his bones, in his muscles." - Gorky
     
    It's what we're all about. Otherwise we'd have exterminated ourselves long ago.
    It's why any decent rule-bound sport has English origins, and why the Empire spread across the globe, regardless of its being propagated and defended by a relative handful of mustachioed buffoons in khaki shorts and long socks. No house rules, no hometown verdicts. We'll string you up regardless, chummy. Play Up, and Play the Game.

    One nation, under a groove. (Apart from the Sweaties, of course. They do their own thing as usual)
  284. Bill says:
    @anonymous
    A 35 minute drive from Boulder was where they decided to put:


    "...Building 710 is an underground bunker complex designed to withstand a nuclear blast. ...completed in 1969 and has a total space of 36,000 square feet (3,300 m2). It was intended as a base for federal operations during a nuclear attack and was designed to house 300 people for up to 30 days in the event of a nuclear war. ...Today Building 710 houses the Region VIII Office of the Federal Emergency Management Agency..."

     

    Lots of government types around makes for the expected politics.

    Back when preppers were survivalists, Colorado was on the list of places not to live. Government facilities, Colorado Springs, choke points for highways, telephone trunk lines, railroads. Place was a magnet for hydrogen bombs. Of course, back then, there was some story for why every place was a magnet for hydrogen bombs. Except Mississippi. And East Tennessee.

  285. @iSteveFan

    but why is the University of Colorado referred to as CU
     
    Personal recollection here: Back when the Big 8 conference existed all the states schools went by similar designations that seemed backwards. You had the University of Colorado going by CU. You had the University of Kansas going by KU. You had the University of Missouri going by MU. You had the University of Oklahoma going by OU.

    I don't know why they did that. Kentucky and other schools like Tennessee in the Southeast Conference went by UK and UT. But the Big8 schools all seemed to go by a different designation.

    That’s interesting. I’d always assumed it was just to avoid confusion with the much more famous University of California system.

  286. @Mr. Anon
    That isn't the point. The point is that it is not actually a prize that was provided for in Alfred Nobel's bequest. Economics is not something that Nobel considered worthy of a prize. Those bankers had no right to glom on to another man's legacy and hijack the name for thier own purposes.

    Would you like a "Victoria Cross" for extraordinary valor in online multiplayer gaming? A "Fields Medal" for Sudoku? A "Wolf Prize" for exceptional accomplishment in lawn mowing? I have my own that I award, and you can have one for a modest financial consideration. I can sell you a "Rolex" too.

    Alfred Nobel was just a rich inventor with a guilty conscience, who was looking to assuage the same, and to have people later remember him fondly and gratefully, rather than resentfully or hatefully. He was not the Second Coming of the Christ! His award has the stature that it does because of the track record that it established of choosing deserving recipients. The notion that the caliber of the people chosen for the Nobel Peace Prize, such as Barack Obama, is more worthy of our recognition and praise than the likes of Nobel laureates in the Economic Sciences, such as Paul Samuelson and Joseph Stiglitz , is a notion that I do not hold. The esteem of an award has to be based upon the collective quality of its recipients– not the other way around!

    • Agree: PV van der Byl
    • Replies: @AmericanaCON
    don’t want to be rude but there is no formal Nobel Prize for economical sciences. It is called Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel and was first awarded in 1969 after a donation from the Swedish National Bank. The Prize is not sanctioned by the Nobel family although it has recently been given in the same ceremony. The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian board consisting of mostly politicians. In general the Peace Prize, Economic and Literature Prize often cause controversy as these Prizes are heavily politicized. Among recent Peace Prize laureates you find Al Gore (2007), Obama (2009) and European Union (2012). Even the committee who gave the prize to Obama didn’t want to give it but there was a lot of political pressure on them. I wouldn’t be surprised if Hillary got it to. Why not? She may be the first female US President.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Whatever. Point is.............it ain't a Nobel Prize.
  287. @syonredux

    Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics.
     
    They can't all be Isaac Newton.....

    They can’t all be Isaac Newton….

    …but when they are they set the standard by which all other physicists are judged.

  288. @Forbes
    The relatively incompetent CEO of Xerox is Ursula Burns, who is one of the very few Blacks actually referred to as such in the media--Wikipedia calls her 'black-American' (yes, lower case "b"), while born in the US, her parents were from Panama. So that African American moniker doesn't work.

    The relatively incompetent CEO of Xerox is Ursula Burns, who is one of the very few Blacks actually referred to as such in the media–Wikipedia calls her ‘black-American’ (yes, lower case “b”), while born in the US, her parents were from Panama. So that African American moniker doesn’t work.

    That doesn’t make sense. It works just as it does for all the other millions of “African-Americans” whose parents weren’t born in Africa.

  289. @5371
    Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics.

    I don’t understand why people say this. If the math you’re stuck on requires someone like Minkowski to help you out it means you’re good at math, not bad at it.

  290. @D. K.
    Right, Jeb Bush is just typical of upper-crust men in America, in recent generations, always marrying those little, brown immigrants from south of the border. 'Tis a wonder that there are any upper-crust Whites left in the United States, in 2016, at all....

    Lots of interracial marriage among powerful families in America in the latest generation.

    John Boehner’s daughter – black man
    John McCain’s son – black woman
    Al Gore’s daughter – Asian man
    Barbara Bush – brown guy from Panama

    • Replies: @Romanian
    Biden's daughter with the Rasta guy
    , @TangoMan
    Barbara Bush – brown guy from Panama

    Sometimes I feel like a sheltered naif. Her boyfriend earns a living as a graffiti artist. I'm gobsmacked by this news. With all that graffiti out there being done for free, who would pay a "professional" for such work?

    I still don't understand how high profile DJs become high profile when there are boatloads of DJs who play music at parties.
    , @Anonymous
    Barabara Bush's first cousin Lauren Bush did a lot better marrying Ralph Lauren's son.
  291. @D. K.
    One of Fox News Channel's token liberals is one of its celebrity Blacks, Juan Williams. He is actually an immigrant from Panama! Nonetheless, he is usually referred to as "African American"-- as are people like Colin Powell, whose parents were from the Caribbean. Juan Williams is actually a Black Hispanic, or an Hispanic Black, but I never have heard anyone refer to him as such.

    My problem, however, is not with immigrants who are naturalized, much less the native-born children of immigrants, being called "African American" (i.e., despite their not having any ancestors who were slaves in America). My problem is primarily with people exchanging two words with seven syllables for a single, monosyllabic word-- even though they call the majority "White" instead of "European American." In the words of 'Judas Iscariot': "It doesn't help us if you're inconsistent!"

    Actually, I find "African American" more objectionable than its mere length: It also is inaccurate, in that the natives of northern Africa are not black (negroid), and are (for the moment, at least) classified as "White or Caucasian" by the government itself. Even worse, of course, is the moronic use of "Asian" as a "racial" designator, as if Afghanis and Japanese were of the same race. Sigh....

    “One of Fox News Channel’s token liberals is one of its celebrity Blacks, Juan Williams. He is actually an immigrant from Panama! Nonetheless, he is usually referred to as “African American”– as are people like Colin Powell, whose parents were from the Caribbean. Juan Williams is actually a Black Hispanic, or an Hispanic Black, but I never have heard anyone refer to him as such.”

    Panama shares a border with the Colombian state of Choco, which is basically the Detroit of Colombia.

  292. @Anonymous
    People here who use the term Negros because of their dislike for blacks sound childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate.

    “Negro” is historically the proper term. It is derived from the Latin “nigra,” meaning “black,” and is used in Romance languages such as Spanish.

    I refuse to use the term “African American” because we’re not talking about Egyptian-Americans, Berber-Americans, Moroccan-Americans, or whites born in South Africa who emigrated to the U.S., are we?

    We’re talking about sub-Saharan Bantus here. Perhaps “Bantu” is a more accurate word than “Negro,” then???

    • Agree: PV van der Byl
    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    Bantu would be accurate for the overwhelming majority of American blacks. There are none Khoisan (bushmen) in the US and only a very small number of Nilotics.
  293. @D. K.
    When I was born, a few months after its fiftieth anniversary, Gary's population was burgeoning-- it went from about 134,000 to about 178,000, between the 1950 and 1960 censuses, courtesy of the Baby Boom (with my mother contributing seven live births, during that decade). Today, it is well under 80,000.

    When I was born, Purdue's enrollment was just under 12,000. When I transfered there, forty years ago come August, it was just past 30,000, for the first time ever. Several years ago, it passed 40,000! It has recently ebbed to a little under 39,000.

    I have not been back down to visit, nor even driven through, West Lafayette since August 1985. I may assure anyone, however, that it is an infinitely more desirable destination than my moribund birthplace. All a matter of magic dirt, I think the agronomists at Purdue University would concede....

    Rural university towns are great places to live. Often they have affordable housing nearby, have outstanding schools, and are usually free of serious crime.

  294. @Mark Caplan
    I enjoy Kunstler's demolition of sacrosanct, modernist architects, such as I. M Pei. Kunstler's architectural or urban design "Eyesore of the Month" website, which he no longer updates, also served the public's interest.
    • Replies: @Mark Caplan
    Thanks, Anon! Here is the no-longer-updated address of Kunstler's old Eyesore of the Month website, where the depressing contents are still available:

    Old Eyesore of the Month site (last updated June 2013).
    http://www.kunstler.com/eyesore.html

    And here is the new site, which Kunstler is still updating (although it appears to be temporarily down as I write this):

    New Eyesore of the Month site.
    http://kunstler.com/featured-eyesore-of-the-month/
  295. AmericanaCON [AKA "Jumperliberal"] says:
    @D. K.
    Alfred Nobel was just a rich inventor with a guilty conscience, who was looking to assuage the same, and to have people later remember him fondly and gratefully, rather than resentfully or hatefully. He was not the Second Coming of the Christ! His award has the stature that it does because of the track record that it established of choosing deserving recipients. The notion that the caliber of the people chosen for the Nobel Peace Prize, such as Barack Obama, is more worthy of our recognition and praise than the likes of Nobel laureates in the Economic Sciences, such as Paul Samuelson and Joseph Stiglitz , is a notion that I do not hold. The esteem of an award has to be based upon the collective quality of its recipients-- not the other way around!

    don’t want to be rude but there is no formal Nobel Prize for economical sciences. It is called Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel and was first awarded in 1969 after a donation from the Swedish National Bank. The Prize is not sanctioned by the Nobel family although it has recently been given in the same ceremony. The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian board consisting of mostly politicians. In general the Peace Prize, Economic and Literature Prize often cause controversy as these Prizes are heavily politicized. Among recent Peace Prize laureates you find Al Gore (2007), Obama (2009) and European Union (2012). Even the committee who gave the prize to Obama didn’t want to give it but there was a lot of political pressure on them. I wouldn’t be surprised if Hillary got it to. Why not? She may be the first female US President.

  296. @D. K.
    One of Fox News Channel's token liberals is one of its celebrity Blacks, Juan Williams. He is actually an immigrant from Panama! Nonetheless, he is usually referred to as "African American"-- as are people like Colin Powell, whose parents were from the Caribbean. Juan Williams is actually a Black Hispanic, or an Hispanic Black, but I never have heard anyone refer to him as such.

    My problem, however, is not with immigrants who are naturalized, much less the native-born children of immigrants, being called "African American" (i.e., despite their not having any ancestors who were slaves in America). My problem is primarily with people exchanging two words with seven syllables for a single, monosyllabic word-- even though they call the majority "White" instead of "European American." In the words of 'Judas Iscariot': "It doesn't help us if you're inconsistent!"

    Actually, I find "African American" more objectionable than its mere length: It also is inaccurate, in that the natives of northern Africa are not black (negroid), and are (for the moment, at least) classified as "White or Caucasian" by the government itself. Even worse, of course, is the moronic use of "Asian" as a "racial" designator, as if Afghanis and Japanese were of the same race. Sigh....

    During the Winter Olympics a few years back when a Jamaican won a medal in some sport the NBC commentator described her as being “the first African American, from any country, to win a medal”.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Broadcaster brains (which are tiny anyway) are so afraid to call blacks anything but "African-American" that they often refer to blacks with no connection to the Americas by that name. The reason they are afraid is that if they slip up and call Negroes by anything except the approved name, people will jump on them and call them racis' and get them fired. So it just comes out automatically even when they are talking about non-American blacks.
    , @Forbes
    I knew that story--NBC Sports also referred to Brit Formula 1 race car driver Lewis Hamilton as the first African American to win a Formula 1 driving championship.
  297. @Alfa158
    In the particular case of Xerox, the competence of the CEO is somewhat irrelevant. The company decided sometime ago that making things is a bad business to be in and is essentially winding itself down. They had several large buildings in the South Bay Area of LA, including a huge manufacturing plant, that are now deserted and displaying the ubiquitous "Creative spaces for lease" signs.
    If you are bulldozing a house instead of building one it doesn't matter as much whether or not you are a master craftsman. When companies are on the rise no one picks the management by affirmitive action.
  298. @SPMoore8
    The reason these names keep changing is because a word designates an object, and if an object accrues bad associations, then by re-naming the object, it is thought that you remove the bad associations. But the bad associations always come right back, because it is the object, not the word, that is creating the problem. The first person I know to point this out was Schopenhauer, 150 years ago (Section 285a in the Parerga and Paralipomena).

    All social justice re-naming (including the current jihad against "oriental") is similarly motivated and will require similar re-naming every cycle.

    There's an amusing anecdote from the Falkland Island War that recaps this: Supposedly the British troops began referring to Falkland Island natives as "Bennies", which was a way of calling them idiots, and the high command got word of this and commanded that they stop using that word. So they started calling them "NB's" with the same disparaging tone. A commander asked, "what does NB stand for?" "Not Bennies" replied the soldier.

    Yes, you see the same thing going on with the various names for the retarded and crippled, which also get changed every few years.

    Conversely, white people are always white people, or at least (according to Genius T. Coates) people who think that they are white. Though I guess the pseudo-scientific sounding Caucasian had a run and faded.

    • Agree: SPMoore8
  299. @newrouter
    >and sustainability.<

    fission nuclear power: yes or no?

    LFTR, yes!

  300. @AndrewR
    I trust the climatologists but I get why some don't.

    Which climatologists? The fellow that started The Weather Channel?

  301. @Jefferson
    "Why that’s a nice little community you’ve got there, Boulder. It’d be a shame if anything were to happen to it.

    C:\Section_8.exe
    C:\Refugee_Resettlement\Import_Kebab.ex"

    That's the same threat George Lucas used on his affluent White Marin County neighbors. He threatens them with creating Section 8 underclass diversity like it was a grenade.

    Grenade? No. Tactical nuclear weapon? Yes.

  302. @Mr. Anon
    "“Many Americans may not be aware that the word ‘Oriental’ is derogatory,” said Rep. Grace Meng of New York and one of the bill’s original sponsors."

    That's because it isn't. Yet another example of minorities trying to wield power over whites by dictating what we may and may not say - which magic words will be forbidden to us.

    And this from a people who call us gwailo and round-eye. How many times, I wonder has Grace Meng used one of these terms? Why is "oriental" derogatory but not "occidental"?

    But, times change, and one must keep up with them. From now on I will be sensitive to their concerns and only refer to them as inscruitable slope-eyed yellow asians.

    inscrutable slope-eyed yellow asians.

    Okay, I hate to admit it, but your absurdity made me laugh – just for a pico-second. But hey, I didn’t spew any liquid this time.

  303. O/T, but sort of mind boggling:

    A newly formed pro-transgender political action committee has sent out a questionnaire to each of the major 2016 presidential candidates — but only Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders has responded.

    The Trans United Fund, launched in April with the goal of building the transgender community’s political power, sent out a questionnaire to campaigns for both Hillary Clinton and Sanders. Although the Clinton campaign initially signaled it would answer the questions, the campaign has yet to return the questionnaire, the committee says.

    The 15-page questionnaire prepared for the candidates covers a range of transgender issues, seeking candidate’s positions on transgender employment as well as access to transition-related health care, education and housing.

    Why do transpeople need education and housing? I mean, anymore than anyone else?

    In his responses, Sanders affirms support for trans rights in each of these areas. Additionally, he volunteers a proposed executive order requiring all federal employees to have access to workplace facilities consistent with their gender identity and to establish an interagency working group to increase opportunities for the trans community.

    Okay, bathrooms again. How do we increase opportunities for transpeople?

    The candidate also recommits himself to fighting HIV/AIDS in response to questions on the epidemic and pledges to work to reform state HIV criminalization laws, which to varying degree penalize the transfer of HIV.

    WTF, I thought knowingly transferring a deadly infection was criminal, and it should be.

    Sanders identifies as his greatest achievement for transgender people his role in enacting the Affordable Care Act, which he says secured $11 billion to expand the network of Federally Qualified Health Centers to assist minority communities like transgender people.

    $11 B is not enough.

    But Sanders didn’t respond to all of the questions. One on whether he has employed a transgender person to work for him in a government and business context, and another on whether he supports the legalization of sex work were left unanswered.

    What does TG have to do with prostitution (sex work)? Apparently, a lot; perhaps these are the opportunities previously referred to. I was right, others were wrong: legalized prostitution is apparently next, call it WWP.

    Many of Sanders’ answers reflect his responses during an interview last year with the Washington Blade in which he promised to make transgender people visible in his administration and became the first presidential candidate to endorse openly transgender military service.

    How do you make TG’s “visible” in your administration? As for the armed services, I have my doubts.

    https://www.washingtonblade.com/2016/05/24/sanders-but-not-clinton-responds-to-trans-group-questionnaire/

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    WTF, I thought knowingly transferring a deadly infection was criminal, and it should be.

    According to this groundbreaking professor, spreading HIV is a form of "alliance" called "breeding".

    , @Grandpa Jack
    "How do you make TG’s “visible” in your administration?"
    - I think if they're there, you'll definitely know it.

    "Why do transpeople need education and housing? I mean, anymore than anyone else?"
    - What they need is a few billion spent on mandatory psychiatric counseling for them.

    "Okay, bathrooms again..."
    -What is it with these people and bathrooms? I've heard rumors of 'toilet tarts' hanging out in men's bathrooms, but if they're gays in drag, what do they get out of hanging out in women's bathrooms? Seems to me it's just the thrill of forcing others to accept them at some level.

    "A newly formed pro-transgender political action committee..."
    -I thought tranny rights were the left finally jumping the shark, but it seems like we won't get there until the president is RuPaul, and Conchita Wurst is on the Supreme Court.

  304. @Harry Baldwin
    Don't forget, Boulder is also the home of Soldier of Fortune magazine and Paladin Press, publisher of such titles as Hit Man: A Technical Manual for Independent Contractors.

    About 20? years ago, Paladin Press published a book or small series of books with titles just like Hit Man: A Technical Manual for Independent Contractors. The author had some hard ass name like colonel rock or something. But as it turned out, the books were written by some old lady!

  305. utu says:
    @Mr. Anon
    "Gamow, like Einstein, is an example of an extraordinarily brilliant physicist who was not very good at mathematics."

    In what sense was Einstein "not very good at mathematics"?

    It’s a common belief that Einstein was pretty bad in math. He always surrounded himself with a very good mathematicians whom he later never (with few exceptions) credited in his papers.

    Ludwig Hopf
    Nathan Rosen
    Walther Mayer
    Valentine Bargmann
    Bruria Kaufman
    Otto Stern
    Cornelius Lanczos
    Jakob Grommer
    Banesh Hoffman
    Herman Müntz
    Marcel Grossmann

    Some say that his wife was instrumental in his canonical 1905 paper.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "Good at math" is a relative term. I'm pretty good at it, but I suspect that Einstein was much better than me. I hadn't heard this claim before.

    "Some say that his wife was instrumental in his canonical 1905 paper."

    Which canonical 1905 paper? There were two. And neither of them involved any especially complicated math.

    Otto Stern wasn't a mathematician.

    , @RadicalCenter
    Your list suggests that the Jewish Einstein repeatedly failed to give credit to non-Jewish Germans where much credit was due. How surprising. Bigotry and invidious discrimination run in all directions, it seems.
  306. @Jack D
    In my lifetime, the politically correct term for black people has changed maybe four or five times, from colored people to Negroes to black to African-American to people of color (which is good but colored people is bad - go figure). I may have missed a couple in there - I think there may have been a short period where it was Afro-American instead of African-American. A lot of this is just shit testing for loyalty to the party line - the powers that be change the acceptable name and you have to signal your virtue and hipness by following the party line that is current this week. Maybe next week the correct term for blacks will be "sun people". If you don't follow along with this, you can be accused of being racis', not to mention "childish, passive aggressive, and effeminate". Maybe some people don't want to play this game anymore.

    At the same time, it’s important to keep the non-preferred nomenclature in the names of institutions like UNCF and NAACP as a honeypot for naive white marks who dare to utter the contents of those acronyms: http://gawker.com/5152367/msnbc-host-sorry-he-called-you-people-colored

  307. @yaqub the mad scientist
    This piece of precious prissiness is hilarious.

    I worked in Boulder 25 years ago. I was stunned at how white it was. Coming from a region with a large black population, with numerous other ethnicities represented, I had never seen anything like it. It was certainly hippiesh, but you could see it dying even then. Boulder was where whatever hippies were left in the area would go to do drug exchanges. The street vibe was already pretty yuppied (another cultural thing I was new to). And it was expensive. You could go and see the leftovers of the beat scene draw modest checks for performing/scenstering at Allan Ginsburg's Naropa Institute (subject of a hilarious takedown by poet Tom Clark in the The Great Naropa Poetry Wars) and do nice day hikes, but everything else cost a lot of money. Culturally, it was white bread liberal, with that typical veneer of exotica wrapped in a Patagonia outfit. There was absolutely nothing speaking of anything authentic or "diverse".

    A year ago, I spent a week there doing some technical training. Things had taken their course and Boulder had become the complete sterile utopia that it was heading toward, and it was as white as ever.

    This writer is so ridiculously naive, I don't know where to begin. The idea that this town represents the future is absurd. First of all, this country will soon be minority majority, and if he has the least bit of intelligence, he would know that the culture of Boulder is not their culture. A city that is 0.9% black represents the past more than anything Donald Trump represents.

    Any journalist who attempts to use a rich college town as representative of anything general about America should be automatically fired. If this town represents anything of America's future, it is white flight via high property values and zoning laws.

    Any journalist who attempts to use a rich college town as representative of anything general about America should be automatically fired.
    The idea that this town represents the future is absurd…this country will soon be minority majority, and if he has the least bit of intelligence, he would know that the culture of Boulder is not their culture. A city that is 0.9% black represents the past more than anything Donald Trump represents.

    If this town represents anything of America’s future, it is white flight via high property values and zoning laws.

    Gentrification is an economic form of ethnic cleansing. The post-Cold War history of US political economy is the elite attempt to push poorer ethnic dregs out of desirable urban locations and replace them with richer white elites (or richer ethnic elites from the RoW).

    Chicago appears to be the only city that’s holding out from this process. Which is why Ralph Emmanuel was called in to fix it. Any guy that can punch his teenage son into line can probably manage the South Side transition.

  308. OT: Peter Thiel helped Hulk Hogan fund his lawsuit???

    This Silicon Valley Billionaire Has Been Secretly Funding Hulk Hogan’s Lawsuits Against Gawker
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/ryanmac/2016/05/24/this-silicon-valley-billionaire-has-been-secretly-funding-hulk-hogans-lawsuits-against-gawker/#7bd8adaa7805

  309. @AndrewR
    This article is smug even by the Guardian's standards.

    Boulder is indeed a nice place but it's very expensive and very white. These are not unrelated phenomenon.

    I'm not really sure what the endgame for these anti-white neoleftists is. Elysium?

    "The place is booming around values and principles to which [Trump supporters] are hostile"

    Is it? As Arclight points out, Boulder can be a lovely place to live even if you don't subscribe to leftist delusions. I have many "liberal" tastes and beliefs. I am all about good food, intellectualism, open-mindedness, environmental preservation, hiking and sustainability. I am interested in other cultures. I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers. But I still like Trump, for the reasons that most Trump fans do. Could the author of this piece wrap his puny intellect around this non-contradiction?

    I have no desire to live around bible beaters or rednecks in large numbers.

    And if you actually knew anything about such people it would have occurred to you that they don’t want to live in close proximity to you, either. (or to anyone at all)

    High population density is not their thing. Even if you lived in a county of 100% bible beaters they’d never bother you a bit.

    • Replies: @Jay
    Bible beaters might never bother you, but rednecks will. You probably never owned a large piece of rural land in the forested parts of the South. I have and have dealt with several hard-case trespassers. One of whom ended his life being beaten to death by a third party.
  310. @D. K.
    One of Fox News Channel's token liberals is one of its celebrity Blacks, Juan Williams. He is actually an immigrant from Panama! Nonetheless, he is usually referred to as "African American"-- as are people like Colin Powell, whose parents were from the Caribbean. Juan Williams is actually a Black Hispanic, or an Hispanic Black, but I never have heard anyone refer to him as such.

    My problem, however, is not with immigrants who are naturalized, much less the native-born children of immigrants, being called "African American" (i.e., despite their not having any ancestors who were slaves in America). My problem is primarily with people exchanging two words with seven syllables for a single, monosyllabic word-- even though they call the majority "White" instead of "European American." In the words of 'Judas Iscariot': "It doesn't help us if you're inconsistent!"

    Actually, I find "African American" more objectionable than its mere length: It also is inaccurate, in that the natives of northern Africa are not black (negroid), and are (for the moment, at least) classified as "White or Caucasian" by the government itself. Even worse, of course, is the moronic use of "Asian" as a "racial" designator, as if Afghanis and Japanese were of the same race. Sigh....

    African American is a treadmill euphemism. When a group can’t meet societal norms they simply change their name hoping that will alleviate the stigma of belonging to the group. There is no use examining the term “African American” because it will soon fall out of favor and some other term will take its place. The New York Times now asks people, or blacks at least, how they describe themselves. In one article five people of African descent are described as black, African American, Afro Caribbean, Tunisian and Egyptian, or mother from Barbados. LINK.

    The terms idiot, imbecile, and moron changed to mentally retarded which changed to special needs and in many places is now called exceptional.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "The terms idiot, imbecile, and moron changed to mentally retarded which changed to special needs and in many places is now called exceptional."

    American exceptionalism?
    , @helena
    African American is a valid ethnic label that accurately summates geographic ancestry. Black is a colour. British West Indians have little in common with British (not quite) Somalis.

    Moving from colours to ancestry is a step forward in breaking down the speech-limits currently imposed. Breaking down speech limits will break down barriers to understanding.
  311. @SPMoore8
    O/T, but sort of mind boggling:

    A newly formed pro-transgender political action committee has sent out a questionnaire to each of the major 2016 presidential candidates — but only Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders has responded.
     

    The Trans United Fund, launched in April with the goal of building the transgender community’s political power, sent out a questionnaire to campaigns for both Hillary Clinton and Sanders. Although the Clinton campaign initially signaled it would answer the questions, the campaign has yet to return the questionnaire, the committee says.
     


    The 15-page questionnaire prepared for the candidates covers a range of transgender issues, seeking candidate’s positions on transgender employment as well as access to transition-related health care, education and housing.
     
    Why do transpeople need education and housing? I mean, anymore than anyone else?

    In his responses, Sanders affirms support for trans rights in each of these areas. Additionally, he volunteers a proposed executive order requiring all federal employees to have access to workplace facilities consistent with their gender identity and to establish an interagency working group to increase opportunities for the trans community.
     
    Okay, bathrooms again. How do we increase opportunities for transpeople?

    The candidate also recommits himself to fighting HIV/AIDS in response to questions on the epidemic and pledges to work to reform state HIV criminalization laws, which to varying degree penalize the transfer of HIV.
     
    WTF, I thought knowingly transferring a deadly infection was criminal, and it should be.

    Sanders identifies as his greatest achievement for transgender people his role in enacting the Affordable Care Act, which he says secured $11 billion to expand the network of Federally Qualified Health Centers to assist minority communities like transgender people.

     

    $11 B is not enough.

    But Sanders didn’t respond to all of the questions. One on whether he has employed a transgender person to work for him in a government and business context, and another on whether he supports the legalization of sex work were left unanswered.
     
    What does TG have to do with prostitution (sex work)? Apparently, a lot; perhaps these are the opportunities previously referred to. I was right, others were wrong: legalized prostitution is apparently next, call it WWP.

    Many of Sanders’ answers reflect his responses during an interview last year with the Washington Blade in which he promised to make transgender people visible in his administration and became the first presidential candidate to endorse openly transgender military service.
     
    How do you make TG's "visible" in your administration? As for the armed services, I have my doubts.

    https://www.washingtonblade.com/2016/05/24/sanders-but-not-clinton-responds-to-trans-group-questionnaire/

    WTF, I thought knowingly transferring a deadly infection was criminal, and it should be.

    According to this groundbreaking professor, spreading HIV is a form of “alliance” called “breeding”.

    • Agree: SPMoore8
    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
    BTW, thats's the definition of 'the poz'.
  312. 88% white, 1% black- the nightmare of no diversity, low crime, high innovation, capitalist success stories! Please, oh please, don’t throw B’rer Rabbit into that briar patch….

  313. @SPMoore8
    O/T, but sort of mind boggling:

    A newly formed pro-transgender political action committee has sent out a questionnaire to each of the major 2016 presidential candidates — but only Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders has responded.
     

    The Trans United Fund, launched in April with the goal of building the transgender community’s political power, sent out a questionnaire to campaigns for both Hillary Clinton and Sanders. Although the Clinton campaign initially signaled it would answer the questions, the campaign has yet to return the questionnaire, the committee says.
     


    The 15-page questionnaire prepared for the candidates covers a range of transgender issues, seeking candidate’s positions on transgender employment as well as access to transition-related health care, education and housing.
     
    Why do transpeople need education and housing? I mean, anymore than anyone else?

    In his responses, Sanders affirms support for trans rights in each of these areas. Additionally, he volunteers a proposed executive order requiring all federal employees to have access to workplace facilities consistent with their gender identity and to establish an interagency working group to increase opportunities for the trans community.
     
    Okay, bathrooms again. How do we increase opportunities for transpeople?

    The candidate also recommits himself to fighting HIV/AIDS in response to questions on the epidemic and pledges to work to reform state HIV criminalization laws, which to varying degree penalize the transfer of HIV.
     
    WTF, I thought knowingly transferring a deadly infection was criminal, and it should be.

    Sanders identifies as his greatest achievement for transgender people his role in enacting the Affordable Care Act, which he says secured $11 billion to expand the network of Federally Qualified Health Centers to assist minority communities like transgender people.

     

    $11 B is not enough.

    But Sanders didn’t respond to all of the questions. One on whether he has employed a transgender person to work for him in