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The Onion stepping up to challenge from The Babylon Bee:

Liberal Parents Struggling To Find School District With High-Quality Drag Queens

 
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  1. OT

    https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-49695560/world-afro-day-kids-takeover-for-big-hair-assembly

    ‘I think most people have no idea about afro hair’ – BBC News

    World Afro Day: Kids takeover for Big Hair Assembly

    … The awareness day aims to celebrate afro hair, and change negative attitudes towards afro hair.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna

    ‘I think most people have no idea about afro hair’ – BBC News
     
    Well I sure wish I didn't..
    , @Smithsonian
    Surely

    ‘I think most people have no idea about afro hair’ – BBC News
     
    Should be

    'Most people neither know nor care about afro hair'.
     
    , @Anonymous
    But wait, there's more!

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49675083

    Obituary: Joan Johnson, the leader of a black hair care revolution
     
  2. Not bad. But when a cute, innocent little black girl was nominated for Best Actress, The Onion covered The Oscars and tweeted “Everyone else seems afraid to say it, but that Quvenzhané Wallis is kind of a c–t, right? #Oscars2013” and it was shockingly hilarious.

    Then The Onion apologized. The Onion apologized. And that was the moment The Onion stopped mattering.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    The Onion leaving Madison was like Tom Petty leaving Florida-- no need to pay attention anymore.
  3. I’ll check it out in the morning, Steve, but I now know what’s happening to you. It’s a FULL MOON Friday the 13th, and Los Angeles is no bastion of sanity on a good day. It’s one day in about 16 years. It brings out the crazies, who will then have bad luck. Stay indoors till tomorrow – especially avoid the In-and-Out burger.

    Don’t go out tonight, it’s bound to take your life, there’s a bad moon-pie at the 7-11:

    Best voice in rock & roll history. Have I ever written this before?

    • Replies: @Kronos
    I understand Detroit has “Devil’s Night” or something along those lines when things are especially crazy. But are there any annual dates in LA to avoid?
    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "Best voice in rock and roll history."

    Uh-oh, NOW you've opened a can of worms.

    Well we could talk about setting baseline levels. Fogerty's voice (and the CCR sound) are kind of a gold standard; if you had to explain to a Martian what rock and roll was, using only one example, you'd probably pick one of about five CCR songs. Or you'd pick something by Kurt Cobain. It isn't really about technical virtuosity, it's all about expressiveness and misterioso.

    Since rock and roll is an American creation primarily, an American should get pride of place for "best rock and roll voice". This excludes John Lennon, or Roger Daltrey, who would probably otherwise win. (Think of it in terms of range: Fogerty could easily cover "Twist and Shout" or "You Can't Do That," but he could never cover "Dear Prudence", "Going Mobile," or "Across the Universe"). We also have to more or less tacitly admit that, Chuck Berry and other great Black founders notwithstanding, rock and roll really is sort of a White thing, and great Black singers like Marvin Gaye and Smokey and Sly belong under their own rubric. Same thing with Johnny Cash. No offense, guys, you have your own brilliant thing going.

    So for the sake of argument, let's say Fogerty is the Equator. Who is north of the equator?

    At the North Pole: Roy Orbison, Brian Wilson, Captain Beefheart. Otherworldly creatures from the rings of Saturn.

    In the temperate zones: Jim Morrison, Patti Smith, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain.

    In the subtropics: David Johansen, Lou Reed, Linda Ronstadt, Phoebe Snow.

    Honorable Mention Despite Being A Brit: Polly Jean Harvey.
    , @Father O'Hara
    "...There's the bathroom on the right..."
    , @Kratoklastes
    Jimmy Barnes. He's absolutely exceptional live, and has been performing since the late 70s.

    You Got Nothin' I Want
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BiJKq7ynms

    Four Walls (live in 2003; original version as in the early 80s)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFYawv1KV4k

    When A Man Loves a Woman (Live)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osFZH-Hq83o

    And for a bit of fun... his band poking fun at Ita Buttrose, who ran Australia's most popular women's magazine in the 70s and 80s...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37Qsqd8mw9o

  4. “We want Caleb to have access to a wide variety of styles—fish drag, camp queens, activessles—not just the same old busted Tina Turner impersonator he has now.

    Yes. There’s a thing called “Activessle” … sigh

  5. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'll check it out in the morning, Steve, but I now know what's happening to you. It's a FULL MOON Friday the 13th, and Los Angeles is no bastion of sanity on a good day. It's one day in about 16 years. It brings out the crazies, who will then have bad luck. Stay indoors till tomorrow - especially avoid the In-and-Out burger.

    Don't go out tonight, it's bound to take your life, there's a bad moon-pie at the 7-11:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BmEGm-mraE

    Best voice in rock & roll history. Have I ever written this before?

    I understand Detroit has “Devil’s Night” or something along those lines when things are especially crazy. But are there any annual dates in LA to avoid?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Whenever Oscars night coincides with 1/2 off fish tacos at El Padrino's?

    Here's my 2nd favorite musical Gerry (with a "G" this time), and I will say, inarguably this time, that Gerry Rafferty has THE SMOOTHEST VOICE IN POP MUSIC! In this song from the early 1980's he makes fun of Hollywood with a great tune - his singing starts at :38 in, so PLEASE give this one a chance:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XF2rLm3Ev0g
    , @J.Ross
    Only about three hundred or so.
  6. @Anonymous
    OT

    https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-49695560/world-afro-day-kids-takeover-for-big-hair-assembly

    'I think most people have no idea about afro hair' - BBC News

    World Afro Day: Kids takeover for Big Hair Assembly

    ... The awareness day aims to celebrate afro hair, and change negative attitudes towards afro hair.
     

    ‘I think most people have no idea about afro hair’ – BBC News

    Well I sure wish I didn’t..

    • Agree: Laurence Whelk
  7. OT:

    “Hustlers” review.

    I used to think strippers who drug & rob men were scum. Turns out they are ‘empowered feminists’

    Finally a movie which I can use to justify going on a date-rape-drug fueled rampage of easy-in-easy-out.

  8. Last week in the New York Times:

    Complaint Filed After Door Closes on Drag Performers With Down Syndrome
    A Republican congressional candidate declined to host the performers, questioning whether they could give their “full and informed consent.”

    • Replies: @mmack
    To quote Glenn Reynolds at Instapundit.com, "The 21st Century is not turning out as I expected"
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    Yeah, we're on the downslope.
  9. @Anonymous
    OT

    https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-49695560/world-afro-day-kids-takeover-for-big-hair-assembly

    'I think most people have no idea about afro hair' - BBC News

    World Afro Day: Kids takeover for Big Hair Assembly

    ... The awareness day aims to celebrate afro hair, and change negative attitudes towards afro hair.
     

    Surely

    ‘I think most people have no idea about afro hair’ – BBC News

    Should be

    ‘Most people neither know nor care about afro hair’.

    • Replies: @Laurence Whelk
    I think the world is divided between:

    "Hey, LOOK at ME - NO, REALLY - LOOK AT MEEEEE!!!!!"

    and

    "Could you just leave me alone, no really - just leave me alone, please."
  10. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'll check it out in the morning, Steve, but I now know what's happening to you. It's a FULL MOON Friday the 13th, and Los Angeles is no bastion of sanity on a good day. It's one day in about 16 years. It brings out the crazies, who will then have bad luck. Stay indoors till tomorrow - especially avoid the In-and-Out burger.

    Don't go out tonight, it's bound to take your life, there's a bad moon-pie at the 7-11:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BmEGm-mraE

    Best voice in rock & roll history. Have I ever written this before?

    “Best voice in rock and roll history.”

    Uh-oh, NOW you’ve opened a can of worms.

    Well we could talk about setting baseline levels. Fogerty’s voice (and the CCR sound) are kind of a gold standard; if you had to explain to a Martian what rock and roll was, using only one example, you’d probably pick one of about five CCR songs. Or you’d pick something by Kurt Cobain. It isn’t really about technical virtuosity, it’s all about expressiveness and misterioso.

    Since rock and roll is an American creation primarily, an American should get pride of place for “best rock and roll voice”. This excludes John Lennon, or Roger Daltrey, who would probably otherwise win. (Think of it in terms of range: Fogerty could easily cover “Twist and Shout” or “You Can’t Do That,” but he could never cover “Dear Prudence”, “Going Mobile,” or “Across the Universe”). We also have to more or less tacitly admit that, Chuck Berry and other great Black founders notwithstanding, rock and roll really is sort of a White thing, and great Black singers like Marvin Gaye and Smokey and Sly belong under their own rubric. Same thing with Johnny Cash. No offense, guys, you have your own brilliant thing going.

    So for the sake of argument, let’s say Fogerty is the Equator. Who is north of the equator?

    At the North Pole: Roy Orbison, Brian Wilson, Captain Beefheart. Otherworldly creatures from the rings of Saturn.

    In the temperate zones: Jim Morrison, Patti Smith, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain.

    In the subtropics: David Johansen, Lou Reed, Linda Ronstadt, Phoebe Snow.

    Honorable Mention Despite Being A Brit: Polly Jean Harvey.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    You have to admit though, the British Invasion helped rock in the USA a LOT. So, I'd probably have to rate Fogerty behind pre-voice blowout Robery Plant.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    It's a can of worms indeed, but that's a good way to organize this, GToD. Speaking of worms, but without cans, someone told me Eddie Money died, and I told him pretty soon they'll be a couple of great rock artists every week dying on us. Should we lower our flags, or just sell our 16" woofers?
    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Thomas Earl Petty for the mofo'in WIN!
    , @Jeff
    I had to think for a bit on the best rock singer. I'll go with:

    1- Chris Cornell
    2- Robert Plant
    3- Bon Scott - if only for his unstoppable energy
    , @Known Fact
    Can't overlook the only black guy I listen to -- Gil Scott-Heron, wonderful voice when he was healthy, like Lou Rawls with attitude.
    , @Thirdeye
    John Lennon was never a great rock vocalist. He could be a good imitator, but nothing established him as a great rock&roll stylist. Dear Prudence, Going Mobile, and Across the Universe weren't rock&roll.
  11. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'll check it out in the morning, Steve, but I now know what's happening to you. It's a FULL MOON Friday the 13th, and Los Angeles is no bastion of sanity on a good day. It's one day in about 16 years. It brings out the crazies, who will then have bad luck. Stay indoors till tomorrow - especially avoid the In-and-Out burger.

    Don't go out tonight, it's bound to take your life, there's a bad moon-pie at the 7-11:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BmEGm-mraE

    Best voice in rock & roll history. Have I ever written this before?

    “…There’s the bathroom on the right…”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Lyricosis is a terrible thing.
  12. No, that must be a true story.

  13. @JimDandy
    Not bad. But when a cute, innocent little black girl was nominated for Best Actress, The Onion covered The Oscars and tweeted “Everyone else seems afraid to say it, but that Quvenzhané Wallis is kind of a c--t, right? #Oscars2013” and it was shockingly hilarious.

    Then The Onion apologized. The Onion apologized. And that was the moment The Onion stopped mattering.

    The Onion leaving Madison was like Tom Petty leaving Florida– no need to pay attention anymore.

    • Agree: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    "Tom Petty leaving Florida -- no need to pay attention anymore."

    You've missed out on three decades of great music. For me, Tom Petty is the quintessential LA sound. Followed by Warren Zevon and Stevie Nicks.
  14. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "Best voice in rock and roll history."

    Uh-oh, NOW you've opened a can of worms.

    Well we could talk about setting baseline levels. Fogerty's voice (and the CCR sound) are kind of a gold standard; if you had to explain to a Martian what rock and roll was, using only one example, you'd probably pick one of about five CCR songs. Or you'd pick something by Kurt Cobain. It isn't really about technical virtuosity, it's all about expressiveness and misterioso.

    Since rock and roll is an American creation primarily, an American should get pride of place for "best rock and roll voice". This excludes John Lennon, or Roger Daltrey, who would probably otherwise win. (Think of it in terms of range: Fogerty could easily cover "Twist and Shout" or "You Can't Do That," but he could never cover "Dear Prudence", "Going Mobile," or "Across the Universe"). We also have to more or less tacitly admit that, Chuck Berry and other great Black founders notwithstanding, rock and roll really is sort of a White thing, and great Black singers like Marvin Gaye and Smokey and Sly belong under their own rubric. Same thing with Johnny Cash. No offense, guys, you have your own brilliant thing going.

    So for the sake of argument, let's say Fogerty is the Equator. Who is north of the equator?

    At the North Pole: Roy Orbison, Brian Wilson, Captain Beefheart. Otherworldly creatures from the rings of Saturn.

    In the temperate zones: Jim Morrison, Patti Smith, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain.

    In the subtropics: David Johansen, Lou Reed, Linda Ronstadt, Phoebe Snow.

    Honorable Mention Despite Being A Brit: Polly Jean Harvey.

    You have to admit though, the British Invasion helped rock in the USA a LOT. So, I’d probably have to rate Fogerty behind pre-voice blowout Robery Plant.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    My wife is an excellent singer and her view is that Freddie Mercury was technically the best male singer of our generation.

    Personally, I didn't find Freddie all that cool, though.

    Okay, as counter-contrarian, here's my pick for the best rock singer with both technical skill and panache: Elvis Presley.

  15. @Redneck farmer
    You have to admit though, the British Invasion helped rock in the USA a LOT. So, I'd probably have to rate Fogerty behind pre-voice blowout Robery Plant.

    My wife is an excellent singer and her view is that Freddie Mercury was technically the best male singer of our generation.

    Personally, I didn’t find Freddie all that cool, though.

    Okay, as counter-contrarian, here’s my pick for the best rock singer with both technical skill and panache: Elvis Presley.

    • Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat
    I always kind of liked Elvis, but recently listened to some old hits of his and was surprised at what I'd missed the first time around. He basically got famous for his annoying shtick of singing in a quavery voice and writhing around. At his worst, he sounds like someone's dumping ice cubes down his shorts. That was the only thing that distinguished him from a hundred other Carl Perkinses and Jim Reeveses.

    Like a lot of pop bands (Beatles) he got much better later on (after he got out of the army) when he was able to drop the shtick. "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" is monumental.
    , @Redneck farmer
    20 years from now, I could see a string of #1 songs being made by using Elvis' voice and different instrumentation. Like that Dutch DJ did a few years ago.
    And Watson79, the first song Alice in Chains released with the new guy, I though they used a recording of Staley.
    , @Ron Mexico
    Yeah, have to go with Elvis. He has seen a big resurgence in recent years due to all the YouTube reaction channels, especially blacks. They do like Freddie, too. Van the Man Morrison is my favorite.
    , @Abe

    Personally, I didn’t find Freddie all that cool, though.
     
    My ten year old son is a great social lab experiment for this theory. I’m meticulous in not imparting any of my own alt-right sensibilities on him- partly, yes, because I’m afraid one errant word learned from me could ruin his socioeconomic prospects (kids have recently had Ivy League acceptances revoked for a single unwoke tweet), but mainly because I want him to become whatever person he is on his own.

    But anyway, Freddie Mercury has become famous again among an entirely new generation thanks to the success of BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY- especially with tweeny girls I am told- but my son (without any bias imparted by me) absolutely despises him, pretty much entirely because he’s a typical heterosexual boy and QUEEN’S very campy aroma disgusts him.

    So trying to control for my own biases, I have to say that while technically Freddie is one of the all-time greats, this needs to be qualified by pointing out that his strength is in the middle range. Here is a great ‘range video’ for Freddy and I have to say his presence in the 5th octave is not at all pleasing. He can certainly hit notes in that area, but starting at G5, his tone becomes too shrill and unpleasingly whistle-register/falsetto-y :

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=kgLmYaRPrGE&t=21m47s

  16. For a voice that could knock down a brick wall, or express near infinite pain – Layne Staley, Alice in Chains.

  17. @ germ theory-
    oh hell no, i will not let this gobbledygook stand…
    .
    firstly, nearly all your choices of ‘great’ rock singers are on the raucous, drunken, raw-voiced-loser, about to OD and go to the ER end of the rock singer spectrum, hardly any with basically good voices… expressive, down-and-dirty, funky, unique, emotional, etc… yeah, sure,w hatever… (so was tiny tim)
    .
    but i generally prefer a NICE voice who can sing well AND be expressive… a raspy, joe-cocker type voice i can only appreciate in small doses…
    as far as a ‘pretty’ rock singer voice, i would go with steve perry, not a huge journey fan (i guess hip among music snobs to slight them), but damned if he can’t SING purty…
    .
    and fogerty ? ? ? seriously ? ? ? love fogerty, love ccwr, but a ‘great’ “SINGER” ? ? ? no, too many weird vocal tics, the twang starts to wear thin quickly, not really a dynamic range, and a monotonous delivery/style… but, yeah, put me in coach…
    .
    YMMV

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    I get your point, but I was addressing Achmed's idea of a rock and roll emblematic "voice," not an all-around "greatest singer". Lots of technically superb singers like Freddie Mercury who are too affected and cute to carry the standard. John Lennon was not a virtuoso nor a powerhouse singer, but he had a great rock voice. Same with Fogerty. Listen to the Beatles duet "I've Got a Feeling" -- McCartney is all over the place with his trunk full of fireworks and zany tricks, then Lennon steps up to the mic and just sounds like a human person. For my money best is Daltrey because he sounds both human and like a lion at the same time, but I only wanted to sift through the Yanks.

    It's sort of like how Ringo Starr is not the best technical drummer, not even top ten, but he is the best rock drummer because he fit perfectly into the overall composition. Guys like Neil Peart can show off all they want, but they are playing The Neil Peart Show, not the damn song.

    If I had to explain to a space alien what a rock singer was, I would play them "Green River" or "Call On Me" or "Personality Crisis" or "Ticket to Ride," not "Carry On My Wayward Son". I wouldn't want to get shot with a laser gun.
  18. Sadly The Onion isn’t farce anymore.

  19. • Replies: @Denis
    I like this one:

    https://politics.theonion.com/biden-complains-moderators-keep-giving-him-ample-time-t-1838083302?utm_medium=sharefromsite&utm_source=theonion_copy&utm_campaign=top

  20. This is funny, but it doesn’t ring true at a deep level. Parents don’t actually care about drag performers, although they might perhaps pretend to care. I think Babylon Bee headlines tend to get at deeper truths.

  21. @Steve Sailer
    My wife is an excellent singer and her view is that Freddie Mercury was technically the best male singer of our generation.

    Personally, I didn't find Freddie all that cool, though.

    Okay, as counter-contrarian, here's my pick for the best rock singer with both technical skill and panache: Elvis Presley.

    I always kind of liked Elvis, but recently listened to some old hits of his and was surprised at what I’d missed the first time around. He basically got famous for his annoying shtick of singing in a quavery voice and writhing around. At his worst, he sounds like someone’s dumping ice cubes down his shorts. That was the only thing that distinguished him from a hundred other Carl Perkinses and Jim Reeveses.

    Like a lot of pop bands (Beatles) he got much better later on (after he got out of the army) when he was able to drop the shtick. “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” is monumental.

    • Replies: @Deckin
    Old or new, there's no denying this
    , @MBlanc46
    “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” is not rock-and-roll.
  22. OT: From Mozilla to Guardrailzilla:

    Mozilla wants to hear your tales of YouTube radicalization so unwanted videos get censored

    Firefox maker Mozilla is trying to shame YouTube into “fixing” its recommendation algorithm, soliciting horror stories [have at it] from users sent down radicalizing “rabbit holes.” Trouble is, most users don’t want more censorship.

    “Once, at 2 a.m., you searched YouTube for ‘Did aliens build Stonehenge?’ Ever since, your YouTube recommendations have been a mess: Roswell, wormholes, Illuminati,” Mozilla laments in its call for submissions, asking users for their “YouTube regret” so that they might “put pressure on YouTube to do better.”

    “YouTube’s recommendation engine can lead users down bizarre rabbit holes — and they’re not always harmless,” the company warns.

    At least it’s not a gerbil hole.

    Searching controversial terms is much more likely to bring up mainstream sources anyway, thanks to YouTube breaking its own algorithm in order to keep users’ opinions in line, as a former employee whistleblower revealed earlier this year, releasing nearly 1,000 pages of internal documents detailing an Orwellian censorship regime.

    Mozilla’s call for complaints is a solution in search of a problem. The company is scheduled to meet with YouTube in two weeks, according to its post. If it really wants to make its users happy, it will tell YouTube to stop censoring them.

    Yeah, reminder that I got teleported to a NYT-issued mind-cleaning video about how Putin is responsible for the US mess and everything and you shouldn’t watch RT because of fake news.

  23. @art guerrilla
    @ germ theory-
    oh hell no, i will not let this gobbledygook stand...
    .
    firstly, nearly all your choices of 'great' rock singers are on the raucous, drunken, raw-voiced-loser, about to OD and go to the ER end of the rock singer spectrum, hardly any with basically good voices... expressive, down-and-dirty, funky, unique, emotional, etc... yeah, sure,w hatever... (so was tiny tim)
    .
    but i generally prefer a NICE voice who can sing well AND be expressive... a raspy, joe-cocker type voice i can only appreciate in small doses...
    as far as a 'pretty' rock singer voice, i would go with steve perry, not a huge journey fan (i guess hip among music snobs to slight them), but damned if he can't SING purty...
    .
    and fogerty ? ? ? seriously ? ? ? love fogerty, love ccwr, but a 'great' "SINGER" ? ? ? no, too many weird vocal tics, the twang starts to wear thin quickly, not really a dynamic range, and a monotonous delivery/style... but, yeah, put me in coach...
    .
    YMMV

    I get your point, but I was addressing Achmed’s idea of a rock and roll emblematic “voice,” not an all-around “greatest singer”. Lots of technically superb singers like Freddie Mercury who are too affected and cute to carry the standard. John Lennon was not a virtuoso nor a powerhouse singer, but he had a great rock voice. Same with Fogerty. Listen to the Beatles duet “I’ve Got a Feeling” — McCartney is all over the place with his trunk full of fireworks and zany tricks, then Lennon steps up to the mic and just sounds like a human person. For my money best is Daltrey because he sounds both human and like a lion at the same time, but I only wanted to sift through the Yanks.

    It’s sort of like how Ringo Starr is not the best technical drummer, not even top ten, but he is the best rock drummer because he fit perfectly into the overall composition. Guys like Neil Peart can show off all they want, but they are playing The Neil Peart Show, not the damn song.

    If I had to explain to a space alien what a rock singer was, I would play them “Green River” or “Call On Me” or “Personality Crisis” or “Ticket to Ride,” not “Carry On My Wayward Son”. I wouldn’t want to get shot with a laser gun.

  24. @Anon
    Last week in the New York Times:

    Complaint Filed After Door Closes on Drag Performers With Down Syndrome
    A Republican congressional candidate declined to host the performers, questioning whether they could give their “full and informed consent.”

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/09/05/arts/05dragsyndrome-promo/05dragsyndrome-promo-jumbo.jpg

    To quote Glenn Reynolds at Instapundit.com, “The 21st Century is not turning out as I expected”

  25. @Steve Sailer
    My wife is an excellent singer and her view is that Freddie Mercury was technically the best male singer of our generation.

    Personally, I didn't find Freddie all that cool, though.

    Okay, as counter-contrarian, here's my pick for the best rock singer with both technical skill and panache: Elvis Presley.

    20 years from now, I could see a string of #1 songs being made by using Elvis’ voice and different instrumentation. Like that Dutch DJ did a few years ago.
    And Watson79, the first song Alice in Chains released with the new guy, I though they used a recording of Staley.

  26. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "Best voice in rock and roll history."

    Uh-oh, NOW you've opened a can of worms.

    Well we could talk about setting baseline levels. Fogerty's voice (and the CCR sound) are kind of a gold standard; if you had to explain to a Martian what rock and roll was, using only one example, you'd probably pick one of about five CCR songs. Or you'd pick something by Kurt Cobain. It isn't really about technical virtuosity, it's all about expressiveness and misterioso.

    Since rock and roll is an American creation primarily, an American should get pride of place for "best rock and roll voice". This excludes John Lennon, or Roger Daltrey, who would probably otherwise win. (Think of it in terms of range: Fogerty could easily cover "Twist and Shout" or "You Can't Do That," but he could never cover "Dear Prudence", "Going Mobile," or "Across the Universe"). We also have to more or less tacitly admit that, Chuck Berry and other great Black founders notwithstanding, rock and roll really is sort of a White thing, and great Black singers like Marvin Gaye and Smokey and Sly belong under their own rubric. Same thing with Johnny Cash. No offense, guys, you have your own brilliant thing going.

    So for the sake of argument, let's say Fogerty is the Equator. Who is north of the equator?

    At the North Pole: Roy Orbison, Brian Wilson, Captain Beefheart. Otherworldly creatures from the rings of Saturn.

    In the temperate zones: Jim Morrison, Patti Smith, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain.

    In the subtropics: David Johansen, Lou Reed, Linda Ronstadt, Phoebe Snow.

    Honorable Mention Despite Being A Brit: Polly Jean Harvey.

    It’s a can of worms indeed, but that’s a good way to organize this, GToD. Speaking of worms, but without cans, someone told me Eddie Money died, and I told him pretty soon they’ll be a couple of great rock artists every week dying on us. Should we lower our flags, or just sell our 16″ woofers?

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    Yeah.

    The next decade or so, in which we'll witness the Twilight of the Rock Idols, is going to be a nonstop schmaltz-fest of tearful tributes and affected devastation. I don't quite get it. I have never felt that sort of connection to any popular musician, actor, or athlete. Some degree of appreciation, maybe, but no real emotional tie. I mean, I don't know these people; when they die, it doesn't trouble me. The best that I can do is pray for their eternal salvation, but most of them have lived their life in such a manner as to make that outcome fairly improbable.

    The only reprieve we'll have from this incessant spectacle is the likelihood that by that time we'll finally have more pressing geopolitical and economic problems afoot to distract us from the eruptive bowels of a passing Bob Seger or whoever.
    , @Anonymous
    Hardly anyone runs big woofers any more. Apart from the horn speaker twiode twats, virtually every non-cult-follower audiophile is running small speakers and a powered subwoofer now.
  27. @Kronos
    I understand Detroit has “Devil’s Night” or something along those lines when things are especially crazy. But are there any annual dates in LA to avoid?

    Whenever Oscars night coincides with 1/2 off fish tacos at El Padrino’s?

    Here’s my 2nd favorite musical Gerry (with a “G” this time), and I will say, inarguably this time, that Gerry Rafferty has THE SMOOTHEST VOICE IN POP MUSIC! In this song from the early 1980’s he makes fun of Hollywood with a great tune – his singing starts at :38 in, so PLEASE give this one a chance:

  28. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'll check it out in the morning, Steve, but I now know what's happening to you. It's a FULL MOON Friday the 13th, and Los Angeles is no bastion of sanity on a good day. It's one day in about 16 years. It brings out the crazies, who will then have bad luck. Stay indoors till tomorrow - especially avoid the In-and-Out burger.

    Don't go out tonight, it's bound to take your life, there's a bad moon-pie at the 7-11:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BmEGm-mraE

    Best voice in rock & roll history. Have I ever written this before?

    Jimmy Barnes. He’s absolutely exceptional live, and has been performing since the late 70s.

    You Got Nothin’ I Want

    Four Walls (live in 2003; original version as in the early 80s)

    When A Man Loves a Woman (Live)

    And for a bit of fun… his band poking fun at Ita Buttrose, who ran Australia’s most popular women’s magazine in the 70s and 80s…

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks, Krato. I'd heard of these guys before from an Aussie co-worker.
  29. @Steve Sailer
    My wife is an excellent singer and her view is that Freddie Mercury was technically the best male singer of our generation.

    Personally, I didn't find Freddie all that cool, though.

    Okay, as counter-contrarian, here's my pick for the best rock singer with both technical skill and panache: Elvis Presley.

    Yeah, have to go with Elvis. He has seen a big resurgence in recent years due to all the YouTube reaction channels, especially blacks. They do like Freddie, too. Van the Man Morrison is my favorite.

  30. @Father O'Hara
    "...There's the bathroom on the right..."

    Lyricosis is a terrible thing.

  31. @Steve Sailer
    My wife is an excellent singer and her view is that Freddie Mercury was technically the best male singer of our generation.

    Personally, I didn't find Freddie all that cool, though.

    Okay, as counter-contrarian, here's my pick for the best rock singer with both technical skill and panache: Elvis Presley.

    Personally, I didn’t find Freddie all that cool, though.

    My ten year old son is a great social lab experiment for this theory. I’m meticulous in not imparting any of my own alt-right sensibilities on him- partly, yes, because I’m afraid one errant word learned from me could ruin his socioeconomic prospects (kids have recently had Ivy League acceptances revoked for a single unwoke tweet), but mainly because I want him to become whatever person he is on his own.

    But anyway, Freddie Mercury has become famous again among an entirely new generation thanks to the success of BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY- especially with tweeny girls I am told- but my son (without any bias imparted by me) absolutely despises him, pretty much entirely because he’s a typical heterosexual boy and QUEEN’S very campy aroma disgusts him.

    So trying to control for my own biases, I have to say that while technically Freddie is one of the all-time greats, this needs to be qualified by pointing out that his strength is in the middle range. Here is a great ‘range video’ for Freddy and I have to say his presence in the 5th octave is not at all pleasing. He can certainly hit notes in that area, but starting at G5, his tone becomes too shrill and unpleasingly whistle-register/falsetto-y :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=kgLmYaRPrGE&t=21m47s

    • Replies: @Abe
    In contrast, the other contender for all-time great rock vocalist, Robert Plant, made the 5th octave his home and kingdom. I read an analysis on a technical singing website and the consensus was that Plant had a unique ability to mix his higher register ‘head voice’ with his more robust ‘chest voice’, resulting in a tone that even in the 5th octave was strong and agreeable to hetero male American rock fans, instead of the more falsetto-y and fey-sounding tone than even singers as great as Mercury had to settle for.

    There are a lot of examples of Robert ‘singing like a god’ from the 1971 tour; the below (where he exceeds the register from the studio version of STAIRWAY- going at least to A5, I think, maybe briefly scraping the bottom of C6) is one of my favorites.

    So to summarize with an analogy- Mercury is like a B-52, lot of power and coverage, Plant is like a SR-71 powerfully cruising where few others can go. The two are both great at what they do, but operate in different zones.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3ryn8RDypEI&t=57m15s

    , @AnotherDad

    ... but my son (without any bias imparted by me) absolutely despises him, pretty much entirely because he’s a typical heterosexual boy and QUEEN’S very campy aroma disgusts him.
     
    Kudos to your son's perceptive good taste.
  32. because he’s a typical heterosexual boy and QUEEN’S very campy aroma disgusts him.

    Errr…. it’s 80s pop.

    Just saying.

  33. @Abe

    Personally, I didn’t find Freddie all that cool, though.
     
    My ten year old son is a great social lab experiment for this theory. I’m meticulous in not imparting any of my own alt-right sensibilities on him- partly, yes, because I’m afraid one errant word learned from me could ruin his socioeconomic prospects (kids have recently had Ivy League acceptances revoked for a single unwoke tweet), but mainly because I want him to become whatever person he is on his own.

    But anyway, Freddie Mercury has become famous again among an entirely new generation thanks to the success of BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY- especially with tweeny girls I am told- but my son (without any bias imparted by me) absolutely despises him, pretty much entirely because he’s a typical heterosexual boy and QUEEN’S very campy aroma disgusts him.

    So trying to control for my own biases, I have to say that while technically Freddie is one of the all-time greats, this needs to be qualified by pointing out that his strength is in the middle range. Here is a great ‘range video’ for Freddy and I have to say his presence in the 5th octave is not at all pleasing. He can certainly hit notes in that area, but starting at G5, his tone becomes too shrill and unpleasingly whistle-register/falsetto-y :

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=kgLmYaRPrGE&t=21m47s

    In contrast, the other contender for all-time great rock vocalist, Robert Plant, made the 5th octave his home and kingdom. I read an analysis on a technical singing website and the consensus was that Plant had a unique ability to mix his higher register ‘head voice’ with his more robust ‘chest voice’, resulting in a tone that even in the 5th octave was strong and agreeable to hetero male American rock fans, instead of the more falsetto-y and fey-sounding tone than even singers as great as Mercury had to settle for.

    There are a lot of examples of Robert ‘singing like a god’ from the 1971 tour; the below (where he exceeds the register from the studio version of STAIRWAY- going at least to A5, I think, maybe briefly scraping the bottom of C6) is one of my favorites.

    So to summarize with an analogy- Mercury is like a B-52, lot of power and coverage, Plant is like a SR-71 powerfully cruising where few others can go. The two are both great at what they do, but operate in different zones.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    I'm curious regarding why the male leads in white rock 'n' roll appear compelled to sing in the highest male octaves, female territory in many cases. Old timey Western music certainly didn't require males to sing in high tenor, though it wasn't prohibited. Is it standard in German and Celt folk music for men to sing in the highest range?
    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    I stood 15 feet away from Robert Plant in the early 2000's in a small club he was playing on his way to hosting South by Southwest. Dude has an enormous sized head.

    Lord, he killed Whole Lotta Love that night. Just killed it. Freaking incredible.
  34. Voice coach analyzes five metal singers; Ozzy a bum, Halford the King:
    http://www.invisibleoranges.com/ask-a-real-musician-5-classic-male-metal-singers/

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    Thanks, enjoyed the thumbs-up for Dio.

    There's a funny YT vid where another voice coach personally demonstrates Dio's technique -- but cautions that he's going to subtly change some of the lyrics because he's a Christian (and indeed he does resemble Ned Flanders).
  35. @Abe
    In contrast, the other contender for all-time great rock vocalist, Robert Plant, made the 5th octave his home and kingdom. I read an analysis on a technical singing website and the consensus was that Plant had a unique ability to mix his higher register ‘head voice’ with his more robust ‘chest voice’, resulting in a tone that even in the 5th octave was strong and agreeable to hetero male American rock fans, instead of the more falsetto-y and fey-sounding tone than even singers as great as Mercury had to settle for.

    There are a lot of examples of Robert ‘singing like a god’ from the 1971 tour; the below (where he exceeds the register from the studio version of STAIRWAY- going at least to A5, I think, maybe briefly scraping the bottom of C6) is one of my favorites.

    So to summarize with an analogy- Mercury is like a B-52, lot of power and coverage, Plant is like a SR-71 powerfully cruising where few others can go. The two are both great at what they do, but operate in different zones.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3ryn8RDypEI&t=57m15s

    I’m curious regarding why the male leads in white rock ‘n’ roll appear compelled to sing in the highest male octaves, female territory in many cases. Old timey Western music certainly didn’t require males to sing in high tenor, though it wasn’t prohibited. Is it standard in German and Celt folk music for men to sing in the highest range?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Well, what time frame? At one time it was not only the gold standard in male singing, but it really took balls.
  36. “I think most people have no idea about afro hair — BBC”

    I’m beginning to believe Steve Sailer is the programmer of my simulation.

  37. @Anon
    Last week in the New York Times:

    Complaint Filed After Door Closes on Drag Performers With Down Syndrome
    A Republican congressional candidate declined to host the performers, questioning whether they could give their “full and informed consent.”

    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/09/05/arts/05dragsyndrome-promo/05dragsyndrome-promo-jumbo.jpg

    Yeah, we’re on the downslope.

  38. @Reg Cæsar
    The Onion leaving Madison was like Tom Petty leaving Florida-- no need to pay attention anymore.

    “Tom Petty leaving Florida — no need to pay attention anymore.”

    You’ve missed out on three decades of great music. For me, Tom Petty is the quintessential LA sound. Followed by Warren Zevon and Stevie Nicks.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    For me, Tom Petty is the quintessential LA sound.
     
    I don't need to know.

    The Heartbreakers were at their best as Gainesville townies:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFLADeOKcss
  39. @Kronos
    I understand Detroit has “Devil’s Night” or something along those lines when things are especially crazy. But are there any annual dates in LA to avoid?

    Only about three hundred or so.

    • LOL: JudgeSmails
  40. @Neil Templeton
    I'm curious regarding why the male leads in white rock 'n' roll appear compelled to sing in the highest male octaves, female territory in many cases. Old timey Western music certainly didn't require males to sing in high tenor, though it wasn't prohibited. Is it standard in German and Celt folk music for men to sing in the highest range?

    Well, what time frame? At one time it was not only the gold standard in male singing, but it really took balls.

  41. @Achmed E. Newman
    It's a can of worms indeed, but that's a good way to organize this, GToD. Speaking of worms, but without cans, someone told me Eddie Money died, and I told him pretty soon they'll be a couple of great rock artists every week dying on us. Should we lower our flags, or just sell our 16" woofers?

    Yeah.

    The next decade or so, in which we’ll witness the Twilight of the Rock Idols, is going to be a nonstop schmaltz-fest of tearful tributes and affected devastation. I don’t quite get it. I have never felt that sort of connection to any popular musician, actor, or athlete. Some degree of appreciation, maybe, but no real emotional tie. I mean, I don’t know these people; when they die, it doesn’t trouble me. The best that I can do is pray for their eternal salvation, but most of them have lived their life in such a manner as to make that outcome fairly improbable.

    The only reprieve we’ll have from this incessant spectacle is the likelihood that by that time we’ll finally have more pressing geopolitical and economic problems afoot to distract us from the eruptive bowels of a passing Bob Seger or whoever.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    ... the eruptive bowels of a passing Bob Seger or whoever.
     
    Night moves oh, oh oh ... ♫♬
  42. @SunBakedSuburb
    "Tom Petty leaving Florida -- no need to pay attention anymore."

    You've missed out on three decades of great music. For me, Tom Petty is the quintessential LA sound. Followed by Warren Zevon and Stevie Nicks.

    For me, Tom Petty is the quintessential LA sound.

    I don’t need to know.

    The Heartbreakers were at their best as Gainesville townies:

  43. @Intelligent Dasein
    Yeah.

    The next decade or so, in which we'll witness the Twilight of the Rock Idols, is going to be a nonstop schmaltz-fest of tearful tributes and affected devastation. I don't quite get it. I have never felt that sort of connection to any popular musician, actor, or athlete. Some degree of appreciation, maybe, but no real emotional tie. I mean, I don't know these people; when they die, it doesn't trouble me. The best that I can do is pray for their eternal salvation, but most of them have lived their life in such a manner as to make that outcome fairly improbable.

    The only reprieve we'll have from this incessant spectacle is the likelihood that by that time we'll finally have more pressing geopolitical and economic problems afoot to distract us from the eruptive bowels of a passing Bob Seger or whoever.

    … the eruptive bowels of a passing Bob Seger or whoever.

    Night moves oh, oh oh … ♫♬

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    Damn, that's another good one. Yoos on a roll.
  44. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "Best voice in rock and roll history."

    Uh-oh, NOW you've opened a can of worms.

    Well we could talk about setting baseline levels. Fogerty's voice (and the CCR sound) are kind of a gold standard; if you had to explain to a Martian what rock and roll was, using only one example, you'd probably pick one of about five CCR songs. Or you'd pick something by Kurt Cobain. It isn't really about technical virtuosity, it's all about expressiveness and misterioso.

    Since rock and roll is an American creation primarily, an American should get pride of place for "best rock and roll voice". This excludes John Lennon, or Roger Daltrey, who would probably otherwise win. (Think of it in terms of range: Fogerty could easily cover "Twist and Shout" or "You Can't Do That," but he could never cover "Dear Prudence", "Going Mobile," or "Across the Universe"). We also have to more or less tacitly admit that, Chuck Berry and other great Black founders notwithstanding, rock and roll really is sort of a White thing, and great Black singers like Marvin Gaye and Smokey and Sly belong under their own rubric. Same thing with Johnny Cash. No offense, guys, you have your own brilliant thing going.

    So for the sake of argument, let's say Fogerty is the Equator. Who is north of the equator?

    At the North Pole: Roy Orbison, Brian Wilson, Captain Beefheart. Otherworldly creatures from the rings of Saturn.

    In the temperate zones: Jim Morrison, Patti Smith, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain.

    In the subtropics: David Johansen, Lou Reed, Linda Ronstadt, Phoebe Snow.

    Honorable Mention Despite Being A Brit: Polly Jean Harvey.

    Thomas Earl Petty for the mofo’in WIN!

  45. @Reg Cæsar

    For me, Tom Petty is the quintessential LA sound.
     
    I don't need to know.

    The Heartbreakers were at their best as Gainesville townies:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFLADeOKcss

    Yep.

  46. @Abe
    In contrast, the other contender for all-time great rock vocalist, Robert Plant, made the 5th octave his home and kingdom. I read an analysis on a technical singing website and the consensus was that Plant had a unique ability to mix his higher register ‘head voice’ with his more robust ‘chest voice’, resulting in a tone that even in the 5th octave was strong and agreeable to hetero male American rock fans, instead of the more falsetto-y and fey-sounding tone than even singers as great as Mercury had to settle for.

    There are a lot of examples of Robert ‘singing like a god’ from the 1971 tour; the below (where he exceeds the register from the studio version of STAIRWAY- going at least to A5, I think, maybe briefly scraping the bottom of C6) is one of my favorites.

    So to summarize with an analogy- Mercury is like a B-52, lot of power and coverage, Plant is like a SR-71 powerfully cruising where few others can go. The two are both great at what they do, but operate in different zones.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3ryn8RDypEI&t=57m15s

    I stood 15 feet away from Robert Plant in the early 2000’s in a small club he was playing on his way to hosting South by Southwest. Dude has an enormous sized head.

    Lord, he killed Whole Lotta Love that night. Just killed it. Freaking incredible.

  47. @Faraday's Bobcat
    I always kind of liked Elvis, but recently listened to some old hits of his and was surprised at what I'd missed the first time around. He basically got famous for his annoying shtick of singing in a quavery voice and writhing around. At his worst, he sounds like someone's dumping ice cubes down his shorts. That was the only thing that distinguished him from a hundred other Carl Perkinses and Jim Reeveses.

    Like a lot of pop bands (Beatles) he got much better later on (after he got out of the army) when he was able to drop the shtick. "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" is monumental.

    Old or new, there’s no denying this

  48. @Smithsonian
    Surely

    ‘I think most people have no idea about afro hair’ – BBC News
     
    Should be

    'Most people neither know nor care about afro hair'.
     

    I think the world is divided between:

    “Hey, LOOK at ME – NO, REALLY – LOOK AT MEEEEE!!!!!”

    and

    “Could you just leave me alone, no really – just leave me alone, please.”

  49. @Anonymous
    OT

    https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-49695560/world-afro-day-kids-takeover-for-big-hair-assembly

    'I think most people have no idea about afro hair' - BBC News

    World Afro Day: Kids takeover for Big Hair Assembly

    ... The awareness day aims to celebrate afro hair, and change negative attitudes towards afro hair.
     

    But wait, there’s more!

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49675083

    Obituary: Joan Johnson, the leader of a black hair care revolution

  50. @Achmed E. Newman

    ... the eruptive bowels of a passing Bob Seger or whoever.
     
    Night moves oh, oh oh ... ♫♬

    Damn, that’s another good one. Yoos on a roll.

  51. @Faraday's Bobcat
    I always kind of liked Elvis, but recently listened to some old hits of his and was surprised at what I'd missed the first time around. He basically got famous for his annoying shtick of singing in a quavery voice and writhing around. At his worst, he sounds like someone's dumping ice cubes down his shorts. That was the only thing that distinguished him from a hundred other Carl Perkinses and Jim Reeveses.

    Like a lot of pop bands (Beatles) he got much better later on (after he got out of the army) when he was able to drop the shtick. "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" is monumental.

    “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” is not rock-and-roll.

  52. @Achmed E. Newman
    It's a can of worms indeed, but that's a good way to organize this, GToD. Speaking of worms, but without cans, someone told me Eddie Money died, and I told him pretty soon they'll be a couple of great rock artists every week dying on us. Should we lower our flags, or just sell our 16" woofers?

    Hardly anyone runs big woofers any more. Apart from the horn speaker twiode twats, virtually every non-cult-follower audiophile is running small speakers and a powered subwoofer now.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Question you might be able to answer: Is there a way to wire a powered subwoofer into a strictly two-channel setup? I have a custom-built amp + pre-amp system made for me by a German guy several years ago, but it can only connect to two speakers. I want to add a subwoofer.

    An explanation and/or link would be helpful. I haven't researched this in years, but now you have me interested again. I am only interested if it can be done without diminishing fidelity.

  53. @Anonymous
    Hardly anyone runs big woofers any more. Apart from the horn speaker twiode twats, virtually every non-cult-follower audiophile is running small speakers and a powered subwoofer now.

    Question you might be able to answer:

    [MORE]
    Is there a way to wire a powered subwoofer into a strictly two-channel setup? I have a custom-built amp + pre-amp system made for me by a German guy several years ago, but it can only connect to two speakers. I want to add a subwoofer.

    An explanation and/or link would be helpful. I haven’t researched this in years, but now you have me interested again. I am only interested if it can be done without diminishing fidelity.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Many subs have an input designed to be driven from the power outputs going to the main speakers, the speakers provide the load, the inputs to the subs are high impedance but calibrated for power amp signal levels.

    Others simply split the preamp signal and have a low pass filter
    It's better to do the crossover at line level but that means a different preamp setup.

    Some subs just have a LFE input that assumes you have a pre or receiver with a mono summed dedicated signal.

    Check with the manufacturer of the subs.

    I checked a couple of the more popular manufacturers' web sites but for some reason I am getting a lot of link errors from Velodyne, one of the more popular brands. Definitive Technology sems to have hidden their owners' manuals pretty well on their site, as well.
  54. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "Best voice in rock and roll history."

    Uh-oh, NOW you've opened a can of worms.

    Well we could talk about setting baseline levels. Fogerty's voice (and the CCR sound) are kind of a gold standard; if you had to explain to a Martian what rock and roll was, using only one example, you'd probably pick one of about five CCR songs. Or you'd pick something by Kurt Cobain. It isn't really about technical virtuosity, it's all about expressiveness and misterioso.

    Since rock and roll is an American creation primarily, an American should get pride of place for "best rock and roll voice". This excludes John Lennon, or Roger Daltrey, who would probably otherwise win. (Think of it in terms of range: Fogerty could easily cover "Twist and Shout" or "You Can't Do That," but he could never cover "Dear Prudence", "Going Mobile," or "Across the Universe"). We also have to more or less tacitly admit that, Chuck Berry and other great Black founders notwithstanding, rock and roll really is sort of a White thing, and great Black singers like Marvin Gaye and Smokey and Sly belong under their own rubric. Same thing with Johnny Cash. No offense, guys, you have your own brilliant thing going.

    So for the sake of argument, let's say Fogerty is the Equator. Who is north of the equator?

    At the North Pole: Roy Orbison, Brian Wilson, Captain Beefheart. Otherworldly creatures from the rings of Saturn.

    In the temperate zones: Jim Morrison, Patti Smith, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain.

    In the subtropics: David Johansen, Lou Reed, Linda Ronstadt, Phoebe Snow.

    Honorable Mention Despite Being A Brit: Polly Jean Harvey.

    I had to think for a bit on the best rock singer. I’ll go with:

    1- Chris Cornell
    2- Robert Plant
    3- Bon Scott – if only for his unstoppable energy

  55. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Question you might be able to answer: Is there a way to wire a powered subwoofer into a strictly two-channel setup? I have a custom-built amp + pre-amp system made for me by a German guy several years ago, but it can only connect to two speakers. I want to add a subwoofer.

    An explanation and/or link would be helpful. I haven't researched this in years, but now you have me interested again. I am only interested if it can be done without diminishing fidelity.

    Many subs have an input designed to be driven from the power outputs going to the main speakers, the speakers provide the load, the inputs to the subs are high impedance but calibrated for power amp signal levels.

    Others simply split the preamp signal and have a low pass filter
    It’s better to do the crossover at line level but that means a different preamp setup.

    Some subs just have a LFE input that assumes you have a pre or receiver with a mono summed dedicated signal.

    Check with the manufacturer of the subs.

    I checked a couple of the more popular manufacturers’ web sites but for some reason I am getting a lot of link errors from Velodyne, one of the more popular brands. Definitive Technology sems to have hidden their owners’ manuals pretty well on their site, as well.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Thank you.
  56. What is with all the grunge?

    Kurt Cobain? Layne Staley? Chris Cornell?

    Really guys?

    Mediocre music by a bunch of dues who killed themselves.

    • Replies: @Eric Novak
    Yes, really. Chris Cornell's history of chemical dependence and psychological vulnerabilities that go along with that don't detract from his status as one of rock's all-time greats. Listen to Soundgarden or Audioslave sometime.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    This is the way they grew up, apparently, so whaddya' expect:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7Hks2GhyzM
  57. @Anonymous
    Many subs have an input designed to be driven from the power outputs going to the main speakers, the speakers provide the load, the inputs to the subs are high impedance but calibrated for power amp signal levels.

    Others simply split the preamp signal and have a low pass filter
    It's better to do the crossover at line level but that means a different preamp setup.

    Some subs just have a LFE input that assumes you have a pre or receiver with a mono summed dedicated signal.

    Check with the manufacturer of the subs.

    I checked a couple of the more popular manufacturers' web sites but for some reason I am getting a lot of link errors from Velodyne, one of the more popular brands. Definitive Technology sems to have hidden their owners' manuals pretty well on their site, as well.

    Thank you.

  58. OT:

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Maybe Bill Watterson will be next?
  59. Of course the kid was named Caleb.

  60. @MEH 0910
    OT:
    https://twitter.com/dailycartoonist/status/1172655910000517120

    https://twitter.com/waxpancake/status/1173029774475677696

    Maybe Bill Watterson will be next?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    I guess there's still some question as to whether this means Gary Larson is producing new work or just allowing his old work to finally be displayed online.

    https://twitter.com/bleedingcool/status/1173250464344940550
  61. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "Best voice in rock and roll history."

    Uh-oh, NOW you've opened a can of worms.

    Well we could talk about setting baseline levels. Fogerty's voice (and the CCR sound) are kind of a gold standard; if you had to explain to a Martian what rock and roll was, using only one example, you'd probably pick one of about five CCR songs. Or you'd pick something by Kurt Cobain. It isn't really about technical virtuosity, it's all about expressiveness and misterioso.

    Since rock and roll is an American creation primarily, an American should get pride of place for "best rock and roll voice". This excludes John Lennon, or Roger Daltrey, who would probably otherwise win. (Think of it in terms of range: Fogerty could easily cover "Twist and Shout" or "You Can't Do That," but he could never cover "Dear Prudence", "Going Mobile," or "Across the Universe"). We also have to more or less tacitly admit that, Chuck Berry and other great Black founders notwithstanding, rock and roll really is sort of a White thing, and great Black singers like Marvin Gaye and Smokey and Sly belong under their own rubric. Same thing with Johnny Cash. No offense, guys, you have your own brilliant thing going.

    So for the sake of argument, let's say Fogerty is the Equator. Who is north of the equator?

    At the North Pole: Roy Orbison, Brian Wilson, Captain Beefheart. Otherworldly creatures from the rings of Saturn.

    In the temperate zones: Jim Morrison, Patti Smith, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain.

    In the subtropics: David Johansen, Lou Reed, Linda Ronstadt, Phoebe Snow.

    Honorable Mention Despite Being A Brit: Polly Jean Harvey.

    Can’t overlook the only black guy I listen to — Gil Scott-Heron, wonderful voice when he was healthy, like Lou Rawls with attitude.

  62. @Intelligent Dasein
    What is with all the grunge?

    Kurt Cobain? Layne Staley? Chris Cornell?

    Really guys?

    Mediocre music by a bunch of dues who killed themselves.

    Yes, really. Chris Cornell’s history of chemical dependence and psychological vulnerabilities that go along with that don’t detract from his status as one of rock’s all-time greats. Listen to Soundgarden or Audioslave sometime.

  63. @Steve Sailer
    Maybe Bill Watterson will be next?

    I guess there’s still some question as to whether this means Gary Larson is producing new work or just allowing his old work to finally be displayed online.

  64. @Kratoklastes
    Jimmy Barnes. He's absolutely exceptional live, and has been performing since the late 70s.

    You Got Nothin' I Want
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BiJKq7ynms

    Four Walls (live in 2003; original version as in the early 80s)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFYawv1KV4k

    When A Man Loves a Woman (Live)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osFZH-Hq83o

    And for a bit of fun... his band poking fun at Ita Buttrose, who ran Australia's most popular women's magazine in the 70s and 80s...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37Qsqd8mw9o

    Thanks, Krato. I’d heard of these guys before from an Aussie co-worker.

  65. @Intelligent Dasein
    What is with all the grunge?

    Kurt Cobain? Layne Staley? Chris Cornell?

    Really guys?

    Mediocre music by a bunch of dues who killed themselves.

    This is the way they grew up, apparently, so whaddya’ expect:

  66. @Ozymandias
    Voice coach analyzes five metal singers; Ozzy a bum, Halford the King:
    http://www.invisibleoranges.com/ask-a-real-musician-5-classic-male-metal-singers/

    Thanks, enjoyed the thumbs-up for Dio.

    There’s a funny YT vid where another voice coach personally demonstrates Dio’s technique — but cautions that he’s going to subtly change some of the lyrics because he’s a Christian (and indeed he does resemble Ned Flanders).

  67. @Abe

    Personally, I didn’t find Freddie all that cool, though.
     
    My ten year old son is a great social lab experiment for this theory. I’m meticulous in not imparting any of my own alt-right sensibilities on him- partly, yes, because I’m afraid one errant word learned from me could ruin his socioeconomic prospects (kids have recently had Ivy League acceptances revoked for a single unwoke tweet), but mainly because I want him to become whatever person he is on his own.

    But anyway, Freddie Mercury has become famous again among an entirely new generation thanks to the success of BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY- especially with tweeny girls I am told- but my son (without any bias imparted by me) absolutely despises him, pretty much entirely because he’s a typical heterosexual boy and QUEEN’S very campy aroma disgusts him.

    So trying to control for my own biases, I have to say that while technically Freddie is one of the all-time greats, this needs to be qualified by pointing out that his strength is in the middle range. Here is a great ‘range video’ for Freddy and I have to say his presence in the 5th octave is not at all pleasing. He can certainly hit notes in that area, but starting at G5, his tone becomes too shrill and unpleasingly whistle-register/falsetto-y :

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=kgLmYaRPrGE&t=21m47s

    … but my son (without any bias imparted by me) absolutely despises him, pretty much entirely because he’s a typical heterosexual boy and QUEEN’S very campy aroma disgusts him.

    Kudos to your son’s perceptive good taste.

  68. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "Best voice in rock and roll history."

    Uh-oh, NOW you've opened a can of worms.

    Well we could talk about setting baseline levels. Fogerty's voice (and the CCR sound) are kind of a gold standard; if you had to explain to a Martian what rock and roll was, using only one example, you'd probably pick one of about five CCR songs. Or you'd pick something by Kurt Cobain. It isn't really about technical virtuosity, it's all about expressiveness and misterioso.

    Since rock and roll is an American creation primarily, an American should get pride of place for "best rock and roll voice". This excludes John Lennon, or Roger Daltrey, who would probably otherwise win. (Think of it in terms of range: Fogerty could easily cover "Twist and Shout" or "You Can't Do That," but he could never cover "Dear Prudence", "Going Mobile," or "Across the Universe"). We also have to more or less tacitly admit that, Chuck Berry and other great Black founders notwithstanding, rock and roll really is sort of a White thing, and great Black singers like Marvin Gaye and Smokey and Sly belong under their own rubric. Same thing with Johnny Cash. No offense, guys, you have your own brilliant thing going.

    So for the sake of argument, let's say Fogerty is the Equator. Who is north of the equator?

    At the North Pole: Roy Orbison, Brian Wilson, Captain Beefheart. Otherworldly creatures from the rings of Saturn.

    In the temperate zones: Jim Morrison, Patti Smith, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain.

    In the subtropics: David Johansen, Lou Reed, Linda Ronstadt, Phoebe Snow.

    Honorable Mention Despite Being A Brit: Polly Jean Harvey.

    John Lennon was never a great rock vocalist. He could be a good imitator, but nothing established him as a great rock&roll stylist. Dear Prudence, Going Mobile, and Across the Universe weren’t rock&roll.

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