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Former SPLC Employee: "We Were Part of the Con, and We Knew It."
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From The New Yorker:

The Reckoning of Morris Dees and the Southern Poverty Law Center
By Bob Moser 11:05 A.M.

Moser was employed by the SPLC from 2001 to 2004 — i.e., a long time ago. And yet the SPLC continued to be promoted by the Great and Good as the final, unquestionable arbiter of Virtue vs. Evil until, hopefully, last week.

The firing of Morris Dees, the co-founder of the S.P.L.C., has flushed up uncomfortable questions that have surrounded the organization for years.

In the days since the stunning dismissal of Morris Dees, the co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center, on March 14th, I’ve been thinking about the jokes my S.P.L.C. colleagues and I used to tell to keep ourselves sane. Walking to lunch past the center’s Maya Lin–designed memorial to civil-rights martyrs, we’d cast a glance at the inscription from Martin Luther King, Jr., etched into the black marble—“Until justice rolls down like waters”—and intone, in our deepest voices, “Until justice rolls down like dollars.”

The Law Center had a way of turning idealists into cynics; like most liberals, our view of the S.P.L.C. before we arrived had been shaped by its oft-cited listings of U.S. hate groups, its reputation for winning cases against the Ku Klux Klan and Aryan Nations, and its stream of direct-mail pleas for money to keep the good work going. The mailers, in particular, painted a vivid picture of a scrappy band of intrepid attorneys and hate-group monitors, working under constant threat of death to fight hatred and injustice in the deepest heart of Dixie. When the S.P.L.C. hired me as a writer, in 2001, I figured I knew what to expect: long hours working with humble resources and a highly diverse bunch of super-dedicated colleagues. I felt self-righteous about the work before I’d even begun it.

The first surprise was the office itself. On a hill in downtown Montgomery, down the street from both Jefferson Davis’s Confederate White House and the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, where M.L.K. preached and organized, the center had recently built a massive modernist glass-and-steel structure that the social critic James Howard Kunstler would later liken to a “Darth Vader building” that made social justice “look despotic.”

… But nothing was more uncomfortable than the racial dynamic that quickly became apparent: a fair number of what was then about a hundred employees were African-American, but almost all of them were administrative and support staff—“the help,” one of my black colleagues said pointedly. The “professional staff”—the lawyers, researchers, educators, public-relations officers, and fund-raisers—were almost exclusively white. Just two staffers, including me, were openly gay.

During my first few weeks, a friendly new co-worker couldn’t help laughing at my bewilderment. “Well, honey, welcome to the Poverty Palace,” she said. “I can guaran-damn-tee that you will never step foot in a more contradictory place as long as you live.”

“Everything feels so out of whack,” I said. “Where are the lawyers? Where’s the diversity? What in God’s name is going on here?”

“And you call yourself a journalist!” she said, laughing again. “Clearly you didn’t do your research.”

In the decade or so before I’d arrived, the center’s reputation as a beacon of justice had taken some hits from reporters who’d peered behind the façade. In 1995, the Montgomery Advertiser had been a Pulitzer finalist for a series that documented, among other things, staffers’ allegations of racial discrimination within the organization. In Harper’s, Ken Silverstein had revealed that the center had accumulated an endowment topping a hundred and twenty million dollars while paying lavish salaries to its highest-ranking staffers and spending far less than most nonprofit groups on the work that it claimed to do. The great Southern journalist John Egerton, writing for The Progressive, had painted a damning portrait of Dees, the center’s longtime mastermind, as a “super-salesman and master fundraiser” who viewed civil-rights work mainly as a marketing tool for bilking gullible Northern liberals. “We just run our business like a business,” Dees told Egerton. “Whether you’re selling cakes or causes, it’s all the same.”

Co-workers stealthily passed along these articles to me—it was a rite of passage for new staffers, a cautionary heads-up about what we’d stepped into with our noble intentions. Incoming female staffers were additionally warned by their new colleagues about Dees’s reputation for hitting on young women. And the unchecked power of the lavishly compensated white men at the top of the organization—Dees and the center’s president, Richard Cohen—made staffers pessimistic that any of these issues would ever be addressed. …

… another former writer at the center said, speculating about what might have prompted the move. “It could be racial, sexual, financial—that place was a virtual buffet of injustices,” she said. Why would they fire him now? …

The staffers wrote that Dees’s firing was welcome but insufficient: their larger concern, they emphasized, was a widespread pattern of racial and gender discrimination by the center’s current leadership, stretching back many years. …

The controversy erupted at a moment when the S.P.L.C. had never been more prominent, or more profitable. Donald Trump’s Presidency opened up a gusher of donations; after raising fifty million dollars in 2016, the center took in a hundred and thirty-two million dollars in 2017, much of it coming after the violent spectacle that unfolded at the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that August. George and Amal Clooney’s justice foundation donated a million, as did Apple, which also added a donation button for the S.P.L.C. to its iTunes store. JPMorgan chipped in five hundred thousand dollars. The new money pushed the center’s endowment past four hundred and fifty million dollars

Most people are assuming that Morris got fired last week for being a horndog and/or a Good Old Boy who doesn’t think highly of blacks. But that was evident for decades. So what happened lately to get him fired rather than (forcibly) let him retire at age 82?

Maybe a tape turned up of him using the N-word? Or maybe somebody taped him talking honestly about the SPLC’s donors? I dunno.

Or what about something financial? It would be interesting to know just how certain it is that every penny the SPLC claims to have piled up is really sitting there in their onshore and offshore accounts.

Here’s the SPLC’s auditor’s statement. It seems pretty reassuring. I think.

So, I dunno …

Back to The New Yorker:

, which is more than the total assets of the American Civil Liberties Union, and it now employs an all-time high of around three hundred and fifty staffers. But none of that has slackened its constant drive for more money.

Can you imagine how much Morris could have reaped for the SPLC off of New Zealand if he hadn’t been fired the day before?

… In the late sixties, Dees sold the direct-mail operation to the Times Mirror Company, of Los Angeles, reportedly for between six and seven million dollars. But he soon sniffed out a new avenue for his marketing genius. …

A decade or so later, the center began to abandon poverty law—representing death-row defendants and others who lacked the means to hire proper representation—to focus on taking down the Ku Klux Klan. This was a seemingly odd mission, given that the Klan, which had millions of members in the nineteen-twenties, was mostly a spent force by the mid-eighties, with only an estimated ten thousand members scattered across the country. But “Dees saw the Klan as a perfect target,” Egerton wrote. For millions of Americans, the K.K.K. still personified violent white supremacy in America, and Dees “perceived chinks in the Klan’s armor: poverty and poor education in its ranks, competitive squabbling among the leaders, scattered and disunited factions, undisciplined behavior, limited funds, few if any good lawyers.” Along with legal challenges to what was left of the Klan, the center launched Klanwatch, which monitored the group’s activities. Klanwatch was the seed for what became the broader-based Intelligence Project, which tracks extremists and produces the S.P.L.C.’s annual hate-group list.

The only thing easier than beating the Klan in court—“like shooting fish in a barrel,” one of Dees’s associates told Egerton—was raising money off Klan-fighting from liberals up north, who still had fresh visions of the violent confrontations of the sixties in their heads. The S.P.L.C. got a huge publicity boost in July, 1983, when three Klansmen firebombed its headquarters. …

By the time I touched down in Montgomery, the center had increased its staff and branched out considerably—adding an educational component called Teaching Tolerance and expanding its legal and intelligence operations to target a broad range of right-wing groups and injustices—but the basic formula perfected in the eighties remained the same. The annual hate-group list, which in 2018 included a thousand and twenty organizations, both small and large, remains a valuable resource for journalists and a masterstroke of Dees’s marketing talents; every year, when the center publishes it, mainstream outlets write about the “rising tide of hate” discovered by the S.P.L.C.’s researchers, and reporters frequently refer to the list when they write about the groups. …

For those of us who’ve worked in the Poverty Palace, putting it all into perspective isn’t easy, even to ourselves. We were working with a group of dedicated and talented people, fighting all kinds of good fights, making life miserable for the bad guys. And yet, all the time, dark shadows hung over everything: the racial and gender disparities, the whispers about sexual harassment, the abuses that stemmed from the top-down management, and the guilt you couldn’t help feeling about the legions of donors who believed that their money was being used, faithfully and well, to do the Lord’s work in the heart of Dixie. We were part of the con, and we knew it.

Outside of work, we spent a lot of time drinking and dishing in Montgomery bars and restaurants about the oppressive security regime, the hyperbolic fund-raising appeals, and the fact that, though the center claimed to be effective in fighting extremism, “hate” always continued to be on the rise, more dangerous than ever, with each year’s report on hate groups. “The S.P.L.C.—making hate pay,” we’d say.

 
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  1. We were working with a group of dedicated and talented people, fighting all kinds of good fights, making life miserable for the bad guys.

    You took the money and whored out your “principles” for the signalling of virtue because that’s what SJW and cucks do. Don’t try to pretend you were, at worst, ambivalent, buddy-rah, you were wrong and you knew it.

    One small bright spot,

    raising money off Klan-fighting from liberals up north, who still had fresh visions of the violent confrontations of the sixties in their heads

    translates to “fleecing vapid status-obsessed boomers still hung up on their faded youth”, so they did some small good.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  2. The Reckoning of Morris Dees and the Southern Poverty Law Center

    By Bob Moser

    His name is Moser! LOL!!!!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  3. Everything is explained by political philosophy. Whores they were, whores the are, whores they will ever be.

  4. Dan Hayes says:

    If this New Yorker article doesn’t put a stake into the heat of the SPLC, then nothing will!

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Anon
  5. Laughing.

    “Just two staffers, including me, were openly gay.”

    If that is meant to be a problem, it’s a funny one, and causes not flick of an eyebrow.

    I am not sure what to say, whites (homosexual practitioners included) gaming the issues that pertain to blacks and equity. Why I am shocked, shocked and more shocked . . .

    not at all.

    Next up . . . the ACLU . . .

    • Replies: @RVBlake
    , @stillCARealist
  6. Thinker says:

    So the whole thing is set up to con big money out of the gullible guilt-ridden liberals up north — can’t let all that righteous indignation go to waste. Who is going to take all the money from the indignant liberals now?

  7. anonymous[355] • Disclaimer says:

    Do you think that employees at the ADL, likewise, go out drinking and dishing in Manhattan, where they commisserate amongst themselves about the hyperbolic fund-rasining appeals, “hate” that always continues to be on the rise and the con they’re pulling over on the public and their donors?

    Or, are the employees at the ADL not capable of that level of self-reflection?

  8. anonymous[130] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I agree. These people have approx. $500 mill. to spread around. They will be able to hire a lot of consultants for damage control , and spread some heavy baksheesh (sp. ?) on the Dem party and its media wing. My bet is that will buy survival.

    • Replies: @lavoisier
  9. @ben tillman

    Mosher is an old colonial name, found in 17th-century Virginia and Massachusetts. It’s of French derivation.

    If Moser is a poser, he’s a deft one.

    • Replies: @Kaganovitch
    , @a reader
  10. @Steve Sailer

    The SPLC lacks any heart into which to thrust a stake.

    But as long as you have the stake out…

  11. istevefan says:

    The “professional staff”—the lawyers, researchers, educators, public-relations officers, and fund-raisers—were almost exclusively white.

    And….

  12. @istevefan

    More accurately, “whites” with names like Cohen and Goldberg.

  13. The SPLC helps facebook decide who’s a hater, but evidently a facebook group called “The Unbearable Whiteness of Being,” dedicated to mocking white people, doesn’t qualify. Under a picture of Tucker Carlson, one person comments, ” can’t help thinking he’s related to what’s his name, the newest and slimiest member of the Supremes,” to which another responds, “all those white dudes look alike , they went to fuck university specializing in peckery jerkery asshole technology,” followed by, “KILL IT WITH FIRE.”

    No hate there, nope.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  14. @Harry Baldwin

    They should hire Andrew Sullivan to ghost their posts.

  15. lavoisier says: • Website
    @anonymous

    They do not need to spend any money.

    Hating white people is a winning strategy today for anyone.

  16. Anonymous[151] • Disclaimer says:

    I think it’s sexual harassment: the suddenness and lack of an obvious precipitating cause point to that. Dees would only get canned for financial impropriety if the AG were up their ass, and he’s not dumb enough to call a black employee “boy” or whatever. But I’m sure he feels comfortable, entitled even, giving every cute intern the Don Draper treatment. The guy’s in his 80s, it was almost expected when he was coming up.

    As much as I despise #MeToo and weaponized feminism, and as much as I know the primary victims will be random college kids and young guys just starting out in their careers, I can’t deny that this “reckoning” has provided us right wingers with a bountiful harvest: Harvey Weinstein, Al Franken, Eric Schneiderman, now potentially Morris Dees. The rain falls on the just and unjust alike, I suppose.

  17. @Oleaginous Outrager

    The SPLC is still deciding who gets deplatformed and whose PayPal accounts are closed, among (many) other things, so it’s a bit early for anyone to be dancing in the end zone.

    As Steve says here: http://www.unz.com/isteve/former-splc-employee-we-were-part-of-the-con-and-we-knew-it/#comment-3107484

    “Well, honey, welcome to the Poverty Palace,” she said. “I can guaran-damn-tee that you will never step foot in a more contradictory place as long as you live.”

    “Everything feels so out of whack,” I said. “Where are the lawyers? Where’s the diversity? What in God’s name is going on here?”

    “And you call yourself a journalist!” she said, laughing again. “Clearly you didn’t do your research.”

    This conversation lacks a certain je ne sais quoi. Oh, I know, the ring of authenticity.

    • Replies: @Cortes
  18. So, this fag is lamenting that he worked for and helped perpetrate and maintain a mendacious/hypocritical hoax operation. Pretty sure that he cashed all of his pay-checks.

  19. Anonymous[151] • Disclaimer says:

    And speaking of suspicious, er, exits, what about this?

    http://www.bloomberg.com%2Fnews%2Farticles%2F2019-03-18%2Fprinceton-economist-alan-krueger-ex-obama-adviser-dies-at-58&usg=AOvVaw2LTrzPQSbkN4Y3ivthHAPn

    Princeton’s Krueger, Ex-Economic Aide to Obama, Dies at 58

    The New Jersey school announced his death on its website Monday. His family later issued a statement saying that Krueger took his own life. Police found Krueger inside his home on Saturday morning and he was later pronounced dead, said Sergeant Fred Williams, a spokesman for the Princeton Police Department.

    According to Econ Job Rumors the guy went silent on Twitter back in January. Have the Pink Mafia claimed another scalp?

  20. J.Ross says: • Website

    Between massive unpopular wars that somehow get rammed through, massively unpopular wave immigration that somehow gets rammed through, massively unpopular banks that somehow get protected, and thoroughly exposed and documented frauds that persist forever and are never prosecuted, it looks like the government and leading institutions exist to punish the innocent and set the guilty free.

  21. Or what about something financial? It would be interesting to know just how certain it is that every penny the SPLC claims to have piled up is really sitting there in their onshore and offshore accounts.

    Here’s the SPLC’s auditor’s statement. It seems pretty reassuring. I think.

    I’m a CPA at a nonprofit which primarily does grantmaking (as opposed to running charitable programs directly); most of our assets are cash or publicly traded securities but we do have some alternative investments as well.

    What’s most striking to me in looking through SPLC’s financials: of the $492 million in net assets, 412 of that is valued based on Net Asset Value per share or equivalent. In other words, the auditors had no way to independently confirm the value of those investments (if they had, the assets would be included in Level I or Level II) and relied on the account statements provided by the investment managers.

    It’s far from certain that there’s anything amiss with the endowment, but it’s the biggest risk I can see.

    • Replies: @res
    , @Steve Sailer
  22. captflee says:

    Having been for a short while a student of Prof. Guy Owen, he of “The Ballad of the Flim Flam Man”, I must grudgingly confess a longstanding admiration for a well executed con. This bunch has been running one of the best of all time for better than three decades, going from strength to strength.

    Millard Farmer, erstwhile partner of Dees, referred to him as “the Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker of the civil rights movement”, though Mr. Farmer has recently been found liable for civil racketeering, so that might be one of those pot/kettle situations.

  23. Anon[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes

    Nothing can kill an organization with half a billion dollars. But what I predict will happen is that Cohen will be next, and sooner or later there will be a complete takeover by SJWs or female lesbian black activists or some other sketchy tribe. This is the New Yorker endorsing this upcoming coup.

    It would be hilarious if the Alabama State Troopers uncovered a drug sales ring inside the organization and confiscated the half a billion, along with the building and the Maya Lin thing, under civil forfeiture.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    , @Craig Nelsen
  24. i still maintain (they) are simply positioning to take full control of SPLC now that the tech companies have invited them to censor the internet. morris dees was useful in the past, but no longer useful, so he’s out. it’s not any more complicated than that.

    (they’ve) done this 1000 times to 1000 organizations.

  25. @Reg Cæsar

    Nah, he means it sounds like the Hebrew/ Yiddish for “stool pigeon” which is “Moser”

  26. anon[853] • Disclaimer says:

    to do the Lord’s work in the heart of Dixie

    These ignorant northern liberals and jews are still coming to the South like they are missionaries coming to darkest Africa a hundred years ago. They are living out a fantasy in their heads completely disconnected from reality. The slander against white Southerners will never end.
    On the upside, the SPLC is fleecing gullible liberals and thankfully spending a lot more of the money on themselves than they are on slander.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  27. Trump should sign an EO tomorrow terminating all federal government contracts with SPLC and prohibiting any government agency from dealing with SPLC or using its materials. He should also order the IRS to begin an examination.

  28. Cortes says:
    @Mr McKenna

    “This conversation lacks a certain je ne sais quoi. Oh, I know, the ring of authenticity.”

    I’m not so sure. After all, it’s edited to cut out the scene where she waddles into the kitchen to deal with the damned cat…

    “THOMAS!!!”

  29. JimDandy says:

    the lawsuits maybe?

  30. jon says:

    the lavishly compensated white men at the top of the organization—Dees and the center’s president, Richard Cohen

    See, Jews are White after all.

    • Replies: @Svigor
  31. Anonymous[357] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Apparent absolute power is a helluva drug!

  32. @Percy Gryce

    Trump should sign an EO tomorrow terminating all federal government contracts with SPLC and prohibiting any government agency from dealing with SPLC or using its materials. He should also order the IRS to begin an examination.

    While he’s at it, why doesn’t Trump order the Justice Department to drop its investigation against him, too?

  33. RobUK says:

    “Where are the lawyers? Where’s the diversity? What in God’s name is going on here?”

    An unintentionally hilarious quote.

  34. RobUK says:

    If only the lavish compensation had gone to the blacks and the gays, everything would have been OK.

    • Replies: @res
  35. Maybe there is some good to these bastards in that they suck up money from lefty and anti-white scum…and use it on themselves. Money that otherwise would do real harm if weilded by a True Believer.
    Poor Morris Dees. At 82 even he has got to have a dried up shlong.
    “Those were the days! Sneaking into my stepdaughters bedroom,dildo in hand! ”
    Now the jews have got the Center,the Donors List…and the dildo.

  36. Garlic says:

    The SPLC has received regular, clean audit opinions from its auditor.

    An audit is not specifically looking for financial fraud or evidence of misappropriation of funds, although a diligent audit may bring such things to light.

    But how diligent was the SPLC’s auditor?

    The SPLC uses an audit firm called Jackson Thornton, which seems to be a small (circa 200 employees) firm based In Montgomery.

    https://www.jacksonthornton.com

    Jackson Thornton has an asset management division.

    https://jt-am.com

    Think about that for a second: an audit firm that also manages assets. That sounds inherently problematic to me in terms of maintaining objectivity. Of course, if JT were to audit a firm that it also managed money for, that would be a huge conflict of interest.

    The SPLC has hundreds of millions of dollars being managed by someone. Who is managing the money? Surely it’s not Jackson Thornton?

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  37. @Anonymous

    They gave some kind of oscar to Kirk D. ouglas this year. He was wheeled on stage and reverently applauded. Dude did some good stuff,but wasnt he a rapist of our women? Wasnt he known for some brutal stuff?
    This undead vampire shouldnt be getting awards, he should be defenestrated,pronto. (Always wanted to use that word.)

  38. Even the auditor name borders misleading: Jackson Thornton CPAs is a local operation not to be confused with major accounting firm Grant Thornton. I wonder how much of the half-billion is managed by Jackson Thornton Asset Management LLC.

  39. Around 2004 Morris Dees came to give a talk at the university I worked at in Dayton, Ohi0. I had no interest in hearing him, but I distinctly remember walking past the entry to the auditorium room in the student union while people were filing in and being amazed that the university had hired a temporary security detail and put temporary metal detectors in place so that everyone going in was checked for supposed weapons. At the front of the room I could sees Dees standing there looking very grim, pretending that he was in a dangerous place, worried about being assaulted by all the imaginary Klansmen that occupied the campus. I had little knowledge of SPLC at that time, but I recall thinking: “This is nuts. They never do this for other speakers. Who in Dayton, Ohio knows or cares about this guy? He is running a scam.” This was all part of Dees’s phony act, and I am sure that the “diversity” personnel at my university were thrilled to arrange it.

    • Replies: @L Woods
  40. Wouldn’t be surprised if Mr. Moser was found to have died from either multiple self inflicted gunshots to the back of the head, or to have accidentally drowned in his toilet bowl, or to have lost control of his self driving car, in the near future.

  41. a reader says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    ben tillman: “His name is Moser! LOL!!!!”

    Moser.

  42. Trevor H. says:
    @Percy Gryce

    Which would be of a piece with yesterday’s executive order regarding free speech on campus. It would be gratifying to see him step up a bit and show that he’s capable of acting on principle after all. He really has little to lose at this point.

  43. @Percy Gryce

    Add it to the heaping lists of Trump’s “should—but didn’t”.

  44. RVBlake says:
    @EliteCommInc.

    Yes…Their paucity in numbers is made up for in their “openness.”

  45. @Percy Gryce

    That Trump officially sailed into the globalist sunset when he cucked to Small Ryan on the first No Wall spending bill.

  46. donut says:
    @Anonymous

    “The rain falls on the just and unjust alike” , maybe but the stream of piss seems to be going in one direction only .

  47. @Anonymous

    When his friend Millard Fuller got the shiv at Habitat for Humanity (a very much legit outfit at the time, I led the first combined audit of all affiliates and we had an outstanding program ratio), sexual harassment was the pretext.

    It was downhill from there.

  48. @anon

    Civil Rights Reenactors.

    We should encourage them to add some cosplay.

  49. anonymous[739] • Disclaimer says:

    I confess that I really hate pretentious, self righteous $ money grubbing outfits like the SPLC. These groups never do anything to help poor Black African Americans. It’s the feeling I get when I see the big sign as one enters Malibu California – home of the richest Lib Leftists in North America.

    The sign proclaims that Malibu CA is a sanctuary city that welcomes the undocumented…..

    This welcome does not entail allowing many/any poor Ameri-Indians live in Malibu California unless they can afford the likes of Rob (The Meathead) Riner’s $ 8 million beach front mansion.

    Yeah, I hate these as* holes.

  50. The SPLC is an anti-White hedge fund scam that siphons loot from Holocaust-haunted Hebrews.

    The pile of loot accumulated by the SPLC gives me the opportunity to once again remind Unz Review readers that the Federal Reserve Bank has helped plenty of the people with big loot piles get their loot piles much bigger by means of monetary extremism — money printing, asset purchases, quantitative easing, dollar swaps and bail outs…etc.

    Here is Patrick Cleburne from 2011:

    The Southern Poverty Law Center has effectively turned itself into a “Fund of Funds” These are entities, spawned by the hedge fund craze, that exist to divide resources between a selection of hedge funds, which they monitor.

    Why the SPLC is going to this trouble is a puzzle. Last year I hypothesized that one objective was to mask the actual value of its assets—much as real estate is usually carried at an entirely different (and lower value) than what it can actually realize. I note that the endowment fund reported rising only 9.9% this year compared to 14.4% for net assets overall.

    The litigation function, increasingly far-fetched and trivial though its targets are, is necessary to advertise to its donor base. Even more, it lends an aura of legitimacy and credibility to what has long been the $PLC’s most important function: serving as commissar to the MSM, facilitating the repression of any sign of resistance to destruction on the part of the historic American nation. In the past year, both Mark Potok and Heidi Beirich have demonstrated this purpose very clearly.

    But the lesson of the past few years is that financial oddities, like Long-Term Capital Management or Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, or Bernie Madoff eventually blow up. Probably what will ultimately relieve America of the $PLC Vampire Squid is scandal over its handling of these gargantuan reserves—to which it is in my opinion inexorably headed.

    Tweet from 2015:

  51. The New Yorker investigative story is remarkably similar to indepth exposes on religious televangelists. The name escapes me (though it was mentioned in James Randi’s book “Fake Healers”), but in the early ’70’s a direct marketing guru (similar to Dees) figured out how to make tons off of unsuspecting ordinary folks in Middle America and the South by using the same tactics as the SPLC. Basically its the same swindle and con, except Dees marketed his appeal to the Northeast, rather than the South and the Midwest for money.

    But it’s essentially the same con. And many, many televangelists, from the late Oral Roberts to Benny Hinn have become gazillionaires using the same letter with the same appeals for money.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @J.Ross
  52. @istevefan

    This one sticks out. The New Yorker still lumps jews in with whites when convenient.

    • Replies: @Pat Kittle
  53. @EliteCommInc.

    Don’t you love how he announces it right away? It’s a way to separate himself from all those other white folks, you know, the ones who are secretly still racist and sexist. Not him, no sir, and he’s not self-righteous about it either.

  54. techanon says:

    I wonder if the people working in the poverty palace realize that most workplaces are not like that

  55. “Until justice rolls down like waters”—and intone, in our deepest voices, “Until justice rolls down like dollars.”

    The reason America is 50 years past Apollo 11 and never landed on Mars. That and The Great and Powerful Obama ending US manned spacecraft operations.

    Black people ended von Braun’s dream of landing on Mars.

    • Replies: @Pat Kittle
  56. Currahee says:

    Elderly jewish widow, pen poised over checkbook, Miami,2006:
    “Oi, what to do? Bernie or Morris?

  57. @Anonymous

    Dan Schdneider could be next

  58. ATBOTL says:

    “The “professional staff”—the lawyers, researchers, educators, public-relations officers, and fund-raisers—were almost exclusively white.”

    More like “fellow whites.”

  59. Steve, you should be proud.

    I read this and thought here’s a group with a half a billion dollar endowment, employing hundreds of well paid lawyers and propagandists and in their entire history they’ve uttered fewer truths than you do on a single day, certainly a single week.

    And, of course, the last 40 years, they’ve done essentially nothing but spew endless calumny and lies, while you have spread awareness of a whole lot of empirical truths and exposed a lot of mainstream bias and illogic to a lot of folks–one man on a shoestring budget.

  60. The Law Center had a way of turning idealists into cynics; like most liberals, our view of the S.P.L.C. before we arrived had been shaped by its oft-cited listings of U.S. hate groups, its reputation for winning cases against the Ku Klux Klan and Aryan Nations, and its stream of direct-mail pleas for money to keep the good work going. The mailers, in particular, painted a vivid picture of a scrappy band of intrepid attorneys and hate-group monitors, working under constant threat of death to fight hatred and injustice in the deepest heart of Dixie. When the S.P.L.C. hired me as a writer, in 2001, I figured I knew what to expect: long hours working with humble resources and a highly diverse bunch of super-dedicated colleagues. I felt self-righteous about the work before I’d even begun it.

    This paragraph struck me.

    It’s one thing to do some lawyering for black people or poor people–fine. And if you are targetting people or groups who are *actually attacking people*–fine.

    But what this is, is just harassment of people who you don’t agree with. Harassing them for having a different opinion–i.e. preferring their own ethnic group.

    Basically he–and his ilk–have that charming hall monitor mentality. Their mission: make sure no white gentile anywhere is allowed to think unapproved thoughts without being bullied.

    How glorious to have these charming people as our national hall monitors instead of having our historic liberties.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    , @Desiderius
  61. Art Deco says:
    @Desiderius

    +10

    I wish I’d thought that up.

  62. anarchyst says:

    I came of age during the first so-called “civil-rights” movement and saw for myself the underhanded dealings, the demonization of decent, law-abiding whites, and in general, the deterioration of civil society.
    Almost all of the “civil-rights” workers and demonstration “handlers” were of one persuasion–New York based leftist communist jews. They cared not one wit about true “civil rights”, but were there to create hate and discontent among their black charges (who were too stupid or naive to see that they were being used to suborn and destroy legitimate government and society–a favorite communist tactic). These New York-based “carpetbaggers” fomented their hate and discontent, only to become future “civil-rights” attorneys, race-hustlers, and America-hating leftist communists…and the $PLC being invented.
    The so-called “non-violent civil-rights demonstrations” were anything but “non-violent”. Robberies, rapes, and other criminal acts were common, but never reported, as even the “mainstream media” was “in on the game” and conveniently turned off their cameras during the acts of violence. You see, even then,”creating crises” was a part of the agenda.
    The “beginning of the end” of America was the use of federal troops against white Americans, which, in itself was a violation of “posse comitatus”–the prohibition on the use of federal troops for domestic “law enforcement” purposes. As most whites were (and still are) law-abiding, they (we) were “steamrollered” by the use of federal troops to crush honest dissent. We never recovered from those unconstitutional actions. It was all downhill from there…

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  63. Svigor says:

    Co-workers stealthily passed along these articles to me—it was a rite of passage for new staffers, a cautionary heads-up about what we’d stepped into with our noble intentions.

    Literally LOLed.

  64. Svigor says:
    @jon

    Not sure who’s the quintessential crypto-goy; Morris Seligman Dees, or Rupert Murdoch.

  65. Barnard says:
    @AnotherDad

    When the S.P.L.C. hired me as a writer, in 2001, I figured I knew what to expect: long hours working with humble resources and a highly diverse bunch of super-dedicated colleagues. I felt self-righteous about the work before I’d even begun it.

    Is he lying about being idealistic, or did he do zero background research on the SPLC before he took the job? By 2001 the racket was already well established and had been reported on in the mainstream media. Wouldn’t the size of the building alone lead any thinking person the to conclusion that the SPLC had resources well beyond the “humble” level?

    You make a good point about the hall monitor mentality. If Big Tech and the government weren’t partnering with the SPLC to harass and censor bad thinkers it would be a completely ineffective group. At this point another organization getting the endowment money without the SPLC’s baggage could be much worse than allowing it to continue ineffectively.

  66. @Anon

    It would be hilarious if the Alabama State Troopers uncovered a drug sales ring inside the organization and confiscated the half a billion, along with the building and the Maya Lin thing, under civil forfeiture.

    I agree, but SCOTUS recently severely curtailed civil forfeiture, which has been a disgrace for years.

    https://reason.com/blog/2019/02/20/supreme-court-delivers-unanimous-victory

  67. @Desiderius

    Civil Rights Reenactors.

    We should encourage them to add some cosplay.

    Yeah, complete with dogs and fire hoses!

    • Replies: @res
  68. Pat Kittle says: • Website
    @swami_cuckenstein

    Those familiar with the JQ know…

    1) Jews are “Jews” when it’s good for the Jews.
    — (as inter-generational Holocau$t “victims,” Nobel Prize winners, philanthropists, etc.)

    2) Jews are “White” when it’s good for the Jews.
    — (when disguising their mega-Jew-privilege, when caught in Wall Street scams, etc.)

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen
  69. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Televangelists were greedheads who took voluntarily surrendered money from spoon bending enthusiasts and the SPLC is a para-governmemtal enemy of the Constitution that wants to take away our rights.

  70. @anarchyst

    So tell me, did the Civil Rights movement need to happen or not? Should the laws have been changed, and would they have changed eventually without the pressure?

    This is no small matter. I would be inclined to agree with you (being born in 1968 and only knowing what my parents talked about) but since I didn’t live through segregation and its humiliation, I can’t really say how bad it was or wasn’t.

    But our official historians and textbook writers all agree it was as bad as anything on earth, and everybody was a racist and had to have a big change of heart. This change had to be forced on them by the non-violence of MLK and the aggression of the street. You know, the real people being downtrodden. If anybody protested that the racism wasn’t so bad, well just take a look at all the exclusion and the barriers to voting. Am I supposed to defend that?

    Until a better history and set of solutions to the Civil Rights struggles of post-WWII get written, we’re not going to win any big battles against the gov’t doing things like forcing integration or even banning separate bathrooms. Think that isn’t coming? It’s still separate but equal… and that can’t be fair.

    We see how Commies change things, but how do conservatives? Maybe we don’t, but what if something needs it?

    • Replies: @anarchyst
  71. SF says:

    Why isn’t Trump’s justice department going after their tax exempt status? I remember many years ago, possibly Nixon era, they went after the Sierra Club and forced them to create a non-tax exempt fund for their political lobbying activities.
    That would be a lot more productive than fighting the ghost of John McCain.

  72. res says:
    @Chris Renner

    Thanks. Could you elaborate a bit more on this?

    What’s most striking to me in looking through SPLC’s financials: of the $492 million in net assets, 412 of that is valued based on Net Asset Value per share or equivalent. In other words, the auditors had no way to independently confirm the value of those investments (if they had, the assets would be included in Level I or Level II) and relied on the account statements provided by the investment managers.

    I assume that means those assets don’t have enough fungibility and/or observable trading to value easily. For example, real estate or private equity placements. But my knowledge is limited here and I don’t have a good sense of the implications you seem to be drawing.

    Can you give a sense of what would be a more typical distribution of assets?

    • Replies: @Chris Renner
  73. res says:
    @RobUK

    I’d say the two most likely explanations are:
    1. MeToo
    2. Failure to pay the diversity tax

  74. res says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    Nah. The Current Year version includes safe spaces for when the microaggressions get too intense.

  75. njguy73 says:

    a massive modernist glass-and-steel structure that the social critic James Howard Kunstler would later liken to a “Darth Vader building” that made social justice “look despotic.”

    James Howard Kunstler is going to be looked back some day as the prophet of our times.

    • Agree: Cortes
  76. @Joe Stalin

    No offense intended, but that may be the 2nd thing* Obama got right.

    Robotic space exploration is orders of magnitude cheaper & effective.

    *(That, and not starting a war with Iran for the (((foulest war criminals))) the world has ever known.)

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  77. Whether or not their workforce is gender balanced and multi cultural, in what way does it help us to be one unified America made of individuals who respect each other to have SPLC?

    As for the “The annual hate-group list, which in 2018 included a thousand and twenty organizations, both small and large,”, there are many groups on its hate watch list who simply are conservative but almost none that actually target a specific victim group for actual violence. Not only that, but left wing groups like anifa and others who do openly call for violence and doxx the right NEVER are on the hate list.

    Imagine if your groups name was put on a “list remains a valuable resource for journalists; every year, when the center publishes it, mainstream outlets write about the “rising tide of hate”…and “reporters frequently refer to the list when they write about the groups.” Some groups are suing because of this problem. I’d like the place to end and focus on us working together to make our country great again!

    What they forget is by targeting some groups as “evil” because they “hate”, they actually target those groups to be hated. And in a country where we are supposed to be free – A multi million dollar intelligence and surveillance operation against “a broad range of right-wing groups and injustices”

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  78. L Woods says:
    @Stephen Paul Foster

    Funny: the cost of security is a leading “reason” for denial of platform where “controversial” right wing speakers are concerned.

  79. anarchyst says:
    @stillCARealist

    I lived through the so-called “civil-rights” era…
    It wasn’t as “bad” as the historians state.
    Blacks were “coming in to their own” and were increasingly being accepted by the majority white society on their own merits and would have been better off if things were allowed to progress without government coercion, and outsider (jewish communist carpetbagger) interference. Jews figured predominantly in the so-called “civil-rights” movement, not because of altruism or true concern for the plight of blacks, but they had their own agenda–diluting the power of white society. We are living with the results of their interference to this day. We used to have a saying: “Behind every Negro, there is a jew”.
    Those blacks who showed a modicum of intelligence and willingness to live by the rules of orderly society were accepted. Increasingly whites were seeing that (some) blacks could behave themselves.
    One could easily see the rampant violence taking place in the all-black areas; at that time white society would not put up with such behavior in their own neighborhoods. It was better to “contain” the violence in the black areas than allow it to spill over into white areas..
    Using federal troops to enforce illegal “desegregation orders” did more to damage cordial race relations and did harden white anti-black attitudes. Add to that, “bussing” white students to schools out of their neighborhoods also hardened white attitudes, especially when white children were being bussed to predominantly black schools in order to achieve “integration”.
    Growing up in Detroit, it was blacks who were the aggressors. Us white kids had to be wary of two blacks riding one bicycle..one pedaling and the other on the handlebars, who would jump off and knock a white kid off his bicycle and steal it. Quite often, if police were called, nothing could be done, as in their minds, “possession was nine-tenths of the law”. The “parents” of these black thugs would DARE the white parents to attempt to retrieve their property. Violence directed against whites was always part of the equation.
    No, the civil-rights laws were (and still are) a massive mistake which destroyed freedom of association, but only for whites…

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  80. “And the unchecked power of the lavishly compensated white men at the top of the organization—Dees and the center’s president, Richard Cohen—”

    Yeah, those “white” men at the top. I bet Scottish Presbyterians and Amish were massively over-represented.

    So when does someone investigate their offshore slush fund?

  81. @AnotherDad

    It’s not really about disagreement. We’ve seen that when they run out of racists they just make them up. Don’t give them credit for being that rational/legit.

  82. @patrialiberty

    They dont forget it, goofus, it’s the whole point!

    The only forgetters are people like you who’ve forgotten what evil looks like.

  83. @Pat Kittle

    Do little kids dream of robotic space exploration? Don’t think so. Doesn’t have much cache to it.

    You know all those smart kids that get into CalTech? I would like to get them working on Cool Shit to get us to Mars. Wouldn’t be cool to seriously fund an Aerospike engine that might possibly get us to that one-stage-to-orbit like we envisioned in our fantasies? If we had that, we could build a von Braun Space Station, a place where we could visit, even civilians.

    I say let the USA break free of the mundane in space.

  84. Or what about something financial? It would be interesting to know just how certain it is that every penny the SPLC claims to have piled up is really sitting there in their onshore and offshore accounts.

    Southern Poverty Law Center was incorporated in Alabama in 1971. The Southern Poverty Law Center was incorporated in 1995 in oversight-free Nevada. The Nevada corporation has only three members: Richard Cohen, Alan Howard, and Teenie Hutchinson. They hold, respectively, the titles in the Alabama SPLC of President, Chairman of the Board, and Sec/Treas.

    Why would the three people with total control of the Alabama SPLC form a Nevada corporation by themselves with almost the same name?

    In the lawsuit I have against the SPLC in US District Court in Kansas City, I name the SPLC, Cohen, Dees, and Heidi Beirich as defendants. One of the arguments I made against their motion to dismiss the three individuals for lack of personal jurisdiction was that this shadow corporation in Nevada could make it difficult to collect on any large judgments entered against them.

    Now Richard Cohen has just announced he, too, is stepping down as well from the Alabama SPLC.

    What are the chances Richard Cohen takes a well-deserved vacation, now. To Israel. Then loses his return ticket?

    • Agree: Pat Kittle
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @J.Ross
  85. @Anon

    But what I predict will happen is that Cohen will be next,

    And you win the blue ribbon. Cohen resigned this afternoon.

  86. @Craig Nelsen

    Cohen just quit?

    Thanks!

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen
  87. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Craig Nelsen

    This is the real story of the day. Destruction or permanent damage to the SPLC is better than the Wall.

  88. @Pat Kittle

    A Polish Jew who fought in the resistance against the Nazis was a Jew.
    A Polish Jew who was Jack the Ripper was a Pole.

  89. @Steve Sailer

    Yep: https://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/2019/03/22/southern-poverty-law-center-president-richard-cohen-step-down/3251224002/

    Here is the motion I filed in my lawsuit against the SPLC this afternoon (it’s hard to keep up) (btw, Steve, you had an impact on this document from something you wrote years ago about having a soft spot for the old scamp):

    MOTION TO DISMISS CLAIM AGAINST DEFENDANT MORRIS DEES ON CONDITION

    This motion is made in light of recent news reports that defendant Richard Cohen has abruptly fired defendant Morris Dees from the organization Dees founded nearly a half century ago, and in light of the successful pro hac vice petitions both Dees and Cohen made to the Court in this case, and in light of their shared representation by defense counsel.

    Contrary to news reports, I do not believe Dees was fired for abusing the staff—racially or sexually—as Cohen has publicly insinuated, and the press, despite a lack of details or proof, has widely reported. As I understand it, it has been years since Dees even took an active part in the day-to-day operations of the SPLC. It seems highly unlikely that an elderly man, who only makes occasional appearances at the office, would suddenly be creating an atmosphere of racial and sexual abuse so severe that the SPLC would have to publicly terminate its founder “effective yesterday”.

    My skepticism of Cohen’s story is increased by reading through the entry for the SPLC on glassdoor.com. The website carries reviews, written by current and former employees, of the working conditions at various companies and organizations. Of the 36 reviews of the SPLC posted on glassdoor.com, about half are negative. Among those negative reviews, there are several negative mentions of Richard Cohen, a negative mention of a “female in upper management”, and numerous descriptions of the “toxic” workplace environment at the SPLC. But there isn’t a single mention of Morris Dees. There are several negative comments about the lack of diversity among the SPLC’s upper management, but no charges of racist behavior are leveled. Likewise, there is no mention of any kind of sexual abuse. If it were true that Dees had acted so abusively to staff members that the SPLC had had to announce his ouster effective yesterday, it seems to me that at least a hint of the mistreatment could be discovered somewhere in the 36 glassdoor.com postings. There is no such hint.

    So, if mistreatment of the staff was not the reason Dees was ousted from his own creation, what was?

    At 82, Morris Dees is at the age when a man is thinking about what he is leaving behind. It may be Dees simply regrets what the SPLC has become and was ousted after attempting—and failing—to rein in the monster he created.

    Here is my offer to Mr. Dees:

    Donate one million dollars to revive the Robinson Jeffers Boxing Club as a force for good—we’ll even call it the Morris Dees Boxing Club—in return for which I will drop you from this suit.

    Sincerely,

    Craig Nelsen
    March 22, 2019

    https://ecf.mowd.uscourts.gov/cgi-bin/DktRpt.pl?142850

  90. @anarchyst

    One look at the quality of people involved in the Harlem Renaissance compared to where even the most prominent blacks are today says all that needs to be said.

    The Civil Rights Movement was principally a wide-front counter-op designed to blunt KGB propaganda efforts targeting American blacks and third-world governments. In retrospect it looks like it may have been compromised from the inside.

  91. @res

    That’s basically correct. Alternative investments are obviously more risky than stocks/bonds/ETFs/mutual funds; they’re less regulated, harder for the investor to understand, and inherently harder to audit because of their complexity. And of course valuation is harder to establish with illiquid assets.

    For reasons like this, most of the smaller (say, <$10M in annual revenue) 501c3 organizations that I'm familiar with don't have alternative investments at all.

    Even compared to similarly-sized organizations, though, SPLC stands out.
    First, that ratio of [alternative investments]/[net assets] that I mentioned is a mind-boggling 84%.
    The comparable figure for Harvard (hedge fund with a university attached) is 75%; for the Heritage Foundation (close enough in revenue to SPLC, has its own substantial endowments) it's 73%; for Institute for Justice (an actual public-interest law firm, albeit with half the staff costs of SPLC) it's a measly 8%.

    The second thing that stands out is that basically all (98%) of SPLC's net assets don't have donor restrictions. The comparable figures for Harvard, Heritage, and IJ are 24%, 78%, and 89% respectively; that SPLC's is that high suggests that they aren't dealing with many donors who are overly concerned about what their money is used for.

    Third, SPLC's investment mix is particularly illiquid (see page 16). In the worst case interpretation, it could take them 2 months to liquidate, whereas Heritage (also see page 16) could redeem more than half of their alt investment in a day.

    Summarizing all this,

    1. SPLC has a huge endowment with a vague purpose that comprises the overwhelming majority.

    2. The staff and board has been pushing the endowment’s growth, not the donors. (They’ve had a couple of bonanza fundraising years recently, but all of that cash could easily have been left in money market or index funds if someone wasn’t pushing the alternatives.)

    3. Most of SPLC’s board and staff don’t have a background that suggests experience with alternative investments; they’re predominantly civil rights lawyers. Amazingly, they don’t even have a CFO; their highest accounting/finance person is “director of administrative services”.
    The notable exception to this is vice chair Bennett Grau (Goldman Sachs alum).

    4. To conclude: if – and there’s no hard evidence of this – one or two members of their leadership wanted to leverage that huge endowment for personal gain at the organization’s expense, there wouldn’t be much to stop them.

    • Replies: @res
  92. res says:
    @Chris Renner

    Thank you so much for your detailed response! I see your comments got their own iSteve post at http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-splcs-murky-finances/
    Well done!

    • Replies: @Chris Renner
  93. @res

    Much appreciated! Now to mention this to my wife, who thought (not like I haven’t given her a reason to think this) that I was just wasting time on the internet again…

  94. @Chris Renner

    Dear CR:

    Charlotte Allen of the Washington Examiner would like to email with you.

    Steve

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  95. @Steve Sailer

    Since commenting at Unz.com requires registering an email address, can’t you (or someone at Unz) forward Charlotte’s request to that address?

    • Replies: @res
  96. @Garlic

    It’s a good question, and if it turns out that Jackson Thornton was approving financial statements while collecting management fees, that would be bad (for them). But note that most big accounting firms do consulting work as well as auditing, so the obvious conflict of interest between auditing and fee-collecting is one of those hiding-in-plain-site conflicts that is just part of the background noise in The Professions. So as most accounting firms live in at least partially glass houses in this way, don’t expect much help from them in throwing stones.

  97. res says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Not everyone uses a real email address.

  98. the inscription from Martin Luther King, Jr., etched into the black marble—“Until justice rolls down like waters”

    Holy cultural illiteracy, Batman!

    That isn’t MLK.

    It is Amos!

    But let justice roll down like waters,
    and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream.
    Amos 5:24

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