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iSteve commenter Prime Noticer points out this amusingly self-contradictory Google result.

Yet, Google’s own cited source Wikipedia says at the link:

The current official decathlon world record holder is French Kevin Mayer, who scored a total of 9,126 points at the 2018 Décastar in France.

Mayer is another one of these track stars, like Matthew Boling, with curly blond hair.

My vague impression going back to Daley Thompson in 1980-84 is that decathlon stars tend to be either half black (e.g., Thompson, Eaton, and Bryan Clay, who is half Japanese) or tall Central Europeans.

It’s not a sport that gets a representative sample of all the best all-around athletes in America, so it’s not a pure test of Nature. Eaton, for example, grew up in a small town in Oregon, one of the last track and field crazed spots in America, so he hit the Nurture jackpot.

But decathlon results are interesting …

By the way, Eaton is an example of how first generation racial crosses sometimes look unique. NBA player Blake Griffin is another case, as is Colin Kaepernick. All three are unusual looking individuals facially.

After a few generations, mixed race individuals typically settle down to looks that strike us as conventional.

 
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  1. My guess is that their AI algorithm has been tuned very systematically to promote black people in search results and has also not got fully nailed down the relationship between “world record holder” and “date”. More recent stories are generally chosen over older ones, but the older ones can win the search pick-me contest if they are strong on some other criterion like diversitude.

  2. In 2007 the greatest athlete in the world was a Czech:

  3. Any “Kevin” that young in America is probably the child of Asian immigrants. That, and perhaps “Michelle”, is the perfect name– a little bit cool, a little bit bland.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
    Kevin Mayer is also a pretty weird name for a Froggo, but then again so is Tony Parker and the Frogs have one of those (a basketsportser, so no surprise his Dad was a Yank of the darker-hued end of the skin-but-not-race spectrum).

    I was going to cite Anthony Martin (a soccersportsball goal-minder) but on reflection both bits of the name are Froggish enough. At least he is not famous enough to crowd out Tony Martin the Kiwi comedian.

    As to Kevin as prenom: it is anachronistic up here on the top half of the planet too (i.e., Straya and Ao Tea Roa) except among the epicanthically-diverse. I have an Uncle Kevin on both sides of the family - both in their 70s - and there were a large number of footy players called Kevin in the 1970s... but the last young Kevin I am aware of was a Malaysian Chinese kid that I taught in the 90s. (The Anglicised first name is common. I have a mate whose real name is Wee Yip, but he goes by “Paul”).

    Same class had a kid who had Anglicised his name... to Edwin, but for some reason chose to keep the rest of his name intact... which was Yoo Fat Kok.

    Not a word of a lie: his graduation ceremony was a fucking débacle because all the Skip (and Wog) kids burst out laughing.

  4. Looking way down on the Wikipedia page, into the Olympics section, we find the winner in 1976 listed as “Caitlyn” Jenner.

    • Replies: @jcd1974
    Undeniably the greatest woman athlete of all time.
    , @Endgame Napoleon
    Caitlyn gave herself a youthful name, didn’t she? Caitlyn was not a popular name for the Seventies generation. It’s more of a Millennial name. Don’t you think Melissa, Angie or Carrie would have been more apropos? Ten years earlier, Janet or Kathy would have been common. Hardly any Xers have the name Caitlyn, but a lot of Millennials have it.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    We'll be in full 1984 mode when the NY Times starts revising its archives to say "Caitlyn".
  5. You are right, but one of your readers has fixed it for you, although the picture still does not match the truth.

  6. It’s not a sport that gets a representative sample of all the best all-around athletes in America, so it’s not a pure test of Nature.

    Eaton, for example, grew up in a small town in Oregon, one of the last track and field crazed spots in America, so he hit the Nurture jackpot.

    Decathlon is not a pure test of Nature – for example this gal hit the Decameron Jackpot of Nurture:

    • Replies: @SFG
    There's probably some weird thing that happens to some high-T guys as they age--the stuff gets turned into estrogen or something. (Testosterone is actually a precursor used to synthesize estrogen so that's my best guess.)

    The comments to his old Wheaties ads are pretty funny though.
  7. Anon[234] • Disclaimer says:

    Some answers from Quora, the world’s most unreliable source:

    How is it possible that some Caucasian people have very curly hair?
    https://www.quora.com/How-is-it-possible-that-some-Caucasian-people-have-very-curly-hair

    whether you like it or not, curly, afro types of hair are a very distinctive mark of african race descent, wether it’s two generations behind you or 10. Gene recessiveness and dominance determines when this characteristics will show up on heritage but they, nonetheless, mean that at SOME point an african person made part of your descendence.

    The genetics of hair shape in Caucasians still isn’t very well known. Asians are generally more well studied, but we do have some findings for Caucasians. In the following studies, the hair is split into three classes; straight, wavy, curly. Wavy is between curly and straight. A study found people of European ancestry is distributed like this; 45% straight hair, 40% wavy hair, and 15% curly hair. Apparently, for Caucasians, Trichohyalin gene (TCHH) has an effect on the curliness of the hair but it only counts for 6% of variation of the trait.

    especially in the South in the US, people don’t like to talk about it, but a lot of the ‘Caucasians’ have “Afro-American” ancestors. But after a few generations, the skin is no longer dark, but other traits still pop up, such as curly hair, broad nose, uneven skin pigmentation (I forget the exact name for this genetic condition), big thick lips

    From a Jewish woman’s website:

    What is Jewish hair?
    https://jwa.org/blog/jewish-hair

    “Jewish hair” is a tricky thing to define, since Judaism can include people from any racial or ethnic background. And while Jews are known to have a variety of haircolors, as well as levels of curliness, “Jewish hair” seems to refer to dark, curly, and often frizzy, hair.

    • Replies: @anon

    whether you like it or not, curly, afro types of hair are a very distinctive mark of african race descent, wether it’s two generations behind you or 10. Gene recessiveness and dominance determines when this characteristics will show up on heritage but they
     
    i notice that africans seem to take pleasure in the idea that some of their genes are DOMINANT

    wonder if sickle cell is dominant
    , @Fabian Forge
    Back in school in the 70's we all, Jews and goyim alike, referred to "Jewish hair" as a "Hebro". But this was a boy's school so I guess we were less delicate.
    , @Rohirrimborn
    Some people are more sensitive to hair characteristics than most. Barbers obviously are part of those some people. I knew an African-American man who says that the first time he went to his barber in Oakland CA that the barber knew he was from East Texas by his hair. My Irish grandparents, aunts and uncles, born in the 1880s, claim they could identify Irish protestants by their hair which they called "presbyterian hair".
    , @James Braxton
    Or maybe it means you are descended from Marcus Aurelius.
  8. During last week’s NFL draft I noticed that a disproportionate number of the black players selected were actually mixed, with a white mother and a black father.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    Or was that all the commercials?
    , @Puerh
    Same in NBA. I suspect it is both a nature and a nurture effect. A white mom/having more white genes indicates a higher social status (for instance, many children of NBA players have white or lightskinned moms.)

    But there might also be physical advantages related to coordination. Blacks tend to have better full-body coordination for large, forceful movement patterns, and whites better coordination for precise, controlled movements. (For example, think of white vs black forms of dance, or white vs black American football positions.) Perhaps having both genes is helpful to, say, Steph Curry's jumpshot.

    Somewhat paradoxically, many of the "bounciest" leapers in the NBA are very lightskinned blacks, including recent dunk contestants Aaron Gordon, Zach LaVine, snd Larry Nance Jr, and the lighthaired All-Star Blake Griffin.
    , @Tiny Duck
    Most white girls find Black Men irresistible for obvious reasons
    , @Craig Nelsen
    In his short story, Benito Cereno, Melville warns us that the "mulatto" has "the Devil in him".
  9. Best explanation is that the Google crawler bot managed to catch the Wikipedia page in the middle of being edited, since 2018 was last year. Google just hasn’t indexed the very latest version.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Wikipedia was presumably updated in September 2018 when the world record was set. Google only crawls every 7 months?
  10. @Buzz Mohawk
    Looking way down on the Wikipedia page, into the Olympics section, we find the winner in 1976 listed as "Caitlyn" Jenner.

    Undeniably the greatest woman athlete of all time.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @jon
    Before the wikipedia mods locked the page, I remember some editor had fun listing all of the individual female olympic and world records that Jenner broke during his gold medal performance.
    , @BB753
    And a brave and beautiful woman, don't forget!
  11. A Frenchman named Kevin. Even if you don’t know anything else about him you could guess his age with a high degree of confidence.

    • Agree: Endgame Napoleon
    • Replies: @Puerh
    Is there any particular reason the French were giving their sons this Scottish name (avec l'accent aigu?)
  12. @GSH
    Best explanation is that the Google crawler bot managed to catch the Wikipedia page in the middle of being edited, since 2018 was last year. Google just hasn't indexed the very latest version.

    Wikipedia was presumably updated in September 2018 when the world record was set. Google only crawls every 7 months?

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    Google only crawls every 7 months?
     
    Don't ask - it is a state secret.
    , @Anon
    If you dig back on the Edit page, where each and every change to the page is archived (version control), you'll find, for instance, this version where the introductory summary does not match the infobox.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Decathlon&oldid=859838833

    Google probably gets some data for their infoboxes from parts of pages that are marked up with microformats, or structured data. This is a way that crawlers can easily understand stuff like ratings or recipes, using a standardized markup format, embedded in the HTML. (Google has changed their preferred structured data system multiple times, resulting in probably billions of hours unpayed of work--not to mention "emotional labor"--on the part of developers to change their sites.)

    For pulling data from the article text itself, that's more of an AI problem. I could see Google batch downloading the Wikipedia full text from time to time and running the whole thing offline, so it wouldn't necessarily be updated in real time like structure data. A lot of stuff in information retrieval has tradititonally be done with offline batch processing (like "people looking for this also looked for x" type features).

    If you page through the Wikipedia Edit page edits, you'll see that the phrasing and organization on the non-infobox introtuctory text has changed, as you would expect with human editing, and scraping algorithms are hand-maintained to a certain extent.

    , @bossel
    One of your right-wing fanboys probably edited the Wikipedia page, waited for the Google crawler to catch it, made a screenshot & sent it to you:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Decathlon&type=revision&diff=894796447&oldid=894674932

    & you obviously fell for it, blinded by your obsession with skin colour.
    , @The Alarmist
    Google are too busy tracking everybody's movement and reading their mail to actually index information all that frequently.
  13. Who controls the initial search results,
    controls the information for the vast majority of useless eaters, who do not care about understanding what they read and will never click past that first paragraph.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    Yes, and BTW Bing is no better than Google. Fun to play with for a few minutes, perhaps. Type in "annoying black people" or "annoying jews" and the results are full of "why are white people always annoying black people/jews" and so on.

    Um, I needed the results for a photo essay ;)

  14. @jcd1974
    During last week's NFL draft I noticed that a disproportionate number of the black players selected were actually mixed, with a white mother and a black father.

    Or was that all the commercials?

  15. The funny thing is that Kevin Mayer didn’t just beat Ashton Eaton’s record, he smashed it 9126-9045 for an 81-point improvement. For comparison, Eaton only improved the previous record of Roman Šebrle (a Czech) in 2001 by 19 points.

    Mayer posted this video where he recounts his record, event by event. Eaton was the best runner in decathlon ever, but Mayer is much better at the throws and the pole vault (a French specialty.)

    If Mayer were American, I would expect him to get lots of press leading up to the Olympics. He is handsome and presents himself well.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    Yeah but does he like Beyonce?
  16. @Steve Sailer
    Wikipedia was presumably updated in September 2018 when the world record was set. Google only crawls every 7 months?

    Google only crawls every 7 months?

    Don’t ask – it is a state secret.

  17. dan o’brien also mulatto.

    probably one of the only instances of actual hybrid vigor. seems to give them more upper body strength for throwing and more endurance for 1500 running. otherwise, not really a combination of abilities you’d see.

    for the ultimate in this, check out strength athlete larry wheels, who is freakishly powerful in upper body pressing and grip strength for a guy his size.

  18. anon[383] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    Some answers from Quora, the world's most unreliable source:

    How is it possible that some Caucasian people have very curly hair?
    https://www.quora.com/How-is-it-possible-that-some-Caucasian-people-have-very-curly-hair


    whether you like it or not, curly, afro types of hair are a very distinctive mark of african race descent, wether it’s two generations behind you or 10. Gene recessiveness and dominance determines when this characteristics will show up on heritage but they, nonetheless, mean that at SOME point an african person made part of your descendence.
     

    The genetics of hair shape in Caucasians still isn’t very well known. Asians are generally more well studied, but we do have some findings for Caucasians. In the following studies, the hair is split into three classes; straight, wavy, curly. Wavy is between curly and straight. A study found people of European ancestry is distributed like this; 45% straight hair, 40% wavy hair, and 15% curly hair. Apparently, for Caucasians, Trichohyalin gene (TCHH) has an effect on the curliness of the hair but it only counts for 6% of variation of the trait.
     

    especially in the South in the US, people don't like to talk about it, but a lot of the 'Caucasians' have "Afro-American" ancestors. But after a few generations, the skin is no longer dark, but other traits still pop up, such as curly hair, broad nose, uneven skin pigmentation (I forget the exact name for this genetic condition), big thick lips
     

    From a Jewish woman's website:

    What is Jewish hair?
    https://jwa.org/blog/jewish-hair

    "Jewish hair" is a tricky thing to define, since Judaism can include people from any racial or ethnic background. And while Jews are known to have a variety of haircolors, as well as levels of curliness, "Jewish hair" seems to refer to dark, curly, and often frizzy, hair.

    whether you like it or not, curly, afro types of hair are a very distinctive mark of african race descent, wether it’s two generations behind you or 10. Gene recessiveness and dominance determines when this characteristics will show up on heritage but they

    i notice that africans seem to take pleasure in the idea that some of their genes are DOMINANT

    wonder if sickle cell is dominant

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    If you take a shit in a bowl of punch, you still have a bowl of punch, but the shit tends to dominate the punch.
    , @Mr McKenna

    whether you like it or not
     
    Therefore! Garfunkel had much more African genes than Simon, which makes sense since Garfunkel was the performing talent and Simon the writing talent. Writing--the part which actually involves creating something of value.

    https://www.insidehook.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Simon-and-Garfunkel-1_1200-e1471890404295-1.jpg

    And after (and even before) they split, Simon had a much better time of it performing than Garfunkel did writing. Genes will tell, huh?
    , @Anonymous
    This is absolute farce. Unless of course you mean homo sapiens arose in Africa.

    The curly haired people common in the fjords of Norway, areas that have often never been seen by an African, let alone had occasion to intermarry with its indigenous people.
  19. @inertial
    A Frenchman named Kevin. Even if you don't know anything else about him you could guess his age with a high degree of confidence.

    https://twitter.com/phl43/status/1005419342320807936

    Is there any particular reason the French were giving their sons this Scottish name (avec l’accent aigu?)

    • Replies: @Horzabky
    "Kevin", usually without an acute accent, is distinctly banlieue here in France. If your first name is Kevin, it means that you grew up in a lousy apartment in a crime-plagued, majority Black and Arab neighborhood, and your parents chose your name from American series, television being their only culture. You understand now why the name quickly fell out of favor.

    I remember reading an article, in the French press, which said that in France people with the first name Kevin are less successful in life than people with more traditionally French first names.

    In France, Kevin is pronounced more or less as in English, not with a nasalized final vowel, as a French word similarly spelled would be pronounced.

    I've known one Kevin. He was the son of the Hindu Mauritian father and a half Algerian, half French mother. He was born and grew up in the banlieue where I live, and he had some run-ins with the law.
    , @Cortes
    Irish name:

    https://www.behindthename.com/name/kevin

    Blame media coverage of Hollywood. Costner and others. Somewhere there’s a group of agents betting on the name generation popularity five years down the line of the cohort of “stars” in today’s media in various markets/countries. The lower the parents are in the socioeconomic scale, the higher the likelihood of naming the kids after royalty or celebrity. (Brazil has a habit of naming after genuinely eminent people - Nelson, Emerson and Edison, for example - and other Latin American countries go down the political route, like the guy who sold out Assange, one Lenin Boltaire (some’ll geddit) Correa).

    Now, remember: it’s wicked to mock the afflicted:

    https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/names/babies-first-names

    , @TTSSYF
    Probably for the same reason a lot of Americans were naming their daughters Kaitlyn, Caitlin, Katlin, etc., 20-30 years ago.
  20. Anon[234] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Wikipedia was presumably updated in September 2018 when the world record was set. Google only crawls every 7 months?

    If you dig back on the Edit page, where each and every change to the page is archived (version control), you’ll find, for instance, this version where the introductory summary does not match the infobox.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Decathlon&oldid=859838833

    Google probably gets some data for their infoboxes from parts of pages that are marked up with microformats, or structured data. This is a way that crawlers can easily understand stuff like ratings or recipes, using a standardized markup format, embedded in the HTML. (Google has changed their preferred structured data system multiple times, resulting in probably billions of hours unpayed of work–not to mention “emotional labor”–on the part of developers to change their sites.)

    For pulling data from the article text itself, that’s more of an AI problem. I could see Google batch downloading the Wikipedia full text from time to time and running the whole thing offline, so it wouldn’t necessarily be updated in real time like structure data. A lot of stuff in information retrieval has tradititonally be done with offline batch processing (like “people looking for this also looked for x” type features).

    If you page through the Wikipedia Edit page edits, you’ll see that the phrasing and organization on the non-infobox introtuctory text has changed, as you would expect with human editing, and scraping algorithms are hand-maintained to a certain extent.

  21. @Buzz Mohawk
    Looking way down on the Wikipedia page, into the Olympics section, we find the winner in 1976 listed as "Caitlyn" Jenner.

    Caitlyn gave herself a youthful name, didn’t she? Caitlyn was not a popular name for the Seventies generation. It’s more of a Millennial name. Don’t you think Melissa, Angie or Carrie would have been more apropos? Ten years earlier, Janet or Kathy would have been common. Hardly any Xers have the name Caitlyn, but a lot of Millennials have it.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Jennifer was a nice name in the Seventies. I had a crush in high school then on a Jenny.

    Jennifer Jenner would have been apropos. Jenny Jenner.
    , @Pericles

    Caitlyn gave herself a youthful name, didn’t she? Caitlyn was not a popular name for the Seventies generation.

     

    But Caitlyn isn't old and busted! No, no, not yet. Caitlyn is young, and attractive, and free! Young!
  22. @bored identity



    It’s not a sport that gets a representative sample of all the best all-around athletes in America, so it’s not a pure test of Nature.

    Eaton, for example, grew up in a small town in Oregon, one of the last track and field crazed spots in America, so he hit the Nurture jackpot.


    https://media.aws.iaaf.org/media/Medium/e2646e2a-8782-4f8f-a687-2e1d403d07ae.png?v=1214127401

     

    Decathlon is not a pure test of Nature - for example this gal hit the Decameron Jackpot of Nurture:


    https://cdn-s3.si.com/images/1976-0730-Bruce-Jenner-Decathlon-gold-medal-090002593.jpg

    There’s probably some weird thing that happens to some high-T guys as they age–the stuff gets turned into estrogen or something. (Testosterone is actually a precursor used to synthesize estrogen so that’s my best guess.)

    The comments to his old Wheaties ads are pretty funny though.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    According to his ex-wife (Linda Thompson), Jenner had odd sexual fetishes (cross-dressing, etc.) even when he was married to her. Apparently, he has been advised by his doctors to not have a lopadickoffofme, so instead puts his sexual fetish and mental illness on full public display by parading around in women's clothes and calling himself Caitlyn while his package remains intact; i.e., he remains a man, with every cell in his body screaming "XY". The only thing more ridiculous than his disfiguring his face and indulging his exhibitionism is that the public gives him even one minute's worth of time and the media give him (yes, him) "courage" awards.
    , @reiner Tor

    some high-T guys
     
    Probably some of their high-T levels were artificially enhanced. This might have had strange effects on their hormone levels in older age.
  23. @J.Ross
    Who controls the initial search results,
    controls the information for the vast majority of useless eaters, who do not care about understanding what they read and will never click past that first paragraph.

    Yes, and BTW Bing is no better than Google. Fun to play with for a few minutes, perhaps. Type in “annoying black people” or “annoying jews” and the results are full of “why are white people always annoying black people/jews” and so on.

    Um, I needed the results for a photo essay 😉

  24. @Puerh
    Is there any particular reason the French were giving their sons this Scottish name (avec l'accent aigu?)

    “Kevin”, usually without an acute accent, is distinctly banlieue here in France. If your first name is Kevin, it means that you grew up in a lousy apartment in a crime-plagued, majority Black and Arab neighborhood, and your parents chose your name from American series, television being their only culture. You understand now why the name quickly fell out of favor.

    I remember reading an article, in the French press, which said that in France people with the first name Kevin are less successful in life than people with more traditionally French first names.

    In France, Kevin is pronounced more or less as in English, not with a nasalized final vowel, as a French word similarly spelled would be pronounced.

    I’ve known one Kevin. He was the son of the Hindu Mauritian father and a half Algerian, half French mother. He was born and grew up in the banlieue where I live, and he had some run-ins with the law.

    • Replies: @whahae
    In Germany "Kevin" is a stereotypical white underclass name often associated with East Germany. I even read similar articles in Germany about how the name Kevin is associated with less sucess in education (quote from a teacher from the linked article "Kevin is not a name - it's a diagnosis")
    , @nebulafox
    Germany is exactly the same. You don't see burghers naming their kids Kevin. At all. The educated will give their children either traditional German (Wilhelm, Friedrich, Horst) or classical/Biblical (Alexander, Peter, Maria) names.

    The local equivalent to white trash.... well, "Cindy From Marzahn" has her name for a reason.

    , @Ola
    Exactly the same in Sweden. Names like Kevin have replaced the traditional "y-names" (Conny, Johnny, Sonny etc.) as a marker of white underclass.
    , @stillCARealist
    Why on earth are non-English speaking countries giving their kids English names? Nobody here calls his kid Etienne or Pierre, or whatever. It's Steven and Peter.
  25. @anon

    whether you like it or not, curly, afro types of hair are a very distinctive mark of african race descent, wether it’s two generations behind you or 10. Gene recessiveness and dominance determines when this characteristics will show up on heritage but they
     
    i notice that africans seem to take pleasure in the idea that some of their genes are DOMINANT

    wonder if sickle cell is dominant

    If you take a shit in a bowl of punch, you still have a bowl of punch, but the shit tends to dominate the punch.

    • LOL: jon, Redneck farmer
  26. @Endgame Napoleon
    Caitlyn gave herself a youthful name, didn’t she? Caitlyn was not a popular name for the Seventies generation. It’s more of a Millennial name. Don’t you think Melissa, Angie or Carrie would have been more apropos? Ten years earlier, Janet or Kathy would have been common. Hardly any Xers have the name Caitlyn, but a lot of Millennials have it.

    Jennifer was a nice name in the Seventies. I had a crush in high school then on a Jenny.

    Jennifer Jenner would have been apropos. Jenny Jenner.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Jenny Jenny who can I turn to
    You give me something I can hold on to
    I know you'll think I'm like the others before

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qc5u9NOV4sE
  27. @Anon
    Some answers from Quora, the world's most unreliable source:

    How is it possible that some Caucasian people have very curly hair?
    https://www.quora.com/How-is-it-possible-that-some-Caucasian-people-have-very-curly-hair


    whether you like it or not, curly, afro types of hair are a very distinctive mark of african race descent, wether it’s two generations behind you or 10. Gene recessiveness and dominance determines when this characteristics will show up on heritage but they, nonetheless, mean that at SOME point an african person made part of your descendence.
     

    The genetics of hair shape in Caucasians still isn’t very well known. Asians are generally more well studied, but we do have some findings for Caucasians. In the following studies, the hair is split into three classes; straight, wavy, curly. Wavy is between curly and straight. A study found people of European ancestry is distributed like this; 45% straight hair, 40% wavy hair, and 15% curly hair. Apparently, for Caucasians, Trichohyalin gene (TCHH) has an effect on the curliness of the hair but it only counts for 6% of variation of the trait.
     

    especially in the South in the US, people don't like to talk about it, but a lot of the 'Caucasians' have "Afro-American" ancestors. But after a few generations, the skin is no longer dark, but other traits still pop up, such as curly hair, broad nose, uneven skin pigmentation (I forget the exact name for this genetic condition), big thick lips
     

    From a Jewish woman's website:

    What is Jewish hair?
    https://jwa.org/blog/jewish-hair

    "Jewish hair" is a tricky thing to define, since Judaism can include people from any racial or ethnic background. And while Jews are known to have a variety of haircolors, as well as levels of curliness, "Jewish hair" seems to refer to dark, curly, and often frizzy, hair.

    Back in school in the 70’s we all, Jews and goyim alike, referred to “Jewish hair” as a “Hebro”. But this was a boy’s school so I guess we were less delicate.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    The term we used was "Jew-fro."
  28. @jcd1974
    During last week's NFL draft I noticed that a disproportionate number of the black players selected were actually mixed, with a white mother and a black father.

    Same in NBA. I suspect it is both a nature and a nurture effect. A white mom/having more white genes indicates a higher social status (for instance, many children of NBA players have white or lightskinned moms.)

    But there might also be physical advantages related to coordination. Blacks tend to have better full-body coordination for large, forceful movement patterns, and whites better coordination for precise, controlled movements. (For example, think of white vs black forms of dance, or white vs black American football positions.) Perhaps having both genes is helpful to, say, Steph Curry’s jumpshot.

    Somewhat paradoxically, many of the “bounciest” leapers in the NBA are very lightskinned blacks, including recent dunk contestants Aaron Gordon, Zach LaVine, snd Larry Nance Jr, and the lighthaired All-Star Blake Griffin.

  29. @anon

    whether you like it or not, curly, afro types of hair are a very distinctive mark of african race descent, wether it’s two generations behind you or 10. Gene recessiveness and dominance determines when this characteristics will show up on heritage but they
     
    i notice that africans seem to take pleasure in the idea that some of their genes are DOMINANT

    wonder if sickle cell is dominant

    whether you like it or not

    Therefore! Garfunkel had much more African genes than Simon, which makes sense since Garfunkel was the performing talent and Simon the writing talent. Writing–the part which actually involves creating something of value.

    And after (and even before) they split, Simon had a much better time of it performing than Garfunkel did writing. Genes will tell, huh?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Garfunkel was incensed at Sinatra's take on "Mrs. Robinson":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tp1SjhY_1j4

    It's backhanded swipe at Joe D as well. He and Sinatra were never friends after the "Wrong Door Raid", and Joe kept Frank out of Marilyn Monroe's funeral which Frank never forgave him for.
    , @PiltdownMan
    I went to an Art Garfunkel concert in the late 1990s. He was still very, very good.
    , @Eddie Collins
    Garfunkel had the better voice. And clearly had more brains (Simon studied English at Queens College and Garfunkel studied art history & math at Columbia w/ masters in math education from Columbia Teachers College).

    I saw Garfunkel in person in 2007 in Washington, D.C. He was coming out of a bathroom at Reagan National Airport and was wearing a “I’d Rather Be Fishing” baseball cap. He and his son were hustling to make a U.S. Airways flight (shuttle to LaGuardia).
    , @anon
    Paul Simon was accused of stealing songs from Los Lobos and also the Africans who helped on one of his albums
  30. @Steve Sailer
    Wikipedia was presumably updated in September 2018 when the world record was set. Google only crawls every 7 months?

    One of your right-wing fanboys probably edited the Wikipedia page, waited for the Google crawler to catch it, made a screenshot & sent it to you:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Decathlon&type=revision&diff=894796447&oldid=894674932

    & you obviously fell for it, blinded by your obsession with skin colour.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    Occam at work again.
    , @bomag

    ...your obsession with skin colour
     
    J'accuse
  31. @Horzabky
    "Kevin", usually without an acute accent, is distinctly banlieue here in France. If your first name is Kevin, it means that you grew up in a lousy apartment in a crime-plagued, majority Black and Arab neighborhood, and your parents chose your name from American series, television being their only culture. You understand now why the name quickly fell out of favor.

    I remember reading an article, in the French press, which said that in France people with the first name Kevin are less successful in life than people with more traditionally French first names.

    In France, Kevin is pronounced more or less as in English, not with a nasalized final vowel, as a French word similarly spelled would be pronounced.

    I've known one Kevin. He was the son of the Hindu Mauritian father and a half Algerian, half French mother. He was born and grew up in the banlieue where I live, and he had some run-ins with the law.

    In Germany “Kevin” is a stereotypical white underclass name often associated with East Germany. I even read similar articles in Germany about how the name Kevin is associated with less sucess in education (quote from a teacher from the linked article “Kevin is not a name – it’s a diagnosis”)

    • Replies: @Zephram

    “Kevin is not a name – it’s a diagnosis”
     
    The same could be said of "Jabari," "Verdell," or "Shaqueequee".
    , @jimmyriddle
    Lol. No wonder Irish bourgeois parents have taken to spelling it "Caoimhin".

    I wonder whether Kevin Kegan popularised it in Germany? He had a successful stint at Hamburg, and apparently spoke pretty decent German.

    Seems a likelier candidate than some Irish saint who used to sail around on tombstones IIRC.

    , @Anonymouse
    >Kevin is not a name – it’s a diagnosis

    Like Wayne?
    , @Lurker
    Kevin is a pretty unproblematic name in the UK. Originally celtic/Irish it seems to have spread to the wider population. I'm not aware of any negative associations. However it's now become dated, Few under-40s would have it as a name.
  32. @Puerh
    Is there any particular reason the French were giving their sons this Scottish name (avec l'accent aigu?)

    Irish name:

    https://www.behindthename.com/name/kevin

    Blame media coverage of Hollywood. Costner and others. Somewhere there’s a group of agents betting on the name generation popularity five years down the line of the cohort of “stars” in today’s media in various markets/countries. The lower the parents are in the socioeconomic scale, the higher the likelihood of naming the kids after royalty or celebrity. (Brazil has a habit of naming after genuinely eminent people – Nelson, Emerson and Edison, for example – and other Latin American countries go down the political route, like the guy who sold out Assange, one Lenin Boltaire (some’ll geddit) Correa).

    Now, remember: it’s wicked to mock the afflicted:

    https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/names/babies-first-names

    • Replies: @Cortes
    Should’ve been more specific: check out Table 4.
    , @anon
    "The lower the parents are in the socioeconomic scale, the higher the likelihood of naming the kids after royalty or celebrity."

    Someone -- Paul Fussell? -- noted that black folks like to give names or nicknames like Duke, Prince, King, which actual White aristos give to their dogs. Don't know if Earl counts.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Brazil has a habit of naming after genuinely eminent people – Nelson, Emerson and Edison, for example
     
    Yeah, but what about Edson and <a href="Ayrton? Maybe they just like the British sound.
  33. @Buzz Mohawk
    Looking way down on the Wikipedia page, into the Olympics section, we find the winner in 1976 listed as "Caitlyn" Jenner.

    We’ll be in full 1984 mode when the NY Times starts revising its archives to say “Caitlyn”.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    Someone should suggest it to them.
  34. Google James Harries for the curly-blonde / high-IQ-trans jackpot.

  35. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr McKenna

    whether you like it or not
     
    Therefore! Garfunkel had much more African genes than Simon, which makes sense since Garfunkel was the performing talent and Simon the writing talent. Writing--the part which actually involves creating something of value.

    https://www.insidehook.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Simon-and-Garfunkel-1_1200-e1471890404295-1.jpg

    And after (and even before) they split, Simon had a much better time of it performing than Garfunkel did writing. Genes will tell, huh?

    Garfunkel was incensed at Sinatra’s take on “Mrs. Robinson”:

    It’s backhanded swipe at Joe D as well. He and Sinatra were never friends after the “Wrong Door Raid”, and Joe kept Frank out of Marilyn Monroe’s funeral which Frank never forgave him for.

  36. The title of world’s greatest athlete should be determined in a different type of event.

    Every athlete who qualifies for the Olympics should be alllowed to compete in any event. Points should be awarded based on a performance’s distance from the event’s Gold Medal performance. The point threshold could be determined by the event’s qualifying standard or the performances of the other athletes who qualified in that event. Performances above the threshold would add points while performances below would subtract points. Additional bonus points could be added for event’s distance from the athlete’s main event.

    So, a great all-round athlete who could compete at the Olympic level in a large number of sports would garner the most total points and be the “world’s greatest athlete”. Competing in more events would add more points, but only if the performances were at a high level, and competing in, say, marathon and wrestling would garner more points than competing in, say, marathon and cycling.

    Otherwise, they should drop strict -athlon events in favor of thematic ones. Modern pentathlon would be the model: for example, Iliadic triathlon could combine javelin, sprinting, and wrestling; etc

  37. @jcd1974
    Undeniably the greatest woman athlete of all time.

    Before the wikipedia mods locked the page, I remember some editor had fun listing all of the individual female olympic and world records that Jenner broke during his gold medal performance.

  38. The Japanese sprinter Abdul Hakim Sani Brown caught my eye when looking up Christophe Lemaitre.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdul_Hakim_Sani_Brown

  39. @Cortes
    Irish name:

    https://www.behindthename.com/name/kevin

    Blame media coverage of Hollywood. Costner and others. Somewhere there’s a group of agents betting on the name generation popularity five years down the line of the cohort of “stars” in today’s media in various markets/countries. The lower the parents are in the socioeconomic scale, the higher the likelihood of naming the kids after royalty or celebrity. (Brazil has a habit of naming after genuinely eminent people - Nelson, Emerson and Edison, for example - and other Latin American countries go down the political route, like the guy who sold out Assange, one Lenin Boltaire (some’ll geddit) Correa).

    Now, remember: it’s wicked to mock the afflicted:

    https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/names/babies-first-names

    Should’ve been more specific: check out Table 4.

  40. @whahae
    In Germany "Kevin" is a stereotypical white underclass name often associated with East Germany. I even read similar articles in Germany about how the name Kevin is associated with less sucess in education (quote from a teacher from the linked article "Kevin is not a name - it's a diagnosis")

    “Kevin is not a name – it’s a diagnosis”

    The same could be said of “Jabari,” “Verdell,” or “Shaqueequee”.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    Yeah, that's right. "Kevin" and "Cindy" are just like "Jabari" or "Shaqueequee."
  41. Doesn’t Bruce Caitlyn Jenner get any diversity points to make him her it the greatest, all-time Decathlete?

  42. @Steve Sailer
    Wikipedia was presumably updated in September 2018 when the world record was set. Google only crawls every 7 months?

    Google are too busy tracking everybody’s movement and reading their mail to actually index information all that frequently.

  43. OT: are there any happy heterosexual couples where the woman is the strong provider and the man is the nurturing second? how does that work in the bedroom?

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    Yes, I've seen several. In each case it was due to the man having a severe physical problem that developed after years of marriage. The wives were very adept at getting and keeping good jobs that brought both health insurance and income.

    This is an argument for women getting both higher education and a viable career. There are no guarantees in life.
  44. @Horzabky
    "Kevin", usually without an acute accent, is distinctly banlieue here in France. If your first name is Kevin, it means that you grew up in a lousy apartment in a crime-plagued, majority Black and Arab neighborhood, and your parents chose your name from American series, television being their only culture. You understand now why the name quickly fell out of favor.

    I remember reading an article, in the French press, which said that in France people with the first name Kevin are less successful in life than people with more traditionally French first names.

    In France, Kevin is pronounced more or less as in English, not with a nasalized final vowel, as a French word similarly spelled would be pronounced.

    I've known one Kevin. He was the son of the Hindu Mauritian father and a half Algerian, half French mother. He was born and grew up in the banlieue where I live, and he had some run-ins with the law.

    Germany is exactly the same. You don’t see burghers naming their kids Kevin. At all. The educated will give their children either traditional German (Wilhelm, Friedrich, Horst) or classical/Biblical (Alexander, Peter, Maria) names.

    The local equivalent to white trash…. well, “Cindy From Marzahn” has her name for a reason.

  45. @Mr McKenna

    whether you like it or not
     
    Therefore! Garfunkel had much more African genes than Simon, which makes sense since Garfunkel was the performing talent and Simon the writing talent. Writing--the part which actually involves creating something of value.

    https://www.insidehook.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Simon-and-Garfunkel-1_1200-e1471890404295-1.jpg

    And after (and even before) they split, Simon had a much better time of it performing than Garfunkel did writing. Genes will tell, huh?

    I went to an Art Garfunkel concert in the late 1990s. He was still very, very good.

  46. @whahae
    In Germany "Kevin" is a stereotypical white underclass name often associated with East Germany. I even read similar articles in Germany about how the name Kevin is associated with less sucess in education (quote from a teacher from the linked article "Kevin is not a name - it's a diagnosis")

    Lol. No wonder Irish bourgeois parents have taken to spelling it “Caoimhin”.

    I wonder whether Kevin Kegan popularised it in Germany? He had a successful stint at Hamburg, and apparently spoke pretty decent German.

    Seems a likelier candidate than some Irish saint who used to sail around on tombstones IIRC.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    Agreed.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_Kurányi

    is a bullseye for Keegan’s spell in Germany and maybe the Belgian superstar De Bruyne is named after him too. The Table 4 entries I linked to earlier definitely support the use of sports stars’ names (surnames as well as lead names) as models among the hoi polloi. The Norse Gods are also well represented - imagine having little Odin in your class of 7-year-olds and he threw a tantrum - and there’s even a Zeus.
  47. In Negro America Sean is spelled and pronounced Shaun. Surprisingly enough, just the way Sean is pronounced in Ireland!

    • Replies: @James Braxton
    They actually pronounce it as "Shun"
    , @Anonymous
    You get DeShawns, ReShawn, Le Shawn.

    Every version of Sean around.

    Just means John, Johan, Jean, Juan
  48. @Endgame Napoleon
    Caitlyn gave herself a youthful name, didn’t she? Caitlyn was not a popular name for the Seventies generation. It’s more of a Millennial name. Don’t you think Melissa, Angie or Carrie would have been more apropos? Ten years earlier, Janet or Kathy would have been common. Hardly any Xers have the name Caitlyn, but a lot of Millennials have it.

    Caitlyn gave herself a youthful name, didn’t she? Caitlyn was not a popular name for the Seventies generation.

    But Caitlyn isn’t old and busted! No, no, not yet. Caitlyn is young, and attractive, and free! Young!

  49. @bossel
    One of your right-wing fanboys probably edited the Wikipedia page, waited for the Google crawler to catch it, made a screenshot & sent it to you:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Decathlon&type=revision&diff=894796447&oldid=894674932

    & you obviously fell for it, blinded by your obsession with skin colour.

    Occam at work again.

  50. @Chrisnonymous
    We'll be in full 1984 mode when the NY Times starts revising its archives to say "Caitlyn".

    Someone should suggest it to them.

  51. @Fabian Forge
    Back in school in the 70's we all, Jews and goyim alike, referred to "Jewish hair" as a "Hebro". But this was a boy's school so I guess we were less delicate.

    The term we used was “Jew-fro.”

    • Agree: jon
    • Replies: @Flip
    I remember “Isro.”
  52. @SFG
    There's probably some weird thing that happens to some high-T guys as they age--the stuff gets turned into estrogen or something. (Testosterone is actually a precursor used to synthesize estrogen so that's my best guess.)

    The comments to his old Wheaties ads are pretty funny though.

    According to his ex-wife (Linda Thompson), Jenner had odd sexual fetishes (cross-dressing, etc.) even when he was married to her. Apparently, he has been advised by his doctors to not have a lopadickoffofme, so instead puts his sexual fetish and mental illness on full public display by parading around in women’s clothes and calling himself Caitlyn while his package remains intact; i.e., he remains a man, with every cell in his body screaming “XY”. The only thing more ridiculous than his disfiguring his face and indulging his exhibitionism is that the public gives him even one minute’s worth of time and the media give him (yes, him) “courage” awards.

    • Agree: 95Theses
    • Replies: @Lurker
    In other worfds - LARPing like most other trannies.
    , @J.Ross
    I should have thought of this when Steve first put forward the "autistic power play" theory of tranny jerkitude, but there's a scene in I, Claudius where Caligula, who has not yet established his reputation, is admiring a statue of Venus with a senator and mentions a blasphemous connection (was it bedding Her or being Her?). The senator now has ten seconds to gamble on which response will not get him killed. In the TV series they summarize this phase by confronting senators summoned to a meeting with John Hurt costumed as Venus.
  53. @Puerh
    Is there any particular reason the French were giving their sons this Scottish name (avec l'accent aigu?)

    Probably for the same reason a lot of Americans were naming their daughters Kaitlyn, Caitlin, Katlin, etc., 20-30 years ago.

  54. By the way, Eaton is an example of how first generation racial crosses sometimes look unique…..After a few generations, mixed race individuals typically settle down to looks that strike us as conventional.

    What possible significance do you see in that, Steve?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's an interesting topic in physical anthropology how mixed groups develop a characteristic look after awhile. Henry Harpending pointed out to me, for example, that part East Asian / part white Uighurs in Central Asia all have a Uighurish look that's not the same as first generation Eurasians. It's not just 50/50 admixture. People fall into a pattern after awhile.

    Guys like Eaton, Griffin, and Kaepernick show that there are a variety of black/white possible looks that we aren't very familiar with, and that tend to go away over the generations.

  55. The decathlon as is has always struck me as a rather unsatisfactory indicator of athletic all round ability.
    Sure it measures speed and strength via 9 events with the 10th event being the 1500m – it doesn’t really have an endurance event ( the 1500m is usually run as a jog )
    Also 4 track events vs 6 field seems the wrong ratio
    But I guess there just aren’t many people who will choose to run both a 100m and a 10000m.

    Incidentally isn’t it about time that women did the decathlon rather than the wussy 7 event heptathlon ?

    • Replies: @res
    Interesting how well this academic paper matches your decathlon description.
    https://waset.org/publications/13614/multivariate-statistical-analysis-of-decathlon-performance-results-in-olympic-athletes-1988-2008-

    Abstract—The performance results of the athletes competed in the 1988-2008 Olympic Games were analyzed (n = 166). The data were obtained from the IAAF official protocols. In the principal component analysis, the first three principal components explained 70% of the total variance. In the 1st principal component (with 43.1% of total variance explained) the largest factor loadings were for 100m (0.89), 400m (0.81), 110m hurdle run (0.76), and long jump
    (–0.72). This factor can be interpreted as the ‘sprinting performance’. The loadings on the 2nd factor (15.3% of the total variance) presented a counter-intuitive throwing-jumping combination: the highest loadings were for throwing events (javelin throwing 0.76; shot put 0.74; and discus throwing 0.73) and also for jumping events (high jump 0.62; pole vaulting 0.58). On the 3rd factor (11.6% of total variance), the largest loading was for 1500 m running (0.88); all other loadings were below 0.4.
     
    I wonder what the decathlon PCA would look like for different populations (rather than just elite decathletes). Say everyone or just all athletes. I suspect we would also see a component for overall athleticism (some combination of weight and muscular/aerobic fitness).
    , @Ron Mexico
    Drop the 110 hurdles and replace with 400 hurdles to add a bit more endurance. Replace the 1500 with 3000 steeplechase.
  56. @jimmyriddle
    Lol. No wonder Irish bourgeois parents have taken to spelling it "Caoimhin".

    I wonder whether Kevin Kegan popularised it in Germany? He had a successful stint at Hamburg, and apparently spoke pretty decent German.

    Seems a likelier candidate than some Irish saint who used to sail around on tombstones IIRC.

    Agreed.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_Kurányi

    is a bullseye for Keegan’s spell in Germany and maybe the Belgian superstar De Bruyne is named after him too. The Table 4 entries I linked to earlier definitely support the use of sports stars’ names (surnames as well as lead names) as models among the hoi polloi. The Norse Gods are also well represented – imagine having little Odin in your class of 7-year-olds and he threw a tantrum – and there’s even a Zeus.

  57. @Mr McKenna

    whether you like it or not
     
    Therefore! Garfunkel had much more African genes than Simon, which makes sense since Garfunkel was the performing talent and Simon the writing talent. Writing--the part which actually involves creating something of value.

    https://www.insidehook.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Simon-and-Garfunkel-1_1200-e1471890404295-1.jpg

    And after (and even before) they split, Simon had a much better time of it performing than Garfunkel did writing. Genes will tell, huh?

    Garfunkel had the better voice. And clearly had more brains (Simon studied English at Queens College and Garfunkel studied art history & math at Columbia w/ masters in math education from Columbia Teachers College).

    I saw Garfunkel in person in 2007 in Washington, D.C. He was coming out of a bathroom at Reagan National Airport and was wearing a “I’d Rather Be Fishing” baseball cap. He and his son were hustling to make a U.S. Airways flight (shuttle to LaGuardia).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Yes, Garfunkel is a cultured man.
  58. @Anonymous

    By the way, Eaton is an example of how first generation racial crosses sometimes look unique.....After a few generations, mixed race individuals typically settle down to looks that strike us as conventional.
     
    What possible significance do you see in that, Steve?

    It’s an interesting topic in physical anthropology how mixed groups develop a characteristic look after awhile. Henry Harpending pointed out to me, for example, that part East Asian / part white Uighurs in Central Asia all have a Uighurish look that’s not the same as first generation Eurasians. It’s not just 50/50 admixture. People fall into a pattern after awhile.

    Guys like Eaton, Griffin, and Kaepernick show that there are a variety of black/white possible looks that we aren’t very familiar with, and that tend to go away over the generations.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Jew
    It should be the same with the Big Five personality traits. Perhaps you get the agreeableness of one group, but the extroversion of another, etc.

    For long-mixed groups, maybe everything averages out after awhile or you get some drift. I wonder if the Uighurs are a pretty good average of their ancestral Caucasian/Mongol populations or if there's been some drift.

    With long-mixed groups their can also be selection for particular genes. Supposedly the Tibetans have a more elegant adaptive solution to altitude than the Andean Indians because they had more genes to draw from, being at a crossroads of different populations.

    With Jews, I notice different traits can pop up within a single family. You have Jeff Goldblum types (swarthy and E. Med) all the way to Mitchell/Geoff Schwartz types (could pass for NW European). But outliers aside, overall we have definitely settled into a certain look, or at least looks.

    , @Reg Cæsar

    It’s an interesting topic in physical anthropology how mixed groups develop a characteristic look after awhile.
     
    Some mixes are just more popular than others.

    The first meat-flavored ice cream was chicken. Of course, it bombed. But that led to bacon ice cream, which was more of a hit.

    Dogs, though, liked the chicken.
    , @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/jleibold/status/1120824721124184064
  59. @Horzabky
    "Kevin", usually without an acute accent, is distinctly banlieue here in France. If your first name is Kevin, it means that you grew up in a lousy apartment in a crime-plagued, majority Black and Arab neighborhood, and your parents chose your name from American series, television being their only culture. You understand now why the name quickly fell out of favor.

    I remember reading an article, in the French press, which said that in France people with the first name Kevin are less successful in life than people with more traditionally French first names.

    In France, Kevin is pronounced more or less as in English, not with a nasalized final vowel, as a French word similarly spelled would be pronounced.

    I've known one Kevin. He was the son of the Hindu Mauritian father and a half Algerian, half French mother. He was born and grew up in the banlieue where I live, and he had some run-ins with the law.

    Exactly the same in Sweden. Names like Kevin have replaced the traditional “y-names” (Conny, Johnny, Sonny etc.) as a marker of white underclass.

  60. @Anon
    Some answers from Quora, the world's most unreliable source:

    How is it possible that some Caucasian people have very curly hair?
    https://www.quora.com/How-is-it-possible-that-some-Caucasian-people-have-very-curly-hair


    whether you like it or not, curly, afro types of hair are a very distinctive mark of african race descent, wether it’s two generations behind you or 10. Gene recessiveness and dominance determines when this characteristics will show up on heritage but they, nonetheless, mean that at SOME point an african person made part of your descendence.
     

    The genetics of hair shape in Caucasians still isn’t very well known. Asians are generally more well studied, but we do have some findings for Caucasians. In the following studies, the hair is split into three classes; straight, wavy, curly. Wavy is between curly and straight. A study found people of European ancestry is distributed like this; 45% straight hair, 40% wavy hair, and 15% curly hair. Apparently, for Caucasians, Trichohyalin gene (TCHH) has an effect on the curliness of the hair but it only counts for 6% of variation of the trait.
     

    especially in the South in the US, people don't like to talk about it, but a lot of the 'Caucasians' have "Afro-American" ancestors. But after a few generations, the skin is no longer dark, but other traits still pop up, such as curly hair, broad nose, uneven skin pigmentation (I forget the exact name for this genetic condition), big thick lips
     

    From a Jewish woman's website:

    What is Jewish hair?
    https://jwa.org/blog/jewish-hair

    "Jewish hair" is a tricky thing to define, since Judaism can include people from any racial or ethnic background. And while Jews are known to have a variety of haircolors, as well as levels of curliness, "Jewish hair" seems to refer to dark, curly, and often frizzy, hair.

    Some people are more sensitive to hair characteristics than most. Barbers obviously are part of those some people. I knew an African-American man who says that the first time he went to his barber in Oakland CA that the barber knew he was from East Texas by his hair. My Irish grandparents, aunts and uncles, born in the 1880s, claim they could identify Irish protestants by their hair which they called “presbyterian hair”.

  61. @whahae
    In Germany "Kevin" is a stereotypical white underclass name often associated with East Germany. I even read similar articles in Germany about how the name Kevin is associated with less sucess in education (quote from a teacher from the linked article "Kevin is not a name - it's a diagnosis")

    >Kevin is not a name – it’s a diagnosis

    Like Wayne?

  62. @Hunsdon
    The term we used was "Jew-fro."

    I remember “Isro.”

  63. @Eddie Collins
    Garfunkel had the better voice. And clearly had more brains (Simon studied English at Queens College and Garfunkel studied art history & math at Columbia w/ masters in math education from Columbia Teachers College).

    I saw Garfunkel in person in 2007 in Washington, D.C. He was coming out of a bathroom at Reagan National Airport and was wearing a “I’d Rather Be Fishing” baseball cap. He and his son were hustling to make a U.S. Airways flight (shuttle to LaGuardia).

    Yes, Garfunkel is a cultured man.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Yes, Garfunkel is a cultured man.
     
    He asked Simon to write a song honoring Frank Lloyd Wright. Whom Simon had never heard of.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUPG_PzNYXg
  64. @Anon
    Some answers from Quora, the world's most unreliable source:

    How is it possible that some Caucasian people have very curly hair?
    https://www.quora.com/How-is-it-possible-that-some-Caucasian-people-have-very-curly-hair


    whether you like it or not, curly, afro types of hair are a very distinctive mark of african race descent, wether it’s two generations behind you or 10. Gene recessiveness and dominance determines when this characteristics will show up on heritage but they, nonetheless, mean that at SOME point an african person made part of your descendence.
     

    The genetics of hair shape in Caucasians still isn’t very well known. Asians are generally more well studied, but we do have some findings for Caucasians. In the following studies, the hair is split into three classes; straight, wavy, curly. Wavy is between curly and straight. A study found people of European ancestry is distributed like this; 45% straight hair, 40% wavy hair, and 15% curly hair. Apparently, for Caucasians, Trichohyalin gene (TCHH) has an effect on the curliness of the hair but it only counts for 6% of variation of the trait.
     

    especially in the South in the US, people don't like to talk about it, but a lot of the 'Caucasians' have "Afro-American" ancestors. But after a few generations, the skin is no longer dark, but other traits still pop up, such as curly hair, broad nose, uneven skin pigmentation (I forget the exact name for this genetic condition), big thick lips
     

    From a Jewish woman's website:

    What is Jewish hair?
    https://jwa.org/blog/jewish-hair

    "Jewish hair" is a tricky thing to define, since Judaism can include people from any racial or ethnic background. And while Jews are known to have a variety of haircolors, as well as levels of curliness, "Jewish hair" seems to refer to dark, curly, and often frizzy, hair.

    Or maybe it means you are descended from Marcus Aurelius.

  65. @Dan Hayes
    In Negro America Sean is spelled and pronounced Shaun. Surprisingly enough, just the way Sean is pronounced in Ireland!

    They actually pronounce it as “Shun”

  66. @Zephram

    “Kevin is not a name – it’s a diagnosis”
     
    The same could be said of "Jabari," "Verdell," or "Shaqueequee".

    Yeah, that’s right. “Kevin” and “Cindy” are just like “Jabari” or “Shaqueequee.”

  67. @Puerh
    The funny thing is that Kevin Mayer didn’t just beat Ashton Eaton’s record, he smashed it 9126-9045 for an 81-point improvement. For comparison, Eaton only improved the previous record of Roman Šebrle (a Czech) in 2001 by 19 points.

    Mayer posted this video where he recounts his record, event by event. Eaton was the best runner in decathlon ever, but Mayer is much better at the throws and the pole vault (a French specialty.)
    https://youtu.be/7WYz8FYSkI0

    If Mayer were American, I would expect him to get lots of press leading up to the Olympics. He is handsome and presents himself well.

    Yeah but does he like Beyonce?

  68. The Wikipedia excerpt cited by Google was edited while Mayer’s record was awaiting official ratification. As of 16 September 2018, it read:

    “The official Decathlon world record holder is American Ashton Eaton, who scored 9,045 points at the 2015 IAAF World Championships. The record was improved upon by French athlete Kevin Mayer, who scored 9,126 points at the 2018 Décastar completed on September 16, 2018. That record is awaiting ratification by the IAAF.”

    On 13 April 2019, editor DolanGrizzly lazily changed “is awaiting ratification” to “was ratified” without checking the rest of the paragraph for consistency.

    On 29 April 2019, an anonymous editor corrected the paragraph to state that Kevin Mayer is the official world record holder.

    Since the last change was made so recently, possibly even by a reader of this blog post, Google hasn’t picked it up yet.

  69. @jcd1974
    During last week's NFL draft I noticed that a disproportionate number of the black players selected were actually mixed, with a white mother and a black father.

    Most white girls find Black Men irresistible for obvious reasons

    • Troll: Craig Nelsen
    • Replies: @anon
    Bestiality?
    , @anon
    good to know

    why are there so few interracial couples then?
    , @Zephram

    Most white girls find Black Men irresistible for obvious reasons
     
    And many are lucky to get out of it alive. Race-mixing just isn’t a great idea.

    https://nypost.com/2019/04/30/teen-beheaded-classmate-in-jealous-rage-over-girlfriend-prosecutors/
  70. Kevin Mayer? Sounds like a nice Jewish boy to me. And he looks pretty good too.

    • Replies: @Semperluctor
    German, from Alsace Lorraine, I think.
  71. I noticed a few years ago all the mixed race men in decathalon, I guessed that is a cluster more than a coincidence, and that since the decathlon is a blending of various T&F disciplines, that mixed race men are served well, because they have enough black in them to do well enough at sprinting and hurdling, and enough white to do well enough at the other events.

  72. anon[128] • Disclaimer says:
    @Cortes
    Irish name:

    https://www.behindthename.com/name/kevin

    Blame media coverage of Hollywood. Costner and others. Somewhere there’s a group of agents betting on the name generation popularity five years down the line of the cohort of “stars” in today’s media in various markets/countries. The lower the parents are in the socioeconomic scale, the higher the likelihood of naming the kids after royalty or celebrity. (Brazil has a habit of naming after genuinely eminent people - Nelson, Emerson and Edison, for example - and other Latin American countries go down the political route, like the guy who sold out Assange, one Lenin Boltaire (some’ll geddit) Correa).

    Now, remember: it’s wicked to mock the afflicted:

    https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/names/babies-first-names

    “The lower the parents are in the socioeconomic scale, the higher the likelihood of naming the kids after royalty or celebrity.”

    Someone — Paul Fussell? — noted that black folks like to give names or nicknames like Duke, Prince, King, which actual White aristos give to their dogs. Don’t know if Earl counts.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    I was struck by the number of classical names black Americans have, or maybe had. Cassius Clay changed his, of course, but Evander Holyfield didn’t. I’d class those as upwardly aspirational.
    , @riches
    "black folks like to give names or nicknames like Duke, Prince, King"

    (Chicago) Englewood's own Gene Chandler (nee Dixon) doubled up with "Duke of Earl."
  73. @Tiny Duck
    Most white girls find Black Men irresistible for obvious reasons

    Bestiality?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Not with ducks.... You foul beast.
  74. @bossel
    One of your right-wing fanboys probably edited the Wikipedia page, waited for the Google crawler to catch it, made a screenshot & sent it to you:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Decathlon&type=revision&diff=894796447&oldid=894674932

    & you obviously fell for it, blinded by your obsession with skin colour.

    …your obsession with skin colour

    J’accuse

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    J’accuse
     
    Don't you mean, Qui s'excuse, s'accuse?
  75. @jcd1974
    Undeniably the greatest woman athlete of all time.

    And a brave and beautiful woman, don’t forget!

  76. Now google says the record holder is Kevin Mayer – accompanied by a picture of Aston Eaton.

  77. @Horzabky
    "Kevin", usually without an acute accent, is distinctly banlieue here in France. If your first name is Kevin, it means that you grew up in a lousy apartment in a crime-plagued, majority Black and Arab neighborhood, and your parents chose your name from American series, television being their only culture. You understand now why the name quickly fell out of favor.

    I remember reading an article, in the French press, which said that in France people with the first name Kevin are less successful in life than people with more traditionally French first names.

    In France, Kevin is pronounced more or less as in English, not with a nasalized final vowel, as a French word similarly spelled would be pronounced.

    I've known one Kevin. He was the son of the Hindu Mauritian father and a half Algerian, half French mother. He was born and grew up in the banlieue where I live, and he had some run-ins with the law.

    Why on earth are non-English speaking countries giving their kids English names? Nobody here calls his kid Etienne or Pierre, or whatever. It’s Steven and Peter.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Because english language and film, music advertisements are ubiquitous globally.
    , @Craig Nelsen

    Why on earth are non-English speaking countries giving their kids English names?
     
    Not anymore. When was the last time you called a corporation to straighten out something on your bill and talked to a "Richard" who sounded just like Apu?

    #FlightfromWhite
  78. @robot
    OT: are there any happy heterosexual couples where the woman is the strong provider and the man is the nurturing second? how does that work in the bedroom?

    Yes, I’ve seen several. In each case it was due to the man having a severe physical problem that developed after years of marriage. The wives were very adept at getting and keeping good jobs that brought both health insurance and income.

    This is an argument for women getting both higher education and a viable career. There are no guarantees in life.

  79. @whahae
    In Germany "Kevin" is a stereotypical white underclass name often associated with East Germany. I even read similar articles in Germany about how the name Kevin is associated with less sucess in education (quote from a teacher from the linked article "Kevin is not a name - it's a diagnosis")

    Kevin is a pretty unproblematic name in the UK. Originally celtic/Irish it seems to have spread to the wider population. I’m not aware of any negative associations. However it’s now become dated, Few under-40s would have it as a name.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Kevin is a pretty unproblematic name in the UK. Originally celtic/Irish it seems to have spread to the wider population. I’m not aware of any negative associations. However it’s now become dated, Few under-40s would have it as a name.
     
    I tell Kevins and Brians that if they're older than me, they must be Irish. If they're younger, they could be anything. But way younger, they're usually Asian. East Asian, that is.

    Brian in The Life of Brian got his name because there were negative associations-- namely with stupidity. In the UK. It just got overused and boring here. Which is why everyone switched to Ryan, I guess.
  80. @TTSSYF
    According to his ex-wife (Linda Thompson), Jenner had odd sexual fetishes (cross-dressing, etc.) even when he was married to her. Apparently, he has been advised by his doctors to not have a lopadickoffofme, so instead puts his sexual fetish and mental illness on full public display by parading around in women's clothes and calling himself Caitlyn while his package remains intact; i.e., he remains a man, with every cell in his body screaming "XY". The only thing more ridiculous than his disfiguring his face and indulging his exhibitionism is that the public gives him even one minute's worth of time and the media give him (yes, him) "courage" awards.

    In other worfds – LARPing like most other trannies.

  81. @bomag

    ...your obsession with skin colour
     
    J'accuse

    J’accuse

    Don’t you mean, Qui s’excuse, s’accuse?

  82. @Lurker
    Kevin is a pretty unproblematic name in the UK. Originally celtic/Irish it seems to have spread to the wider population. I'm not aware of any negative associations. However it's now become dated, Few under-40s would have it as a name.

    Kevin is a pretty unproblematic name in the UK. Originally celtic/Irish it seems to have spread to the wider population. I’m not aware of any negative associations. However it’s now become dated, Few under-40s would have it as a name.

    I tell Kevins and Brians that if they’re older than me, they must be Irish. If they’re younger, they could be anything. But way younger, they’re usually Asian. East Asian, that is.

    Brian in The Life of Brian got his name because there were negative associations– namely with stupidity. In the UK. It just got overused and boring here. Which is why everyone switched to Ryan, I guess.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Common in American blacks. Along with Calvin, Kelvin, several other similar sounding names.
    , @prosa123
    Bruce used to be considered a rather effeminate name in the US. What changed that, and made the name seem much more masculine, was Bruce Wayne and Bruce Willis.
  83. @Steve Sailer
    It's an interesting topic in physical anthropology how mixed groups develop a characteristic look after awhile. Henry Harpending pointed out to me, for example, that part East Asian / part white Uighurs in Central Asia all have a Uighurish look that's not the same as first generation Eurasians. It's not just 50/50 admixture. People fall into a pattern after awhile.

    Guys like Eaton, Griffin, and Kaepernick show that there are a variety of black/white possible looks that we aren't very familiar with, and that tend to go away over the generations.

    It should be the same with the Big Five personality traits. Perhaps you get the agreeableness of one group, but the extroversion of another, etc.

    For long-mixed groups, maybe everything averages out after awhile or you get some drift. I wonder if the Uighurs are a pretty good average of their ancestral Caucasian/Mongol populations or if there’s been some drift.

    With long-mixed groups their can also be selection for particular genes. Supposedly the Tibetans have a more elegant adaptive solution to altitude than the Andean Indians because they had more genes to draw from, being at a crossroads of different populations.

    With Jews, I notice different traits can pop up within a single family. You have Jeff Goldblum types (swarthy and E. Med) all the way to Mitchell/Geoff Schwartz types (could pass for NW European). But outliers aside, overall we have definitely settled into a certain look, or at least looks.

  84. @Cortes
    Irish name:

    https://www.behindthename.com/name/kevin

    Blame media coverage of Hollywood. Costner and others. Somewhere there’s a group of agents betting on the name generation popularity five years down the line of the cohort of “stars” in today’s media in various markets/countries. The lower the parents are in the socioeconomic scale, the higher the likelihood of naming the kids after royalty or celebrity. (Brazil has a habit of naming after genuinely eminent people - Nelson, Emerson and Edison, for example - and other Latin American countries go down the political route, like the guy who sold out Assange, one Lenin Boltaire (some’ll geddit) Correa).

    Now, remember: it’s wicked to mock the afflicted:

    https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/vital-events/names/babies-first-names

    Brazil has a habit of naming after genuinely eminent people – Nelson, Emerson and Edison, for example

    Yeah, but what about Edson and <a title=”"Ayrton? Maybe they just like the British sound.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    The most famous Edson is Pelè. The Wikipedia entry (not written or edited by me) includes

    “Pelé was born Edson Arantes do Nascimento on 23 October 1940, in Três Corações, Minas Gerais, Brazil, the son of Fluminense footballer Dondinho (born João Ramos do Nascimento) and Celeste Arantes. He was the elder of two siblings.[1] He was named after the American inventor Thomas Edison.[2] His parents decided to remove the "i" and call him "Edson", but there was a mistake on the birth certificate, leading many documents to show his name as "Edison", not "Edson", as he is called.[2][3] He was originally nicknamed "Dico" by his family.[1][4] He received the nickname "Pelé" during his school days, when it is claimed he was given it because of his pronunciation of the name of his favorite player, local Vasco da Gama goalkeeper Bilé, which he misspoke but the more he complained the more it stuck. In his autobiography, Pelé stated he had no idea what the name means, nor did his old friends.[1] Apart from the assertion that the name is derived from that of Bilé, and that it is Hebrew for "miracle" (פֶּ֫לֶא), the word has no known meaning in Portuguese.[note 1][5]”

    The sloppy pronunciation explanation seems reasonable as sloppy pronunciation is probably the key to diversification of languages from original forms (the courtiers imitating the lithping monarch sort of model). Pele was named Athlete of the Century by the IOC, according to the same Wikipedia article.

    Ayrton? Standard place name surname. The organist referred to in the Wikipedia list was at Ripon, not far from Airton.

  85. @Steve Sailer
    Yes, Garfunkel is a cultured man.

    Yes, Garfunkel is a cultured man.

    He asked Simon to write a song honoring Frank Lloyd Wright. Whom Simon had never heard of.

  86. @Steve Sailer
    It's an interesting topic in physical anthropology how mixed groups develop a characteristic look after awhile. Henry Harpending pointed out to me, for example, that part East Asian / part white Uighurs in Central Asia all have a Uighurish look that's not the same as first generation Eurasians. It's not just 50/50 admixture. People fall into a pattern after awhile.

    Guys like Eaton, Griffin, and Kaepernick show that there are a variety of black/white possible looks that we aren't very familiar with, and that tend to go away over the generations.

    It’s an interesting topic in physical anthropology how mixed groups develop a characteristic look after awhile.

    Some mixes are just more popular than others.

    The first meat-flavored ice cream was chicken. Of course, it bombed. But that led to bacon ice cream, which was more of a hit.

    Dogs, though, liked the chicken.

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen

    Dogs, though, liked the chicken.
     
    It's nearly impossible to brush my dog's teeth, such is his love for poultry flavored toothpaste. It's like the Simpson's episode where Homer keeps licking off the grease Marge is trying to use to remove the faucet he's accidentally super-glued to his forehead. When she complains, he tells her she has to use non-delicious grease. And then, despairing, realizes there's no such thing.
  87. @sb
    The decathlon as is has always struck me as a rather unsatisfactory indicator of athletic all round ability.
    Sure it measures speed and strength via 9 events with the 10th event being the 1500m - it doesn't really have an endurance event ( the 1500m is usually run as a jog )
    Also 4 track events vs 6 field seems the wrong ratio
    But I guess there just aren't many people who will choose to run both a 100m and a 10000m.

    Incidentally isn't it about time that women did the decathlon rather than the wussy 7 event heptathlon ?

    Interesting how well this academic paper matches your decathlon description.
    https://waset.org/publications/13614/multivariate-statistical-analysis-of-decathlon-performance-results-in-olympic-athletes-1988-2008-

    Abstract—The performance results of the athletes competed in the 1988-2008 Olympic Games were analyzed (n = 166). The data were obtained from the IAAF official protocols. In the principal component analysis, the first three principal components explained 70% of the total variance. In the 1st principal component (with 43.1% of total variance explained) the largest factor loadings were for 100m (0.89), 400m (0.81), 110m hurdle run (0.76), and long jump
    (–0.72). This factor can be interpreted as the ‘sprinting performance’. The loadings on the 2nd factor (15.3% of the total variance) presented a counter-intuitive throwing-jumping combination: the highest loadings were for throwing events (javelin throwing 0.76; shot put 0.74; and discus throwing 0.73) and also for jumping events (high jump 0.62; pole vaulting 0.58). On the 3rd factor (11.6% of total variance), the largest loading was for 1500 m running (0.88); all other loadings were below 0.4.

    I wonder what the decathlon PCA would look like for different populations (rather than just elite decathletes). Say everyone or just all athletes. I suspect we would also see a component for overall athleticism (some combination of weight and muscular/aerobic fitness).

  88. @anon
    "The lower the parents are in the socioeconomic scale, the higher the likelihood of naming the kids after royalty or celebrity."

    Someone -- Paul Fussell? -- noted that black folks like to give names or nicknames like Duke, Prince, King, which actual White aristos give to their dogs. Don't know if Earl counts.

    I was struck by the number of classical names black Americans have, or maybe had. Cassius Clay changed his, of course, but Evander Holyfield didn’t. I’d class those as upwardly aspirational.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Clay was named for his father, who was named for the white Kentucky emancipationist Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903). So the classical inspiration was indirect.

    Another Cassius Marcellus was Coolidge, quite white and who hailed from Philadelphia, New York, which is almost in Canada. (Fellow artist Frederic Remington was from nearby.)

    You don't know Coolidge by name, but you'll recognize his art.


    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Zg_jxhrXn2A/VaqcU9kYr6I/AAAAAAAAZi4/NYRbuRyRCF4/s320/lobbyBg.jpg
  89. @sb
    The decathlon as is has always struck me as a rather unsatisfactory indicator of athletic all round ability.
    Sure it measures speed and strength via 9 events with the 10th event being the 1500m - it doesn't really have an endurance event ( the 1500m is usually run as a jog )
    Also 4 track events vs 6 field seems the wrong ratio
    But I guess there just aren't many people who will choose to run both a 100m and a 10000m.

    Incidentally isn't it about time that women did the decathlon rather than the wussy 7 event heptathlon ?

    Drop the 110 hurdles and replace with 400 hurdles to add a bit more endurance. Replace the 1500 with 3000 steeplechase.

  90. @Reg Cæsar

    Brazil has a habit of naming after genuinely eminent people – Nelson, Emerson and Edison, for example
     
    Yeah, but what about Edson and <a href="Ayrton? Maybe they just like the British sound.

    The most famous Edson is Pelè. The Wikipedia entry (not written or edited by me) includes

    “Pelé was born Edson Arantes do Nascimento on 23 October 1940, in Três Corações, Minas Gerais, Brazil, the son of Fluminense footballer Dondinho (born João Ramos do Nascimento) and Celeste Arantes. He was the elder of two siblings.[1] He was named after the American inventor Thomas Edison.[2] His parents decided to remove the “i” and call him “Edson”, but there was a mistake on the birth certificate, leading many documents to show his name as “Edison”, not “Edson”, as he is called.[2][3] He was originally nicknamed “Dico” by his family.[1][4] He received the nickname “Pelé” during his school days, when it is claimed he was given it because of his pronunciation of the name of his favorite player, local Vasco da Gama goalkeeper Bilé, which he misspoke but the more he complained the more it stuck. In his autobiography, Pelé stated he had no idea what the name means, nor did his old friends.[1] Apart from the assertion that the name is derived from that of Bilé, and that it is Hebrew for “miracle” (פֶּ֫לֶא), the word has no known meaning in Portuguese.[note 1][5]”

    The sloppy pronunciation explanation seems reasonable as sloppy pronunciation is probably the key to diversification of languages from original forms (the courtiers imitating the lithping monarch sort of model). Pele was named Athlete of the Century by the IOC, according to the same Wikipedia article.

    Ayrton? Standard place name surname. The organist referred to in the Wikipedia list was at Ripon, not far from Airton.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    I remember Pelé being a super huge deal in the mid-70s when he came to America (to play for the NY Cosmos? when he retired? don't remember, I was five or six). Up there with the Globetrotters.
  91. @Mr McKenna

    whether you like it or not
     
    Therefore! Garfunkel had much more African genes than Simon, which makes sense since Garfunkel was the performing talent and Simon the writing talent. Writing--the part which actually involves creating something of value.

    https://www.insidehook.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Simon-and-Garfunkel-1_1200-e1471890404295-1.jpg

    And after (and even before) they split, Simon had a much better time of it performing than Garfunkel did writing. Genes will tell, huh?

    Paul Simon was accused of stealing songs from Los Lobos and also the Africans who helped on one of his albums

  92. @Tiny Duck
    Most white girls find Black Men irresistible for obvious reasons

    good to know

    why are there so few interracial couples then?

  93. @SFG
    There's probably some weird thing that happens to some high-T guys as they age--the stuff gets turned into estrogen or something. (Testosterone is actually a precursor used to synthesize estrogen so that's my best guess.)

    The comments to his old Wheaties ads are pretty funny though.

    some high-T guys

    Probably some of their high-T levels were artificially enhanced. This might have had strange effects on their hormone levels in older age.

  94. “After a few generations, mixed race individuals typically settle down to looks that strike us as conventional.”

    Here’s quarter Japanese Phoebe Cates (hot) with her daughter (not).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Shes Filipino
    , @Anonymous
    Phoebe Cates is remembered mostly for the swimming pool scene in Fast Times. Yeah, she's hot, but Marilyn Monroe was hotter at nearly twice her age in her pool scene in the unreleased Something's Got To Give. Cates has aged reasonably well but she hasn't worked much in thirty-plus years.
  95. “The funny thing is that Kevin Mayer didn’t just beat Ashton Eaton’s record, he smashed it”

    no, i’m sorry. as you can plainly see, he ‘improved upon it’. europeans do not ‘break’ records set by africans or part africans.

    lol. first time in 40 years of paying attention to sports that i’ve ever seen a record described as being ‘improved upon’.

    almost like ashton eaton invented something, but kevin mayer merely improved upon the original, important invention. google says, let’s put this into perspective. the african guy is who is important here. the other guy just made a few small improvements.

    what nonsense double speak the enemy weaves today. that’s how you know it was written by leftists. they come up with some term you’ve never heard before. like easter worshippers.

  96. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    whether you like it or not, curly, afro types of hair are a very distinctive mark of african race descent, wether it’s two generations behind you or 10. Gene recessiveness and dominance determines when this characteristics will show up on heritage but they
     
    i notice that africans seem to take pleasure in the idea that some of their genes are DOMINANT

    wonder if sickle cell is dominant

    This is absolute farce. Unless of course you mean homo sapiens arose in Africa.

    The curly haired people common in the fjords of Norway, areas that have often never been seen by an African, let alone had occasion to intermarry with its indigenous people.

  97. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Kevin is a pretty unproblematic name in the UK. Originally celtic/Irish it seems to have spread to the wider population. I’m not aware of any negative associations. However it’s now become dated, Few under-40s would have it as a name.
     
    I tell Kevins and Brians that if they're older than me, they must be Irish. If they're younger, they could be anything. But way younger, they're usually Asian. East Asian, that is.

    Brian in The Life of Brian got his name because there were negative associations-- namely with stupidity. In the UK. It just got overused and boring here. Which is why everyone switched to Ryan, I guess.

    Common in American blacks. Along with Calvin, Kelvin, several other similar sounding names.

  98. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @stillCARealist
    Why on earth are non-English speaking countries giving their kids English names? Nobody here calls his kid Etienne or Pierre, or whatever. It's Steven and Peter.

    Because english language and film, music advertisements are ubiquitous globally.

  99. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    Bestiality?

    Not with ducks…. You foul beast.

  100. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes
    In Negro America Sean is spelled and pronounced Shaun. Surprisingly enough, just the way Sean is pronounced in Ireland!

    You get DeShawns, ReShawn, Le Shawn.

    Every version of Sean around.

    Just means John, Johan, Jean, Juan

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  101. @Buzz Mohawk
    Jennifer was a nice name in the Seventies. I had a crush in high school then on a Jenny.

    Jennifer Jenner would have been apropos. Jenny Jenner.

    Jenny Jenny who can I turn to
    You give me something I can hold on to
    I know you’ll think I’m like the others before

  102. @anon
    "The lower the parents are in the socioeconomic scale, the higher the likelihood of naming the kids after royalty or celebrity."

    Someone -- Paul Fussell? -- noted that black folks like to give names or nicknames like Duke, Prince, King, which actual White aristos give to their dogs. Don't know if Earl counts.

    “black folks like to give names or nicknames like Duke, Prince, King”

    (Chicago) Englewood’s own Gene Chandler (nee Dixon) doubled up with “Duke of Earl.”

  103. @Reg Cæsar

    Kevin is a pretty unproblematic name in the UK. Originally celtic/Irish it seems to have spread to the wider population. I’m not aware of any negative associations. However it’s now become dated, Few under-40s would have it as a name.
     
    I tell Kevins and Brians that if they're older than me, they must be Irish. If they're younger, they could be anything. But way younger, they're usually Asian. East Asian, that is.

    Brian in The Life of Brian got his name because there were negative associations-- namely with stupidity. In the UK. It just got overused and boring here. Which is why everyone switched to Ryan, I guess.

    Bruce used to be considered a rather effeminate name in the US. What changed that, and made the name seem much more masculine, was Bruce Wayne and Bruce Willis.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Robin was turning into a girl's name. Then Robins Yount, Ventura, Gibb, and Williams came along, just in time.

    Paris could have been hijacked, too, but Miss Hilton and Miss Jackson will make it disappear fast.

    The son of REO Speedwagon's singer is a Paris.
  104. @Tiny Duck
    Most white girls find Black Men irresistible for obvious reasons

    Most white girls find Black Men irresistible for obvious reasons

    And many are lucky to get out of it alive. Race-mixing just isn’t a great idea.

    https://nypost.com/2019/04/30/teen-beheaded-classmate-in-jealous-rage-over-girlfriend-prosecutors/

  105. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimB
    “After a few generations, mixed race individuals typically settle down to looks that strike us as conventional.”

    Here’s quarter Japanese Phoebe Cates (hot) with her daughter (not).
    http://www2.pictures.zimbio.com/gi/Phoebe+Cates+Greta+Simone+Kline+Extra+Man+_gFSRfC82VXl.jpg

    Shes Filipino

    • Replies: @BB753
    Actually, Phoebe Cates is 3/4 Ashkenazi Jewish, 1/4 Chinese-Filipino (which could either mean her maternal grandfather was either full Chinese or mainly Chinese mixed with Filipino). She was quite the looker in her prime, but she chose to reproduce with Kevin Kline, and has a daughter who's almost fully Ashkenazi and thus not great - looking at all (regression to the mean?).
  106. @TTSSYF
    According to his ex-wife (Linda Thompson), Jenner had odd sexual fetishes (cross-dressing, etc.) even when he was married to her. Apparently, he has been advised by his doctors to not have a lopadickoffofme, so instead puts his sexual fetish and mental illness on full public display by parading around in women's clothes and calling himself Caitlyn while his package remains intact; i.e., he remains a man, with every cell in his body screaming "XY". The only thing more ridiculous than his disfiguring his face and indulging his exhibitionism is that the public gives him even one minute's worth of time and the media give him (yes, him) "courage" awards.

    I should have thought of this when Steve first put forward the “autistic power play” theory of tranny jerkitude, but there’s a scene in I, Claudius where Caligula, who has not yet established his reputation, is admiring a statue of Venus with a senator and mentions a blasphemous connection (was it bedding Her or being Her?). The senator now has ten seconds to gamble on which response will not get him killed. In the TV series they summarize this phase by confronting senators summoned to a meeting with John Hurt costumed as Venus.

  107. @prosa123
    Bruce used to be considered a rather effeminate name in the US. What changed that, and made the name seem much more masculine, was Bruce Wayne and Bruce Willis.

    Robin was turning into a girl’s name. Then Robins Yount, Ventura, Gibb, and Williams came along, just in time.

    Paris could have been hijacked, too, but Miss Hilton and Miss Jackson will make it disappear fast.

    The son of REO Speedwagon’s singer is a Paris.

    • Agree: prosa123
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Robin Roberts the ballplayer and Robin Olds, a two war (WWII and Vietnam) air ace stand out.
  108. @Reg Cæsar
    Any "Kevin" that young in America is probably the child of Asian immigrants. That, and perhaps "Michelle", is the perfect name-- a little bit cool, a little bit bland.

    Kevin Mayer is also a pretty weird name for a Froggo, but then again so is Tony Parker and the Frogs have one of those (a basketsportser, so no surprise his Dad was a Yank of the darker-hued end of the skin-but-not-race spectrum).

    I was going to cite Anthony Martin (a soccersportsball goal-minder) but on reflection both bits of the name are Froggish enough. At least he is not famous enough to crowd out Tony Martin the Kiwi comedian.

    As to Kevin as prenom: it is anachronistic up here on the top half of the planet too (i.e., Straya and Ao Tea Roa) except among the epicanthically-diverse. I have an Uncle Kevin on both sides of the family – both in their 70s – and there were a large number of footy players called Kevin in the 1970s… but the last young Kevin I am aware of was a Malaysian Chinese kid that I taught in the 90s. (The Anglicised first name is common. I have a mate whose real name is Wee Yip, but he goes by “Paul”).

    Same class had a kid who had Anglicised his name… to Edwin, but for some reason chose to keep the rest of his name intact… which was Yoo Fat Kok.

    Not a word of a lie: his graduation ceremony was a fucking débacle because all the Skip (and Wog) kids burst out laughing.

  109. Now the text has been fixed but the picture is not updated.

  110. @jcd1974
    During last week's NFL draft I noticed that a disproportionate number of the black players selected were actually mixed, with a white mother and a black father.

    In his short story, Benito Cereno, Melville warns us that the “mulatto” has “the Devil in him”.

  111. It’s interesting that even world-record decathletes are sucky distance runners. This Kevin guy would have won my state (Ohio) high school championship in every event other than shot put and the 1500. And his shot put would have still been impressive. But his 1500 (extrapolating to the mile, which is what we ran back in the day), wouldn’t have won even a typical dual meet.

    How hard could it be for a guy like that to work on his endurance a bit, and get his 1500 time down to the 3:50s? It would be worth another 200 points to his overall decathlon score!

    • Replies: @Semperluctor
    He is lighter than most recent dec. champions, but still, at 175 lbs.. most milers weigh about 150 lbs
    , @prime noticer
    probably because they just did 9 other events first?

    the milers in your state wouldn't even be able to get thru a decathlon, but if they did, they'd barely be able to walk a 1500 by the end.
  112. A lot of Oregon’s love for Track and Field came from Steve Prefontaine. Google him. Plus, before the trailblazers came to Portland, Oregon didn’t have much in the way of Pro Baseball, Football, etc. and Oregon was never a Football or BB powerhouse until recently. Usually in the 70s, 80s, 90s they got beaten up by UCLA/USC/Cal aka all those evil California schools. So interest drifted to Track and Field.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Oregon's love of track & field came from Bill Bowerman.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Bowerman
  113. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @JimB
    “After a few generations, mixed race individuals typically settle down to looks that strike us as conventional.”

    Here’s quarter Japanese Phoebe Cates (hot) with her daughter (not).
    http://www2.pictures.zimbio.com/gi/Phoebe+Cates+Greta+Simone+Kline+Extra+Man+_gFSRfC82VXl.jpg

    Phoebe Cates is remembered mostly for the swimming pool scene in Fast Times. Yeah, she’s hot, but Marilyn Monroe was hotter at nearly twice her age in her pool scene in the unreleased Something’s Got To Give. Cates has aged reasonably well but she hasn’t worked much in thirty-plus years.

    • Replies: @JimB

    Phoebe Cates is remembered mostly for the swimming pool scene in Fast Times. Yeah, she’s hot, but Marilyn Monroe was hotter at nearly twice her age in her pool scene in the unreleased Something’s Got To Give.
     
    IMO Lauren Bacall beat all the Hollywood starlets in the looks department, hands down, and she remained hot pretty much her entire life. So what? Phoebe Cates left acting for motherhood, not because she ceased being hot. It was an admirable thing for her to do.
  114. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    Robin was turning into a girl's name. Then Robins Yount, Ventura, Gibb, and Williams came along, just in time.

    Paris could have been hijacked, too, but Miss Hilton and Miss Jackson will make it disappear fast.

    The son of REO Speedwagon's singer is a Paris.

    Robin Roberts the ballplayer and Robin Olds, a two war (WWII and Vietnam) air ace stand out.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Robin Roberts the ballplayer and Robin Olds, a two war (WWII and Vietnam) air ace stand out.

     

    But the girl Robins appeared in their heyday.

    Nor did Claire Chennault do much for his name.



    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claire_Lee_Chennault
  115. @Cortes
    The most famous Edson is Pelè. The Wikipedia entry (not written or edited by me) includes

    “Pelé was born Edson Arantes do Nascimento on 23 October 1940, in Três Corações, Minas Gerais, Brazil, the son of Fluminense footballer Dondinho (born João Ramos do Nascimento) and Celeste Arantes. He was the elder of two siblings.[1] He was named after the American inventor Thomas Edison.[2] His parents decided to remove the "i" and call him "Edson", but there was a mistake on the birth certificate, leading many documents to show his name as "Edison", not "Edson", as he is called.[2][3] He was originally nicknamed "Dico" by his family.[1][4] He received the nickname "Pelé" during his school days, when it is claimed he was given it because of his pronunciation of the name of his favorite player, local Vasco da Gama goalkeeper Bilé, which he misspoke but the more he complained the more it stuck. In his autobiography, Pelé stated he had no idea what the name means, nor did his old friends.[1] Apart from the assertion that the name is derived from that of Bilé, and that it is Hebrew for "miracle" (פֶּ֫לֶא), the word has no known meaning in Portuguese.[note 1][5]”

    The sloppy pronunciation explanation seems reasonable as sloppy pronunciation is probably the key to diversification of languages from original forms (the courtiers imitating the lithping monarch sort of model). Pele was named Athlete of the Century by the IOC, according to the same Wikipedia article.

    Ayrton? Standard place name surname. The organist referred to in the Wikipedia list was at Ripon, not far from Airton.

    I remember Pelé being a super huge deal in the mid-70s when he came to America (to play for the NY Cosmos? when he retired? don’t remember, I was five or six). Up there with the Globetrotters.

  116. @Steve Sailer
    It's an interesting topic in physical anthropology how mixed groups develop a characteristic look after awhile. Henry Harpending pointed out to me, for example, that part East Asian / part white Uighurs in Central Asia all have a Uighurish look that's not the same as first generation Eurasians. It's not just 50/50 admixture. People fall into a pattern after awhile.

    Guys like Eaton, Griffin, and Kaepernick show that there are a variety of black/white possible looks that we aren't very familiar with, and that tend to go away over the generations.

    • Replies: @anon

    This one asserts that Xinjiang has long been a mixed race region
     
    sounds familiar

    pretty soon they'll be claiming all of China has long been a mixed race region
    , @Craig Nelsen

    Han-Uyghur inter-marriage.
     
    Gotta love Chinese directness. Reminds me of the time in China when I was hired for a job a black American colleague had already been turned down for. When I found out, I asked the guy what the deal was and he said they wanted "a real American". I thereupon turned down the job, which left us equally perplexed by each other.

    Anyway, Westerners conquer, Chinese seep. In the end, they will win.
  117. @Hannah Katz
    Kevin Mayer? Sounds like a nice Jewish boy to me. And he looks pretty good too.

    German, from Alsace Lorraine, I think.

  118. @stillCARealist
    Why on earth are non-English speaking countries giving their kids English names? Nobody here calls his kid Etienne or Pierre, or whatever. It's Steven and Peter.

    Why on earth are non-English speaking countries giving their kids English names?

    Not anymore. When was the last time you called a corporation to straighten out something on your bill and talked to a “Richard” who sounded just like Apu?

    #FlightfromWhite

  119. @International Jew
    It's interesting that even world-record decathletes are sucky distance runners. This Kevin guy would have won my state (Ohio) high school championship in every event other than shot put and the 1500. And his shot put would have still been impressive. But his 1500 (extrapolating to the mile, which is what we ran back in the day), wouldn't have won even a typical dual meet.

    How hard could it be for a guy like that to work on his endurance a bit, and get his 1500 time down to the 3:50s? It would be worth another 200 points to his overall decathlon score!

    He is lighter than most recent dec. champions, but still, at 175 lbs.. most milers weigh about 150 lbs

  120. So who here is mixed-race?

    My grandmother on my mother’s side is fully Native American. (She grew up on a reservation and went to an Indian boarding school. She was born less than ten years after the passage of the Indian Citizenship Act.) My mother is half and I’m one-quarter.

    When I emerged from the womb, I looked pretty damn European:

    (The red blotches on my nose are makeup. For Halloween, my family dressed my cousin and me as Raggedy Ann and Andy. respectively.)

    At the age of two, I didn’t look much like my mother:

    In most of my childhood pictures, I looked either glum or sad. Evidently I was wondering what happened to my real family:

    Now in my mid-thirties, I’ve blossomed into one of those fat incel sperg types. I don’t like to post my picture online. But, in the interests of scientific research, and for the lulz, I’ll go ahead and show you. If you’ve been laboring under the delusion that I look like an underwear model, prepare to be disappointed:

    (On a scale of 1 to 100, I lose a thousand points for being morbidly-obese, but I gain ten for having the balls to prove it. If you’re looking for the shirtless pic, it’s on LiveLeak under the heading “Extremely Graphic.”)

    So who wants to go next?

    • Replies: @International Jew
    Doesn't your phone have a backwards-facing camera??
    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    Bro-

    Deadlifts, squats, overhead press, bench press, bent-over rows, and curls.

    You'll be fine.
    , @BB753
    Hasn't it occurred to you that your grandmother wasn't fully Indian? Even in those days, full-blooded Indians were scarce. She might have looked like a squaw but still have some cowboy in her.
    In any case, your obesity might be due to your Indian ancestry, as they seem extremely prone to diabetes.
  121. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/jleibold/status/1120824721124184064

    This one asserts that Xinjiang has long been a mixed race region

    sounds familiar

    pretty soon they’ll be claiming all of China has long been a mixed race region

  122. @Desiderius
    https://twitter.com/jleibold/status/1120824721124184064

    Han-Uyghur inter-marriage.

    Gotta love Chinese directness. Reminds me of the time in China when I was hired for a job a black American colleague had already been turned down for. When I found out, I asked the guy what the deal was and he said they wanted “a real American”. I thereupon turned down the job, which left us equally perplexed by each other.

    Anyway, Westerners conquer, Chinese seep. In the end, they will win.

  123. @Reg Cæsar

    It’s an interesting topic in physical anthropology how mixed groups develop a characteristic look after awhile.
     
    Some mixes are just more popular than others.

    The first meat-flavored ice cream was chicken. Of course, it bombed. But that led to bacon ice cream, which was more of a hit.

    Dogs, though, liked the chicken.

    Dogs, though, liked the chicken.

    It’s nearly impossible to brush my dog’s teeth, such is his love for poultry flavored toothpaste. It’s like the Simpson’s episode where Homer keeps licking off the grease Marge is trying to use to remove the faucet he’s accidentally super-glued to his forehead. When she complains, he tells her she has to use non-delicious grease. And then, despairing, realizes there’s no such thing.

  124. @International Jew
    It's interesting that even world-record decathletes are sucky distance runners. This Kevin guy would have won my state (Ohio) high school championship in every event other than shot put and the 1500. And his shot put would have still been impressive. But his 1500 (extrapolating to the mile, which is what we ran back in the day), wouldn't have won even a typical dual meet.

    How hard could it be for a guy like that to work on his endurance a bit, and get his 1500 time down to the 3:50s? It would be worth another 200 points to his overall decathlon score!

    probably because they just did 9 other events first?

    the milers in your state wouldn’t even be able to get thru a decathlon, but if they did, they’d barely be able to walk a 1500 by the end.

  125. @Anonymous
    Robin Roberts the ballplayer and Robin Olds, a two war (WWII and Vietnam) air ace stand out.

    Robin Roberts the ballplayer and Robin Olds, a two war (WWII and Vietnam) air ace stand out.

    But the girl Robins appeared in their heyday.

    Nor did Claire Chennault do much for his name.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claire_Lee_Chennault

  126. @Stan Adams
    So who here is mixed-race?

    My grandmother on my mother's side is fully Native American. (She grew up on a reservation and went to an Indian boarding school. She was born less than ten years after the passage of the Indian Citizenship Act.) My mother is half and I'm one-quarter.

    When I emerged from the womb, I looked pretty damn European:
    https://i.ibb.co/6rvGNQY/a0585d10-Copy.jpg

    (The red blotches on my nose are makeup. For Halloween, my family dressed my cousin and me as Raggedy Ann and Andy. respectively.)

    At the age of two, I didn't look much like my mother:
    https://i.ibb.co/ys9MBCd/a0cbf110-Copy.jpg

    In most of my childhood pictures, I looked either glum or sad. Evidently I was wondering what happened to my real family:
    https://i.ibb.co/Ns7ZDsj/AD7875-A4-156-C-45-CA-BB00-86868-C8-F1-A0-B-Copy.jpg

    Now in my mid-thirties, I've blossomed into one of those fat incel sperg types. I don't like to post my picture online. But, in the interests of scientific research, and for the lulz, I'll go ahead and show you. If you've been laboring under the delusion that I look like an underwear model, prepare to be disappointed:
    https://i.ibb.co/NWbZNHV/8e026e10-Copy.jpg

    (On a scale of 1 to 100, I lose a thousand points for being morbidly-obese, but I gain ten for having the balls to prove it. If you're looking for the shirtless pic, it's on LiveLeak under the heading "Extremely Graphic.")

    So who wants to go next?

    Doesn’t your phone have a backwards-facing camera??

  127. @Cortes
    I was struck by the number of classical names black Americans have, or maybe had. Cassius Clay changed his, of course, but Evander Holyfield didn’t. I’d class those as upwardly aspirational.

    Clay was named for his father, who was named for the white Kentucky emancipationist Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903). So the classical inspiration was indirect.

    Another Cassius Marcellus was Coolidge, quite white and who hailed from Philadelphia, New York, which is almost in Canada. (Fellow artist Frederic Remington was from nearby.)

    You don’t know Coolidge by name, but you’ll recognize his art.

  128. @Honesthughgrant
    A lot of Oregon's love for Track and Field came from Steve Prefontaine. Google him. Plus, before the trailblazers came to Portland, Oregon didn't have much in the way of Pro Baseball, Football, etc. and Oregon was never a Football or BB powerhouse until recently. Usually in the 70s, 80s, 90s they got beaten up by UCLA/USC/Cal aka all those evil California schools. So interest drifted to Track and Field.

    Oregon’s love of track & field came from Bill Bowerman.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Bowerman

  129. JimB says:
    @Anonymous
    Phoebe Cates is remembered mostly for the swimming pool scene in Fast Times. Yeah, she's hot, but Marilyn Monroe was hotter at nearly twice her age in her pool scene in the unreleased Something's Got To Give. Cates has aged reasonably well but she hasn't worked much in thirty-plus years.

    Phoebe Cates is remembered mostly for the swimming pool scene in Fast Times. Yeah, she’s hot, but Marilyn Monroe was hotter at nearly twice her age in her pool scene in the unreleased Something’s Got To Give.

    IMO Lauren Bacall beat all the Hollywood starlets in the looks department, hands down, and she remained hot pretty much her entire life. So what? Phoebe Cates left acting for motherhood, not because she ceased being hot. It was an admirable thing for her to do.

  130. BB753 says:
    @Anonymous
    Shes Filipino

    Actually, Phoebe Cates is 3/4 Ashkenazi Jewish, 1/4 Chinese-Filipino (which could either mean her maternal grandfather was either full Chinese or mainly Chinese mixed with Filipino). She was quite the looker in her prime, but she chose to reproduce with Kevin Kline, and has a daughter who’s almost fully Ashkenazi and thus not great – looking at all (regression to the mean?).

  131. @Stan Adams
    So who here is mixed-race?

    My grandmother on my mother's side is fully Native American. (She grew up on a reservation and went to an Indian boarding school. She was born less than ten years after the passage of the Indian Citizenship Act.) My mother is half and I'm one-quarter.

    When I emerged from the womb, I looked pretty damn European:
    https://i.ibb.co/6rvGNQY/a0585d10-Copy.jpg

    (The red blotches on my nose are makeup. For Halloween, my family dressed my cousin and me as Raggedy Ann and Andy. respectively.)

    At the age of two, I didn't look much like my mother:
    https://i.ibb.co/ys9MBCd/a0cbf110-Copy.jpg

    In most of my childhood pictures, I looked either glum or sad. Evidently I was wondering what happened to my real family:
    https://i.ibb.co/Ns7ZDsj/AD7875-A4-156-C-45-CA-BB00-86868-C8-F1-A0-B-Copy.jpg

    Now in my mid-thirties, I've blossomed into one of those fat incel sperg types. I don't like to post my picture online. But, in the interests of scientific research, and for the lulz, I'll go ahead and show you. If you've been laboring under the delusion that I look like an underwear model, prepare to be disappointed:
    https://i.ibb.co/NWbZNHV/8e026e10-Copy.jpg

    (On a scale of 1 to 100, I lose a thousand points for being morbidly-obese, but I gain ten for having the balls to prove it. If you're looking for the shirtless pic, it's on LiveLeak under the heading "Extremely Graphic.")

    So who wants to go next?

    Bro-

    Deadlifts, squats, overhead press, bench press, bent-over rows, and curls.

    You’ll be fine.

  132. @Stan Adams
    So who here is mixed-race?

    My grandmother on my mother's side is fully Native American. (She grew up on a reservation and went to an Indian boarding school. She was born less than ten years after the passage of the Indian Citizenship Act.) My mother is half and I'm one-quarter.

    When I emerged from the womb, I looked pretty damn European:
    https://i.ibb.co/6rvGNQY/a0585d10-Copy.jpg

    (The red blotches on my nose are makeup. For Halloween, my family dressed my cousin and me as Raggedy Ann and Andy. respectively.)

    At the age of two, I didn't look much like my mother:
    https://i.ibb.co/ys9MBCd/a0cbf110-Copy.jpg

    In most of my childhood pictures, I looked either glum or sad. Evidently I was wondering what happened to my real family:
    https://i.ibb.co/Ns7ZDsj/AD7875-A4-156-C-45-CA-BB00-86868-C8-F1-A0-B-Copy.jpg

    Now in my mid-thirties, I've blossomed into one of those fat incel sperg types. I don't like to post my picture online. But, in the interests of scientific research, and for the lulz, I'll go ahead and show you. If you've been laboring under the delusion that I look like an underwear model, prepare to be disappointed:
    https://i.ibb.co/NWbZNHV/8e026e10-Copy.jpg

    (On a scale of 1 to 100, I lose a thousand points for being morbidly-obese, but I gain ten for having the balls to prove it. If you're looking for the shirtless pic, it's on LiveLeak under the heading "Extremely Graphic.")

    So who wants to go next?

    Hasn’t it occurred to you that your grandmother wasn’t fully Indian? Even in those days, full-blooded Indians were scarce. She might have looked like a squaw but still have some cowboy in her.
    In any case, your obesity might be due to your Indian ancestry, as they seem extremely prone to diabetes.

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