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Garrison Keillor Projects His Own Resentments: Trump's Problem Is That Jews Run Manhattan
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In the Chicago Tribune, Minnesotan Garrison Keillor, recently retired from his Prairie Home Companion radio show, tries to explain Donald Trump:

When this is over, you will have nothing that you want

Garrison Keillor
Special To The Washington Post

… And The New York Times treats you like the village idiot. This is painful for a Queens boy trying to win respect in Manhattan where the Times is the Supreme Liberal Jewish Anglican Arbiter of Who Has The Smarts and What Goes Where. When you came to Manhattan 40 years ago, you discovered that in entertainment, the press, politics, finance, everywhere you went, you ran into Jews

I don’t actually think that it took Donald Trump until age 30 to learn about Jews.

, and they are not like you: Jews didn’t go in for big yachts

Garrison Keillor evidently doesn’t spend a lot of time in Florida. He probably found War Dogs confusing: Why isn’t this movie about Dick Cheney? What is this movie about anyway?

and a fleet of aircraft — they showed off by way of philanthropy or by raising brilliant offspring. They sympathized with the civil rights movement. In Queens, blacks were a threat to property values — they belonged in the Bronx, not down the street. To the Times, Queens is Cleveland. Bush league. You are Queens.

And clearly no Jews ever lived in Fred Trump’s apartments in Forest Hills, Brighton Beach, or Coney Island. The reason Fred pretend to be Swedish instead of German to his racist tenants who didn’t want their neighborhoods turning black was that he only rented to, uh, Texans.

The casinos were totally Queens, the gold faucets in your triplex, the bragging, the insults, but you wanted to be liked by Those People.

Because there weren’t any of Those People in Queens when Trump grew up there.

Actually, Keillor might be onto an interesting social distinction without knowing enough or having the bravery to follow it up.

Clearly, contra Keillor, Trump’s persona is highly Jewish in affect. But perhaps Keillor isn’t thinking about Jewish-Americans in general, but instead is obsessing about one particular varietal: the old money German-Jewish high society who wouldn’t let Eastern European Jews into their country clubs because of their cruder manners.

There is a reasonable possibility that Trump didn’t encounter until he was an adult many of the more refined German-Jewish Our Crowd elite, like the Sulzbergers. I don’t know if it’s true, but that’s an interesting possibility that a better-informed observer than Keillor might be able to do something with.

You wanted Mike Bloomberg to invite you to dinner at his townhouse. You wanted the Times to run a three-part story about you, that you meditate and are a passionate kayaker and collect 14th-century Islamic mosaics. You wish you were that person but you didn’t have the time.

Actually, I don’t think Trump cares at all about being seen as an SWPL.

Trump has an on-the-noseness that’s averse to SWPL irony and pretense. Consider: Kayaking or golf? Which would seem more fashionable for Trump to do?

Clearly, golf is going out of fashion as the public gets poorer and more stressed for time.

Except that the really big guys in Trump’s orbit — the last four presidents, say, or Mike Bloomberg, Bill Gates, and Warren Buffett — are fanatical golfers. Heck Bill Clinton is a member of Trump’s golf club. The idea of pretending to care about a sport other than golf so that he would look fashionable in the Times simply doesn’t occur to Trump. Presidents play golf.

I do know what Trump passionately cares about, which is to get to host the U.S. Open and the British Open on Trump brand golf courses. He’s gotten the women’s version of each, but not the men’s Opens yet.

In that field, Trump has laboriously taught himself over the years how to talk about golf courses in the vocabulary of USGA and the Royal & Ancient. He’s learned that fake waterfalls don’t go over well with the tastes of the USGA. His two Trump National Bedminster courses near the USGA headquarters in New Jersey were designed from the ground up to win over the USGA to host the US Open.

But he also can’t stop himself from giving his opinion. For example, when the USGA went nuts a couple of years ago with their state of the art aesthetic by playing the USGA at a Pinehurst where half the sprinklers had been ripped out so the course was mostly brown, Trump tweeted that it looked awful. The USGA guys were mad about Trump saying the emperor had no clothes.

Trump is risking a lot by running for President. He got hammered by the golf tours a year ago for saying that Mexico wasn’t sending its best. His standing up to the golf tours and taking a big hit rather than apologize was a surprise: it showed he was serious.

Running for president is your last bid for the respect of Manhattan. If you were to win election, they couldn’t ridicule you anymore. They could be horrified, but there is nothing ridiculous about being Leader of the Free World. You have B-52 bombers at your command. When you go places, a battalion of security guys comb the environs. You attract really really good speechwriters who give you Churchillian cadences and toss in quotes from Emerson and Aeschylus and Ecclesiastes.

Nah. While Trump has attracted one really good speechwriter, Stephen Miller doesn’t bother much with the kind of stuff Ted Sorensen stuck into speeches to make the Kennedy Brothers sound smart. Instead, Miller seems focused on introducing new arguments into American public life and Trump seems focused on making them understandable to voters. It’s a difficult combination to pull off, but they seem to be getting better at it.

Labor Day and it is not going well. You had a very bad month. …

It got better at the end.

Anyway, as several commenters have noted in the comments below, Keillor appears to be projecting some of his own provincial status insecurities onto Trump, which isn’t a good fit. I believe Keillor tried living in New York for a number of years, but then returned to St. Paul where he can be a very big fish in a small pond.

Trump may just not be a good subject for writers, so they wind up projecting a lot onto him.

 
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  1. Remarkable. According to the Sage of Minnesota, Trump had a Very Bad Month. But he is doing better in the polls at the end of it than he was at the beginning. Two more months this bad would easily make him president.

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    Who is the Sage of Minnesota please. But that's funny you say. My Dad's an old DC politico, GOP. And he's from Minnesota. I got the inside scoop about the hilarious rat-fucking episode the day it went down.

    The background. Some Cruz PAC put out an ad that used a pin-up of Trumps wife. Then Trump goes, "Be careful, or I'll spill the beans on Heidi." That of course means Heidi's been doing something she's not supposed to be doing, and what she wasn't supposed to be doing is turning into a man, since that's what the actual photo of her face Trump next tweeted out truly looks like. And Trump wasn't done. The very next day is when the National Enquirer story came out about Cruz'a five affairs and quoted Trump's man Roger Stone.

    http://gawker.com/ted-cruz-implies-hed-fuck-a-rat-as-long-as-it-wasnt-don-1767113389

    Addressing the issue, mind you the issue of he himself reportedly having sex with several other than Heidi, this is what popped into Cruz's mind:

    "Roger Stone is a man for whom a term was coined for copulating with a rodent. Well let me be clear: Donald Trump may be a rat, but I have no desire to copulate with him. And this garbage does not belong in politics."

    See what he accidentally did all over the place there? He says Stone is known to fuck rodents. Then, he wants to "be clear": Donald is a rodent he's a rat: yes, Cruz says Roger Stone has bestiality with Donald Trump because The Donald is a rodent rat. That's literally unfathomably disgusting BUT: "I have no desire to copulate with him." I mean you can't make that up.

    Now this is why his mind did that. First of all Stone is not a ratfucker. He's the guy who for fifty years has been calling people ratfuckers. So Cruz lied there. Second, if you go back to that ugly picture of Heidi that Trump tweeted, the caption on it reads "A picture says a thousand words." That was a sharper touch than anyone knew, because Trump made sure Cruz received at the time of that tweet a one word message just for him; RATFUCKER. Trump called Heidi a rat, and made Cruz look at her when she looked like one, to add injury to the insult you would say.

    Walk through it one more time. "Roger Stone is a man for whom a term was coined for copulating with a rodent." Wrong: Roger Stone is laughing at you for copulating with a rodent. "Well let me be clear: Donald Trump may be a rat." Wrong: Donald Trump said your wife is a nasty looking rat. "but I have no desire to copulate with him." True: but only because you probably don't have any desire to copulate with your wife anymore either. "And this garbage does not belong in politics." Correct: because you actually did not just start the garbage.

    And I'm pretty sure they knew they could hit him that hard cause they had on good authority them affairs were true, and that he was gonna be on the defensive inside his chest. Sage of Minnesota didn't say any of that, ya got it?

    , @Bill Jones
    Another decade or so of Somali immigration should fix the Minnesota Mind-set once and for all.
  2. Here Keillor proves he really is the folksy bumpkin he’s always pretended to be. His screed is filled with errors only a slow talker could make.

    As Kurt Vonnegut wrote, “You are what you pretend to be.”

    Where did Garrison learn about New York, I wonder? From watching TV on a fuzzy screen in Minnesota?

    Somebody should tell him: A lot of people out here got here from somewhere else because they are at the top of their field — and they don’t give a rat’s ass what he thinks. (That’s the key he’s too simple to understand.)

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Garrison Keillor deigning to explain New York City to Donald Trump is the epitome of chutzpah.

    Also, the idea that anyone who looks down on Trump now would respect him if he were elected President -- does Keillor think they respected W.? Maybe his memory is a bet sketchy between the debut of the B-52 and today (and yes, I know the B-52 is still in service).
    , @Pat Casey

    As Kurt Vonnegut wrote, “You are what you pretend to be.”
     
    Nice Buzz, I knew someone had to have said that better than Sartre but I don't read Vonnegut. But, I like Joyce's better, "We live by the stories we tell ourselves." Actually I think that's so true it's metaphysical. And I'll tell ya, this is why I don't agree we pretend to be anybody: because I have pretended to be someone, when I was drunk at bars havin a hoary time with strangers I knew I didn't exactly respect for some reason. And you feel terrible about it the next day, its exactly like not feeling like yourself.

    Then I remember when Charlie Rose asked a slowed down Hunter S. Thompson if he had created an identity to write by, Thompson was stumped for like fifteen seconds and he gradually starts motioning his hands molding a round figure and goes, "If I had..... somehow....crafted....that....I.. I think that would be too much credit." And of course you can barely hear him mumble "credit," as though he didn't even care about actually making the whole point of that painstaking cogitation he accomplished.

    I read that Jewish bumpkin and can tell exactly what he is: only worth slaying. What I want to know about a pro writer like that though is who the hell he reads deeply. What flicks his creative spark? Who taught him to tell a billionaire where he's from and what he does and oh also that's he not Jewish, do that and your billionaire will go to bed unsettled. That seems most of all immature to me.

    I was just telling Steve what the Irish Writers do to each other in memoirs, they simply make up stories about their rivals, and just as long as it doesn't touch on anything that actually did happen to the guy, they know its fair game and that they can get away with it in terms of libel. Heres Yeats on George Moore in middle life:

    He said to a friend: "How do you keep your pants from falling about your knees?" "O" said the friend, "I put my braces through the little tapes that are sewn there for the purpose." A few days later he thanked the friend with emotion.

    And the masters touch is that last line it is.

    The stories we tell ourselves. Hey Buzz I'll tell ya, if one of my short stories has a shot at the New Yorker, it will only be because no one told them I'm not from Ireland so don't. They made Updike read like 800 pages of Brian O'Nolan years and years after he had died, and they recently couldn't get enough of Collin Barrett (though his one about the fake poet made me want to puke). Living in New York anyways, like DFW shrugged, New You OK? Not me. Couldn't tell my Joe Sobran stories.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    This is exactly right. In one of his Lake Wobegon stories, he tells of a young Minnesotan who fantasizes that someday his mother would burst through the door to the dining room with heaping platters of spaghetti and his family would reveal that they were secretly Italian.

    When I was 10, I thought this was hilarious because it was funny imagery, and I didn't conceive of self-loathing liberals. Now that it's 2016, I recognize Keillor is a pathetic, unfunny, ugly man from a cold and backward place. He hates himself almost as much as he hates the people who raised him. I wish I hadn't been exposed to him in my youth.
    , @The Only Catholic Unionist
    "How did [he] learn about New York...?"

    From reading just about everything he wrote up until about 1990, the short answer is: The New Yorker magazine...
  3. It’s pretty funny that Keillor thinks Trump and his followers would be dissuaded if only he sneered at their non-SWPLness little more.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    Keiler's audience is neither Trump nor Trump supporters.
    , @Elf Himself

    It’s pretty funny that Keillor thinks Trump and his followers would be dissuaded if only he sneered at their non-SWPLness little more.
     
    Sort of the mirror image of Republicans' quadrennial protest: "We'd have won if only we'd been more vigorous in our rabid right-wing librul-bashing."
    , @melendwyr
    It's more likely that he's playing to his audience - those people who DO care what he thinks. He's posturing for their benefit, to be seen by them speaking down to Trump. Whether Trump, or anyone who follows him, care? Isn't relevant to his purpose.
  4. Trump has more than his share of personality flaws, but acute insecurity isn’t among them. Despite all of the kowtowing to Manhattan’s “Liberal Jewish Anglican” elite, Keillor is playing to his goyish Midwestern audience, since Jews — even if they despise Trump — recognize chutzpah when they see it.

    • Replies: @MC
    I think Trump suffers from a kind of insecurity, in the way that braggarts do. I just don't think it's quite of the flavor that Keillor describes. After all, Trump knows NY, knows Jews, probably isn't intimidated by them anymore, if he ever was. But I find the the theory that Trump originally ran for president mostly to shut up all the smarty-pants people who said he'd never run to have some plausibility.
  5. @Buzz Mohawk
    Here Keillor proves he really is the folksy bumpkin he's always pretended to be. His screed is filled with errors only a slow talker could make.

    As Kurt Vonnegut wrote, "You are what you pretend to be."

    Where did Garrison learn about New York, I wonder? From watching TV on a fuzzy screen in Minnesota?

    Somebody should tell him: A lot of people out here got here from somewhere else because they are at the top of their field -- and they don't give a rat's ass what he thinks. (That's the key he's too simple to understand.)

    Garrison Keillor deigning to explain New York City to Donald Trump is the epitome of chutzpah.

    Also, the idea that anyone who looks down on Trump now would respect him if he were elected President — does Keillor think they respected W.? Maybe his memory is a bet sketchy between the debut of the B-52 and today (and yes, I know the B-52 is still in service).

    • Replies: @Lurker
    There is a line between chutzpah and faux pas. Keillor crossed it.
  6. Did Garrison Keillor burp up some cool Trump putdowns to impress his lib/lefty/folkie friends?

  7. I clicked the link to the Chicago Tribune. After Keillor’s hit piece you had this article: The Worst Case for the Republicans: Donald Trump Wins by Steve Chapman. This was followed by The Trump Pivot is Dead, in its place was a Hate Speech by Rex Huppke.

    • Replies: @Flip
    The Tribune has moved left in the last year or two.
  8. I am starting to see Robert Mercer, and his daughter Rebekah come up more often in articles about Trump.

    I haven’t really found out much about him though. They are not Jewish, however.

    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    Wren


    Robert Mercer is a machine learning expert(specifically, an expert on Hidden Markov Chains) from IBM who was hired by Simons to design high frequency trading algorithms for Rennaissance Technologies.



    Mercer was sued by his Salvadoran slaves on his Setauket Mansion for withholding wages because they didn't top off his shampoo bottles at the very precise level he gave in written instructions. Not making this up.



    Mercer has a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Michigan.
    , @ATX Hipster
    Before he started backing Trump, Mercer was a big donor to the Cruz campaign and apparently owns a large share of Breitbart news as well.

    He and Jim Simons are interesting guys. Over at Nuclear Phynance there is a years-long thread devoted to speculation about how RenTec's Medallion Fund achieved its returns.
  9. Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    Keillor is demonstrating typical Minnesota snobbery here, unintentionally telling us more about his own native habitat than about Trump’s.

    • Agree: PV van der Byl
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?
     

    Acute status consciousness may not be universal among Twin Citians, but I think you're on to something. I have experienced this attitude in a couple of personal situations that left me quite angry . . . .

    My theory (I grew up about four hours' drive southwest of MSP, in NW Iowa, but well within its ambit): the Twin Cities comprise the de facto, essentially unchallenged capital of the upper midwest/northern plains, and many of their residents see themselves as upholding the standards of sophistication and cultural light-bringing that status entails. They want to be in the conversation with Chicago and Seattle and, yes, perhaps NYC itself, as 'national' cities; the other cities for hundreds of miles are so obviously provincial . . . .

    As I've mentioned before, people where I'm from react a bit differently if a young person says 'I'm moving to the Twin Cities after college' than if he says he's going to try his luck in Omaha or Kansas City or Des Moines or Milwaukee. There's more of a 'Oh, so you're really going to go for it' kind of vibe . . . .

    Minnesotans -- am I wrong about this?

    , @Muse
    As nice as he upper Midwest Germanic and Nordic types seem to be, you don't have to dig too far under the surface to find that they tend to be antisemitic. This is not surprising if you consider the history of the holocaust. There are some very pronounced differences in these cultures that are difficult to reconcile and are worth exploring. McCarthy was from Wisconsin, and his war against communism seemed primarily to be a war against leftist Jews.

    Meanwhile the chink in the armor of Germany and Minnesota seems to be the willingness of Lutheran Social Services and Angela Merkel to fill Minneapolis and Germany with third world refugees. Somebody has found that weakness and is exploiting it. Their cultural immune system and their high trust culture seem to be unable to recognize the invasion. There is no question who is pushing this invade invite the world strategy.

    I fear the time when the Minnesotans and Germans find they have had enough and figure out what their friends have done to them. They will sweep the sidewalks with their typical efficiency.
    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    From my time in the Twin Cities, the people there were always miffed (as much a Minnesotan can show such things) about being essentially forgotten. They felt (and were, in fact, correct) that the Twin Cities was a top-tier city on par with Seattle, San Diego, Portland, etc. Yet, nobody outside of the upper Midwest ever mentioned or thought about the Twin Cities while the country did have a feeling for other similar cities.

    In essence, Mpls-St. Paul is the pretty girl who never gets asked to dance, and she can't understand why. Thus the frustration.

    So where does passive-aggressive anger come from? Well, to continue my little analogy, Twin Cities folk worry that they don't get asked out because they're terrible in bed, i.e. a pretty face and sweet body but boring as hell.

    That all being said, I liked the Twin Cities. If not for God-awful weather, it'd be a great place to live. Also, it has the quintessential song written about it. How many cities outside of NYC and LA have that.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FED6AHlXXaA
    , @Crawfurdmuir
    There's something to what you say. Two decades and more ago, Minneapolis had a promotion touting itself as "the Mini-Apple," as if to suggest that it was a sort of smaller New York - because, of course, New York was so so cosmopolitan and sophisticated, and, why, Minneapolis had its own symphony orchestra, repertory theater, and a couple of art museums, which (the promoters seemed to feel) put it nearly on a par with such cosmopolitanism and sophistication!

    What it also had was a burgeoning rate of violent crime that may indeed have approached or exceeded that of New York before Giuliani. As one long-past December approached its end, the city had experienced nearly a hundred murders year-to-date and the local nightly news reported with bated breath that the death toll was now up to 96...97... - would it make it to 100? It was as if Minneapolis hit 100 murders, then it would truly have made it to the urban "big leagues."
    , @Al Kemmy
    The refugee resettlement racketeers think a lot of the Twin Cities.

    Apparently the Somalian tribes have mixed emotions about the place.
    , @AnotherDad

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?
     
    It's not my part of the midwest--though the family heimat is in NE Iowa, so i've got a bit of handle on it.

    I don't think this is particular complicated. The midwest is a nice, pleasant, productive place. But it's ... "the provinces". For most mid-westerners ... that's fine, it's home, they like it. (Including burgers, corn on the cob and apple--or even rhubarb!--pie.)

    But for a certain set of middle-brow intellectuals, they are a bit consumed or left insecure by the thought that their own midwestern heritage is uncool, unsophisticated. And they feel absolutely compelled to either leave, or seek approval, or show their superiority by genuflecting toward the east, particularly New York where *real* intellectuals and culture live.

    And for these boomer--or near boomer like Keillor--folks coming of age during the Jewish ascendancy, that means sucking up to the Jews as defining what's "intellectual" and sophisticated. (If i had to guess Keillor either isn't aware of how Jewish Trump's persona is, or just really doesn't think about it because his idea of "Jewishness" is a particular Minnesota nice fantasy version of well-behaved--actually quasi-WASPy--intellectual academic liberalism.)

    ~~~

    As a midwesterner myself and child of depression era farm kids, i value the practical, the useful and the true ... Keillor's east coast fetishization strikes me as pathetic. The midwest is the more *actually productive* area of the nation, and most of the cultural product of the East coast is "unimpressive".

    I lean intellectual and value intellectual effort that produces genuine insight. And I admire Jewish contributions in the sciences. But all the finance and rent-seeking ... is just finance and rent seeking. And the Jews' really bad politics and social science fantasizing is *really bad*. The Anglo Saxons actually produce pretty terrific, prosperous, rule of law societies, and have a better, better more empirical, approach to science, including social science. So unlike Keillor, I don't need--i don't think us boring gentiles need to seek--the approval of Jews. Maybe some of that is simply because unlike Keillor my interest and education was in the natural sciences and i'm unimpressed by all the dominant Jewish political, cultural and social science flap-doodle; 90% of which is appalling bad, though not all at the Stephen J. Gouldish level of pure political dishonesty.)

    As far as i'm concerned, if we'd floated New York and Washington out to sea years ago the nation would have been off. The "work product" of these places has been negative for years, while the midwest keeps doing its job.
    , @anon
    "Does anyone have a theory to explain it?"

    It's a SPWL impulse. Perhaps the Scandinavian heritage involves a tendency to take that to the extreme?
    , @SFG
    It makes sense. Southern and Midwestern areas often have that one city that really wants to prove it can class with the big boys. As I recall, the whole bathroom mess in NC came about when the city council of Charlotte (pop, 800,000) decided to pass a pro-transgender ordinance and the state legislature retaliated.
  10. Keillor elevates Democrat status to a substitute religion. For him, there are only two kinds of Americans: Dems and Reps, polarized like Europe in the Thirty Years War. Of course both sides are White, because all the NAMS he got on PHC were White-presenting.

    Democrianiaty appears to substitute in Keillor’s brain for the Lutheranism he loved to harmlessly insert in PHC, but which he must know in his heart has long gone daft, literally far over the rainbow.

    For a guy whose radio plays are entertaining, his prose on a written page in front of me is brutally simplistic – folk Manicheanism. I’ve never been able to finish reading one page of it without revulsion.

    • Agree: Bill Jones, AndrewR
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Cardinal Richelieu of France backed the Protestants in that war. And it was the Swedes, today the most deranged disciples of "tolerance", that pillaged most of Germania.
    , @Crawfurdmuir

    Democrianiaty appears to substitute in Keillor’s brain for the Lutheranism he loved to harmlessly insert in PHC, but which he must know in his heart has long gone daft, literally far over the rainbow.
     
    Whether Keillor was ever a Lutheran I do not know. He was born into a Plymouth Brethren family, and I think it scarred him. The Plymouth Brethren are a particularly austere bunch of Protestants. Aleister Crowley was also brought up in that sect, and his entire career thereafter was one of spectacular apostasy. I suspect that Keillor has been rebelling against his upbringing for similar reasons, though in his own "Minnesota nice" fashion.
  11. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    I was taking a quick look into Emma Lazarus, whose poem is getting a lot of play these days as some kind of nostrum against Trumpish borders. When she wasn’t telling us This is Who We Are, i.e. a nation of immigrants taken in without regard to race or creed or rank, she was advocating for a Jewish nation in Palestine without cracking a smile, forming the Society for the Improvement and Colonization of East European Jews, and sticking up for these now elite German Jews, who in 1877 were the arriviste bane of New York hoteliers:

    Judge Henry Hilton, the Grand Union Hotel’s owner, explained he had no objection to the Sephardic elite. Those like Emma Lazarus’ family, who had lived in America since before the Revolution, were the refined, “true Hebrews.” According to Hilton, only the dirty, greedy, German immigrant “Seligman Jews” were unwanted.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I interviewed for a job once at Seligman Funds. Offices had a very sedate, old money vibe. Which wasn't common in my experience, even among other firms with similarly long histories.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    If you take a closer look at the poem you'll discover that the Zionist agitating and the "Mother of Exiles" are related. You can read more about that in one of my previous comments, searchable at Unz.com...
    , @Bee
    Well, we know Emma Lazarus sucks because she encouraged Steve Sailer's grandparents to come to the U.S.
  12. How depressing. I’d always been a fan of Keillor’s and, after rediscovering him recently, became an even bigger fan. This sneering article doesn’t sound like him at all (although admittedly I’ve hardly ever read his articles). It’s true, political correctness makes you stupid (not to mention nasty), and not even such a brilliant guy as Keillor is immune.

    Here’s when Keillor wasn’t politically correct: Nonbelievers, please leave Christmas alone.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Keillor's review of a Bernard Henri-Levy book is very funny.
    , @South Texas Guy
    I just quickly looked it up, and holy crap! Keillor was right. A veritable shit load of Christmas songs were written by jews.

    And to get back to the topic, my favorite FDR quote (not a fan, but I like the feeling behind it), was, in response to his critics, "I welcome their hatred." I don't think Trump gives too much of a damn about what people say about him. That's not true of the past four-plus decades of major republicans (Reagan may be an exception), and that's why so many got on the Trump train.
    , @AndrewR
    2009 might seem like the recent past, and in many ways it is, but I think you are highly unserestimating how much the Zeitgeist has changed since then.
  13. @black sea
    Trump has more than his share of personality flaws, but acute insecurity isn't among them. Despite all of the kowtowing to Manhattan's "Liberal Jewish Anglican" elite, Keillor is playing to his goyish Midwestern audience, since Jews -- even if they despise Trump -- recognize chutzpah when they see it.

    I think Trump suffers from a kind of insecurity, in the way that braggarts do. I just don’t think it’s quite of the flavor that Keillor describes. After all, Trump knows NY, knows Jews, probably isn’t intimidated by them anymore, if he ever was. But I find the the theory that Trump originally ran for president mostly to shut up all the smarty-pants people who said he’d never run to have some plausibility.

    • Replies: @jon

    I find the the theory that Trump originally ran for president mostly to shut up all the smarty-pants people who said he’d never run to have some plausibility.
     
    Trump registered the "Make America Great Again" trademark back in 2012. He got involved in the whole birther stuff (to no apparent benefit to anything he was doing at the time) back in 2008. And there are video interviews of him talking about a run for the presidency from then back all the way to the '80's. This seems like a thing he had been contemplating forever.
    , @Alec Leamas
    If Trump was ever motivated by winning the respect of the Times and urbane Jews he would have made a series of different choices in life more to their tastes and probably would have stayed clear of Atlantic City altogether. His style and aesthetic is more reminiscent of what blue collar Italian Americans would do if they came into money. His persona would have been so different that he probably would not have been a household name.

    Being so obviously status-conscious, it probably escapes Keillor that the Trump persona is intentionally in opposition to the swells who think they are the gatekeepers and taste-makers.
    , @Eric Rasmusen
    Usually people value the opinion of their peers. Federal judges, for example, value the opinion of other federal judges. For Trump, that would be CEO's--- people who run big enterprises. Not rich people, and not investment bankers or consultants or even bankers. They no doubt joke about him as someone who takes time off to do TV, who gets into the newspapers, etc., who is unorthodox in many ways. He wants to show that this is a plus, not a minus--- that he is a CEO Plus.
  14. I can’t decide if this an effete man’s attempt at a troll, by saying something so obviously wrong, or if he’s really spent that so time in uber-SWPL circles that he believes it. It’s obvious to just about everybody that the focus of Trump’s campaign is to run AGAINST the Manhattan consensus.

    • Replies: @SFG
    Well, the *consensus* anyway. The guy loves New York itself--he's the only Republican presidential candidate to put skyscrapers in an ad. He made his money there and was a local fixture before all this.
  15. @tomv
    How depressing. I'd always been a fan of Keillor's and, after rediscovering him recently, became an even bigger fan. This sneering article doesn't sound like him at all (although admittedly I've hardly ever read his articles). It's true, political correctness makes you stupid (not to mention nasty), and not even such a brilliant guy as Keillor is immune.

    Here's when Keillor wasn't politically correct: Nonbelievers, please leave Christmas alone.

    Keillor’s review of a Bernard Henri-Levy book is very funny.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    It was pretty funny. The late Christopher Hitchens also had a pretty good take down of it:

    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/fighting_words/2006/02/garrison_keillor_vulgarian.html
    , @Chris from Gresham
    Some interesting observations just the same, by Monsieur Henri-Levy: Hillary seeking the White House to wipe away the Lewinsky scandal...hmmm... from Freud's point of view, this could explain a lot.
  16. I’ve read the first three or four of Keillor’s novels, and quite liked them when I was younger.

    But Keillor’s been doing his schtick all these years at least in part to win the approval of the annointed — it’s blinded him to much, and held him back from becoming a lasting novelist.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Forbes
    After his first novel, aren't the rest just riffs on the same idea--a mockery of provincialism. I read his second, and it was just more of the same. Like most writers, he only had one idea--many stories, but one idea.
    , @pyrrhus
    "Schtick" is exactly the right word for Keillor's act...all his stuff is the same, kind of a Prairie Vaudeville act. That act gets boring fast even if you like it...
    , @melendwyr
    It's something anyone who tries to play to their audience has to watch out for, certainly. That includes us. That even includes Mr. Sailer.

    It's been famously noted that leadership is mostly finding a parade and putting yourself at the head of it. It's remarkably easy for that 'leader' to be so responsive to the parade's wants that they never actually change its direction in any way.
  17. Any time I read something anyone else on the left, especially when they try to analyze someone else, I think of Vox Day’s adage: SJW always project. My guess is that Keillor’s observations about Trump tell you more about Keillor’s experience living in NYC while temporarily basing his show there.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    My guess is that Keillor’s observations about Trump tell you more about Keillor’s experience living in NYC while temporarily basing his show there.
     
    Well, that's all he has to go on - his temporal parochialism cuts him off from the other sources of human understanding the rest of us enjoy. Common Prog malady.
  18. Garrison Keillor did more to preserve and venerate white American culture than Trump has ever done

    • Replies: @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    "Garrison Keillor did more to preserve and venerate white American culture than Trump has ever done"
    Thank you for dropping by, Mr One Post Wonder.
    , @bomag
    Garrison Keillor did more to preserve and venerate white American culture than Trump has ever done

    Before his run for president, I don't suppose Trump could have been considered much of a cultural preserver.

    But Keillor has done much to make White culture a mockable thing that we are supposed to move beyond, and embrace the Gay, the Trans, the Slut, and the dusky foreigner who is more exotic and interesting than the trudging White guy in the snow of rural Minnesota.
    , @Eric Rasmusen
    True, and Garrison Keillor is a national treasure. But it's fascinating how he has had to write about his small-town roots to achieve his obvious lifetime goal of repudiating them and becoming a sophisticate--- and how he has failed in the process.

    In fact, if he'd succeeded in becoming a sophisticate, he would have lost his creative abilities and been kicked out of the sophisticate crowd, which seems to have happened to some extent. But somehow his perceptiveness when it comes to small-town life fails him when it comes to the nuances of Manhattan. It makes for an interesting contrast with Tom Wolfe, who can describe people from any setting, rich or poor. I bet Tom Wolfe, a Ph.D., is more detached and also knows how to do the hard work of researching how people live and think, while Keillor goes entirely on formative personal experiences.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Dude, you misspelled your handle. The first letter should be an "a". Thanks for playing.
  19. Something tells me the “bumpkin in the big city” seeking an appreciative audience of sophisticates he doesn’t understand describes Keillor better than it does Trump.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  20. Nope, there are no loud Jews from Forest Hills, Queens.

    • Replies: @asdf
    Good one!
  21. Michael Eisner never had a yacht.

    Barry Diller does not own a yacht called the Eos, 305′ in length.

    David Geffen never had a yacht called Rising Sun which he now owns outright, but used to share with Larry Ellison, who is Jewish and therefore could have never owned half a yacht.
    ___

    Re: Trump’s interior decoration tastes. Does it not occur that Trump has gold toilets as a giant FU to the Manhattan crowd from a brash Queensman? Trump’s ex sister-in-law Blaine was very Upper East Side before Trump’s brother cheated on her with his secretary and was exiled to Long Island.

    Trump didn’t get the toilet designs from his Viking mother from the Outer Hebrides. That Keillor and I can agree on.

    • Replies: @Lot

    Jews didn’t go in for big yachts
     

    Larry Ellison, who is Jewish and therefore could have never owned half a yacht.
     
    Half a yacht? Larry Ellison is the primary sponsor of the fastest racing yachts in the world:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Team_USA

    He's always had pleasure yachts. The particular one he co-owned is a super-yacht, the 8th largest in the world at some point. American billionaires consider them a bit tacky.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Jim, Thank you, and Michael Bloomberg never had a yacht, and a private jet or and estate on Bermuda, even though I saw all three. Or Carl Icahn or Bernie Madoff ad infinitum
  22. @tomv
    How depressing. I'd always been a fan of Keillor's and, after rediscovering him recently, became an even bigger fan. This sneering article doesn't sound like him at all (although admittedly I've hardly ever read his articles). It's true, political correctness makes you stupid (not to mention nasty), and not even such a brilliant guy as Keillor is immune.

    Here's when Keillor wasn't politically correct: Nonbelievers, please leave Christmas alone.

    I just quickly looked it up, and holy crap! Keillor was right. A veritable shit load of Christmas songs were written by jews.

    And to get back to the topic, my favorite FDR quote (not a fan, but I like the feeling behind it), was, in response to his critics, “I welcome their hatred.” I don’t think Trump gives too much of a damn about what people say about him. That’s not true of the past four-plus decades of major republicans (Reagan may be an exception), and that’s why so many got on the Trump train.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    A veritable shitload of songs were written by Jews. It's almost as if they are on the average more verbally facile than other groups.

    In the so called Great American Songbook era, in which hundreds of stage and movie musicals and similar productions largely generated the songs people like Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald sang, out of about fifteen writers (lyricists and composers) who were prominent about three or four were not Jewish. The early part of the rock era featured a lot of songs written by Jewish writers as well, such as Leiber and Stoller, Goffin and King, Barry Goldberg, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry, Carole Bayer Sager, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil.

    Of course several rock stars were Jews, Dylan, Lou Reed, Joey Ramone, or Jews were widely considered the driving force in the band or were behind the scenes "gurus" or "Svengalis".
    , @Eric Rasmusen
    George W. Bush clearly didn't care about elite opinion, not only despite but because of his aristocratic and Yale background, which I think is the main reason he drove people like Krugman bonkers. Like FDR, his pedigree was so good he could look down on the nouveau elite.
    , @sayless
    Yes, E. Michael Jones published an article on Jewish Christmas music:. "White Christmas Subversion" on his Culture Wars website. Jones is a traditionalist Catholic, and is SPLC-certified as a Hater.

    A Brand You Can Trust!

    , @Anonymous
    They wrote "holiday" songs. You'll be hard pressed to find any that mention "Christmas," much less celebrate the occasion.
  23. The article is an exercise in wishful thinking, trying to see Trump as an insecure individual who craves approval, despite the overwhelming evidence that he’s always been his own man. Few people care less than Trump about others’ opinion of them.

    • Replies: @Chase
    There are a few people whose opinions DJT cares deeply, obviously and movingly about: His brother and father are a couple.

    As complex as he can be, mostly it's all out there for everyone to see. I guess that's boring for writers raised on deconstruction.
  24. Garrison Keillor is projecting a bit here. Mr. Lake Wobegone lived part-time in Manhattan for decades and likely never quite fit in on the Upper West Side.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1996/11/29/arts/manhattan-as-a-bit-of-prairie.html

    As for Queens, remember on Seinfeld when George was unemployed and he had to stay with his Swedish parents in Queens for a few weeks?

    • Replies: @Clyde

    Garrison Keillor is projecting a bit here. Mr. Lake Wobegone lived part-time in Manhattan for decades and likely never quite fit in on the Upper West Side.
    http://www.nytimes.com/1996/11/29/arts/manhattan-as-a-bit-of-prairie.html
     
    Then being in show business he encountered more than his share of New York City Jews. Dominicans and Puerto Ricans too? No just the Jews rubbed his Minnesota self the wrong way. Wikipedia says his ancestry is English and Scottish.
    _______
    wikipedia: ___iStevey kinda slant:
    Keillor considers himself a loner and prefers not to make eye contact with people. Though not diagnosed, he also considers himself to be on the high-functioning end of the autism spectrum.[12] He spoke about his experiences as an autistic person in his keynote address at the 19th Annual Minnesota Autism Conference in 2014.[13][14]
    , @Anon
    Costanzas were supposed to be Italian. Ever wonder why there are so many TV characters who are supposed to be "Italian" but are Jewish? The Costanzas, Bea Arthur as Dorothy on the Golden Girls, Carla on Cheers, etc..
  25. @Jim Walker
    Michael Eisner never had a yacht.

    Barry Diller does not own a yacht called the Eos, 305' in length.

    David Geffen never had a yacht called Rising Sun which he now owns outright, but used to share with Larry Ellison, who is Jewish and therefore could have never owned half a yacht.
    ___

    Re: Trump's interior decoration tastes. Does it not occur that Trump has gold toilets as a giant FU to the Manhattan crowd from a brash Queensman? Trump's ex sister-in-law Blaine was very Upper East Side before Trump's brother cheated on her with his secretary and was exiled to Long Island.

    Trump didn't get the toilet designs from his Viking mother from the Outer Hebrides. That Keillor and I can agree on.

    Jews didn’t go in for big yachts

    Larry Ellison, who is Jewish and therefore could have never owned half a yacht.

    Half a yacht? Larry Ellison is the primary sponsor of the fastest racing yachts in the world:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Team_USA

    He’s always had pleasure yachts. The particular one he co-owned is a super-yacht, the 8th largest in the world at some point. American billionaires consider them a bit tacky.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    "Those super yachts are just so ... third world. They lack style, grace, class. Nova rich, if you will," said Larry. The rest of the Forbes list nodded sagely. Warren pressed another hot dog into his mouth. In the silence that had grown from pondering the excesses of super yachts, the wet mulching sounds were loud. Larry looked at his watch. "I better get back to the office."
  26. I have never liked Keillor’, but I’d like to read (not hear) his explanation of why Minneapolis (not St. Paul) was for many years “the capital of anti-Semitism in the United States”:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Minneapolis#Politics.2C_corruption.2C_anti-Semitism_and_social_change

    Minneapolis was known for anti-Semitism beginning in the 1880s and through the 1950s.[29] The city was described as “the capital of anti-Semitism in the United States” in 1946 by Carey McWilliams[30] and in 1959 by Gunther Plaut.[31] At that time the city’s Jews were excluded from membership in many organizations, faced employment discrimination, and were considered unwelcome residents in some neighborhoods.[32] Jews in Minneapolis were also not allowed to buy homes in certain neighborhoods of Minneapolis.[33]

    An interesting topic, but I’m almost certain he would have nothing interesting to say about it.

    • Replies: @Yo Trump
    Those sorts of claims (& wikis) need to be taken with a box of kosher salt.
    , @ScarletNumber
    If you are going to steal from Wikipedia, at least take the citations out.
  27. Searching “Donald Trump” versus “Garrison Keillor” on the website of the New York Times’ Keillor is so obsessed with reveals that Trump had more mentions in his “very bad month” (933) in the Times than Keillor has had ever (883). That has to sting a bit: Trump goes from New York to a bunch of flyover states to campaign in a trucker hat, gets more attention than Keillor ever did going from the flyover country to New York itself.

    Incidentally, Keillor appeared once on the New York Times’ bestseller list, for Lake Wobegon Days, in 1985, and never again since.

  28. If it was a brash, Jewish New Yorker with all of Trump’s mannerisms and crudity–but a liberal Democrat–running against a prudish WASP–just like Hillary–Republican, Uncle Goy here could fashion his diatribe with much better results around those two cliches right there.

  29. Why doesn’t someone in your entourage dare to say these things? So sad.

    A once great orator can’t even properly mimic The Donald? Sad!

  30. So Keillor’s argument is that in New York everyone is above average.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    LOL (Evading the once per hour rule.)
  31. Wow, your readers aren’t kidding about the projection Keillor has going on there. Reading it felt like watching one of those scenes on “The Office” where Steve Carrell’s character is embarrassing himself and the other characters just stand around looking nervous while he continues to dig himself in deeper.

  32. The article tells me a lot more about Keillor obsessions’ than Trump.

    Mr. Midwest Nice isn’t actually that Rube he pretends to be. He wants the right people to know this. And his fans not to.

    I think the term is called Projection.

  33. @Clifford Brown
    Nope, there are no loud Jews from Forest Hills, Queens.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYh1lRR1m6Y

    Good one!

  34. @MC
    I think Trump suffers from a kind of insecurity, in the way that braggarts do. I just don't think it's quite of the flavor that Keillor describes. After all, Trump knows NY, knows Jews, probably isn't intimidated by them anymore, if he ever was. But I find the the theory that Trump originally ran for president mostly to shut up all the smarty-pants people who said he'd never run to have some plausibility.

    I find the the theory that Trump originally ran for president mostly to shut up all the smarty-pants people who said he’d never run to have some plausibility.

    Trump registered the “Make America Great Again” trademark back in 2012. He got involved in the whole birther stuff (to no apparent benefit to anything he was doing at the time) back in 2008. And there are video interviews of him talking about a run for the presidency from then back all the way to the ’80’s. This seems like a thing he had been contemplating forever.

    • Replies: @MC
    Those facts are consistent with the theory that he used the "I might run for president" stuff to get attention, but only decided to do it for real when the media relentlessly mocked him for being all talk.

    And let's be honest, he had earned some degree of mockery for ostentatiously dragging out the will-he-won't-he stuff for decades. Not unlike every offseason for Brett Favre during the last few years of his career.
  35. I loved Garrison’s show and find his insights in this article as amusing. I agree with his assessment about the hat and the yellow hair shimmer. I also agree that Mr. Trump may have a score to settle with the snobs of Manhattan. But on his conclusion, I am sorry but Garrison has it as wrong as the Manhattan snobs that he folksomely protected with his musings.

    Who better to go after the economic Imbalances and excesses international capitalism than a billionaire with a chip on his shoulder. I do not doubt Trump’s patriotism even as I do not doubt Garrison’s assertion of his shoulder chip. The little guy, which Garrison has so often warmly spoken of, cannot pierce the armor of this multinational juggernaut.

    Heck, maybe even Donald Trump cannot thwart it. But he is America’s David going up against a globalist Goliath. And we sit back in awe as we pray he has the stamina to use all his flaws for the American people!

  36. @k-hole kaitlin
    Garrison Keillor did more to preserve and venerate white American culture than Trump has ever done

    “Garrison Keillor did more to preserve and venerate white American culture than Trump has ever done”
    Thank you for dropping by, Mr One Post Wonder.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    Keiler's version of white American culture is quite distinct from Trump's version. Both are real cultures, but they have little in common other than skin color.
  37. @Grumpy
    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    Keillor is demonstrating typical Minnesota snobbery here, unintentionally telling us more about his own native habitat than about Trump's.

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    Acute status consciousness may not be universal among Twin Citians, but I think you’re on to something. I have experienced this attitude in a couple of personal situations that left me quite angry . . . .

    My theory (I grew up about four hours’ drive southwest of MSP, in NW Iowa, but well within its ambit): the Twin Cities comprise the de facto, essentially unchallenged capital of the upper midwest/northern plains, and many of their residents see themselves as upholding the standards of sophistication and cultural light-bringing that status entails. They want to be in the conversation with Chicago and Seattle and, yes, perhaps NYC itself, as ‘national’ cities; the other cities for hundreds of miles are so obviously provincial . . . .

    As I’ve mentioned before, people where I’m from react a bit differently if a young person says ‘I’m moving to the Twin Cities after college’ than if he says he’s going to try his luck in Omaha or Kansas City or Des Moines or Milwaukee. There’s more of a ‘Oh, so you’re really going to go for it’ kind of vibe . . . .

    Minnesotans — am I wrong about this?

    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    So its like Boston, without Harvard and MIT?
    , @black sea
    If you can make it in St. Paul, you can make it anywhere.
    , @Desiderius

    the Twin Cities comprise the de facto, essentially unchallenged capital of the upper midwest/northern plains
     
    The Norse were born to rule the Anglo-Saxon/Celt yeomanry. It's England circa 1076.
    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    As someone from your neck of the woods who lived in the Twin Cities for several years, I think that you're spot on.

    By the way, does I-29 still run right through the stockyards of Sioux City? That was always one smelly stretch of road.
    , @Barnard
    I would say that is right, but only for the people whose families have lived in the Twin Cities for more than two generations. There is a subset of the Scandinavian Lutherans who really want the metro area to be important on a national scale, but the transplants realize it isn't and I don't think it is as important to them.

    The Twins Cities status as a de facto capital of the upper midwest is also fading. In my experience, the range would include only the state of Minnesota, the Eastern Dakotas and Northern Iowa. Outside of that range, they tend to gravitate to Chicago, Denver or Kansas City.

    , @Neil Templeton
    The Converted Christian Norsemen appear not to understand that to take the admonition "Love thy Neighbor" literally is a very high risk venture.
  38. Trump has been doing his good friend Joan Rivers’ shtick this whole time, I don’t know why nobody gets that.

    She called Michelle a tranny and was dead within a week. “Just sayin.”

    • Agree: Old fogey
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    I rhought her comment "everybody knows that" was very interesting. Who is in the know?
    , @Clyde

    Trump has been doing his good friend Joan Rivers’ shtick this whole time, I don’t know why nobody gets that.
     
    I noticed this ages ago. Trump doesn't do (channel) Rivers all the time but you can see it sometimes. I am pretty sure Joan Rivers was non-PC and a bit right wing. She made me laugh in the 1980s when I would see her on TV. I classify Trump and Rivers as old school New Yorkers.
  39. @Jack Highlands
    Keillor elevates Democrat status to a substitute religion. For him, there are only two kinds of Americans: Dems and Reps, polarized like Europe in the Thirty Years War. Of course both sides are White, because all the NAMS he got on PHC were White-presenting.

    Democrianiaty appears to substitute in Keillor's brain for the Lutheranism he loved to harmlessly insert in PHC, but which he must know in his heart has long gone daft, literally far over the rainbow.

    For a guy whose radio plays are entertaining, his prose on a written page in front of me is brutally simplistic - folk Manicheanism. I've never been able to finish reading one page of it without revulsion.

    Cardinal Richelieu of France backed the Protestants in that war. And it was the Swedes, today the most deranged disciples of “tolerance”, that pillaged most of Germania.

    • Replies: @Lot

    And it was the Swedes, today the most deranged disciples of “tolerance”, that pillaged most of Germania.
     
    This is being too harsh on the Swedes. Yes Sweden, but also France, Spain, Austria, Swiss and Italian mercenaries, and the Germans and Bohemians themselves all pillaged Germany and massacred each other and the local population in the Thirty Years War. The English funded the war.

    Cardinal Richelieu of France backed the Protestants in that war.
     
    He had no choice as the Spanish-Austrian-German-Catholic alliance was hostile to France and surrounding it on every side, and oppressing French speakers along the Rhine.
    , @Tex
    The Swedes' hired guns of the Thirty Years War (a multi-cultural crew of Germans, Scots, Croats, and anybody else who would wield a pike for pay) popularized the "Swedish Drink." This was a mix of foul water, crap (literally), and more crap that the goons would force down some hapless victim's throat with with the aid of a funnel. Of course all the other hired thugs working for German princes did the same thing, but it started with the Swedes.

    Nowadays, Merkel the German furstin has learned from her Swedish preceptors about forcing a foul mixture down the throats of the populace. And she didn't even have to tie anyone down.

    As the good cardinal would say, la plus ca change.
  40. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?
     

    Acute status consciousness may not be universal among Twin Citians, but I think you're on to something. I have experienced this attitude in a couple of personal situations that left me quite angry . . . .

    My theory (I grew up about four hours' drive southwest of MSP, in NW Iowa, but well within its ambit): the Twin Cities comprise the de facto, essentially unchallenged capital of the upper midwest/northern plains, and many of their residents see themselves as upholding the standards of sophistication and cultural light-bringing that status entails. They want to be in the conversation with Chicago and Seattle and, yes, perhaps NYC itself, as 'national' cities; the other cities for hundreds of miles are so obviously provincial . . . .

    As I've mentioned before, people where I'm from react a bit differently if a young person says 'I'm moving to the Twin Cities after college' than if he says he's going to try his luck in Omaha or Kansas City or Des Moines or Milwaukee. There's more of a 'Oh, so you're really going to go for it' kind of vibe . . . .

    Minnesotans -- am I wrong about this?

    So its like Boston, without Harvard and MIT?

  41. the old money German-Jewish high society who wouldn’t let Eastern European Jews into their country clubs because of their cruder manners.

    This is an interesting topic. “German” and more properly here “Anglicized” Jews are those Ashkenazi that have been culturally assimilated, speak German or English as their first language, usually for generations, and are mostly ignorant or even disdainful of some of the practices of our bumpkin ancestors and distant relatives in Eastern Europe and Israel. It is not really just “old money high society” that is not fond of their “cruder manners,” but the large respectable majority.

    Germanization was a process that extended far outside the borders of modern Germany. All over Eastern Europe, covering modern Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and parts of Ukraine and Romania, the more urban and intelligent Jews moved to the German-speaking cities and adopted increasing amounts of German language and culture.

    Just to give an example of this, John von Neumann went to a German-language and style high school in Budapest, run by the Lutheran Church, but with a majority Jewish student body. From there he went to the German University of Berlin and the German-Swiss ETH Zurich before settling in Princeton.

    As in greater Germany for several centuries, it really only takes one or two generations raised in secular America to join the larger Anglicized US Jewish population, so there really is no longer meaningful distinction in New York society between the descendants of Jews from Berlin who came in 1852 and Jews from Kiev who came in 1907. Nonetheless, new immigrants from Russia sometimes just can’t fit in a place like the New York Times.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I think "Anglican" alludes to the current publisher of the NYT, whose mother was episcopalian and who was raised as one.
    , @Lurker

    As in greater Germany for several centuries
     
    Greater Germany - that's got a nice ring to it.
    , @Old fogey
    I worked with a native New Yorker - known globally for his scientific research - whose father was a Russian Jewish immigrant who worked as a furrier. When our organization hired a new president who was also a native New Yorker but from a German-Jewish background, my friend was not happy. He considered German-Jews to be uppity and complained that they looked down their noses at Russian Jews like himself - so it may take another generation or two to overcome that brand of snobbery, even here, and even among the highly educated.
  42. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?
     

    Acute status consciousness may not be universal among Twin Citians, but I think you're on to something. I have experienced this attitude in a couple of personal situations that left me quite angry . . . .

    My theory (I grew up about four hours' drive southwest of MSP, in NW Iowa, but well within its ambit): the Twin Cities comprise the de facto, essentially unchallenged capital of the upper midwest/northern plains, and many of their residents see themselves as upholding the standards of sophistication and cultural light-bringing that status entails. They want to be in the conversation with Chicago and Seattle and, yes, perhaps NYC itself, as 'national' cities; the other cities for hundreds of miles are so obviously provincial . . . .

    As I've mentioned before, people where I'm from react a bit differently if a young person says 'I'm moving to the Twin Cities after college' than if he says he's going to try his luck in Omaha or Kansas City or Des Moines or Milwaukee. There's more of a 'Oh, so you're really going to go for it' kind of vibe . . . .

    Minnesotans -- am I wrong about this?

    If you can make it in St. Paul, you can make it anywhere.

  43. @Lot

    the old money German-Jewish high society who wouldn’t let Eastern European Jews into their country clubs because of their cruder manners.
     
    This is an interesting topic. "German" and more properly here "Anglicized" Jews are those Ashkenazi that have been culturally assimilated, speak German or English as their first language, usually for generations, and are mostly ignorant or even disdainful of some of the practices of our bumpkin ancestors and distant relatives in Eastern Europe and Israel. It is not really just "old money high society" that is not fond of their "cruder manners," but the large respectable majority.

    Germanization was a process that extended far outside the borders of modern Germany. All over Eastern Europe, covering modern Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and parts of Ukraine and Romania, the more urban and intelligent Jews moved to the German-speaking cities and adopted increasing amounts of German language and culture.

    Just to give an example of this, John von Neumann went to a German-language and style high school in Budapest, run by the Lutheran Church, but with a majority Jewish student body. From there he went to the German University of Berlin and the German-Swiss ETH Zurich before settling in Princeton.

    As in greater Germany for several centuries, it really only takes one or two generations raised in secular America to join the larger Anglicized US Jewish population, so there really is no longer meaningful distinction in New York society between the descendants of Jews from Berlin who came in 1852 and Jews from Kiev who came in 1907. Nonetheless, new immigrants from Russia sometimes just can't fit in a place like the New York Times.

    I think “Anglican” alludes to the current publisher of the NYT, whose mother was episcopalian and who was raised as one.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Aside from this, I think Anglicized Jewsis the more precise description of the "German Jews" Steve has mentioned a few times who were excluding the new "Russian Jews" from the country club. The Old Country Club Jews were certainly disproportionately from greater Germany, but greater Germany was receiving and assimilating a continuous influx of "Russian Jews" in the 17th to 19th centuries, as well expanding Prussia and Austria into heavily Jewish areas to their east and imposing secularization and germanization policies on them. So it is less an ethnic discrimination at the country clubs than a cultural one. One people had been living well in the West for many generations, the other was arriving poor and with unrefined Russian customs and often took religious customs too seriously.
  44. @Anonymous
    I was taking a quick look into Emma Lazarus, whose poem is getting a lot of play these days as some kind of nostrum against Trumpish borders. When she wasn't telling us This is Who We Are, i.e. a nation of immigrants taken in without regard to race or creed or rank, she was advocating for a Jewish nation in Palestine without cracking a smile, forming the Society for the Improvement and Colonization of East European Jews, and sticking up for these now elite German Jews, who in 1877 were the arriviste bane of New York hoteliers:

    Judge Henry Hilton, the Grand Union Hotel's owner, explained he had no objection to the Sephardic elite. Those like Emma Lazarus' family, who had lived in America since before the Revolution, were the refined, "true Hebrews." According to Hilton, only the dirty, greedy, German immigrant "Seligman Jews" were unwanted.
     

    I interviewed for a job once at Seligman Funds. Offices had a very sedate, old money vibe. Which wasn’t common in my experience, even among other firms with similarly long histories.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    Curiously, so did I once interview there (early-mid '90s)--with the same impression, though I'd describe that very sedate, old money vibe as 'well-worn' heels. Living on a reputation that was running on fumes.
  45. @Lot

    Jews didn’t go in for big yachts
     

    Larry Ellison, who is Jewish and therefore could have never owned half a yacht.
     
    Half a yacht? Larry Ellison is the primary sponsor of the fastest racing yachts in the world:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Team_USA

    He's always had pleasure yachts. The particular one he co-owned is a super-yacht, the 8th largest in the world at some point. American billionaires consider them a bit tacky.

    “Those super yachts are just so … third world. They lack style, grace, class. Nova rich, if you will,” said Larry. The rest of the Forbes list nodded sagely. Warren pressed another hot dog into his mouth. In the silence that had grown from pondering the excesses of super yachts, the wet mulching sounds were loud. Larry looked at his watch. “I better get back to the office.”

  46. @k-hole kaitlin
    Garrison Keillor did more to preserve and venerate white American culture than Trump has ever done

    Garrison Keillor did more to preserve and venerate white American culture than Trump has ever done

    Before his run for president, I don’t suppose Trump could have been considered much of a cultural preserver.

    But Keillor has done much to make White culture a mockable thing that we are supposed to move beyond, and embrace the Gay, the Trans, the Slut, and the dusky foreigner who is more exotic and interesting than the trudging White guy in the snow of rural Minnesota.

    • Replies: @Dan S
    Keillor is the embodiment of oikophobia. I've been listening to him since his radio days in Collegeville MN (1970s Morning Show, before NPR and the progressive elite discovered him.) I think he's full of self loathing. Witness his attempts to be something other than a pale dingus from the northern Minneapolis suburbs: moving to New York, Denmark, heck he even hated his neighbors in St Paul. He makes Woody Allen look like like Dale Carnegie.
  47. For some reason I get the feeling that Keillor is expecting Trump to, at some point, whisper “Rosebud”.

  48. OT: ABC News has an article (and video that I haven’t watched yet) about college drop-out Milo Yiannapolous.

    Paragraph 4 of 31:

    Many of the attacks, known as “trolling,” came from anonymous users, but not all. Milo Yiannopoulos, one of the most infamous trolls on the internet, was one of them. He is an editor at Breitbart, the conservative news website.

    We learn something that sounds sort of interesting in paragraph 29 of 31:

    There was also a wave of support for Leslie Jones with #LoveforLeslie and she is now back on Twitter. Jones took action and reported Yiannopoulos to Twitter. In response, the company permanently suspended his account for violating their rules and conditions.

    What did Milo say exactly, and where/when did he say it?

    We don’t know, but we have to assume it must have been really, really bad- so bad that ABC News couldn’t publish any of his comments, no matter how heavily censored.

    • Replies: @Simonini

    What did Milo say exactly, and where/when did he say it?

    We don’t know, but we have to assume it must have been really, really bad- so bad that ABC News couldn’t publish any of his comments, no matter how heavily censored.
     
    I can't tell if you are being satirical or not. They didn't publish his comments because it would undermine their story - they weren't actually very bad. He wasn't banned for anything he himself said, but for supposedly setting the anonymous trolls on Leslie Jones.
    , @anon
    She was in the news for the female Ghostbusters remake. Twitter's theory is he linked/retweeted her and that set off a Twitter army of his followers who harassed her mercilessly. A dog whistle type thing. Twitter would say he did this stuff knowingly even though there was no explicit call to arms.

    So basically organized bullying and harassing but with silent mutual understanding.

    I agree with Twitter that this type of thing is problem, but why do they never dole out any punishment to SJW/BLM types? It was a few years ago, granted, but they didn't give a shit when celebrities were retweeting George Zimmerman's parents address. And they didn't care when everyone bullied some mom and pop Ohio bakery that didn't want to make a homosexual wedding cake.

    , @Anonym
    OT: ABC News has an article (and video that I haven’t watched yet) about college drop-out Milo Yiannapolous.

    I just watched the video, Milo destroyed, showing how to double down in style. I feel that our movement will ultimately triumph, and we are in the guerrilla phase, popping up in unexpected places and attacking while the establishment doesn't really know what to do. They are trying the old tricks and they are just not working.
    , @ScarletNumber

    permanently suspended
     
    This sounds like something from 1984.
  49. @iSteveFan
    I clicked the link to the Chicago Tribune. After Keillor's hit piece you had this article: The Worst Case for the Republicans: Donald Trump Wins by Steve Chapman. This was followed by The Trump Pivot is Dead, in its place was a Hate Speech by Rex Huppke.

    The Tribune has moved left in the last year or two.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    That recently?

    Or just further left...
    , @Hibernian
    The Tribune has been moving steadily Leftward since the '70s.
  50. I don’t know, Steven, I think Fred Trump showed plenty of German-American pride at that KKK rally in 1927.

    • Replies: @Marcus
    You mean American pride: the strongly nativist 2nd KKK was involved in the suppression of German culture during WWI.
  51. @South Texas Guy
    I just quickly looked it up, and holy crap! Keillor was right. A veritable shit load of Christmas songs were written by jews.

    And to get back to the topic, my favorite FDR quote (not a fan, but I like the feeling behind it), was, in response to his critics, "I welcome their hatred." I don't think Trump gives too much of a damn about what people say about him. That's not true of the past four-plus decades of major republicans (Reagan may be an exception), and that's why so many got on the Trump train.

    A veritable shitload of songs were written by Jews. It’s almost as if they are on the average more verbally facile than other groups.

    In the so called Great American Songbook era, in which hundreds of stage and movie musicals and similar productions largely generated the songs people like Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald sang, out of about fifteen writers (lyricists and composers) who were prominent about three or four were not Jewish. The early part of the rock era featured a lot of songs written by Jewish writers as well, such as Leiber and Stoller, Goffin and King, Barry Goldberg, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry, Carole Bayer Sager, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil.

    Of course several rock stars were Jews, Dylan, Lou Reed, Joey Ramone, or Jews were widely considered the driving force in the band or were behind the scenes “gurus” or “Svengalis”.

    • Replies: @fnn

    Leiber and Stoller
     
    I was mildly shocked when I found out who wrote "Hound Dog." It really seemed like it must have had its origins in old Negro folk music (especially the original version).
    , @Anonymous
    Brian Epstein & the Beatles?
    , @Bugg
    David Lee Roth lights the menorah!

    Suspect Keillor has NO IDEA who that is, but he grew up in his uncle's Greenwich Village bar.
    , @PiltdownMan

    It’s almost as if they are on the average more verbally facile than other groups.
     
    Hmm...ya think?
  52. @Buzz Mohawk
    Here Keillor proves he really is the folksy bumpkin he's always pretended to be. His screed is filled with errors only a slow talker could make.

    As Kurt Vonnegut wrote, "You are what you pretend to be."

    Where did Garrison learn about New York, I wonder? From watching TV on a fuzzy screen in Minnesota?

    Somebody should tell him: A lot of people out here got here from somewhere else because they are at the top of their field -- and they don't give a rat's ass what he thinks. (That's the key he's too simple to understand.)

    As Kurt Vonnegut wrote, “You are what you pretend to be.”

    Nice Buzz, I knew someone had to have said that better than Sartre but I don’t read Vonnegut. But, I like Joyce’s better, “We live by the stories we tell ourselves.” Actually I think that’s so true it’s metaphysical. And I’ll tell ya, this is why I don’t agree we pretend to be anybody: because I have pretended to be someone, when I was drunk at bars havin a hoary time with strangers I knew I didn’t exactly respect for some reason. And you feel terrible about it the next day, its exactly like not feeling like yourself.

    Then I remember when Charlie Rose asked a slowed down Hunter S. Thompson if he had created an identity to write by, Thompson was stumped for like fifteen seconds and he gradually starts motioning his hands molding a round figure and goes, “If I had….. somehow….crafted….that….I.. I think that would be too much credit.” And of course you can barely hear him mumble “credit,” as though he didn’t even care about actually making the whole point of that painstaking cogitation he accomplished.

    I read that Jewish bumpkin and can tell exactly what he is: only worth slaying. What I want to know about a pro writer like that though is who the hell he reads deeply. What flicks his creative spark? Who taught him to tell a billionaire where he’s from and what he does and oh also that’s he not Jewish, do that and your billionaire will go to bed unsettled. That seems most of all immature to me.

    I was just telling Steve what the Irish Writers do to each other in memoirs, they simply make up stories about their rivals, and just as long as it doesn’t touch on anything that actually did happen to the guy, they know its fair game and that they can get away with it in terms of libel. Heres Yeats on George Moore in middle life:

    He said to a friend: “How do you keep your pants from falling about your knees?” “O” said the friend, “I put my braces through the little tapes that are sewn there for the purpose.” A few days later he thanked the friend with emotion.

    And the masters touch is that last line it is.

    The stories we tell ourselves. Hey Buzz I’ll tell ya, if one of my short stories has a shot at the New Yorker, it will only be because no one told them I’m not from Ireland so don’t. They made Updike read like 800 pages of Brian O’Nolan years and years after he had died, and they recently couldn’t get enough of Collin Barrett (though his one about the fake poet made me want to puke). Living in New York anyways, like DFW shrugged, New You OK? Not me. Couldn’t tell my Joe Sobran stories.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    I read that Jewish bumpkin and can tell exactly what he is: only worth slaying. What I want to know about a pro writer like that though is who the hell he reads deeply. What flicks his creative spark? Who taught him to tell a billionaire where he’s from and what he does and oh also that’s he not Jewish, do that and your billionaire will go to bed unsettled. That seems most of all immature to me.
     
    Perhaps I misunderstood what you wrote, but Garrison Keillor is not Jewish.
  53. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Groovy Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:
    @wren
    I am starting to see Robert Mercer, and his daughter Rebekah come up more often in articles about Trump.

    I haven't really found out much about him though. They are not Jewish, however.

    Wren

    Robert Mercer is a machine learning expert(specifically, an expert on Hidden Markov Chains) from IBM who was hired by Simons to design high frequency trading algorithms for Rennaissance Technologies.

    Mercer was sued by his Salvadoran slaves on his Setauket Mansion for withholding wages because they didn’t top off his shampoo bottles at the very precise level he gave in written instructions. Not making this up.

    Mercer has a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Michigan.

    • Replies: @rod1963
    Those sorts of high maintenance geeks can get really fussy and freaky if things are not exactly as they demand.

    Oh yeah he owes the IRS billions in taxes as well.

    And has been embroiled in other law suits as well, all seem to deal with him short changing contractors and sellers.

    A real SOB.
    , @Travis
    He was sued for reducing their Monthly bonus. His help was well paid, but it is always upsetting when your boss gives a larger bonus to some than others. Occurs on Wall Street every year.

    Not many people give their servants a monthly bonus, but is is actually a good idea if you have the money. I paid my Live-In nanny a yearly Bonus at Christmas, it really does improve performance and keeps them from quitting before the holiday season.

    When I no longer needed my nanny, she got another job quickly in Tribeca, and they paid her 50% more ($450 per week) but she had to work 6 days instead of 5 per week. and 12 hour days instead of the 9 hours I had her working. When they failed to give her a Christmas bonus, as I had done, she quit. They did not celebrate Christmas.
  54. @Superman
    I can't decide if this an effete man's attempt at a troll, by saying something so obviously wrong, or if he's really spent that so time in uber-SWPL circles that he believes it. It's obvious to just about everybody that the focus of Trump's campaign is to run AGAINST the Manhattan consensus.

    Well, the *consensus* anyway. The guy loves New York itself–he’s the only Republican presidential candidate to put skyscrapers in an ad. He made his money there and was a local fixture before all this.

  55. they showed off by way of philanthropy or by raising brilliant offspring.

    Trump is such a tool for struggling to win the respect of Manhattan Jews.

  56. Queens? Trump spent his formative years at a military academy in upstate NY and the Univ of Pennsylvania Wharton school. He spent some time at Fordham which is in The Bronx. So he may not be the Queens story I see in a lot of poorly researched bios.

    Oddly nobody notices that the US Open is in the very wealthy area, Forest Hills, Queens NY. Before being shipped off to the military academy The Donald went to High School at the The Kew-Forest School, Forest as in Forest Hills. ‘Due to behavior problems, Trump left the school at age 13 and was enrolled in the New York Military Academy’ -wikipedia

    Notable alumni of the The Kew-Forest School seem to include Trump and Jewish people.

    • Replies: @George
    "The Donald went to High School at the The Kew-Forest School " Kew Forest is k-12, Trump get's bounced out at grade 8. So K-8 I would speculate half or more of his class had one parent that was Jewish. Looking through the short Alumni list the mix of Jews might have been interesting including Sephardic and Israeli Jews. So I think Keillor is imagining Trump as a Nebraska kid making it big in Public Radio.
    , @ScarletNumber

    the US Open is in the very wealthy area, Forest Hills, Queens NY.
     
    Well it was from 1915-20 and 1924-77. Since then it has been on the grounds of the World's Fair in Flushing.
  57. anon • Disclaimer says:

    The best part of all this is, it’s gotten me to think about what a great, almost Shakespearean article someone could write about the psychology that drives the wife of a former president who failed the DC bar exam.

    Sadly, I don’t think that this will appear in the Washington Post.

  58. Nobody in Manhattan even cares who Garrison Keillor is, or where St. Paul is.

    And nobody in Queens even knows.

    I’m not trying to be dismissive or catty, I’m just trying to convey my sense of what preoccupies New York City residents.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    Although I've lived in NYC going on 30 years (IOW, non-native), I discovered Keillor when I lived in Denver. I doubt I've ever heard Keillor's name mentioned since living here. That's not dispositive of NYC as a whole, but more akin to a curiosity or a triviality. Whatever Queens means to NYC, it's certainly more than Keillor's satire of bumpkin provincialism.
    , @Thea
    Gawker used to draw a disproportionate number of Minneapolitans. I always thought they really wanted to be seen as rootless cosmopolitans for some reason.
  59. @Clifford Brown
    Garrison Keillor is projecting a bit here. Mr. Lake Wobegone lived part-time in Manhattan for decades and likely never quite fit in on the Upper West Side.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1996/11/29/arts/manhattan-as-a-bit-of-prairie.html

    As for Queens, remember on Seinfeld when George was unemployed and he had to stay with his Swedish parents in Queens for a few weeks?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3AMRHXMfjs

    Garrison Keillor is projecting a bit here. Mr. Lake Wobegone lived part-time in Manhattan for decades and likely never quite fit in on the Upper West Side.
    http://www.nytimes.com/1996/11/29/arts/manhattan-as-a-bit-of-prairie.html

    Then being in show business he encountered more than his share of New York City Jews. Dominicans and Puerto Ricans too? No just the Jews rubbed his Minnesota self the wrong way. Wikipedia says his ancestry is English and Scottish.
    _______
    wikipedia: ___iStevey kinda slant:
    Keillor considers himself a loner and prefers not to make eye contact with people. Though not diagnosed, he also considers himself to be on the high-functioning end of the autism spectrum.[12] He spoke about his experiences as an autistic person in his keynote address at the 19th Annual Minnesota Autism Conference in 2014.[13][14]

  60. And of course, I should have added the first rule of Jews in New York is that you don’t talk about Jews in New York. This alone ensures that that Keillor is talking into a void.

  61. Unless you’re Jesse Jackson. Then you’ll get attention.

  62. @George
    Queens? Trump spent his formative years at a military academy in upstate NY and the Univ of Pennsylvania Wharton school. He spent some time at Fordham which is in The Bronx. So he may not be the Queens story I see in a lot of poorly researched bios.

    Oddly nobody notices that the US Open is in the very wealthy area, Forest Hills, Queens NY. Before being shipped off to the military academy The Donald went to High School at the The Kew-Forest School, Forest as in Forest Hills. 'Due to behavior problems, Trump left the school at age 13 and was enrolled in the New York Military Academy' -wikipedia

    Notable alumni of the The Kew-Forest School seem to include Trump and Jewish people.

    “The Donald went to High School at the The Kew-Forest School ” Kew Forest is k-12, Trump get’s bounced out at grade 8. So K-8 I would speculate half or more of his class had one parent that was Jewish. Looking through the short Alumni list the mix of Jews might have been interesting including Sephardic and Israeli Jews. So I think Keillor is imagining Trump as a Nebraska kid making it big in Public Radio.

  63. In other news…Keillor is still alive.

  64. @Dave Pinsen
    I think "Anglican" alludes to the current publisher of the NYT, whose mother was episcopalian and who was raised as one.

    Aside from this, I think Anglicized Jewsis the more precise description of the “German Jews” Steve has mentioned a few times who were excluding the new “Russian Jews” from the country club. The Old Country Club Jews were certainly disproportionately from greater Germany, but greater Germany was receiving and assimilating a continuous influx of “Russian Jews” in the 17th to 19th centuries, as well expanding Prussia and Austria into heavily Jewish areas to their east and imposing secularization and germanization policies on them. So it is less an ethnic discrimination at the country clubs than a cultural one. One people had been living well in the West for many generations, the other was arriving poor and with unrefined Russian customs and often took religious customs too seriously.

  65. @Grumpy
    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    Keillor is demonstrating typical Minnesota snobbery here, unintentionally telling us more about his own native habitat than about Trump's.

    As nice as he upper Midwest Germanic and Nordic types seem to be, you don’t have to dig too far under the surface to find that they tend to be antisemitic. This is not surprising if you consider the history of the holocaust. There are some very pronounced differences in these cultures that are difficult to reconcile and are worth exploring. McCarthy was from Wisconsin, and his war against communism seemed primarily to be a war against leftist Jews.

    Meanwhile the chink in the armor of Germany and Minnesota seems to be the willingness of Lutheran Social Services and Angela Merkel to fill Minneapolis and Germany with third world refugees. Somebody has found that weakness and is exploiting it. Their cultural immune system and their high trust culture seem to be unable to recognize the invasion. There is no question who is pushing this invade invite the world strategy.

    I fear the time when the Minnesotans and Germans find they have had enough and figure out what their friends have done to them. They will sweep the sidewalks with their typical efficiency.

  66. @Boomstick
    It's pretty funny that Keillor thinks Trump and his followers would be dissuaded if only he sneered at their non-SWPLness little more.

    Keiler’s audience is neither Trump nor Trump supporters.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Keillor's audience may have included conservatives before he took to rah-rahing for Clinton in the 1990s. He made it clear that they were not welcome.
  67. @Maj. Kong
    Cardinal Richelieu of France backed the Protestants in that war. And it was the Swedes, today the most deranged disciples of "tolerance", that pillaged most of Germania.

    And it was the Swedes, today the most deranged disciples of “tolerance”, that pillaged most of Germania.

    This is being too harsh on the Swedes. Yes Sweden, but also France, Spain, Austria, Swiss and Italian mercenaries, and the Germans and Bohemians themselves all pillaged Germany and massacred each other and the local population in the Thirty Years War. The English funded the war.

    Cardinal Richelieu of France backed the Protestants in that war.

    He had no choice as the Spanish-Austrian-German-Catholic alliance was hostile to France and surrounding it on every side, and oppressing French speakers along the Rhine.

  68. @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    "Garrison Keillor did more to preserve and venerate white American culture than Trump has ever done"
    Thank you for dropping by, Mr One Post Wonder.

    Keiler’s version of white American culture is quite distinct from Trump’s version. Both are real cultures, but they have little in common other than skin color.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Keiler’s version of white American culture is quite distinct from Trump’s version. Both are real cultures, but they have little in common other than skin color.
     
    Keiler's version is post-American, and has been essentially for sixty years. Good, bad, or ugly, Trump's is about the only American culture left.
  69. You attract really really good speechwriters who give you Churchillian cadences and toss in quotes from Emerson and Aeschylus and Ecclesiastes.

    This age is already stuffed to the gills with Ecclesiastes and it’s knowing nihilism.

    A really good speechwriter would be hitting Amos and Hebrews.

    • Agree: sayless
    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    If Rene Girard is right and I increasingly think he was then Hebrews is exactly right as far as biblical wisdom is concerned.
    , @dr kill
    Thanks for the Bible references. I had not read Hebrews, Ecclesiastes or Amos in 50 years. Cows of Bashan indeed.
  70. @NOTA
    Keiler's version of white American culture is quite distinct from Trump's version. Both are real cultures, but they have little in common other than skin color.

    Keiler’s version of white American culture is quite distinct from Trump’s version. Both are real cultures, but they have little in common other than skin color.

    Keiler’s version is post-American, and has been essentially for sixty years. Good, bad, or ugly, Trump’s is about the only American culture left.

  71. LA Times: Why our poll keeps showing Trump with a small lead when most polls show him behind 4 to 8 points:

    http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-trump-disaffected-voters-20160831-snap-htmlstory.html

    Mostly the poll is more accepting as “likely voters” people who did not vote in prior elections but are adamant they will vote in this one.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    The polls including Gary Johnson and Jill Stein are consistently closer than the head to head ones. I don't think Trump can get to 50%, but can still win if they drag down Hillary in enough close states. Trump also needs a lot of people who have given up on politics to come back and vote for him.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    That's interesting, but do you think they will really vote? It's a crap shoot.
    , @Forbes
    "Likely voters" are usually determined by several subjective questions used to determine the likelihood of the respondent actually voting--but that questioning is done for all for all respondents that are among "registered voters."

    But the number and content of the questions will be a part of the 'secret sauce' of opinion polling--and different polling organizations will have different approaches.

    In the end, polling results are still subjective judgments--not objective science.
  72. The rules of acceptable speech are so confusing. I used to think that only a Jewish writer could pen this kind of article without being an evil anti-semite, but it appears that as long as you’re attacking Donald Trump a Gentile can get away with it too. I still wouldn’t dare to mention Jewish influence under my real name.

  73. @tomv
    How depressing. I'd always been a fan of Keillor's and, after rediscovering him recently, became an even bigger fan. This sneering article doesn't sound like him at all (although admittedly I've hardly ever read his articles). It's true, political correctness makes you stupid (not to mention nasty), and not even such a brilliant guy as Keillor is immune.

    Here's when Keillor wasn't politically correct: Nonbelievers, please leave Christmas alone.

    2009 might seem like the recent past, and in many ways it is, but I think you are highly unserestimating how much the Zeitgeist has changed since then.

  74. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?
     

    Acute status consciousness may not be universal among Twin Citians, but I think you're on to something. I have experienced this attitude in a couple of personal situations that left me quite angry . . . .

    My theory (I grew up about four hours' drive southwest of MSP, in NW Iowa, but well within its ambit): the Twin Cities comprise the de facto, essentially unchallenged capital of the upper midwest/northern plains, and many of their residents see themselves as upholding the standards of sophistication and cultural light-bringing that status entails. They want to be in the conversation with Chicago and Seattle and, yes, perhaps NYC itself, as 'national' cities; the other cities for hundreds of miles are so obviously provincial . . . .

    As I've mentioned before, people where I'm from react a bit differently if a young person says 'I'm moving to the Twin Cities after college' than if he says he's going to try his luck in Omaha or Kansas City or Des Moines or Milwaukee. There's more of a 'Oh, so you're really going to go for it' kind of vibe . . . .

    Minnesotans -- am I wrong about this?

    the Twin Cities comprise the de facto, essentially unchallenged capital of the upper midwest/northern plains

    The Norse were born to rule the Anglo-Saxon/Celt yeomanry. It’s England circa 1076.

  75. I think Sand Hills changed the aesthetic. Look at the highlights of 1984 US Open at Winged Foot West. Huge trees next to the fairway. Rough up to the ankles.

    Trump joined Winged Foot around that time and I assume that set his aesthetic. Even Trump Aberdeen goes for the bold and loud. It certainly is not North Berwick.

  76. It’s interesting to me how sentimental NPR and its listeners are. Keillor’s show has been a sad imitation of itself for at least 20 years and now that he’s leaving, they actually plan to continue the show. Why?

    Click or Clack dies and they just keep their show rolling by endless permutations of ancient shows. They even have new sponsors announced by the living guy while the dead one sticks to the old sponsors. Rather creepy.

    Prairie Home Companion has no currency in Manhattan except among those pale spinsters gripping their WNYC tot-bags on the subway. When Garrison made his stand in Manhattan, he swept into stores and restaurants like a flamboyant queen, with an entourage, expecting to be recognized and celebrated. I think it broke his heart that he never was.

    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, “Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion. Some of these people really shouldn’t vote because they don’t know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed.”

    It almost like a literacy test might be in order.

    • Replies: @Barnard

    Some of these people really shouldn’t vote because they don’t know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed.”
     
    How does Kareem think the last oh, six or seven Presidential elections would have gone if all the voters who didn't know what the issues are, didn't vote?
    , @hhsiii
    I heard that in passing by my radio in the kitchen this morning. Didn't know it was Jabbar.

    They stopped playing Car Talk on WNYC, just like they stopped playing Danny Stiles' Music Museum (they still do The Big Broadcast Sunday Nights on WFUV). That went on a couple of years after he died.

    If you listen to enough NPR and are a noticer you just get conservative. And if you read the WSJ enough you morph from agreeing with them to questioning them to alt right.
    , @e
    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, “Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion. Some of these people really shouldn’t vote because they don’t know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed.”

    Yo, Kareem. Did you publicly recommend that the denizens of Philly not vote in the last two Presidential elections?
    , @Forbes

    Some of these people really shouldn’t vote because they don’t know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed.”

    It almost like a literacy test might be in order.

     

    A test to see if the people, or some people, are 'better informed'? Who decides that?

    No doubt the losing side always complains about the ignorance of those on the winning side. "If only they were better informed, we wouldn't have lost."
    , @Triumph104
    My local station moved the Best of Car Talk to 5pm on Saturday and it's old timeslot, 10am, has been filled by Marketplace Weekend of all things. I don't think the station will carry the Best of Car Talk much longer.

    Regarding Kareem, last Tuesday in Arizona's primary election several people showed up to the polls to vote for president of the United States and were upset when they found out that was not possible. The elections official being interviewed said they needed to provide more information to the public. Umm, no they don't.
    , @dr kill
    Yes, It's like stumbling across a fund raiser for the local public TV channel and seeing what they consider proper programming to raise funds by - Bob Hope specials, Carol Burnett roasts, Views of Italy, Pete Seeger concerts. I think Lew Alcindor might be on to something, he was just describing the wrong cohort.
    , @iSteveFan

    Prairie Home Companion has no currency in Manhattan
     
    Does it have any currency with the Somalis of Minnesota?
  77. Anyway, as several commenters have noted in the comments below, Keillor appears to be projecting some of his own provincial status insecurities onto Trump, which isn’t a good fit. I believe Keillor tried living in New York for a number of years,

    LOL. I had the same thought halfway through. I remember Keillor exiting Prairie Home Companion, then resurrecting it in New York City of all places.

    Keillor comes across as quite venomous here. Trump threatens a lot of comfy bourgeois worldviews. Sorry folks, this is the future you chose.

  78. @MC
    I think Trump suffers from a kind of insecurity, in the way that braggarts do. I just don't think it's quite of the flavor that Keillor describes. After all, Trump knows NY, knows Jews, probably isn't intimidated by them anymore, if he ever was. But I find the the theory that Trump originally ran for president mostly to shut up all the smarty-pants people who said he'd never run to have some plausibility.

    If Trump was ever motivated by winning the respect of the Times and urbane Jews he would have made a series of different choices in life more to their tastes and probably would have stayed clear of Atlantic City altogether. His style and aesthetic is more reminiscent of what blue collar Italian Americans would do if they came into money. His persona would have been so different that he probably would not have been a household name.

    Being so obviously status-conscious, it probably escapes Keillor that the Trump persona is intentionally in opposition to the swells who think they are the gatekeepers and taste-makers.

    • Replies: @Marc
    The public Trump of the late 1970's to the late 1990's was far less abrasive than the Trump of the 21st century. He was more like a calm, smooth talking, extroverted Scots-Irishman in those early years than an Italian from the Neighborhood. He appealed to a much wider cross section than the more abrasive modern Trump, who is a tad less in-your-face than the Bronx-born, Russian Jew talk radio host, Michael Savage.
  79. @Grumpy
    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    Keillor is demonstrating typical Minnesota snobbery here, unintentionally telling us more about his own native habitat than about Trump's.

    From my time in the Twin Cities, the people there were always miffed (as much a Minnesotan can show such things) about being essentially forgotten. They felt (and were, in fact, correct) that the Twin Cities was a top-tier city on par with Seattle, San Diego, Portland, etc. Yet, nobody outside of the upper Midwest ever mentioned or thought about the Twin Cities while the country did have a feeling for other similar cities.

    In essence, Mpls-St. Paul is the pretty girl who never gets asked to dance, and she can’t understand why. Thus the frustration.

    So where does passive-aggressive anger come from? Well, to continue my little analogy, Twin Cities folk worry that they don’t get asked out because they’re terrible in bed, i.e. a pretty face and sweet body but boring as hell.

    That all being said, I liked the Twin Cities. If not for God-awful weather, it’d be a great place to live. Also, it has the quintessential song written about it. How many cities outside of NYC and LA have that.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    Good album but I prefer Tim and even Hootenanny.
    , @AnotherDad

    That all being said, I liked the Twin Cities. If not for God-awful weather, it’d be a great place to live.
     
    What Minneapolis has going for it beyond the obvious big plus of the German-Scandinavian core population, is that it sits next to the North Woods, which is a better recreational getaway than other midwestern cities have.

    It's problem is ... diversification. If it could have somehow frozen it's population demographics at 1970, with it's quality white population and low black population it would have been a place--maybe *the* place--that whites would flock to as the nation diversifies and whites seek refuge. But as they let in the Somalis, the core city now is not so pleasant. (Sure, better than Chicago, but that's a low bar.)

    This is the fundamental problem with keeping the quality of any grouping--a club, a community, a nation--you have to have some way to keep out the riff-raff!


    Basically what all of what "civil rights", new-left politics--and what so animates the New York Times editorial board--is that white people *must not be allowed* to keep out the riff-raff.
  80. It appears that Keillor never watched the Nanny.

  81. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?
     

    Acute status consciousness may not be universal among Twin Citians, but I think you're on to something. I have experienced this attitude in a couple of personal situations that left me quite angry . . . .

    My theory (I grew up about four hours' drive southwest of MSP, in NW Iowa, but well within its ambit): the Twin Cities comprise the de facto, essentially unchallenged capital of the upper midwest/northern plains, and many of their residents see themselves as upholding the standards of sophistication and cultural light-bringing that status entails. They want to be in the conversation with Chicago and Seattle and, yes, perhaps NYC itself, as 'national' cities; the other cities for hundreds of miles are so obviously provincial . . . .

    As I've mentioned before, people where I'm from react a bit differently if a young person says 'I'm moving to the Twin Cities after college' than if he says he's going to try his luck in Omaha or Kansas City or Des Moines or Milwaukee. There's more of a 'Oh, so you're really going to go for it' kind of vibe . . . .

    Minnesotans -- am I wrong about this?

    As someone from your neck of the woods who lived in the Twin Cities for several years, I think that you’re spot on.

    By the way, does I-29 still run right through the stockyards of Sioux City? That was always one smelly stretch of road.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    The stockyards in Sioux City closed in the early 2000s and the John Morrell plant closed about ten years after that. I think the smell finally starting to dissipate.
  82. @TheBoom
    Any time I read something anyone else on the left, especially when they try to analyze someone else, I think of Vox Day's adage: SJW always project. My guess is that Keillor's observations about Trump tell you more about Keillor's experience living in NYC while temporarily basing his show there.

    My guess is that Keillor’s observations about Trump tell you more about Keillor’s experience living in NYC while temporarily basing his show there.

    Well, that’s all he has to go on – his temporal parochialism cuts him off from the other sources of human understanding the rest of us enjoy. Common Prog malady.

  83. @MC
    I think Trump suffers from a kind of insecurity, in the way that braggarts do. I just don't think it's quite of the flavor that Keillor describes. After all, Trump knows NY, knows Jews, probably isn't intimidated by them anymore, if he ever was. But I find the the theory that Trump originally ran for president mostly to shut up all the smarty-pants people who said he'd never run to have some plausibility.

    Usually people value the opinion of their peers. Federal judges, for example, value the opinion of other federal judges. For Trump, that would be CEO’s— people who run big enterprises. Not rich people, and not investment bankers or consultants or even bankers. They no doubt joke about him as someone who takes time off to do TV, who gets into the newspapers, etc., who is unorthodox in many ways. He wants to show that this is a plus, not a minus— that he is a CEO Plus.

  84. Dahlia says:

    “Trump may just not be a good subject for writers, so they wind up projecting a lot onto him.”

    That’s too bad because he’s fabulous.

    Is it that hard to understand or appreciate that someone can have rare, needed virtues despite being tacky?

    And he’s so funny, too! During the primary debates, I accidentally landed on the floor from one particularly hysterical laughing fit. After that, I made sure to have the oversized sofa all to myself to lie on, go crazy on…

    Feel so sorry for all the writers and serious people who cannot enjoy such pleasure and, indeed, are in pain!

    • Replies: @NOTA
    The media reaction to Trump reminds me a lot of the media reaction to Palin. In both cases:

    a. There is plenty to criticize, and plenty of reasons not to want them as president or VP.

    b. A lot of the actual reaction and much of the criticism comes down to style--wrong class markers, describing policies in the wrong words, wrong accent, etc.
  85. I tried listening to Prairie Home Companion once. Instant Zzzzzzzs.

  86. @South Texas Guy
    I just quickly looked it up, and holy crap! Keillor was right. A veritable shit load of Christmas songs were written by jews.

    And to get back to the topic, my favorite FDR quote (not a fan, but I like the feeling behind it), was, in response to his critics, "I welcome their hatred." I don't think Trump gives too much of a damn about what people say about him. That's not true of the past four-plus decades of major republicans (Reagan may be an exception), and that's why so many got on the Trump train.

    George W. Bush clearly didn’t care about elite opinion, not only despite but because of his aristocratic and Yale background, which I think is the main reason he drove people like Krugman bonkers. Like FDR, his pedigree was so good he could look down on the nouveau elite.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    That was part of it for sure but he father and brothers are both solicitous of elite opinion so I don't think it can entirely be isolated by that factor. I think there was also the religious conversion factor- evangelical religion truly saved him from personal disaster. It's noticeable that as his faith seems to have flagged- I think he is even drinking again- his attempts to curry elite opinion have increased.
    , @carol
    I don't remember either Bush playing golf much.

    Is this something that was played down ala JFK to avoid the "duffer" image?

    , @JohnnyWalker123
    In his book "The Price of Loyalty," former Treasury secretary (also former CEO of Alcoa) Paul O'Neil had some interesting remarks about Bush.

    Here's a quote from O'Neil: "President Bush showed little interest in policy discussions in his first two years in the White House, leading Cabinet meetings 'like a blind man in a roomful of deaf people. There is no discernible connection…"

    Here's another interesting story about George Bush. He was invited to be on the Board of Directors of the Carlyle Group, a prestigious investment firm. He was eventually asked to leave. Why?

    Here's a quote from the firm's CEO: "He [Bush]… came to all the meetings. Told a lot of jokes. Not that many clean ones. And after a while I said to him, after about three years: 'You know, I'm not sure this is really for you… because I don't think you're adding that much value. You don't know that much about the company.'.... If you said to me, name 25m people who would maybe be president of the United States, he wouldn't have been in that category."
  87. @Lot
    LA Times: Why our poll keeps showing Trump with a small lead when most polls show him behind 4 to 8 points:

    http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-trump-disaffected-voters-20160831-snap-htmlstory.html

    Mostly the poll is more accepting as "likely voters" people who did not vote in prior elections but are adamant they will vote in this one.

    The polls including Gary Johnson and Jill Stein are consistently closer than the head to head ones. I don’t think Trump can get to 50%, but can still win if they drag down Hillary in enough close states. Trump also needs a lot of people who have given up on politics to come back and vote for him.

  88. No one can get respect in the Jewish community unless they are working for Israel’s survival as a Jewish state. Only President Trump would create the ME fluidity necessary, and give Israel freedom of action to deal with it.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    I don't see how Israel's main problem is more likely to be solved under a Trump than Clinton regime. We'll keep giving them money and arms, they'll keep oppressing the Palestinians (who, given the chance, would do much worse to the Israelis). They're not going to entirely ethnically cleanse or mass murder the Palestinians (it wouldn't play domestically or internationally), the Palestinians aren't going to start liking the Israelis enough for peace to be likely except under a strongman with effective secret police who is cowed or bought by us or Israel to avoid conflict (and Israel wouldn't want a strong state there anyway), and so things will go on as they have been for the forseeable future.
  89. @k-hole kaitlin
    Garrison Keillor did more to preserve and venerate white American culture than Trump has ever done

    True, and Garrison Keillor is a national treasure. But it’s fascinating how he has had to write about his small-town roots to achieve his obvious lifetime goal of repudiating them and becoming a sophisticate— and how he has failed in the process.

    In fact, if he’d succeeded in becoming a sophisticate, he would have lost his creative abilities and been kicked out of the sophisticate crowd, which seems to have happened to some extent. But somehow his perceptiveness when it comes to small-town life fails him when it comes to the nuances of Manhattan. It makes for an interesting contrast with Tom Wolfe, who can describe people from any setting, rich or poor. I bet Tom Wolfe, a Ph.D., is more detached and also knows how to do the hard work of researching how people live and think, while Keillor goes entirely on formative personal experiences.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Keillor is very good on letting you know exactly where he's coming from, while Wolfe is relatively opaque on that (in part because being from the post-Confederate intellectual class of Virginia is not very popular). Wolfe is better on other people, but Keillor is extremely good on his strong suit of small town Minnesotans.
  90. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?
     

    Acute status consciousness may not be universal among Twin Citians, but I think you're on to something. I have experienced this attitude in a couple of personal situations that left me quite angry . . . .

    My theory (I grew up about four hours' drive southwest of MSP, in NW Iowa, but well within its ambit): the Twin Cities comprise the de facto, essentially unchallenged capital of the upper midwest/northern plains, and many of their residents see themselves as upholding the standards of sophistication and cultural light-bringing that status entails. They want to be in the conversation with Chicago and Seattle and, yes, perhaps NYC itself, as 'national' cities; the other cities for hundreds of miles are so obviously provincial . . . .

    As I've mentioned before, people where I'm from react a bit differently if a young person says 'I'm moving to the Twin Cities after college' than if he says he's going to try his luck in Omaha or Kansas City or Des Moines or Milwaukee. There's more of a 'Oh, so you're really going to go for it' kind of vibe . . . .

    Minnesotans -- am I wrong about this?

    I would say that is right, but only for the people whose families have lived in the Twin Cities for more than two generations. There is a subset of the Scandinavian Lutherans who really want the metro area to be important on a national scale, but the transplants realize it isn’t and I don’t think it is as important to them.

    The Twins Cities status as a de facto capital of the upper midwest is also fading. In my experience, the range would include only the state of Minnesota, the Eastern Dakotas and Northern Iowa. Outside of that range, they tend to gravitate to Chicago, Denver or Kansas City.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    The Twins Cities status as a de facto capital of the upper midwest is also fading. In my experience, the range would include only the state of Minnesota, the Eastern Dakotas and Northern Iowa. Outside of that range, they tend to gravitate to Chicago, Denver or Kansas City.

     

    Interesting. I haven't lived in the USA for many years, so I'll surely take your word for it on this. I do get the sense that going to Denver/Colorado Springs has risen in estimation as an option for ambitious young people from my area, whereas when I was young it seemed pretty remote. Also, Des Moines has improved a lot as a middle- to upper-middle-class option, so I get the sense more ambitious Iowans may be staying in-state.
    , @Buck Turgidson
    As a native upper midwesterner I agree with that view of the Twin Cities. Where I grew up in N Iowa, if a high school grad wanted to go off to the big city, it was not the Twin Cities--it was for the most part Denver, Chicago, or Dallas. The TC winter is brutal and not many outsiders will go through it more than 1-2 years. The place is more liberal than most other liberal big cities and of course they don't do themselves any favors as a result. The denizens are (MN) nice, but they also can be a little goofy and naive. They get overrun by Somalis and they just take it and don't want to raise their voice about their crooked liberal politicians who think the place is too white and incompetent ("B+" in Gov Dayton condescending liberal lingo). The politicians can get by with being nice to everyone except the native white Lutherans, who will accept tremendous amounts of abuse without pushing back, if the office holders are Democrat. They accept this vigorous rogering and invasion b/c, well, it wouldn't be nice to make a fuss over that, or over anything for that matter. Republicans? Well they are skinflint greedy evil mean people who hate brown people, women, children, and dogs. You don't want to be like them! Marge Gunderson doesn't think much of them because the nice lady on CNN told her that they are evil. I think it's a great town and love to visit, but not in winter.
  91. >>In Queens, blacks were a threat to property values — they belonged in the Bronx, not down the street. To the Times, Queens is Cleveland. Bush league. You are Queens.

    Blacks are a threat to property values in Manhattan and upscale SWPL Brooklyn too, that’s why they have been, willy-nilly, removed from these locales by public policy directed by the machers of Manhattan.

    You know what preserves property values in New York City? An Eruv. Nothing else achieves the same effect, and the neighborhood that Trump grew up in, and neighborhoods adjoining it, have been Eruved for at least 40 years, probably more. Trump grew up in Jamaica estates, cheek by jowl to the ghetto that is now south western queens, but the ghetto will never move into Jamaica Estates and the adjoining upscale neighborhoods because they have been Eruved.

    The upper west side of Manhattan, liberal macher heartland, has been Eruved too.

    Keilor is such a toady.

    • Replies: @Forbes

    Blacks are a threat to property values in Manhattan and upscale SWPL Brooklyn too, that’s why they have been, willy-nilly, removed from these locales by public policy directed by the machers of Manhattan.
     
    A better example of historical revisionism couldn't be found. In 1960, 95% of Blacks in Manhattan lived in Harlem (above E.96th St., and north of CP/W. 110th St.). Whatever the machers have been about, it hasn't been removing Blacks from south of Harlem--where real estate is exceedingly expensive by any measure.
  92. @Anonymous
    I was taking a quick look into Emma Lazarus, whose poem is getting a lot of play these days as some kind of nostrum against Trumpish borders. When she wasn't telling us This is Who We Are, i.e. a nation of immigrants taken in without regard to race or creed or rank, she was advocating for a Jewish nation in Palestine without cracking a smile, forming the Society for the Improvement and Colonization of East European Jews, and sticking up for these now elite German Jews, who in 1877 were the arriviste bane of New York hoteliers:

    Judge Henry Hilton, the Grand Union Hotel's owner, explained he had no objection to the Sephardic elite. Those like Emma Lazarus' family, who had lived in America since before the Revolution, were the refined, "true Hebrews." According to Hilton, only the dirty, greedy, German immigrant "Seligman Jews" were unwanted.
     

    If you take a closer look at the poem you’ll discover that the Zionist agitating and the “Mother of Exiles” are related. You can read more about that in one of my previous comments, searchable at Unz.com…

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Oh hell... It's here:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/why-the-establishment-is-so-berserk-over-trump-talking-sense-on-immigration/#comment-1455828
  93. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Trump has been doing his good friend Joan Rivers' shtick this whole time, I don't know why nobody gets that.

    She called Michelle a tranny and was dead within a week. "Just sayin."

    I rhought her comment “everybody knows that” was very interesting. Who is in the know?

  94. they showed off by way of philanthropy or by raising brilliant offspring

    Yes “philanthropy,” many a Jewish conman has pointed to his massive contributions to Jewish orgs to garner sympathy after the SEC comes calling.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Donald Sterling.
  95. @5371
    Remarkable. According to the Sage of Minnesota, Trump had a Very Bad Month. But he is doing better in the polls at the end of it than he was at the beginning. Two more months this bad would easily make him president.

    Who is the Sage of Minnesota please. But that’s funny you say. My Dad’s an old DC politico, GOP. And he’s from Minnesota. I got the inside scoop about the hilarious rat-fucking episode the day it went down.

    The background. Some Cruz PAC put out an ad that used a pin-up of Trumps wife. Then Trump goes, “Be careful, or I’ll spill the beans on Heidi.” That of course means Heidi’s been doing something she’s not supposed to be doing, and what she wasn’t supposed to be doing is turning into a man, since that’s what the actual photo of her face Trump next tweeted out truly looks like. And Trump wasn’t done. The very next day is when the National Enquirer story came out about Cruz’a five affairs and quoted Trump’s man Roger Stone.

    http://gawker.com/ted-cruz-implies-hed-fuck-a-rat-as-long-as-it-wasnt-don-1767113389

    Addressing the issue, mind you the issue of he himself reportedly having sex with several other than Heidi, this is what popped into Cruz’s mind:

    “Roger Stone is a man for whom a term was coined for copulating with a rodent. Well let me be clear: Donald Trump may be a rat, but I have no desire to copulate with him. And this garbage does not belong in politics.”

    See what he accidentally did all over the place there? He says Stone is known to fuck rodents. Then, he wants to “be clear”: Donald is a rodent he’s a rat: yes, Cruz says Roger Stone has bestiality with Donald Trump because The Donald is a rodent rat. That’s literally unfathomably disgusting BUT: “I have no desire to copulate with him.” I mean you can’t make that up.

    Now this is why his mind did that. First of all Stone is not a ratfucker. He’s the guy who for fifty years has been calling people ratfuckers. So Cruz lied there. Second, if you go back to that ugly picture of Heidi that Trump tweeted, the caption on it reads “A picture says a thousand words.” That was a sharper touch than anyone knew, because Trump made sure Cruz received at the time of that tweet a one word message just for him; RATFUCKER. Trump called Heidi a rat, and made Cruz look at her when she looked like one, to add injury to the insult you would say.

    Walk through it one more time. “Roger Stone is a man for whom a term was coined for copulating with a rodent.” Wrong: Roger Stone is laughing at you for copulating with a rodent. “Well let me be clear: Donald Trump may be a rat.” Wrong: Donald Trump said your wife is a nasty looking rat. “but I have no desire to copulate with him.” True: but only because you probably don’t have any desire to copulate with your wife anymore either. “And this garbage does not belong in politics.” Correct: because you actually did not just start the garbage.

    And I’m pretty sure they knew they could hit him that hard cause they had on good authority them affairs were true, and that he was gonna be on the defensive inside his chest. Sage of Minnesota didn’t say any of that, ya got it?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I have no idea what you meant in this post.
  96. @Rob McX
    The article is an exercise in wishful thinking, trying to see Trump as an insecure individual who craves approval, despite the overwhelming evidence that he's always been his own man. Few people care less than Trump about others' opinion of them.

    There are a few people whose opinions DJT cares deeply, obviously and movingly about: His brother and father are a couple.

    As complex as he can be, mostly it’s all out there for everyone to see. I guess that’s boring for writers raised on deconstruction.

  97. I have absolutely no idea what this man is going on about. He’s obviously really angry about something.

  98. A lot of Lefty trolling lately has been moldy. Its summary of conservatives consists of political characteristics that may have been valid in, say, 1956, but are stagnant enough to stink up the place today. The rightwing is warmongering. Well… Not that old Nazi, Pat Buchanan. The rightwing coddles our plutocracy. And you think open borders doesn’t? The rightwing is white. Well… One out of three isn’t… good. But that last one is accurate. And that’s really the Alt-Right’s greatest sin. It’s very white. And another horror: It is and should REMAIN very, very Gentile.

    Everyone knows WASPs envy Jews. That’s why so many Mayflower types dye their hair a darker shade and undergo torture of nose-jobs to look Semitic.

  99. @Buzz Mohawk
    Here Keillor proves he really is the folksy bumpkin he's always pretended to be. His screed is filled with errors only a slow talker could make.

    As Kurt Vonnegut wrote, "You are what you pretend to be."

    Where did Garrison learn about New York, I wonder? From watching TV on a fuzzy screen in Minnesota?

    Somebody should tell him: A lot of people out here got here from somewhere else because they are at the top of their field -- and they don't give a rat's ass what he thinks. (That's the key he's too simple to understand.)

    This is exactly right. In one of his Lake Wobegon stories, he tells of a young Minnesotan who fantasizes that someday his mother would burst through the door to the dining room with heaping platters of spaghetti and his family would reveal that they were secretly Italian.

    When I was 10, I thought this was hilarious because it was funny imagery, and I didn’t conceive of self-loathing liberals. Now that it’s 2016, I recognize Keillor is a pathetic, unfunny, ugly man from a cold and backward place. He hates himself almost as much as he hates the people who raised him. I wish I hadn’t been exposed to him in my youth.

  100. @Boomstick
    It's pretty funny that Keillor thinks Trump and his followers would be dissuaded if only he sneered at their non-SWPLness little more.

    It’s pretty funny that Keillor thinks Trump and his followers would be dissuaded if only he sneered at their non-SWPLness little more.

    Sort of the mirror image of Republicans’ quadrennial protest: “We’d have won if only we’d been more vigorous in our rabid right-wing librul-bashing.”

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Sort of the mirror image of Republicans’ quadrennial protest: “We’d have won if only we’d been more vigorous in our rabid right-wing librul-bashing.”
     
    Romney especially was notorious for that. Who can forget that time he breathed fire on poor defenseless Candy Crowley at that debate.

    Amirite?
  101. @NOTA
    Keiler's audience is neither Trump nor Trump supporters.

    Keillor’s audience may have included conservatives before he took to rah-rahing for Clinton in the 1990s. He made it clear that they were not welcome.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    I like a lot of Keillor's work and support Trump. I don't particularly like Trump although I bet he'd be fun to play golf with and he seems ok if you can get past the bluster. Like Steve said, too gauche for this east coaster. But I have grown to support the U.S. citizens' first position after a long time as a WSJ or Ludwig von Mises (so I fancied) free trade uber alles believer.

    I may have followed the evolution of a lot of people my age;

    Daily News sports page and comics as a kid.
    NY Times into teens
    Village Voice late teens
    WSJ as a young professional
    Back to NY Post type to read sports page on way to work on subway, broadsheet too hard to handle in crowd.
    Internet stuff, hey, who is this Steve Sailer guy?
    , @Jim Don Bob
    That's when I stopped listening. As they told Linda Rondstat after she got all preachy at a concert, "Shut up, and sing".
  102. @fnn
    I have never liked Keillor’, but I'd like to read (not hear) his explanation of why Minneapolis (not St. Paul) was for many years "the capital of anti-Semitism in the United States":
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Minneapolis#Politics.2C_corruption.2C_anti-Semitism_and_social_change

    Minneapolis was known for anti-Semitism beginning in the 1880s and through the 1950s.[29] The city was described as "the capital of anti-Semitism in the United States" in 1946 by Carey McWilliams[30] and in 1959 by Gunther Plaut.[31] At that time the city's Jews were excluded from membership in many organizations, faced employment discrimination, and were considered unwelcome residents in some neighborhoods.[32] Jews in Minneapolis were also not allowed to buy homes in certain neighborhoods of Minneapolis.[33]
     
    An interesting topic, but I'm almost certain he would have nothing interesting to say about it.

    Those sorts of claims (& wikis) need to be taken with a box of kosher salt.

  103. @Maj. Kong
    Cardinal Richelieu of France backed the Protestants in that war. And it was the Swedes, today the most deranged disciples of "tolerance", that pillaged most of Germania.

    The Swedes’ hired guns of the Thirty Years War (a multi-cultural crew of Germans, Scots, Croats, and anybody else who would wield a pike for pay) popularized the “Swedish Drink.” This was a mix of foul water, crap (literally), and more crap that the goons would force down some hapless victim’s throat with with the aid of a funnel. Of course all the other hired thugs working for German princes did the same thing, but it started with the Swedes.

    Nowadays, Merkel the German furstin has learned from her Swedish preceptors about forcing a foul mixture down the throats of the populace. And she didn’t even have to tie anyone down.

    As the good cardinal would say, la plus ca change.

  104. @Dave Pinsen
    Garrison Keillor deigning to explain New York City to Donald Trump is the epitome of chutzpah.

    Also, the idea that anyone who looks down on Trump now would respect him if he were elected President -- does Keillor think they respected W.? Maybe his memory is a bet sketchy between the debut of the B-52 and today (and yes, I know the B-52 is still in service).

    There is a line between chutzpah and faux pas. Keillor crossed it.

  105. @Chrisnonymous
    If you take a closer look at the poem you'll discover that the Zionist agitating and the "Mother of Exiles" are related. You can read more about that in one of my previous comments, searchable at Unz.com...
  106. @Lot

    the old money German-Jewish high society who wouldn’t let Eastern European Jews into their country clubs because of their cruder manners.
     
    This is an interesting topic. "German" and more properly here "Anglicized" Jews are those Ashkenazi that have been culturally assimilated, speak German or English as their first language, usually for generations, and are mostly ignorant or even disdainful of some of the practices of our bumpkin ancestors and distant relatives in Eastern Europe and Israel. It is not really just "old money high society" that is not fond of their "cruder manners," but the large respectable majority.

    Germanization was a process that extended far outside the borders of modern Germany. All over Eastern Europe, covering modern Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and parts of Ukraine and Romania, the more urban and intelligent Jews moved to the German-speaking cities and adopted increasing amounts of German language and culture.

    Just to give an example of this, John von Neumann went to a German-language and style high school in Budapest, run by the Lutheran Church, but with a majority Jewish student body. From there he went to the German University of Berlin and the German-Swiss ETH Zurich before settling in Princeton.

    As in greater Germany for several centuries, it really only takes one or two generations raised in secular America to join the larger Anglicized US Jewish population, so there really is no longer meaningful distinction in New York society between the descendants of Jews from Berlin who came in 1852 and Jews from Kiev who came in 1907. Nonetheless, new immigrants from Russia sometimes just can't fit in a place like the New York Times.

    As in greater Germany for several centuries

    Greater Germany – that’s got a nice ring to it.

  107. @Steve Sailer
    Keillor's review of a Bernard Henri-Levy book is very funny.

    It was pretty funny. The late Christopher Hitchens also had a pretty good take down of it:

    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/fighting_words/2006/02/garrison_keillor_vulgarian.html

  108. It’s ironic but it seems to me that it is more outer borough jews like Woody Allen who are ashamed of the bad taste of their Pale of Settlement immigrant bumpkin relatives and want to please the Manhattanites. trump’s taste would be more akin to Jack Carter’s character in The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (even though Trump started from some money, he also made more and never gave a damn about “taste”; like Sandy Weill said when JP Morgan didn’t want to merge with his Citi “they kept talking about the firm’s culture, I was like, what, you mean yogurt?”)

    Trump does want people to like him or respect him, though. He’d send to notes to Graydon Carter (or Kurt Anderson, I forget), formerly of Spy, which referred to him as a short-fingered vulgarian, with pictures of his hands saying something like “see, pretty big.” And they aren’t really especially small hands. 🙂

    Anyway, this is the scene I think of when I think of what Allen’s take on Trump would be (“…deadening the sensibilities of a Great Democracy”). With Alan Alda who very well took on the Tony Roberts’ type roles in Allen films:

  109. “The casinos were totally Queens,”

    Sheldon Adelson, Steve Wynn, oh wait.

    If the Times considers Queens to be the equivalent to Cleveland, then what’s St. Paul? Nowheresville? Palookaland? Or as Al Smith said in ’28 when running for President, “What states are there west of the Mississippi?”

    It appears to be only a surprise to the likes of Keillor that Trump isn’t in fact an SWPL wannabe.

    “Trump may just not be a good subject for writers, so they wind up projecting a lot onto him.”

    This is an awesome sentence, and may sum up the entire reason why the elites can’t figure him out, as in “Oh come on! There’s gotta be more to him than meets the eye, there’s just gotta!” No, no, there doesn’t have to be. He is what he appears to be.

    Ironically, Keillor’s tone and style while writing about Trump is quite similar to Peggy Noonan. A native New Yorker, Noonan could easily have written this exact same column about Trump, (and she used to wax lyrical about her native city from time to time in just this sort of detail) as she was originally slow to coming around to endorsing him and may have harbored some snobbish elitist opinions regarding his candidacy for a long while, though that does appear to have changed since the early summer.

    • Agree: Forbes
  110. @Lot
    LA Times: Why our poll keeps showing Trump with a small lead when most polls show him behind 4 to 8 points:

    http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-trump-disaffected-voters-20160831-snap-htmlstory.html

    Mostly the poll is more accepting as "likely voters" people who did not vote in prior elections but are adamant they will vote in this one.

    That’s interesting, but do you think they will really vote? It’s a crap shoot.

  111. Trump vs the NY elite/established consensus of acceptable opinion/MSN reminds me of former A’s owner Charles Finley during the early ’70’s. In the 1972 WS, Finley is constantly seen in the stands cheering on his team, passionate, excited, while the likes of established MLB suits Bowie Kuhn, the Reds’s owners and other nameless corporate execs. just really couldn’t stand Charley. And yet, the A’s won (and would repeat in ’73 and ’74).

    Trump is very much in the vein of Charles Finley.

    • Replies: @Marty
    There really is only one thing to say about Finley, which is that he was right about free agency early on: "make them all free agents." By making player free agency only partial each year, the owners ensured that salaries would be needlessly bid up, to the point now where only the upper middle class can afford to attend a game. I visited the Finley farm in La Porte in '69. Nice kids. As a California kid, I couldn't believe how bleak the Midwest sky was.
  112. @Harry Baldwin
    Keillor's audience may have included conservatives before he took to rah-rahing for Clinton in the 1990s. He made it clear that they were not welcome.

    I like a lot of Keillor’s work and support Trump. I don’t particularly like Trump although I bet he’d be fun to play golf with and he seems ok if you can get past the bluster. Like Steve said, too gauche for this east coaster. But I have grown to support the U.S. citizens’ first position after a long time as a WSJ or Ludwig von Mises (so I fancied) free trade uber alles believer.

    I may have followed the evolution of a lot of people my age;

    Daily News sports page and comics as a kid.
    NY Times into teens
    Village Voice late teens
    WSJ as a young professional
    Back to NY Post type to read sports page on way to work on subway, broadsheet too hard to handle in crowd.
    Internet stuff, hey, who is this Steve Sailer guy?

  113. GK said about Trump:
    “The brim shadows your face, which gives a sinister look, as if you’d come to town to announce the closing of the pulp factory. ”

    This from the ugliest guy in show business. If I didn’t know who Garrison Keillor and I saw him on the street, I’d check to see where my children were real quick. Big creepy eyes and a mushed in face. He pretty much looks like Jack Elam after a traffic accident.

    I used to have some connections with the music business, and what I’d heard from musicians who had performed on his show was that he was a very insecure guy wearing a costume of confidence. One described him to me as one of those guys who was never popular in high school, so he spends his life trying to be the guy he never was in high school.

    It’s in this context of insecurity that I view Keillor’s comments about Trump. You see, Keillor honestly sees himself as the voice of flyover America, and to have that role usurped by a New Yorker who lives in a Manhattan apartment that’s decorated like a French palace must be infuriating for him. Of course, Keillor isn’t the voice of flyover America. Never was. Not even close. He’s the voice of middle America in the same way Willa Cather was – as a costume you put on until something better comes along.

    The obvious response from the left would be, “But that’s what Trump is! In spades! He’s a phony!” But Trump doesn’t pretend to be one of us like GK does. Trump tries to connect with us as an American, and he doesn’t do it in the Barrack Obama way – putting on a Kansas accent when he’s in Kansas, and talking black when he’s in New Orleans just a few days later.

    Trump talks like Trump all the time. His views may change, but his persona doesn’t. My dad is 96 years old, and I remember his sour expression 40 years ago when mom used to have Prairie Home Companion on Saturday nights. He hated Garrison Keillor, and Dad is a midwesterner, born and raised. And like most real midwesterners, he hates phonies. I always admired him because of that.

    • Replies: @Ragno

    If I didn’t know who Garrison Keillor and I saw him on the street, I’d check to see where my children were real quick. Big creepy eyes and a mushed in face. He pretty much looks like Jack Elam after a traffic accident.
     
    Do tell.

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/07/20/22/2AB5239800000578-3168660-image-a-1_1437428985295.jpg

    (How people manage to post photos and even video-clips here continues to elude me somehow. Is there an FAQ?)

    , @James O'Meara
    Dude, I just posted this BEFORE reading your comment!

    The boys from MST3k were/are a good index of “college educated” Minnesota SWPLs (as we would say today). Always commented if a movie “only has white people” in it, or black or female “stereotypes.” But one of their funniest riffs was when they started calling Jack Elam’s small town creepy character “Young Garrison Keillor.” [The Girl in Lover's Lane]. Funny, because true.
    , @Mike Zwick
    "This from the ugliest guy in show business. If I didn’t know who Garrison Keillor and I saw him on the street, I’d check to see where my children were real quick. Big creepy eyes and a mushed in face. He pretty much looks like Jack Elam after a traffic accident. "
    One time, Steve Dahl went off on a rant on his radio show about Garrison and likened him to Bazooka Joe from the bubble gum packages.
    , @Desiderius

    I used to have some connections with the music business, and what I’d heard from musicians who had performed on his show was that he was a very insecure guy wearing a costume of confidence. One described him to me as one of those guys who was never popular in high school, so he spends his life trying to be the guy he never was in high school.
     
    Wonder if there's a similar dynamic behind Roger Ebert's seemingly out-of-character political ruminations.
  114. Pop-pyscho analysis by B-list wanna-be’s always, and I mean always, tell more about the wanna-be than the subject.

  115. @Desiderius

    You attract really really good speechwriters who give you Churchillian cadences and toss in quotes from Emerson and Aeschylus and Ecclesiastes.
     
    This age is already stuffed to the gills with Ecclesiastes and it's knowing nihilism.

    A really good speechwriter would be hitting Amos and Hebrews.

    If Rene Girard is right and I increasingly think he was then Hebrews is exactly right as far as biblical wisdom is concerned.

  116. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    You ran into Jews, and they are not like you. Jews didn’t go in for big yachts and a fleet of aircraft — they showed off by way of philanthropy or by raising brilliant offspring. They sympathized with the civil rights movement.

    Keillor is hitting cuckdom levels that shouldn’t even be possible.

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    And where was Keillor when Trump's "brilliant offspring" were wowing the Republican convention?
  117. @Eric Rasmusen
    George W. Bush clearly didn't care about elite opinion, not only despite but because of his aristocratic and Yale background, which I think is the main reason he drove people like Krugman bonkers. Like FDR, his pedigree was so good he could look down on the nouveau elite.

    That was part of it for sure but he father and brothers are both solicitous of elite opinion so I don’t think it can entirely be isolated by that factor. I think there was also the religious conversion factor- evangelical religion truly saved him from personal disaster. It’s noticeable that as his faith seems to have flagged- I think he is even drinking again- his attempts to curry elite opinion have increased.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    It’s noticeable that as his faith seems to have flagged- I think he is even drinking again- his attempts to curry elite opinion have increased.
     
    Laura's always been susceptible to elite (sic) opinion.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    If I were George W. Bush I'd be drinking again too. Anything to keep from being able to clearly focus on the mess I made of my party, my country, and the Middle East. The trillions of dollars wasted, the hundreds of thousands of lives destroyed.
  118. @Buzz Mohawk
    Here Keillor proves he really is the folksy bumpkin he's always pretended to be. His screed is filled with errors only a slow talker could make.

    As Kurt Vonnegut wrote, "You are what you pretend to be."

    Where did Garrison learn about New York, I wonder? From watching TV on a fuzzy screen in Minnesota?

    Somebody should tell him: A lot of people out here got here from somewhere else because they are at the top of their field -- and they don't give a rat's ass what he thinks. (That's the key he's too simple to understand.)

    “How did [he] learn about New York…?”

    From reading just about everything he wrote up until about 1990, the short answer is: The New Yorker magazine…

  119. No surprises in this entry: Garrison Keillor has always been a tin-plated boob. (Ask anybody with the common sense to violently switch the radio dial for 40+ years the very moment the Prairie Home Companion came on the air. Five minutes of Keillor and you’d long for the no-holds-barred audacity of Paul Harvey.)

    Still, he must have had a sleepless night or two in between composing and submitting this op-ed. I mean, if he’s not actually typing out Jews, he’s using the almost-as-bad-if-unauthorized-ahead-of-time Those People. But I’m sure sufficient phone calls were made, and e-mails emailed, to assure Lake Wobegon’s premiere wet blanket that all the germane rabbinical councils have been informed, and have nodded their assent. (Hey, anything to get that ponderous bore off the phone. Did he attack Trump like he was supposed to? Fine, then he did his job. Tell him to go away now.)

    • LOL: vinteuil
  120. Off-topic, but this NYT letter may interest Steve and his readers:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/02/opinion/closing-the-academic-gap.html
    Closing the Academic Gap
    SEPT. 1, 2016
    To the Editor:

    “The Good News About Educational Inequality” (Sunday Review, Aug. 28), on the narrowing of the academic gap between rich and poor children, attributed some of the success to low-income families’ adaptation of parenting practices formerly associated with wealthier families: specifically, the practice of investing more time developing their children’s cognitive skills.

    Not mentioned, but likely also extremely important, is the decrease in the birthrate of lower-income families. Being able to control both the number and spacing of one’s children allows a parent to spend more quality time with a child, focusing on that child’s individual needs. Wealthier families have had fewer children than lower-income families for many years.

    The availability of low-cost pregnancy tests, contraceptives and abortions will help to close the gap even further. And let’s not forget that good prenatal care decreases premature births, which can negatively affect both the physical and mental development of the child.

    SARAH A. BURNETT

    Houston

  121. @Elf Himself

    It’s pretty funny that Keillor thinks Trump and his followers would be dissuaded if only he sneered at their non-SWPLness little more.
     
    Sort of the mirror image of Republicans' quadrennial protest: "We'd have won if only we'd been more vigorous in our rabid right-wing librul-bashing."

    Sort of the mirror image of Republicans’ quadrennial protest: “We’d have won if only we’d been more vigorous in our rabid right-wing librul-bashing.”

    Romney especially was notorious for that. Who can forget that time he breathed fire on poor defenseless Candy Crowley at that debate.

    Amirite?

  122. Yes, Keillor projects quite a bit … he has written and had as thematic elements things that would have gotten anyone associated in any way, shape, or form with the Right cast in the outer darkness a long time ago.

  123. @J1234

    GK said about Trump:
    "The brim shadows your face, which gives a sinister look, as if you'd come to town to announce the closing of the pulp factory. "

     

    This from the ugliest guy in show business. If I didn't know who Garrison Keillor and I saw him on the street, I'd check to see where my children were real quick. Big creepy eyes and a mushed in face. He pretty much looks like Jack Elam after a traffic accident.

    I used to have some connections with the music business, and what I'd heard from musicians who had performed on his show was that he was a very insecure guy wearing a costume of confidence. One described him to me as one of those guys who was never popular in high school, so he spends his life trying to be the guy he never was in high school.

    It's in this context of insecurity that I view Keillor's comments about Trump. You see, Keillor honestly sees himself as the voice of flyover America, and to have that role usurped by a New Yorker who lives in a Manhattan apartment that's decorated like a French palace must be infuriating for him. Of course, Keillor isn't the voice of flyover America. Never was. Not even close. He's the voice of middle America in the same way Willa Cather was - as a costume you put on until something better comes along.

    The obvious response from the left would be, "But that's what Trump is! In spades! He's a phony!" But Trump doesn't pretend to be one of us like GK does. Trump tries to connect with us as an American, and he doesn't do it in the Barrack Obama way - putting on a Kansas accent when he's in Kansas, and talking black when he's in New Orleans just a few days later.

    Trump talks like Trump all the time. His views may change, but his persona doesn't. My dad is 96 years old, and I remember his sour expression 40 years ago when mom used to have Prairie Home Companion on Saturday nights. He hated Garrison Keillor, and Dad is a midwesterner, born and raised. And like most real midwesterners, he hates phonies. I always admired him because of that.

    If I didn’t know who Garrison Keillor and I saw him on the street, I’d check to see where my children were real quick. Big creepy eyes and a mushed in face. He pretty much looks like Jack Elam after a traffic accident.

    Do tell.

    (How people manage to post photos and even video-clips here continues to elude me somehow. Is there an FAQ?)

  124. New York immune system rejected the transplant from Minnesota many years ago. Keillor did not make it in Jewish New York. Keillor must have been traumatized that he tried to make a new life and find solace among Danes in Denmark away from all those Manhattan Jews. He must have been really hurt that was ready to give up on America. Apparently it did not work out. He returned to Minnesota and resurrected his radio show that ostensively was about and for white gentile Americans. His show was the last redoubt – a living skansen museum – of gentile American culture on NPR. What is really behind this article about Trump and Jewish Manhattan? Could it be a criticism against the Jews, those cultured Jews who rejected the aspiring writer and intellectual from Minnesota but de facto accepted the vulgarian Trump? He seems to say that Trump would not make it among white gentile Minnesotans who apparently unlike the Manhattan Jews have higher standards. Without Jews there would be no Trumps in America.

  125. @David
    It's interesting to me how sentimental NPR and its listeners are. Keillor's show has been a sad imitation of itself for at least 20 years and now that he's leaving, they actually plan to continue the show. Why?

    Click or Clack dies and they just keep their show rolling by endless permutations of ancient shows. They even have new sponsors announced by the living guy while the dead one sticks to the old sponsors. Rather creepy.

    Prairie Home Companion has no currency in Manhattan except among those pale spinsters gripping their WNYC tot-bags on the subway. When Garrison made his stand in Manhattan, he swept into stores and restaurants like a flamboyant queen, with an entourage, expecting to be recognized and celebrated. I think it broke his heart that he never was.

    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, "Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion. Some of these people really shouldn't vote because they don't know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed."

    It almost like a literacy test might be in order.

    Some of these people really shouldn’t vote because they don’t know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed.”

    How does Kareem think the last oh, six or seven Presidential elections would have gone if all the voters who didn’t know what the issues are, didn’t vote?

  126. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    As someone from your neck of the woods who lived in the Twin Cities for several years, I think that you're spot on.

    By the way, does I-29 still run right through the stockyards of Sioux City? That was always one smelly stretch of road.

    The stockyards in Sioux City closed in the early 2000s and the John Morrell plant closed about ten years after that. I think the smell finally starting to dissipate.

  127. @Grumpy
    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    Keillor is demonstrating typical Minnesota snobbery here, unintentionally telling us more about his own native habitat than about Trump's.

    There’s something to what you say. Two decades and more ago, Minneapolis had a promotion touting itself as “the Mini-Apple,” as if to suggest that it was a sort of smaller New York – because, of course, New York was so so cosmopolitan and sophisticated, and, why, Minneapolis had its own symphony orchestra, repertory theater, and a couple of art museums, which (the promoters seemed to feel) put it nearly on a par with such cosmopolitanism and sophistication!

    What it also had was a burgeoning rate of violent crime that may indeed have approached or exceeded that of New York before Giuliani. As one long-past December approached its end, the city had experienced nearly a hundred murders year-to-date and the local nightly news reported with bated breath that the death toll was now up to 96…97… – would it make it to 100? It was as if Minneapolis hit 100 murders, then it would truly have made it to the urban “big leagues.”

    • Replies: @Marcus
    Was that why the Mary Tyler Moore Show was set there? Always puzzled me.
    , @Keith Vaz
    Nothing is more parochial and low status than trying to ape a more famous counterpart.
  128. @jon

    I find the the theory that Trump originally ran for president mostly to shut up all the smarty-pants people who said he’d never run to have some plausibility.
     
    Trump registered the "Make America Great Again" trademark back in 2012. He got involved in the whole birther stuff (to no apparent benefit to anything he was doing at the time) back in 2008. And there are video interviews of him talking about a run for the presidency from then back all the way to the '80's. This seems like a thing he had been contemplating forever.

    Those facts are consistent with the theory that he used the “I might run for president” stuff to get attention, but only decided to do it for real when the media relentlessly mocked him for being all talk.

    And let’s be honest, he had earned some degree of mockery for ostentatiously dragging out the will-he-won’t-he stuff for decades. Not unlike every offseason for Brett Favre during the last few years of his career.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Believe whatever you want to. Because the other plausible theory is that he had been contemplating running forever because, you know, he really did think he could win. He's had attention for over 35 yrs he really doesn't have to rely on that kind of bush league thing, ala Ralph Nader; Gary Johnson; William Weld; Ross Perrot or fill in the blank third party third rate candidacies for the presidency.

    Nobody was "endlessly mocking" him about running for decades. He was the one who originally brought it up before anyone else. A case could also be made that since Trump had been actively involved to various degrees in GOP politics since the early '80's (along with his dad serving on Reagan's '80 campaign committee) that Trump isn't the naive novice regarding presidential politics that might be implied in your statement. And of course Trump has either met or personally known many of the major two party candidates for the last thirty-five yrs.

    In other words, your theory would carry a lot more weight IF Trump had actually gone on to run say, a third party candidacy, on his own, self-financing, the whole nine yards. He didn't. He played it smart and actually worked within the traditional two party system to gain the nomination from one of the two established two parties. That would tend to suggest that he's been serious about running for president for decades and now he's read the tea leaves and figured out that '16 is his best opportunity to not only run and win the nomination of one of the two major parties but to actually have a legitimate chance of winning the White House.
  129. I haven’t read the comments yet; usually, I do before leaving one. But I can’t resist.

    I first heard Keillor many years ago on NPR. His feigned down home style was uninteresting and boring to me. Thereafter, the only times I listened to him was when I worked out at an odd time, and his was the only non-music program I could find. He used factoids and a sonorous voice to give his performance gravitas.

    But, with this article on Trump, it is now perfectly obvious: Keillor took his comedy/monologues seriously as social commentary. He’s coming out of the closet as an earnest pretender. Of course, he’s exactly the same as he always was: pretentious, lightweight on facts, and above all, boring, boring, boring.

  130. @J1234

    GK said about Trump:
    "The brim shadows your face, which gives a sinister look, as if you'd come to town to announce the closing of the pulp factory. "

     

    This from the ugliest guy in show business. If I didn't know who Garrison Keillor and I saw him on the street, I'd check to see where my children were real quick. Big creepy eyes and a mushed in face. He pretty much looks like Jack Elam after a traffic accident.

    I used to have some connections with the music business, and what I'd heard from musicians who had performed on his show was that he was a very insecure guy wearing a costume of confidence. One described him to me as one of those guys who was never popular in high school, so he spends his life trying to be the guy he never was in high school.

    It's in this context of insecurity that I view Keillor's comments about Trump. You see, Keillor honestly sees himself as the voice of flyover America, and to have that role usurped by a New Yorker who lives in a Manhattan apartment that's decorated like a French palace must be infuriating for him. Of course, Keillor isn't the voice of flyover America. Never was. Not even close. He's the voice of middle America in the same way Willa Cather was - as a costume you put on until something better comes along.

    The obvious response from the left would be, "But that's what Trump is! In spades! He's a phony!" But Trump doesn't pretend to be one of us like GK does. Trump tries to connect with us as an American, and he doesn't do it in the Barrack Obama way - putting on a Kansas accent when he's in Kansas, and talking black when he's in New Orleans just a few days later.

    Trump talks like Trump all the time. His views may change, but his persona doesn't. My dad is 96 years old, and I remember his sour expression 40 years ago when mom used to have Prairie Home Companion on Saturday nights. He hated Garrison Keillor, and Dad is a midwesterner, born and raised. And like most real midwesterners, he hates phonies. I always admired him because of that.

    Dude, I just posted this BEFORE reading your comment!

    The boys from MST3k were/are a good index of “college educated” Minnesota SWPLs (as we would say today). Always commented if a movie “only has white people” in it, or black or female “stereotypes.” But one of their funniest riffs was when they started calling Jack Elam’s small town creepy character “Young Garrison Keillor.” [The Girl in Lover’s Lane]. Funny, because true.

    • Replies: @J1234
    http://newshour-tc.pbs.org/newshour/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/gk-beard-1976.jpg

    http://movie-dude.co.uk/Jack%20Elam%20%20The%20Way%20West%20(1967).jpg

    Worse than Jack Elam, Keillor reminds me of those high minded and self-congratulatory graduate students my wife knew when working on her doctorate in Madison, WI in the 1980's and 90's. Wisconsin and southern Minnesota were filled with 'em. The guys with the beards and the girls with the peasant dresses and the really really bad folk music and yechh!

    Say what you want about Bryant Gumbel; like my dad, he was spot on about GK almost 30 years ago:

    Don't look for Cher or Garrison Keillor to appear on NBC's "Today" show anytime soon. Co-host Bryant Gumbel, in an interview published in Us magazine, mentioned Keillor as being foremost among the "real jerks" he's had to interview. "I feel sorry for him because he has such a glorified opinion of himself," Gumbel said.
     

    https://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P2-3900154.html
  131. @Bee
    I don't know, Steven, I think Fred Trump showed plenty of German-American pride at that KKK rally in 1927.

    You mean American pride: the strongly nativist 2nd KKK was involved in the suppression of German culture during WWI.

  132. @Crawfurdmuir
    There's something to what you say. Two decades and more ago, Minneapolis had a promotion touting itself as "the Mini-Apple," as if to suggest that it was a sort of smaller New York - because, of course, New York was so so cosmopolitan and sophisticated, and, why, Minneapolis had its own symphony orchestra, repertory theater, and a couple of art museums, which (the promoters seemed to feel) put it nearly on a par with such cosmopolitanism and sophistication!

    What it also had was a burgeoning rate of violent crime that may indeed have approached or exceeded that of New York before Giuliani. As one long-past December approached its end, the city had experienced nearly a hundred murders year-to-date and the local nightly news reported with bated breath that the death toll was now up to 96...97... - would it make it to 100? It was as if Minneapolis hit 100 murders, then it would truly have made it to the urban "big leagues."

    Was that why the Mary Tyler Moore Show was set there? Always puzzled me.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    No connection. The Mary Tyler Moore show aired 1970-1977.

    I saw MTM on Larry King's show many years ago and he asked her this very same question, and her answer was that at the time the MTM show began, nearly every tv show at that time was set in NY or LA and they wanted to do something different. Somebody connected to the show (I cannot remember who) suggested Minneapolis because he was familiar with it (I think he may have been from there originally) so Mary and Grant Tinker hopped on a plane to check it out and loved it, so Minneapolis became the setting for the MTM show.

     

    https://www.datalounge.com/thread/11896021-why-did-they-set-the-mary-tyler-moore-show-in-minneapolis-
  133. Keillor should stick to comedy writing because he’s got the politics of a retarded bag of hammers.

  134. @Jack Highlands
    Keillor elevates Democrat status to a substitute religion. For him, there are only two kinds of Americans: Dems and Reps, polarized like Europe in the Thirty Years War. Of course both sides are White, because all the NAMS he got on PHC were White-presenting.

    Democrianiaty appears to substitute in Keillor's brain for the Lutheranism he loved to harmlessly insert in PHC, but which he must know in his heart has long gone daft, literally far over the rainbow.

    For a guy whose radio plays are entertaining, his prose on a written page in front of me is brutally simplistic - folk Manicheanism. I've never been able to finish reading one page of it without revulsion.

    Democrianiaty appears to substitute in Keillor’s brain for the Lutheranism he loved to harmlessly insert in PHC, but which he must know in his heart has long gone daft, literally far over the rainbow.

    Whether Keillor was ever a Lutheran I do not know. He was born into a Plymouth Brethren family, and I think it scarred him. The Plymouth Brethren are a particularly austere bunch of Protestants. Aleister Crowley was also brought up in that sect, and his entire career thereafter was one of spectacular apostasy. I suspect that Keillor has been rebelling against his upbringing for similar reasons, though in his own “Minnesota nice” fashion.

  135. Holy Christ, I just realized he’s trying to channel Hannibal Lecter! “You know what you look like to me, with your good bag and your cheap shoes? You look like a rube. A well scrubbed, hustling rube with a little taste. Good nutrition’s given you some length of bone, but you’re not more than one generation from poor white trash, are you, Agent Starling? And that accent you’ve tried so desperately to shed: pure West Virginia. What is your father, dear? Is he a coal miner? Does he stink of the lamp? You know how quickly the boys found you… all those tedious sticky fumblings in the back seats of cars… while you could only dream of getting out… getting anywhere… getting all the way to the FBI.”

  136. Sorry ot
    But I’ve been thinking about the fact that encouraging women to enter the workplace in mass number had the same effect on wages as immigration. Apparently. Over time tptb decided that wasn’t enough so they opened the borders as well. Now it will be robots to lower wages more.

    I hate to be so pessimistic but it looks like industrialization just naturally leads this way. The ever going search for lower costs, even the so called socialists play the game.

    Is it possible to have industrialization in some sort of equilibrium with human nature?

  137. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Trump vs the NY elite/established consensus of acceptable opinion/MSN reminds me of former A's owner Charles Finley during the early '70's. In the 1972 WS, Finley is constantly seen in the stands cheering on his team, passionate, excited, while the likes of established MLB suits Bowie Kuhn, the Reds's owners and other nameless corporate execs. just really couldn't stand Charley. And yet, the A's won (and would repeat in '73 and '74).

    Trump is very much in the vein of Charles Finley.

    There really is only one thing to say about Finley, which is that he was right about free agency early on: “make them all free agents.” By making player free agency only partial each year, the owners ensured that salaries would be needlessly bid up, to the point now where only the upper middle class can afford to attend a game. I visited the Finley farm in La Porte in ’69. Nice kids. As a California kid, I couldn’t believe how bleak the Midwest sky was.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    The A's had some cool uniforms for their time. Imagine getting future HOFers Reggie Jackson; Catfish Hunter; and Rollie Fingers. While its entirely possible that my personal favorite, Dave Kingman, could be a lost cause for future Cooperstown induction, one could make a case for the likes of 3B Sal Bando; OF Joe Rudi; possibly Vida Blue. I believe Rudi's fielding stats are in a similar vein as 2B Bobby Grich (a perennial Bill James favorite) so perhaps the powers that be will open the doors and let Rudi slide thru. Of course, Vida Blue could always be inducted as well.

    But the A's of the early/mid. '70's were great teams. Proving that you don't need "team chemistry" and being the best of chums to, you know, actually win WS.

    For that matter, Charles Finley should be inducted into Cooperstown. Only 20th century owner to win three consecutive WS whose teams weren't in the Pinstripes.
  138. Is it true that Trump meditates and kayaks?

  139. @David
    It's interesting to me how sentimental NPR and its listeners are. Keillor's show has been a sad imitation of itself for at least 20 years and now that he's leaving, they actually plan to continue the show. Why?

    Click or Clack dies and they just keep their show rolling by endless permutations of ancient shows. They even have new sponsors announced by the living guy while the dead one sticks to the old sponsors. Rather creepy.

    Prairie Home Companion has no currency in Manhattan except among those pale spinsters gripping their WNYC tot-bags on the subway. When Garrison made his stand in Manhattan, he swept into stores and restaurants like a flamboyant queen, with an entourage, expecting to be recognized and celebrated. I think it broke his heart that he never was.

    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, "Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion. Some of these people really shouldn't vote because they don't know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed."

    It almost like a literacy test might be in order.

    I heard that in passing by my radio in the kitchen this morning. Didn’t know it was Jabbar.

    They stopped playing Car Talk on WNYC, just like they stopped playing Danny Stiles’ Music Museum (they still do The Big Broadcast Sunday Nights on WFUV). That went on a couple of years after he died.

    If you listen to enough NPR and are a noticer you just get conservative. And if you read the WSJ enough you morph from agreeing with them to questioning them to alt right.

  140. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    From my time in the Twin Cities, the people there were always miffed (as much a Minnesotan can show such things) about being essentially forgotten. They felt (and were, in fact, correct) that the Twin Cities was a top-tier city on par with Seattle, San Diego, Portland, etc. Yet, nobody outside of the upper Midwest ever mentioned or thought about the Twin Cities while the country did have a feeling for other similar cities.

    In essence, Mpls-St. Paul is the pretty girl who never gets asked to dance, and she can't understand why. Thus the frustration.

    So where does passive-aggressive anger come from? Well, to continue my little analogy, Twin Cities folk worry that they don't get asked out because they're terrible in bed, i.e. a pretty face and sweet body but boring as hell.

    That all being said, I liked the Twin Cities. If not for God-awful weather, it'd be a great place to live. Also, it has the quintessential song written about it. How many cities outside of NYC and LA have that.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FED6AHlXXaA

    Good album but I prefer Tim and even Hootenanny.

  141. @Lot

    the old money German-Jewish high society who wouldn’t let Eastern European Jews into their country clubs because of their cruder manners.
     
    This is an interesting topic. "German" and more properly here "Anglicized" Jews are those Ashkenazi that have been culturally assimilated, speak German or English as their first language, usually for generations, and are mostly ignorant or even disdainful of some of the practices of our bumpkin ancestors and distant relatives in Eastern Europe and Israel. It is not really just "old money high society" that is not fond of their "cruder manners," but the large respectable majority.

    Germanization was a process that extended far outside the borders of modern Germany. All over Eastern Europe, covering modern Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and parts of Ukraine and Romania, the more urban and intelligent Jews moved to the German-speaking cities and adopted increasing amounts of German language and culture.

    Just to give an example of this, John von Neumann went to a German-language and style high school in Budapest, run by the Lutheran Church, but with a majority Jewish student body. From there he went to the German University of Berlin and the German-Swiss ETH Zurich before settling in Princeton.

    As in greater Germany for several centuries, it really only takes one or two generations raised in secular America to join the larger Anglicized US Jewish population, so there really is no longer meaningful distinction in New York society between the descendants of Jews from Berlin who came in 1852 and Jews from Kiev who came in 1907. Nonetheless, new immigrants from Russia sometimes just can't fit in a place like the New York Times.

    I worked with a native New Yorker – known globally for his scientific research – whose father was a Russian Jewish immigrant who worked as a furrier. When our organization hired a new president who was also a native New Yorker but from a German-Jewish background, my friend was not happy. He considered German-Jews to be uppity and complained that they looked down their noses at Russian Jews like himself – so it may take another generation or two to overcome that brand of snobbery, even here, and even among the highly educated.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    How old was this well known native New Yorker researcher, and how long ago did this occur? In my interactions, there has been little to no tension among the descendants of German Jews and East European Jews. There aren't even many pure German Jews or pure descendants of old New York Sephardic families left.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Agreed. A friend of my father's stock came from Philadelphia and could trace their lineage back to at least the 1860's if not earlier. They made it clear that when their relatives first arrived in the US, they spoke German as a first language and not Yiddish (which was traditionally one way to tell a German Jewish immigrant from Eastern European Jewish immigrant). Economist Thomas Sowell in his book Ethnic America chapter on Jewish Americans made clear that certain slurs originated not from WASPs but from NY's established German-Jewish community toward the Johnny Come Latelies from Eastern Europe. It would also be interesting to subdivide the Ashkenazi if it can be done, between those originally from Germany and those from Russia/Poland to determine which group has the higher IQ of the two groups. One would tend to speculate that its the German-Jewish quotient that has the higher IQ of the two since Germany experienced industrialization centuries earlier than Russia and the German Jews that immigrated to the US during the 18th and early/mid 19th centuries were much more secular in outlook as well as…more advanced in their outlook/thinking (the Reformed and Conservative movements originated in Germany after all while Russia and Poland's Jewish communities for the most part stayed Orthodox).
  142. @Clifford Brown
    Garrison Keillor is projecting a bit here. Mr. Lake Wobegone lived part-time in Manhattan for decades and likely never quite fit in on the Upper West Side.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1996/11/29/arts/manhattan-as-a-bit-of-prairie.html

    As for Queens, remember on Seinfeld when George was unemployed and he had to stay with his Swedish parents in Queens for a few weeks?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3AMRHXMfjs

    Costanzas were supposed to be Italian. Ever wonder why there are so many TV characters who are supposed to be “Italian” but are Jewish? The Costanzas, Bea Arthur as Dorothy on the Golden Girls, Carla on Cheers, etc..

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Because the Seinfelds were already Jewish, so you couldn't have BOTH leads be Jewish.
    , @syonredux

    Costanzas were supposed to be Italian. Ever wonder why there are so many TV characters who are supposed to be “Italian” but are Jewish? The Costanzas, Bea Arthur as Dorothy on the Golden Girls, Carla on Cheers, etc..
     
    It's also interesting how well it works when Italians play Jews/Jews play Italians: Abe Vigoda, Paul Giamatti, John Turturro, James Caan, etc.
  143. @Alec Leamas
    If Trump was ever motivated by winning the respect of the Times and urbane Jews he would have made a series of different choices in life more to their tastes and probably would have stayed clear of Atlantic City altogether. His style and aesthetic is more reminiscent of what blue collar Italian Americans would do if they came into money. His persona would have been so different that he probably would not have been a household name.

    Being so obviously status-conscious, it probably escapes Keillor that the Trump persona is intentionally in opposition to the swells who think they are the gatekeepers and taste-makers.

    The public Trump of the late 1970’s to the late 1990’s was far less abrasive than the Trump of the 21st century. He was more like a calm, smooth talking, extroverted Scots-Irishman in those early years than an Italian from the Neighborhood. He appealed to a much wider cross section than the more abrasive modern Trump, who is a tad less in-your-face than the Bronx-born, Russian Jew talk radio host, Michael Savage.

  144. @Anonymous

    You ran into Jews, and they are not like you. Jews didn't go in for big yachts and a fleet of aircraft — they showed off by way of philanthropy or by raising brilliant offspring. They sympathized with the civil rights movement.
     
    Keillor is hitting cuckdom levels that shouldn't even be possible.

    And where was Keillor when Trump’s “brilliant offspring” were wowing the Republican convention?

  145. Let’s see Keillor do a similar job on someone like Charles Schumer, portraying him as being desperate to be accepted by the WASP establishment, still bitter about being snubbed by blonde schiksas at Harvard, etc.

  146. @J1234

    GK said about Trump:
    "The brim shadows your face, which gives a sinister look, as if you'd come to town to announce the closing of the pulp factory. "

     

    This from the ugliest guy in show business. If I didn't know who Garrison Keillor and I saw him on the street, I'd check to see where my children were real quick. Big creepy eyes and a mushed in face. He pretty much looks like Jack Elam after a traffic accident.

    I used to have some connections with the music business, and what I'd heard from musicians who had performed on his show was that he was a very insecure guy wearing a costume of confidence. One described him to me as one of those guys who was never popular in high school, so he spends his life trying to be the guy he never was in high school.

    It's in this context of insecurity that I view Keillor's comments about Trump. You see, Keillor honestly sees himself as the voice of flyover America, and to have that role usurped by a New Yorker who lives in a Manhattan apartment that's decorated like a French palace must be infuriating for him. Of course, Keillor isn't the voice of flyover America. Never was. Not even close. He's the voice of middle America in the same way Willa Cather was - as a costume you put on until something better comes along.

    The obvious response from the left would be, "But that's what Trump is! In spades! He's a phony!" But Trump doesn't pretend to be one of us like GK does. Trump tries to connect with us as an American, and he doesn't do it in the Barrack Obama way - putting on a Kansas accent when he's in Kansas, and talking black when he's in New Orleans just a few days later.

    Trump talks like Trump all the time. His views may change, but his persona doesn't. My dad is 96 years old, and I remember his sour expression 40 years ago when mom used to have Prairie Home Companion on Saturday nights. He hated Garrison Keillor, and Dad is a midwesterner, born and raised. And like most real midwesterners, he hates phonies. I always admired him because of that.

    “This from the ugliest guy in show business. If I didn’t know who Garrison Keillor and I saw him on the street, I’d check to see where my children were real quick. Big creepy eyes and a mushed in face. He pretty much looks like Jack Elam after a traffic accident. ”
    One time, Steve Dahl went off on a rant on his radio show about Garrison and likened him to Bazooka Joe from the bubble gum packages.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Keillor has a face made for radio. And what do you know, he made 90% of his career in radio.
  147. Keith Vaz [AKA "The Greatest Man"] says:
    @Crawfurdmuir
    There's something to what you say. Two decades and more ago, Minneapolis had a promotion touting itself as "the Mini-Apple," as if to suggest that it was a sort of smaller New York - because, of course, New York was so so cosmopolitan and sophisticated, and, why, Minneapolis had its own symphony orchestra, repertory theater, and a couple of art museums, which (the promoters seemed to feel) put it nearly on a par with such cosmopolitanism and sophistication!

    What it also had was a burgeoning rate of violent crime that may indeed have approached or exceeded that of New York before Giuliani. As one long-past December approached its end, the city had experienced nearly a hundred murders year-to-date and the local nightly news reported with bated breath that the death toll was now up to 96...97... - would it make it to 100? It was as if Minneapolis hit 100 murders, then it would truly have made it to the urban "big leagues."

    Nothing is more parochial and low status than trying to ape a more famous counterpart.

  148. Does Garrison Keillor find it weird that Andrew Zimmern came all the way from New York and hit the big time in Minneapolis?

  149. @Grumpy
    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    Keillor is demonstrating typical Minnesota snobbery here, unintentionally telling us more about his own native habitat than about Trump's.

    The refugee resettlement racketeers think a lot of the Twin Cities.

    Apparently the Somalian tribes have mixed emotions about the place.

  150. @Dave Pinsen
    I interviewed for a job once at Seligman Funds. Offices had a very sedate, old money vibe. Which wasn't common in my experience, even among other firms with similarly long histories.

    Curiously, so did I once interview there (early-mid ’90s)–with the same impression, though I’d describe that very sedate, old money vibe as ‘well-worn’ heels. Living on a reputation that was running on fumes.

  151. Clearly, contra Keillor, Trump’s persona is highly Jewish in affect.

    In contrast to the last New York-identified presidents, TR and FDR, who embodied the manners and mores of the old WASP elite.

  152. @The Last Real Calvinist
    I've read the first three or four of Keillor's novels, and quite liked them when I was younger.

    But Keillor's been doing his schtick all these years at least in part to win the approval of the annointed -- it's blinded him to much, and held him back from becoming a lasting novelist.

    After his first novel, aren’t the rest just riffs on the same idea–a mockery of provincialism. I read his second, and it was just more of the same. Like most writers, he only had one idea–many stories, but one idea.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Like most writers, he only had one idea–many stories, but one idea."

    Keillor has a lot of stories, though. His fertility in coming up with new stories is impressive.

  153. @Former Darfur
    A veritable shitload of songs were written by Jews. It's almost as if they are on the average more verbally facile than other groups.

    In the so called Great American Songbook era, in which hundreds of stage and movie musicals and similar productions largely generated the songs people like Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald sang, out of about fifteen writers (lyricists and composers) who were prominent about three or four were not Jewish. The early part of the rock era featured a lot of songs written by Jewish writers as well, such as Leiber and Stoller, Goffin and King, Barry Goldberg, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry, Carole Bayer Sager, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil.

    Of course several rock stars were Jews, Dylan, Lou Reed, Joey Ramone, or Jews were widely considered the driving force in the band or were behind the scenes "gurus" or "Svengalis".

    Leiber and Stoller

    I was mildly shocked when I found out who wrote “Hound Dog.” It really seemed like it must have had its origins in old Negro folk music (especially the original version).

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    The famous divorce attorney Raoul Felder's brother was songwriter Doc Pomus. Doc Pomus wrote or co-wrote Save The Last Dance For Me,Viva Las Vegas, This Magic Moment, Little Sister, and Turn Me Loose. He introduced Lou Reed to the music industry. Doc was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992, a year after his death.
  154. @k-hole kaitlin
    Garrison Keillor did more to preserve and venerate white American culture than Trump has ever done

    Dude, you misspelled your handle. The first letter should be an “a”. Thanks for playing.

    • Replies: @anon
    I was thinking 3-hole
  155. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Trump has been doing his good friend Joan Rivers' shtick this whole time, I don't know why nobody gets that.

    She called Michelle a tranny and was dead within a week. "Just sayin."

    Trump has been doing his good friend Joan Rivers’ shtick this whole time, I don’t know why nobody gets that.

    I noticed this ages ago. Trump doesn’t do (channel) Rivers all the time but you can see it sometimes. I am pretty sure Joan Rivers was non-PC and a bit right wing. She made me laugh in the 1980s when I would see her on TV. I classify Trump and Rivers as old school New Yorkers.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Trump and Joan Rivers have similar tastes in home decorating. Joan loved making money and loved spending it.
    , @dcite
    Joan died a martyr, so i call her St. Joan.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    Joan Rivers had a NYC pistol permit. She was no liberal.
  156. @Flip
    The Tribune has moved left in the last year or two.

    That recently?

    Or just further left…

    • Replies: @Flip
    Further left. There has been a change in ownership and editorial staff and the articles are a lot more hostile to white males. I've stopped taking the print version and just read it online.
  157. “I don’t actually think that it took Donald Trump until age 30 to learn about Jews.”

    Correct. Here’s Donald at a Bar Mitzvah with his school chums in 1959.

    I could be wrong, but I suspect Trump would be the president who had the most Jewish friends growing up.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "I could be wrong, but I suspect Trump would be the president who had the most Jewish friends growing up."

    Could be.

    Was JFK's neighborhood growing up pretty Jewish?

    Most recent Presidents grew up in neighborhoods that were either pretty rural or downscale (Eisenhower, Nixon, Carter, etc, or pretty WASP old money).

  158. @PiltdownMan
    Nobody in Manhattan even cares who Garrison Keillor is, or where St. Paul is.

    And nobody in Queens even knows.

    I'm not trying to be dismissive or catty, I'm just trying to convey my sense of what preoccupies New York City residents.

    Although I’ve lived in NYC going on 30 years (IOW, non-native), I discovered Keillor when I lived in Denver. I doubt I’ve ever heard Keillor’s name mentioned since living here. That’s not dispositive of NYC as a whole, but more akin to a curiosity or a triviality. Whatever Queens means to NYC, it’s certainly more than Keillor’s satire of bumpkin provincialism.

  159. Some iSteve bait from the pages of the Swarthmore Daily Gazette. As you predicted earlier, the war on privilege isn’t working out too well for the Jews.

    Basically to make a long story short, someone spray painted a swastika in the library the other day, and some liberal jew uses this as an opportunity to vent.

    daily.swarthmore.edu/2016/09/01/37672/

    • Replies: @anon22

    " As you predicted earlier, the war on privilege isn’t working out too well for the Jews."
     
    because jews are the ones that have the real privilege?
  160. @David
    It's interesting to me how sentimental NPR and its listeners are. Keillor's show has been a sad imitation of itself for at least 20 years and now that he's leaving, they actually plan to continue the show. Why?

    Click or Clack dies and they just keep their show rolling by endless permutations of ancient shows. They even have new sponsors announced by the living guy while the dead one sticks to the old sponsors. Rather creepy.

    Prairie Home Companion has no currency in Manhattan except among those pale spinsters gripping their WNYC tot-bags on the subway. When Garrison made his stand in Manhattan, he swept into stores and restaurants like a flamboyant queen, with an entourage, expecting to be recognized and celebrated. I think it broke his heart that he never was.

    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, "Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion. Some of these people really shouldn't vote because they don't know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed."

    It almost like a literacy test might be in order.

    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, “Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion. Some of these people really shouldn’t vote because they don’t know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed.”

    Yo, Kareem. Did you publicly recommend that the denizens of Philly not vote in the last two Presidential elections?

    • Replies: @anon22

    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, “Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion"
     
    do pretentiousness?
  161. @The Last Real Calvinist
    I've read the first three or four of Keillor's novels, and quite liked them when I was younger.

    But Keillor's been doing his schtick all these years at least in part to win the approval of the annointed -- it's blinded him to much, and held him back from becoming a lasting novelist.

    “Schtick” is exactly the right word for Keillor’s act…all his stuff is the same, kind of a Prairie Vaudeville act. That act gets boring fast even if you like it…

  162. I don’t know, Steven, I think Fred Trump showed plenty of German-American pride at that KKK rally in 1927.

    Emmitt Till’s daddy murdered Emmitt Till’s mommy. He also murdered at least two women in Europe, one of whom he raped. Or maybe I have that backwards, he might’ve raped two women in Europe, one of whom he murdered. Either way, the army hanged him for it.

    Since we’re on the subject of fathers…

  163. Garrison is a national treasure, but he’s also a professional Keilor.

    His hit piece is signaling all frustrations and fear that Manhattanites stoically had to endure during the decades of Trump’s Clan domination.

    The latest example of that suffering is Stanley Stewart , your regular octogenarian from Queens.

    After 53 years of living in fear that Trump’s vengeful apparatus could destroy him for his only crime of being a justice-for-y’all kind of person, Mr. Stewart was finally able to share with us about the all emotional pain he experienced under the reign of one of the most despicable landlords of darkness and his vile Aryan spawn who just watched the horror without saying a single word.

    Yes my friends, Donald was not only Schicklgruber’s silent partner, but his willing executioner as well!

    And before you start meditating about what took Stanley so long to reveal the truth, ask yourself one thing:

    It was 1963 AD, and the City of The Five Boroughs was better known as Birmingham on the Hudson.

    It’s not that a social justice-conscious tandem made of the banker’s grandaughter Dorothy Schiff and a communist James Wechsler had owned/edited the New York Post at that time, so Stanley could have just casually walked in their reporter’s room to Urbi et Orbi denounce a racist undoings of the Gruesome Twosome.

    So,what in a world, a single son of Shem could have a done against an omnipotent conglomerate of Drumpf’s banks, media, real estate, and bought politicians ?

    As Leonard used to sing ; First We Take Manhattan, than We Take Jamaica Estates.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/donald-trump-dad-don-rent-n-s-1963-article-1.2774947

  164. @Lot
    LA Times: Why our poll keeps showing Trump with a small lead when most polls show him behind 4 to 8 points:

    http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-trump-disaffected-voters-20160831-snap-htmlstory.html

    Mostly the poll is more accepting as "likely voters" people who did not vote in prior elections but are adamant they will vote in this one.

    “Likely voters” are usually determined by several subjective questions used to determine the likelihood of the respondent actually voting–but that questioning is done for all for all respondents that are among “registered voters.”

    But the number and content of the questions will be a part of the ‘secret sauce’ of opinion polling–and different polling organizations will have different approaches.

    In the end, polling results are still subjective judgments–not objective science.

  165. Yes “philanthropy,” many a Jewish conman has pointed to his massive contributions to Jewish orgs to garner sympathy after the SEC comes calling.

    I would really love to see a detailed article or study on where Jewish philanthropy goes. How much goes to Jews, vs. not, how much goes to non-whites, how much goes to foreigners, etc.

    But in the meantime, I think we can do some reading between the lines on our own, sort of like we can gather that very, very few Jews marry blacks.

    • Replies: @Honorary Thief
    The lines about how virtuous the Jews are are truly nauseating. It's one thing to avoid antagonizing the Jews. That's just prudent. It's quite another to slavishly suck up to them, especially when you have nothing to gain by doing so.
  166. @David
    It's interesting to me how sentimental NPR and its listeners are. Keillor's show has been a sad imitation of itself for at least 20 years and now that he's leaving, they actually plan to continue the show. Why?

    Click or Clack dies and they just keep their show rolling by endless permutations of ancient shows. They even have new sponsors announced by the living guy while the dead one sticks to the old sponsors. Rather creepy.

    Prairie Home Companion has no currency in Manhattan except among those pale spinsters gripping their WNYC tot-bags on the subway. When Garrison made his stand in Manhattan, he swept into stores and restaurants like a flamboyant queen, with an entourage, expecting to be recognized and celebrated. I think it broke his heart that he never was.

    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, "Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion. Some of these people really shouldn't vote because they don't know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed."

    It almost like a literacy test might be in order.

    Some of these people really shouldn’t vote because they don’t know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed.”

    It almost like a literacy test might be in order.

    A test to see if the people, or some people, are ‘better informed’? Who decides that?

    No doubt the losing side always complains about the ignorance of those on the winning side. “If only they were better informed, we wouldn’t have lost.”

  167. @Pat Casey
    Who is the Sage of Minnesota please. But that's funny you say. My Dad's an old DC politico, GOP. And he's from Minnesota. I got the inside scoop about the hilarious rat-fucking episode the day it went down.

    The background. Some Cruz PAC put out an ad that used a pin-up of Trumps wife. Then Trump goes, "Be careful, or I'll spill the beans on Heidi." That of course means Heidi's been doing something she's not supposed to be doing, and what she wasn't supposed to be doing is turning into a man, since that's what the actual photo of her face Trump next tweeted out truly looks like. And Trump wasn't done. The very next day is when the National Enquirer story came out about Cruz'a five affairs and quoted Trump's man Roger Stone.

    http://gawker.com/ted-cruz-implies-hed-fuck-a-rat-as-long-as-it-wasnt-don-1767113389

    Addressing the issue, mind you the issue of he himself reportedly having sex with several other than Heidi, this is what popped into Cruz's mind:

    "Roger Stone is a man for whom a term was coined for copulating with a rodent. Well let me be clear: Donald Trump may be a rat, but I have no desire to copulate with him. And this garbage does not belong in politics."

    See what he accidentally did all over the place there? He says Stone is known to fuck rodents. Then, he wants to "be clear": Donald is a rodent he's a rat: yes, Cruz says Roger Stone has bestiality with Donald Trump because The Donald is a rodent rat. That's literally unfathomably disgusting BUT: "I have no desire to copulate with him." I mean you can't make that up.

    Now this is why his mind did that. First of all Stone is not a ratfucker. He's the guy who for fifty years has been calling people ratfuckers. So Cruz lied there. Second, if you go back to that ugly picture of Heidi that Trump tweeted, the caption on it reads "A picture says a thousand words." That was a sharper touch than anyone knew, because Trump made sure Cruz received at the time of that tweet a one word message just for him; RATFUCKER. Trump called Heidi a rat, and made Cruz look at her when she looked like one, to add injury to the insult you would say.

    Walk through it one more time. "Roger Stone is a man for whom a term was coined for copulating with a rodent." Wrong: Roger Stone is laughing at you for copulating with a rodent. "Well let me be clear: Donald Trump may be a rat." Wrong: Donald Trump said your wife is a nasty looking rat. "but I have no desire to copulate with him." True: but only because you probably don't have any desire to copulate with your wife anymore either. "And this garbage does not belong in politics." Correct: because you actually did not just start the garbage.

    And I'm pretty sure they knew they could hit him that hard cause they had on good authority them affairs were true, and that he was gonna be on the defensive inside his chest. Sage of Minnesota didn't say any of that, ya got it?

    I have no idea what you meant in this post.

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    I see that. I thought the top said Trump has Very Bad Mouth. That reeled my mind to ratfuckers. Also I never heard of this guy and didn't know he was a sage in minnesota initially.
  168. @South Texas Guy
    I just quickly looked it up, and holy crap! Keillor was right. A veritable shit load of Christmas songs were written by jews.

    And to get back to the topic, my favorite FDR quote (not a fan, but I like the feeling behind it), was, in response to his critics, "I welcome their hatred." I don't think Trump gives too much of a damn about what people say about him. That's not true of the past four-plus decades of major republicans (Reagan may be an exception), and that's why so many got on the Trump train.

    Yes, E. Michael Jones published an article on Jewish Christmas music:. “White Christmas Subversion” on his Culture Wars website. Jones is a traditionalist Catholic, and is SPLC-certified as a Hater.

    A Brand You Can Trust!

  169. @Harry Baldwin
    Keillor's audience may have included conservatives before he took to rah-rahing for Clinton in the 1990s. He made it clear that they were not welcome.

    That’s when I stopped listening. As they told Linda Rondstat after she got all preachy at a concert, “Shut up, and sing”.

  170. Look, a people can dominate production of what we see pouring out of the entertainment biz, or be well-known as tasteful.

    But not both.

  171. @Dahlia
    "Trump may just not be a good subject for writers, so they wind up projecting a lot onto him."

    That's too bad because he's fabulous.

    Is it that hard to understand or appreciate that someone can have rare, needed virtues despite being tacky?

    And he's so funny, too! During the primary debates, I accidentally landed on the floor from one particularly hysterical laughing fit. After that, I made sure to have the oversized sofa all to myself to lie on, go crazy on...

    Feel so sorry for all the writers and serious people who cannot enjoy such pleasure and, indeed, are in pain!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShZ6eCaZ_Bc

    The media reaction to Trump reminds me a lot of the media reaction to Palin. In both cases:

    a. There is plenty to criticize, and plenty of reasons not to want them as president or VP.

    b. A lot of the actual reaction and much of the criticism comes down to style–wrong class markers, describing policies in the wrong words, wrong accent, etc.

    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    a. There is plenty to criticize, and plenty of reasons not to want them as president or VP.

    Compared with the alternative?

    Which cave have you been living in.
  172. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Pat Casey

    As Kurt Vonnegut wrote, “You are what you pretend to be.”
     
    Nice Buzz, I knew someone had to have said that better than Sartre but I don't read Vonnegut. But, I like Joyce's better, "We live by the stories we tell ourselves." Actually I think that's so true it's metaphysical. And I'll tell ya, this is why I don't agree we pretend to be anybody: because I have pretended to be someone, when I was drunk at bars havin a hoary time with strangers I knew I didn't exactly respect for some reason. And you feel terrible about it the next day, its exactly like not feeling like yourself.

    Then I remember when Charlie Rose asked a slowed down Hunter S. Thompson if he had created an identity to write by, Thompson was stumped for like fifteen seconds and he gradually starts motioning his hands molding a round figure and goes, "If I had..... somehow....crafted....that....I.. I think that would be too much credit." And of course you can barely hear him mumble "credit," as though he didn't even care about actually making the whole point of that painstaking cogitation he accomplished.

    I read that Jewish bumpkin and can tell exactly what he is: only worth slaying. What I want to know about a pro writer like that though is who the hell he reads deeply. What flicks his creative spark? Who taught him to tell a billionaire where he's from and what he does and oh also that's he not Jewish, do that and your billionaire will go to bed unsettled. That seems most of all immature to me.

    I was just telling Steve what the Irish Writers do to each other in memoirs, they simply make up stories about their rivals, and just as long as it doesn't touch on anything that actually did happen to the guy, they know its fair game and that they can get away with it in terms of libel. Heres Yeats on George Moore in middle life:

    He said to a friend: "How do you keep your pants from falling about your knees?" "O" said the friend, "I put my braces through the little tapes that are sewn there for the purpose." A few days later he thanked the friend with emotion.

    And the masters touch is that last line it is.

    The stories we tell ourselves. Hey Buzz I'll tell ya, if one of my short stories has a shot at the New Yorker, it will only be because no one told them I'm not from Ireland so don't. They made Updike read like 800 pages of Brian O'Nolan years and years after he had died, and they recently couldn't get enough of Collin Barrett (though his one about the fake poet made me want to puke). Living in New York anyways, like DFW shrugged, New You OK? Not me. Couldn't tell my Joe Sobran stories.

    I read that Jewish bumpkin and can tell exactly what he is: only worth slaying. What I want to know about a pro writer like that though is who the hell he reads deeply. What flicks his creative spark? Who taught him to tell a billionaire where he’s from and what he does and oh also that’s he not Jewish, do that and your billionaire will go to bed unsettled. That seems most of all immature to me.

    Perhaps I misunderstood what you wrote, but Garrison Keillor is not Jewish.

    • Replies: @Pat Casey
    Actually that's interesting to me. I never heard of the man. I figured he was Jewish because he was writing pretty assertively about Jews. That's rare, whatever way ya slice it. Through me off ya know. But, I've also been wanting to call somebody a Jewish bumpkin for like a month now so I can't say I'd even take it back it felt great. kidding.
  173. @Sean
    No one can get respect in the Jewish community unless they are working for Israel's survival as a Jewish state. Only President Trump would create the ME fluidity necessary, and give Israel freedom of action to deal with it.

    I don’t see how Israel’s main problem is more likely to be solved under a Trump than Clinton regime. We’ll keep giving them money and arms, they’ll keep oppressing the Palestinians (who, given the chance, would do much worse to the Israelis). They’re not going to entirely ethnically cleanse or mass murder the Palestinians (it wouldn’t play domestically or internationally), the Palestinians aren’t going to start liking the Israelis enough for peace to be likely except under a strongman with effective secret police who is cowed or bought by us or Israel to avoid conflict (and Israel wouldn’t want a strong state there anyway), and so things will go on as they have been for the forseeable future.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    the Palestinians aren’t going to start liking the Israelis enough for peace to be likely except under a strongman

    It isn't necessary for Palestinians to like Israelis for there to be peace. All that is required is that they be given (1) either equal civil rights in Israel with jews or full sovereignty in the West Bank and Gaza, and (2) reparations from Israel for all the harm done to them these 70 years.
    , @Sean
    The US financed settlements are a powerful lobby, which makes withdrawal from the West Bank politically impossible for any Israeli government. The US gave continued to give money that allowed the construction of West Bank settlements to to continue with that idea, of creating a unsustainable Israel. Israel is too far in for withdrawal and yet it cannot stay. The West Bank Arabs will have to be given full rights in Israel or their own state.This is the official US policy. It has already started to go wrong for Israel.

    he Jerusalem Post Israel News‎ – 12 days ago:
    Barak accused the prime minister of poor judgement and putting political concerns before security. He blasted Netanyahu for his handling of the new defense aid package from the US, in a speech to the anti-Netanyahu organization Darkenu. According to Barak, Israel would receive $3.8 billion in aid, instead of $4.5 billion, because of Netanyahu’s poor relationship with US President Barack Obama, and the aid will be conditional on not asking Congress for additional funds
     
    It isn’t going to happen, and the West Bank Arabs are going to have to be given full rights, kept in an Apartheid system, or sent packing, because they will never be reconciled. They refused a genuinely serious final settlement offer from Barak; they want it all and if the the Israeli establishment is not willing to offend some important sectors of opinion in the US the Arabs will win in the end. If Clinton is elected she will continue intervening to freeze the Middle East as it is which is a time bomb for Israel. never forget that the Arabs They refused a genuinely serious final agreement and territorial West BankPalestinian state from Barak; they want it all and if the the Israeli establishment is not willing to offend some important sectors of opinion in the US the Arabs will win in the end. If Clinton is elected she will certainly continue the policy of intervening to freeze the Middle East. Israel needs a wider war in involving Jordan, and the West Bank Arabs the (wrongly) to think their position is hopeless and revolt. "Only the dead have seen the end of war".
  174. @War for Blair Mountain
    Wren


    Robert Mercer is a machine learning expert(specifically, an expert on Hidden Markov Chains) from IBM who was hired by Simons to design high frequency trading algorithms for Rennaissance Technologies.



    Mercer was sued by his Salvadoran slaves on his Setauket Mansion for withholding wages because they didn't top off his shampoo bottles at the very precise level he gave in written instructions. Not making this up.



    Mercer has a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Michigan.

    Those sorts of high maintenance geeks can get really fussy and freaky if things are not exactly as they demand.

    Oh yeah he owes the IRS billions in taxes as well.

    And has been embroiled in other law suits as well, all seem to deal with him short changing contractors and sellers.

    A real SOB.

  175. @Former Darfur
    A veritable shitload of songs were written by Jews. It's almost as if they are on the average more verbally facile than other groups.

    In the so called Great American Songbook era, in which hundreds of stage and movie musicals and similar productions largely generated the songs people like Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald sang, out of about fifteen writers (lyricists and composers) who were prominent about three or four were not Jewish. The early part of the rock era featured a lot of songs written by Jewish writers as well, such as Leiber and Stoller, Goffin and King, Barry Goldberg, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry, Carole Bayer Sager, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil.

    Of course several rock stars were Jews, Dylan, Lou Reed, Joey Ramone, or Jews were widely considered the driving force in the band or were behind the scenes "gurus" or "Svengalis".

    Brian Epstein & the Beatles?

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    Epstein was neither a performer nor a songwriter.

    He was immortalized in the song "Baby You're A Rich Man Too". On a really good audio system, if you listen carefully, there can be heard clearly John Lennon singing "Baby you're a rich fag Jew" on at least some pressings of the album it's on.
  176. @NOTA
    The media reaction to Trump reminds me a lot of the media reaction to Palin. In both cases:

    a. There is plenty to criticize, and plenty of reasons not to want them as president or VP.

    b. A lot of the actual reaction and much of the criticism comes down to style--wrong class markers, describing policies in the wrong words, wrong accent, etc.

    a. There is plenty to criticize, and plenty of reasons not to want them as president or VP.

    Compared with the alternative?

    Which cave have you been living in.

  177. The reason Fred pretend to be Swedish instead of German to his racist tenants who didn’t want their neighborhoods turning black was that he only rented to, uh, Texans.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_German
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Texan

    The Texas Hill Country has a strong German influence. Off of I-35 between Austin and San Antonio there are many towns with German names (e.g., Schertz, Niederwald, New Braunfels) and even some German-styled beer gardens.

    Also notable is the Schlitterbahn water park (in New Braunfels).

  178. Two thoughts:
    Of course we all remember Zero Mostel’s character in “The Producers” screaming, “THAT’S IT, BABY! WHEN YA GOT IT, SPONSOR A GUATEMALAN FAMILY!”
    Jews are the most unapologetically materialistic people in the western world. Chinese, who are often compared to Jews, give them some competition. Jews are unapologetically materialistic because they see material wealth as proof of goodness. They gave the same reasoning to Protestants.
    But also:
    Surely this is a wrong foot twice over: is there anything less moral than Jewish philanthropy? George Soros is uncomplicatedly a terrorist in sending money and training over borders to foment political violence. MSF has been an undisguised warmongering propaganda outfit in Syria, and its head threw a physical tantrum when his friend presumed to criticize Israel’s Operation Cast Lead. The loathesome SPLC is a major beneficiary of Jewish philanthropy, notably from the friends of Bernard Madoff. And the Hassidim tax cheats are always misusing charity status in novel ways.

  179. @Daniel H
    >>In Queens, blacks were a threat to property values — they belonged in the Bronx, not down the street. To the Times, Queens is Cleveland. Bush league. You are Queens.

    Blacks are a threat to property values in Manhattan and upscale SWPL Brooklyn too, that's why they have been, willy-nilly, removed from these locales by public policy directed by the machers of Manhattan.

    You know what preserves property values in New York City? An Eruv. Nothing else achieves the same effect, and the neighborhood that Trump grew up in, and neighborhoods adjoining it, have been Eruved for at least 40 years, probably more. Trump grew up in Jamaica estates, cheek by jowl to the ghetto that is now south western queens, but the ghetto will never move into Jamaica Estates and the adjoining upscale neighborhoods because they have been Eruved.

    The upper west side of Manhattan, liberal macher heartland, has been Eruved too.

    Keilor is such a toady.

    Blacks are a threat to property values in Manhattan and upscale SWPL Brooklyn too, that’s why they have been, willy-nilly, removed from these locales by public policy directed by the machers of Manhattan.

    A better example of historical revisionism couldn’t be found. In 1960, 95% of Blacks in Manhattan lived in Harlem (above E.96th St., and north of CP/W. 110th St.). Whatever the machers have been about, it hasn’t been removing Blacks from south of Harlem–where real estate is exceedingly expensive by any measure.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Hasn't Harlem been gentrifying lately? And Bed-Stuy, in Brooklyn?
  180. @Eric Rasmusen
    George W. Bush clearly didn't care about elite opinion, not only despite but because of his aristocratic and Yale background, which I think is the main reason he drove people like Krugman bonkers. Like FDR, his pedigree was so good he could look down on the nouveau elite.

    I don’t remember either Bush playing golf much.

    Is this something that was played down ala JFK to avoid the “duffer” image?

  181. @Marcus

    they showed off by way of philanthropy or by raising brilliant offspring
     
    Yes "philanthropy," many a Jewish conman has pointed to his massive contributions to Jewish orgs to garner sympathy after the SEC comes calling.

    Donald Sterling.

  182. it certainly is entertaining how the Left and establishment GOP has gone off the rails trying to analyze Trump and his supporters.

  183. A Lutheran from Minnesota explaining the Jews of Manhattan to a Manhattan real estate developer from Queens; that’s cute. Might as well explain space travel to Buzz Aldrin, had Buzz Aldrin’s daughter also married another astronaut and produced astronaut grandchildren to boot.

    As to it going badly, Hillary Clinton and her media flying monkeys are savaging the living shit out of him every day and fundraising like crazy. If this as a total ground ball, she would be coasting. She is not.

  184. @War for Blair Mountain
    Wren


    Robert Mercer is a machine learning expert(specifically, an expert on Hidden Markov Chains) from IBM who was hired by Simons to design high frequency trading algorithms for Rennaissance Technologies.



    Mercer was sued by his Salvadoran slaves on his Setauket Mansion for withholding wages because they didn't top off his shampoo bottles at the very precise level he gave in written instructions. Not making this up.



    Mercer has a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Michigan.

    He was sued for reducing their Monthly bonus. His help was well paid, but it is always upsetting when your boss gives a larger bonus to some than others. Occurs on Wall Street every year.

    Not many people give their servants a monthly bonus, but is is actually a good idea if you have the money. I paid my Live-In nanny a yearly Bonus at Christmas, it really does improve performance and keeps them from quitting before the holiday season.

    When I no longer needed my nanny, she got another job quickly in Tribeca, and they paid her 50% more ($450 per week) but she had to work 6 days instead of 5 per week. and 12 hour days instead of the 9 hours I had her working. When they failed to give her a Christmas bonus, as I had done, she quit. They did not celebrate Christmas.

  185. @Former Darfur
    A veritable shitload of songs were written by Jews. It's almost as if they are on the average more verbally facile than other groups.

    In the so called Great American Songbook era, in which hundreds of stage and movie musicals and similar productions largely generated the songs people like Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald sang, out of about fifteen writers (lyricists and composers) who were prominent about three or four were not Jewish. The early part of the rock era featured a lot of songs written by Jewish writers as well, such as Leiber and Stoller, Goffin and King, Barry Goldberg, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry, Carole Bayer Sager, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil.

    Of course several rock stars were Jews, Dylan, Lou Reed, Joey Ramone, or Jews were widely considered the driving force in the band or were behind the scenes "gurus" or "Svengalis".

    David Lee Roth lights the menorah!

    Suspect Keillor has NO IDEA who that is, but he grew up in his uncle’s Greenwich Village bar.

    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    What made Van Halen the band interesting was DLR's being a Catskills/English music hall type showbiz type in conjunction with the Van Halens, whose father was a classical musician and who became rockers sort of to cope with a move from Holland to California.

    Roth reminds me more than anyone else of British Jew Frankie Vaughan, a fixture in fifties Britain but unknown in the US except for his role in Let's Make Love, essentially an Elvis movie with Marilyn Monroe instead of Elvis.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hB_giBMO23g
  186. @larry lurker
    OT: ABC News has an article (and video that I haven't watched yet) about college drop-out Milo Yiannapolous.

    Paragraph 4 of 31:


    Many of the attacks, known as “trolling,” came from anonymous users, but not all. Milo Yiannopoulos, one of the most infamous trolls on the internet, was one of them. He is an editor at Breitbart, the conservative news website.
     
    We learn something that sounds sort of interesting in paragraph 29 of 31:

    There was also a wave of support for Leslie Jones with #LoveforLeslie and she is now back on Twitter. Jones took action and reported Yiannopoulos to Twitter. In response, the company permanently suspended his account for violating their rules and conditions.
     
    What did Milo say exactly, and where/when did he say it?

    We don't know, but we have to assume it must have been really, really bad- so bad that ABC News couldn't publish any of his comments, no matter how heavily censored.

    What did Milo say exactly, and where/when did he say it?

    We don’t know, but we have to assume it must have been really, really bad- so bad that ABC News couldn’t publish any of his comments, no matter how heavily censored.

    I can’t tell if you are being satirical or not. They didn’t publish his comments because it would undermine their story – they weren’t actually very bad. He wasn’t banned for anything he himself said, but for supposedly setting the anonymous trolls on Leslie Jones.

  187. Buying older planes has advantages: In addition to being less expensive, their depreciation costs are lower.

    Mr. Trump said he liked older planes because they had been “tested” and had “been around.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/24/us/politics/donald-trumps-aging-air-fleet-gives-his-bid-and-his-brand-a-lift.html?_r=0

    New Englanders are inclined to differentiate between good and bad by determining whether it’s old or new. Frugality, reluctance to change, reliance on the “tried and true”, abhorrence of things showy or gaudy, pride in the past, a strong need for tradition and continuity – all these natural inclinations in our personalities result, not surprisingly, in our wearing slightly threadbare old clothes, joining old, comfortable not-posh social clubs, owning old boats, attending old schools and colleges, living in old houses, marrying into old families, and so forth.

    https://waspmanifesto.wordpress.com/2015/07/11/good-and-bad-old-or-new/

    Thrift has always been among the core WASP values, as anyone of us who has ever been told “Use it up, wear it out; make it do, or do without,” can attest. Thrift, probably as much as great acumen and great crimes, was instrumental in creating some of the enormous wealth that many of our people possessed until recently. These sensibilities were echoed in the wider society.

    However, in the latter-day United States, striving is effected not by adding to one’s bank account, but by adding to one’s closet. Or rather, contemporary Americans attempt both activities, which presents to most a mutually exclusive set of priorities.

    Nancy Gibbs, editor-at-large at TIME magazine, has written compellingly on this subject in that magazine’s October 13th issue. It is worth the read.

    TIME: Real Patriots Don’t Spend

    http://waspmanifesto.blogspot.com/2008/10/on-thrift.html

  188. Minnesota was the only state whose state GOP went for Rubio. Bunch of weirdos who don’t get Trump.

  189. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @NOTA
    I don't see how Israel's main problem is more likely to be solved under a Trump than Clinton regime. We'll keep giving them money and arms, they'll keep oppressing the Palestinians (who, given the chance, would do much worse to the Israelis). They're not going to entirely ethnically cleanse or mass murder the Palestinians (it wouldn't play domestically or internationally), the Palestinians aren't going to start liking the Israelis enough for peace to be likely except under a strongman with effective secret police who is cowed or bought by us or Israel to avoid conflict (and Israel wouldn't want a strong state there anyway), and so things will go on as they have been for the forseeable future.

    the Palestinians aren’t going to start liking the Israelis enough for peace to be likely except under a strongman

    It isn’t necessary for Palestinians to like Israelis for there to be peace. All that is required is that they be given (1) either equal civil rights in Israel with jews or full sovereignty in the West Bank and Gaza, and (2) reparations from Israel for all the harm done to them these 70 years.

  190. @Boomstick
    It's pretty funny that Keillor thinks Trump and his followers would be dissuaded if only he sneered at their non-SWPLness little more.

    It’s more likely that he’s playing to his audience – those people who DO care what he thinks. He’s posturing for their benefit, to be seen by them speaking down to Trump. Whether Trump, or anyone who follows him, care? Isn’t relevant to his purpose.

  191. @The Last Real Calvinist
    I've read the first three or four of Keillor's novels, and quite liked them when I was younger.

    But Keillor's been doing his schtick all these years at least in part to win the approval of the annointed -- it's blinded him to much, and held him back from becoming a lasting novelist.

    It’s something anyone who tries to play to their audience has to watch out for, certainly. That includes us. That even includes Mr. Sailer.

    It’s been famously noted that leadership is mostly finding a parade and putting yourself at the head of it. It’s remarkably easy for that ‘leader’ to be so responsive to the parade’s wants that they never actually change its direction in any way.

  192. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The Donald has always struck me as very secure in his own skin.

    People have been giggling at him for ages, but he doesn’t seem to care in the least. I get the sense he truly feels better than all of them. I don’t think it’s an act.

    The one thing that amazed me was early in the campaign when it seemed the entire elite class was coming down on him… Macy’s, PGA, all the papers, etc. I honestly felt bad for him. I thought he would be ruined. His entire business and reputation would be destroyed.

    I was amazed that he didn’t back down. That was a very brave move. Even he must have felt uneasy about it all. Those awful cartoons on the front cover of your hometown paper…hate coming at you from every direction.

    It reminded me of Kevin MacDonald’s description of Charles Lindberg in ‘Culture of Critique’. A national here reduced to a pariah in an instant. I’m hoping it works out better for Mr Trump.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I’m hoping it works out better for Mr Trump.

    Until last year I never thought much about Donald Trump one way or the other. Never watched his reality show(s). Now I hold him in the highest regard, as do tens of millions of others. So there's that, for what it's worth.
  193. @South Texas Guy
    I just quickly looked it up, and holy crap! Keillor was right. A veritable shit load of Christmas songs were written by jews.

    And to get back to the topic, my favorite FDR quote (not a fan, but I like the feeling behind it), was, in response to his critics, "I welcome their hatred." I don't think Trump gives too much of a damn about what people say about him. That's not true of the past four-plus decades of major republicans (Reagan may be an exception), and that's why so many got on the Trump train.

    They wrote “holiday” songs. You’ll be hard pressed to find any that mention “Christmas,” much less celebrate the occasion.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "I'm dreaming of a white Christmas"?
    , @Anonymous
    Indeed, and I had it in mind even as I composed that post. Perhaps I should have written "many" rather than "any". Still, I think what I wrote is largely accurate. And note that the content of "White Christmas" is secular rather than religious. (A skeptic might even note that fact entails that using the word in a song does more harm than good - part of a subversion of Christianity by replacing the content of its religious concepts with secular content. Paging Kevin MacDonald...)
  194. @Eric Rasmusen
    George W. Bush clearly didn't care about elite opinion, not only despite but because of his aristocratic and Yale background, which I think is the main reason he drove people like Krugman bonkers. Like FDR, his pedigree was so good he could look down on the nouveau elite.

    In his book “The Price of Loyalty,” former Treasury secretary (also former CEO of Alcoa) Paul O’Neil had some interesting remarks about Bush.

    Here’s a quote from O’Neil: “President Bush showed little interest in policy discussions in his first two years in the White House, leading Cabinet meetings ‘like a blind man in a roomful of deaf people. There is no discernible connection…”

    Here’s another interesting story about George Bush. He was invited to be on the Board of Directors of the Carlyle Group, a prestigious investment firm. He was eventually asked to leave. Why?

    Here’s a quote from the firm’s CEO: “He [Bush]… came to all the meetings. Told a lot of jokes. Not that many clean ones. And after a while I said to him, after about three years: ‘You know, I’m not sure this is really for you… because I don’t think you’re adding that much value. You don’t know that much about the company.’…. If you said to me, name 25m people who would maybe be president of the United States, he wouldn’t have been in that category.”

  195. Way OT, but I’m really enjoying Hillary’s current dilemma.

    She’s being quoted in her FBI interview as not being able to remember all manner of things because of her health problems with her concussion.

    So what’s her defense now?

    That she was lying, and only said that in the interviews to get out of trouble,

    or,

    That she was telling the truth, and she has had big problems in her cognition due to health?

    Rock and hard place, Hillary.

    Sometimes even lying can’t save you. Who’d have guessed?

  196. Anyway, so, now that Trump has held a press conference where relatives of people killed by illegal aliens endorsed him, will Hillary have an anti-Trump press conference where relatives of people killed by people of German origin endorse her?

    She could start with Holocaust survivors, and move on to relatives of soldiers killed in WWII, either on the front lines or in POW camps. She can then have a coup-de-grace by bringing in relatives of the victims of German-American serial killers like Ed Gein, Jeffrey Dahmer, Emil Kemper, and Dennis Rader.

    Whenever there’s a terrorist attack, I always ask, was it Muslims?

    Whenever they catch a long-elusive serial killer, I always ask, how German is their last name going to sound?

    Hillary could even bring on stage the husband of Andrea Yates, who killed all her children in Texas in 2001, and whose mother was a German immigrant.

    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    That level of crazy is so awesome, all I can say is: I am literally shaking at the moment!

    #The Shakening.
    , @SFG
    He was probably responding to Hillary having all the black people with relatives killed by police speak.

    I would actually guess it's probably easier to be a serial killer in the Midwest and get away with it over a long time--plenty of room to hide bodies, etc. Of course the overall level of crime is lower. Serial killers are scary and great for movies but actually quite rare.

    , @ATX Hipster
    Because serial killers typically kill within their own race, the German-sounding serial killers are very famous partly because they killed a lot of white people. If D'Shawn in the hood becomes a serial killer and preys locally on people who have already fallen through the cracks, nobody will notice or care much. It definitely won't be in the news.

    There was an article over at Taki's (I'm too lazy to find the link atm but Steve might be the author) that mentioned evidence that at one point south central L.A. had more than one serial killer operating simultaneously in a small area. Similarly, Rocky Mount, NC, one of the poorest towns in the country, has had a decade+ string of black prostitute disappearances/murders that will likely never be solved.
  197. “Jewish in affect.” I thought I was the only one to notice that. His shoulder shrugs, his “what have you got to lose” mantra. Trump would blend in just fine in a Brooklyn (not Park Slope, but say Flatbush/Gravesend) synagogue.

  198. @Jim Walker
    Michael Eisner never had a yacht.

    Barry Diller does not own a yacht called the Eos, 305' in length.

    David Geffen never had a yacht called Rising Sun which he now owns outright, but used to share with Larry Ellison, who is Jewish and therefore could have never owned half a yacht.
    ___

    Re: Trump's interior decoration tastes. Does it not occur that Trump has gold toilets as a giant FU to the Manhattan crowd from a brash Queensman? Trump's ex sister-in-law Blaine was very Upper East Side before Trump's brother cheated on her with his secretary and was exiled to Long Island.

    Trump didn't get the toilet designs from his Viking mother from the Outer Hebrides. That Keillor and I can agree on.

    Jim, Thank you, and Michael Bloomberg never had a yacht, and a private jet or and estate on Bermuda, even though I saw all three. Or Carl Icahn or Bernie Madoff ad infinitum

  199. @Grumpy
    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    Keillor is demonstrating typical Minnesota snobbery here, unintentionally telling us more about his own native habitat than about Trump's.

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    It’s not my part of the midwest–though the family heimat is in NE Iowa, so i’ve got a bit of handle on it.

    I don’t think this is particular complicated. The midwest is a nice, pleasant, productive place. But it’s … “the provinces”. For most mid-westerners … that’s fine, it’s home, they like it. (Including burgers, corn on the cob and apple–or even rhubarb!–pie.)

    But for a certain set of middle-brow intellectuals, they are a bit consumed or left insecure by the thought that their own midwestern heritage is uncool, unsophisticated. And they feel absolutely compelled to either leave, or seek approval, or show their superiority by genuflecting toward the east, particularly New York where *real* intellectuals and culture live.

    And for these boomer–or near boomer like Keillor–folks coming of age during the Jewish ascendancy, that means sucking up to the Jews as defining what’s “intellectual” and sophisticated. (If i had to guess Keillor either isn’t aware of how Jewish Trump’s persona is, or just really doesn’t think about it because his idea of “Jewishness” is a particular Minnesota nice fantasy version of well-behaved–actually quasi-WASPy–intellectual academic liberalism.)

    ~~~

    As a midwesterner myself and child of depression era farm kids, i value the practical, the useful and the true … Keillor’s east coast fetishization strikes me as pathetic. The midwest is the more *actually productive* area of the nation, and most of the cultural product of the East coast is “unimpressive”.

    I lean intellectual and value intellectual effort that produces genuine insight. And I admire Jewish contributions in the sciences. But all the finance and rent-seeking … is just finance and rent seeking. And the Jews’ really bad politics and social science fantasizing is *really bad*. The Anglo Saxons actually produce pretty terrific, prosperous, rule of law societies, and have a better, better more empirical, approach to science, including social science. So unlike Keillor, I don’t need–i don’t think us boring gentiles need to seek–the approval of Jews. Maybe some of that is simply because unlike Keillor my interest and education was in the natural sciences and i’m unimpressed by all the dominant Jewish political, cultural and social science flap-doodle; 90% of which is appalling bad, though not all at the Stephen J. Gouldish level of pure political dishonesty.)

    As far as i’m concerned, if we’d floated New York and Washington out to sea years ago the nation would have been off. The “work product” of these places has been negative for years, while the midwest keeps doing its job.

    • Replies: @S. anonyia
    Then the center of power would just shift to some other place.
    , @SFG
    Barry Goldwater agreed with you:

    http://www.livingroomcandidate.org/commercials/1964/eastern-seabord

    The commercial is a bit disingenuous as presumably he would have started cutting east at Maryland.

    Realistically, as S. anonyia says, they'd just have a new capital and it would steal all the money. Chicago or something. Not that NY/DC haven't formed a hostile elite, just that it's a common problem of advanced societies--heck, Machiavelli talked about it.

  200. The U-505 suffered the worst damage of any boat that survived such damage . At one time under depth charge attack the captain killed himself . He was a martinet and an incompetent commander , it’s quite likely that the 2nd officer killed him to save the boat . One of the former crew members ended up living in Chicago after the war and came many times to The Museum of Science and Industry to revisit the boat . If any of you have the opportunity to visit Chicago I recommend you go to see the U-505 . They also have one of the few surviving Stuka dive bombers there .

  201. Oh, let’s not forget the most prolific serial killer in American history, Gary Ridgeway, the grandson of Midwestern German-Americans Clara and Edmond Steinman (no, not Jews). Gary was convicted of 49 murders, matching Omar Mateen’s record.

    That would be a long press conference!

  202. I’m not surprised Keillor wrote this. Minnesota didn’t go for Trump, but rather Rubio, although I have a sneaking suspicion they thought the point guard for the T Wolves was on the ballot, rather than the Gang of 8 sleazeball who self-destructed in front of the nation. Minnesotans don’t get Trump. He’s a creature of the East who appeals to people concerned about borders and security or whose lives have been personally touched by Islamic terror or Mexican crime. Minnesotans are intelligent yet pathological altruists who were so desperate for an injection of diversity that they encouraged Somalis to make a new home on Lake Wobegone. I’d say they’re getting an education on the limits of altruism.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    Minnesotans don’t get Trump. He’s a creature of the East who appeals to people concerned about borders and security or whose lives have been personally touched by Islamic terror or Mexican crime. Minnesotans are intelligent yet pathological altruists who were so desperate for an injection of diversity that they encouraged Somalis to make a new home on Lake Wobegone. I’d say they’re getting an education on the limits of altruism.

    Something about Minnesotans I find incomprehensible. Why ask a person 3 times whether he wants some more food (or whatever)? I GAVE MY DAMN ANSWER THE FIRST TIME, YOU DEAF/STUPID MORON!

    http://matadornetwork.com/life/piss-off-someone-minnesota/

    These Swedes/Minnesotans are like a child eating dirt, they need some cultural enrichment in order to build up their ethnic immune system, or just disappear entirely. Perhaps in the end these cucks will give rise to some sort of weird Swede/Muslim hybrid people known for asking women three times to put on some clothes before they rape them.

  203. Our house :

    He’s still voting Republican now my god he must be thick .

  204. @Anonymous
    They wrote "holiday" songs. You'll be hard pressed to find any that mention "Christmas," much less celebrate the occasion.

    “I’m dreaming of a white Christmas”?

    • Replies: @Bee
    Yeah, lol. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is out there one Christmas eve, "The Christmas Song", etc. Those definitely mention Christmas.

    BTW, Steve, here's a new dog whistle for you and others:

    "I like the kind of people who SING Christmas songs, not the kind of people who WRITE them!"
    , @Anonymous
    For what it's worth, reposting this because I accidentally replied to you elsewhere.

    Indeed, and I had it in mind as I composed that post. Perhaps I should have written “many” rather than “any”. Still, I think what I wrote is largely accurate.

    And, again, note that the content of “White Christmas” is secular rather than religious. (A skeptic might contend that such a fact entails that using the word in a song does more harm than good – it subverts Christianity by substituting secular content for the religious substance of its concepts. Paging Kevin MacDonald…)
  205. @Grumpy
    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    Keillor is demonstrating typical Minnesota snobbery here, unintentionally telling us more about his own native habitat than about Trump's.

    “Does anyone have a theory to explain it?”

    It’s a SPWL impulse. Perhaps the Scandinavian heritage involves a tendency to take that to the extreme?

  206. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    They wrote "holiday" songs. You'll be hard pressed to find any that mention "Christmas," much less celebrate the occasion.

    Indeed, and I had it in mind even as I composed that post. Perhaps I should have written “many” rather than “any”. Still, I think what I wrote is largely accurate. And note that the content of “White Christmas” is secular rather than religious. (A skeptic might even note that fact entails that using the word in a song does more harm than good – part of a subversion of Christianity by replacing the content of its religious concepts with secular content. Paging Kevin MacDonald…)

  207. @Bee
    Anyway, so, now that Trump has held a press conference where relatives of people killed by illegal aliens endorsed him, will Hillary have an anti-Trump press conference where relatives of people killed by people of German origin endorse her?

    She could start with Holocaust survivors, and move on to relatives of soldiers killed in WWII, either on the front lines or in POW camps. She can then have a coup-de-grace by bringing in relatives of the victims of German-American serial killers like Ed Gein, Jeffrey Dahmer, Emil Kemper, and Dennis Rader.

    Whenever there's a terrorist attack, I always ask, was it Muslims?

    Whenever they catch a long-elusive serial killer, I always ask, how German is their last name going to sound?

    Hillary could even bring on stage the husband of Andrea Yates, who killed all her children in Texas in 2001, and whose mother was a German immigrant.

    That level of crazy is so awesome, all I can say is: I am literally shaking at the moment!

    #The Shakening.

  208. @Bee
    "I don’t actually think that it took Donald Trump until age 30 to learn about Jews."

    Correct. Here's Donald at a Bar Mitzvah with his school chums in 1959.
    http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/160415205315-donald-trump-boyhood-neighborhood-queens-kaye-pkg-ac-00011222-large-169.jpg

    I could be wrong, but I suspect Trump would be the president who had the most Jewish friends growing up.

    “I could be wrong, but I suspect Trump would be the president who had the most Jewish friends growing up.”

    Could be.

    Was JFK’s neighborhood growing up pretty Jewish?

    Most recent Presidents grew up in neighborhoods that were either pretty rural or downscale (Eisenhower, Nixon, Carter, etc, or pretty WASP old money).

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Was JFK’s neighborhood growing up pretty Jewish?
     
    Possibly. JFK was born in Brookline, MA, and he lived there for the first ten years of his life.Mike Wallace was also from Brookline, and he characterized his neighborhood as a Jewish and Irish mix:

    He was born Myron Leon Wallace in 1918, he tells us on the special, proud resident of a Boston suburb called Brookline where everybody was "either Jewish or Irish."
     
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1997/09/11/mike-wallaces-unforgettable-minutes/e270527b-976a-4b3a-94fa-ffab2ab91e2a/
    , @Honesthughgrant
    JFK was the son of a millionaire. His mother was the daughter of a popular Mayor of Boston. He attended Choate, a wealthy WASPy Prep School, and then went on to Harvard. He did go to elementary school in Boston but he attended the prestigious Noble and Greenough Lower School, which was filled with the sons of white, Protestant families.

    Later he attended Riverdale School near NYC and a year at the Catholic Canterbury School, in New Milford, Connecticut.

    I'm sure that JFK knew more Jews than the average Gentile in pre-ww2 America. But they all would have been wealthy and upper-class like himself.
    , @Chief Seattle
    OT, but at the Disney museum in San Francisco, run by the family, not the company, they had posted a roll call of Walt's high school class in Chicago. From a crude eyeballing of the list, about half the names were Jewish. Surprising, and interesting given the rumors surrounding him later in life. Apparently he had plenty of Jewish contact before making it to Hollywood.
  209. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @larry lurker
    OT: ABC News has an article (and video that I haven't watched yet) about college drop-out Milo Yiannapolous.

    Paragraph 4 of 31:


    Many of the attacks, known as “trolling,” came from anonymous users, but not all. Milo Yiannopoulos, one of the most infamous trolls on the internet, was one of them. He is an editor at Breitbart, the conservative news website.
     
    We learn something that sounds sort of interesting in paragraph 29 of 31:

    There was also a wave of support for Leslie Jones with #LoveforLeslie and she is now back on Twitter. Jones took action and reported Yiannopoulos to Twitter. In response, the company permanently suspended his account for violating their rules and conditions.
     
    What did Milo say exactly, and where/when did he say it?

    We don't know, but we have to assume it must have been really, really bad- so bad that ABC News couldn't publish any of his comments, no matter how heavily censored.

    She was in the news for the female Ghostbusters remake. Twitter’s theory is he linked/retweeted her and that set off a Twitter army of his followers who harassed her mercilessly. A dog whistle type thing. Twitter would say he did this stuff knowingly even though there was no explicit call to arms.

    So basically organized bullying and harassing but with silent mutual understanding.

    I agree with Twitter that this type of thing is problem, but why do they never dole out any punishment to SJW/BLM types? It was a few years ago, granted, but they didn’t give a shit when celebrities were retweeting George Zimmerman’s parents address. And they didn’t care when everyone bullied some mom and pop Ohio bakery that didn’t want to make a homosexual wedding cake.

  210. @Clyde

    Trump has been doing his good friend Joan Rivers’ shtick this whole time, I don’t know why nobody gets that.
     
    I noticed this ages ago. Trump doesn't do (channel) Rivers all the time but you can see it sometimes. I am pretty sure Joan Rivers was non-PC and a bit right wing. She made me laugh in the 1980s when I would see her on TV. I classify Trump and Rivers as old school New Yorkers.

    Trump and Joan Rivers have similar tastes in home decorating. Joan loved making money and loved spending it.

    • Replies: @Clyde

    Trump and Joan Rivers have similar tastes in home decorating
     
    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/joan-rivers-inside-28-million-york-city-penthouse/story?id=28837754
    Some photos of her NY penthouse that sold for 28 million. Yes, it looks like a wing of the Trump mansion in Florida. I would suffocate there. I prefer the Frank Sinatra, Palm Springs house, mid-century look. Danish/Swedish/Scandinavian from that era.
    , @syonredux
    Here's an interesting piece about a group of wealthy Bel Air matrons who support Trump:

    Past a pair of Rolls-Royces parked in the driveway and a bodyguard who answers the door, the first thing you encounter upon entering Toni Holt Kramer’s house is a picture of Donald Trump.
    This Hollywood reporter turned bicoastal socialite is the founder of “Trumpettes USA,” a group of mostly high-society female friends and admirers of the GOP nominee — including Gennifer Flowers, of Bill Clinton sex scandal notoriety — dedicated to making Trump America’s next president.
     

    The world of Trump and the Trumpettes is unsubtly wealthy, full of knuckle-sized bejeweled rings and multiple vacation homes. Its residents are ideologically flexible: Like Trump, they have donated extensively to both parties and claim friendships with power players across the political spectrum. (Kramer says she has been both a friend and donor to Hillary Clinton.) And like Trump, the Trumpettes and their male counterparts, “the Trumpsters,” are politically incorrect — often much more so than the proudly irreverent nominee himself.

     


    Those gathered at Kramer’s home were largely dismissive of criticism that Trump’s campaign has played off racial tensions (“Black Lives Matter and all that bullshit”) or that some of his supporters are motivated by bigotry (“I was raised by a black nanny, there’s no prejudice on my side”). They disbelieve polls that peg their candidate as deeply unpopular with women — and some don’t think any woman should be president anyway (“You think ISIS is going to listen to her?”). And if they have quibbles with Trump’s rhetoric, it’s because they believe he has been, at times, too restrained (One “regrets” that Trump dropped the birther issue).
     

    To the Trumpettes, the candidate’s lack of governing experience is irrelevant. The proof of his ability to make America great again is in his business empire and the properties contained within it, places Trumpettes know well.
    “The reason I love his club and Trump International is because it’s perfection,” Kramer said of Mar-a-Lago, his private Palm Beach club, and Trump’s nearby golf course. “That’s the way he’ll run the country.

     
    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/donald-trump-2016-trumpettes-bel-air-214206
  211. @Forbes
    After his first novel, aren't the rest just riffs on the same idea--a mockery of provincialism. I read his second, and it was just more of the same. Like most writers, he only had one idea--many stories, but one idea.

    “Like most writers, he only had one idea–many stories, but one idea.”

    Keillor has a lot of stories, though. His fertility in coming up with new stories is impressive.

  212. @Mike Zwick
    "This from the ugliest guy in show business. If I didn’t know who Garrison Keillor and I saw him on the street, I’d check to see where my children were real quick. Big creepy eyes and a mushed in face. He pretty much looks like Jack Elam after a traffic accident. "
    One time, Steve Dahl went off on a rant on his radio show about Garrison and likened him to Bazooka Joe from the bubble gum packages.

    Keillor has a face made for radio. And what do you know, he made 90% of his career in radio.

  213. @AnotherDad

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?
     
    It's not my part of the midwest--though the family heimat is in NE Iowa, so i've got a bit of handle on it.

    I don't think this is particular complicated. The midwest is a nice, pleasant, productive place. But it's ... "the provinces". For most mid-westerners ... that's fine, it's home, they like it. (Including burgers, corn on the cob and apple--or even rhubarb!--pie.)

    But for a certain set of middle-brow intellectuals, they are a bit consumed or left insecure by the thought that their own midwestern heritage is uncool, unsophisticated. And they feel absolutely compelled to either leave, or seek approval, or show their superiority by genuflecting toward the east, particularly New York where *real* intellectuals and culture live.

    And for these boomer--or near boomer like Keillor--folks coming of age during the Jewish ascendancy, that means sucking up to the Jews as defining what's "intellectual" and sophisticated. (If i had to guess Keillor either isn't aware of how Jewish Trump's persona is, or just really doesn't think about it because his idea of "Jewishness" is a particular Minnesota nice fantasy version of well-behaved--actually quasi-WASPy--intellectual academic liberalism.)

    ~~~

    As a midwesterner myself and child of depression era farm kids, i value the practical, the useful and the true ... Keillor's east coast fetishization strikes me as pathetic. The midwest is the more *actually productive* area of the nation, and most of the cultural product of the East coast is "unimpressive".

    I lean intellectual and value intellectual effort that produces genuine insight. And I admire Jewish contributions in the sciences. But all the finance and rent-seeking ... is just finance and rent seeking. And the Jews' really bad politics and social science fantasizing is *really bad*. The Anglo Saxons actually produce pretty terrific, prosperous, rule of law societies, and have a better, better more empirical, approach to science, including social science. So unlike Keillor, I don't need--i don't think us boring gentiles need to seek--the approval of Jews. Maybe some of that is simply because unlike Keillor my interest and education was in the natural sciences and i'm unimpressed by all the dominant Jewish political, cultural and social science flap-doodle; 90% of which is appalling bad, though not all at the Stephen J. Gouldish level of pure political dishonesty.)

    As far as i'm concerned, if we'd floated New York and Washington out to sea years ago the nation would have been off. The "work product" of these places has been negative for years, while the midwest keeps doing its job.

    Then the center of power would just shift to some other place.

  214. @larry lurker
    OT: ABC News has an article (and video that I haven't watched yet) about college drop-out Milo Yiannapolous.

    Paragraph 4 of 31:


    Many of the attacks, known as “trolling,” came from anonymous users, but not all. Milo Yiannopoulos, one of the most infamous trolls on the internet, was one of them. He is an editor at Breitbart, the conservative news website.
     
    We learn something that sounds sort of interesting in paragraph 29 of 31:

    There was also a wave of support for Leslie Jones with #LoveforLeslie and she is now back on Twitter. Jones took action and reported Yiannopoulos to Twitter. In response, the company permanently suspended his account for violating their rules and conditions.
     
    What did Milo say exactly, and where/when did he say it?

    We don't know, but we have to assume it must have been really, really bad- so bad that ABC News couldn't publish any of his comments, no matter how heavily censored.

    OT: ABC News has an article (and video that I haven’t watched yet) about college drop-out Milo Yiannapolous.

    I just watched the video, Milo destroyed, showing how to double down in style. I feel that our movement will ultimately triumph, and we are in the guerrilla phase, popping up in unexpected places and attacking while the establishment doesn’t really know what to do. They are trying the old tricks and they are just not working.

  215. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Old fogey
    I worked with a native New Yorker - known globally for his scientific research - whose father was a Russian Jewish immigrant who worked as a furrier. When our organization hired a new president who was also a native New Yorker but from a German-Jewish background, my friend was not happy. He considered German-Jews to be uppity and complained that they looked down their noses at Russian Jews like himself - so it may take another generation or two to overcome that brand of snobbery, even here, and even among the highly educated.

    How old was this well known native New Yorker researcher, and how long ago did this occur? In my interactions, there has been little to no tension among the descendants of German Jews and East European Jews. There aren’t even many pure German Jews or pure descendants of old New York Sephardic families left.

    • Replies: @Old fogey
    The conversation I related took place sometime around 1990, at which time my friend was in his mid-60s. It sticks in my mind because it was so out of character for my friend to refer to his religion in this way, as he was a completely secular man who wished everyone a Happy Christmas. As he put it, Christmas celebrates of the birth of a Jewish baby boy, so what's not to like?
  216. Oh Steve pls don’t :

  217. @MC
    Those facts are consistent with the theory that he used the "I might run for president" stuff to get attention, but only decided to do it for real when the media relentlessly mocked him for being all talk.

    And let's be honest, he had earned some degree of mockery for ostentatiously dragging out the will-he-won't-he stuff for decades. Not unlike every offseason for Brett Favre during the last few years of his career.

    Believe whatever you want to. Because the other plausible theory is that he had been contemplating running forever because, you know, he really did think he could win. He’s had attention for over 35 yrs he really doesn’t have to rely on that kind of bush league thing, ala Ralph Nader; Gary Johnson; William Weld; Ross Perrot or fill in the blank third party third rate candidacies for the presidency.

    Nobody was “endlessly mocking” him about running for decades. He was the one who originally brought it up before anyone else. A case could also be made that since Trump had been actively involved to various degrees in GOP politics since the early ’80’s (along with his dad serving on Reagan’s ’80 campaign committee) that Trump isn’t the naive novice regarding presidential politics that might be implied in your statement. And of course Trump has either met or personally known many of the major two party candidates for the last thirty-five yrs.

    In other words, your theory would carry a lot more weight IF Trump had actually gone on to run say, a third party candidacy, on his own, self-financing, the whole nine yards. He didn’t. He played it smart and actually worked within the traditional two party system to gain the nomination from one of the two established two parties. That would tend to suggest that he’s been serious about running for president for decades and now he’s read the tea leaves and figured out that ’16 is his best opportunity to not only run and win the nomination of one of the two major parties but to actually have a legitimate chance of winning the White House.

    • Replies: @MC
    I think you're reading a lot more into my comment than is justified. It's entirely possible that every other feint towards the presidency by Trump was completely serious, and that each time he just happened to feel that it wasn't the right time yet. But after 4-5 times of saying "I really might run," I think you've earned people's skepticism that you are serious about it.

    But on the whole, Trump has run and done surprisingly well. Just like Brett Favre did a little too much dithering before coming back and having a great couple of seasons with the Vikings. Hopefully Trump doesn't throw across the middle into the Saints secondary, and gives his field goal kicker a chance (metaphorically speaking).

    That being said, we'll have to agree to disagree about whether "Nobody was 'endlessly mocking' him about running for decades." (BTW, the word I used was "relentlessly", which doesn't imply as long a duration of mockery). Trump has been a punchline on this stuff for a while. I even had a "loser pays for lunch" bet with a co-worker back in 2011 about whether he would run in 2012. I was sure he wouldn't because he messed around with running for so long that I just assumed it was a plea for attention. I think after 2012 this calcified into conventional wisdom, which meant that in order to continue to get the same level of attention, Trump had to actually get into the race.

    It's to Trump's credit that he stayed in the race after it started to have seriously negative consequences for his other lines of work.

  218. part of me feels in a few years – all this liberal hysteria and hand wringing is going to look like the fuddy-duddies in the 1960s objecting to rock and roll and the hippies.

    We have a counter-counter cultural revolution going on and the establishment is freaking out.

    BTW< I am a WASP from Queens, ask me anything a couple of decades younger than the Donald.
    I like Trump back in the wolham rink days (yeah i know I spelled it wrong) then found him gaudy but now I think he’s great.

    I always find it funny that people put a blanket definition of queens – similar to NJ, Brooklyn -when i was a kid there were still wasp neighborhoods in queens (though a lot of non wasps lived there too) – bayside, richmond hill, forest hills -when the US open was actually played there) …

    but also remember that there still farms in queens after wwii – in fact i think there are still two – but they are kept more for cultural purposes now, obviously.

    BTW, I too went to public schools – i was in IGC so 90% of my class were jewish..

    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    Re distinguished WASPs from Queens: Samuel Huntington (Clash of Civilizations).
    He went to Stuyvesant High School, too.
  219. @AnotherDad

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?
     
    It's not my part of the midwest--though the family heimat is in NE Iowa, so i've got a bit of handle on it.

    I don't think this is particular complicated. The midwest is a nice, pleasant, productive place. But it's ... "the provinces". For most mid-westerners ... that's fine, it's home, they like it. (Including burgers, corn on the cob and apple--or even rhubarb!--pie.)

    But for a certain set of middle-brow intellectuals, they are a bit consumed or left insecure by the thought that their own midwestern heritage is uncool, unsophisticated. And they feel absolutely compelled to either leave, or seek approval, or show their superiority by genuflecting toward the east, particularly New York where *real* intellectuals and culture live.

    And for these boomer--or near boomer like Keillor--folks coming of age during the Jewish ascendancy, that means sucking up to the Jews as defining what's "intellectual" and sophisticated. (If i had to guess Keillor either isn't aware of how Jewish Trump's persona is, or just really doesn't think about it because his idea of "Jewishness" is a particular Minnesota nice fantasy version of well-behaved--actually quasi-WASPy--intellectual academic liberalism.)

    ~~~

    As a midwesterner myself and child of depression era farm kids, i value the practical, the useful and the true ... Keillor's east coast fetishization strikes me as pathetic. The midwest is the more *actually productive* area of the nation, and most of the cultural product of the East coast is "unimpressive".

    I lean intellectual and value intellectual effort that produces genuine insight. And I admire Jewish contributions in the sciences. But all the finance and rent-seeking ... is just finance and rent seeking. And the Jews' really bad politics and social science fantasizing is *really bad*. The Anglo Saxons actually produce pretty terrific, prosperous, rule of law societies, and have a better, better more empirical, approach to science, including social science. So unlike Keillor, I don't need--i don't think us boring gentiles need to seek--the approval of Jews. Maybe some of that is simply because unlike Keillor my interest and education was in the natural sciences and i'm unimpressed by all the dominant Jewish political, cultural and social science flap-doodle; 90% of which is appalling bad, though not all at the Stephen J. Gouldish level of pure political dishonesty.)

    As far as i'm concerned, if we'd floated New York and Washington out to sea years ago the nation would have been off. The "work product" of these places has been negative for years, while the midwest keeps doing its job.

    Barry Goldwater agreed with you:

    http://www.livingroomcandidate.org/commercials/1964/eastern-seabord

    The commercial is a bit disingenuous as presumably he would have started cutting east at Maryland.

    Realistically, as S. anonyia says, they’d just have a new capital and it would steal all the money. Chicago or something. Not that NY/DC haven’t formed a hostile elite, just that it’s a common problem of advanced societies–heck, Machiavelli talked about it.

  220. @Steve Sailer
    Trump and Joan Rivers have similar tastes in home decorating. Joan loved making money and loved spending it.

    Trump and Joan Rivers have similar tastes in home decorating

    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/joan-rivers-inside-28-million-york-city-penthouse/story?id=28837754
    Some photos of her NY penthouse that sold for 28 million. Yes, it looks like a wing of the Trump mansion in Florida. I would suffocate there. I prefer the Frank Sinatra, Palm Springs house, mid-century look. Danish/Swedish/Scandinavian from that era.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Joan Rivers described her primary apartment as "where Marie Antoinette would have lived if she had the money."

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2747795/Marble-statues-chandeliers-walls-lined-gold-stacks-jokes-Inside-Joan-Rivers-opulent-New-York-apartment-Marie-Antoinette-lived-money.html#ixzz4J91igdJC
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

    , @Harry Baldwin
    And how about that Rush Limbaugh apartment?

    http://gawker.com/5482793/rush-limbaughs-gaudy-fifth-avenue-penthouse-is-now-for-sale/
  221. @Bee
    Anyway, so, now that Trump has held a press conference where relatives of people killed by illegal aliens endorsed him, will Hillary have an anti-Trump press conference where relatives of people killed by people of German origin endorse her?

    She could start with Holocaust survivors, and move on to relatives of soldiers killed in WWII, either on the front lines or in POW camps. She can then have a coup-de-grace by bringing in relatives of the victims of German-American serial killers like Ed Gein, Jeffrey Dahmer, Emil Kemper, and Dennis Rader.

    Whenever there's a terrorist attack, I always ask, was it Muslims?

    Whenever they catch a long-elusive serial killer, I always ask, how German is their last name going to sound?

    Hillary could even bring on stage the husband of Andrea Yates, who killed all her children in Texas in 2001, and whose mother was a German immigrant.

    He was probably responding to Hillary having all the black people with relatives killed by police speak.

    I would actually guess it’s probably easier to be a serial killer in the Midwest and get away with it over a long time–plenty of room to hide bodies, etc. Of course the overall level of crime is lower. Serial killers are scary and great for movies but actually quite rare.

    • Replies: @Bee
    Well, Muslim terrorist attacks are rare, too, in the sense that only a few happen a year and you're not likely to be killed in one. The same with murders by illegal aliens. Nevertheless...

    I am not an invade nor inviter, but Trump's tactics are heinous.

    I especially loved the part where one woman said "My [son?] was killed by a Russian who overstayed his visa". It is as if simply being in the country illegally for any amount of time and for any reason will drive someone to murder. Such demagoguery we've not seen from a major party nominee in a very long time, if ever.
    , @Bee
    PS, isn't there a lot of room to hide bodies in, say, spacious New England, with all those states like Maine or Vermont?

    Also a lot of room to bury bodies in the desert out west.

    Yet not too many serial killers come out of New England. Perhaps we need to turn to our human biodiversity textbook to see why.
    , @Former Darfur
    There is a lot of room to hide bodies anywhere, besides perhaps Manhattan, , but you have to be able to dig graves with a shovel, unless you have your own plot and a backhoe or excavator. It's a lot of work.

    Where I live we had a guy who buried grandpa in the backyard and kept collecting his military pension for 20+ years. Apparently the old duffer kicked of natural causes, so they went out and dug a hole in the backyard in full view of all and sundry and snuck him out at night. They told all the neighbors that he went out to Arizona to visit friends and the neighbors never connected the two events. So if you can dig, bodies aren't that big a problem.
  222. @Grumpy
    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?

    Keillor is demonstrating typical Minnesota snobbery here, unintentionally telling us more about his own native habitat than about Trump's.

    It makes sense. Southern and Midwestern areas often have that one city that really wants to prove it can class with the big boys. As I recall, the whole bathroom mess in NC came about when the city council of Charlotte (pop, 800,000) decided to pass a pro-transgender ordinance and the state legislature retaliated.

  223. @Steve Sailer
    "I could be wrong, but I suspect Trump would be the president who had the most Jewish friends growing up."

    Could be.

    Was JFK's neighborhood growing up pretty Jewish?

    Most recent Presidents grew up in neighborhoods that were either pretty rural or downscale (Eisenhower, Nixon, Carter, etc, or pretty WASP old money).

    Was JFK’s neighborhood growing up pretty Jewish?

    Possibly. JFK was born in Brookline, MA, and he lived there for the first ten years of his life.Mike Wallace was also from Brookline, and he characterized his neighborhood as a Jewish and Irish mix:

    He was born Myron Leon Wallace in 1918, he tells us on the special, proud resident of a Boston suburb called Brookline where everybody was “either Jewish or Irish.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1997/09/11/mike-wallaces-unforgettable-minutes/e270527b-976a-4b3a-94fa-ffab2ab91e2a/

  224. @Old fogey
    I worked with a native New Yorker - known globally for his scientific research - whose father was a Russian Jewish immigrant who worked as a furrier. When our organization hired a new president who was also a native New Yorker but from a German-Jewish background, my friend was not happy. He considered German-Jews to be uppity and complained that they looked down their noses at Russian Jews like himself - so it may take another generation or two to overcome that brand of snobbery, even here, and even among the highly educated.

    Agreed. A friend of my father’s stock came from Philadelphia and could trace their lineage back to at least the 1860’s if not earlier. They made it clear that when their relatives first arrived in the US, they spoke German as a first language and not Yiddish (which was traditionally one way to tell a German Jewish immigrant from Eastern European Jewish immigrant). Economist Thomas Sowell in his book Ethnic America chapter on Jewish Americans made clear that certain slurs originated not from WASPs but from NY’s established German-Jewish community toward the Johnny Come Latelies from Eastern Europe. It would also be interesting to subdivide the Ashkenazi if it can be done, between those originally from Germany and those from Russia/Poland to determine which group has the higher IQ of the two groups. One would tend to speculate that its the German-Jewish quotient that has the higher IQ of the two since Germany experienced industrialization centuries earlier than Russia and the German Jews that immigrated to the US during the 18th and early/mid 19th centuries were much more secular in outlook as well as…more advanced in their outlook/thinking (the Reformed and Conservative movements originated in Germany after all while Russia and Poland’s Jewish communities for the most part stayed Orthodox).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    A lot of German and Austrian Jews became such via the late 18th century partitions of Poland. Before that, they had been Polish Jews. Even Jews whose ancestors had lived in traditional German states might have Polish-Jewish ancestors. For example, the composers Mendelssohn and Meyerbeer were both descended from Rabbi Moses Isserles (d. 1572), a prominent rabbi who lived in Krakow, Poland.
  225. @Clyde

    Trump and Joan Rivers have similar tastes in home decorating
     
    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/joan-rivers-inside-28-million-york-city-penthouse/story?id=28837754
    Some photos of her NY penthouse that sold for 28 million. Yes, it looks like a wing of the Trump mansion in Florida. I would suffocate there. I prefer the Frank Sinatra, Palm Springs house, mid-century look. Danish/Swedish/Scandinavian from that era.

    Joan Rivers described her primary apartment as “where Marie Antoinette would have lived if she had the money.”

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2747795/Marble-statues-chandeliers-walls-lined-gold-stacks-jokes-Inside-Joan-Rivers-opulent-New-York-apartment-Marie-Antoinette-lived-money.html#ixzz4J91igdJC
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

  226. @David
    It's interesting to me how sentimental NPR and its listeners are. Keillor's show has been a sad imitation of itself for at least 20 years and now that he's leaving, they actually plan to continue the show. Why?

    Click or Clack dies and they just keep their show rolling by endless permutations of ancient shows. They even have new sponsors announced by the living guy while the dead one sticks to the old sponsors. Rather creepy.

    Prairie Home Companion has no currency in Manhattan except among those pale spinsters gripping their WNYC tot-bags on the subway. When Garrison made his stand in Manhattan, he swept into stores and restaurants like a flamboyant queen, with an entourage, expecting to be recognized and celebrated. I think it broke his heart that he never was.

    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, "Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion. Some of these people really shouldn't vote because they don't know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed."

    It almost like a literacy test might be in order.

    My local station moved the Best of Car Talk to 5pm on Saturday and it’s old timeslot, 10am, has been filled by Marketplace Weekend of all things. I don’t think the station will carry the Best of Car Talk much longer.

    Regarding Kareem, last Tuesday in Arizona’s primary election several people showed up to the polls to vote for president of the United States and were upset when they found out that was not possible. The elections official being interviewed said they needed to provide more information to the public. Umm, no they don’t.

  227. @Bragadocious
    I'm not surprised Keillor wrote this. Minnesota didn't go for Trump, but rather Rubio, although I have a sneaking suspicion they thought the point guard for the T Wolves was on the ballot, rather than the Gang of 8 sleazeball who self-destructed in front of the nation. Minnesotans don't get Trump. He's a creature of the East who appeals to people concerned about borders and security or whose lives have been personally touched by Islamic terror or Mexican crime. Minnesotans are intelligent yet pathological altruists who were so desperate for an injection of diversity that they encouraged Somalis to make a new home on Lake Wobegone. I'd say they're getting an education on the limits of altruism.

    Minnesotans don’t get Trump. He’s a creature of the East who appeals to people concerned about borders and security or whose lives have been personally touched by Islamic terror or Mexican crime. Minnesotans are intelligent yet pathological altruists who were so desperate for an injection of diversity that they encouraged Somalis to make a new home on Lake Wobegone. I’d say they’re getting an education on the limits of altruism.

    Something about Minnesotans I find incomprehensible. Why ask a person 3 times whether he wants some more food (or whatever)? I GAVE MY DAMN ANSWER THE FIRST TIME, YOU DEAF/STUPID MORON!

    http://matadornetwork.com/life/piss-off-someone-minnesota/

    These Swedes/Minnesotans are like a child eating dirt, they need some cultural enrichment in order to build up their ethnic immune system, or just disappear entirely. Perhaps in the end these cucks will give rise to some sort of weird Swede/Muslim hybrid people known for asking women three times to put on some clothes before they rape them.

  228. @Marty
    There really is only one thing to say about Finley, which is that he was right about free agency early on: "make them all free agents." By making player free agency only partial each year, the owners ensured that salaries would be needlessly bid up, to the point now where only the upper middle class can afford to attend a game. I visited the Finley farm in La Porte in '69. Nice kids. As a California kid, I couldn't believe how bleak the Midwest sky was.

    The A’s had some cool uniforms for their time. Imagine getting future HOFers Reggie Jackson; Catfish Hunter; and Rollie Fingers. While its entirely possible that my personal favorite, Dave Kingman, could be a lost cause for future Cooperstown induction, one could make a case for the likes of 3B Sal Bando; OF Joe Rudi; possibly Vida Blue. I believe Rudi’s fielding stats are in a similar vein as 2B Bobby Grich (a perennial Bill James favorite) so perhaps the powers that be will open the doors and let Rudi slide thru. Of course, Vida Blue could always be inducted as well.

    But the A’s of the early/mid. ’70’s were great teams. Proving that you don’t need “team chemistry” and being the best of chums to, you know, actually win WS.

    For that matter, Charles Finley should be inducted into Cooperstown. Only 20th century owner to win three consecutive WS whose teams weren’t in the Pinstripes.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Charles Finley should be inducted into Cooperstown"

    Makes sense.

  229. Can Garrison write about how he has been a cheerleader for turning his state into a non white immigrant flop house to enable him and his open border globalist friends to wear a heavy moral crown caring more for the ‘others” while ignoring those poor here who he is trying to erase?

    I can’t wait for the Muslims to take over Lake Woebgone . I bet the town does not have as many young girls as did Rotherham and so many other towns in the UK where the Muslims have used the thousands of white children like meat, but it will be a good place to start. ( and yes I know it is a fictional town.)

  230. @Steve Sailer
    Trump and Joan Rivers have similar tastes in home decorating. Joan loved making money and loved spending it.

    Here’s an interesting piece about a group of wealthy Bel Air matrons who support Trump:

    Past a pair of Rolls-Royces parked in the driveway and a bodyguard who answers the door, the first thing you encounter upon entering Toni Holt Kramer’s house is a picture of Donald Trump.
    This Hollywood reporter turned bicoastal socialite is the founder of “Trumpettes USA,” a group of mostly high-society female friends and admirers of the GOP nominee — including Gennifer Flowers, of Bill Clinton sex scandal notoriety — dedicated to making Trump America’s next president.

    The world of Trump and the Trumpettes is unsubtly wealthy, full of knuckle-sized bejeweled rings and multiple vacation homes. Its residents are ideologically flexible: Like Trump, they have donated extensively to both parties and claim friendships with power players across the political spectrum. (Kramer says she has been both a friend and donor to Hillary Clinton.) And like Trump, the Trumpettes and their male counterparts, “the Trumpsters,” are politically incorrect — often much more so than the proudly irreverent nominee himself.

    Those gathered at Kramer’s home were largely dismissive of criticism that Trump’s campaign has played off racial tensions (“Black Lives Matter and all that bullshit”) or that some of his supporters are motivated by bigotry (“I was raised by a black nanny, there’s no prejudice on my side”). They disbelieve polls that peg their candidate as deeply unpopular with women — and some don’t think any woman should be president anyway (“You think ISIS is going to listen to her?”). And if they have quibbles with Trump’s rhetoric, it’s because they believe he has been, at times, too restrained (One “regrets” that Trump dropped the birther issue).

    To the Trumpettes, the candidate’s lack of governing experience is irrelevant. The proof of his ability to make America great again is in his business empire and the properties contained within it, places Trumpettes know well.
    “The reason I love his club and Trump International is because it’s perfection,” Kramer said of Mar-a-Lago, his private Palm Beach club, and Trump’s nearby golf course. “That’s the way he’ll run the country.

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/donald-trump-2016-trumpettes-bel-air-214206

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The women in the photo at the beginning of the article are an exhibit of bad plastic surgery.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    If Gennifer Flowers is involved, shouldn't it be "Strumpettes"?

    (Sorry, that was a bit too obvious.)
  231. @Steve Sailer
    Keillor's review of a Bernard Henri-Levy book is very funny.

    Some interesting observations just the same, by Monsieur Henri-Levy: Hillary seeking the White House to wipe away the Lewinsky scandal…hmmm… from Freud’s point of view, this could explain a lot.

  232. @Desiderius

    You attract really really good speechwriters who give you Churchillian cadences and toss in quotes from Emerson and Aeschylus and Ecclesiastes.
     
    This age is already stuffed to the gills with Ecclesiastes and it's knowing nihilism.

    A really good speechwriter would be hitting Amos and Hebrews.

    Thanks for the Bible references. I had not read Hebrews, Ecclesiastes or Amos in 50 years. Cows of Bashan indeed.

  233. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    The A's had some cool uniforms for their time. Imagine getting future HOFers Reggie Jackson; Catfish Hunter; and Rollie Fingers. While its entirely possible that my personal favorite, Dave Kingman, could be a lost cause for future Cooperstown induction, one could make a case for the likes of 3B Sal Bando; OF Joe Rudi; possibly Vida Blue. I believe Rudi's fielding stats are in a similar vein as 2B Bobby Grich (a perennial Bill James favorite) so perhaps the powers that be will open the doors and let Rudi slide thru. Of course, Vida Blue could always be inducted as well.

    But the A's of the early/mid. '70's were great teams. Proving that you don't need "team chemistry" and being the best of chums to, you know, actually win WS.

    For that matter, Charles Finley should be inducted into Cooperstown. Only 20th century owner to win three consecutive WS whose teams weren't in the Pinstripes.

    “Charles Finley should be inducted into Cooperstown”

    Makes sense.

    • Replies: @MC
    It's petty, but I can't get behind the man who gave us the DH.
  234. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Agreed. A friend of my father's stock came from Philadelphia and could trace their lineage back to at least the 1860's if not earlier. They made it clear that when their relatives first arrived in the US, they spoke German as a first language and not Yiddish (which was traditionally one way to tell a German Jewish immigrant from Eastern European Jewish immigrant). Economist Thomas Sowell in his book Ethnic America chapter on Jewish Americans made clear that certain slurs originated not from WASPs but from NY's established German-Jewish community toward the Johnny Come Latelies from Eastern Europe. It would also be interesting to subdivide the Ashkenazi if it can be done, between those originally from Germany and those from Russia/Poland to determine which group has the higher IQ of the two groups. One would tend to speculate that its the German-Jewish quotient that has the higher IQ of the two since Germany experienced industrialization centuries earlier than Russia and the German Jews that immigrated to the US during the 18th and early/mid 19th centuries were much more secular in outlook as well as…more advanced in their outlook/thinking (the Reformed and Conservative movements originated in Germany after all while Russia and Poland's Jewish communities for the most part stayed Orthodox).

    A lot of German and Austrian Jews became such via the late 18th century partitions of Poland. Before that, they had been Polish Jews. Even Jews whose ancestors had lived in traditional German states might have Polish-Jewish ancestors. For example, the composers Mendelssohn and Meyerbeer were both descended from Rabbi Moses Isserles (d. 1572), a prominent rabbi who lived in Krakow, Poland.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Ralph Lauren's wife's surname is Loherbeer, (sp.?) and her family is originally from Austria. While she was raised Catholic, it was speculated by Michael Gross's biography "Ralph Lauren: An American Original" that her family were originally Jewish converts some centuries ago in Austria.

    Of course, the question remains: where did Jews who lived in Poland that later migrated to Germany come from? They weren't indigenous to Poland and they had to come from someplace. Perhaps they were just returning to the German lands that they had migrated to prior to living in Poland. Just as possible as any other speculation on back and forth migration from one of the world's ancient ethnic tribes.
  235. Funny and witty at times, but I always took Keillor for nothing more than another sneering lefty. His angle on Trump is unsurprising, predictable.

  236. @David
    It's interesting to me how sentimental NPR and its listeners are. Keillor's show has been a sad imitation of itself for at least 20 years and now that he's leaving, they actually plan to continue the show. Why?

    Click or Clack dies and they just keep their show rolling by endless permutations of ancient shows. They even have new sponsors announced by the living guy while the dead one sticks to the old sponsors. Rather creepy.

    Prairie Home Companion has no currency in Manhattan except among those pale spinsters gripping their WNYC tot-bags on the subway. When Garrison made his stand in Manhattan, he swept into stores and restaurants like a flamboyant queen, with an entourage, expecting to be recognized and celebrated. I think it broke his heart that he never was.

    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, "Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion. Some of these people really shouldn't vote because they don't know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed."

    It almost like a literacy test might be in order.

    Yes, It’s like stumbling across a fund raiser for the local public TV channel and seeing what they consider proper programming to raise funds by – Bob Hope specials, Carol Burnett roasts, Views of Italy, Pete Seeger concerts. I think Lew Alcindor might be on to something, he was just describing the wrong cohort.

    • Replies: @Triumph104
    "Garrison Keillor" on the Simpsons

    https://youtu.be/tmkq7yylRkU
  237. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Believe whatever you want to. Because the other plausible theory is that he had been contemplating running forever because, you know, he really did think he could win. He's had attention for over 35 yrs he really doesn't have to rely on that kind of bush league thing, ala Ralph Nader; Gary Johnson; William Weld; Ross Perrot or fill in the blank third party third rate candidacies for the presidency.

    Nobody was "endlessly mocking" him about running for decades. He was the one who originally brought it up before anyone else. A case could also be made that since Trump had been actively involved to various degrees in GOP politics since the early '80's (along with his dad serving on Reagan's '80 campaign committee) that Trump isn't the naive novice regarding presidential politics that might be implied in your statement. And of course Trump has either met or personally known many of the major two party candidates for the last thirty-five yrs.

    In other words, your theory would carry a lot more weight IF Trump had actually gone on to run say, a third party candidacy, on his own, self-financing, the whole nine yards. He didn't. He played it smart and actually worked within the traditional two party system to gain the nomination from one of the two established two parties. That would tend to suggest that he's been serious about running for president for decades and now he's read the tea leaves and figured out that '16 is his best opportunity to not only run and win the nomination of one of the two major parties but to actually have a legitimate chance of winning the White House.

    I think you’re reading a lot more into my comment than is justified. It’s entirely possible that every other feint towards the presidency by Trump was completely serious, and that each time he just happened to feel that it wasn’t the right time yet. But after 4-5 times of saying “I really might run,” I think you’ve earned people’s skepticism that you are serious about it.

    But on the whole, Trump has run and done surprisingly well. Just like Brett Favre did a little too much dithering before coming back and having a great couple of seasons with the Vikings. Hopefully Trump doesn’t throw across the middle into the Saints secondary, and gives his field goal kicker a chance (metaphorically speaking).

    That being said, we’ll have to agree to disagree about whether “Nobody was ‘endlessly mocking’ him about running for decades.” (BTW, the word I used was “relentlessly”, which doesn’t imply as long a duration of mockery). Trump has been a punchline on this stuff for a while. I even had a “loser pays for lunch” bet with a co-worker back in 2011 about whether he would run in 2012. I was sure he wouldn’t because he messed around with running for so long that I just assumed it was a plea for attention. I think after 2012 this calcified into conventional wisdom, which meant that in order to continue to get the same level of attention, Trump had to actually get into the race.

    It’s to Trump’s credit that he stayed in the race after it started to have seriously negative consequences for his other lines of work.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "But after 4-5 times of saying “I really might run,” I think you’ve earned people’s skepticism that you are serious about it."

    Uh, Mitt Romney was the same way. He speculated in the 90's and early 2000's about wanting to run before actually throwing his hat into the GOP ring in '08.

    "It’s to Trump’s credit that he stayed in the race after it started to have seriously negative consequences for his other lines of work."

    Of course they cynics would say that this is all part of the master plan. If Trump loses in November, his Q rating will still be higher than ever before and he will be worth more than ever before, etc etc.

    "That being said, we’ll have to agree to disagree about whether “Nobody was ‘endlessly mocking’ him about running for decades.” (BTW, the word I used was “relentlessly”, which doesn’t imply as long a duration of mockery)."

    Yes, yes, but the people who were 'relentlessly' mocking him were mostly elite opinion, of which Trump doesn't appear to care much for. Now if you mean popular opinion included (late night talk shows etc) perhaps a case can be made there, however, Trump seems to have always looked out for what's good for his bottom line as well as what's in his best interests. If he saw all these "low energy" lightweights running in either party for decades, he must've reasonably figured out that "hey, if these shmos an run, why can't I? I can give speeches better, and I can always find people to write the policy details in my speeches".
  238. @Steve Sailer
    "Charles Finley should be inducted into Cooperstown"

    Makes sense.

    It’s petty, but I can’t get behind the man who gave us the DH.

  239. @Svigor

    Yes “philanthropy,” many a Jewish conman has pointed to his massive contributions to Jewish orgs to garner sympathy after the SEC comes calling.
     
    I would really love to see a detailed article or study on where Jewish philanthropy goes. How much goes to Jews, vs. not, how much goes to non-whites, how much goes to foreigners, etc.

    But in the meantime, I think we can do some reading between the lines on our own, sort of like we can gather that very, very few Jews marry blacks.

    The lines about how virtuous the Jews are are truly nauseating. It’s one thing to avoid antagonizing the Jews. That’s just prudent. It’s quite another to slavishly suck up to them, especially when you have nothing to gain by doing so.

  240. GK’s interpretation of Trump’s rise sounds like a good basis for the script of Caddyshack 3.

  241. @Dennis Dale
    So Keillor's argument is that in New York everyone is above average.

    LOL (Evading the once per hour rule.)

  242. @Flip
    The Tribune has moved left in the last year or two.

    The Tribune has been moving steadily Leftward since the ’70s.

  243. @Anonymous
    A lot of German and Austrian Jews became such via the late 18th century partitions of Poland. Before that, they had been Polish Jews. Even Jews whose ancestors had lived in traditional German states might have Polish-Jewish ancestors. For example, the composers Mendelssohn and Meyerbeer were both descended from Rabbi Moses Isserles (d. 1572), a prominent rabbi who lived in Krakow, Poland.

    Ralph Lauren’s wife’s surname is Loherbeer, (sp.?) and her family is originally from Austria. While she was raised Catholic, it was speculated by Michael Gross’s biography “Ralph Lauren: An American Original” that her family were originally Jewish converts some centuries ago in Austria.

    Of course, the question remains: where did Jews who lived in Poland that later migrated to Germany come from? They weren’t indigenous to Poland and they had to come from someplace. Perhaps they were just returning to the German lands that they had migrated to prior to living in Poland. Just as possible as any other speculation on back and forth migration from one of the world’s ancient ethnic tribes.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    It's thought that most Polish Jews are descended from West European and German Jews who moved east during the medieval period due to periodic persecutions and expulsions.
  244. @MC
    I think you're reading a lot more into my comment than is justified. It's entirely possible that every other feint towards the presidency by Trump was completely serious, and that each time he just happened to feel that it wasn't the right time yet. But after 4-5 times of saying "I really might run," I think you've earned people's skepticism that you are serious about it.

    But on the whole, Trump has run and done surprisingly well. Just like Brett Favre did a little too much dithering before coming back and having a great couple of seasons with the Vikings. Hopefully Trump doesn't throw across the middle into the Saints secondary, and gives his field goal kicker a chance (metaphorically speaking).

    That being said, we'll have to agree to disagree about whether "Nobody was 'endlessly mocking' him about running for decades." (BTW, the word I used was "relentlessly", which doesn't imply as long a duration of mockery). Trump has been a punchline on this stuff for a while. I even had a "loser pays for lunch" bet with a co-worker back in 2011 about whether he would run in 2012. I was sure he wouldn't because he messed around with running for so long that I just assumed it was a plea for attention. I think after 2012 this calcified into conventional wisdom, which meant that in order to continue to get the same level of attention, Trump had to actually get into the race.

    It's to Trump's credit that he stayed in the race after it started to have seriously negative consequences for his other lines of work.

    “But after 4-5 times of saying “I really might run,” I think you’ve earned people’s skepticism that you are serious about it.”

    Uh, Mitt Romney was the same way. He speculated in the 90’s and early 2000’s about wanting to run before actually throwing his hat into the GOP ring in ’08.

    “It’s to Trump’s credit that he stayed in the race after it started to have seriously negative consequences for his other lines of work.”

    Of course they cynics would say that this is all part of the master plan. If Trump loses in November, his Q rating will still be higher than ever before and he will be worth more than ever before, etc etc.

    “That being said, we’ll have to agree to disagree about whether “Nobody was ‘endlessly mocking’ him about running for decades.” (BTW, the word I used was “relentlessly”, which doesn’t imply as long a duration of mockery).”

    Yes, yes, but the people who were ‘relentlessly’ mocking him were mostly elite opinion, of which Trump doesn’t appear to care much for. Now if you mean popular opinion included (late night talk shows etc) perhaps a case can be made there, however, Trump seems to have always looked out for what’s good for his bottom line as well as what’s in his best interests. If he saw all these “low energy” lightweights running in either party for decades, he must’ve reasonably figured out that “hey, if these shmos an run, why can’t I? I can give speeches better, and I can always find people to write the policy details in my speeches”.

    • Replies: @MC
    "Uh, Mitt Romney was the same way. He speculated in the 90′s and early 2000′s about wanting to run before actually throwing his hat into the GOP ring in ’08."

    Mitt Romney won his first public office of any kind in 2002, then declared his candidacy for president a little over four years later. He ran for president at the first opportunity.
  245. @Anon
    Costanzas were supposed to be Italian. Ever wonder why there are so many TV characters who are supposed to be "Italian" but are Jewish? The Costanzas, Bea Arthur as Dorothy on the Golden Girls, Carla on Cheers, etc..

    Because the Seinfelds were already Jewish, so you couldn’t have BOTH leads be Jewish.

  246. @Jim Don Bob
    I have no idea what you meant in this post.

    I see that. I thought the top said Trump has Very Bad Mouth. That reeled my mind to ratfuckers. Also I never heard of this guy and didn’t know he was a sage in minnesota initially.

  247. Tangentially on topic: the latest form David Brooks, Trump is pushing identity politics:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/02/opinion/identity-politics-run-amok.html?rref=collection%2Fcolumn%2Fdavid-brooks&action=click&contentCollection=opinion&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=collection

    An amazing column. My head immediately popped with a few things:

    1) Mostly obviously the Democrats have spent the past few years on an absolute identity politics tear. It’s just that it’s been pretty much 100% on ginning up black rage.

    2) All his stuff about immigration’s effect on the working class–where he has the temerity to say Trump’s statements are “false”–is a lie–an *obvious* lie.
    — The idea that low skill immigrants don’t affect the wages of low skill Americans because they work in different sectors. What can you say about such ridiculous nonsense? Brooks pointedly leaves out “construction” which of course used to be a huge employer of non-bookish American, who have seen huge displacement. But more on point when i’ve been around the country and end up someplace without a lot of immigrants … Americans are doing all these “immigrant jobs”. And where there are a lot of immigrants … the immigrants are doing these “American jobs”. One just rolls one’s eyes … lying? stupidity?
    — And at the statistical level, income inequality has gone up. The high end you can explain by financialization–winners, winning bigger. But the low end–working class wages stalling. That can only be because some “X” factor is depressing the price of labor. What the heck can it be?

    3) Then here’s Brook’s conclusion:

    Identity politics, as practiced by Trump, but also by others on the left and the right, distracts from the reality that we are one nation. It corrodes the sense of solidarity. It breeds suspicion, cynicism and distrust.

    Human beings are too complicated to be defined by skin color, income or citizenship status. Those who try to reduce politics to these identities do real violence to national life.

    I kid you not! Trump’s nationalism, his sorta one-nation conservatism, “distracts from the reality that we are one nation”.

    And appealing to human beings on the basis of “citizenship status” … “does violence to national life” Huh!?!?

    Seriously, David this is not complicated: If you are *not* going to appeal to human beings on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion or income–i.e. pitch the big tent–then common citizenship is all you have left. Beyond that there is *nothing*–no common appeal. All you have is naked self-interest.

    4) Finally … isn’t it a bit cheeky for someone whose own son–brought up by Brooks in America as an American–has enlisted not in the US, but the Israeli Army, to lecture the rest of us on the evil “identity politics”. What’s says more about identity than what you are willing to fight for? Say what you like, but Trump’s voters are the kind of people who see their identity as “American” and enlist in the US army.

  248. @Forbes

    Blacks are a threat to property values in Manhattan and upscale SWPL Brooklyn too, that’s why they have been, willy-nilly, removed from these locales by public policy directed by the machers of Manhattan.
     
    A better example of historical revisionism couldn't be found. In 1960, 95% of Blacks in Manhattan lived in Harlem (above E.96th St., and north of CP/W. 110th St.). Whatever the machers have been about, it hasn't been removing Blacks from south of Harlem--where real estate is exceedingly expensive by any measure.

    Hasn’t Harlem been gentrifying lately? And Bed-Stuy, in Brooklyn?

  249. @fnn
    I have never liked Keillor’, but I'd like to read (not hear) his explanation of why Minneapolis (not St. Paul) was for many years "the capital of anti-Semitism in the United States":
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Minneapolis#Politics.2C_corruption.2C_anti-Semitism_and_social_change

    Minneapolis was known for anti-Semitism beginning in the 1880s and through the 1950s.[29] The city was described as "the capital of anti-Semitism in the United States" in 1946 by Carey McWilliams[30] and in 1959 by Gunther Plaut.[31] At that time the city's Jews were excluded from membership in many organizations, faced employment discrimination, and were considered unwelcome residents in some neighborhoods.[32] Jews in Minneapolis were also not allowed to buy homes in certain neighborhoods of Minneapolis.[33]
     
    An interesting topic, but I'm almost certain he would have nothing interesting to say about it.

    If you are going to steal from Wikipedia, at least take the citations out.

    • Replies: @fnn
    Left in deliberately cuz it shows they weren't just pulling it all out of their ass.
  250. @Anon
    Costanzas were supposed to be Italian. Ever wonder why there are so many TV characters who are supposed to be "Italian" but are Jewish? The Costanzas, Bea Arthur as Dorothy on the Golden Girls, Carla on Cheers, etc..

    Costanzas were supposed to be Italian. Ever wonder why there are so many TV characters who are supposed to be “Italian” but are Jewish? The Costanzas, Bea Arthur as Dorothy on the Golden Girls, Carla on Cheers, etc..

    It’s also interesting how well it works when Italians play Jews/Jews play Italians: Abe Vigoda, Paul Giamatti, John Turturro, James Caan, etc.

    • Replies: @SFG
    I think there was a genetic study showing a huge genetic influx from Italians into the Ashkenazi gene pool in Roman times. Which explains why Jews can play Italians, and vice versa.
    , @ScarletNumber
    While Ray Romano is Italian, the creator of Everybody Loves Raymond is Jewish.

    They have said there are a lot of commonalities between the two types of families. Doris Roberts, who won four Emmy Awards playing Raymond's mother, is Jewish.
  251. @Anonymous

    I read that Jewish bumpkin and can tell exactly what he is: only worth slaying. What I want to know about a pro writer like that though is who the hell he reads deeply. What flicks his creative spark? Who taught him to tell a billionaire where he’s from and what he does and oh also that’s he not Jewish, do that and your billionaire will go to bed unsettled. That seems most of all immature to me.
     
    Perhaps I misunderstood what you wrote, but Garrison Keillor is not Jewish.

    Actually that’s interesting to me. I never heard of the man. I figured he was Jewish because he was writing pretty assertively about Jews. That’s rare, whatever way ya slice it. Through me off ya know. But, I’ve also been wanting to call somebody a Jewish bumpkin for like a month now so I can’t say I’d even take it back it felt great. kidding.

  252. @larry lurker
    OT: ABC News has an article (and video that I haven't watched yet) about college drop-out Milo Yiannapolous.

    Paragraph 4 of 31:


    Many of the attacks, known as “trolling,” came from anonymous users, but not all. Milo Yiannopoulos, one of the most infamous trolls on the internet, was one of them. He is an editor at Breitbart, the conservative news website.
     
    We learn something that sounds sort of interesting in paragraph 29 of 31:

    There was also a wave of support for Leslie Jones with #LoveforLeslie and she is now back on Twitter. Jones took action and reported Yiannopoulos to Twitter. In response, the company permanently suspended his account for violating their rules and conditions.
     
    What did Milo say exactly, and where/when did he say it?

    We don't know, but we have to assume it must have been really, really bad- so bad that ABC News couldn't publish any of his comments, no matter how heavily censored.

    permanently suspended

    This sounds like something from 1984.

  253. @Steve Sailer
    "I could be wrong, but I suspect Trump would be the president who had the most Jewish friends growing up."

    Could be.

    Was JFK's neighborhood growing up pretty Jewish?

    Most recent Presidents grew up in neighborhoods that were either pretty rural or downscale (Eisenhower, Nixon, Carter, etc, or pretty WASP old money).

    JFK was the son of a millionaire. His mother was the daughter of a popular Mayor of Boston. He attended Choate, a wealthy WASPy Prep School, and then went on to Harvard. He did go to elementary school in Boston but he attended the prestigious Noble and Greenough Lower School, which was filled with the sons of white, Protestant families.

    Later he attended Riverdale School near NYC and a year at the Catholic Canterbury School, in New Milford, Connecticut.

    I’m sure that JFK knew more Jews than the average Gentile in pre-ww2 America. But they all would have been wealthy and upper-class like himself.

  254. @SFG
    He was probably responding to Hillary having all the black people with relatives killed by police speak.

    I would actually guess it's probably easier to be a serial killer in the Midwest and get away with it over a long time--plenty of room to hide bodies, etc. Of course the overall level of crime is lower. Serial killers are scary and great for movies but actually quite rare.

    Well, Muslim terrorist attacks are rare, too, in the sense that only a few happen a year and you’re not likely to be killed in one. The same with murders by illegal aliens. Nevertheless…

    I am not an invade nor inviter, but Trump’s tactics are heinous.

    I especially loved the part where one woman said “My [son?] was killed by a Russian who overstayed his visa”. It is as if simply being in the country illegally for any amount of time and for any reason will drive someone to murder. Such demagoguery we’ve not seen from a major party nominee in a very long time, if ever.

    • Replies: @SFG
    True. I would still argue that if you consider immigration to be an important issue, he is your best bet.
    , @ATX Hipster
    I agree the rhetoric gets out of hand, but the point is not that there's some sort of Bloodthirsty Illegal Syndrome. The point is that we don't even try to screen the people we allow into the country in the first place, so we end up with a lot of undesirables who never would have had the opportunity to murder an American citizen under a sane immigration policy.

    If a citizen kills a citizen there may have been no way to screen for it - citizens have a right to be here after all. An illegal immigrant murdering an American citizen, on the other hand, is preventable.
  255. @Steve Sailer
    "I'm dreaming of a white Christmas"?

    Yeah, lol. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is out there one Christmas eve, “The Christmas Song”, etc. Those definitely mention Christmas.

    BTW, Steve, here’s a new dog whistle for you and others:

    “I like the kind of people who SING Christmas songs, not the kind of people who WRITE them!”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Yeah, lol. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is out there one Christmas eve, “The Christmas Song”, etc. Those definitely mention Christmas.

    They are secular though. They act subversively by substituting for the religious content.
    , @Honesthughgrant
    The reason all these Jewish songwriters wrote all these Christmas songs is because they were trying to make $$$.. There was a big market for Christmas songs, and they were trying to fill it.

    So we get songs about Snow and Winter and Silver Belles, Santa Claus, Snowmen, Reindeer, and Toyland.

    Christmas songs that aren't really about, y'know Christmas.

    What's funny is that even a secular song about December Snow by Irving Berlin, is now too "Christian" and "Exclusionary".
  256. @Anonymous
    I was taking a quick look into Emma Lazarus, whose poem is getting a lot of play these days as some kind of nostrum against Trumpish borders. When she wasn't telling us This is Who We Are, i.e. a nation of immigrants taken in without regard to race or creed or rank, she was advocating for a Jewish nation in Palestine without cracking a smile, forming the Society for the Improvement and Colonization of East European Jews, and sticking up for these now elite German Jews, who in 1877 were the arriviste bane of New York hoteliers:

    Judge Henry Hilton, the Grand Union Hotel's owner, explained he had no objection to the Sephardic elite. Those like Emma Lazarus' family, who had lived in America since before the Revolution, were the refined, "true Hebrews." According to Hilton, only the dirty, greedy, German immigrant "Seligman Jews" were unwanted.
     

    Well, we know Emma Lazarus sucks because she encouraged Steve Sailer’s grandparents to come to the U.S.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Well, we know Emma Lazarus sucks because she encouraged Steve Sailer’s grandparents to come to the U.S.
     
    More because her poem is now invoked as a quasi-foundational document.

    As I've remarked before, mediocre poetry should never be used as the basis for government policy.
  257. @SFG
    He was probably responding to Hillary having all the black people with relatives killed by police speak.

    I would actually guess it's probably easier to be a serial killer in the Midwest and get away with it over a long time--plenty of room to hide bodies, etc. Of course the overall level of crime is lower. Serial killers are scary and great for movies but actually quite rare.

    PS, isn’t there a lot of room to hide bodies in, say, spacious New England, with all those states like Maine or Vermont?

    Also a lot of room to bury bodies in the desert out west.

    Yet not too many serial killers come out of New England. Perhaps we need to turn to our human biodiversity textbook to see why.

  258. @Bee
    Yeah, lol. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is out there one Christmas eve, "The Christmas Song", etc. Those definitely mention Christmas.

    BTW, Steve, here's a new dog whistle for you and others:

    "I like the kind of people who SING Christmas songs, not the kind of people who WRITE them!"

    Yeah, lol. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is out there one Christmas eve, “The Christmas Song”, etc. Those definitely mention Christmas.

    They are secular though. They act subversively by substituting for the religious content.

    • Replies: @Bee
    So now you can't even write secular Christmas songs anymore?

    If you want to have more wildly successful religious Christmas songs, why don't you write some? It's a free country.

    However, it's almost without question that secular Christmas songs are so successful precisely because they ''are'' secular, and more people find themselves enjoying them without feeling tied to religion.
    , @Karl
    > They are secular though. They became wildly popular because that's what actual Christians wanted to sing with their kids.


    fixed it for you.
  259. @George
    Queens? Trump spent his formative years at a military academy in upstate NY and the Univ of Pennsylvania Wharton school. He spent some time at Fordham which is in The Bronx. So he may not be the Queens story I see in a lot of poorly researched bios.

    Oddly nobody notices that the US Open is in the very wealthy area, Forest Hills, Queens NY. Before being shipped off to the military academy The Donald went to High School at the The Kew-Forest School, Forest as in Forest Hills. 'Due to behavior problems, Trump left the school at age 13 and was enrolled in the New York Military Academy' -wikipedia

    Notable alumni of the The Kew-Forest School seem to include Trump and Jewish people.

    the US Open is in the very wealthy area, Forest Hills, Queens NY.

    Well it was from 1915-20 and 1924-77. Since then it has been on the grounds of the World’s Fair in Flushing.

  260. @syonredux
    Here's an interesting piece about a group of wealthy Bel Air matrons who support Trump:

    Past a pair of Rolls-Royces parked in the driveway and a bodyguard who answers the door, the first thing you encounter upon entering Toni Holt Kramer’s house is a picture of Donald Trump.
    This Hollywood reporter turned bicoastal socialite is the founder of “Trumpettes USA,” a group of mostly high-society female friends and admirers of the GOP nominee — including Gennifer Flowers, of Bill Clinton sex scandal notoriety — dedicated to making Trump America’s next president.
     

    The world of Trump and the Trumpettes is unsubtly wealthy, full of knuckle-sized bejeweled rings and multiple vacation homes. Its residents are ideologically flexible: Like Trump, they have donated extensively to both parties and claim friendships with power players across the political spectrum. (Kramer says she has been both a friend and donor to Hillary Clinton.) And like Trump, the Trumpettes and their male counterparts, “the Trumpsters,” are politically incorrect — often much more so than the proudly irreverent nominee himself.

     


    Those gathered at Kramer’s home were largely dismissive of criticism that Trump’s campaign has played off racial tensions (“Black Lives Matter and all that bullshit”) or that some of his supporters are motivated by bigotry (“I was raised by a black nanny, there’s no prejudice on my side”). They disbelieve polls that peg their candidate as deeply unpopular with women — and some don’t think any woman should be president anyway (“You think ISIS is going to listen to her?”). And if they have quibbles with Trump’s rhetoric, it’s because they believe he has been, at times, too restrained (One “regrets” that Trump dropped the birther issue).
     

    To the Trumpettes, the candidate’s lack of governing experience is irrelevant. The proof of his ability to make America great again is in his business empire and the properties contained within it, places Trumpettes know well.
    “The reason I love his club and Trump International is because it’s perfection,” Kramer said of Mar-a-Lago, his private Palm Beach club, and Trump’s nearby golf course. “That’s the way he’ll run the country.

     
    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/donald-trump-2016-trumpettes-bel-air-214206

    The women in the photo at the beginning of the article are an exhibit of bad plastic surgery.

  261. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    "I'm dreaming of a white Christmas"?

    For what it’s worth, reposting this because I accidentally replied to you elsewhere.

    Indeed, and I had it in mind as I composed that post. Perhaps I should have written “many” rather than “any”. Still, I think what I wrote is largely accurate.

    And, again, note that the content of “White Christmas” is secular rather than religious. (A skeptic might contend that such a fact entails that using the word in a song does more harm than good – it subverts Christianity by substituting secular content for the religious substance of its concepts. Paging Kevin MacDonald…)

    • Replies: @SFG
    I think they just wanted money. There was a market, so...
    , @Hibernian
    Rudolph the Red Nose Reindeer has a Christian theme; the last shall be first, the first last. It doesn't specifically reference the Incarnation except by mention of the word Christmas, so it's watered down compared to God Rest ye Merry Gentlemen, etc.
  262. @Bee
    Well, we know Emma Lazarus sucks because she encouraged Steve Sailer's grandparents to come to the U.S.

    Well, we know Emma Lazarus sucks because she encouraged Steve Sailer’s grandparents to come to the U.S.

    More because her poem is now invoked as a quasi-foundational document.

    As I’ve remarked before, mediocre poetry should never be used as the basis for government policy.

    • Replies: @Bee
    Well, I agree, but I have no idea why Emma Lazarus herself is demonized for writing a nice poem (and all because she supported a Jewish homeland? So what. She probably supported a Swedish homeland, too. What of it?).

    We already got Sailer, but I imagine quite a lot of other people posting on this board are descended from at least a few post-1883 (!) immigrants to the U.S. (unless iSteve is wildly popular among African-Americans. Who are the black posters here?).

    BTW, Lazarus' poem was commissioned by WASP politician William M. Evarts, and encouraged by WASP Constance Cary Harrison. No one ever criticizes either of them here, but of course if either had been Jewish we'd hear all about them.
  263. @Anonymous
    Yeah, lol. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is out there one Christmas eve, “The Christmas Song”, etc. Those definitely mention Christmas.

    They are secular though. They act subversively by substituting for the religious content.

    So now you can’t even write secular Christmas songs anymore?

    If you want to have more wildly successful religious Christmas songs, why don’t you write some? It’s a free country.

    However, it’s almost without question that secular Christmas songs are so successful precisely because they ”are” secular, and more people find themselves enjoying them without feeling tied to religion.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Few write good Christmas songs anymore, although Maria Carey and her co-composer have made a bundle off writing a catchy one about 20 years ago, but decent Christmas movies still get made now and then, like Elf and the Santa Clause series.
  264. @oh its just me too
    part of me feels in a few years - all this liberal hysteria and hand wringing is going to look like the fuddy-duddies in the 1960s objecting to rock and roll and the hippies.

    We have a counter-counter cultural revolution going on and the establishment is freaking out.


    BTW< I am a WASP from Queens, ask me anything a couple of decades younger than the Donald.
    I like Trump back in the wolham rink days (yeah i know I spelled it wrong) then found him gaudy but now I think he's great.

    I always find it funny that people put a blanket definition of queens - similar to NJ, Brooklyn -when i was a kid there were still wasp neighborhoods in queens (though a lot of non wasps lived there too) - bayside, richmond hill, forest hills -when the US open was actually played there) ...

    but also remember that there still farms in queens after wwii - in fact i think there are still two - but they are kept more for cultural purposes now, obviously.

    BTW, I too went to public schools - i was in IGC so 90% of my class were jewish..

    Re distinguished WASPs from Queens: Samuel Huntington (Clash of Civilizations).
    He went to Stuyvesant High School, too.

    • Replies: @oh its just me too
    Jacoob Ris lived in Richmond Hill - Theodore Roosevelt came out to a Episcopal church there to give his (Ris's daughter) away at a wedding. The church is still there.

    Huntington - that's interesting because he had an old time New York accent, which, incidentally Norman Rockwell had too.
  265. @Bee
    So now you can't even write secular Christmas songs anymore?

    If you want to have more wildly successful religious Christmas songs, why don't you write some? It's a free country.

    However, it's almost without question that secular Christmas songs are so successful precisely because they ''are'' secular, and more people find themselves enjoying them without feeling tied to religion.

    Few write good Christmas songs anymore, although Maria Carey and her co-composer have made a bundle off writing a catchy one about 20 years ago, but decent Christmas movies still get made now and then, like Elf and the Santa Clause series.

  266. @ScarletNumber
    If you are going to steal from Wikipedia, at least take the citations out.

    Left in deliberately cuz it shows they weren’t just pulling it all out of their ass.

  267. @Sam Haysom
    That was part of it for sure but he father and brothers are both solicitous of elite opinion so I don't think it can entirely be isolated by that factor. I think there was also the religious conversion factor- evangelical religion truly saved him from personal disaster. It's noticeable that as his faith seems to have flagged- I think he is even drinking again- his attempts to curry elite opinion have increased.

    It’s noticeable that as his faith seems to have flagged- I think he is even drinking again- his attempts to curry elite opinion have increased.

    Laura’s always been susceptible to elite (sic) opinion.

  268. @syonredux

    Well, we know Emma Lazarus sucks because she encouraged Steve Sailer’s grandparents to come to the U.S.
     
    More because her poem is now invoked as a quasi-foundational document.

    As I've remarked before, mediocre poetry should never be used as the basis for government policy.

    Well, I agree, but I have no idea why Emma Lazarus herself is demonized for writing a nice poem (and all because she supported a Jewish homeland? So what. She probably supported a Swedish homeland, too. What of it?).

    We already got Sailer, but I imagine quite a lot of other people posting on this board are descended from at least a few post-1883 (!) immigrants to the U.S. (unless iSteve is wildly popular among African-Americans. Who are the black posters here?).

    BTW, Lazarus’ poem was commissioned by WASP politician William M. Evarts, and encouraged by WASP Constance Cary Harrison. No one ever criticizes either of them here, but of course if either had been Jewish we’d hear all about them.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    I have no idea
     
    The rest is commentary.
    , @SFG
    Sailer's big thing is opposing immigration. She's famous for writing a poem in favor of immigration. It's not that hard to figure out. ;) Nobody's criticizing her role in Henry George's Single Tax movement.
    , @syonredux

    Well, I agree, but I have no idea why Emma Lazarus herself is demonized for writing a nice poem
     
    Because it's being used to shape policy.End of story.

    We already got Sailer, but I imagine quite a lot of other people posting on this board are descended from at least a few post-1883 (!) immigrants to the U.S.

     

    So am I. My Ashkenazi grandfather got out of Latvia just as Stalin invaded. Thing is, I'm not sentimental about it. I don't think that that means that the USA is forever obligated to take people in.
    , @Anonymous

    She probably supported a Swedish homeland, too.
     
    Since you seem to know so much about it can you tell me what she did for Swedish or Irish or Italian immigrants? Besides establishing the Hebrew Technical Institute for training immigrants who might be attracted to that kind of name.

    Really, does it not seem strange to you to reimagine (?) and idealize America as a place of refuge for all comers while being both highly conscious of the need for a homogeneous ethnostate of your own and fully aware of some old-stock Americans' resentments about their country becoming increasing heterogeneous?

    She's simply another data point in my hypothesis: that the bitter pill of ethnic self-interest is being washed down with enough schmaltz to get whites, wherever they are, drunk enough to sign away their own houses.

    Maybe they just have low schmaltz tolerance.

    , @Hibernian
    All of my immigrant forbears came here post-1880 except the immigrant forbears (probably her parents and probably Famine refugees) of my Great Grandmother who was born in Boston in 1860. That doesn't mean I have to agree to the abolition of American borders and culture.

    I'm in favor of diversity, within reason. The last two words are key.
  269. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Ralph Lauren's wife's surname is Loherbeer, (sp.?) and her family is originally from Austria. While she was raised Catholic, it was speculated by Michael Gross's biography "Ralph Lauren: An American Original" that her family were originally Jewish converts some centuries ago in Austria.

    Of course, the question remains: where did Jews who lived in Poland that later migrated to Germany come from? They weren't indigenous to Poland and they had to come from someplace. Perhaps they were just returning to the German lands that they had migrated to prior to living in Poland. Just as possible as any other speculation on back and forth migration from one of the world's ancient ethnic tribes.

    It’s thought that most Polish Jews are descended from West European and German Jews who moved east during the medieval period due to periodic persecutions and expulsions.

  270. @Clyde

    Trump has been doing his good friend Joan Rivers’ shtick this whole time, I don’t know why nobody gets that.
     
    I noticed this ages ago. Trump doesn't do (channel) Rivers all the time but you can see it sometimes. I am pretty sure Joan Rivers was non-PC and a bit right wing. She made me laugh in the 1980s when I would see her on TV. I classify Trump and Rivers as old school New Yorkers.

    Joan died a martyr, so i call her St. Joan.

  271. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    From my time in the Twin Cities, the people there were always miffed (as much a Minnesotan can show such things) about being essentially forgotten. They felt (and were, in fact, correct) that the Twin Cities was a top-tier city on par with Seattle, San Diego, Portland, etc. Yet, nobody outside of the upper Midwest ever mentioned or thought about the Twin Cities while the country did have a feeling for other similar cities.

    In essence, Mpls-St. Paul is the pretty girl who never gets asked to dance, and she can't understand why. Thus the frustration.

    So where does passive-aggressive anger come from? Well, to continue my little analogy, Twin Cities folk worry that they don't get asked out because they're terrible in bed, i.e. a pretty face and sweet body but boring as hell.

    That all being said, I liked the Twin Cities. If not for God-awful weather, it'd be a great place to live. Also, it has the quintessential song written about it. How many cities outside of NYC and LA have that.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FED6AHlXXaA

    That all being said, I liked the Twin Cities. If not for God-awful weather, it’d be a great place to live.

    What Minneapolis has going for it beyond the obvious big plus of the German-Scandinavian core population, is that it sits next to the North Woods, which is a better recreational getaway than other midwestern cities have.

    It’s problem is … diversification. If it could have somehow frozen it’s population demographics at 1970, with it’s quality white population and low black population it would have been a place–maybe *the* place–that whites would flock to as the nation diversifies and whites seek refuge. But as they let in the Somalis, the core city now is not so pleasant. (Sure, better than Chicago, but that’s a low bar.)

    This is the fundamental problem with keeping the quality of any grouping–a club, a community, a nation–you have to have some way to keep out the riff-raff!

    Basically what all of what “civil rights”, new-left politics–and what so animates the New York Times editorial board–is that white people *must not be allowed* to keep out the riff-raff.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Basically what all of what “civil rights”, new-left politics–and what so animates the New York Times editorial board–is that white people *must not be allowed* to keep out the riff-raff.
     
    It's no wonder, as the likes of Pinch Sulzberger and Mark Dayton aren't exactly the cream of the crop.
    , @Honesthughgrant
    You can bet that Garrison K. is 100% in favor of Somalis' in the Twin-Cities and wishes there were 10x more.

    And considers anyone who doesn't agree, a racist, bigot, and homphobe.
  272. @David
    It's interesting to me how sentimental NPR and its listeners are. Keillor's show has been a sad imitation of itself for at least 20 years and now that he's leaving, they actually plan to continue the show. Why?

    Click or Clack dies and they just keep their show rolling by endless permutations of ancient shows. They even have new sponsors announced by the living guy while the dead one sticks to the old sponsors. Rather creepy.

    Prairie Home Companion has no currency in Manhattan except among those pale spinsters gripping their WNYC tot-bags on the subway. When Garrison made his stand in Manhattan, he swept into stores and restaurants like a flamboyant queen, with an entourage, expecting to be recognized and celebrated. I think it broke his heart that he never was.

    OT, Kareem Abdul Jabbar was on NPR this morning and said, "Ignorance is not something that lends itself to a meaningful discussion. Some of these people really shouldn't vote because they don't know what the issues are. And I think people who are voting in the blind are doing a disservice to our country by not being better informed."

    It almost like a literacy test might be in order.

    Prairie Home Companion has no currency in Manhattan

    Does it have any currency with the Somalis of Minnesota?

    • Replies: @IBC
    Probably not, but forcing psychologically disturbed Somali-Americans to listen to Garrison Keillor's singing might offer a culturally-appropriate, local alternative to the hyena therapy that's considered best-practice mental care back in Somalia. Bonus: If they survive the treatment, their whole extended clan will become life-long NPR supporters and help ensure "A Prairie Home Companion" survives the next 40 years in re-runs, like Lawrence Welk on PBS...
  273. @J1234

    GK said about Trump:
    "The brim shadows your face, which gives a sinister look, as if you'd come to town to announce the closing of the pulp factory. "

     

    This from the ugliest guy in show business. If I didn't know who Garrison Keillor and I saw him on the street, I'd check to see where my children were real quick. Big creepy eyes and a mushed in face. He pretty much looks like Jack Elam after a traffic accident.

    I used to have some connections with the music business, and what I'd heard from musicians who had performed on his show was that he was a very insecure guy wearing a costume of confidence. One described him to me as one of those guys who was never popular in high school, so he spends his life trying to be the guy he never was in high school.

    It's in this context of insecurity that I view Keillor's comments about Trump. You see, Keillor honestly sees himself as the voice of flyover America, and to have that role usurped by a New Yorker who lives in a Manhattan apartment that's decorated like a French palace must be infuriating for him. Of course, Keillor isn't the voice of flyover America. Never was. Not even close. He's the voice of middle America in the same way Willa Cather was - as a costume you put on until something better comes along.

    The obvious response from the left would be, "But that's what Trump is! In spades! He's a phony!" But Trump doesn't pretend to be one of us like GK does. Trump tries to connect with us as an American, and he doesn't do it in the Barrack Obama way - putting on a Kansas accent when he's in Kansas, and talking black when he's in New Orleans just a few days later.

    Trump talks like Trump all the time. His views may change, but his persona doesn't. My dad is 96 years old, and I remember his sour expression 40 years ago when mom used to have Prairie Home Companion on Saturday nights. He hated Garrison Keillor, and Dad is a midwesterner, born and raised. And like most real midwesterners, he hates phonies. I always admired him because of that.

    I used to have some connections with the music business, and what I’d heard from musicians who had performed on his show was that he was a very insecure guy wearing a costume of confidence. One described him to me as one of those guys who was never popular in high school, so he spends his life trying to be the guy he never was in high school.

    Wonder if there’s a similar dynamic behind Roger Ebert’s seemingly out-of-character political ruminations.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "what I’d heard from musicians who had performed on his show was that he was a very insecure guy wearing a costume of confidence."

    A lot of high achievers are like that. It's a pretty good combination for getting a lot done.
  274. @AnotherDad

    That all being said, I liked the Twin Cities. If not for God-awful weather, it’d be a great place to live.
     
    What Minneapolis has going for it beyond the obvious big plus of the German-Scandinavian core population, is that it sits next to the North Woods, which is a better recreational getaway than other midwestern cities have.

    It's problem is ... diversification. If it could have somehow frozen it's population demographics at 1970, with it's quality white population and low black population it would have been a place--maybe *the* place--that whites would flock to as the nation diversifies and whites seek refuge. But as they let in the Somalis, the core city now is not so pleasant. (Sure, better than Chicago, but that's a low bar.)

    This is the fundamental problem with keeping the quality of any grouping--a club, a community, a nation--you have to have some way to keep out the riff-raff!


    Basically what all of what "civil rights", new-left politics--and what so animates the New York Times editorial board--is that white people *must not be allowed* to keep out the riff-raff.

    Basically what all of what “civil rights”, new-left politics–and what so animates the New York Times editorial board–is that white people *must not be allowed* to keep out the riff-raff.

    It’s no wonder, as the likes of Pinch Sulzberger and Mark Dayton aren’t exactly the cream of the crop.

  275. @Bee
    Yeah, lol. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is out there one Christmas eve, "The Christmas Song", etc. Those definitely mention Christmas.

    BTW, Steve, here's a new dog whistle for you and others:

    "I like the kind of people who SING Christmas songs, not the kind of people who WRITE them!"

    The reason all these Jewish songwriters wrote all these Christmas songs is because they were trying to make $$$.. There was a big market for Christmas songs, and they were trying to fill it.

    So we get songs about Snow and Winter and Silver Belles, Santa Claus, Snowmen, Reindeer, and Toyland.

    Christmas songs that aren’t really about, y’know Christmas.

    What’s funny is that even a secular song about December Snow by Irving Berlin, is now too “Christian” and “Exclusionary”.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Some of them, in addition to saying the word Christmas, have low key Christian themes: Christian fellowship, and the exaltation of the lowly in Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer. Christmas in Killarney references a priest, Father John.
  276. @Steve Sailer
    "I could be wrong, but I suspect Trump would be the president who had the most Jewish friends growing up."

    Could be.

    Was JFK's neighborhood growing up pretty Jewish?

    Most recent Presidents grew up in neighborhoods that were either pretty rural or downscale (Eisenhower, Nixon, Carter, etc, or pretty WASP old money).

    OT, but at the Disney museum in San Francisco, run by the family, not the company, they had posted a roll call of Walt’s high school class in Chicago. From a crude eyeballing of the list, about half the names were Jewish. Surprising, and interesting given the rumors surrounding him later in life. Apparently he had plenty of Jewish contact before making it to Hollywood.

  277. @AnotherDad

    That all being said, I liked the Twin Cities. If not for God-awful weather, it’d be a great place to live.
     
    What Minneapolis has going for it beyond the obvious big plus of the German-Scandinavian core population, is that it sits next to the North Woods, which is a better recreational getaway than other midwestern cities have.

    It's problem is ... diversification. If it could have somehow frozen it's population demographics at 1970, with it's quality white population and low black population it would have been a place--maybe *the* place--that whites would flock to as the nation diversifies and whites seek refuge. But as they let in the Somalis, the core city now is not so pleasant. (Sure, better than Chicago, but that's a low bar.)

    This is the fundamental problem with keeping the quality of any grouping--a club, a community, a nation--you have to have some way to keep out the riff-raff!


    Basically what all of what "civil rights", new-left politics--and what so animates the New York Times editorial board--is that white people *must not be allowed* to keep out the riff-raff.

    You can bet that Garrison K. is 100% in favor of Somalis’ in the Twin-Cities and wishes there were 10x more.

    And considers anyone who doesn’t agree, a racist, bigot, and homphobe.

  278. @James O'Meara
    Dude, I just posted this BEFORE reading your comment!

    The boys from MST3k were/are a good index of “college educated” Minnesota SWPLs (as we would say today). Always commented if a movie “only has white people” in it, or black or female “stereotypes.” But one of their funniest riffs was when they started calling Jack Elam’s small town creepy character “Young Garrison Keillor.” [The Girl in Lover's Lane]. Funny, because true.


    Worse than Jack Elam, Keillor reminds me of those high minded and self-congratulatory graduate students my wife knew when working on her doctorate in Madison, WI in the 1980’s and 90’s. Wisconsin and southern Minnesota were filled with ’em. The guys with the beards and the girls with the peasant dresses and the really really bad folk music and yechh!

    Say what you want about Bryant Gumbel; like my dad, he was spot on about GK almost 30 years ago:

    Don’t look for Cher or Garrison Keillor to appear on NBC’s “Today” show anytime soon. Co-host Bryant Gumbel, in an interview published in Us magazine, mentioned Keillor as being foremost among the “real jerks” he’s had to interview. “I feel sorry for him because he has such a glorified opinion of himself,” Gumbel said.

    https://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P2-3900154.html

  279. @Desiderius

    I used to have some connections with the music business, and what I’d heard from musicians who had performed on his show was that he was a very insecure guy wearing a costume of confidence. One described him to me as one of those guys who was never popular in high school, so he spends his life trying to be the guy he never was in high school.
     
    Wonder if there's a similar dynamic behind Roger Ebert's seemingly out-of-character political ruminations.

    “what I’d heard from musicians who had performed on his show was that he was a very insecure guy wearing a costume of confidence.”

    A lot of high achievers are like that. It’s a pretty good combination for getting a lot done.

  280. @Anonymous
    For what it's worth, reposting this because I accidentally replied to you elsewhere.

    Indeed, and I had it in mind as I composed that post. Perhaps I should have written “many” rather than “any”. Still, I think what I wrote is largely accurate.

    And, again, note that the content of “White Christmas” is secular rather than religious. (A skeptic might contend that such a fact entails that using the word in a song does more harm than good – it subverts Christianity by substituting secular content for the religious substance of its concepts. Paging Kevin MacDonald…)

    I think they just wanted money. There was a market, so…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Are the directors, producers, and writers in Hollywood motivated solely by money in their choices of content and characters?

    The endless stream of anti-Southern films, Holocaust movies, etc, etc. The absence of Christian and Muslim heroic stories (Passion of the Christ controversy). The new Ghostbusters. The anti-Gentile Mad Men. In a majority White, Christian, straight country, do you make the most money by insulting your audience and mocking and subverting their history and culture.

    No doubt money was a goal of the songwriters, but do you really think ethnocentric insecurities and hatreds played no role in their thematic choices?
  281. @Bee
    Well, I agree, but I have no idea why Emma Lazarus herself is demonized for writing a nice poem (and all because she supported a Jewish homeland? So what. She probably supported a Swedish homeland, too. What of it?).

    We already got Sailer, but I imagine quite a lot of other people posting on this board are descended from at least a few post-1883 (!) immigrants to the U.S. (unless iSteve is wildly popular among African-Americans. Who are the black posters here?).

    BTW, Lazarus' poem was commissioned by WASP politician William M. Evarts, and encouraged by WASP Constance Cary Harrison. No one ever criticizes either of them here, but of course if either had been Jewish we'd hear all about them.

    I have no idea

    The rest is commentary.

  282. @Bee
    Well, Muslim terrorist attacks are rare, too, in the sense that only a few happen a year and you're not likely to be killed in one. The same with murders by illegal aliens. Nevertheless...

    I am not an invade nor inviter, but Trump's tactics are heinous.

    I especially loved the part where one woman said "My [son?] was killed by a Russian who overstayed his visa". It is as if simply being in the country illegally for any amount of time and for any reason will drive someone to murder. Such demagoguery we've not seen from a major party nominee in a very long time, if ever.

    True. I would still argue that if you consider immigration to be an important issue, he is your best bet.

  283. @Bee
    Well, I agree, but I have no idea why Emma Lazarus herself is demonized for writing a nice poem (and all because she supported a Jewish homeland? So what. She probably supported a Swedish homeland, too. What of it?).

    We already got Sailer, but I imagine quite a lot of other people posting on this board are descended from at least a few post-1883 (!) immigrants to the U.S. (unless iSteve is wildly popular among African-Americans. Who are the black posters here?).

    BTW, Lazarus' poem was commissioned by WASP politician William M. Evarts, and encouraged by WASP Constance Cary Harrison. No one ever criticizes either of them here, but of course if either had been Jewish we'd hear all about them.

    Sailer’s big thing is opposing immigration. She’s famous for writing a poem in favor of immigration. It’s not that hard to figure out. 😉 Nobody’s criticizing her role in Henry George’s Single Tax movement.

    • Replies: @Bee
    Sailer's thing is opposing immigration... mostly in today's context, and from the third world or non-white countries.

    I don't think Sailer's thing is opposing European immigration in 1884. That's why the constant reaching back to the Lazarus era is so odd to see.
  284. @syonredux

    Costanzas were supposed to be Italian. Ever wonder why there are so many TV characters who are supposed to be “Italian” but are Jewish? The Costanzas, Bea Arthur as Dorothy on the Golden Girls, Carla on Cheers, etc..
     
    It's also interesting how well it works when Italians play Jews/Jews play Italians: Abe Vigoda, Paul Giamatti, John Turturro, James Caan, etc.

    I think there was a genetic study showing a huge genetic influx from Italians into the Ashkenazi gene pool in Roman times. Which explains why Jews can play Italians, and vice versa.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    I think there was a genetic study showing a huge genetic influx from Italians into the Ashkenazi gene pool in Roman times. Which explains why Jews can play Italians, and vice versa.
     
    Yeah, although recent studies indicate that the Italian admixture event was post-Roman:

    Here they’re looking at finer details. When they analyze the origins of the European component of Ashkenazi ancestry, they conclude that most is southern – probably Italian, but that smaller amounts originated from (probably) Western Europe and (more certainly) Eastern Europe: and in that temporal order. They conclude that the Italian admixture slightly predated a late medieval founder event. Different methods came up with somewhat different estimates for the total amount of European ancestry: the local ancestry inference (LAI) approach came up with 53% European, while the GLOBETROTTER analysis came up with an estimate of 67% European ancestry (after calibration by simulations). In their best guess, they split the difference and go for 60% European.

    To sum up, their model is that a population from the Levant mixed with Italians, and shortly thereafter moved to the Rhineland (the founding bottleneck), perhaps mixing to some degree with the local Europeans there, and certainly mixing some with Slavic types when they moved to the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

    How do their conclusions differ from those in the last report? Previously they were thinking that the bottleneck was around 1350, a product of the Black Death and savage persecution – now they’re talking the original settlement in the Rhineland. Previously they had a somewhat lower estimate of European ancestry (~48%, now 60%). I thought these two conclusions likely a couple of years ago.

    The big new point, important if correct, is that the admixture with Italians is relatively recent – too recent to have happened back in Roman times. In their model, this main admixture event is 25-55 generations ago, while the founding bottleneck is 25-35 generations ago. It’s not impossible that the admixture happened at the same time as the founding. This I didn’t expect.

     

    https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2016/07/20/even-more-on-ashkenazi-ancestry/
  285. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Minnesotans, namely urbanites and suburbanites in the Twin Cities, are excruciatingly status-conscious. F. Scott Fitzgerald was the quintessential Minnesotan in that respect.

    Does anyone have a theory to explain it?
     

    Acute status consciousness may not be universal among Twin Citians, but I think you're on to something. I have experienced this attitude in a couple of personal situations that left me quite angry . . . .

    My theory (I grew up about four hours' drive southwest of MSP, in NW Iowa, but well within its ambit): the Twin Cities comprise the de facto, essentially unchallenged capital of the upper midwest/northern plains, and many of their residents see themselves as upholding the standards of sophistication and cultural light-bringing that status entails. They want to be in the conversation with Chicago and Seattle and, yes, perhaps NYC itself, as 'national' cities; the other cities for hundreds of miles are so obviously provincial . . . .

    As I've mentioned before, people where I'm from react a bit differently if a young person says 'I'm moving to the Twin Cities after college' than if he says he's going to try his luck in Omaha or Kansas City or Des Moines or Milwaukee. There's more of a 'Oh, so you're really going to go for it' kind of vibe . . . .

    Minnesotans -- am I wrong about this?

    The Converted Christian Norsemen appear not to understand that to take the admonition “Love thy Neighbor” literally is a very high risk venture.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    The Converted Christian Norsemen appear not to understand that to take the admonition “Love thy Neighbor” literally is a very high risk venture.

     

    The problem is, the CCNs (nice, BTW) are not really interested in loving their actual neighbors, e.g. the hicks/losers who live right there in rural Minnesota and the MSP burbs. They want to import nice new neighbors to love -- 'love' via the delivery of government services paid for by taxing their real neighbors, that is.
  286. Well now that this guy isn’t at PBS trying to convince Manhattan that small towns are just as lame as they portray on Television, he can go back to Minnesota to write up the details of the brand new Somali Pirate Industry that Obama helped set up there. Will he blame it on Kaiser Wilhelm? He’s even more German than Hitler was you know.

  287. @Eric Rasmusen
    True, and Garrison Keillor is a national treasure. But it's fascinating how he has had to write about his small-town roots to achieve his obvious lifetime goal of repudiating them and becoming a sophisticate--- and how he has failed in the process.

    In fact, if he'd succeeded in becoming a sophisticate, he would have lost his creative abilities and been kicked out of the sophisticate crowd, which seems to have happened to some extent. But somehow his perceptiveness when it comes to small-town life fails him when it comes to the nuances of Manhattan. It makes for an interesting contrast with Tom Wolfe, who can describe people from any setting, rich or poor. I bet Tom Wolfe, a Ph.D., is more detached and also knows how to do the hard work of researching how people live and think, while Keillor goes entirely on formative personal experiences.

    Keillor is very good on letting you know exactly where he’s coming from, while Wolfe is relatively opaque on that (in part because being from the post-Confederate intellectual class of Virginia is not very popular). Wolfe is better on other people, but Keillor is extremely good on his strong suit of small town Minnesotans.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Keillor is very good on letting you know exactly where he’s coming from, while Wolfe is relatively opaque on that (in part because being from the post-Confederate intellectual class of Virginia is not very popular). Wolfe is better on other people, but Keillor is extremely good on his strong suit of small town Minnesotans.

     

    It's pretty simple: Wolfe is secure in who and what he is, so he doesn't need to constantly assert and reinforce his identity. Keillor is a convert, from an evangelical Christian to a heretical post-Christian leftist, so he's driven by the constant need to reassert his new religion's bona fides, both for his own benefit, and to send signals to his co-religionists.

    Early Keillor is really good, actually. He's got a knack for character and storytelling that's pretty rare. I just find it a pity he's mostly squandered it on playing variations on the same tune for decades.
  288. @Anonymous
    How old was this well known native New Yorker researcher, and how long ago did this occur? In my interactions, there has been little to no tension among the descendants of German Jews and East European Jews. There aren't even many pure German Jews or pure descendants of old New York Sephardic families left.

    The conversation I related took place sometime around 1990, at which time my friend was in his mid-60s. It sticks in my mind because it was so out of character for my friend to refer to his religion in this way, as he was a completely secular man who wished everyone a Happy Christmas. As he put it, Christmas celebrates of the birth of a Jewish baby boy, so what’s not to like?

  289. @syonredux

    Costanzas were supposed to be Italian. Ever wonder why there are so many TV characters who are supposed to be “Italian” but are Jewish? The Costanzas, Bea Arthur as Dorothy on the Golden Girls, Carla on Cheers, etc..
     
    It's also interesting how well it works when Italians play Jews/Jews play Italians: Abe Vigoda, Paul Giamatti, John Turturro, James Caan, etc.

    While Ray Romano is Italian, the creator of Everybody Loves Raymond is Jewish.

    They have said there are a lot of commonalities between the two types of families. Doris Roberts, who won four Emmy Awards playing Raymond’s mother, is Jewish.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    They have said there are a lot of commonalities between the two types of families. Doris Roberts, who won four Emmy Awards playing Raymond’s mother, is Jewish.
     
    I'm tempted to invoke genetics as a factor, seeing as how Ashkenazi Jews are roughly 50% Italian in terms of ancestry.....
  290. Good show for the goyim. Thank you jews.

  291. @PiltdownMan
    Nobody in Manhattan even cares who Garrison Keillor is, or where St. Paul is.

    And nobody in Queens even knows.

    I'm not trying to be dismissive or catty, I'm just trying to convey my sense of what preoccupies New York City residents.

    Gawker used to draw a disproportionate number of Minneapolitans. I always thought they really wanted to be seen as rootless cosmopolitans for some reason.

  292. People are missing the big picture here. Keillor is wrong about Jews — they are at war with each other and have been for decades like every other White group.

    Bibi served in the Paras as a young man, no doubt he had and has nothing but contempt for Africans, Muslims, etc. Given his brother died at Entebbe. Meanwhile a bunch of rich, spoiled Jewish kids were agitating (at a safe distance) for Blacks etc. Jerry Seinfeld collects cars, and has been notably absent in agitating for BLM, or any other Identity Status Marker stuff. While Mark Zuckerberg eagerly courts elite SJW; and Howard Stern loathes and mocks them.

    For every Jew earnestly SWPL-ing it up, there’s another Jew like Stern or Bibi mocking SWPL or living the life of a hard-bitten Para. Or shooting Jihadi terrorist Palestinians like say, Ehud Barak. Keillor would faint and get the vapors if Barak told him what he *really* did in Beirut for Mossad.

    Keillor is the perfect embodiment of SWPL-ism, status striving, always uncertain, the stuff Seinfeld and Larry David mocked constantly, with rules changing and situational. Its stuff driven by OUTSIDE money and forces. A Gunnery Sgt. in the Marines knows damn well who he is, and what he is, and likely holds himself in higher regard than almost anyone else on the planet save a few SEALs and Delta Force people. Maybe. Would a Gunnery Sgt really care what the glitterati say about him on Twitter? Why would he? He’s a GUNNERY SGT. Stern, Seinfeld, Larry David, Bibi, Barak, are all like that too — they don’t literally care what anyone else thinks of them any more than Trump because their power, status, etc. comes from achievement. There are very few people in the world capable of being a Gunnery Sgt in the Marines; and even fewer of being say, Howard Stern.

    Garrison Keillor will be forgotten ten minutes after he stops making radio shows; I honestly did not know he was still alive. No wonder he’s so insecure and believes in Upper Class Good White people vs. Lower Class Bad White People.
    ——————
    As for peace in Israel, no chance. The Palestinians had their last chance at it during Barak’s PM tenure, when he made about 95% of what the PLA demanded, and Arafat walked out afraid to do any deal as Arafat knew well he would be killed for making any deal. The Palestinians want all of Israel and Jews out or dead. That’s a non-starter and even most liberal Israelis know it. Sharon withdrew from Gaza and got constant rocketing instead.

    Most likely the Israelis will simply deport much/most of the Palestinians into Syria/Lebanon and let them disappear into the maw of ISIS vs. Iran meatgrinder; good riddance to a people with no redeeming human values or qualities whatsoever. Not even the Egyptians care about them any more, having had their own Muslim Brotherhood run things and fail to deliver even affordable bread. Everyone else is focused on the massive Iran/ISIS fight with Turkey, Russia, the US, China, and more being drawn in along with the Saudis, the Gulf emirates, and Pakistan.

  293. @ScarletNumber
    While Ray Romano is Italian, the creator of Everybody Loves Raymond is Jewish.

    They have said there are a lot of commonalities between the two types of families. Doris Roberts, who won four Emmy Awards playing Raymond's mother, is Jewish.

    They have said there are a lot of commonalities between the two types of families. Doris Roberts, who won four Emmy Awards playing Raymond’s mother, is Jewish.

    I’m tempted to invoke genetics as a factor, seeing as how Ashkenazi Jews are roughly 50% Italian in terms of ancestry…..

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    If you read the study that Cochran blogged about, of the roughly half of Ashkenazi ancestry that is of European origin, the vast majority is Southern European but about 10-20% is Northern European. The authors favor that component to be Eastern European rather than Western European, but they can't settle the question definitively from their data.
  294. @Neil Templeton
    The Converted Christian Norsemen appear not to understand that to take the admonition "Love thy Neighbor" literally is a very high risk venture.

    The Converted Christian Norsemen appear not to understand that to take the admonition “Love thy Neighbor” literally is a very high risk venture.

    The problem is, the CCNs (nice, BTW) are not really interested in loving their actual neighbors, e.g. the hicks/losers who live right there in rural Minnesota and the MSP burbs. They want to import nice new neighbors to love — ‘love’ via the delivery of government services paid for by taxing their real neighbors, that is.

  295. @SFG
    I think there was a genetic study showing a huge genetic influx from Italians into the Ashkenazi gene pool in Roman times. Which explains why Jews can play Italians, and vice versa.

    I think there was a genetic study showing a huge genetic influx from Italians into the Ashkenazi gene pool in Roman times. Which explains why Jews can play Italians, and vice versa.

    Yeah, although recent studies indicate that the Italian admixture event was post-Roman:

    Here they’re looking at finer details. When they analyze the origins of the European component of Ashkenazi ancestry, they conclude that most is southern – probably Italian, but that smaller amounts originated from (probably) Western Europe and (more certainly) Eastern Europe: and in that temporal order. They conclude that the Italian admixture slightly predated a late medieval founder event. Different methods came up with somewhat different estimates for the total amount of European ancestry: the local ancestry inference (LAI) approach came up with 53% European, while the GLOBETROTTER analysis came up with an estimate of 67% European ancestry (after calibration by simulations). In their best guess, they split the difference and go for 60% European.

    To sum up, their model is that a population from the Levant mixed with Italians, and shortly thereafter moved to the Rhineland (the founding bottleneck), perhaps mixing to some degree with the local Europeans there, and certainly mixing some with Slavic types when they moved to the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

    How do their conclusions differ from those in the last report? Previously they were thinking that the bottleneck was around 1350, a product of the Black Death and savage persecution – now they’re talking the original settlement in the Rhineland. Previously they had a somewhat lower estimate of European ancestry (~48%, now 60%). I thought these two conclusions likely a couple of years ago.

    The big new point, important if correct, is that the admixture with Italians is relatively recent – too recent to have happened back in Roman times. In their model, this main admixture event is 25-55 generations ago, while the founding bottleneck is 25-35 generations ago. It’s not impossible that the admixture happened at the same time as the founding. This I didn’t expect.

    https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2016/07/20/even-more-on-ashkenazi-ancestry/

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The least reliable aspect of any population genetic study is its estimate of dates. Also, depending on methods, what we may be seeing from that study is a reflection of the latest time admixture occurred. But Cochran is aware of all of this and more, so he would presumably have mentioned that in his post if he thought that was the explanation.
  296. Keillor is an interesting guy. Here he is railing against bean-counting diversitocracy in at the National Press Club in 2015.

    Of course, he proceeded immediately to endorse replacing Andrew Jackson with Harriet Tubman without a hint of irony.

    In the same speech, he not only expressed an appreciation of domestic oil production in “Alaska and Texas and North Dokota” , but because that should enable the U.S. to wash their hands of the “tribes of the Middle East.” He also went on promote nuclear energy, after earlier voicing his opposition the 7th Fleet’s being sent to protect Japan.

    Somehow I suspect these points would not have been as well received had they been delivered by Donald Trump.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    In the same speech, he not only expressed an appreciation of domestic oil production in “Alaska and Texas and North Dokota” , but because that should enable the U.S. to wash their hands of the “tribes of the Middle East.”

    What an idiot. These are just neocon talking points. They have been so going back at least to 9/11.

    We should be consuming Middle Eastern oil, not our own, given how it is cheap and plentiful right now--and that oil is a finite resource.
  297. @Bee
    Well, I agree, but I have no idea why Emma Lazarus herself is demonized for writing a nice poem (and all because she supported a Jewish homeland? So what. She probably supported a Swedish homeland, too. What of it?).

    We already got Sailer, but I imagine quite a lot of other people posting on this board are descended from at least a few post-1883 (!) immigrants to the U.S. (unless iSteve is wildly popular among African-Americans. Who are the black posters here?).

    BTW, Lazarus' poem was commissioned by WASP politician William M. Evarts, and encouraged by WASP Constance Cary Harrison. No one ever criticizes either of them here, but of course if either had been Jewish we'd hear all about them.

    Well, I agree, but I have no idea why Emma Lazarus herself is demonized for writing a nice poem

    Because it’s being used to shape policy.End of story.

    We already got Sailer, but I imagine quite a lot of other people posting on this board are descended from at least a few post-1883 (!) immigrants to the U.S.

    So am I. My Ashkenazi grandfather got out of Latvia just as Stalin invaded. Thing is, I’m not sentimental about it. I don’t think that that means that the USA is forever obligated to take people in.

    • Replies: @utu
    "I’m not sentimental about it." Exactly, because as a Jew you are different. You never assimilate and always you have or must have a Plan B to emigrate. It was Latvia, now it is USA. Who knows which country will be blessed with your presence next? To stop that wandering you either have to cease being Jewish and truly assimilate or make aliyah and go to Israel. But this is not your plan, right? Your Plan A, is to own the whole world and eliminate all borders.
  298. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG
    I think they just wanted money. There was a market, so...

    Are the directors, producers, and writers in Hollywood motivated solely by money in their choices of content and characters?

    The endless stream of anti-Southern films, Holocaust movies, etc, etc. The absence of Christian and Muslim heroic stories (Passion of the Christ controversy). The new Ghostbusters. The anti-Gentile Mad Men. In a majority White, Christian, straight country, do you make the most money by insulting your audience and mocking and subverting their history and culture.

    No doubt money was a goal of the songwriters, but do you really think ethnocentric insecurities and hatreds played no role in their thematic choices?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhzxQCTCI3E
    , @SFG
    Holocaust movies, duh. Anti-Southern, also duh, though to a lesser extent. Mad Men I think is a little ambiguous, but yes. So yes, I think that definitely plays a role.

    But watering down the Christmas songs? Probably they saw a market and that was as far as they could make themselves go. It was another religion after all.
  299. @Steve Sailer
    Keillor is very good on letting you know exactly where he's coming from, while Wolfe is relatively opaque on that (in part because being from the post-Confederate intellectual class of Virginia is not very popular). Wolfe is better on other people, but Keillor is extremely good on his strong suit of small town Minnesotans.

    Keillor is very good on letting you know exactly where he’s coming from, while Wolfe is relatively opaque on that (in part because being from the post-Confederate intellectual class of Virginia is not very popular). Wolfe is better on other people, but Keillor is extremely good on his strong suit of small town Minnesotans.

    It’s pretty simple: Wolfe is secure in who and what he is, so he doesn’t need to constantly assert and reinforce his identity. Keillor is a convert, from an evangelical Christian to a heretical post-Christian leftist, so he’s driven by the constant need to reassert his new religion’s bona fides, both for his own benefit, and to send signals to his co-religionists.

    Early Keillor is really good, actually. He’s got a knack for character and storytelling that’s pretty rare. I just find it a pity he’s mostly squandered it on playing variations on the same tune for decades.

  300. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @tomv
    Keillor is an interesting guy. Here he is railing against bean-counting diversitocracy in at the National Press Club in 2015.

    Of course, he proceeded immediately to endorse replacing Andrew Jackson with Harriet Tubman without a hint of irony.

    In the same speech, he not only expressed an appreciation of domestic oil production in "Alaska and Texas and North Dokota" , but because that should enable the U.S. to wash their hands of the "tribes of the Middle East." He also went on promote nuclear energy, after earlier voicing his opposition the 7th Fleet's being sent to protect Japan.

    Somehow I suspect these points would not have been as well received had they been delivered by Donald Trump.

    In the same speech, he not only expressed an appreciation of domestic oil production in “Alaska and Texas and North Dokota” , but because that should enable the U.S. to wash their hands of the “tribes of the Middle East.”

    What an idiot. These are just neocon talking points. They have been so going back at least to 9/11.

    We should be consuming Middle Eastern oil, not our own, given how it is cheap and plentiful right now–and that oil is a finite resource.

  301. @Anonymous
    Are the directors, producers, and writers in Hollywood motivated solely by money in their choices of content and characters?

    The endless stream of anti-Southern films, Holocaust movies, etc, etc. The absence of Christian and Muslim heroic stories (Passion of the Christ controversy). The new Ghostbusters. The anti-Gentile Mad Men. In a majority White, Christian, straight country, do you make the most money by insulting your audience and mocking and subverting their history and culture.

    No doubt money was a goal of the songwriters, but do you really think ethnocentric insecurities and hatreds played no role in their thematic choices?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Okay fine, Steve--you win.

    It's a wonderful little song. Thanks for putting it in front of me.
  302. @Clyde

    Trump has been doing his good friend Joan Rivers’ shtick this whole time, I don’t know why nobody gets that.
     
    I noticed this ages ago. Trump doesn't do (channel) Rivers all the time but you can see it sometimes. I am pretty sure Joan Rivers was non-PC and a bit right wing. She made me laugh in the 1980s when I would see her on TV. I classify Trump and Rivers as old school New Yorkers.

    Joan Rivers had a NYC pistol permit. She was no liberal.

    • Replies: @oh its just me too
    so to a lot of gun control advocates, and particularly 'don't allow the cossacks to have guns' nyc jews.. mike bloomberg on down
  303. @Barnard
    I would say that is right, but only for the people whose families have lived in the Twin Cities for more than two generations. There is a subset of the Scandinavian Lutherans who really want the metro area to be important on a national scale, but the transplants realize it isn't and I don't think it is as important to them.

    The Twins Cities status as a de facto capital of the upper midwest is also fading. In my experience, the range would include only the state of Minnesota, the Eastern Dakotas and Northern Iowa. Outside of that range, they tend to gravitate to Chicago, Denver or Kansas City.

    The Twins Cities status as a de facto capital of the upper midwest is also fading. In my experience, the range would include only the state of Minnesota, the Eastern Dakotas and Northern Iowa. Outside of that range, they tend to gravitate to Chicago, Denver or Kansas City.

    Interesting. I haven’t lived in the USA for many years, so I’ll surely take your word for it on this. I do get the sense that going to Denver/Colorado Springs has risen in estimation as an option for ambitious young people from my area, whereas when I was young it seemed pretty remote. Also, Des Moines has improved a lot as a middle- to upper-middle-class option, so I get the sense more ambitious Iowans may be staying in-state.

  304. @Anonymous
    The Donald has always struck me as very secure in his own skin.

    People have been giggling at him for ages, but he doesn't seem to care in the least. I get the sense he truly feels better than all of them. I don't think it's an act.

    The one thing that amazed me was early in the campaign when it seemed the entire elite class was coming down on him… Macy's, PGA, all the papers, etc. I honestly felt bad for him. I thought he would be ruined. His entire business and reputation would be destroyed.

    I was amazed that he didn't back down. That was a very brave move. Even he must have felt uneasy about it all. Those awful cartoons on the front cover of your hometown paper…hate coming at you from every direction.

    It reminded me of Kevin MacDonald's description of Charles Lindberg in 'Culture of Critique'. A national here reduced to a pariah in an instant. I'm hoping it works out better for Mr Trump.

    I’m hoping it works out better for Mr Trump.

    Until last year I never thought much about Donald Trump one way or the other. Never watched his reality show(s). Now I hold him in the highest regard, as do tens of millions of others. So there’s that, for what it’s worth.

  305. @Steve Sailer
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhzxQCTCI3E

    Okay fine, Steve–you win.

    It’s a wonderful little song. Thanks for putting it in front of me.

  306. @Clyde

    Trump and Joan Rivers have similar tastes in home decorating
     
    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/joan-rivers-inside-28-million-york-city-penthouse/story?id=28837754
    Some photos of her NY penthouse that sold for 28 million. Yes, it looks like a wing of the Trump mansion in Florida. I would suffocate there. I prefer the Frank Sinatra, Palm Springs house, mid-century look. Danish/Swedish/Scandinavian from that era.
  307. @Bee
    Anyway, so, now that Trump has held a press conference where relatives of people killed by illegal aliens endorsed him, will Hillary have an anti-Trump press conference where relatives of people killed by people of German origin endorse her?

    She could start with Holocaust survivors, and move on to relatives of soldiers killed in WWII, either on the front lines or in POW camps. She can then have a coup-de-grace by bringing in relatives of the victims of German-American serial killers like Ed Gein, Jeffrey Dahmer, Emil Kemper, and Dennis Rader.

    Whenever there's a terrorist attack, I always ask, was it Muslims?

    Whenever they catch a long-elusive serial killer, I always ask, how German is their last name going to sound?

    Hillary could even bring on stage the husband of Andrea Yates, who killed all her children in Texas in 2001, and whose mother was a German immigrant.

    Because serial killers typically kill within their own race, the German-sounding serial killers are very famous partly because they killed a lot of white people. If D’Shawn in the hood becomes a serial killer and preys locally on people who have already fallen through the cracks, nobody will notice or care much. It definitely won’t be in the news.

    There was an article over at Taki’s (I’m too lazy to find the link atm but Steve might be the author) that mentioned evidence that at one point south central L.A. had more than one serial killer operating simultaneously in a small area. Similarly, Rocky Mount, NC, one of the poorest towns in the country, has had a decade+ string of black prostitute disappearances/murders that will likely never be solved.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The LAPD only figured out in the wake of the Grim Sleeper case a few years ago that around 1990 there were at least five serial killers operating in South Central L.A. murdering mostly crack whores. Four of the serial killers were black, one was white. So many people were getting murdered in the crack wars at the time that the LAPD didn't notice that serial killers were operating rather than just murderous drug dealers.

    Finally, one of the serial killers reactivated himself and a reporter named Christine Pelisek (sp?) figured out he was the same guy who had been active around 1990: thus, the name the Grim Sleeper.