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From the New York Times op-ed column:

The Finlandization of the United States
By Roger Cohen
Opinion Columnist

July 9, 2018

MADRID — Over the next week, President Trump will visit Europe to call on allies, get in some golf and then meet President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki. He’ll no doubt feel more comfortable with the Russian leader, whom he considers “fine,” than with freeloading NATO partners who, he says, treat Americans as “schmucks.” …

… The Finlandization of Trump’s United States is pretty much complete. …

Traveling from Madrid to beautiful Segovia the other day, in a line of traffic full of Spaniards fleeing the capital for the weekend, I gazed out on a wealthy country. Spain was poor and under a dictatorship a little more than four decades ago. That’s what the European Union does. It’s a transformative peace magnet delivering democratic stability and prosperity to more than a half-billion people. That’s why the United States has always supported it.

So maybe the wealthy Spain of today should pay a little higher fraction of its defense than the poor Spain of 1978?

A European who visited Trump recently tells me he was shocked by two things: the president’s venom against European allies that don’t buy enough American goods even as they ask the United States to protect them, and his paean to the new xenophobic Italian government that, in Trump’s view, is finally getting with the anti-immigrant program.

It’s almost as if Trump has some understanding of the reality behind World’s Most Important Graph

Trump’s with Matteo Salvini, the Italian interior minister from the anti-immigrant League party. He’s with Viktor Orban, the Hungarian prime minister who is successfully exporting across Europe his illiberal template for a closed democracy that can produce only one election result.

I.e., under the Orban-Salvini system, the only election result possible, taken at the most abstract level, is the People occasionally electing a new government, which is Bad, in contrast to the Cohen-Brecht system of the Government electing a new and less unsatisfactory people, which is Good.

… The question remains: Why is Trump in Putin’s thrall? He may be compromised, whether by Russian intelligence or money.

Screenshot 2018-07-09 18.38.59Meanwhile, in New York Magazine, Jonathan Chait offers a vast A Beautiful Mind-style diagram.

The colored yarn connections prove that Trump has been a deep underground Bridge of Spies-style Moscow sleeper agent since 1987 when the KGB chose him to burrow anonymously into the American hinterland and attract no attention until finally activated by his controllers.

(Other Soviet candidates for this ultra low-profile spy role in 1987 included Madonna, Jesse Jackson, Hulk Hogan, Robin Williams, John Paul II, Eddie Murphy, and Andre the Giant.)

Here’s Chait’s self-image of himself unraveling the nefarious Kremlin plot:

Chait explains his reasoning:

It is often said that Donald Trump has had the same nationalistic, zero-sum worldview forever. But that isn’t exactly true. Yes, his racism and mendacity have been evident since his youth, but those who have traced the evolution of his hypernationalism all settle on one year in particular: 1987. Trump “came onto the political stage in 1987 with a full-page ad in the New York Times attacking the Japanese for relying on the United States to defend it militarily,” reported Edward Alden, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. “The president has believed for 30 years that these alliance commitments are a drain on our finite national treasure,” a White House official told the Washington Post columnist Josh Rogin. Tom Wright, another scholar who has delved into Trump’s history, reached the same conclusion. “1987 is Trump’s breakout year. There are only a couple of examples of him commenting on world politics before then.”

And here’s a photo of Chait hard at work in New York Magazine’s secret sub-basement conspiracy-deconstructing lair uncovering the final link connecting Putin and Trump as Chait realizes that the mysterious Pepe Silvia does not exist.

What changed that year? One possible explanation is that Trump published The Art of the Deal, which sped up his transformation from an aggressive, publicity-seeking New York developer to a national symbol of capitalism. But the timing for this account does not line up perfectly — the book came out on November 1, and Trump had begun opining loudly on trade and international politics two months earlier. The other important event from that year is that Trump visited Moscow.

Other events in 1987 included a broad Establishment consensus, epitomized in Yale historian Paul Kennedy’s 1987 bestseller The Rise and Fall of Great Powers, which argued by a wealth of historical analogies, that the U.S. was exhausting itself supporting Cold War allies around the world. (As it turned out, of course, the Soviet Union was exhausting itself even faster.)

In 1985, the Soviet Red Army had 53,000 tanks and 5 million troops in uniform, so there were reasons for the USA to undertake massive defense spending on the Fulda Gap. Still, Professor Kennedy did have a point: rivalry with the Soviet Union was expensive.

Today, the Soviet Red Army isn’t really quite so massive, but everybody knows that the only reason the President of the USA might ask the “now wealthy” Spaniards to chip in some more for their own defense is because Trump has been Putin’s agent for 31 years.

Here’s video of Chait explaining it all:

And here’s an excerpt from the autobiographical screenplay Jonathan Chait is working on: “The Putin-Trump Code and How I Cracked It:”

After all, you can’t put anything past Chait, who was Stephen Glass’s best friend and co-author at The New Republic. In the movie Shattered Glass, Chait’s character was renamed “Amy Brand” and played by Melanie Lynskey:

 
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  1. The best part of the chart is that MMA fighter Fedor Emelianenko is a link between Putin and Trump. His old fights – when he was fighting in Japan – are things of beauty.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    The best part of the chart is that MMA fighter Fedor Emelianenko is a link between Putin and Trump.
     
    Is Kevin Bacon on that chart anywhere? If not, it's not worth the paper it's printed on.
    , @Twinkie

    His old fights – when he was fighting in Japan – are things of beauty.
     
    No drug testing and lots of cans. He almost got knocked out by Fujita!

    His fights with Crocop and Big Nog were excellent though, as was submitting Kevin Randleman after getting monster suplexed on his head.

    It was sad to see him get KOd by a middle weight (Hendo) and doubly sad to see him awarded a “win” against another middle weight (Fabio Maldonado) after being knocked out on his feet.
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  2. OT, the president of Croatia

    https://www.instagram.com/p/Bk_JnY5h5OD

    Read More
    • Replies: @It's All Ball Bearings
    That be Ice T's bitch; however I don't tire of seeing the Croatian prez. Hope they win the WC just so she gets more screen time.
    , @blahbahblah
    That's CoCo...
    , @Tiny Duck
    Like me most white girls she secretly craves Black Men
    , @Father O'Hara
    Why'd they put Ice T bitch Coco up there? Much rather see the Presidential MILF in a bikini.
    Its all good,tho. Ice T still can't act worth a damn.
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  3. Tom-in-VA says:

    It’s a wilderness of mirrors, I tell ya. The beauty of this kind of thinking is that an absence of evidence is just proof of how devilishly clever the other side is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @David
    "absence of evidence is just proof"

    For example, from near the end: "Trump’s determination to conciliate Putin can’t be dismissed as casual trolling or some idle attraction to a friendly face. It has a serious cost: He is raising suspicions among the public, and among probably some hawkish Republican senators, whose support he very much needs against Mueller. His motive for these foreign-policy moves is obviously strong enough in his mind to be worth prolonging an investigation he is desperate to terminate."

    If he isn't guilty, why would he act inculpable? See?
    , @pyrrhus
    I wonder if Cohen has actually been to "wealthy" Spain...The ex-pats there are fairly wealthy, but the people of Spain certainly are not...they can't afford clothes dryers, and few of them own automobiles...Nor are there many high level restaurants.

    It's almost like guys in the Carlos Slim blog just make stuff up all the time....

    , @SunBakedSuburb
    "It's a wilderness of mirrors, I tell ya."

    It actually is, but not with Trump; he's refreshingly transparent. The rest of them, the clever ones, are rooms within rooms. They have made pacts with the things in the dark.
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  4. anon[149] • Disclaimer says:

    But the timing for this account does not line up perfectly — the book came out on November 1, and Trump had begun opining loudly on trade and international politics two months earlier.

    I’m not quite sure I get the implication here. Is Jonathan Chait of the opinion that Trump wrote his book in one day?

    Our best and brightest, clearly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    No, he's saying the President went back in time and gave himself a copy of The Art of the Deal, Biff Tannen-style.
    , @Barnard
    Isn't the liberal argument that Trump didn't write the book at all and doesn't even know what is in it? Doesn't the ghostwriter for Art of the Deal bash him as a dunce every couple of months? It is hard to keep up with where the left is at on this.
    , @kaganovitch
    Well, the alternative is that Trump decided to get out ahead of the publication date with a healthy dose of exposure. But how plausible is that? After all, what the hell does Donald Trump know about marketing??
    , @Anon
    Well, Trump didn't write it anyway, but more to the point, as someone who has written a few published books of my own, it would take months to come out (check out the "pre-publication" links on Amazon), unless it's some super-special "ripped from the headlines" exploitation job, so yeah, he's an idiot.
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  5. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

    Other events in 1987 included a broad Establishment consensus, epitomized in Yale historian Paul Kennedy’s 1987 bestseller The Rise and Fall of Great Powers, which argued by a wealth of historical analogies, that the U.S. was exhausting itself supporting Cold War allies around the world. (As it turned out, of course, the Soviet Union was exhausting itself even faster.)

    Incidentally, the reason Kennedy turned out to be wrong and why the Soviet Union was exhausting itself compared to us was that the Soviet Union had a trade surplus with its satellites and allies. The Soviet Union was exporting lots of real goods abroad and importing less. Domestic consumption was suppressed as a result, and the domestic economy had to subsidize the Soviet military-industrial complex. Whereas the opposite has obtained in the US. Foreign countries have subsidized US consumption and the US military industrial complex.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Whereas the opposite has obtained in the US. Foreign countries have subsidized US consumption and the US military industrial complex.
     
    DISAGREE. That is the situation NOW, but it was not during the Cold War era. Up until the mid-1980's the USA did damn well for itself producing its own goods, and go back to the 1960's (middle of the CW) and we were producing goods for consumption all over the free world.

    Steve Sailer couldn't go into all this in the one post, as it's off the topic really, but it was also President Reagan's intentional-or-not bluffing at the summit in Iceland about America's "Star Wars" anti-ballistic missile technology. That made the Soviets think they'd need to spend a whole 'nother chunk of money on military hardware, and once that sunk in, things may have looked hopeless for them.
    , @Neil Templeton

    The Soviet Union was exporting lots of real goods abroad and importing less. Domestic consumption was suppressed as a result, and the domestic economy had to subsidize the Soviet military-industrial complex.
     
    Help me here. It sounds like the USSR was exporting lots of raw materials and other goods, using the cash to manufacture or purchase armaments, and having no cash left for imports of important consumption goods. What mechanism prevented the country from manufacturing the necessary consumption goods internally? How does this make Kennedy wrong? The fact that the USSR model was even less sustainable does not provide much information on the value of the US model.
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  6. The Democratic Party wants an open-hot war with Christian Russia. What other conclusion can one draw? Trump’s policy towards Christian Russia has been very aggressive and dangerous….the Democratic Party wants an even more aggressive and dangerous policy towards Christian Russia.

    At the most fundamental level it is both a race war and social-cultural war that the Democratic Party is waging against Christian Russia and Trump’s White Conservative Christian Voting Bloc.

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  7. Achilles says:

    A long-time observer of our hysterical and neurotic MSM would have to suspect that a large part of their obsession with Russia has some relation to the impenetrable and internecine politics of Russian Jewish oligarchs and Putin’s inner circle. Not that these oligarchs form a uniform bloc, far from that, but the perceived collective Jewish interest relative to the Putin regime undoubtedly drives the agenda of much of the American MSM.

    If there existed such a set of Chinese Jewish oligarchs then no doubt we would see a similar paranoid obsession with China.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Yes it's a hidden quarrel among hidden people with hidden motives. We on the outside just get told that Putin is bad because he is mean to gays, women and Protestants. It's really unconvincing. You wonder what the real story is.
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  8. J.Ross says: • Website

    Glenn Greenwald has an excellent capstone piece to this issue. It will be in textbooks in the future if civilization survives.

    https://theintercept.com/2018/07/08/msnbc-does-not-merely-permit-fabrications-against-democratic-party-critics-it-encourages-and-rewards-them/

    When I reflect that Malcolm Nance and Egghead McMuffin and James Comey and Scott Israel and John Podesta are on the other side, I feel like I’m looking at Tojo failing to kill himself after the Japanese surrender in WWII (he tried to shoot himself in the chest). Of course they’re appealling to leftover cold war Pavlovian training, what else would these Einsteins do?

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  9. peterike says:

    A couple of years back I accused Chait of having Jewish privilege on the New York comment board. I was quickly banned.

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  10. anon[149] • Disclaimer says:

    The best thing about that Pepe Silvia meme in its current context is the name of the guy who first made it popular online. From your link:

    “The scene was an instant hit with Always Sunny fans. A month after it aired, IGN user russianhoodlum[2] posted a thread declaring it one of the best Always Sunny scenes to date.”

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  11. BenKenobi says:
    @anon

    But the timing for this account does not line up perfectly — the book came out on November 1, and Trump had begun opining loudly on trade and international politics two months earlier.
     
    I'm not quite sure I get the implication here. Is Jonathan Chait of the opinion that Trump wrote his book in one day?

    Our best and brightest, clearly.

    No, he’s saying the President went back in time and gave himself a copy of The Art of the Deal, Biff Tannen-style.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Trump, time-traveller confirmed.
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  12. @27 year old
    OT, the president of Croatia

    https://www.instagram.com/p/Bk_JnY5h5OD

    That be Ice T’s bitch; however I don’t tire of seeing the Croatian prez. Hope they win the WC just so she gets more screen time.

    Read More
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  13. Barnard says:
    @anon

    But the timing for this account does not line up perfectly — the book came out on November 1, and Trump had begun opining loudly on trade and international politics two months earlier.
     
    I'm not quite sure I get the implication here. Is Jonathan Chait of the opinion that Trump wrote his book in one day?

    Our best and brightest, clearly.

    Isn’t the liberal argument that Trump didn’t write the book at all and doesn’t even know what is in it? Doesn’t the ghostwriter for Art of the Deal bash him as a dunce every couple of months? It is hard to keep up with where the left is at on this.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    Isn’t the liberal argument that Trump didn’t write the book at all and doesn’t even know what is in it?
     
    It is not a "liberal" argument, it is a fact, contested by nobody, that Trump didn't write the book. The best you can say is that is Trump-content as observed and transcribed by Tony Schwarz.
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  14. istevefan says:

    . Spain was poor and under a dictatorship a little more than four decades ago. That’s what the European Union does. It’s a transformative peace magnet delivering democratic stability and prosperity to more than a half-billion people. That’s why the United States has always supported it.

    The EU takes too much credit for the wealth and stability of Europe. If anything the EU is the one pissing away that wealth and definitely the EU is pissing away the stability with its insane importation of a religious group whose various antecedents attempted to take Europe by force for centuries, and even succeeded in Iberia and the Balkans.

    Europe became stable because it was under occupation by outside forces. And when one of those outside forces withdrew we saw outbreaks of conflict that the EU wasn’t able to deal with.

    Europe became wealthy in large part because of Marshall Plan which is to say Uncle Sam. And to this day they still don’t spend much on defense and are able to use that funding for social spending. Compare the German Luftwaffe to the Israeli Air Force.

    Heck the German Air Force isn’t even as powerful as the air component of the US Marine Corps let alone the USAF and USN. If the Marines were its own stand alone armed force, its air component would best that of any NATO nation not named the United States.

    Read More
    • Replies: @WHAT
    Germany will never be allowed anything resembling actual army in the NATO structure. Old adage of "germans down" is still very much in effect.
    And Israel is a bad comparison anyway, first taking murrican goy money and then "buying" goy arms with it.
    , @Anon

    Spain was poor and under a dictatorship a little more than four decades ago.
     
    Poor Mr. Cohen, he was so right about Spain, he just had the wrong time period. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_miracle

    And to this day they still don’t spend much on defense and are able to use that funding for social spending.
     
    For people in many places in the US, it comes to much the same thing.

    It’s a transformative peace magnet
     
    After all, it's not like Spain had had forty years of peace already in 1978, or like Spanish real income was higher then...
    , @TheJester
    It's interesting that so little attention is paid to the 1990 treat finally ending WWII in Europe. Everyone, it seems, has heard of the Treaty of Versailles that ended WWI. Whom, however, has heard of the Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany signed in 1990 that ended WWII?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_on_the_Final_Settlement_with_Respect_to_Germany

    The 1990 Treaty established severe restrictions on the size and capability of the German armed forces in return for West and East Germany reuniting. United Germany was then theoretically given back its sovereignty as the "four Powers" gave up the special rights they had enjoyed as occupying powers since Germany surrendered in 1945.

    However, "sovereignty" came with a basket of restrictions. Germany had to accept, in perpetuity, the territorial changes forced on Germany after WWII. It left open future claims for reparations against Germany by [ fill in the blank ]. The Treaty also required a provision in the German constitution that forbade ever adding addition territory to Germany, regardless of the circumstances.

    Keeping Germany down ...

    The West German Army had been a major force factor for NATO during the Cold War. Going forward, the new Treaty specified that Germany's armed forces, in perpetuity, would be a national disgrace. It could have airplanes ... but they didn't have to fly. It could have tanks ... but they didn't have to work. It could have naval ships ... but they didn't have to float. It could have 370,000 personnel in its armed forces, but this included administrative personnel. As of 28 February 2018, there were a total of 61,054 soldiers on active service in the German Army.

    It is an open question whether the Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany really gave back Germany its sovereignty. Reparations aside, the tenor of the treaty sounds a lot like the Treaty of Versailles. Germany remains under the boot of the United States, Britain, France, and Russia. Like the Treaty of Versailles, the purpose of the "Final Settlement" was to keep Germany down while requiring it to do penance for its "sins" in perpetuity.

    Globalism anyone ...? It is no wonder that nationalism in Germany is still seen as an existential threat to world peace. Indeed, it is for all practical purposes illegal. What would happen, let's say, if a movement sprang up in Germany to abrogate the "Final Settlement" and assert Germany's right to sovereign control over its borders, its economy, its defense, etc.?

    The European Union and NATO were designed to keep that from happening.

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  15. Mr. Anon says:

    “1987 is Trump’s breakout year. There are only a couple of examples of him commenting on world politics before then.”

    How many people had heard Trump opine on anything before then? Outside of New York, was he even that well known?

    Here’s Chait hard at work in New York Magazine’s secret sub-basement conspiracy-decoding lair discovering the final link connecting Putin and Trump via the non-existence of Pepe Silvia.

    The other important event from that year is that Trump visited Moscow.

    The paranoid style in left-wing politics.

    Recruiting The Donald was certainly a master-stroke of soviet spy-craft. Too bad for them they never got to activate their other moles: Merv Griffin, Ron Popeil, and George Zimmer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But George Steinbrenner, Frank Perdue, and Crazy Eddie were all KGB moles in the 1980s.
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  16. Mr. Anon says:

    Actual video of Jonathan Chait, cracking the Trump-Code:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks.
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  17. Jonathan Chait’s New York magazine article is stark, raving lunacy, or, more likely, cynical propaganda of the most vile sort for a gullible (and willing) audience. It expect it will go largely unremarked upon, and unchallenged. There is no embarrassment or moral self-awareness, anymore, among the public intellectuals on the left, on matters regarding Russia.

    One of the minor bits of disinformation floating around that never gets any push-back is the meme that Vladimir Putin is a corrupt man who has an estimated $200 billion fortune. That’s the number that gets bandied about.

    I’ve never seen even the slightest shred of evidence to show that Putin has assets disproportionate to his relatively modest income as the Russian president. Or any evidence of any ostentatious assets at all, save for a sighting, once upon a time, of a nice Swiss watch on his wrist.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    I’ve never seen even the slightest shred of evidence to show that Putin has assets disproportionate to his relatively modest income as the Russian president.

    Are you really this stupid? Or just morally depraved?
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  18. MEH 0910 says:
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  19. I have been told that Ann Margaret was the KGB’s most successful agent.

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  20. Cohen said:

    He’s with Viktor Orban, the Hungarian prime minister who is successfully exporting across Europe his illiberal template…

    I remember when “illiberal” basically had the non-political connotation of “not generous.”

    For the first time, a few days ago, I saw “illiberal” used as a positive term.

    Have liberals so alienated ordinary people that decent folks will soon be proud to announce that they are “illiberal”?

    Is “illiberal” the next “basket of deplorables”?

    Will ordinary Americans soon have T-shirts declaring “I’m illiberal!”?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    ordinary people are still trying to break-out of (whatever the appropriate time would be?????) what their neighbors think about them.
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  21. Veracitor says:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Is Don Siegel a better director than Sidney Lumet?
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  22. @27 year old
    OT, the president of Croatia

    https://www.instagram.com/p/Bk_JnY5h5OD

    That’s CoCo…

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  23. Lagertha says:

    hahahaaa! Roger Cohen and all these idiot journalists that hate 98% of the people who live in the USA…are soooooo out of touch & such, well, jerks. They don’t even understand the real definition of Finlandization. I mean, Finlandization (where were you in AP Euro History, for eff’s sake?!?)

    Is this a set-up, :)? It was mostly cool, rainy…with amazing afternoon sun for the last 4 weeks of my life.

    Hahhaaaa. I took big bets on exactly which remote place in Finland Trump & Putin will meet in! All of them, are so hidden – many off grid (duh) …but have the “works” and can accommodate entourages; chefs; pet walkers; hairdressers; take anyone fishing/golfing/scuba diving/flying/jet skiing/wake-boarding, etc. Ocean temp is about 20 degrees C in late July.

    Finland has not been played by Russia, evah, since 1917. Americans who hate USA and hate the American Settlers of 1600′s……. should just go back to Old Europe and Israel. Finland is still anti-Communist…and, now, they are one of the more prosperous countries in the world. However, they don’t like Outsiders. It was cold there, this June, but is was the right place for me. It got warm and things are changing in Europe, once again. Immigration is being impeded. Poor people can not expect mostly middle class people to keep paying for them.

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  24. Lagertha says:
    @PhysicistDave
    Cohen said:

    He’s with Viktor Orban, the Hungarian prime minister who is successfully exporting across Europe his illiberal template...
     
    I remember when "illiberal" basically had the non-political connotation of "not generous."

    For the first time, a few days ago, I saw "illiberal" used as a positive term.

    Have liberals so alienated ordinary people that decent folks will soon be proud to announce that they are "illiberal"?

    Is "illiberal" the next "basket of deplorables"?

    Will ordinary Americans soon have T-shirts declaring "I'm illiberal!"?

    ordinary people are still trying to break-out of (whatever the appropriate time would be?????) what their neighbors think about them.

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  25. @anon

    But the timing for this account does not line up perfectly — the book came out on November 1, and Trump had begun opining loudly on trade and international politics two months earlier.
     
    I'm not quite sure I get the implication here. Is Jonathan Chait of the opinion that Trump wrote his book in one day?

    Our best and brightest, clearly.

    Well, the alternative is that Trump decided to get out ahead of the publication date with a healthy dose of exposure. But how plausible is that? After all, what the hell does Donald Trump know about marketing??

    Read More
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  26. Anon[183] • Disclaimer says:

    There have been even more elaborate charts on Twitter over the past year, but I’m surprised to see New York Magazine allow Chait to go full Truther on their website.

    To his credit, Chait still seems to retain a little self awareness that he’s starting to come across as an adult-onset schizo case.

    Chait’s chart doesn’t use my favorite type of relationship line: “operative.” What exactly is an operative? If you’re someone’s operative, does that someone have to know you? Does that someone have to know what you’re doing, or are operatives always unilaterally “working towards the fuhrer?”

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    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    I'm not going to read the article-length spewing of someone slipping into the manic part of their cycle. Does he use the word kompromat?
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  27. @Anonymous

    Other events in 1987 included a broad Establishment consensus, epitomized in Yale historian Paul Kennedy’s 1987 bestseller The Rise and Fall of Great Powers, which argued by a wealth of historical analogies, that the U.S. was exhausting itself supporting Cold War allies around the world. (As it turned out, of course, the Soviet Union was exhausting itself even faster.)
     
    Incidentally, the reason Kennedy turned out to be wrong and why the Soviet Union was exhausting itself compared to us was that the Soviet Union had a trade surplus with its satellites and allies. The Soviet Union was exporting lots of real goods abroad and importing less. Domestic consumption was suppressed as a result, and the domestic economy had to subsidize the Soviet military-industrial complex. Whereas the opposite has obtained in the US. Foreign countries have subsidized US consumption and the US military industrial complex.

    Whereas the opposite has obtained in the US. Foreign countries have subsidized US consumption and the US military industrial complex.

    DISAGREE. That is the situation NOW, but it was not during the Cold War era. Up until the mid-1980′s the USA did damn well for itself producing its own goods, and go back to the 1960′s (middle of the CW) and we were producing goods for consumption all over the free world.

    Steve Sailer couldn’t go into all this in the one post, as it’s off the topic really, but it was also President Reagan’s intentional-or-not bluffing at the summit in Iceland about America’s “Star Wars” anti-ballistic missile technology. That made the Soviets think they’d need to spend a whole ‘nother chunk of money on military hardware, and once that sunk in, things may have looked hopeless for them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    It started in the mid 70s. In '72, the US abandoned dollar gold convertability and Treasuries became the basis for global reserves, which meant foreign holders of Treasuries financed the US budget deficit and military spending. '75 was the last year we had a trade surplus, and the trade deficit swelled during the 80s, along with the budget deficit.
    , @hyperbola
    Reagan was a traitorous lackey of a foreign sect from the very beginning.

    Shamir’s October Surprise Admission
    https://consortiumnews.com/2012/07/03/shamirs-october-surprise-admission/
    Two decades ago, ex-Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir offered the stunning confirmation that “of course” an October Surprise plot had blocked President Jimmy Carter from gaining the release of 52 U.S. hostages in Iran, thus helping Ronald Reagan win the presidency in 1980,....

    To "pay off" his israeli masters, Reagan then gave the Zioncons control of foreign policy in Central America, where they promptly produced millions of refugees in the US.

    How Neocons Destabilized Europe
    https://consortiumnews.com/2015/09/07/how-neocons-destabilized-europe/
    ....When I first encountered the neocons in the 1980s, they had been given Central America to play with. President Ronald Reagan had credentialed many of them, bringing into the U.S. government neocon luminaries such as Elliott Abrams and Robert Kagan. But Reagan mostly kept them out of the big-power realms: the Mideast and Europe.

    Those strategic areas went to the “adults,” people like James Baker, George Shultz, Philip Habib and Brent Scowcroft. The poor Central Americans, as they tried to shed generations of repression and backwardness imposed by brutal right-wing oligarchies, faced U.S. neocon ideologues who unleashed death squads and even genocide against peasants, students and workers.

    The result not surprisingly was a flood of refugees, especially from El Salvador and Guatemala, northward to the United States. The neocon “success” in the 1980s, crushing progressive social movements and reinforcing the oligarchic controls, left most countries of Central America in the grip of corrupt regimes and crime syndicates, periodically driving more waves of what Reagan called “feet people” through Mexico to the southern U.S. border.....


    Lets also remember that it was Reagan who started subsidizing the move of American jobs and companies to foreign countries.


    How Reagan Sold The United States Piece By Piece
    http://borderlessnewsandviews.com/2012/02/08/how-reagan-sold-the-united-states-piece-by-piece/
    .... It is not a coincidence that China’s progress started during Reagan presidency. It was Reagan who started the process of deregulation that ultimately resulted in American jobs being outsourced all over the world and, a by the end of his era, there was a large increase in crappy jobs for Americans.....


    As for "star wars", that boondoggle was really about channeling corrruption to the "defense industries".

    The US Missile Defence System Is The Magic Pudding That Will Never Run Out
    https://www.countercurrents.org/monbiot200808.htm
    ..... The system has been in development since 1946, and so far it has achieved a grand total of nothing. You wouldn't know it if you read the press releases published by the Pentagon's missile defence agency: the word "success" features more often than any other noun.... Missile defence is so expensive and the measures required to evade it so cheap that if the US government were serious about making the system work it would bankrupt the country, just as the arms race helped to bring the Soviet Union down. By spending a couple of billion dollars on decoy technologies, Russia would commit the US to trillions of dollars of countermeasures. The cost ratios are such that even Iran could outspend the US.....
    The US has spent between $120bn and $150bn on the programme since Ronald Reagan relaunched it in 1983. Under George Bush, the costs have accelerated. The Pentagon has requested $62bn for the next five-year tranche, which means that the total cost between 2003 and 2013 will be $110bn. Yet there are no clear criteria for success. As a recent paper in the journal Defense and Security Analysis shows, the Pentagon invented a new funding system in order to allow the missile defence programme to evade the government's usual accounting standards. It's called spiral development, which is quite appropriate, because it ensures that the costs spiral out of control.....
    So why commit endless billions to a programme that is bound to fail? I'll give you a clue: the answer is in the question. It persists because it doesn't work.

    US politics, because of the failure by both Republicans and Democrats to deal with the problems of campaign finance, is rotten from head to toe. But under Bush, the corruption has acquired Nigerian qualities. Federal government is a vast corporate welfare programme, rewarding the industries that give millions of dollars in political donations with contracts worth billions. Missile defence is the biggest pork barrel of all, the magic pudding that won't run out, however much you eat. The funds channelled to defence, aerospace and other manufacturing and service companies will never run dry because the system will never work.

    To keep the pudding flowing, the administration must exaggerate the threats from nations that have no means of nuking it - and ignore the likely responses of those that do......
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  28. @Anonymous

    Other events in 1987 included a broad Establishment consensus, epitomized in Yale historian Paul Kennedy’s 1987 bestseller The Rise and Fall of Great Powers, which argued by a wealth of historical analogies, that the U.S. was exhausting itself supporting Cold War allies around the world. (As it turned out, of course, the Soviet Union was exhausting itself even faster.)
     
    Incidentally, the reason Kennedy turned out to be wrong and why the Soviet Union was exhausting itself compared to us was that the Soviet Union had a trade surplus with its satellites and allies. The Soviet Union was exporting lots of real goods abroad and importing less. Domestic consumption was suppressed as a result, and the domestic economy had to subsidize the Soviet military-industrial complex. Whereas the opposite has obtained in the US. Foreign countries have subsidized US consumption and the US military industrial complex.

    The Soviet Union was exporting lots of real goods abroad and importing less. Domestic consumption was suppressed as a result, and the domestic economy had to subsidize the Soviet military-industrial complex.

    Help me here. It sounds like the USSR was exporting lots of raw materials and other goods, using the cash to manufacture or purchase armaments, and having no cash left for imports of important consumption goods. What mechanism prevented the country from manufacturing the necessary consumption goods internally? How does this make Kennedy wrong? The fact that the USSR model was even less sustainable does not provide much information on the value of the US model.

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Yes, I'd like to have this explained in more detail as well.
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  29. … proving that Trump has been a deep underground Moscow sleeper agent since 1987 when the KGB chose him to burrow anonymously into the American hinterland and attract no attention until finally activated by his controllers.

    Trump wanted to be a deep underground Moscow sleeper agent, I want to be a deep underground Moscow sleeper agent, my Grandmama wants to be a deep underground Moscow sleeper agent! Just quit now, Mayo!

    BTW, I really like your Beautiful Mind theme in this one, Steve. That kind of humor really adds to the posts. Nice work.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    SS Steve - Master & Commander; our true North...hahhaaa!
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  30. 1987? Wasn’t he too busy [email protected] Marla Maples around that time to worry about the Russians?

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    probably. There is a shelf-life for chasing tail for both men and women. After 50, no one (strangers) cares about you.

    But, now,...it is so serious.

    I am 100% behind Trump bc he is so "outta here"!..he is a Punk and an Outsider..but few people get that. I am old enough (lived thru the crazy 80's in NYC) to know what Trump may be driving for. He is a weird and stealth dude...this is why 4chan and reddit peeps like him.

    Europe must become more Finlandized and find their balls...that, is what should be expected. They can no longer wait around for USA and their battleships to protect them.

    , @John Cunningham
    How foolish of you, Rosamund! Isn't it obvious that Marla Maples was his KGB control?
    , @Jim Don Bob

    Wasn’t he too busy [email protected] Marla Maples around that time to worry about the Russians?
     
    I wouldn't be worrying about ANYTHING if I'd been [email protected] Marla Maples back then.
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  31. @sleeping noticer
    The best part of the chart is that MMA fighter Fedor Emelianenko is a link between Putin and Trump. His old fights - when he was fighting in Japan - are things of beauty.

    The best part of the chart is that MMA fighter Fedor Emelianenko is a link between Putin and Trump.

    Is Kevin Bacon on that chart anywhere? If not, it’s not worth the paper it’s printed on.

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  32. Anonym says:

    The only thing worse than Chain Migration is Chait Migration.

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  33. Anon7 says:

    Omigod, this is great! I want that New York Magazine diagram in a poster. The TrumpRussia story is a classic tale of cognitive dissonance. Democrats can’t believe that HRC lost to someone as stupid and boorish as Trump, so… it must have been Putin! (Great picture of Spymaster Putin, btw).

    However, since I’m a fair-minded guy who believes in equal time, here’s the equivalent Republican tale of cognitive dissonance. It’s impossible that an inexperienced black guy could beat someone as qualified as George Romney, so…

    … Obama was never the President!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.
    , @Achilles
    Based on the positioning in that New York magazine diagram, Trump's inner circle consists of:

    1. George Papadopoulos
    2. Michael Cohen
    3. Jared Kushner
    4. Donald Trump, Jr.
    5. Paul Manafort
    6. Michael Flynn

    In fact, Papadopoulos is positioned even closer to Trump than his own son Donald Trump, Jr.

    I can certainly see from the chart why such great hopes are placed on Papadopoulos flipping on Trump to turn state's evidence.

    But must we not by the same token credit Papadopoulos with masterminding the amazing upset election victory?
    , @CJ

    Omigod, this is great! I want that New York Magazine diagram in a poster.
     
    Me too. It's classic material. Believing it or not, or pretending to believe it, is entirely a matter of taste. You could put it on your office wall if you were a mole inside Google.
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  34. Lagertha says:
    @Rosamond Vincy
    1987? Wasn't he too busy [email protected] Marla Maples around that time to worry about the Russians?

    probably. There is a shelf-life for chasing tail for both men and women. After 50, no one (strangers) cares about you.

    But, now,...it is so serious.

    I am 100% behind Trump bc he is so “outta here”!..he is a Punk and an Outsider..but few people get that. I am old enough (lived thru the crazy 80′s in NYC) to know what Trump may be driving for. He is a weird and stealth dude…this is why 4chan and reddit peeps like him.

    Europe must become more Finlandized and find their balls…that, is what should be expected. They can no longer wait around for USA and their battleships to protect them.

    Read More
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  35. 22pp22 says:

    I live in a tiny town hours from the nearest settlement of any size surrounded by high mountains covered in snow. Increasingly, I take little interest in events beyond the frontiers of Central Otago. This is doing wonders for my blood pressure and allowing me to be more dispassionate.

    The Dems are being really stupid.

    They have been screeching about Russia for the better part of two years and have come up with no evidence. They treat Russia as the Great Satan, something they never did when the USSR still existed and was thrashing America in proxy wars all over the globe from Nicaragua to Vietnam.

    They react with horror to innocuous comments like “It’s OK to be white.”

    They call for open borders when anyone who lives outside a university campus knows that that would be catastrophic. You don’t have to be a Sailerite to see it. It is still the conventional wisdom.

    Are there still enough traditional Americans to vote down this insanity? Why is nobody saying: Where the beef? This is more extremist than Jeremy Corbyn.

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    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    They have been screeching about Russia for the better part of two years and have come up with no evidence.

    No evidence, other than the myriad of indictments Mueller has already brought. The circumstantial evidence is overwhelming, every day some new meeting comes to light, witnesses conveniently keep dying, every new revelation ends up confirming some element of the Steele dossier rather than disproving it, and most damning of all is simply Trump's behavior. Why is he stonewalling? Why has he been stonewalling from day one? Why does Trump continue to suck up to Putin for no obvious reason? Why is Trump so intent on destroying the EU and NATO? All of a sudden Noam Chomsky and Stephen Cohen seem to be running US foreign policy.

    It is sad to see Sailer turn traitor in a misguided belief that Vladimir Putin is going to save us from the black hordes. Putin runs the most Muslim country in Europe, he is a white nationalist the same way that Hilary Clinton is a great humanitarian.
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  36. Lagertha says:

    Europe must figure out their multi-culti bs programs (and justify taxing their people even more) to deal with all the increasing amounts of Chechnyians, Afghanis, Bulgarians, Africans, etc., (all male) teeming over their borders. Let Europe suffer the consequences of exalting their moral superiority, I say. Good luck ;)…but, I don’t care about you…Life is: your family and you; your friends and your pets (most Muslims hate dogs; and eat horses)…that is it.

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    • Replies: @Old Jew
    Bulgarians?

    Bulgaria is part of the European Union.
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  37. Cortes says:

    In 2010 (January) I witnessed for the first time people dive into skips (?dumpsters in the US) outside a row of restaurants in the very busy resort of Torremolinos, outside Malaga in SE Spain. Since then, I’ve seen the same thing occur elsewhere in Spain and read of the huge percentage of unemployed people of marriageable age still living with their aging parents. The horrible phrase I’ve heard quite often is “vuelta a la penuria” or return to penury. No doubt they are just the inconvenient “little people” for Mr Cohen. Once upon a time journalists could be expected to have their eyes open to reality.

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  38. Lagertha says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    ... proving that Trump has been a deep underground Moscow sleeper agent since 1987 when the KGB chose him to burrow anonymously into the American hinterland and attract no attention until finally activated by his controllers.
     
    Trump wanted to be a deep underground Moscow sleeper agent, I want to be a deep underground Moscow sleeper agent, my Grandmama wants to be a deep underground Moscow sleeper agent! Just quit now, Mayo!

    BTW, I really like your Beautiful Mind theme in this one, Steve. That kind of humor really adds to the posts. Nice work.

    SS Steve – Master & Commander; our true North…hahhaaa!

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Master of his own domain, at least ...

    ;-}
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  39. Orban-Salvini system

    Add Netanjahu to those two (and Austrian Kunz and ? Bavarian Seehofer).

    https://www.politico.eu/article/viktor-orban-israeli-intelligence-firm-targeted-ngos-during-hungarys-election-campaign-george-soros/

    Netanjahu has declared numerous times, that Orban is right, and Soros is wrong. If I mention this in German discussions, claiming that it might be a bit of a problem to declare, that Orban is an antisemite, since Netanjahu is clearly supporting him, the answers are at times of this kind: Oh, why don’t we discuss something else?
    It’s not a cognitive dissonance, what this special anti-open borders coalition seems to be causing, but rather a cognitive blockade of the most impressive kind. The social world too is full of “miracles and wonders” in out times (maybe forever, that is).

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  40. For the record:
    Spain is not wealthy. The highest level of convergence with the richest 9 EU countries was in 1975 (the year Franco died), when Spain’s GDP was 81.3% of the average GDP of Germany, Belgium, Denmark, France, the Netherlands, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg and the UK combined. Since then, that rate has never been achieved; in 2012 it was 73.3%.
    Under the EU, a lot of freeways have been built to ensure that northern tourists have a safe trip to the cheap beer and hotels in Spain. That’s about all the progress that the EU has brought to Spain.

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  41. Mr. Sailer’s link to that video clip from A Beautiful Mind is broken, so I thought I’d contribute these.

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  42. WHAT says:
    @istevefan

    . Spain was poor and under a dictatorship a little more than four decades ago. That’s what the European Union does. It’s a transformative peace magnet delivering democratic stability and prosperity to more than a half-billion people. That’s why the United States has always supported it.
     
    The EU takes too much credit for the wealth and stability of Europe. If anything the EU is the one pissing away that wealth and definitely the EU is pissing away the stability with its insane importation of a religious group whose various antecedents attempted to take Europe by force for centuries, and even succeeded in Iberia and the Balkans.

    Europe became stable because it was under occupation by outside forces. And when one of those outside forces withdrew we saw outbreaks of conflict that the EU wasn't able to deal with.

    Europe became wealthy in large part because of Marshall Plan which is to say Uncle Sam. And to this day they still don't spend much on defense and are able to use that funding for social spending. Compare the German Luftwaffe to the Israeli Air Force.

    Heck the German Air Force isn't even as powerful as the air component of the US Marine Corps let alone the USAF and USN. If the Marines were its own stand alone armed force, its air component would best that of any NATO nation not named the United States.

    Germany will never be allowed anything resembling actual army in the NATO structure. Old adage of “germans down” is still very much in effect.
    And Israel is a bad comparison anyway, first taking murrican goy money and then “buying” goy arms with it.

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  43. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon7
    Omigod, this is great! I want that New York Magazine diagram in a poster. The TrumpRussia story is a classic tale of cognitive dissonance. Democrats can't believe that HRC lost to someone as stupid and boorish as Trump, so... it must have been Putin! (Great picture of Spymaster Putin, btw).

    However, since I'm a fair-minded guy who believes in equal time, here's the equivalent Republican tale of cognitive dissonance. It's impossible that an inexperienced black guy could beat someone as qualified as George Romney, so...


    ... Obama was never the President!

    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.
     
    Please let this be true. But I don’t think even she has that level of lack of self-awareness.
    , @Anon7
    Unfortunately the graphic of Obama’s birth certificate didn’t appear in my post.

    I am unable to contain my glee over HRC’s graceless (and typically female) refusal to step aside. The more time and attention wasted on her by Dems, the better for us.

    Also, the further Left the Dems can be pushed, the better for us. I try to emphasize the sheer volume of cash that will be needed to welcome every unskilled indigent in the world to my lib friends, and then I ask if they plan to rely on Social Security and Medicare when they retire.
    , @Jim Don Bob

    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.
     
    Quite possibly. She and Bill were slumming with the common people recently: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5935411/Bill-Hillary-Clinton-fly-commercial-TWICE-one-weekend-former-president-mingling-fans.html

    Neither one of them has flown commercial in the past 30 years I'll bet.

    Bill was reading the novel Crimson Lake, about a man accused of abducting a 13-year-old girl.
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    I hesitate to wish ill on anyone, but I hope she has one of her trademark falls down a Mayan step-pyramid before that happens. Many will argue that her candidacy guarantees a Trump landslide victory, but I wouldn't take the smallest chance of Cackles getting anywhere near the White House again. That woman is a Hall Monitor if I ever saw one. It's all there: the self-righteousness, the smugness, the for-your-own-good routine. From all such, good Lord deliver us.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Trump should have offered Hillary the seat on the Supreme Court and then watched as she drove herself crazier trying to decide if she wanted it or another shot at the brass ring. Would have made great theatre.
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  44. @Mr. Anon
    Actual video of Jonathan Chait, cracking the Trump-Code:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vzpu-P2eRuI

    Thanks.

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  45. @Mr. Anon

    “1987 is Trump’s breakout year. There are only a couple of examples of him commenting on world politics before then.”
     
    How many people had heard Trump opine on anything before then? Outside of New York, was he even that well known?

    Here’s Chait hard at work in New York Magazine’s secret sub-basement conspiracy-decoding lair discovering the final link connecting Putin and Trump via the non-existence of Pepe Silvia.

    The other important event from that year is that Trump visited Moscow.
     
    The paranoid style in left-wing politics.

    Recruiting The Donald was certainly a master-stroke of soviet spy-craft. Too bad for them they never got to activate their other moles: Merv Griffin, Ron Popeil, and George Zimmer.

    But George Steinbrenner, Frank Perdue, and Crazy Eddie were all KGB moles in the 1980s.

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    • Replies: @TheBoom
    Billy Martin was also a Russian mole. His public feuds with Steinbrenner were just Putin's (while still in the KGB) way of their passing info to the Russians.
    , @Charles Pewitt
    George Steinbrenner had a run-in with two KGB agents in an elevator in Los Angeles. There was a rumour David Lynch was going to film a movie about the altercation, but he thought better of it because the screenplay didn't come to him right off the bat.

    Los Angeles is a nest of KGB agents everywhere. Some people claim to be bothered by it. But the Republican Party and the Democrat Party don't seem to mind the hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens in Los Angeles County, though.

    Thoughts about David Lynch's new book and Lynch having some respect for Trump:

    David Lynch and Bill Belichick remind me of guys who could relate to Trump.

    Belichick famously resigned as head coach of the New York Jets thusly:

    I resign as the HC of the NYJ. BB

    I imagine David Lynch broke up with Isabella Rossellini thusly:

    I resign as BF of IR. DL

    Terse and to the point guys like Belichick and David Lynch can say a lot or say nothing and you might not know the difference.
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  46. Anon[274] • Disclaimer says:
    @BenKenobi
    No, he's saying the President went back in time and gave himself a copy of The Art of the Deal, Biff Tannen-style.

    Trump, time-traveller confirmed.

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  47. @Rosamond Vincy
    1987? Wasn't he too busy [email protected] Marla Maples around that time to worry about the Russians?

    How foolish of you, Rosamund! Isn’t it obvious that Marla Maples was his KGB control?

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Whatfor they peeck someone so nekulturny?
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  48. Achilles says:
    @Anon7
    Omigod, this is great! I want that New York Magazine diagram in a poster. The TrumpRussia story is a classic tale of cognitive dissonance. Democrats can't believe that HRC lost to someone as stupid and boorish as Trump, so... it must have been Putin! (Great picture of Spymaster Putin, btw).

    However, since I'm a fair-minded guy who believes in equal time, here's the equivalent Republican tale of cognitive dissonance. It's impossible that an inexperienced black guy could beat someone as qualified as George Romney, so...


    ... Obama was never the President!

    Based on the positioning in that New York magazine diagram, Trump’s inner circle consists of:

    1. George Papadopoulos
    2. Michael Cohen
    3. Jared Kushner
    4. Donald Trump, Jr.
    5. Paul Manafort
    6. Michael Flynn

    In fact, Papadopoulos is positioned even closer to Trump than his own son Donald Trump, Jr.

    I can certainly see from the chart why such great hopes are placed on Papadopoulos flipping on Trump to turn state’s evidence.

    But must we not by the same token credit Papadopoulos with masterminding the amazing upset election victory?

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  49. Anon[146] • Disclaimer says:

    Chait –> Trump –> Russian agent – is trolling.
    Similar to the Flat Earth Theory chaps on the internet.

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    • Replies: @Sandmich
    Who is he trolling? Seriously, so many lefties nowadays make their own points so badly that it's indistinguishable from actual trolling. The only way the ChaitChart could be more ridiculous is if he put a cartoon character on it. The moment I ask myself "who believes in that crap" there's college educated lefties (ok, white women) on Facebook parroting the outlandish propaganda.
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  50. TheBoom says:
    @Steve Sailer
    But George Steinbrenner, Frank Perdue, and Crazy Eddie were all KGB moles in the 1980s.

    Billy Martin was also a Russian mole. His public feuds with Steinbrenner were just Putin’s (while still in the KGB) way of their passing info to the Russians.

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  51. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Whereas the opposite has obtained in the US. Foreign countries have subsidized US consumption and the US military industrial complex.
     
    DISAGREE. That is the situation NOW, but it was not during the Cold War era. Up until the mid-1980's the USA did damn well for itself producing its own goods, and go back to the 1960's (middle of the CW) and we were producing goods for consumption all over the free world.

    Steve Sailer couldn't go into all this in the one post, as it's off the topic really, but it was also President Reagan's intentional-or-not bluffing at the summit in Iceland about America's "Star Wars" anti-ballistic missile technology. That made the Soviets think they'd need to spend a whole 'nother chunk of money on military hardware, and once that sunk in, things may have looked hopeless for them.

    It started in the mid 70s. In ’72, the US abandoned dollar gold convertability and Treasuries became the basis for global reserves, which meant foreign holders of Treasuries financed the US budget deficit and military spending. ’75 was the last year we had a trade surplus, and the trade deficit swelled during the 80s, along with the budget deficit.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I have no disagreement with that, #400. I didn't want to get into the causes, but just to note the general situation that even in the mid-1980's, though we had trade deficits, America still produced much more than any on other country, and most major consumer items were still made here.

    The Japanese imports of (1st) cameras and electronics started in the early '70's, as the Jap auto imports ramped up in the middle of that decade (the oil "crisis" worked very favorably for them in this regard). China imports did not really take off like a rocket until that early '00's. In the mid-90's I would only see a few things made in China. 15 years, later 95% of most retail-store items were Chinese made.
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  52. Tyrion 2 says: • Website

    Click bait Chait.

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  53. Twinkie says:
    @sleeping noticer
    The best part of the chart is that MMA fighter Fedor Emelianenko is a link between Putin and Trump. His old fights - when he was fighting in Japan - are things of beauty.

    His old fights – when he was fighting in Japan – are things of beauty.

    No drug testing and lots of cans. He almost got knocked out by Fujita!

    His fights with Crocop and Big Nog were excellent though, as was submitting Kevin Randleman after getting monster suplexed on his head.

    It was sad to see him get KOd by a middle weight (Hendo) and doubly sad to see him awarded a “win” against another middle weight (Fabio Maldonado) after being knocked out on his feet.

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    • Replies: @John Gruskos
    His opponents were mostly K-1 tournament winners, former UFC champions, ADCC tournament winners, and combat sports Olympic medalists.

    Some "cans".
    , @Anonym
    He fought some cans but defeated a lot of talent too. Arona, Hunt, Coleman, Schilt, Sylvia, Arlovskiand now Mir (other than the names you mentioned). Several former UFC champions and contenders amongst them.

    If Fedor was using it was not obvious (see the following). The playing field was level.

    https://youtu.be/ZNmQWaeu_2w

    Now he is old though.
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  54. Twinkie says:

    Paul Kennedy’s 1987 bestseller The Rise and Fall of Great Powers, which argued by a wealth of historical analogies, that the U.S. was exhausting itself supporting Cold War allies around the world.

    It’s been a few decades since I read it, but I don’t remember that being the thesis or conclusion of the book. The main thesis – as I recall – was the rather unoriginal contention that military power depended on economic and industrial power, and that overspending on the military degraded that base. His predictions at the end of the book were quite wrong – he expected the Soviet Union to persist as a status quo superpower and Japan to eclipse the U.S.

    The book was highly influential in its day, but his predictions/implications were so off that he quickly fell out of limelight and his next book was a bust.

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  55. Twinkie says:
    @Anon
    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.

    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.

    Please let this be true. But I don’t think even she has that level of lack of self-awareness.

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    • Replies: @RonaldB
    I think the country is best served by having viable candidates in both parties. Wishing HRC on the Democrats just so the Republicans will win easily has numerous dangers.

    1. HRC might just win. The Mueller investigation could bring indictments on Trump based on cooked-up evidence right before election campaigning began. HRC would not make the same mistake of ignoring key fly-by states.

    2. We would be better off with viable alternate solutions by Democrats, rather than relying completely on Trump and the Republican establishment. For example, consider this alternate platform for a centrist Democrat:
    No wall
    Continuation of catch-and-release
    Mandatory e-verify for all employment
    End welfare and public benefits to non-citizens

    It's a bad idea to cook the odds even legitimately.
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  56. @Barnard
    Isn't the liberal argument that Trump didn't write the book at all and doesn't even know what is in it? Doesn't the ghostwriter for Art of the Deal bash him as a dunce every couple of months? It is hard to keep up with where the left is at on this.

    Isn’t the liberal argument that Trump didn’t write the book at all and doesn’t even know what is in it?

    It is not a “liberal” argument, it is a fact, contested by nobody, that Trump didn’t write the book. The best you can say is that is Trump-content as observed and transcribed by Tony Schwarz.

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  57. @22pp22
    I live in a tiny town hours from the nearest settlement of any size surrounded by high mountains covered in snow. Increasingly, I take little interest in events beyond the frontiers of Central Otago. This is doing wonders for my blood pressure and allowing me to be more dispassionate.

    The Dems are being really stupid.

    They have been screeching about Russia for the better part of two years and have come up with no evidence. They treat Russia as the Great Satan, something they never did when the USSR still existed and was thrashing America in proxy wars all over the globe from Nicaragua to Vietnam.

    They react with horror to innocuous comments like "It's OK to be white."

    They call for open borders when anyone who lives outside a university campus knows that that would be catastrophic. You don't have to be a Sailerite to see it. It is still the conventional wisdom.

    Are there still enough traditional Americans to vote down this insanity? Why is nobody saying: Where the beef? This is more extremist than Jeremy Corbyn.

    They have been screeching about Russia for the better part of two years and have come up with no evidence.

    No evidence, other than the myriad of indictments Mueller has already brought. The circumstantial evidence is overwhelming, every day some new meeting comes to light, witnesses conveniently keep dying, every new revelation ends up confirming some element of the Steele dossier rather than disproving it, and most damning of all is simply Trump’s behavior. Why is he stonewalling? Why has he been stonewalling from day one? Why does Trump continue to suck up to Putin for no obvious reason? Why is Trump so intent on destroying the EU and NATO? All of a sudden Noam Chomsky and Stephen Cohen seem to be running US foreign policy.

    It is sad to see Sailer turn traitor in a misguided belief that Vladimir Putin is going to save us from the black hordes. Putin runs the most Muslim country in Europe, he is a white nationalist the same way that Hilary Clinton is a great humanitarian.

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    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    The kompromat is right there for everybody to see.
    , @Cagey Beast
    You're the first intelligent person I think I've encountered (online or in person) who actually believes Trump is a Russian agent. All the others who claim this seem to have been "either stupid or implicated", as they say.
    , @Bill
    Is this irony?
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  58. @PiltdownMan
    Jonathan Chait's New York magazine article is stark, raving lunacy, or, more likely, cynical propaganda of the most vile sort for a gullible (and willing) audience. It expect it will go largely unremarked upon, and unchallenged. There is no embarrassment or moral self-awareness, anymore, among the public intellectuals on the left, on matters regarding Russia.

    One of the minor bits of disinformation floating around that never gets any push-back is the meme that Vladimir Putin is a corrupt man who has an estimated $200 billion fortune. That's the number that gets bandied about.

    I've never seen even the slightest shred of evidence to show that Putin has assets disproportionate to his relatively modest income as the Russian president. Or any evidence of any ostentatious assets at all, save for a sighting, once upon a time, of a nice Swiss watch on his wrist.

    I’ve never seen even the slightest shred of evidence to show that Putin has assets disproportionate to his relatively modest income as the Russian president.

    Are you really this stupid? Or just morally depraved?

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  59. BB753 says:

    “I gazed out on a wealthy country. (..) Spain was poor (…) That’s whst the European Union does”

    No, the EU does not do that. And Spain isn’t wealthier than four decades ago, it just looks more modern. GDP per head was higher in 1978.

    “That’s why the United States has always supported it (the EU) ”

    I’m not so sure about that.

    “It’s a transformative peace magnet delivering democratic stability and prosperity to more than a half-billion people”

    More like an expensive giant scam and a tyrannical überstate that’s been quietly eroding national sovereignty from its member states since its inception.
    It’s only been an economical success story for Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium.

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  60. David says:
    @Tom-in-VA
    It’s a wilderness of mirrors, I tell ya. The beauty of this kind of thinking is that an absence of evidence is just proof of how devilishly clever the other side is.

    “absence of evidence is just proof”

    For example, from near the end: “Trump’s determination to conciliate Putin can’t be dismissed as casual trolling or some idle attraction to a friendly face. It has a serious cost: He is raising suspicions among the public, and among probably some hawkish Republican senators, whose support he very much needs against Mueller. His motive for these foreign-policy moves is obviously strong enough in his mind to be worth prolonging an investigation he is desperate to terminate.”

    If he isn’t guilty, why would he act inculpable? See?

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  61. Traveling from Madrid to beautiful Segovia the other day, in a line of traffic full of Spaniards fleeing the capital for the weekend, I gazed out on a wealthy country. Spain was poor and under a dictatorship a little more than four decades ago. That’s what the European Union does.

    Spain? Wealthy? With it’s official unemployment rate of 16% – the second highest in the EU after Greece?

    http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Unemployment_statistics

    Roger Cohen must be dropping acid again.

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    • Replies: @hyperbola
    In Spain they still calculate unemployment in the way that the US used in the 1970s, i.e. without leaving out millions of people who have given up in desperation. Below is the Asst. Secretary of Treasury from the Reagan administration. Another difference is that Spain has a rather large "black" economy that is not reported to the government (and which provides "jobs" and income to people) as well as much stronger family structures than in the US (which provides "emergency" help). One sees much less desperation in Spanish communities than in many parts of the US.

    Make-Believe America: Why the US Unemployment Rate Doesn’t Indicate Economic Recovery
    https://www.foreignpolicyjournal.com/2018/03/08/make-believe-america-why-the-us-unemployment-rate-doesnt-indicate-economic-recovery/

    Americans live a never-never-land existence. The politicians and presstitutes make sure of that. Consider something as simple as the unemployment rate. The US is said to have full employment with a January 2018 unemployment rate of 4.1 percent, down from 9.8 percent in January 2010.

    However, the low rate of unemployment is contradicted by the long-term decline in the labor force participation rate. After a long rise during the Reagan 1980s, the labor force participation rate peaked in January 1990 at 66.8 percent, more or less holding to that rate for another decade until 2001 when decline set in accelerating in September 2008.

    Allegedly, the current unemployment rate of 4.1 percent is the result of the long recovery that allegedly began in June 2009. However, normally, employment opportunities created by economic recovery cause an increase in the labor force participation rate as people join the work force to take advantage of employment opportunities. A fall in the participation rate is associated with recession or stagnation, not with economic recovery.

    How can this contradiction be reconciled? The answer lies in the measurement of unemployment. If you have not looked for a job in the last four weeks, you are not counted as being unemployed, because you are not counted as being part of the work force. When there are no jobs to be found, job seekers become discouraged and cease looking for jobs. In other words, the 4.1 percent unemployment rate does not count discouraged workers who cannot find jobs.

    The US Bureau of Labor Statistics has a second measure of unemployment that includes workers who have been discouraged and out of the labor force for less than one year. This rate of unemployment is 8.2 percent, double the 4.1 percent reported rate.

    The US government no longer tracks unemployment among discouraged workers who have been out of the work force for more than one year. However, John Williams of shadowstats.com continues to estimate this rate and places it at 22 or 23 percent, a far cry from 4.1 percent.

    In other words, the 4.1 percent unemployment rate does not count the unemployed who do show up in the declining labor force participation rate.

    If the US had a print and TV media instead of the propaganda ministry that it has, the financial press would not tolerate the deception of the public about employment in America.

    Junk economists, of which the US has an over-supply, claim that the decline in the labor force participation rate merely reflects people who prefer to live on welfare than to work for a living and the current generation of young people who prefer life at home with parents paying the bills. This explanation from junk economists does not explain why suddenly Americans discovered welfare and became lazy in 2001 and turned their back on job opportunities. The junk economists also do not explain why, if the economy is at full employment, competition for workers is not driving up wages.

    The reason Americans cannot find jobs and have left the labor force is that US corporations have offshored millions of American jobs in order to raise profits, share prices, and executive bonuses by lowering labor costs. Many American industrial and manufacturing cities have been devastated by the relocation abroad of production for the American consumer market, by the movement abroad of IT and software engineering jobs, and by importing lower paid foreign workers on H1-B and other work visas to take the jobs of Americans. In my book, The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism, I give examples and document the devastating impact jobs offshoring has had on communities, cities, pension funds, and consumer purchasing power.

    John Williams of shadowstats.com questions whether there has been any real growth in the US economy since the 2008 crisis that resulted from the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act. Williams believes that the GDP growth rate is an illusion resulting from the understatement of inflation. Just as unemployment is under-counted, so is inflation......
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  62. Tiny Duck says:
    @27 year old
    OT, the president of Croatia

    https://www.instagram.com/p/Bk_JnY5h5OD

    Like me most white girls she secretly craves Black Men

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    • Troll: IHTG
    • Replies: @tyrone
    So ,tiny you crave black men? ,that answers a lot of questions ,don't worry your secrets safe with us.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Like me most white girls she secretly craves Black Men
     
    Most Croatians are black men, in part, thanks to that notorious shipwreck 400 or 500 years ago, at Ulcinj.

    In medieval times a shipwreck of a Saracen sailing boat beached there with African slaves. Some locals from Ulcinj saved the Africans and integrated the slaves into their community...

    One square in Ulcinj down town is called the “Slave Square” because the pirates from Ulcinj were trading in the 17th and 18th century black slaves from different African countries.

    http://www.visit-ulcinj.com/ulcinj-travel-guide/montenegro-ulcinj/
     
    Alright, technically Ulcinj is in Montenegro and has an Albanian majority. But it's just a short hop down the coast from Croatia, and Tito was hardly the first to unite all these-- there were the Austro-Hungarians and the Ottomans just for starters. Plenty of time for the genes to ripple through the area.
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  63. The funny thing about this is that for eight years the United States had a man in the Oval Office who really did have shady ties to card-carrying Communists, who really had taken unexplained trips to visit curiously influential people in foreign countries of swiveling allegiance, who came from a family of really peculiar deep state operatives, and whose personal biography really was a Manchurian Candidate-esque patchwork of stealth, evasions and fabrications.

    And the media had zero interest.

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    • Replies: @Bugg
    Except don't think Putin is a communist, which was apparently lost on The Lightbringer in his zeal to be worldly and beloved-

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsFR8DbSRQE
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  64. First of all, a lot of the EU countries claim the EU has made them prosperous; I heard a UK remainer make that claim. The while world has gotten wealthier since the formation of the EU, so any benefit to the UK may simply be a spurious correlation. In the case of Spain, tons of EU money have been pumped into it, so there is little doubt the EU has been good for Spain … at least up until now.

    “In 1985, the Soviet Red Army had 53,000 tanks ….”

    Many of those turned out to be mock-ups to mislead us. The CIA “B-team” turned “A-team” in the mid-1980s happily glommed onto exaggerated troop strength and materiel figures to pump up the budget.

    Were the Russians running Trump all along? Good question. He does have a taste for Eastern European women, though a lot of us do too. He also has the decorating tastes, as evidenced by his place in Trump Tower, of a Russian oligarch, though if you took a drive to the wealthier side of Staten Island you’d see the same thing. Maybe Trump is an Italian spy.

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  65. Anon[178] • Disclaimer says:

    First, Trump was a moron. Now, he’s a movie villain genius whose devilish 4D chess plans can only be unraveled by fellow geniuses like Jonathan Chait. Could it be that Trump is just some guy and these people aren’t as clever as they think? How much of this is just ego padding for insecure guys who are now regretting that journalism degree they got?

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I think that's it. The onward horror-movie slog of Trumpzilla stirs some deep self-doubt in the souls of credentialed folks who gravitate toward media & social analysis jobs. In a heated moment one of them might rant about the "dumbing down of America" but they never imagined being out of the clover, having to justify their cognoscenti reputation. Since Brexit/Trump 2016 they act as if they've seen a ghost.

    Witness the labored, shoehorn attempt by Cohen to tar Trump with "Finlandization" -- outside of poli-sci/int'l relations majors, who even knows this arcane term, and more importantly its proper regard to a highly specific historical context? Actually it had, until Cohen, a somewhat right-wing flavor or at least an anti-communist provenance, so to twist it into a quick argument e-grenade is highly clownish and/or desperate ("Hey, 'Finlandization'--that's the ticket!"). Cohen merely tries, and fails, to seem smarter than he is to his peers, which is the underlying and single remaining true purpose of English op-ed journalism.

    To the non-Acela-riding public "Finlandization" indicates nothing bad or ominous, if it means anything at all. On outward evidence Finland presents as a quirky but quaint out-of-the-way country lacking the most visible of our Current Year social problems. As G.K. Chesterton said, the man who thinks any stick is good enough will pick up a boomerang.

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  66. @Anon
    There have been even more elaborate charts on Twitter over the past year, but I'm surprised to see New York Magazine allow Chait to go full Truther on their website.

    To his credit, Chait still seems to retain a little self awareness that he's starting to come across as an adult-onset schizo case.

    Chait's chart doesn't use my favorite type of relationship line: "operative." What exactly is an operative? If you're someone's operative, does that someone have to know you? Does that someone have to know what you're doing, or are operatives always unilaterally "working towards the fuhrer?"

    I’m not going to read the article-length spewing of someone slipping into the manic part of their cycle. Does he use the word kompromat?

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  67. @Peter Akuleyev
    They have been screeching about Russia for the better part of two years and have come up with no evidence.

    No evidence, other than the myriad of indictments Mueller has already brought. The circumstantial evidence is overwhelming, every day some new meeting comes to light, witnesses conveniently keep dying, every new revelation ends up confirming some element of the Steele dossier rather than disproving it, and most damning of all is simply Trump's behavior. Why is he stonewalling? Why has he been stonewalling from day one? Why does Trump continue to suck up to Putin for no obvious reason? Why is Trump so intent on destroying the EU and NATO? All of a sudden Noam Chomsky and Stephen Cohen seem to be running US foreign policy.

    It is sad to see Sailer turn traitor in a misguided belief that Vladimir Putin is going to save us from the black hordes. Putin runs the most Muslim country in Europe, he is a white nationalist the same way that Hilary Clinton is a great humanitarian.

    The kompromat is right there for everybody to see.

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    • Replies: @Anon7
    I hadn’t realized that the Trump dossier strategy idea is Russian in origin: longtime enemies do become like each other.

    In January 1999, Prosecutor General Yury Skuratov was summoned to the Kremlin by then-President Boris Yeltsin’s chief of staff, who showed him a videotape of “a man who looked like” Skuratov frolicking in bed with two prostitutes. Then he asked Skuratov to resign...

    Soon afterward, on April 7, 1999, Putin went on TV himself to claim the tape authentic—that the “man who looked like” Skuratov was indeed Skuratov—and called not only for Skuratov’s resignation, but for a more robust criminal investigation.

    All this is noteworthy not only because this was one of Putin’s key steps toward the presidential throne, but because this dark and convoluted chapter of contemporary Russian history is also, however amazingly, now relevant reading for understanding contemporary American history. Now that Buzzfeed has released a dossier compiled by a private intelligence company, with unverified allegations that the FSB has a video of Donald Trump with prostitutes in the Moscow Ritz Carlton in 2013, America has entered uniquely Russian territory. (I should add that I, like many other journalists, was approached over the summer with the story of the prostitutes and could not verify it.)

    In any case, welcome to the world of kompromat, America.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/01/kompromat-trump-dossier/512891/
     

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  68. Anon[352] • Disclaimer says:

    “I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.”

    I knew she would from the moment her media lackeys started harping over Trump-Putin. It was to set the stage for her to make a comeback by claiming she was robbed and Trump is a traitor. She kept her hands clean while letting her goons do all the peddling and dirty work – typical Clinton strategy…just like Libya and her Viagra lie.

    Personally, I think Clinton would be extremely dangerous as president: incompetent, serial liar, deluded, self-important, emotional warmonger with a track record of failure and motivated by extreme anti-Russian animus while backed by the entirety of state media; she could quickly lead to us into disaster. She wanted to shoot down Russian jets over Syria. CNN definitely would have supported her if she had tried it. By virtue of a divine miracle, we avoided that. Thank God for Trump…and I’m an atheist.

    In any case, I don’t think she will get it. The new democrat party of Ms. Red Chavez will be a tough nut for Ms. White Teacher Lady to crack. She’ll have to devolve to TYT levels of racism to drive up the non-white vote high enough to have a shot.

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    • Replies: @RonaldB
    I agree with you that HRC is extremely dangerous, tempered only by the knowledge that she is susceptible to the wishes of big money contributors, who might pull back from the brink when they see the actual clouds of nuclear war.

    As far as having to increase her non-white vote, recall she lost on two factors: her constituency was crowded up in large cities in blue-safe states, and she lost a considerable proportion of white votes by totally ignoring the flyover swing states that gave Trump his edge.

    An energetic, more centrist Democrat would have a great shot at overcoming these problems, and would likely receive a significant amount of support from the traditional conservative wing of Republicans, plush the McCain-Kassich style Republican.

    I'm not saying this because I want Trump to lose, but because I prefer to have a real fight between competing ideas. Hillary's biggest deficit, from my point of view, is that she genuinely had no ideas at all. Anyone who looked at her policy papers on her website could see they were quite similar to her failed health care plan: a mass of unimaginative, detailed lines and arrows also reminiscent of the Beautiful Mind graphics.
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  69. @Neil Templeton

    The Soviet Union was exporting lots of real goods abroad and importing less. Domestic consumption was suppressed as a result, and the domestic economy had to subsidize the Soviet military-industrial complex.
     
    Help me here. It sounds like the USSR was exporting lots of raw materials and other goods, using the cash to manufacture or purchase armaments, and having no cash left for imports of important consumption goods. What mechanism prevented the country from manufacturing the necessary consumption goods internally? How does this make Kennedy wrong? The fact that the USSR model was even less sustainable does not provide much information on the value of the US model.

    Yes, I’d like to have this explained in more detail as well.

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  70. Altai says:

    Jonathan Chait right now.

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  71. Anon[306] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    But the timing for this account does not line up perfectly — the book came out on November 1, and Trump had begun opining loudly on trade and international politics two months earlier.
     
    I'm not quite sure I get the implication here. Is Jonathan Chait of the opinion that Trump wrote his book in one day?

    Our best and brightest, clearly.

    Well, Trump didn’t write it anyway, but more to the point, as someone who has written a few published books of my own, it would take months to come out (check out the “pre-publication” links on Amazon), unless it’s some super-special “ripped from the headlines” exploitation job, so yeah, he’s an idiot.

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  72. Traveling from Madrid to beautiful Segovia the other day, in a line of traffic full of Spaniards fleeing the capital for the weekend, I gazed out on a wealthy country. Spain was poor and under a dictatorship a little more than four decades ago.

    Just imagine how much more wealthy Spain would be today had the Reds been able to fend off the Generalissimo.

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    • LOL: BB753
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  73. In the movie Shattered Glass, Chait’s character was renamed “Amy Brand” and played by Melanie Lynskey.

    But who played Donald Trump in The Baader Meinhof Complex? We all know Trump got weapons training at that PLO camp in Jordan at the same time the Red Army Faction was there, so who played him in the film? There’s even a scene at the camp in which the German girls are sunbathing nude on a rooftop. We all know Comrade Trump wouldn’t have missed out on that.

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    • Replies: @Lot
    Great movie. Rewatched it last month as a kind of prequel to 7 Days in Entebbe, also a great movie, though not as good as Baader-Meinhoff.
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  74. Wife and I watched Kevin Costner is No Way Out last night. I was chuckling at the parallels to today. I must admit I had forgotten the surprise ending.

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    Funny, I just watched it the other day as well.

    I've been on an unwitting Fred Thompson kick, forgetting he was in that film as the fictional CIA Director and surprised to have seen him as a minor character "Knox Pooley" in a few episodes of Wiseguy.
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  75. Anon[298] • Disclaimer says:
    @istevefan

    . Spain was poor and under a dictatorship a little more than four decades ago. That’s what the European Union does. It’s a transformative peace magnet delivering democratic stability and prosperity to more than a half-billion people. That’s why the United States has always supported it.
     
    The EU takes too much credit for the wealth and stability of Europe. If anything the EU is the one pissing away that wealth and definitely the EU is pissing away the stability with its insane importation of a religious group whose various antecedents attempted to take Europe by force for centuries, and even succeeded in Iberia and the Balkans.

    Europe became stable because it was under occupation by outside forces. And when one of those outside forces withdrew we saw outbreaks of conflict that the EU wasn't able to deal with.

    Europe became wealthy in large part because of Marshall Plan which is to say Uncle Sam. And to this day they still don't spend much on defense and are able to use that funding for social spending. Compare the German Luftwaffe to the Israeli Air Force.

    Heck the German Air Force isn't even as powerful as the air component of the US Marine Corps let alone the USAF and USN. If the Marines were its own stand alone armed force, its air component would best that of any NATO nation not named the United States.

    Spain was poor and under a dictatorship a little more than four decades ago.

    Poor Mr. Cohen, he was so right about Spain, he just had the wrong time period. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_miracle

    And to this day they still don’t spend much on defense and are able to use that funding for social spending.

    For people in many places in the US, it comes to much the same thing.

    It’s a transformative peace magnet

    After all, it’s not like Spain had had forty years of peace already in 1978, or like Spanish real income was higher then…

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  76. Anon7 says:
    @Anon
    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.

    Unfortunately the graphic of Obama’s birth certificate didn’t appear in my post.

    I am unable to contain my glee over HRC’s graceless (and typically female) refusal to step aside. The more time and attention wasted on her by Dems, the better for us.

    Also, the further Left the Dems can be pushed, the better for us. I try to emphasize the sheer volume of cash that will be needed to welcome every unskilled indigent in the world to my lib friends, and then I ask if they plan to rely on Social Security and Medicare when they retire.

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  77. Anon[280] • Disclaimer says:

    “No evidence, other than the myriad of indictments Mueller has already brought.”

    Please. Those “indictments” are all either procedural in nature or have nothing to do with the president directly.

    “The circumstantial evidence is overwhelming, every day some new meeting comes to light, witnesses conveniently keep dying,”

    There is no evidence. Period.

    If any of that were true, we’d already know it. Cohen is an incompetent buffoon incapable of covering his tracks. The evidence should be everywhere but all we have is conspiracy mongering from sheep who can’t think for themselves.

    Further, the NSA is extremely adept at its job, and so is the CIA. They’d already have the evidence if it existed, and they would have leaked it by now. During the Ukraine Crisis, the NSA was able to read sensitive Russian military communiques proving they had sent soldiers into Ukraine. You’d think that this organization would be able to find evidence of a dumbass attorney conspiring with the Russians if it existed.

    “every new revelation ends up confirming some element of the Steele dossier rather than disproving it, and most damning of all is simply Trump’s behavior.”

    Nothing of any real note has been “proved” from that fake dossier. Just the names and locations that government intelligence agencies would already have on anyone of any prominence anyway. The fact that I spy on you and then learn that you visited a bank on some date can easily be added to a false allegation to make it seem true (like you picked up a hooker from the same bank and dumped her body in the ocean after you had your way with her…good luck “disproving” that seeing as though I have video of you entering the bank and a prominent mole inside the bank who said he saw you with the woman).

    My conspiracy theory (of which there is a ton of circumstantial evidence for):

    The Steele Dossier was a clandestine intelligence operation run by the CIA with help from MI6. All countries keep intelligence files on prominent individuals, especially foreign nationals. They filtered dirt from an intelligence file to Steele, who then laundered it via his contacts in Russia to make it seem legitimate….same as the bank example above.

    Since Steele is a foreign national, US intelligence would presumably have a harder time uncovering a plot he was involved with outside the US. Steele also had Cold War and Yeltsin-era contacts in Russia, making any allegation he made seem credible. In all, Michael Steele was the perfect person for traitorous elements of the US Deep State to pick for this assignment – hard to track, hard to disprove, and seemingly credible just for who he was.

    1. The British have a long history of interfering in our elections and foreign policy, including rigging the 1940 GOP convention in favor of a man sure to lose to the pro-British, clandestinely pro-war, Franklin Roosevelt.

    2. After the election, James Clapper, in a panic, called Trump to assure him that the Steele Dossier wasn’t “an intelligence operation” against him. Hmm….mighty strange behavior now that we are on the subject.

    3. They hired a spy to infiltrate the Trump campaign.

    4. This spy also once illegally passed information to the Reagan campaign in 1980 from Jimmy Carter in order to help George H.W. Bush, former CIA director, to get elected. So, he was definitely the kind of guy whom they could rely on to do something nefarious.

    5. This spy was paid an extraordinary sum of money in two lump sum payments in 2016 for a nebulous “India-China” grant. I have yet to see a legitimate explanation for this. Payment for services rendered?

    6. This man tried to insert himself into the Trump administration after the election, despite this India-China grant running until 2018. Wouldn’t this guy have been better off looking after his grant, instead?

    7. A credible allegation from Glenn Greenwald suggests that the government lied about when they started their investigation. This could be interpreted in one of two ways. 1. the email conversation did happen but they learned of it through illegal clandestine spying, then later tried to cover their tracks and hide it 2. they lied, always planning to spy on him but they needed some reason, so they invented one.

    8. The Establishment media, with help from politicians with ties to the intelligence services like Mark Warner, publicly lied about the nature of this man’s operation. They falsely claimed that revealing his name would damage national security. Glenn Greenwald has pointed out that this is not true. Hmm….smells like a cover up.

    9. The Establishment media, in conjunction with the release of this Steele Dossier, ran multiple fake news stories alleging a preposterous Russian scheme to control our media (WaPo did this); this was an attempt to kneecap our president from the outset. These same media outlets have deep ties to the government; Comey and McCabe both leaked information to them.

    10. Micheal Steele lied to congress and was terminated as a source as a result. He leaked this BS dossier to Yahoo News.

    11. The FBI purposely withheld information from a Federal FISA judge concerning the source of the Steele Dossier in order to get a warrant to spy on then candidate Trump. This is potentially a crime. It was done on purpose to ensure the spy warrant went through.

    12. The government hacked Trump’s computers at Trump Tower. Despite finding no evidence of Russian involvement, the spying continued anyway. The Russia allegation was merely a ruse to get the entire camel into the tent. The intention was to spy on the guy and leak what they found to help Hillary.

    13. FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe leaked information about this investigation to the media. He was terminated for covering this up. He now wants immunity to testify before congress. What’s he hiding?

    14. Michael Steele went into hiding just after Trump won. He did so with help from British intelligence.

    15. Several FBI agents, including two fired from Mueller’s investigation, discussed a “back up plan” to prevent Trump from getting elected. They did so in McCabe’s office. Presumably, McCabe was present and participated in the conversation.

    16. American government agents met in London, safe from FBI counterintelligence’s prying eyes.

    17. The dossier was leaked by rabid anti-Russian warmonger John McCain. Other individuals with intelligence service ties are alleged to have had possession of it. Many of those individuals were rabid never Trump supporters and did everything they could to sabotage the guy during the election.

    18. The FBI coordinated with a senior DNC member in regards to this dossier.

    19. The FBI did not examine DNC servers allegedly hacked.

    20. The Steele Dossier was paid for by people linked to notorious liar Hillary Clinton. In 2008, her goons peddled the “Obama born in Kenya” lie and while Secretary of State, her goons peddled the lie that Qaddafi was giving Viagra to his troops so they’d rape people; this was done with the intention of forcing Obama to establish a “no-fly zone”, so she could later run for president without the anchor of the Iraq War weighing her down (she was under the impression at the time that Libya would be a cake walk…oops). This was definitely the kind of thing a self-absorbed unscrupulous psychopathic liar like Hillary Clinton would do.

    Oh, as a bonus, she also lied about coming under sniper fire while in Bosnia.

    A lot of this conspiracy mongering is just counter-conspiracy mongering to cover up a real conspiracy. It doesn’t take a genius to put two and two together here.

    “Why is he stonewalling?”

    Why didn’t the witch float back to the surface is she wasn’t guilty?

    “Why has he been stonewalling from day one?”

    Like how?

    “Why does Trump continue to suck up to Putin for no obvious reason?”

    Why are the Italians doing the same? CONSPIRACY!!!

    Isn’t it just OBVIOUS that the Russians are no good, anyway? Somebody, quick. Channel McCarthy’s ghost. He’ll know what to do.

    Hmmm….it’s almost like there are indeed obvious reasons (economic and geopolitical).

    “Why is Trump so intent on destroying the EU and NATO?”

    He’s trying to destroy the EU, really? Please. And lots of people have argued against NATO. Patrick Buchanan, for example. You know, the guy’s columns run on this same blog. If Trump reads Coulter, he probably also has read Buchanan.

    “All of a sudden Noam Chomsky and Stephen Cohen seem to be running US foreign policy.”

    Lol, wut?

    “It is sad to see Sailer turn traitor in a misguided belief that Vladimir Putin is going to save us from the black hordes.”

    You should get an Oscar for concern trolling.

    “Putin runs the most Muslim country in Europe, he is a white nationalist the same way that Hilary Clinton is a great humanitarian.”

    And for best supporting actor, too.

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    • Replies: @tyrone
    Gee wiz , I was fix'in to start thanking Putin for giving us Trump .
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  78. tyrone says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Like me most white girls she secretly craves Black Men

    So ,tiny you crave black men? ,that answers a lot of questions ,don’t worry your secrets safe with us.

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    • Replies: @Alfa158
    He’s getting slowly better. His spoofs were often too long winded and over the top exaggerated, so I’ve been coaching him on keeping them pithy and only inserting one malapropism or garbled spelling per post as a sort of Easter egg to get the best guffaws. A couple of times I even took the time to copy and paste one of his posts and edited them to show how they could have been improved. This last one was exactly what he should be producing but he still has to work on his consistency. I’m wondering if that might be because he is sometimes abusing consciousness enhancing substances. There is a kind of a stoner vibe that may not be faked.
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  79. @Anonymous
    It started in the mid 70s. In '72, the US abandoned dollar gold convertability and Treasuries became the basis for global reserves, which meant foreign holders of Treasuries financed the US budget deficit and military spending. '75 was the last year we had a trade surplus, and the trade deficit swelled during the 80s, along with the budget deficit.

    I have no disagreement with that, #400. I didn’t want to get into the causes, but just to note the general situation that even in the mid-1980′s, though we had trade deficits, America still produced much more than any on other country, and most major consumer items were still made here.

    The Japanese imports of (1st) cameras and electronics started in the early ’70′s, as the Jap auto imports ramped up in the middle of that decade (the oil “crisis” worked very favorably for them in this regard). China imports did not really take off like a rocket until that early ’00′s. In the mid-90′s I would only see a few things made in China. 15 years, later 95% of most retail-store items were Chinese made.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The camera business was all imports from the early fifties onward. The only US made cameras were Graflex large format, cinema stuff and a few feeble efforts like the Bell and Howell Foton put out in hopes of getting military orders. The photo industry in the US was the first to be ruined by contractor spoilage.

    The fifties and early sixties were the time of German cameras rather than Japanese. Japan started by making improved Leica and Contax copies, and lenses for them. But it was the adoption of the Nikon F by newspaper photogs nearly universally that made Japan dominant. That took place in a very short time, the JFK/MM era if you will.

    Almost every photo of Ike in office is on 4x5 sheet film. Ones of LBJ on sheet film are almost nonexistent.
    , @Anonymous

    The Japanese imports of (1st) cameras and electronics started in the early ’70′s,
     
    I think it was a long time before that.
    https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/american-actress-marilyn-monroe-pointing-a-nikon-camera-at-news-photo/754097341#american-actress-marilyn-monroe-pointing-a-nikon-camera-at-bert-los-picture-id754097341
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  80. @Lagertha
    SS Steve - Master & Commander; our true North...hahhaaa!

    Master of his own domain, at least …

    ;-}

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  81. Alfa158 says:
    @tyrone
    So ,tiny you crave black men? ,that answers a lot of questions ,don't worry your secrets safe with us.

    He’s getting slowly better. His spoofs were often too long winded and over the top exaggerated, so I’ve been coaching him on keeping them pithy and only inserting one malapropism or garbled spelling per post as a sort of Easter egg to get the best guffaws. A couple of times I even took the time to copy and paste one of his posts and edited them to show how they could have been improved. This last one was exactly what he should be producing but he still has to work on his consistency. I’m wondering if that might be because he is sometimes abusing consciousness enhancing substances. There is a kind of a stoner vibe that may not be faked.

    Read More
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  82. tyrone says:
    @Anon
    "No evidence, other than the myriad of indictments Mueller has already brought."

    Please. Those "indictments" are all either procedural in nature or have nothing to do with the president directly.

    "The circumstantial evidence is overwhelming, every day some new meeting comes to light, witnesses conveniently keep dying,"

    There is no evidence. Period.

    If any of that were true, we'd already know it. Cohen is an incompetent buffoon incapable of covering his tracks. The evidence should be everywhere but all we have is conspiracy mongering from sheep who can't think for themselves.

    Further, the NSA is extremely adept at its job, and so is the CIA. They'd already have the evidence if it existed, and they would have leaked it by now. During the Ukraine Crisis, the NSA was able to read sensitive Russian military communiques proving they had sent soldiers into Ukraine. You'd think that this organization would be able to find evidence of a dumbass attorney conspiring with the Russians if it existed.

    "every new revelation ends up confirming some element of the Steele dossier rather than disproving it, and most damning of all is simply Trump’s behavior."

    Nothing of any real note has been "proved" from that fake dossier. Just the names and locations that government intelligence agencies would already have on anyone of any prominence anyway. The fact that I spy on you and then learn that you visited a bank on some date can easily be added to a false allegation to make it seem true (like you picked up a hooker from the same bank and dumped her body in the ocean after you had your way with her...good luck "disproving" that seeing as though I have video of you entering the bank and a prominent mole inside the bank who said he saw you with the woman).

    My conspiracy theory (of which there is a ton of circumstantial evidence for):

    The Steele Dossier was a clandestine intelligence operation run by the CIA with help from MI6. All countries keep intelligence files on prominent individuals, especially foreign nationals. They filtered dirt from an intelligence file to Steele, who then laundered it via his contacts in Russia to make it seem legitimate....same as the bank example above.

    Since Steele is a foreign national, US intelligence would presumably have a harder time uncovering a plot he was involved with outside the US. Steele also had Cold War and Yeltsin-era contacts in Russia, making any allegation he made seem credible. In all, Michael Steele was the perfect person for traitorous elements of the US Deep State to pick for this assignment - hard to track, hard to disprove, and seemingly credible just for who he was.

    1. The British have a long history of interfering in our elections and foreign policy, including rigging the 1940 GOP convention in favor of a man sure to lose to the pro-British, clandestinely pro-war, Franklin Roosevelt.

    2. After the election, James Clapper, in a panic, called Trump to assure him that the Steele Dossier wasn't "an intelligence operation" against him. Hmm....mighty strange behavior now that we are on the subject.

    3. They hired a spy to infiltrate the Trump campaign.

    4. This spy also once illegally passed information to the Reagan campaign in 1980 from Jimmy Carter in order to help George H.W. Bush, former CIA director, to get elected. So, he was definitely the kind of guy whom they could rely on to do something nefarious.

    5. This spy was paid an extraordinary sum of money in two lump sum payments in 2016 for a nebulous "India-China" grant. I have yet to see a legitimate explanation for this. Payment for services rendered?

    6. This man tried to insert himself into the Trump administration after the election, despite this India-China grant running until 2018. Wouldn't this guy have been better off looking after his grant, instead?

    7. A credible allegation from Glenn Greenwald suggests that the government lied about when they started their investigation. This could be interpreted in one of two ways. 1. the email conversation did happen but they learned of it through illegal clandestine spying, then later tried to cover their tracks and hide it 2. they lied, always planning to spy on him but they needed some reason, so they invented one.

    8. The Establishment media, with help from politicians with ties to the intelligence services like Mark Warner, publicly lied about the nature of this man's operation. They falsely claimed that revealing his name would damage national security. Glenn Greenwald has pointed out that this is not true. Hmm....smells like a cover up.

    9. The Establishment media, in conjunction with the release of this Steele Dossier, ran multiple fake news stories alleging a preposterous Russian scheme to control our media (WaPo did this); this was an attempt to kneecap our president from the outset. These same media outlets have deep ties to the government; Comey and McCabe both leaked information to them.

    10. Micheal Steele lied to congress and was terminated as a source as a result. He leaked this BS dossier to Yahoo News.

    11. The FBI purposely withheld information from a Federal FISA judge concerning the source of the Steele Dossier in order to get a warrant to spy on then candidate Trump. This is potentially a crime. It was done on purpose to ensure the spy warrant went through.

    12. The government hacked Trump's computers at Trump Tower. Despite finding no evidence of Russian involvement, the spying continued anyway. The Russia allegation was merely a ruse to get the entire camel into the tent. The intention was to spy on the guy and leak what they found to help Hillary.

    13. FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe leaked information about this investigation to the media. He was terminated for covering this up. He now wants immunity to testify before congress. What's he hiding?

    14. Michael Steele went into hiding just after Trump won. He did so with help from British intelligence.

    15. Several FBI agents, including two fired from Mueller's investigation, discussed a "back up plan" to prevent Trump from getting elected. They did so in McCabe's office. Presumably, McCabe was present and participated in the conversation.

    16. American government agents met in London, safe from FBI counterintelligence's prying eyes.

    17. The dossier was leaked by rabid anti-Russian warmonger John McCain. Other individuals with intelligence service ties are alleged to have had possession of it. Many of those individuals were rabid never Trump supporters and did everything they could to sabotage the guy during the election.

    18. The FBI coordinated with a senior DNC member in regards to this dossier.

    19. The FBI did not examine DNC servers allegedly hacked.

    20. The Steele Dossier was paid for by people linked to notorious liar Hillary Clinton. In 2008, her goons peddled the "Obama born in Kenya" lie and while Secretary of State, her goons peddled the lie that Qaddafi was giving Viagra to his troops so they'd rape people; this was done with the intention of forcing Obama to establish a "no-fly zone", so she could later run for president without the anchor of the Iraq War weighing her down (she was under the impression at the time that Libya would be a cake walk...oops). This was definitely the kind of thing a self-absorbed unscrupulous psychopathic liar like Hillary Clinton would do.

    Oh, as a bonus, she also lied about coming under sniper fire while in Bosnia.

    A lot of this conspiracy mongering is just counter-conspiracy mongering to cover up a real conspiracy. It doesn't take a genius to put two and two together here.

    "Why is he stonewalling?"

    Why didn't the witch float back to the surface is she wasn't guilty?

    "Why has he been stonewalling from day one?"

    Like how?

    "Why does Trump continue to suck up to Putin for no obvious reason?"

    Why are the Italians doing the same? CONSPIRACY!!!

    Isn't it just OBVIOUS that the Russians are no good, anyway? Somebody, quick. Channel McCarthy's ghost. He'll know what to do.

    Hmmm....it's almost like there are indeed obvious reasons (economic and geopolitical).

    "Why is Trump so intent on destroying the EU and NATO?"

    He's trying to destroy the EU, really? Please. And lots of people have argued against NATO. Patrick Buchanan, for example. You know, the guy's columns run on this same blog. If Trump reads Coulter, he probably also has read Buchanan.

    "All of a sudden Noam Chomsky and Stephen Cohen seem to be running US foreign policy."

    Lol, wut?

    "It is sad to see Sailer turn traitor in a misguided belief that Vladimir Putin is going to save us from the black hordes."

    You should get an Oscar for concern trolling.

    "Putin runs the most Muslim country in Europe, he is a white nationalist the same way that Hilary Clinton is a great humanitarian."

    And for best supporting actor, too.

    Gee wiz , I was fix’in to start thanking Putin for giving us Trump .

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  83. Sandmich says:
    @Anon
    Chait --> Trump --> Russian agent - is trolling.
    Similar to the Flat Earth Theory chaps on the internet.

    Who is he trolling? Seriously, so many lefties nowadays make their own points so badly that it’s indistinguishable from actual trolling. The only way the ChaitChart could be more ridiculous is if he put a cartoon character on it. The moment I ask myself “who believes in that crap” there’s college educated lefties (ok, white women) on Facebook parroting the outlandish propaganda.

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  84. Ibound1 says:

    “Findlandization” of America? That would far more preferable than the Latin Americanization and Somalization of America that Cohen prefers. We could use some Findlandization.

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  85. @Peter Akuleyev
    They have been screeching about Russia for the better part of two years and have come up with no evidence.

    No evidence, other than the myriad of indictments Mueller has already brought. The circumstantial evidence is overwhelming, every day some new meeting comes to light, witnesses conveniently keep dying, every new revelation ends up confirming some element of the Steele dossier rather than disproving it, and most damning of all is simply Trump's behavior. Why is he stonewalling? Why has he been stonewalling from day one? Why does Trump continue to suck up to Putin for no obvious reason? Why is Trump so intent on destroying the EU and NATO? All of a sudden Noam Chomsky and Stephen Cohen seem to be running US foreign policy.

    It is sad to see Sailer turn traitor in a misguided belief that Vladimir Putin is going to save us from the black hordes. Putin runs the most Muslim country in Europe, he is a white nationalist the same way that Hilary Clinton is a great humanitarian.

    You’re the first intelligent person I think I’ve encountered (online or in person) who actually believes Trump is a Russian agent. All the others who claim this seem to have been “either stupid or implicated”, as they say.

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  86. pyrrhus says:
    @Tom-in-VA
    It’s a wilderness of mirrors, I tell ya. The beauty of this kind of thinking is that an absence of evidence is just proof of how devilishly clever the other side is.

    I wonder if Cohen has actually been to “wealthy” Spain…The ex-pats there are fairly wealthy, but the people of Spain certainly are not…they can’t afford clothes dryers, and few of them own automobiles…Nor are there many high level restaurants.

    It’s almost like guys in the Carlos Slim blog just make stuff up all the time….

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  87. @Veracitor
    http://thepinksmoke.com/images/telefonposter.jpg

    Is Don Siegel a better director than Sidney Lumet?

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    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    "Is Don Siegel a better director than Sidney Lumet?"

    It's a subjective question, of course. Siegel made Dirty Harry (1971), a thrilling right-wing reaction to all of that California/Bay Area drug-fueled peace and love. They made their stand-in for the Zodiac killer a dirty hippy (the actual Zodiac killer was definitely not a hippy). The rest of Siegel's oeuvre contains some good films, but nothing that approaches Dirty Harry.

    Lumet has a long and distinguished body of work: Fail Safe (1964), Serpico (1973), Network (1976), to name a few. One of his later efforts, a return to his NYPD chronicles, Q&A (1990), contains a harrowing performance by the great Nick Nolte. My vote goes to Lumet.
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  88. @Rosamond Vincy
    1987? Wasn't he too busy [email protected] Marla Maples around that time to worry about the Russians?

    Wasn’t he too busy [email protected] Marla Maples around that time to worry about the Russians?

    I wouldn’t be worrying about ANYTHING if I’d been [email protected] Marla Maples back then.

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    His 1st wife Ivana was also an attractive model. He admitted to Howard Stern that he hadn't initially intended to divorce Ivana: he was really hoping to eat his cake and still have his cake.

    It's funny they always compare him to Hitler, because I think he really wanted to be Hugh Hefner
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  89. @Anon
    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.

    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.

    Quite possibly. She and Bill were slumming with the common people recently: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5935411/Bill-Hillary-Clinton-fly-commercial-TWICE-one-weekend-former-president-mingling-fans.html

    Neither one of them has flown commercial in the past 30 years I’ll bet.

    Bill was reading the novel Crimson Lake, about a man accused of abducting a 13-year-old girl.

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  90. Anon[204] • Disclaimer says:

    Ukraine rotting in the fields

    In Poland, for example, Ukrainians replace Poles who have left for work in Ireland and the United Kingdom. The number of work permits in the EU issued to Ukrainians tripled in 2014-2016, according to the study. The Czech Republic, Poland, and Israel have even introduced employment quotas for Ukrainians in particular sectors such as construction.

    In Russia, migrants from Central Asia do the dirty jobs Russians don’t want to take. In Ukraine, however, there’s no one to take the place of those who leave.

    https://www.kyivpost.com/business/ukrainian-industry-looks-for-ways-to-keep-its-workers.html

    Ukraine, free from Russia, soon to be culturally enriched by Afghans, Nigerians and Rohingya.

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  91. @Steve Sailer
    But George Steinbrenner, Frank Perdue, and Crazy Eddie were all KGB moles in the 1980s.

    George Steinbrenner had a run-in with two KGB agents in an elevator in Los Angeles. There was a rumour David Lynch was going to film a movie about the altercation, but he thought better of it because the screenplay didn’t come to him right off the bat.

    Los Angeles is a nest of KGB agents everywhere. Some people claim to be bothered by it. But the Republican Party and the Democrat Party don’t seem to mind the hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens in Los Angeles County, though.

    Thoughts about David Lynch’s new book and Lynch having some respect for Trump:

    David Lynch and Bill Belichick remind me of guys who could relate to Trump.

    Belichick famously resigned as head coach of the New York Jets thusly:

    I resign as the HC of the NYJ. BB

    I imagine David Lynch broke up with Isabella Rossellini thusly:

    I resign as BF of IR. DL

    Terse and to the point guys like Belichick and David Lynch can say a lot or say nothing and you might not know the difference.

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  92. Lot says:
    @Cagey Beast
    In the movie Shattered Glass, Chait’s character was renamed “Amy Brand” and played by Melanie Lynskey.

    But who played Donald Trump in The Baader Meinhof Complex? We all know Trump got weapons training at that PLO camp in Jordan at the same time the Red Army Faction was there, so who played him in the film? There's even a scene at the camp in which the German girls are sunbathing nude on a rooftop. We all know Comrade Trump wouldn't have missed out on that.

    Great movie. Rewatched it last month as a kind of prequel to 7 Days in Entebbe, also a great movie, though not as good as Baader-Meinhoff.

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  93. @Twinkie

    His old fights – when he was fighting in Japan – are things of beauty.
     
    No drug testing and lots of cans. He almost got knocked out by Fujita!

    His fights with Crocop and Big Nog were excellent though, as was submitting Kevin Randleman after getting monster suplexed on his head.

    It was sad to see him get KOd by a middle weight (Hendo) and doubly sad to see him awarded a “win” against another middle weight (Fabio Maldonado) after being knocked out on his feet.

    His opponents were mostly K-1 tournament winners, former UFC champions, ADCC tournament winners, and combat sports Olympic medalists.

    Some “cans”.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie
    These are his wins in Pride:

    Sammy Schilt
    Heath Herring
    Big Nog
    E. Valavicius
    Fujita
    Garry Goodridge
    Yuji Nagata
    Mark Coleman
    Kevin Randleman
    Naoya Ogawa
    Big Nog (again)
    Tsuyoshi Kohsaka
    Crocop
    Zuluzinho
    Mark Coleman (again)
    Mark Hunt

    Then subsequently in two other Japanese events:
    Matt Lindland
    Choi Hong-Man

    Of these, only 3-4 were high level MMA talents at the time, and only two (Crocop and Big Nog) were world-class. And those two are legitimately his most impressive victories. Several were cans or low-level MMA talents at best. Some of them might have excelled in other sports (Schilt in kickboxing, Ogawa in Judo), but adapted very poorly to MMA. Some were outright freak shows (Zuluzhino, Choi Hong-Man).
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  94. Bill says:
    @Peter Akuleyev
    They have been screeching about Russia for the better part of two years and have come up with no evidence.

    No evidence, other than the myriad of indictments Mueller has already brought. The circumstantial evidence is overwhelming, every day some new meeting comes to light, witnesses conveniently keep dying, every new revelation ends up confirming some element of the Steele dossier rather than disproving it, and most damning of all is simply Trump's behavior. Why is he stonewalling? Why has he been stonewalling from day one? Why does Trump continue to suck up to Putin for no obvious reason? Why is Trump so intent on destroying the EU and NATO? All of a sudden Noam Chomsky and Stephen Cohen seem to be running US foreign policy.

    It is sad to see Sailer turn traitor in a misguided belief that Vladimir Putin is going to save us from the black hordes. Putin runs the most Muslim country in Europe, he is a white nationalist the same way that Hilary Clinton is a great humanitarian.

    Is this irony?

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  95. Old Jew says:
    @Lagertha
    Europe must figure out their multi-culti bs programs (and justify taxing their people even more) to deal with all the increasing amounts of Chechnyians, Afghanis, Bulgarians, Africans, etc., (all male) teeming over their borders. Let Europe suffer the consequences of exalting their moral superiority, I say. Good luck ;)...but, I don't care about you...Life is: your family and you; your friends and your pets (most Muslims hate dogs; and eat horses)...that is it.

    Bulgarians?

    Bulgaria is part of the European Union.

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    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    On paper, yes. But otherwise...
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  96. @Tom-in-VA
    It’s a wilderness of mirrors, I tell ya. The beauty of this kind of thinking is that an absence of evidence is just proof of how devilishly clever the other side is.

    “It’s a wilderness of mirrors, I tell ya.”

    It actually is, but not with Trump; he’s refreshingly transparent. The rest of them, the clever ones, are rooms within rooms. They have made pacts with the things in the dark.

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  97. Rob McX says:

    It’s strange what’s classified as “interfering” in a country’s affairs. The accusation of influencing the election of Trump or “recruiting” him is something that’s endlessly discussed and analysed. But importing millions of people from the Third World never gets the same type of scrutiny. Who is behind it, and what are their motives? Just to focus on the electoral consequences, bringing in millions of Hispanics, if continued for long enough, would eventually ensure the Democrats’ being voted into power forever. George Soros’s funding of immigration-promoting NGOs influences elections far more in the long run than anything the Russians could have done with Trump.

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    • Replies: @Travis
    imagine if Putin encouraged millions of Russians to enter the United States illegally , and then campaigned directly to Russians in America to become US citizens and vote to support Russian interests. Yet the Mexican Presidents have done this for decades while helping the Mexican Cartels build a drug distribution network in America.
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  98. @John Cunningham
    How foolish of you, Rosamund! Isn't it obvious that Marla Maples was his KGB control?

    Whatfor they peeck someone so nekulturny?

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  99. @Charles Pewitt
    Is Don Siegel a better director than Sidney Lumet?

    “Is Don Siegel a better director than Sidney Lumet?”

    It’s a subjective question, of course. Siegel made Dirty Harry (1971), a thrilling right-wing reaction to all of that California/Bay Area drug-fueled peace and love. They made their stand-in for the Zodiac killer a dirty hippy (the actual Zodiac killer was definitely not a hippy). The rest of Siegel’s oeuvre contains some good films, but nothing that approaches Dirty Harry.

    Lumet has a long and distinguished body of work: Fail Safe (1964), Serpico (1973), Network (1976), to name a few. One of his later efforts, a return to his NYPD chronicles, Q&A (1990), contains a harrowing performance by the great Nick Nolte. My vote goes to Lumet.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Lumet's Before the Devil Knows You're Dead is outstanding. Phillip Seymour Hoffman. Albert Finney, Ethan Hawke, and Marisa Tomei.

    https://www.amazon.com/Before-Devil-Knows-Youre-Dead/dp/B00112S8RS
    , @Charles Pewitt

    Lumet has a long and distinguished body of work: Fail Safe (1964), Serpico (1973), Network (1976), to name a few. One of his later efforts, a return to his NYPD chronicles, Q&A (1990), contains a harrowing performance by the great Nick Nolte. My vote goes to Lumet.

     

    I say Lumet over Siegel, too.

    Nick Nolte is German, English, Scottish and Swiss German, among other ancestries. In the movie Q & A, Nolte wears lifts in his shoes and blackens his hair to play a New York City Irish cop named Mike Brennan. Nolte has a lot of fun playing the Irish cop and I think the audiences had fun watching him. I did.

    Sidney Lumet is now gone, but I can't forgive him for a particular scene he directed with Marisa Tomei that was gratuitous and featured a fat drug addict actor who was playing a fat drug addict.
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  100. @Jim Don Bob

    Wasn’t he too busy [email protected] Marla Maples around that time to worry about the Russians?
     
    I wouldn't be worrying about ANYTHING if I'd been [email protected] Marla Maples back then.

    His 1st wife Ivana was also an attractive model. He admitted to Howard Stern that he hadn’t initially intended to divorce Ivana: he was really hoping to eat his cake and still have his cake.

    It’s funny they always compare him to Hitler, because I think he really wanted to be Hugh Hefner

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  101. They push Russia for the same reason they push gun control – to divide and conquer their opposition.

    Gun control separates R voters from R donors, the Russia stuff pits the remaining Rs inside the deep state (nat sec types) against those of us outside.

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  102. CJ says:
    @Anon7
    Omigod, this is great! I want that New York Magazine diagram in a poster. The TrumpRussia story is a classic tale of cognitive dissonance. Democrats can't believe that HRC lost to someone as stupid and boorish as Trump, so... it must have been Putin! (Great picture of Spymaster Putin, btw).

    However, since I'm a fair-minded guy who believes in equal time, here's the equivalent Republican tale of cognitive dissonance. It's impossible that an inexperienced black guy could beat someone as qualified as George Romney, so...


    ... Obama was never the President!

    Omigod, this is great! I want that New York Magazine diagram in a poster.

    Me too. It’s classic material. Believing it or not, or pretending to believe it, is entirely a matter of taste. You could put it on your office wall if you were a mole inside Google.

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    • Replies: @Anon7
    I wonder if you could still read it if you printed it on a big coffee mug, or something like that. This diagram is kind of like those cool tables that have three columns and you take one word from each column to create a new jargon phrase.

    In this case, you could start anywhere, looping through it for ever more far fetched, ever more impossible to prove (or deny!) accusations against our President, Donald J. Trump. American Big Media is going to need this as we enter the fall election season.

    (I’d also like to take this opportunity to remind everyone to avoid the use of just “Trump” in conversations with liberals. Always use “our President, Donald J. Trump” or “President Donald Trump” or “the President of the United States, Donald J. Trump.” It’s worth it when you watch their faces, and don’t you enjoy saying it?)

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  103. @Anon
    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.

    I hesitate to wish ill on anyone, but I hope she has one of her trademark falls down a Mayan step-pyramid before that happens. Many will argue that her candidacy guarantees a Trump landslide victory, but I wouldn’t take the smallest chance of Cackles getting anywhere near the White House again. That woman is a Hall Monitor if I ever saw one. It’s all there: the self-righteousness, the smugness, the for-your-own-good routine. From all such, good Lord deliver us.

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  104. Marty says:

    Sorry, OT, but man is this country weird. Two white guys just came into McD’s in Marin. One looks like Roger Ebert, soft pudgy but with a white goatee, wearing corduroy. His fingers are all tattoed. The other, slightly younger, looks like the golfer Stewart Cink. He’s wearing sensible Florscheim-type shoes. His fingers and back of hands are all tatooed, and he also has a big neck tattoo. Who knows, maybe they’re master solar installers or something.

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  105. Bill B. says:

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  106. Sammler says: • Website

    Before praising Spain’s wealth, you have to look at its population pyramid. I don’t know what the moral is, but it is empirically true that Spain started dying when Franco died, almost to the day.

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  107. OFF TOPIC

    Trump Must Kill the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

    Trump Must Kill The European Union.

    Trump Must Kill The European Central Bank.

    Trump must Kill The Euro Currency.

    Trump Must Give Life To the Sovereignty and Independence Of The European Christian Nation-States.

    Trump Must Remove Angela Merkel, Emmanuel Macron and Theresa May From Power.

    Trump Must Enjoy A Steak and Potatoes Meal At Ramstein Air Force Base. Invite base commander Moore and that Seehofer guy.

    The Germans should be allowed to turn the screw and acquire a nuclear weapon deterrent.

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  108. Anonymous[242] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I have no disagreement with that, #400. I didn't want to get into the causes, but just to note the general situation that even in the mid-1980's, though we had trade deficits, America still produced much more than any on other country, and most major consumer items were still made here.

    The Japanese imports of (1st) cameras and electronics started in the early '70's, as the Jap auto imports ramped up in the middle of that decade (the oil "crisis" worked very favorably for them in this regard). China imports did not really take off like a rocket until that early '00's. In the mid-90's I would only see a few things made in China. 15 years, later 95% of most retail-store items were Chinese made.

    The camera business was all imports from the early fifties onward. The only US made cameras were Graflex large format, cinema stuff and a few feeble efforts like the Bell and Howell Foton put out in hopes of getting military orders. The photo industry in the US was the first to be ruined by contractor spoilage.

    The fifties and early sixties were the time of German cameras rather than Japanese. Japan started by making improved Leica and Contax copies, and lenses for them. But it was the adoption of the Nikon F by newspaper photogs nearly universally that made Japan dominant. That took place in a very short time, the JFK/MM era if you will.

    Almost every photo of Ike in office is on 4×5 sheet film. Ones of LBJ on sheet film are almost nonexistent.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Oh, c'mon, I'm not talking about the high-dollar cameras owned by your photojournalists and real photo buffs (the ones that developed their own, even color!). The family cameras were often Kodak, such as the Brownies - Kodak made about all the film, but they made cameras too. Then there was Polaroid.

    You are right about all the SLRs, as I remember there were Pentaxes, Canons, Olympuses, Mirandas, and Nikon's from any time I can remember.

    How can we forget?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rlDTK6QI-w
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  109. Europe doesn’t bother me as much as Canada does. With the Artic to the north and two mighty oceans shielding both coasts and the good old US of A protecting their hindquarters Canadians seem to think that Americans, at least this one American, don’t mind them slamming our government and criticizing every policy that doesn’t fit their agenda. The Buffalo News, last week, said that a majority of Canadians would take their tourist dollars elsewhere. Well, first of all those are Canadian dollars and secondly, starting in South Carolina all the way to the Keys and across the gulf coast you will see Canadian snow birds. I bid you farewell. Enjoy Cuba or Haiti or the DR or coastal Mexico, it will be easier for me to rent a decent priced condo on Long Boat Key. Oh, and other than their vast mineral wealth, most of Canada’s industry is American born.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Yeah, Canada has a bad case of Little Brother Syndrome. I was there last fall for a funeral and went to pick up a neighbor. There was a crew across the street working on a drive way. One of the guys saw my US plate, came over and started ranting about DJT, and why don't we have free health care, what the US looks like to the rest of the world, etc. I usually ignore this shite, but I was not in a great mood that day, so I told him in no uncertain terms that I did not give a s**t what any other country thinks about the US. It's my country, and if you don't like, then don't come. And, btw, I don't come up here and tell you what I think of Boy Trudeau.

    Canadians are nice people, but they are obsessed with the US, and don't realize that no one in the US has paid any attention to Canada since Sergeant Preston of the Yukon went off the air many moons ago.
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  110. @27 year old
    OT, the president of Croatia

    https://www.instagram.com/p/Bk_JnY5h5OD

    Why’d they put Ice T bitch Coco up there? Much rather see the Presidential MILF in a bikini.
    Its all good,tho. Ice T still can’t act worth a damn.

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  111. Anonymous[176] • Disclaimer says:
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  112. RonaldB says:
    @Twinkie

    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.
     
    Please let this be true. But I don’t think even she has that level of lack of self-awareness.

    I think the country is best served by having viable candidates in both parties. Wishing HRC on the Democrats just so the Republicans will win easily has numerous dangers.

    1. HRC might just win. The Mueller investigation could bring indictments on Trump based on cooked-up evidence right before election campaigning began. HRC would not make the same mistake of ignoring key fly-by states.

    2. We would be better off with viable alternate solutions by Democrats, rather than relying completely on Trump and the Republican establishment. For example, consider this alternate platform for a centrist Democrat:
    No wall
    Continuation of catch-and-release
    Mandatory e-verify for all employment
    End welfare and public benefits to non-citizens

    It’s a bad idea to cook the odds even legitimately.

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    • Replies: @Alfa158
    1. The Democratic leadership thinks HRC is toxic and is ready to move on to fresh blood. She disappeared from news coverage after going off again on the deplorables during her India trip and became a non-person as far as the Megaphone was concerned. Before they let her suck all the oxygen out of the Party again, they’ll draw straws for who gets to put a pillow over her face.
    2. Centrist Democrats don’t exist. No Democrat will ever be allowed run on a platform of mandatory e-verify or ending welfare to non-citizens.
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  113. RonaldB says:
    @Anon
    "I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020."

    I knew she would from the moment her media lackeys started harping over Trump-Putin. It was to set the stage for her to make a comeback by claiming she was robbed and Trump is a traitor. She kept her hands clean while letting her goons do all the peddling and dirty work - typical Clinton strategy...just like Libya and her Viagra lie.

    Personally, I think Clinton would be extremely dangerous as president: incompetent, serial liar, deluded, self-important, emotional warmonger with a track record of failure and motivated by extreme anti-Russian animus while backed by the entirety of state media; she could quickly lead to us into disaster. She wanted to shoot down Russian jets over Syria. CNN definitely would have supported her if she had tried it. By virtue of a divine miracle, we avoided that. Thank God for Trump...and I'm an atheist.

    In any case, I don't think she will get it. The new democrat party of Ms. Red Chavez will be a tough nut for Ms. White Teacher Lady to crack. She'll have to devolve to TYT levels of racism to drive up the non-white vote high enough to have a shot.

    I agree with you that HRC is extremely dangerous, tempered only by the knowledge that she is susceptible to the wishes of big money contributors, who might pull back from the brink when they see the actual clouds of nuclear war.

    As far as having to increase her non-white vote, recall she lost on two factors: her constituency was crowded up in large cities in blue-safe states, and she lost a considerable proportion of white votes by totally ignoring the flyover swing states that gave Trump his edge.

    An energetic, more centrist Democrat would have a great shot at overcoming these problems, and would likely receive a significant amount of support from the traditional conservative wing of Republicans, plush the McCain-Kassich style Republican.

    I’m not saying this because I want Trump to lose, but because I prefer to have a real fight between competing ideas. Hillary’s biggest deficit, from my point of view, is that she genuinely had no ideas at all. Anyone who looked at her policy papers on her website could see they were quite similar to her failed health care plan: a mass of unimaginative, detailed lines and arrows also reminiscent of the Beautiful Mind graphics.

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  114. Anon7 says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    The kompromat is right there for everybody to see.

    I hadn’t realized that the Trump dossier strategy idea is Russian in origin: longtime enemies do become like each other.

    In January 1999, Prosecutor General Yury Skuratov was summoned to the Kremlin by then-President Boris Yeltsin’s chief of staff, who showed him a videotape of “a man who looked like” Skuratov frolicking in bed with two prostitutes. Then he asked Skuratov to resign…

    Soon afterward, on April 7, 1999, Putin went on TV himself to claim the tape authentic—that the “man who looked like” Skuratov was indeed Skuratov—and called not only for Skuratov’s resignation, but for a more robust criminal investigation.

    All this is noteworthy not only because this was one of Putin’s key steps toward the presidential throne, but because this dark and convoluted chapter of contemporary Russian history is also, however amazingly, now relevant reading for understanding contemporary American history. Now that Buzzfeed has released a dossier compiled by a private intelligence company, with unverified allegations that the FSB has a video of Donald Trump with prostitutes in the Moscow Ritz Carlton in 2013, America has entered uniquely Russian territory. (I should add that I, like many other journalists, was approached over the summer with the story of the prostitutes and could not verify it.)

    In any case, welcome to the world of kompromat, America.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/01/kompromat-trump-dossier/512891/

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    • Replies: @hyperbola
    Does anyone still believe anything published in The Atlantic now that it is run by a dual-citizen member of a foreign sect of anglo-zionist-globalists? Frankly, anyone quoting this as a "source" should be considered as a dodgy type.
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  115. @Buffalo Joe
    Europe doesn't bother me as much as Canada does. With the Artic to the north and two mighty oceans shielding both coasts and the good old US of A protecting their hindquarters Canadians seem to think that Americans, at least this one American, don't mind them slamming our government and criticizing every policy that doesn't fit their agenda. The Buffalo News, last week, said that a majority of Canadians would take their tourist dollars elsewhere. Well, first of all those are Canadian dollars and secondly, starting in South Carolina all the way to the Keys and across the gulf coast you will see Canadian snow birds. I bid you farewell. Enjoy Cuba or Haiti or the DR or coastal Mexico, it will be easier for me to rent a decent priced condo on Long Boat Key. Oh, and other than their vast mineral wealth, most of Canada's industry is American born.

    Yeah, Canada has a bad case of Little Brother Syndrome. I was there last fall for a funeral and went to pick up a neighbor. There was a crew across the street working on a drive way. One of the guys saw my US plate, came over and started ranting about DJT, and why don’t we have free health care, what the US looks like to the rest of the world, etc. I usually ignore this shite, but I was not in a great mood that day, so I told him in no uncertain terms that I did not give a s**t what any other country thinks about the US. It’s my country, and if you don’t like, then don’t come. And, btw, I don’t come up here and tell you what I think of Boy Trudeau.

    Canadians are nice people, but they are obsessed with the US, and don’t realize that no one in the US has paid any attention to Canada since Sergeant Preston of the Yukon went off the air many moons ago.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Jim Don, I had the same experience working a food festival in Hamilton.
    , @hyperbola
    The same foreign sect that owns "our" government and subjects Americans to cradle-to-grave propaganda to keep us dumb, distracted, divided and easy for the sect to manipulate also owns the Canadian government. The sect's "story-line" is slightly different in Canada, but in keeping with their "divide and rule" practices. The Trudeau family has long been involved.

    The Jewish Takeover Of Canada
    http://www.realjewnews.com/?p=705


    IT ALL BEGAN with Pierre Elliot Trudeau, who ruled as Prime Minister of Canada from 1968 to 1984. The year “1984″ which saw the summation of Trudeau’s policies—namely the Jewification of Canada—is an apt metaphor for the police-state grip that Jewry now wields on the once sovereign and Christian nation of Canada, currently a vassal of the global Zionist beast.

    Although some argue that Trudeau showed himself as an anti-Semite and pro-Palestinian, in reality, he bowed to Zionist pressure both from American and Canadian Jewry. ..... with such groups as the Canadian Jewish Political Affairs Committee; the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (Canada’s counterpart to America’s AIPAC); the Jewish Federations of North America; and the Jewish Defense League, the strangle hold of Jewry on Canada’s national policies is secure. View Entire Story Here, Here, Here & Here....
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  116. epebble says:

    Well, at least from Electoral College perspective, if not from popularity, if Trump is a Soviet sleeper agent, then, many would ask, can we have more of them in 2020, 2024 . . .

    At this point, more “analysis” like this will convert Putin into an American Patriot in the minds of many voters. With an adversary like Putin, who wants friends?

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    • Replies: @Bernardo Pizzaro Cortez Del Castro
    If the Russians had a sleeper agent it was Hillary Clinton. She accepted millions from Russians and Kremlin connected firms. She paid for Steele, an unregistered foreign agent, to collude with Russian operatives and Kremlin officials to create the “Russian Dossier”. Then Clinton paid them to disseminate this Dossier to all the media outlets and newspapers while her deep state operatives used the Dossier to obtain warrants to wiretap Trump associates and advisors.

    It is much easier to link the Clintons with Putin than Trump.
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  117. Andrew says:

    Maybe Donald Trump started reading “The New American” magazine published by the John Birch Society in 1987.

    That was when I started reading it. The New American and JBS argued the same thing, we shouldn’t be spending money to defend wealthy countries in Europe and Asia who could pay for it themselves. They were also notably protectionist and gave a forum to protectionist Republicans like Congresswoman Helen Delich Bentley of Maryland.

    Donald Trump has posted tweets with obscure quotes I’ve only ever seen published in The New American. Most of his politics are straight up Birchism. The JBS and The New American have very vocally supported him since he started running. The type of non-establishment rich people who support(ed) Trump are the sort the JBS long cultivated.

    Why look for wild conspiracies with Putin when something obvious like this is sitting right there?

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I grew up reading American Opinion(as it was then) / The New American as well. RP Oliver had been purged out before i was reading it-I'd have been four maybe?-but it was still a mostly well written journal that seemed reasonable to me and much of it still does, even though I suspect RPO was right-Welch was subsidized by the Rockefellers and/or others. What the Birchers printed wasn't wrong, it was things that were little known to the general public but not really otherwise secret. It served the purpose of misdirection-it established that the Commies were perfidious and brutal (they were) and that our government often did things that were blatantly against our stated interests in defending us from them (they did) and in fact was propping the communist regimes up (they were). Those things were already known to anyone who knew where to look. What was not discussed, was the why, and that was -or, at least, one theory explaining why was-what got RPO kicked out of the JBS and off the staff of Truckling Bill Cuckley's National Review.
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  118. Anon[395] • Disclaimer says:

    Crops about to rot in the fields

    It’s the eighth-most dangerous job for men in the U.S. It’s an occupation where catastrophe lurks behind every rain cloud, drought in every relentless sunbeam and disease in every swarm of insects.

    It’s the most dangerous job in South Africa, but you never see that reported in mainstream media…

    In San Diego County, the everyday risks are compounded by a labor shortage which is reaching acute proportions.

    The bureau’s annual Crop Report, released in June, reveals another risk. Lack of water and its high cost have taken a toll on what used to be the area’s largest and most famous crop: avocados. Its value dropped more than 10 percent in 2017, to $122 million.

    Importing the avocado from Mexico is a win-win. And in any case this sitution is exactly what H-2A was designed to address.

    http://www.kpbs.org/news/2018/jul/10/labor-shortage-and-other-risks-confront-san-diego-/

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  119. @Old Jew
    Bulgarians?

    Bulgaria is part of the European Union.

    On paper, yes. But otherwise…

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    • Replies: @22pp22
    Bulgaria's a nice place and they are building a fence along the border with Turkey.
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  120. Anonymous[346] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    First, Trump was a moron. Now, he's a movie villain genius whose devilish 4D chess plans can only be unraveled by fellow geniuses like Jonathan Chait. Could it be that Trump is just some guy and these people aren't as clever as they think? How much of this is just ego padding for insecure guys who are now regretting that journalism degree they got?

    I think that’s it. The onward horror-movie slog of Trumpzilla stirs some deep self-doubt in the souls of credentialed folks who gravitate toward media & social analysis jobs. In a heated moment one of them might rant about the “dumbing down of America” but they never imagined being out of the clover, having to justify their cognoscenti reputation. Since Brexit/Trump 2016 they act as if they’ve seen a ghost.

    Witness the labored, shoehorn attempt by Cohen to tar Trump with “Finlandization” — outside of poli-sci/int’l relations majors, who even knows this arcane term, and more importantly its proper regard to a highly specific historical context? Actually it had, until Cohen, a somewhat right-wing flavor or at least an anti-communist provenance, so to twist it into a quick argument e-grenade is highly clownish and/or desperate (“Hey, ‘Finlandization’–that’s the ticket!”). Cohen merely tries, and fails, to seem smarter than he is to his peers, which is the underlying and single remaining true purpose of English op-ed journalism.

    To the non-Acela-riding public “Finlandization” indicates nothing bad or ominous, if it means anything at all. On outward evidence Finland presents as a quirky but quaint out-of-the-way country lacking the most visible of our Current Year social problems. As G.K. Chesterton said, the man who thinks any stick is good enough will pick up a boomerang.

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  121. @ben tillman
    Wife and I watched Kevin Costner is No Way Out last night. I was chuckling at the parallels to today. I must admit I had forgotten the surprise ending.

    Funny, I just watched it the other day as well.

    I’ve been on an unwitting Fred Thompson kick, forgetting he was in that film as the fictional CIA Director and surprised to have seen him as a minor character “Knox Pooley” in a few episodes of Wiseguy.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I think Fred Thompson would have made a good President. RIP.
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  122. @Alec Leamas
    Funny, I just watched it the other day as well.

    I've been on an unwitting Fred Thompson kick, forgetting he was in that film as the fictional CIA Director and surprised to have seen him as a minor character "Knox Pooley" in a few episodes of Wiseguy.

    I think Fred Thompson would have made a good President. RIP.

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  123. donut says:

    Hey Sailer , have you thought about putting Saguaros in your yard ? I bet you could raise them in that climate .

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    • Replies: @donut
    You wanker , why post my question w/o an answer . Commie f**k .
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  124. Anonym says:
    @Twinkie

    His old fights – when he was fighting in Japan – are things of beauty.
     
    No drug testing and lots of cans. He almost got knocked out by Fujita!

    His fights with Crocop and Big Nog were excellent though, as was submitting Kevin Randleman after getting monster suplexed on his head.

    It was sad to see him get KOd by a middle weight (Hendo) and doubly sad to see him awarded a “win” against another middle weight (Fabio Maldonado) after being knocked out on his feet.

    He fought some cans but defeated a lot of talent too. Arona, Hunt, Coleman, Schilt, Sylvia, Arlovskiand now Mir (other than the names you mentioned). Several former UFC champions and contenders amongst them.

    If Fedor was using it was not obvious (see the following). The playing field was level.

    Now he is old though.

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  125. I’ve uncovered evidence of a conspiracy linking Trump, Mikhail Gorbachev, Tom Wolfe, and Ronald Reagan.

    Chait sez The Art of the Deal came out on the first day of November 1987. (That was a Sunday, if anyone cares.)

    Also on that day, The New York Times published its review of The Bonfire of the Vanities:

    https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/98/12/06/specials/wolfe-bonfire.html

    The next day – November 2, 1987 – Mikhail Gorbachev’s book (Perestroika: New Thinking for Our Country and the World) was published:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1987/11/03/gorbachev-by-the-book/57ae4180-40b9-4957-8269-c45f39c0ce6a/?utm_term=.454465e1fe79

    On the same day that his book came out, Gorbachev gave a major speech marking the 70th anniversary of the Russian Revolution:

    https://www.nytimes.com/1987/11/03/world/gorbachev-on-history-a-breakthrough-sought-in-summit.html

    Portions of this speech were broadcast on American television. It is conceivable that the clips of Gorbachev were an activation signal for various Soviet sleeper agents in the United States:

    Then, on November 3, 1987, Trump met Reagan at the White House:

    https://elianabenador.com/2016/03/benador-trump-unstoppable-now/trump-and-reagan/

    So, to review: Trump’s book was published almost simultaneously with Gorbachev’s; both books were published on the occasion of the 70th anniversary of the Russian Revolution. Gorbachev appeared on American television the same day that his book was published. The next day, Trump, acting as a Russian agent, infiltrated the White House and made contact with the President of the United States.

    What does Wolfe have to do with this? Well, Bonfire cast aspersions on the character of wealthy capitalists. So, clearly, he was acting as a Soviet agent, as well.

    This is scary stuff. The Russians were (and are) everywhere. Obviously, we need to start bombing Moscow immediately.

    Incidentally, I stayed up all night last night re-reading Bonfire for the first time in a long time.

    A few days ago, I was going through some boxes and found my copy of The Devil’s Candy, an account of the making of Brian De Palma’s execrable film of Wolfe’s book. Re-reading the book about the making of the movie got me interested in seeing the movie again.

    (Ironically, the only free copy of the movie I was able to find online was dubbed in Russian. The Russians always dub their movies on top of the English soundtrack, so a patient English-speaker with good hearing can make out most of what’s being said.)

    Watching the craptastic movie made me want to read the novel. So I did.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    This may be the wrong venue at which to post this, but it's possible that I was one of those sleeper agents that you all have been discussing here. I distinctly remember that CBS newscast, Stan. I remember hearing "two Communist giants" and then, next thing I knew I all I heard was the Star Spangled Banner, total static on the video, and the word "Courage" reverberating around the house (we have a large living room).

    Was I one of those sleepers? If Dan Rather put me to sleep (hundreds of times), then what does that make him?

    Anyway, funny stuff in that post. "It takes a beautiful mind to $#ake it." "What, it takes a beautiful mind to take it or a beautiful mind NOT to take it?" "It takes a beautiful mind to MAKE it, snort snort...."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeaZ5OIWko8
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  126. Twinkie says:
    @John Gruskos
    His opponents were mostly K-1 tournament winners, former UFC champions, ADCC tournament winners, and combat sports Olympic medalists.

    Some "cans".

    These are his wins in Pride:

    Sammy Schilt
    Heath Herring
    Big Nog
    E. Valavicius
    Fujita
    Garry Goodridge
    Yuji Nagata
    Mark Coleman
    Kevin Randleman
    Naoya Ogawa
    Big Nog (again)
    Tsuyoshi Kohsaka
    Crocop
    Zuluzinho
    Mark Coleman (again)
    Mark Hunt

    Then subsequently in two other Japanese events:
    Matt Lindland
    Choi Hong-Man

    Of these, only 3-4 were high level MMA talents at the time, and only two (Crocop and Big Nog) were world-class. And those two are legitimately his most impressive victories. Several were cans or low-level MMA talents at best. Some of them might have excelled in other sports (Schilt in kickboxing, Ogawa in Judo), but adapted very poorly to MMA. Some were outright freak shows (Zuluzhino, Choi Hong-Man).

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  127. George says:

    “Model Escort” has one link to some Russian dude. She is there gratuitously although probably in an earlier version she was linked to Trump, but legal threw a fit so she sits there incongruously as a dead end in the graph. Also she has that inflatable doll open mouth look, even though that is not what Trump was accused of.

    I did a search on Finlandization and it seems that might be a talking point that is circulating behind the seen as the usual suspects are using it.

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  128. Redman says:

    OT-but I watched part of a “protest” in front of the NYC courts (Foley Square-sort of the center of NYC government) against the new Supreme Court nominee.

    The MCs of the rally were Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney, the Brooklyn Borough President and Eric Adams, the head of some odd but often mentioned group called “100 blacks in law enforcement.” No idea what that means.

    As is typical at these things, the speakers all sounded like Maxine Waters. Crazy and ignorant. Post Giuliani/Bloomberg, the City is run by insane people.

    That said, NYC cares not about who governs. But how the banks are doing. Nothing else pretty much matters in determining quality of life here.

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  129. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I have no disagreement with that, #400. I didn't want to get into the causes, but just to note the general situation that even in the mid-1980's, though we had trade deficits, America still produced much more than any on other country, and most major consumer items were still made here.

    The Japanese imports of (1st) cameras and electronics started in the early '70's, as the Jap auto imports ramped up in the middle of that decade (the oil "crisis" worked very favorably for them in this regard). China imports did not really take off like a rocket until that early '00's. In the mid-90's I would only see a few things made in China. 15 years, later 95% of most retail-store items were Chinese made.
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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks. I was thinking more of my family's stuff.
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  130. Jim Given says:

    The EU is a “transformative peace magnet”!! The completely over-the-top prose style seems like a signature.Do neocons all employ the same ghost writer?

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  131. donut says:

    You’re a troll Sailer .

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  132. @epebble
    Well, at least from Electoral College perspective, if not from popularity, if Trump is a Soviet sleeper agent, then, many would ask, can we have more of them in 2020, 2024 . . .

    At this point, more "analysis" like this will convert Putin into an American Patriot in the minds of many voters. With an adversary like Putin, who wants friends?

    If the Russians had a sleeper agent it was Hillary Clinton. She accepted millions from Russians and Kremlin connected firms. She paid for Steele, an unregistered foreign agent, to collude with Russian operatives and Kremlin officials to create the “Russian Dossier”. Then Clinton paid them to disseminate this Dossier to all the media outlets and newspapers while her deep state operatives used the Dossier to obtain warrants to wiretap Trump associates and advisors.

    It is much easier to link the Clintons with Putin than Trump.

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  133. Bugg says:
    @Almost Missouri
    The funny thing about this is that for eight years the United States had a man in the Oval Office who really did have shady ties to card-carrying Communists, who really had taken unexplained trips to visit curiously influential people in foreign countries of swiveling allegiance, who came from a family of really peculiar deep state operatives, and whose personal biography really was a Manchurian Candidate-esque patchwork of stealth, evasions and fabrications.

    And the media had zero interest.

    Except don’t think Putin is a communist, which was apparently lost on The Lightbringer in his zeal to be worldly and beloved-

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  134. donut says:
    @donut
    Hey Sailer , have you thought about putting Saguaros in your yard ? I bet you could raise them in that climate .

    You wanker , why post my question w/o an answer . Commie f**k .

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  135. @Anonymous
    The camera business was all imports from the early fifties onward. The only US made cameras were Graflex large format, cinema stuff and a few feeble efforts like the Bell and Howell Foton put out in hopes of getting military orders. The photo industry in the US was the first to be ruined by contractor spoilage.

    The fifties and early sixties were the time of German cameras rather than Japanese. Japan started by making improved Leica and Contax copies, and lenses for them. But it was the adoption of the Nikon F by newspaper photogs nearly universally that made Japan dominant. That took place in a very short time, the JFK/MM era if you will.

    Almost every photo of Ike in office is on 4x5 sheet film. Ones of LBJ on sheet film are almost nonexistent.

    Oh, c’mon, I’m not talking about the high-dollar cameras owned by your photojournalists and real photo buffs (the ones that developed their own, even color!). The family cameras were often Kodak, such as the Brownies – Kodak made about all the film, but they made cameras too. Then there was Polaroid.

    You are right about all the SLRs, as I remember there were Pentaxes, Canons, Olympuses, Mirandas, and Nikon’s from any time I can remember.

    How can we forget?

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    American photojournalists covering the Korean War in early 1950s discovered Nikons.
    , @Anonymous
    Kodak made billions of crappy cameras, Instamatics, Pocket Instamatics, Disc, APS cameras, all thoroughgoing pieces of shit. And for a few years an instant camera system that was in some ways better than the competing Polaroid SX-70 system. (Polaroid sued, they not only quit making them and the film they bought almost all back and destroyed them.) They made very little money off any of this. The goal was to sell the film, so the cameras were sold pretty much at cost.

    Earlier Kodak had sold some fairly decent amateur cameras, the best of which were the Retinas. The Medalist was fairly good too except that it used 620 rather than 120 film, which Kodak quit making (it was identical to 120 film but the spools were narrower and had a male rather than female bump end for the spool.) They also made some decent pro equipment for specialized purposes and for the darkroom.


    Polaroid cameras were mechanically very robustly built, at least the old ones were, but the lenses were crap except on a few professional models. Those, and only those, had value up until the end of the film era as NY fashion and glamour houses and film shoots used them for certain specific purposes and beat them to death, then bought another from the dealers. The consumer models are generally worthless except for one or two specific models-i.e., the Big Shot portrait camera is valuable because Andy Warhol used them all the time. They were very fragile, but since Polaroid pack film is no longer available (the SX-70 film has been reintroduced) no one is going to use one anyway.
    https://78.media.tumblr.com/c0be86c63a9eda94f35d8ac54b184d64/tumblr_mmm1vqF6ZL1r1p7nfo1_1280.jpg

    It's worth adding that taking the cheap three element pop bottle glass lens off a roll film 80 series Polaroid and putting it on another camera (cutting down a lens extension for a 6x7 Pentax, a Praktica, or when they were available a focal plane shutter Hassy or Bronica and mounting the whole front standard with its Waterhouse stops and focusing mount was the easy way, but to be sneaky, the Marty Forschers would remount the elements in a microscope barrel mount or similar....) was a "secret weapon" for soft focus photos of old women back in the day.

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  136. @Anonymous

    The Japanese imports of (1st) cameras and electronics started in the early ’70′s,
     
    I think it was a long time before that.
    https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/american-actress-marilyn-monroe-pointing-a-nikon-camera-at-news-photo/754097341#american-actress-marilyn-monroe-pointing-a-nikon-camera-at-bert-los-picture-id754097341

    Thanks. I was thinking more of my family’s stuff.

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  137. @Anon
    I saw saw something on Drudge that Hildabeast plans to run again in 2020.

    Trump should have offered Hillary the seat on the Supreme Court and then watched as she drove herself crazier trying to decide if she wanted it or another shot at the brass ring. Would have made great theatre.

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    • Replies: @Rob McX
    Too big a gamble. She probably take it. She'd be still sitting there like a zombie in 2040 making crazy decisions.
    , @Anonym
    Trump should have offered Hillary the seat on the Supreme Court and then watched as she drove herself crazier trying to decide if she wanted it or another shot at the brass ring. Would have made great theatre.

    He could have at least interviewed her for the position.

    https://static.politico.com/dims4/default/3794e99/2147483647/resize/463x/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fstatic.politico.com%2Ff8%2Fdd%2Ff1879e1d45e093ffa35112f61dcb%2F171201-trump-romney-gty-1160.jpg
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  138. @SunBakedSuburb
    "Is Don Siegel a better director than Sidney Lumet?"

    It's a subjective question, of course. Siegel made Dirty Harry (1971), a thrilling right-wing reaction to all of that California/Bay Area drug-fueled peace and love. They made their stand-in for the Zodiac killer a dirty hippy (the actual Zodiac killer was definitely not a hippy). The rest of Siegel's oeuvre contains some good films, but nothing that approaches Dirty Harry.

    Lumet has a long and distinguished body of work: Fail Safe (1964), Serpico (1973), Network (1976), to name a few. One of his later efforts, a return to his NYPD chronicles, Q&A (1990), contains a harrowing performance by the great Nick Nolte. My vote goes to Lumet.

    Lumet’s Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead is outstanding. Phillip Seymour Hoffman. Albert Finney, Ethan Hawke, and Marisa Tomei.

    https://www.amazon.com/Before-Devil-Knows-Youre-Dead/dp/B00112S8RS

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  139. @Jim Don Bob
    Yeah, Canada has a bad case of Little Brother Syndrome. I was there last fall for a funeral and went to pick up a neighbor. There was a crew across the street working on a drive way. One of the guys saw my US plate, came over and started ranting about DJT, and why don't we have free health care, what the US looks like to the rest of the world, etc. I usually ignore this shite, but I was not in a great mood that day, so I told him in no uncertain terms that I did not give a s**t what any other country thinks about the US. It's my country, and if you don't like, then don't come. And, btw, I don't come up here and tell you what I think of Boy Trudeau.

    Canadians are nice people, but they are obsessed with the US, and don't realize that no one in the US has paid any attention to Canada since Sergeant Preston of the Yukon went off the air many moons ago.

    Jim Don, I had the same experience working a food festival in Hamilton.

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  140. @Stan Adams
    I've uncovered evidence of a conspiracy linking Trump, Mikhail Gorbachev, Tom Wolfe, and Ronald Reagan.

    Chait sez The Art of the Deal came out on the first day of November 1987. (That was a Sunday, if anyone cares.)

    Also on that day, The New York Times published its review of The Bonfire of the Vanities:
    https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/98/12/06/specials/wolfe-bonfire.html

    The next day - November 2, 1987 - Mikhail Gorbachev's book (Perestroika: New Thinking for Our Country and the World) was published:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1987/11/03/gorbachev-by-the-book/57ae4180-40b9-4957-8269-c45f39c0ce6a/?utm_term=.454465e1fe79

    On the same day that his book came out, Gorbachev gave a major speech marking the 70th anniversary of the Russian Revolution:
    https://www.nytimes.com/1987/11/03/world/gorbachev-on-history-a-breakthrough-sought-in-summit.html

    Portions of this speech were broadcast on American television. It is conceivable that the clips of Gorbachev were an activation signal for various Soviet sleeper agents in the United States:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drYFBKMJrCg

    Then, on November 3, 1987, Trump met Reagan at the White House:
    https://elianabenador.com/2016/03/benador-trump-unstoppable-now/trump-and-reagan/

    So, to review: Trump's book was published almost simultaneously with Gorbachev's; both books were published on the occasion of the 70th anniversary of the Russian Revolution. Gorbachev appeared on American television the same day that his book was published. The next day, Trump, acting as a Russian agent, infiltrated the White House and made contact with the President of the United States.

    What does Wolfe have to do with this? Well, Bonfire cast aspersions on the character of wealthy capitalists. So, clearly, he was acting as a Soviet agent, as well.

    This is scary stuff. The Russians were (and are) everywhere. Obviously, we need to start bombing Moscow immediately.

    Incidentally, I stayed up all night last night re-reading Bonfire for the first time in a long time.

    A few days ago, I was going through some boxes and found my copy of The Devil's Candy, an account of the making of Brian De Palma's execrable film of Wolfe's book. Re-reading the book about the making of the movie got me interested in seeing the movie again.

    (Ironically, the only free copy of the movie I was able to find online was dubbed in Russian. The Russians always dub their movies on top of the English soundtrack, so a patient English-speaker with good hearing can make out most of what's being said.)

    Watching the craptastic movie made me want to read the novel. So I did.

    This may be the wrong venue at which to post this, but it’s possible that I was one of those sleeper agents that you all have been discussing here. I distinctly remember that CBS newscast, Stan. I remember hearing “two Communist giants” and then, next thing I knew I all I heard was the Star Spangled Banner, total static on the video, and the word “Courage” reverberating around the house (we have a large living room).

    Was I one of those sleepers? If Dan Rather put me to sleep (hundreds of times), then what does that make him?

    Anyway, funny stuff in that post. “It takes a beautiful mind to $#ake it.” “What, it takes a beautiful mind to take it or a beautiful mind NOT to take it?” “It takes a beautiful mind to MAKE it, snort snort….”

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  141. @Achmed E. Newman
    Oh, c'mon, I'm not talking about the high-dollar cameras owned by your photojournalists and real photo buffs (the ones that developed their own, even color!). The family cameras were often Kodak, such as the Brownies - Kodak made about all the film, but they made cameras too. Then there was Polaroid.

    You are right about all the SLRs, as I remember there were Pentaxes, Canons, Olympuses, Mirandas, and Nikon's from any time I can remember.

    How can we forget?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rlDTK6QI-w

    American photojournalists covering the Korean War in early 1950s discovered Nikons.

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  142. Anon[395] • Disclaimer says:

    Note the contradictions:

    More than a third of small businesses can’t fill open jobs, matching a record
    The percentage of small businesses not able to fill open positions hit 36 percent in June, according to the NFIB Research Center, the highest level on record.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/07/10/more-than-a-third-of-small-businesses-cant-fill-open-jobs-a-record.html

    Employers will do almost anything to find workers to fill jobs — except pay them more

    Of all the addictions that undermine stability in communities and society at large, surely one of the worst and most persistent is the addiction of corporate managements to pleasing their shareholders.
    Billions of dollars are funneled to owners of capital in the form of dividends and stock buybacks, while laborers go begging for even the measliest wage increases. In recent days and weeks we’ve seen the process play out for the umpteenth time, as businesses grouse about a labor shortage even as job openings increase.

    http://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/la-fi-hiltzik-employment-20180710-story.html

    The House version of the food-stamp-to-work program Congress is considering this week would require recipients to enroll in job training programs if they can’t find work — but in many states, those programs won’t be fully available for at least another decade.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/food-stamp-work-requirements-would-force-states-to_us_5b44af58e4b00db1492ffe8d

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  143. Rob McX says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Trump should have offered Hillary the seat on the Supreme Court and then watched as she drove herself crazier trying to decide if she wanted it or another shot at the brass ring. Would have made great theatre.

    Too big a gamble. She probably take it. She’d be still sitting there like a zombie in 2040 making crazy decisions.

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  144. Anonym says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Trump should have offered Hillary the seat on the Supreme Court and then watched as she drove herself crazier trying to decide if she wanted it or another shot at the brass ring. Would have made great theatre.

    Trump should have offered Hillary the seat on the Supreme Court and then watched as she drove herself crazier trying to decide if she wanted it or another shot at the brass ring. Would have made great theatre.

    He could have at least interviewed her for the position.

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  145. Cohen and Chait may be mentally challenged, so we should cut them some slack. Assholes. The real pro-Soviet/Russian spies that I know about were all, let’s say, “progressives.” All of this is in the public domain now. After all, they’ve got Trump to worry about now — who cares about the real, old-school Soviet agents, who really caused us harm?

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  146. Anon7 says:
    @CJ

    Omigod, this is great! I want that New York Magazine diagram in a poster.
     
    Me too. It's classic material. Believing it or not, or pretending to believe it, is entirely a matter of taste. You could put it on your office wall if you were a mole inside Google.

    I wonder if you could still read it if you printed it on a big coffee mug, or something like that. This diagram is kind of like those cool tables that have three columns and you take one word from each column to create a new jargon phrase.

    In this case, you could start anywhere, looping through it for ever more far fetched, ever more impossible to prove (or deny!) accusations against our President, Donald J. Trump. American Big Media is going to need this as we enter the fall election season.

    (I’d also like to take this opportunity to remind everyone to avoid the use of just “Trump” in conversations with liberals. Always use “our President, Donald J. Trump” or “President Donald Trump” or “the President of the United States, Donald J. Trump.” It’s worth it when you watch their faces, and don’t you enjoy saying it?)

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  147. Alfa158 says:
    @RonaldB
    I think the country is best served by having viable candidates in both parties. Wishing HRC on the Democrats just so the Republicans will win easily has numerous dangers.

    1. HRC might just win. The Mueller investigation could bring indictments on Trump based on cooked-up evidence right before election campaigning began. HRC would not make the same mistake of ignoring key fly-by states.

    2. We would be better off with viable alternate solutions by Democrats, rather than relying completely on Trump and the Republican establishment. For example, consider this alternate platform for a centrist Democrat:
    No wall
    Continuation of catch-and-release
    Mandatory e-verify for all employment
    End welfare and public benefits to non-citizens

    It's a bad idea to cook the odds even legitimately.

    1. The Democratic leadership thinks HRC is toxic and is ready to move on to fresh blood. She disappeared from news coverage after going off again on the deplorables during her India trip and became a non-person as far as the Megaphone was concerned. Before they let her suck all the oxygen out of the Party again, they’ll draw straws for who gets to put a pillow over her face.
    2. Centrist Democrats don’t exist. No Democrat will ever be allowed run on a platform of mandatory e-verify or ending welfare to non-citizens.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I think you have the whole drawing straws concept wrong, Alfa. For your proposal, I think some kind of celebrity auction would probably work best. They could use the money collected from the winner of the pillow to buy the Inner Party a Gulfstream 550 - for the people's use, of course.
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  148. Travis says:
    @Rob McX
    It's strange what's classified as "interfering" in a country's affairs. The accusation of influencing the election of Trump or "recruiting" him is something that's endlessly discussed and analysed. But importing millions of people from the Third World never gets the same type of scrutiny. Who is behind it, and what are their motives? Just to focus on the electoral consequences, bringing in millions of Hispanics, if continued for long enough, would eventually ensure the Democrats' being voted into power forever. George Soros's funding of immigration-promoting NGOs influences elections far more in the long run than anything the Russians could have done with Trump.

    imagine if Putin encouraged millions of Russians to enter the United States illegally , and then campaigned directly to Russians in America to become US citizens and vote to support Russian interests. Yet the Mexican Presidents have done this for decades while helping the Mexican Cartels build a drug distribution network in America.

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  149. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Andrew
    Maybe Donald Trump started reading “The New American” magazine published by the John Birch Society in 1987.

    That was when I started reading it. The New American and JBS argued the same thing, we shouldn’t be spending money to defend wealthy countries in Europe and Asia who could pay for it themselves. They were also notably protectionist and gave a forum to protectionist Republicans like Congresswoman Helen Delich Bentley of Maryland.

    Donald Trump has posted tweets with obscure quotes I’ve only ever seen published in The New American. Most of his politics are straight up Birchism. The JBS and The New American have very vocally supported him since he started running. The type of non-establishment rich people who support(ed) Trump are the sort the JBS long cultivated.

    Why look for wild conspiracies with Putin when something obvious like this is sitting right there?

    I grew up reading American Opinion(as it was then) / The New American as well. RP Oliver had been purged out before i was reading it-I’d have been four maybe?-but it was still a mostly well written journal that seemed reasonable to me and much of it still does, even though I suspect RPO was right-Welch was subsidized by the Rockefellers and/or others. What the Birchers printed wasn’t wrong, it was things that were little known to the general public but not really otherwise secret. It served the purpose of misdirection-it established that the Commies were perfidious and brutal (they were) and that our government often did things that were blatantly against our stated interests in defending us from them (they did) and in fact was propping the communist regimes up (they were). Those things were already known to anyone who knew where to look. What was not discussed, was the why, and that was -or, at least, one theory explaining why was-what got RPO kicked out of the JBS and off the staff of Truckling Bill Cuckley’s National Review.

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  150. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Oh, c'mon, I'm not talking about the high-dollar cameras owned by your photojournalists and real photo buffs (the ones that developed their own, even color!). The family cameras were often Kodak, such as the Brownies - Kodak made about all the film, but they made cameras too. Then there was Polaroid.

    You are right about all the SLRs, as I remember there were Pentaxes, Canons, Olympuses, Mirandas, and Nikon's from any time I can remember.

    How can we forget?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rlDTK6QI-w

    Kodak made billions of crappy cameras, Instamatics, Pocket Instamatics, Disc, APS cameras, all thoroughgoing pieces of shit. And for a few years an instant camera system that was in some ways better than the competing Polaroid SX-70 system. (Polaroid sued, they not only quit making them and the film they bought almost all back and destroyed them.) They made very little money off any of this. The goal was to sell the film, so the cameras were sold pretty much at cost.

    Earlier Kodak had sold some fairly decent amateur cameras, the best of which were the Retinas. The Medalist was fairly good too except that it used 620 rather than 120 film, which Kodak quit making (it was identical to 120 film but the spools were narrower and had a male rather than female bump end for the spool.) They also made some decent pro equipment for specialized purposes and for the darkroom.

    Polaroid cameras were mechanically very robustly built, at least the old ones were, but the lenses were crap except on a few professional models. Those, and only those, had value up until the end of the film era as NY fashion and glamour houses and film shoots used them for certain specific purposes and beat them to death, then bought another from the dealers. The consumer models are generally worthless except for one or two specific models-i.e., the Big Shot portrait camera is valuable because Andy Warhol used them all the time. They were very fragile, but since Polaroid pack film is no longer available (the SX-70 film has been reintroduced) no one is going to use one anyway.
    It’s worth adding that taking the cheap three element pop bottle glass lens off a roll film 80 series Polaroid and putting it on another camera (cutting down a lens extension for a 6×7 Pentax, a Praktica, or when they were available a focal plane shutter Hassy or Bronica and mounting the whole front standard with its Waterhouse stops and focusing mount was the easy way, but to be sneaky, the Marty Forschers would remount the elements in a microscope barrel mount or similar….) was a “secret weapon” for soft focus photos of old women back in the day.

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  151. @Tiny Duck
    Like me most white girls she secretly craves Black Men

    Like me most white girls she secretly craves Black Men

    Most Croatians are black men, in part, thanks to that notorious shipwreck 400 or 500 years ago, at Ulcinj.

    In medieval times a shipwreck of a Saracen sailing boat beached there with African slaves. Some locals from Ulcinj saved the Africans and integrated the slaves into their community…

    One square in Ulcinj down town is called the “Slave Square” because the pirates from Ulcinj were trading in the 17th and 18th century black slaves from different African countries.

    http://www.visit-ulcinj.com/ulcinj-travel-guide/montenegro-ulcinj/

    Alright, technically Ulcinj is in Montenegro and has an Albanian majority. But it’s just a short hop down the coast from Croatia, and Tito was hardly the first to unite all these– there were the Austro-Hungarians and the Ottomans just for starters. Plenty of time for the genes to ripple through the area.

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    • Replies: @Rob McX
    I don't know about the Balkans, but people are seeing blacks everywhere in history these days. Here's the Guardian on the possibility that George III's Queen Charlotte was part African:

    It is a great "what if" of history. "If she was black," says the historian Kate Williams, "this raises a lot of important suggestions about not only our royal family but those of most of Europe, considering that Queen Victoria's descendants are spread across most of the royal families of Europe and beyond. If we class Charlotte as black, then ergo Queen Victoria and our entire royal family, [down] to Prince Harry, are also black ... a very interesting concept."
     
    This is based on the fact that Charlotte may have had an ancestor who was a Moor, 500 years earlier in the 13th century. That's 15 generations back at a conservative estimate, which would make Charlotte 1/32768 Moor.

    Williams is a Professor of History at Reading University.

    , @hyperbola
    Actually Montenegro has a Serbian majority. These days it is a corruption center for the Rothschild family in the form of Nathan (son of the current "lord") and of corrupt Labor party politicians of Britain.

    Peter Mandelson parties with his super-rich chums again ... and the security guards DEFINITELY don't want you to see him
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2012882/Peter-Mandelson-parties-super-rich-Nat-Rothschild-Montenegro.html

    It was a lavish party packed with oligarchs and mining magnates. Just the sort of occasion where you might expect to see Peter Mandelson.

    But it seems someone was determined the world would not be allowed to see the Labour peer enjoying the lavish 40th birthday celebrations of his close friend billionaire Nat Rothschild.

    Burly security guards used strong-arm tactics in a bid to prevent the former Business Secretary from being photographed as he joined other guests in Montenegro for the £1million event.
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  152. TheJester says:
    @istevefan

    . Spain was poor and under a dictatorship a little more than four decades ago. That’s what the European Union does. It’s a transformative peace magnet delivering democratic stability and prosperity to more than a half-billion people. That’s why the United States has always supported it.
     
    The EU takes too much credit for the wealth and stability of Europe. If anything the EU is the one pissing away that wealth and definitely the EU is pissing away the stability with its insane importation of a religious group whose various antecedents attempted to take Europe by force for centuries, and even succeeded in Iberia and the Balkans.

    Europe became stable because it was under occupation by outside forces. And when one of those outside forces withdrew we saw outbreaks of conflict that the EU wasn't able to deal with.

    Europe became wealthy in large part because of Marshall Plan which is to say Uncle Sam. And to this day they still don't spend much on defense and are able to use that funding for social spending. Compare the German Luftwaffe to the Israeli Air Force.

    Heck the German Air Force isn't even as powerful as the air component of the US Marine Corps let alone the USAF and USN. If the Marines were its own stand alone armed force, its air component would best that of any NATO nation not named the United States.

    It’s interesting that so little attention is paid to the 1990 treat finally ending WWII in Europe. Everyone, it seems, has heard of the Treaty of Versailles that ended WWI. Whom, however, has heard of the Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany signed in 1990 that ended WWII?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_on_the_Final_Settlement_with_Respect_to_Germany

    The 1990 Treaty established severe restrictions on the size and capability of the German armed forces in return for West and East Germany reuniting. United Germany was then theoretically given back its sovereignty as the “four Powers” gave up the special rights they had enjoyed as occupying powers since Germany surrendered in 1945.

    However, “sovereignty” came with a basket of restrictions. Germany had to accept, in perpetuity, the territorial changes forced on Germany after WWII. It left open future claims for reparations against Germany by [ fill in the blank ]. The Treaty also required a provision in the German constitution that forbade ever adding addition territory to Germany, regardless of the circumstances.

    Keeping Germany down …

    The West German Army had been a major force factor for NATO during the Cold War. Going forward, the new Treaty specified that Germany’s armed forces, in perpetuity, would be a national disgrace. It could have airplanes … but they didn’t have to fly. It could have tanks … but they didn’t have to work. It could have naval ships … but they didn’t have to float. It could have 370,000 personnel in its armed forces, but this included administrative personnel. As of 28 February 2018, there were a total of 61,054 soldiers on active service in the German Army.

    It is an open question whether the Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany really gave back Germany its sovereignty. Reparations aside, the tenor of the treaty sounds a lot like the Treaty of Versailles. Germany remains under the boot of the United States, Britain, France, and Russia. Like the Treaty of Versailles, the purpose of the “Final Settlement” was to keep Germany down while requiring it to do penance for its “sins” in perpetuity.

    Globalism anyone …? It is no wonder that nationalism in Germany is still seen as an existential threat to world peace. Indeed, it is for all practical purposes illegal. What would happen, let’s say, if a movement sprang up in Germany to abrogate the “Final Settlement” and assert Germany’s right to sovereign control over its borders, its economy, its defense, etc.?

    The European Union and NATO were designed to keep that from happening.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Of course this was ostensibly about the re-unification, but yours is an interesting comment, Jester. Is this a repeat of the situation after Versailles, but in slow motion? All it would take for me to believe that would be if there emerged a man (or woman) with a funny mustache as leader of a new German reich ... wait a minute ...
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  153. @Alfa158
    1. The Democratic leadership thinks HRC is toxic and is ready to move on to fresh blood. She disappeared from news coverage after going off again on the deplorables during her India trip and became a non-person as far as the Megaphone was concerned. Before they let her suck all the oxygen out of the Party again, they’ll draw straws for who gets to put a pillow over her face.
    2. Centrist Democrats don’t exist. No Democrat will ever be allowed run on a platform of mandatory e-verify or ending welfare to non-citizens.

    I think you have the whole drawing straws concept wrong, Alfa. For your proposal, I think some kind of celebrity auction would probably work best. They could use the money collected from the winner of the pillow to buy the Inner Party a Gulfstream 550 – for the people’s use, of course.

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  154. @TheJester
    It's interesting that so little attention is paid to the 1990 treat finally ending WWII in Europe. Everyone, it seems, has heard of the Treaty of Versailles that ended WWI. Whom, however, has heard of the Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany signed in 1990 that ended WWII?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_on_the_Final_Settlement_with_Respect_to_Germany

    The 1990 Treaty established severe restrictions on the size and capability of the German armed forces in return for West and East Germany reuniting. United Germany was then theoretically given back its sovereignty as the "four Powers" gave up the special rights they had enjoyed as occupying powers since Germany surrendered in 1945.

    However, "sovereignty" came with a basket of restrictions. Germany had to accept, in perpetuity, the territorial changes forced on Germany after WWII. It left open future claims for reparations against Germany by [ fill in the blank ]. The Treaty also required a provision in the German constitution that forbade ever adding addition territory to Germany, regardless of the circumstances.

    Keeping Germany down ...

    The West German Army had been a major force factor for NATO during the Cold War. Going forward, the new Treaty specified that Germany's armed forces, in perpetuity, would be a national disgrace. It could have airplanes ... but they didn't have to fly. It could have tanks ... but they didn't have to work. It could have naval ships ... but they didn't have to float. It could have 370,000 personnel in its armed forces, but this included administrative personnel. As of 28 February 2018, there were a total of 61,054 soldiers on active service in the German Army.

    It is an open question whether the Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany really gave back Germany its sovereignty. Reparations aside, the tenor of the treaty sounds a lot like the Treaty of Versailles. Germany remains under the boot of the United States, Britain, France, and Russia. Like the Treaty of Versailles, the purpose of the "Final Settlement" was to keep Germany down while requiring it to do penance for its "sins" in perpetuity.

    Globalism anyone ...? It is no wonder that nationalism in Germany is still seen as an existential threat to world peace. Indeed, it is for all practical purposes illegal. What would happen, let's say, if a movement sprang up in Germany to abrogate the "Final Settlement" and assert Germany's right to sovereign control over its borders, its economy, its defense, etc.?

    The European Union and NATO were designed to keep that from happening.

    Of course this was ostensibly about the re-unification, but yours is an interesting comment, Jester. Is this a repeat of the situation after Versailles, but in slow motion? All it would take for me to believe that would be if there emerged a man (or woman) with a funny mustache as leader of a new German reich … wait a minute …

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  155. Anonymous[532] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achilles
    A long-time observer of our hysterical and neurotic MSM would have to suspect that a large part of their obsession with Russia has some relation to the impenetrable and internecine politics of Russian Jewish oligarchs and Putin's inner circle. Not that these oligarchs form a uniform bloc, far from that, but the perceived collective Jewish interest relative to the Putin regime undoubtedly drives the agenda of much of the American MSM.

    If there existed such a set of Chinese Jewish oligarchs then no doubt we would see a similar paranoid obsession with China.

    Yes it’s a hidden quarrel among hidden people with hidden motives. We on the outside just get told that Putin is bad because he is mean to gays, women and Protestants. It’s really unconvincing. You wonder what the real story is.

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  156. @SunBakedSuburb
    "Is Don Siegel a better director than Sidney Lumet?"

    It's a subjective question, of course. Siegel made Dirty Harry (1971), a thrilling right-wing reaction to all of that California/Bay Area drug-fueled peace and love. They made their stand-in for the Zodiac killer a dirty hippy (the actual Zodiac killer was definitely not a hippy). The rest of Siegel's oeuvre contains some good films, but nothing that approaches Dirty Harry.

    Lumet has a long and distinguished body of work: Fail Safe (1964), Serpico (1973), Network (1976), to name a few. One of his later efforts, a return to his NYPD chronicles, Q&A (1990), contains a harrowing performance by the great Nick Nolte. My vote goes to Lumet.

    Lumet has a long and distinguished body of work: Fail Safe (1964), Serpico (1973), Network (1976), to name a few. One of his later efforts, a return to his NYPD chronicles, Q&A (1990), contains a harrowing performance by the great Nick Nolte. My vote goes to Lumet.

    I say Lumet over Siegel, too.

    Nick Nolte is German, English, Scottish and Swiss German, among other ancestries. In the movie Q & A, Nolte wears lifts in his shoes and blackens his hair to play a New York City Irish cop named Mike Brennan. Nolte has a lot of fun playing the Irish cop and I think the audiences had fun watching him. I did.

    Sidney Lumet is now gone, but I can’t forgive him for a particular scene he directed with Marisa Tomei that was gratuitous and featured a fat drug addict actor who was playing a fat drug addict.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Sidney Lumet is now gone, but I can’t forgive him for a particular scene he directed with Marisa Tomei that was gratuitous and featured a fat drug addict actor who was playing a fat drug addict.
     
    Yeah, it was gratuitous, but I'd always wanted to see her naked. She looked good.
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  157. Rob McX says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Like me most white girls she secretly craves Black Men
     
    Most Croatians are black men, in part, thanks to that notorious shipwreck 400 or 500 years ago, at Ulcinj.

    In medieval times a shipwreck of a Saracen sailing boat beached there with African slaves. Some locals from Ulcinj saved the Africans and integrated the slaves into their community...

    One square in Ulcinj down town is called the “Slave Square” because the pirates from Ulcinj were trading in the 17th and 18th century black slaves from different African countries.

    http://www.visit-ulcinj.com/ulcinj-travel-guide/montenegro-ulcinj/
     
    Alright, technically Ulcinj is in Montenegro and has an Albanian majority. But it's just a short hop down the coast from Croatia, and Tito was hardly the first to unite all these-- there were the Austro-Hungarians and the Ottomans just for starters. Plenty of time for the genes to ripple through the area.

    I don’t know about the Balkans, but people are seeing blacks everywhere in history these days. Here’s the Guardian on the possibility that George III’s Queen Charlotte was part African:

    It is a great “what if” of history. “If she was black,” says the historian Kate Williams, “this raises a lot of important suggestions about not only our royal family but those of most of Europe, considering that Queen Victoria’s descendants are spread across most of the royal families of Europe and beyond. If we class Charlotte as black, then ergo Queen Victoria and our entire royal family, [down] to Prince Harry, are also black … a very interesting concept.”

    This is based on the fact that Charlotte may have had an ancestor who was a Moor, 500 years earlier in the 13th century. That’s 15 generations back at a conservative estimate, which would make Charlotte 1/32768 Moor.

    Williams is a Professor of History at Reading University.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    That’s 15 generations back at a conservative estimate, which would make Charlotte 1/32768 Moor.
     
    Would that make her a trigesimabimillennialseptacentennialsexagesimaloctaroon?
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  158. @Charles Pewitt

    Lumet has a long and distinguished body of work: Fail Safe (1964), Serpico (1973), Network (1976), to name a few. One of his later efforts, a return to his NYPD chronicles, Q&A (1990), contains a harrowing performance by the great Nick Nolte. My vote goes to Lumet.

     

    I say Lumet over Siegel, too.

    Nick Nolte is German, English, Scottish and Swiss German, among other ancestries. In the movie Q & A, Nolte wears lifts in his shoes and blackens his hair to play a New York City Irish cop named Mike Brennan. Nolte has a lot of fun playing the Irish cop and I think the audiences had fun watching him. I did.

    Sidney Lumet is now gone, but I can't forgive him for a particular scene he directed with Marisa Tomei that was gratuitous and featured a fat drug addict actor who was playing a fat drug addict.

    Sidney Lumet is now gone, but I can’t forgive him for a particular scene he directed with Marisa Tomei that was gratuitous and featured a fat drug addict actor who was playing a fat drug addict.

    Yeah, it was gratuitous, but I’d always wanted to see her naked. She looked good.

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  159. @Rob McX
    I don't know about the Balkans, but people are seeing blacks everywhere in history these days. Here's the Guardian on the possibility that George III's Queen Charlotte was part African:

    It is a great "what if" of history. "If she was black," says the historian Kate Williams, "this raises a lot of important suggestions about not only our royal family but those of most of Europe, considering that Queen Victoria's descendants are spread across most of the royal families of Europe and beyond. If we class Charlotte as black, then ergo Queen Victoria and our entire royal family, [down] to Prince Harry, are also black ... a very interesting concept."
     
    This is based on the fact that Charlotte may have had an ancestor who was a Moor, 500 years earlier in the 13th century. That's 15 generations back at a conservative estimate, which would make Charlotte 1/32768 Moor.

    Williams is a Professor of History at Reading University.

    That’s 15 generations back at a conservative estimate, which would make Charlotte 1/32768 Moor.

    Would that make her a trigesimabimillennialseptacentennialsexagesimaloctaroon?

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  160. hyperbola says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Whereas the opposite has obtained in the US. Foreign countries have subsidized US consumption and the US military industrial complex.
     
    DISAGREE. That is the situation NOW, but it was not during the Cold War era. Up until the mid-1980's the USA did damn well for itself producing its own goods, and go back to the 1960's (middle of the CW) and we were producing goods for consumption all over the free world.

    Steve Sailer couldn't go into all this in the one post, as it's off the topic really, but it was also President Reagan's intentional-or-not bluffing at the summit in Iceland about America's "Star Wars" anti-ballistic missile technology. That made the Soviets think they'd need to spend a whole 'nother chunk of money on military hardware, and once that sunk in, things may have looked hopeless for them.

    Reagan was a traitorous lackey of a foreign sect from the very beginning.

    Shamir’s October Surprise Admission

    https://consortiumnews.com/2012/07/03/shamirs-october-surprise-admission/

    Two decades ago, ex-Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir offered the stunning confirmation that “of course” an October Surprise plot had blocked President Jimmy Carter from gaining the release of 52 U.S. hostages in Iran, thus helping Ronald Reagan win the presidency in 1980,….

    To “pay off” his israeli masters, Reagan then gave the Zioncons control of foreign policy in Central America, where they promptly produced millions of refugees in the US.

    How Neocons Destabilized Europe

    https://consortiumnews.com/2015/09/07/how-neocons-destabilized-europe/

    ….When I first encountered the neocons in the 1980s, they had been given Central America to play with. President Ronald Reagan had credentialed many of them, bringing into the U.S. government neocon luminaries such as Elliott Abrams and Robert Kagan. But Reagan mostly kept them out of the big-power realms: the Mideast and Europe.

    Those strategic areas went to the “adults,” people like James Baker, George Shultz, Philip Habib and Brent Scowcroft. The poor Central Americans, as they tried to shed generations of repression and backwardness imposed by brutal right-wing oligarchies, faced U.S. neocon ideologues who unleashed death squads and even genocide against peasants, students and workers.

    The result not surprisingly was a flood of refugees, especially from El Salvador and Guatemala, northward to the United States. The neocon “success” in the 1980s, crushing progressive social movements and reinforcing the oligarchic controls, left most countries of Central America in the grip of corrupt regimes and crime syndicates, periodically driving more waves of what Reagan called “feet people” through Mexico to the southern U.S. border…..


    Lets also remember that it was Reagan who started subsidizing the move of American jobs and companies to foreign countries.

    [MORE]

    How Reagan Sold The United States Piece By Piece

    http://borderlessnewsandviews.com/2012/02/08/how-reagan-sold-the-united-states-piece-by-piece/

    …. It is not a coincidence that China’s progress started during Reagan presidency. It was Reagan who started the process of deregulation that ultimately resulted in American jobs being outsourced all over the world and, a by the end of his era, there was a large increase in crappy jobs for Americans…..

    As for “star wars”, that boondoggle was really about channeling corrruption to the “defense industries”.

    The US Missile Defence System Is The Magic Pudding That Will Never Run Out

    https://www.countercurrents.org/monbiot200808.htm

    ….. The system has been in development since 1946, and so far it has achieved a grand total of nothing. You wouldn’t know it if you read the press releases published by the Pentagon’s missile defence agency: the word “success” features more often than any other noun…. Missile defence is so expensive and the measures required to evade it so cheap that if the US government were serious about making the system work it would bankrupt the country, just as the arms race helped to bring the Soviet Union down. By spending a couple of billion dollars on decoy technologies, Russia would commit the US to trillions of dollars of countermeasures. The cost ratios are such that even Iran could outspend the US…..
    The US has spent between $120bn and $150bn on the programme since Ronald Reagan relaunched it in 1983. Under George Bush, the costs have accelerated. The Pentagon has requested $62bn for the next five-year tranche, which means that the total cost between 2003 and 2013 will be $110bn. Yet there are no clear criteria for success. As a recent paper in the journal Defense and Security Analysis shows, the Pentagon invented a new funding system in order to allow the missile defence programme to evade the government’s usual accounting standards. It’s called spiral development, which is quite appropriate, because it ensures that the costs spiral out of control…..
    So why commit endless billions to a programme that is bound to fail? I’ll give you a clue: the answer is in the question. It persists because it doesn’t work.

    US politics, because of the failure by both Republicans and Democrats to deal with the problems of campaign finance, is rotten from head to toe. But under Bush, the corruption has acquired Nigerian qualities. Federal government is a vast corporate welfare programme, rewarding the industries that give millions of dollars in political donations with contracts worth billions. Missile defence is the biggest pork barrel of all, the magic pudding that won’t run out, however much you eat. The funds channelled to defence, aerospace and other manufacturing and service companies will never run dry because the system will never work.

    To keep the pudding flowing, the administration must exaggerate the threats from nations that have no means of nuking it – and ignore the likely responses of those that do……

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  161. hyperbola says:
    @Seamus Padraig

    Traveling from Madrid to beautiful Segovia the other day, in a line of traffic full of Spaniards fleeing the capital for the weekend, I gazed out on a wealthy country. Spain was poor and under a dictatorship a little more than four decades ago. That’s what the European Union does.
     
    Spain? Wealthy? With it's official unemployment rate of 16% - the second highest in the EU after Greece?

    http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Unemployment_statistics

    Roger Cohen must be dropping acid again.

    In Spain they still calculate unemployment in the way that the US used in the 1970s, i.e. without leaving out millions of people who have given up in desperation. Below is the Asst. Secretary of Treasury from the Reagan administration. Another difference is that Spain has a rather large “black” economy that is not reported to the government (and which provides “jobs” and income to people) as well as much stronger family structures than in the US (which provides “emergency” help). One sees much less desperation in Spanish communities than in many parts of the US.

    Make-Believe America: Why the US Unemployment Rate Doesn’t Indicate Economic Recovery

    https://www.foreignpolicyjournal.com/2018/03/08/make-believe-america-why-the-us-unemployment-rate-doesnt-indicate-economic-recovery/

    Americans live a never-never-land existence. The politicians and presstitutes make sure of that. Consider something as simple as the unemployment rate. The US is said to have full employment with a January 2018 unemployment rate of 4.1 percent, down from 9.8 percent in January 2010.

    However, the low rate of unemployment is contradicted by the long-term decline in the labor force participation rate. After a long rise during the Reagan 1980s, the labor force participation rate peaked in January 1990 at 66.8 percent, more or less holding to that rate for another decade until 2001 when decline set in accelerating in September 2008.

    [MORE]

    Allegedly, the current unemployment rate of 4.1 percent is the result of the long recovery that allegedly began in June 2009. However, normally, employment opportunities created by economic recovery cause an increase in the labor force participation rate as people join the work force to take advantage of employment opportunities. A fall in the participation rate is associated with recession or stagnation, not with economic recovery.

    How can this contradiction be reconciled? The answer lies in the measurement of unemployment. If you have not looked for a job in the last four weeks, you are not counted as being unemployed, because you are not counted as being part of the work force. When there are no jobs to be found, job seekers become discouraged and cease looking for jobs. In other words, the 4.1 percent unemployment rate does not count discouraged workers who cannot find jobs.

    The US Bureau of Labor Statistics has a second measure of unemployment that includes workers who have been discouraged and out of the labor force for less than one year. This rate of unemployment is 8.2 percent, double the 4.1 percent reported rate.

    The US government no longer tracks unemployment among discouraged workers who have been out of the work force for more than one year. However, John Williams of shadowstats.com continues to estimate this rate and places it at 22 or 23 percent, a far cry from 4.1 percent.

    In other words, the 4.1 percent unemployment rate does not count the unemployed who do show up in the declining labor force participation rate.

    If the US had a print and TV media instead of the propaganda ministry that it has, the financial press would not tolerate the deception of the public about employment in America.

    Junk economists, of which the US has an over-supply, claim that the decline in the labor force participation rate merely reflects people who prefer to live on welfare than to work for a living and the current generation of young people who prefer life at home with parents paying the bills. This explanation from junk economists does not explain why suddenly Americans discovered welfare and became lazy in 2001 and turned their back on job opportunities. The junk economists also do not explain why, if the economy is at full employment, competition for workers is not driving up wages.

    The reason Americans cannot find jobs and have left the labor force is that US corporations have offshored millions of American jobs in order to raise profits, share prices, and executive bonuses by lowering labor costs. Many American industrial and manufacturing cities have been devastated by the relocation abroad of production for the American consumer market, by the movement abroad of IT and software engineering jobs, and by importing lower paid foreign workers on H1-B and other work visas to take the jobs of Americans. In my book, The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism, I give examples and document the devastating impact jobs offshoring has had on communities, cities, pension funds, and consumer purchasing power.

    John Williams of shadowstats.com questions whether there has been any real growth in the US economy since the 2008 crisis that resulted from the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act. Williams believes that the GDP growth rate is an illusion resulting from the understatement of inflation. Just as unemployment is under-counted, so is inflation……

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  162. hyperbola says:
    @Anon7
    I hadn’t realized that the Trump dossier strategy idea is Russian in origin: longtime enemies do become like each other.

    In January 1999, Prosecutor General Yury Skuratov was summoned to the Kremlin by then-President Boris Yeltsin’s chief of staff, who showed him a videotape of “a man who looked like” Skuratov frolicking in bed with two prostitutes. Then he asked Skuratov to resign...

    Soon afterward, on April 7, 1999, Putin went on TV himself to claim the tape authentic—that the “man who looked like” Skuratov was indeed Skuratov—and called not only for Skuratov’s resignation, but for a more robust criminal investigation.

    All this is noteworthy not only because this was one of Putin’s key steps toward the presidential throne, but because this dark and convoluted chapter of contemporary Russian history is also, however amazingly, now relevant reading for understanding contemporary American history. Now that Buzzfeed has released a dossier compiled by a private intelligence company, with unverified allegations that the FSB has a video of Donald Trump with prostitutes in the Moscow Ritz Carlton in 2013, America has entered uniquely Russian territory. (I should add that I, like many other journalists, was approached over the summer with the story of the prostitutes and could not verify it.)

    In any case, welcome to the world of kompromat, America.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/01/kompromat-trump-dossier/512891/
     

    Does anyone still believe anything published in The Atlantic now that it is run by a dual-citizen member of a foreign sect of anglo-zionist-globalists? Frankly, anyone quoting this as a “source” should be considered as a dodgy type.

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  163. hyperbola says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    Yeah, Canada has a bad case of Little Brother Syndrome. I was there last fall for a funeral and went to pick up a neighbor. There was a crew across the street working on a drive way. One of the guys saw my US plate, came over and started ranting about DJT, and why don't we have free health care, what the US looks like to the rest of the world, etc. I usually ignore this shite, but I was not in a great mood that day, so I told him in no uncertain terms that I did not give a s**t what any other country thinks about the US. It's my country, and if you don't like, then don't come. And, btw, I don't come up here and tell you what I think of Boy Trudeau.

    Canadians are nice people, but they are obsessed with the US, and don't realize that no one in the US has paid any attention to Canada since Sergeant Preston of the Yukon went off the air many moons ago.

    The same foreign sect that owns “our” government and subjects Americans to cradle-to-grave propaganda to keep us dumb, distracted, divided and easy for the sect to manipulate also owns the Canadian government. The sect’s “story-line” is slightly different in Canada, but in keeping with their “divide and rule” practices. The Trudeau family has long been involved.

    The Jewish Takeover Of Canada

    http://www.realjewnews.com/?p=705

    IT ALL BEGAN with Pierre Elliot Trudeau, who ruled as Prime Minister of Canada from 1968 to 1984. The year “1984″ which saw the summation of Trudeau’s policies—namely the Jewification of Canada—is an apt metaphor for the police-state grip that Jewry now wields on the once sovereign and Christian nation of Canada, currently a vassal of the global Zionist beast.

    Although some argue that Trudeau showed himself as an anti-Semite and pro-Palestinian, in reality, he bowed to Zionist pressure both from American and Canadian Jewry. ….. with such groups as the Canadian Jewish Political Affairs Committee; the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (Canada’s counterpart to America’s AIPAC); the Jewish Federations of North America; and the Jewish Defense League, the strangle hold of Jewry on Canada’s national policies is secure. View Entire Story Here, Here, Here & Here….

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  164. hyperbola says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Like me most white girls she secretly craves Black Men
     
    Most Croatians are black men, in part, thanks to that notorious shipwreck 400 or 500 years ago, at Ulcinj.

    In medieval times a shipwreck of a Saracen sailing boat beached there with African slaves. Some locals from Ulcinj saved the Africans and integrated the slaves into their community...

    One square in Ulcinj down town is called the “Slave Square” because the pirates from Ulcinj were trading in the 17th and 18th century black slaves from different African countries.

    http://www.visit-ulcinj.com/ulcinj-travel-guide/montenegro-ulcinj/
     
    Alright, technically Ulcinj is in Montenegro and has an Albanian majority. But it's just a short hop down the coast from Croatia, and Tito was hardly the first to unite all these-- there were the Austro-Hungarians and the Ottomans just for starters. Plenty of time for the genes to ripple through the area.

    Actually Montenegro has a Serbian majority. These days it is a corruption center for the Rothschild family in the form of Nathan (son of the current “lord”) and of corrupt Labor party politicians of Britain.

    Peter Mandelson parties with his super-rich chums again … and the security guards DEFINITELY don’t want you to see him

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2012882/Peter-Mandelson-parties-super-rich-Nat-Rothschild-Montenegro.html

    It was a lavish party packed with oligarchs and mining magnates. Just the sort of occasion where you might expect to see Peter Mandelson.

    But it seems someone was determined the world would not be allowed to see the Labour peer enjoying the lavish 40th birthday celebrations of his close friend billionaire Nat Rothschild.

    Burly security guards used strong-arm tactics in a bid to prevent the former Business Secretary from being photographed as he joined other guests in Montenegro for the £1million event.

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  165. 22pp22 says:
    @JerseyJeffersonian
    On paper, yes. But otherwise...

    Bulgaria’s a nice place and they are building a fence along the border with Turkey.

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