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From Foreign Policy:

More White, More Male, More Jesus: CIA Employees Fear Pompeo Is Quietly Killing the Agency’s Diversity Mandate

CIA insiders worry reforms pushed by Brennan are languishing in his absence.

BY JENNA MCLAUGHLIN

SEPTEMBER 8, 2017
In early summer, Judy and Dennis Shepard bought plane tickets to give a speech to the workforce at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. The Shepards in 1998 had founded the Matthew Shepard Foundation in honor of their late son — a 21-year-old college freshman who was viciously attacked and left tied to a fence before he was brought to a hospital where he died of his injuries. One of the most notorious anti-gay acts of violence in U.S. history, his death led to some of the country’s first federal hate crime laws.

The Shepards had been invited to the CIA to talk about diversity and LGBTQ rights…

The schedule was set, and the details arranged, but in the 11th hour, the senior leadership shut down the event. The seventh floor, where the director’s office sits, had the Shepards’ speech canceled, questioning what value it would bring to the CIA mission.

Infiltrating Wyoming is at the heart of the CIA mission.

… The cancellation, now under review by the CIA’s Office of General Counsel, according to a second source, left employees disheartened — particularly those invested in the diversity reforms that were emphasized during the tenure of John Brennan, the former CIA director.

The CIA described the reasons for the cancellation as “materially false,” though confirmed the event had been scheduled. “As we explained to the Shepards, CIA decided on a Pride month event with a national security focus and the event with Senator [Tammy] Baldwin achieved that goal,” an agency spokesperson told FP.

… “This isn’t just about today’s diversity issue. It’s about tomorrow’s lack of diversity that will erode the agency,” Bakos told FP. “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”

From CIAagentedu.org:

Nada Glass Bakos grew up in a small town near Missoula and attended Montana State University.

 
    []
  1. If Pompeo was any good he would have exposed John Brennan’s ‘Russia-hacked-the-election’ hoax. He’s almost as big a dud as Sessions.

    Read More
    • Disagree: Lot
    • Replies: @O'Really
    Sessions is a massive disappointment -- we thought we knew him as a fighter for these last 30 years. His behavior in office has been enigmatic at best.
    , @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).
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  2. O'Really says:

    I had read somewhere that Shepard’s murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    Read More
    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @fish
    Why let facts get in the way of an incredibly effective (and lucrative) narrative!
    , @Jack Hanson
    The Gospel of St. Matthew, written by a homosexual journo, tore apart the narrative around Matt Shepard and revealed him as a meth dealer who was killed by his boyfriend over drugs.

    The point and sputter was amazing when it wasn't ignored totally.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Yeah, pretty much.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    The whole LGBT-martyr story is - like most SJW narratives - a lie. Both the victim and the murderers were involved in a homosexual / male-prostitute / meth-dealer demi-monde.

    , @The Z Blog
    Not only that, one of his killers was, at one time, having sex with him and therefore a homosexual. That was conveniently left out of the NYTimes narrative. They have also refused to give back that Pulitzer too. It sits next to a plaque of Walter Duranty.
    , @AnotherDad

    I had read somewhere that Shepard’s murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?
     
    As I recall, fag, prostitute, druggie/dealer, murdered by another--sometime sex partner--fag, prostitute druggie over drugs.

    The "Matthew Shepard"--cue hushed tones--narrative is as phony as the Trayvon! narrative, the Michael Brown "Gentle Giant" and "hands up, don't shoot" narrative, the Duke Lacrosse narrative, the U of Virginia frat boy rapist narrative, the "mattress girl" narrative, the Charlottesville narrative, the Heather Heyer narrative ... on and on and on.

    A few of these crashed and burned before being welded into the average person's consciousness, but most have been successful--Shepard particularly.

    Ron Unz's comments on "American Pravda" are spot on.
    , @Mike Zwick
    There was a 60 Minutes story on this where they interviewed people who said that the killers were gay as well and the motive was robbery.
  3. fish says:
    @O'Really
    I had read somewhere that Shepard's murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    Why let facts get in the way of an incredibly effective (and lucrative) narrative!

    Read More
  4. dr kill says:

    A cursory review of the subject. There is an American High School in Riyadh. Our youngest two sons attended. The kid was disturbed.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    Read More
    • Replies: @jimbojones
    G00d link, thank you.
    , @fnn
    "He suffered periods of depression, possibly as a result of being gang raped a few years earlier while on holiday in Morocco."


    I wonder if that was that before or after he became a "drug-addicted prostitute"? And do Westerners *still* go to Morocco for Gay sex tourism? It seems like a completely unnecessary risk these days.
  5. DFH says:

    “This isn’t just about today’s diversity issue. It’s about tomorrow’s lack of diversity that will erode the agency,” Bakos told FP. “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”

    This adds a whole new dimension to invade the world, invite the world; we need to invite the people we’ve just invaded here, so we can get them to spy on their compatriots.

    How did the CIA ever cope with all these pale, stale old white men in the past when it was conducting operations ins Latin America/Africa/Southeast Asia?

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    "How did the CIA ever cope..."

    This is tricky, because I think the CIA really sucked at its job. (Unless I misunderstand its job, because I suppose people made money and got power off their work.) But the way they coped was to develop assets. You know, spy stuff. They helped create the monster of radical jihadism they're now fighting just fine. So what's the big deal about walking around Baghdad? I know we've invaded a lot of that part of the world lately, but it's not like our foreign policy just discovered the Middle East.

    Not that I expect Foreign Policy magazine to know recent history.

    This reminds me of the Diversity Machine's self-justification in business. White people will be drowned out in the marketplace. The Others are coming, so we better hire them and learn how to be sensitive to their needs and what-not. Otherwise we'll lose money!

    Meanwhile, we already developed modernity and bourgeois manners. Everything we need for diverse commerce to function. Others will learn our ways. (Or starve!) But, oops, we dumped all that nonsense. Now we have to make it up as we go. Conveniently, the Diversity Machine can teach us how, for a fee.

    In the case of the CIA, the fee may include national security.

    , @LondonBob
    Segragationist America had no problem recruiting the likes of Freddy Lugo, Orlando Bosch, Herminio Diaz Garcia etc. Didn't stop the inspiration for Colonel Kurtz Tony Po having great success in SE Asia either.
  6. O'Really says:
    @Emblematic
    If Pompeo was any good he would have exposed John Brennan's 'Russia-hacked-the-election' hoax. He's almost as big a dud as Sessions.

    Sessions is a massive disappointment — we thought we knew him as a fighter for these last 30 years. His behavior in office has been enigmatic at best.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TangoMan
    Sessions is a massive disappointment — we thought we knew him as a fighter for these last 30 years.

    It seems that Sessions found himself a niche, the immigration question, and then exploited it using the very strategy that the Republicans used for ObamaCare - all talk while ever safe from having to put the talk into action.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Sessions pulled the plug on DACA. He ought to get credit for that.
  7. @O'Really
    I had read somewhere that Shepard's murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    The Gospel of St. Matthew, written by a homosexual journo, tore apart the narrative around Matt Shepard and revealed him as a meth dealer who was killed by his boyfriend over drugs.

    The point and sputter was amazing when it wasn’t ignored totally.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    I assume you mean this book?
    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Matt-Hidden-Matthew-Shepard/dp/1586422146

    The one/five star review split is a classic pattern for books like this.

    Long excerpt from one of the review comments follows. I think it is from a local former meth user who knew Aaron and worth a look if you are interested in that case.


    Chicksly 3 years ago In reply to an earlier post Report abuse
    Lots of opinions... I wish they weren't based upon media coverage though. I lived in Laramie for 23 years and went to school with Aaron. I know the bar owner and the police officers involved. It's a small town. Let me give you some insight on how the town works. It is owned by the University. Without the University Laramie would be nothing. When this originally happened hate crimes were not prominent, especially in WY. Drugs on the other hand were a huge deal everywhere. The University didn't want our cute little college town to be known as a meth capital and lose students (money). No parent would send their child to a town well known for drugs. They spun this story to look as if it were based on Matt being gay instead of a drug related crime. I'm sure they had no idea this would spiral out of control and become national news. Did you guys hear about the man that was thrown out of a car on the interstate and ran over multiple times killing him?? I didn't think so... Also drug related and happened around the same time. The victim wasn't gay so it was brushed under the rug. Though I am happy gay rights and hate crimes have become more and more important, this is not what took place in Laramie. As a local and at that time a meth user (9 years clean), I can attest to this being a drug related crime. Aaron was known to "swing that way" from time to time. So why would he kill because someone hit on him that he had already slept with? Meth is an ugly drug and it can make you feel invincible and take you out of reality.

    On another note, I am happy to see the author mentioned my friend Daphne Sulk. She was murdered about a year before Matt and got zero media attention. I knew both her and her killer (who was also in the meth scene). She was a troubled girl that wanted a baby to feel the love she wasn't receiving at home. She was trying to straighten her life out. She didn't quite make it. God rest her soul and Matthew's as well. I think of them often and wonder what they could have been. This was a tragic crime and none of this information makes it ok to kill another human being.

    So here you go. Here are your "known facts" There is no use arguing over who is right and who is wrong. It doesn't bring Matthew back. Here are some facts for you: Matthew was killed in a gruesome manor. He was taken way before his time. It doesn't matter how good of a person he was or that he was a troubled young man. Nobody deserves what happened to him.

    I don't care if you believe me or not and don't have time for internet arguments so I probably wont reply back after this. I'm assuming you will discredit me in some way to support your own opinions. But I was there. I lived this. I lived my hometown being overrun by media. I lived the swat team with guns guarding the court house. I did the candlelight vigils for Matthew. Now I have to deal with people's opinions of my town every time they ask where I'm from. "You hate gays in Wyoming" is usually what I hear. Breaks my heart considering I have lots of gay friends and a gay uncle. Sad what the media has done to WY. And most of all, I live with the memory of Matthew and that will be a positive one no matter what his troubles may have been.

    Thanks for listening.
     
  8. guest says:

    I remember that Good Shepherd movie, with Matt Damon as a WASP robot. He meets with Bobby DeNiro as “Wild Bill” Donovan at one of them exclusive Skull and Bones retreats, or something like that. This is during WWII, but before Pearl Harbor. Donovan informs him that he’s looking for patriotic young men “from the right backgrounds” to run an intelligence service. That means Skull and Bones WASP-types. Who are stereotypical spooks in the public imagination to this day.

    Donovan explicitly mentions no Jews and no blacks, though I don’t know why he singles them out. He also mentions few Catholics because he’s a Catholic. “Donovan” being a decidedly un-WASP name. This is said for the audience, I believe, because in reality he’d just have to say the right sort of people and leave it at that.

    I suppose this was all a mistake, because the Damon-bot screws up and gets turned by the Russians. Maybe if the CIA had fewer John Wasps and more Shitavius Jacksons it wouldn’t have a legacy of ashes.

    By the way, there was one really good line in that movie. Joe Pesci is playing a mobster, and he’s going on with the usual nonsense about WASPs being devoid of culture. Something like, “Italians have families and church, Irish have their homeland, Jews have tradition, even blacks have music. What do you have?”

    Damon’s response is perfect: “The United States of America. The rest of you are just visiting.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    IIRC the Russians try to turn him through his son, who was seduced by a Russian asset. Damon's character kills the asset surreptiously (has her thrown out of a plane) .
    , @LondonBob
    The Damon character was James Angleton, CIA counterintelligence chief. Likely architect of the JFK assassination, Israeli asset, great chum of the mafia and someone so inept at capturing Soviet spies some suspected he was one himself. Interesting chap. Jefferson Morley has a book coming out about him shortly.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I've been trying to get this movie from the library ever since Steve Sailer mentioned/embedded that one scene, maybe more than once. It sounds pretty good. Anyway, when I saw the name Shepard at the top of Steve's excerpt of the Foreign Policy article, I figured he was going to write about the stuff you did.

    What the hell a talk by the parents of an alleged meth-head, and more-than-alleged homo who got killed horrifically killed in Wyoming 20 years back, about more diversity in employment, HAS TO DO AT ALL with an out-of-control unaccountable US Feral Government agency that has caused havoc around the world for the last 50 years and is the very basic core of the Deep State is way below my pay grade, apparently.

    Does anyone wonder how I thought of my URL? Stupidity levels CANNOT go much higher, as when things take place for which we cannot even fathom the quality of stupid involved, has stupidity even happened at all? It's like the tree in the forest thing, basically.
    , @Hibernian
    "Damon’s response is perfect: 'The United States of America. The rest of you are just visiting.'"

    Wasn't that same line in one of the Godfather films?
    , @Anon
    It seems an unlikely line. Antagonism for WASPs is more of a Jewish and sometimes Irish thing than an Italian thing.
  9. inertial says:

    “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”

    And talking about LGBTQXYZ rights will help this how?

    “As we explained to the Shepards, CIA decided on a Pride month event with a national security focus…”

    Pride month event…with a national security focus. This is from the Onion, right?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico

    “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”
     
    That's an understatement. But you can't have someone so abjectly clueless about intelligence gathering making HR recommendations for an intelligence organization, either.

    In most cases, intelligence case officers *don't* directly infiltrate the countries or institutions they attempt to glean information from. More typically they set up shop posing as generic citizens from the area (if it's the same country) or as diplomatic personnel or expat détaché workers (in a foreign country) and spend their time spotting, recruiting and training "agents," usually ordinary people already well-integrated into the target structure, who are persuaded/bribed/blackmailed into betraying their country or employer.

    There usually isn't a good reason to employ case officers who can easily pass for locals, and there may be very good reasons, for questions of trust and character, sure, but also for the safety of the case officer: a naturalized American citizen from, say, Pakistan is going to be more easily detected and read out as a defector and is also going to be more difficult to protect.
  10. I had read somewhere that Shepard’s murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    There’s a book about the subject: The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, by Stephen Jimenez that was published in 2014. From a Guardian article reviewing the book:

    But the Matthew Shepard story is not yet finished. A new twist came last year with the publication of another book, this one by investigative journalist Stephen Jimenez, who has spent 13 years interviewing more than 100 people with a connection to the case. His conclusion, outlined in The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, is that the grotesque murder was not a hate crime, but could instead be blamed on crystal meth, a drug that was flooding Denver and the surrounding area at the time of Matthew’s death. This new theory has, understandably, caused a lot of anger …

    Jimenez found that Matthew was addicted to and dealing crystal meth and had dabbled in heroin. He also took significant sexual risks and was being pimped alongside Aaron McKinney, one of his killers, with whom he’d had occasional sexual encounters. He was HIV positive at the time of his death.

    “This does not make the perfect poster boy for the gay-rights movement,” says Jimenez. “Which is a big part of the reason my book has been so trashed.”

    Matthew’s drug abuse, and the fact that he knew one of his killers prior to the attack, was never explored in court. Neither was the rumour that the killers knew that he had access to a shipment of crystal meth with a street value of $10,000 which they wanted to steal.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Understandable Anger: the Story of the Backlash Against the Story of the Myth of St. Matthew of the Shepard.

    I saw a tv movie about Matthew Shepard on MTV, I think, years ago, and there was scene where he gets all indignant at his bigoted college professor and walks out of class. I'm not sure, but it was something like Shepard saying Michelangelo was a homo, and the professor being all, "No, sir, I'll have none of that sinfulness associated with my Michelangelo." I don't really remember.

    Professors who argue with students in movies are usually stern, inflexible conservatives. From where do screenwriters draw inspiration for such creatures? It's like finding a garbagewoman who used to be a fashion model.

    , @Frau Katze
    I read the book. It's logical, well researched and persuasive.

    Conclusion: Shepard's killing was drug related. If I recall correctly, at least one of the killers was also gay.
    , @Frau Katze
    I even wrote a book review for BlazingCatFur.ca

    https://www.blazingcatfur.ca/2013/12/11/the-book-of-matt-excellent-reporting-uncovers-inconvenient-truths-indeed/
    , @Nico
    I didn't read the book and I don't know whether anything in the book is necessarily true: one needs to keep in mind it was all gleaned from secondhand sources. However, most likely a lot of it is true. I do know the author is reputed to be a man of integrity and nuance. Of course, as far as motives go, a forensic investigation won't reveal what was on someone's mind, and one reason why the notion of "hate crimes" is such a sham in the first place is that motivation is not necessary to secure a conviction for first-degree murder: the prosecution needs only to show that the event was premeditated. And a nasty motivation can move the judge or jury to impose a harsher penalty. In reality, "hate crime" laws are merely a stepping-stone towards blasphemy laws protecting The Narrative (such laws already exist in numerous countries, of course). The Narrative functions as a state religion in many ways (more so under some governments than under others), but not making spiritual pretensions they do not fear falling afoul of the First Amendment.

    As far as Matthew Shepard was concerned, I remember that at the time nothing I saw in the press suggested that this was a "hate crime" the way they were defining the term, and I was puzzled as to why people kept saying that it was. That was my first taste of the bad faith of SJWs. In the end, there is no reason to believe Shepard was murdered because of his sexual orientation, and there are numerous reasons to suspect he was murdered for some other reason.
    , @Art Deco
    I wouldn't take Jimenez thesis terribly seriously, and local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy. Shepard had been in Laramie all of six weeks at the time of his death. He'd lived in Casper as a youngster (halfway across the state) then abroad for the last years of high school, then on the east coast, then Fort Collins. Socially, he was a professional class kid very distant from Henderson and McKinney (both employed by a roofing company and living in trailer parks with their girlfriends / baby-mammas) and under ordinary circumstances would have hardly had occasion to cross paths with them. The notion that he'd developed some regular association with McKinney in that brief span of time beggars belief. Jimenez claims (IIRC) they were acquainted in Fort Collins, but his evidence for that was next-to-nothing.

    What it looks like is a robbery gone bad (in part because the perpetrators were strung out on meth). This has been understood for some time (see JoAnn Wipijewski's article published about a year or so later). The media manufactured a social fiction for their own purposes. Dennis Shepard was initially resistant to efforts to use his son's death in this way.
  11. the Agency’s Diversity Mandate

    In other news, from the Daily Mail:

    ‘We allowed standards to drop’: US Navy ADMITS it is using under-trained sailors and uncertified ships

    Diversity enriches again? Who was on watch?

    Chris Eigeman in Whit Stillman’s Barcelona:

    A Naval officer has the rare job that deals with the physical world all day, and it counts. It is not theoretical. You dominate the elements in four dimensions without a slip-up – or it gets very wet.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TangoMan
    Diversity enriches again? Who was on watch?

    That article was impressive for all of the names being dropped. Then there was the dog which didn't bark:

    Commanding Officer
    CDR A. J. Sanchez

    Executive Officer
    CDR J. L. Sanchez
    , @Autochthon

    [The] navy admits it is using under-trained sailors and uncertified ships as senior officials begin probe into the two aircraft carrier collisions that left seventeen dead.
     
    That's an interesting way to describe destroyers. I mean, they are equipped with helos, so, technicially, they do "carry aircraft," but "aircraft carrier" is a very specific term of art which describes a particular sort of vessel....

    Carry on, intrepid reporters.
  12. eah says:

    Read More
    • Replies: @eah
    https://twitter.com/cohendavid/status/906523238964109312
    , @Cagey Beast
    Yes, the US war machine needs to fly into a murderous rage when its global gays are harmed. It needs to be like the mohawk wearing biker in Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior when his catamite is killed by an alt-right boomerang:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2gVXd7FzhQ
    , @eah
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DJYjExLW4AA1EMV.jpg
  13. TangoMan says:
    @O'Really
    Sessions is a massive disappointment -- we thought we knew him as a fighter for these last 30 years. His behavior in office has been enigmatic at best.

    Sessions is a massive disappointment — we thought we knew him as a fighter for these last 30 years.

    It seems that Sessions found himself a niche, the immigration question, and then exploited it using the very strategy that the Republicans used for ObamaCare – all talk while ever safe from having to put the talk into action.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Where do you observe Sessions NOT trying to put it into action?
  14. Mr. Anon says:
    @O'Really
    I had read somewhere that Shepard's murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    Yeah, pretty much.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    The whole LGBT-martyr story is – like most SJW narratives – a lie. Both the victim and the murderers were involved in a homosexual / male-prostitute / meth-dealer demi-monde.

    Read More
  15. TangoMan says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    the Agency’s Diversity Mandate
     
    In other news, from the Daily Mail:

    'We allowed standards to drop': US Navy ADMITS it is using under-trained sailors and uncertified ships
     
    Diversity enriches again? Who was on watch?

    Chris Eigeman in Whit Stillman’s Barcelona:

    A Naval officer has the rare job that deals with the physical world all day, and it counts. It is not theoretical. You dominate the elements in four dimensions without a slip-up – or it gets very wet.
     

    Diversity enriches again? Who was on watch?

    That article was impressive for all of the names being dropped. Then there was the dog which didn’t bark:

    Commanding Officer
    CDR A. J. Sanchez

    Executive Officer
    CDR J. L. Sanchez

    Read More
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    At least Los Dos Amigos could walk around Baghdad, habla-ing Espanol with the locals. That seems to be the criteria du jour, according to Nada Bakos.
  16. Mr. Anon says:

    Yes, certainly what the CIA needs is more homosexuals. That worked out so well for Britain’s MI-6.

    The Cambridge Five

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    I'll get J Edgar on it, right after he finishes ironing his party dress.
    , @Edwhy
    And the Catholic Church.
  17. guest says:
    @DFH

    “This isn’t just about today’s diversity issue. It’s about tomorrow’s lack of diversity that will erode the agency,” Bakos told FP. “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”
     
    This adds a whole new dimension to invade the world, invite the world; we need to invite the people we've just invaded here, so we can get them to spy on their compatriots.

    How did the CIA ever cope with all these pale, stale old white men in the past when it was conducting operations ins Latin America/Africa/Southeast Asia?

    “How did the CIA ever cope…”

    This is tricky, because I think the CIA really sucked at its job. (Unless I misunderstand its job, because I suppose people made money and got power off their work.) But the way they coped was to develop assets. You know, spy stuff. They helped create the monster of radical jihadism they’re now fighting just fine. So what’s the big deal about walking around Baghdad? I know we’ve invaded a lot of that part of the world lately, but it’s not like our foreign policy just discovered the Middle East.

    Not that I expect Foreign Policy magazine to know recent history.

    This reminds me of the Diversity Machine’s self-justification in business. White people will be drowned out in the marketplace. The Others are coming, so we better hire them and learn how to be sensitive to their needs and what-not. Otherwise we’ll lose money!

    Meanwhile, we already developed modernity and bourgeois manners. Everything we need for diverse commerce to function. Others will learn our ways. (Or starve!) But, oops, we dumped all that nonsense. Now we have to make it up as we go. Conveniently, the Diversity Machine can teach us how, for a fee.

    In the case of the CIA, the fee may include national security.

    Read More
    • Agree: Randal
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Yes, this is one of those cases where I feel like its safe to say that the CIA has been pretty incompetent and will, regardless of any wrangling and whatnot, continue to remain incompetent.
    , @Nico

    This is tricky, because I think the CIA really sucked at its job... Not that I expect Foreign Policy magazine to know recent history.
     
    The two are linked, actually. As Twinkie points out in a later post, cultural factors are one of several reasons why the U.S. is not particularly brilliant in the gathering of human intelligence (and as I point out later on down, the French are way, way ahead in this department, and are recognized worldwide among intelligence organizations). And in fact, these same cultural factors explain why the U.S. intelligentsia, including Foreign Policy and The New York Times, so regularly get diplomacy so wrong.
  18. @dr kill
    A cursory review of the subject. There is an American High School in Riyadh. Our youngest two sons attended. The kid was disturbed.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    G00d link, thank you.

    Read More
  19. guest says:
    @for-the-record
    I had read somewhere that Shepard’s murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    There's a book about the subject: The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, by Stephen Jimenez that was published in 2014. From a Guardian article reviewing the book:

    But the Matthew Shepard story is not yet finished. A new twist came last year with the publication of another book, this one by investigative journalist Stephen Jimenez, who has spent 13 years interviewing more than 100 people with a connection to the case. His conclusion, outlined in The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, is that the grotesque murder was not a hate crime, but could instead be blamed on crystal meth, a drug that was flooding Denver and the surrounding area at the time of Matthew’s death. This new theory has, understandably, caused a lot of anger ...

    Jimenez found that Matthew was addicted to and dealing crystal meth and had dabbled in heroin. He also took significant sexual risks and was being pimped alongside Aaron McKinney, one of his killers, with whom he’d had occasional sexual encounters. He was HIV positive at the time of his death.

    “This does not make the perfect poster boy for the gay-rights movement,” says Jimenez. “Which is a big part of the reason my book has been so trashed.”

    Matthew’s drug abuse, and the fact that he knew one of his killers prior to the attack, was never explored in court. Neither was the rumour that the killers knew that he had access to a shipment of crystal meth with a street value of $10,000 which they wanted to steal.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

     

    Understandable Anger: the Story of the Backlash Against the Story of the Myth of St. Matthew of the Shepard.

    I saw a tv movie about Matthew Shepard on MTV, I think, years ago, and there was scene where he gets all indignant at his bigoted college professor and walks out of class. I’m not sure, but it was something like Shepard saying Michelangelo was a homo, and the professor being all, “No, sir, I’ll have none of that sinfulness associated with my Michelangelo.” I don’t really remember.

    Professors who argue with students in movies are usually stern, inflexible conservatives. From where do screenwriters draw inspiration for such creatures? It’s like finding a garbagewoman who used to be a fashion model.

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  20. @guest
    "How did the CIA ever cope..."

    This is tricky, because I think the CIA really sucked at its job. (Unless I misunderstand its job, because I suppose people made money and got power off their work.) But the way they coped was to develop assets. You know, spy stuff. They helped create the monster of radical jihadism they're now fighting just fine. So what's the big deal about walking around Baghdad? I know we've invaded a lot of that part of the world lately, but it's not like our foreign policy just discovered the Middle East.

    Not that I expect Foreign Policy magazine to know recent history.

    This reminds me of the Diversity Machine's self-justification in business. White people will be drowned out in the marketplace. The Others are coming, so we better hire them and learn how to be sensitive to their needs and what-not. Otherwise we'll lose money!

    Meanwhile, we already developed modernity and bourgeois manners. Everything we need for diverse commerce to function. Others will learn our ways. (Or starve!) But, oops, we dumped all that nonsense. Now we have to make it up as we go. Conveniently, the Diversity Machine can teach us how, for a fee.

    In the case of the CIA, the fee may include national security.

    Yes, this is one of those cases where I feel like its safe to say that the CIA has been pretty incompetent and will, regardless of any wrangling and whatnot, continue to remain incompetent.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    Daniel "Chieh" Guevara, I have a slightly OT question to ask you, as I feel the subject matter is in your wheelhouse.

    How does one correctly pronounce "baizuo"? Is it the intuitive "BY-zu-OH" or something like "BAY-chu-OH" or "Bay-zwoh"?
  21. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    The CIA seems to produce more self-promoters than any part of the U.S. government with the possible exception of the Navy SEALs. Ex-CIA agents write books about their service, work as TV pundits, run for President as wanna-be spoilers, etc. While ex-Navy SEALs write airplane books about how being frogman gave them insight you can use as a corporate executive.

    At least the SEALs accomplish some concrete tasks, killing or guarding VIPs, respectively. I can’t see much benefit to the CIA now though. I bet the NYPD’s agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel than the CIA does. And, AFAIK, they don’t wreck other countries, leaving vacuums for jihadis to fill.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    "run for President as wanna-be spoilers"

    Or win the presidency, in the case of Bush the Elder.
    , @Twinkie

    Ex-CIA agents write books about their service, work as TV pundits, run for President as wanna-be spoilers, etc.
     
    1. Washouts and the greedy do. Successful and capable officers who had long careers do not. They retire and quietly fade away. Or they consult a little and tend to their hobbies.

    2. "Agents" are foreign human assets the Agency recruits and are run by case officers. This isn't the FBI.

    3. The U.S. has ALWAYS been relatively weak in human intelligence. Part of that is cultural, part is institutional, and part legal. No one else has our signal intelligence capability, however. So while we may be very bad at reading intentions, we are without peer in understanding capabilities.

    4. I have my own criticisms of the intelligence community, with the CIA in particular. But it's unfair to rate its effectiveness simply based on public information. Failures are often publicized, but successes won't be declassified for a long time, if ever.

    And, AFAIK, they don’t wreck other countries, leaving vacuums for jihadis to fill.
     
    Those "wrecks" occur usually as a result of political decisions made by elected officials.
    , @Twinkie

    I bet the NYPD’s agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel
     
    Yup, the Mossad sure does. And please, NYPD "international liaison intelligence officer," not "agent."
    , @Rod1963
    There are no incentives for the CIA to be competent. None. They missed the run up to 9/11 and no one was fired or disciplined. Same with the FBI. Again with the Boston bombing, and the San Bernadino jihadis. No one got fired or even disciplined. It's a joke.

    Remember the case of Aldrich Ames, a legacy man. He started out as a agent in Rome whose job was primarily to get drunk every day and be rousted by Italian cops. It got so bad his boss transferred him to Langley to a office job where he apparently slept on the job a lot. When he started living in a mansion and driving to work in a Jag no one paid attention to it. They thought he might have a Colombian connection.

    It was the FBI who found out he was spying for the Russians. The agency had no internal security worth a shit.

    All that happens is they get more and more money. It's just like a school that produces lots of morons. They get more money.
  22. @TangoMan
    Sessions is a massive disappointment — we thought we knew him as a fighter for these last 30 years.

    It seems that Sessions found himself a niche, the immigration question, and then exploited it using the very strategy that the Republicans used for ObamaCare - all talk while ever safe from having to put the talk into action.

    Where do you observe Sessions NOT trying to put it into action?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Ninth Circus AUSAs are still damn near needing a murder to prosecute 1325/1326.

    His refusal to touch Hillary/Lerner/Rice is pretty ridiculous tho.
    , @Paul Rise
    I think I agree with the intent of your question. Sessions can't do anything outside the legal boundaries set for him by decades of pro immigration and silly criminals rights legislation. He can prioritize existing enforcement efforts, which it seems like he is doing ( including going after MS 13, an international gang associated with illegals).

    He has to wait for the courts to say Trumps new executive orders are constitutional, and for the congress to pass new immigration security laws (probably a pipedream).
    , @SteveRogers42
    Well, NOT arresting the mayors of these Sanctuary cities, for starters. Although I'd love to see Seattle's Ed Murray - ahem - "go down" first, I think the best bet for a first strike would be Austin, where the neo-commie mayor would get no support from the state governor, a Republican.
  23. guest says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    The CIA seems to produce more self-promoters than any part of the U.S. government with the possible exception of the Navy SEALs. Ex-CIA agents write books about their service, work as TV pundits, run for President as wanna-be spoilers, etc. While ex-Navy SEALs write airplane books about how being frogman gave them insight you can use as a corporate executive.

    At least the SEALs accomplish some concrete tasks, killing or guarding VIPs, respectively. I can't see much benefit to the CIA now though. I bet the NYPD's agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel than the CIA does. And, AFAIK, they don't wreck other countries, leaving vacuums for jihadis to fill.

    “run for President as wanna-be spoilers”

    Or win the presidency, in the case of Bush the Elder.

    Read More
  24. J Grant says:

    Interestingly the MI5 Historian Christopher Andrews revealed that the service placed a thirty year ban on hiring Jews after WW2. The reason was the high proportion of wartime British Jewish spies who were working for the Soviet Union and who eventually gave their loyalty to Mossad

    Read More
  25. wren says:

    I guess I am still stuck thinking Brennan is a communist, islamophile who cleared out Obama’s passport file so that he could become president.

    Read More
    • Replies: @wren
    I wish Trump would declare an investigation of Brennan.

    There are too many strange things coming out now that seem to fit the conspiracy theories, rather than the other way around.
  26. Twinkie says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    The CIA seems to produce more self-promoters than any part of the U.S. government with the possible exception of the Navy SEALs. Ex-CIA agents write books about their service, work as TV pundits, run for President as wanna-be spoilers, etc. While ex-Navy SEALs write airplane books about how being frogman gave them insight you can use as a corporate executive.

    At least the SEALs accomplish some concrete tasks, killing or guarding VIPs, respectively. I can't see much benefit to the CIA now though. I bet the NYPD's agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel than the CIA does. And, AFAIK, they don't wreck other countries, leaving vacuums for jihadis to fill.

    Ex-CIA agents write books about their service, work as TV pundits, run for President as wanna-be spoilers, etc.

    1. Washouts and the greedy do. Successful and capable officers who had long careers do not. They retire and quietly fade away. Or they consult a little and tend to their hobbies.

    2. “Agents” are foreign human assets the Agency recruits and are run by case officers. This isn’t the FBI.

    3. The U.S. has ALWAYS been relatively weak in human intelligence. Part of that is cultural, part is institutional, and part legal. No one else has our signal intelligence capability, however. So while we may be very bad at reading intentions, we are without peer in understanding capabilities.

    4. I have my own criticisms of the intelligence community, with the CIA in particular. But it’s unfair to rate its effectiveness simply based on public information. Failures are often publicized, but successes won’t be declassified for a long time, if ever.

    And, AFAIK, they don’t wreck other countries, leaving vacuums for jihadis to fill.

    Those “wrecks” occur usually as a result of political decisions made by elected officials.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico
    I'm glad to see I'm not the only one on here who has something like a clue how intelligence gathering actually works. Of course, I'll admit I only know because I read James Bond n'existe pas ("James Bond Doesn't Exist"), the recent autobiography of François Waroux, a former French government/military case officer, while I was on holiday this summer. If you read French, I highly recommend the book. Waroux is no washout, nor is he greedy: he outlines the path of his career and the day-to-day how-to of intelligence gathering without betraying any still-classified information of any specific case he worked on. The book is thus somewhat short on insights into the workings of the world from the 1960s through the 1980s, but not completely bare of them: his depiction of life in Ethiopia under the Derg is quite an eye-opener, and Waroux recalls writing a report many decades ago that Benazir Bhutto could eventually be a prime target for assassination by political and religious opponents.

    The French are of course much more competent than the Americans in human intelligence gathering - their expertise in the area is renowned worldwide - but it is interesting to ponder the cultural differences that make this possible. The American mind is thoroughly infected by P.C. or buzzwords or both in all layers of society, across all stripes of ideology. Much of this cultural rot can be found in France, as well, but the top layer of society escapes largely unscathed. It is interesting that the Republic preaches "liberty, fraternity, equality" and "human rights" through all its institutions and notably its brainwashing public schools but the top 2 to 5 percent of the population knows things do not work like that. Why is this? The complete answer is rather complex but here's one important hint: when you get to the upper levels of French hierarchies public or private, whatever their beliefs and political positions today you will rarely find a specimen that did not attend Catholic schools as a child.

    For a revealing example of this phenomenon, see the 2016 book Un président ne devrait pas dire ça... : Les secrets d'un quinquennat ("A President Shouldn't Say That...: The Secrets of a Five-Year Term"). The book is a compilation of then-unpublished interviews then-president François Hollande gave to investigative journalists Gérard Davet et Fabrice Lhomme all throughout his mandate. He loathed Donald Trump, unsurprisingly (and he never made a secret of his disdain in public), but there are some very revealing tidbits:

    For the public and health sectors, the 35-hour work week "was ill-conceived."

    "I think the Americans have the same problem that we do, apart from the institutional crisis: pauperization of the middle classes, fear of immigration, damaged morale, Muslims...

    The French national football team needs to organize some "brain workouts" and is composed of thugs "with no regularity, no values... thrown from the poverty of the ghetto into extreme wealth with no grooming."

    There is "too much influx, immigration that should not be happening" in France.

    Islam and its revindications of "places of worship and recognition" is a problem for France.

    French justice is a pathologically "lax institution" and "all these prosecutors and high magistrates just hide away behind pretenses of virtue."

    The French Socialist Party (to which he belongs) is "in need of liquidation, should commit hara-kiri."

    The Grand Ouest Airport for which the scope was written in 53 years ago and which has attracted ferocious opposition "will probably never see the light of day."

    Hollande acknowledges (such acknowledgment is unprecedented for any French president in or out of office) authorizing four assassinations during his mandate (the Action Service calls such actions, Operation Homo [as in "man," not "gay]).

    , @Anonymous
    I have the impression the CIA and State Department and NSA are weak in foreign languages. Seems like it has been that way for decades.
    , @Anonymous
    I have the impression the CIA and State Department and NSA are weak in foreign languages. Seems like it has been that way for decades.
  27. Twinkie says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    The CIA seems to produce more self-promoters than any part of the U.S. government with the possible exception of the Navy SEALs. Ex-CIA agents write books about their service, work as TV pundits, run for President as wanna-be spoilers, etc. While ex-Navy SEALs write airplane books about how being frogman gave them insight you can use as a corporate executive.

    At least the SEALs accomplish some concrete tasks, killing or guarding VIPs, respectively. I can't see much benefit to the CIA now though. I bet the NYPD's agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel than the CIA does. And, AFAIK, they don't wreck other countries, leaving vacuums for jihadis to fill.

    I bet the NYPD’s agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel

    Yup, the Mossad sure does. And please, NYPD “international liaison intelligence officer,” not “agent.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    I remember reading about the NYPD sending officers to Afghanistan because 9/11 and thought it was a little wacky.
    , @Anonymous


    I bet the NYPD’s agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel
     
    Yup, the Mossad sure does. And please, NYPD “international liaison intelligence officer,” not “agent.”
     
    Lol, my thoughts exactly.

    Charlie Ben-Naim, a veteran NYPD police detective of Israeli origin who married a native New Yorker, was chosen to open the department’s Israeli branch.

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/nypd-opens-local-branch-in-kfar-saba/
     

  28. JimB says:

    The Matthew Shepherd gay victim narrative was upended long ago, by a gay journalist no less.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    The groups of people not covered by the Matthew Shepherd’s hate crime law, white heterosexuals, cops, and elderly veterans, are the most common victims of hate crimes. It’s the reason Antifa, a bunch of violent public school teachers openly radicalizing their students and calling for home invasions of their political enemies, can bash white people without fear of arrest and prosecution.

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  29. You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.

    Yeah, everyone knows that to effectively infiltrate Mohammedan societies requires a nuanced understadning of flaming homosexuals who wave flags to assert how proud they are of destroying each others’ colons, and who better to advise about it than the parents of a methhead in rural America whose drug-fueled sexual degeneracy lead to his murder by peers in the same scene?

    I mean, the man on the street in Baghdad is all about that stuff, right? Agents who master it will blend in inconspicuously….

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  30. @guest
    I remember that Good Shepherd movie, with Matt Damon as a WASP robot. He meets with Bobby DeNiro as "Wild Bill" Donovan at one of them exclusive Skull and Bones retreats, or something like that. This is during WWII, but before Pearl Harbor. Donovan informs him that he's looking for patriotic young men "from the right backgrounds" to run an intelligence service. That means Skull and Bones WASP-types. Who are stereotypical spooks in the public imagination to this day.

    Donovan explicitly mentions no Jews and no blacks, though I don't know why he singles them out. He also mentions few Catholics because he's a Catholic. "Donovan" being a decidedly un-WASP name. This is said for the audience, I believe, because in reality he'd just have to say the right sort of people and leave it at that.

    I suppose this was all a mistake, because the Damon-bot screws up and gets turned by the Russians. Maybe if the CIA had fewer John Wasps and more Shitavius Jacksons it wouldn't have a legacy of ashes.

    By the way, there was one really good line in that movie. Joe Pesci is playing a mobster, and he's going on with the usual nonsense about WASPs being devoid of culture. Something like, "Italians have families and church, Irish have their homeland, Jews have tradition, even blacks have music. What do you have?"

    Damon's response is perfect: "The United States of America. The rest of you are just visiting."

    IIRC the Russians try to turn him through his son, who was seduced by a Russian asset. Damon’s character kills the asset surreptiously (has her thrown out of a plane) .

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    • Replies: @guest
    "has her thrown out of a plane"

    Along with his grandchild, whom she was carrying. Oops.

    The final scene between Damon and the Russian who keeps trying to trap him (known as Ulysses) is ambiguous and very espionage-y, but I will give my interpretation:

    The Russian asset seduced Damon's son and got him to spill the beans on the Bay of Pigs invasion. Damon must never allow that fact to come to light. His son could be tried for treason, and his career would be ruined. Furthermore, the son intends to marry the girl, which would mean the Russians would have an asset within Damon's family. That can't happen.

    Ulysses knows everything. He could out the son's mistake any time he wants. In their final meeting, Ulysses says to Damon something like, "There may come when I ask a favor of you." They don't shake hands or anything, but I don't get the feeling Damon turns him down. Ulysses also asks whether Damon is okay with their asset joining his family. Duh, no.

    Then one of Ulysses' men asks Damon for a dollar bill. Damon gives him one, and says the word "cardinal" in a sentence. If you recall, earlier in the movie a highly placed CIA asset in the Kremlin communicates with Damon through a dollar bill, and his codename is "Cardinal."

    The implication, to me at least, is that Ulysses is offering a quid pro quo: Damon gives them the identity of the American asset, and in exchange the Russians kill the son's fiance. Easy-peasy.

    Alternatively, the guy Damon hands the dollar bill to could himself be the asset. In which case Damon wasn't turned. But the axe remains over Damon's head, and that favor Ulysses may or may not ask of him in future hangs there.

  31. @Twinkie

    I bet the NYPD’s agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel
     
    Yup, the Mossad sure does. And please, NYPD "international liaison intelligence officer," not "agent."

    I remember reading about the NYPD sending officers to Afghanistan because 9/11 and thought it was a little wacky.

    Read More
  32. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    the Agency’s Diversity Mandate
     
    In other news, from the Daily Mail:

    'We allowed standards to drop': US Navy ADMITS it is using under-trained sailors and uncertified ships
     
    Diversity enriches again? Who was on watch?

    Chris Eigeman in Whit Stillman’s Barcelona:

    A Naval officer has the rare job that deals with the physical world all day, and it counts. It is not theoretical. You dominate the elements in four dimensions without a slip-up – or it gets very wet.
     

    [The] navy admits it is using under-trained sailors and uncertified ships as senior officials begin probe into the two aircraft carrier collisions that left seventeen dead.

    That’s an interesting way to describe destroyers. I mean, they are equipped with helos, so, technicially, they do “carry aircraft,” but “aircraft carrier” is a very specific term of art which describes a particular sort of vessel….

    Carry on, intrepid reporters.

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    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    In coverage of the latest hurricane relief, I was informed by the corporate media that several "battleships" were en route to the coast of Florida. I have noticed this before...it seems to be the way that half-educated reporters describe any surface ship without a flight deck.

    I expected better naval savvy from the Brits, though.
  33. @Opinionator
    Where do you observe Sessions NOT trying to put it into action?

    Ninth Circus AUSAs are still damn near needing a murder to prosecute 1325/1326.

    His refusal to touch Hillary/Lerner/Rice is pretty ridiculous tho.

    Read More
  34. @Emblematic
    If Pompeo was any good he would have exposed John Brennan's 'Russia-hacked-the-election' hoax. He's almost as big a dud as Sessions.

    Except it isn’t a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    Read More
    • Replies: @GW
    How many votes did they change? In which states?
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Proof that if you repeat a lie, it becomes truth. What nonsense.
    , @Clyde
    Spill the beans. How did the Russians hack the last election? How did they change a few million votes, presumably from Hillary to Donald Trump?
    , @Cagey Beast
    Please walk us through the details of this remarkable "hack". I'm especially interesting in how Col. Sanders' secret recipe of seven herbs and spices, sorry, the famous seventeen intelligence agencies cracked the case:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Intelligence_Community#Organization

    I guess the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency captured satellite images of Russian ships carrying pre-stuffed ballot boxes? I'm certain you're right though. We've all heard the testimony that Vladimir Putin took premature ballots out of Wisconsin incubators and left them to die on the floor. We all saw Colin Powell at the UN wave around a test tube of Russia's magic vote zapping powder. Maybe I'm thinking of something else?

    , @Chrisnonymous
    The phrase "hack the election" doesn't even mean anything unless you're talking about actual vote tallying. The things that go into influencing which lever people pull on election day are so many, so varied, and so unpredictable that saying the Russians "hacked the election" is about as sensible as a single man saying he elected a politician in an election with a 1000000 to 999999 result. Actually, it's less sensible, because the man has a definite effect, whereas how do you measure the Russians' effect and prove it wasn't zero?

    Furthermore, all claims about Russia I've seen suffer from the same lack of context. For example, let's say team Trump met with Russian representatives 100 times during the election. Oh my god! Except, there are 3 important pieces of information missing--how often did team Hillary meet with Russia, how often do US presidential campaigns usually meet with Russians, and how often did team Trump meet with other other countries? I see this same lack of context in all coverage of Russian "election hacking" I've read (admittedly, not all by a long shot).
    , @Big Bill
    You are wrong. It was MI-5 and the Democrats who hacked the election (with their pee memo). This is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and the Democrats and British intelligence are quite proud about it).

    No, wait! It was Russian prostitutes working for the FSB who ratted Trump out on his hotel pee party, and told the MI-5 agent, who told the Democrats, who ... who ... aw hell ... I give up. :)
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Mr Akuleyev, I've read some good opinions from you in the comments here, at times (especially on nationalism, immigration, etc). However, when you let it slip that you believe in the entire Global Climate Disruption(TM) hoax, and now this blanket statement about election hacking, you become hard to take seriously.

    Do you mean influence on the '16 presidential election via hacking of email accounts? That's one story, and not anything too worrisome for me. As 2 repliers already asked/told you, actual hacking into voting data is another story - do you maintain that it happened?

    Americans have much more to worry about from the agency that happens to be part of the original subject of this post, along with it's psychopathic-brother agency, the NSA. Both of these Deep State Cold War would-be-relics have switched to being the enemies of the American people, just so that they would not be actual relics.

    Russian hackers seem to be all about useless attempts at SQL-injection hacking of websites, and filling up blog comment sections with unreadable ads for viagra. I don't think your Motherland is virtually-sending their best, Peter.*

    * except for the IMILFS, of course.

    , @Mr. Anon

    Except it isn’t a hoax, the Russians did hack the election.
     
    In what sense did they "hack the election" (whatever the Hell that means)? How many votes did they change, and in what precincts?

    Just repeating something doesn't make it true, although you and most of the Democratic Party seem to think it does.

    You know who might actually have "hacked" the election (in the sense of engaging in vote fraud)?

    The Democratic Party:

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/09/08/election-commission-alleges-new-hampshire-voter-fraud/

    , @guest
    What does "hack the election" mean? Some Russian did something with a computer having some connection to last year's electoral process in the U.S.? As Adam Sandler might say, "well, a-whoopedie-doo."
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    I have a dream. It is a dream of peace, harmony and quiet solitude. But the dream begins with your tail, and the tail of Mike Pompeo, being lashed together. Then the two of you are thrown over a clothesline. And after about 90 seconds the peace, harmony and quiet solitude of my dream ensue, causing me to once again embrace the Karmic resolution of a nettlesome matter.
    , @Joe Franklin
    There's a lot more evidence that Israel and Mexico interfered in US elections than there is of Russian interference.

    Vote fraud is the cultivated expertise of illegal Mexicans, Neo-Cohens, and Democrats.

    Vote fraudsters naturally oppose a state-issued photo ID for voting.
  35. The cancellation, now under review by the CIA’s Office of General Counsel, according to a second source, left employees disheartened — particularly those invested in the diversity reforms that were emphasized during the tenure of John Brennan, the former CIA director.

    Interesting word choice.

    Read More
  36. GW says:
    @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    How many votes did they change? In which states?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    First things first: Who are "they" and what did "they" do?
  37. The Shepards had been invited to the CIA to talk about diversity and LGBTQ rights…

    … the senior leadership shut down the event. ……. the Shepards’ speech canceled, questioning what value it would bring to the CIA mission.

    I would guess the CIA needs to have some Sodomites on staff just to use as honey traps for foreign leaders who swing that way. That would be the only reason I can see for the CIA to have LQGTXYZ diversity.

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  38. So, CIA personnel, the ones who are supposed to know what’s really going on, were to sit and listen politely to Matthew Shepard’s parents tell a made-up story about their innocent, martyred son. And, presumably, accept it at face value.

    Says a lot about what’s wrong with our intelligence services.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    The incentives for the CIA(and many government agencies for that matter) is to fail in non-catastrophic ways: the more they fail, the more resources they can request at the next week. At the very least, success does not usually bring more resources; it usually causes cutbacks if success is permanent or significant.

    With such a broken incentive structure, its not surprising that their performance is spotty.
  39. Flemur says:

    The Shepards had been invited to the CIA to talk about diversity and LGBTQ rights…

    “Don’t hire any LGBTQ people because they’re drug addicts who kill each other.”

    I bet that’s what they said!

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  40. eah says:
    @eah
    https://twitter.com/ForeignPolicy/status/906548828307902464

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  41. @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    Proof that if you repeat a lie, it becomes truth. What nonsense.

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  42. @Harry Baldwin
    So, CIA personnel, the ones who are supposed to know what's really going on, were to sit and listen politely to Matthew Shepard's parents tell a made-up story about their innocent, martyred son. And, presumably, accept it at face value.

    Says a lot about what's wrong with our intelligence services.

    The incentives for the CIA(and many government agencies for that matter) is to fail in non-catastrophic ways: the more they fail, the more resources they can request at the next week. At the very least, success does not usually bring more resources; it usually causes cutbacks if success is permanent or significant.

    With such a broken incentive structure, its not surprising that their performance is spotty.

    Read More
    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Cwhatfuture
    After 9/11 the CIA should have been disbanded, along with a dozen or so other agencies. They all failed horribly - that time not non-catastrophically - and still no one resigned, was fired, was even demoted. Did DC think it a triumph for our intelligence services? They must have because they were all rewarded with vastly increased budgets. You are rewarded for a good job. If you subsidize something - in this case complete failure on every level - you will get more if it. That is an iron clad economic law. The response to 9/11, more than 9/11 itself, showed the US as a country in severe, if not terminal, decline. In this case there would have been a "diversity office" with many personnel, all well paid, who set up the invitation and arrangements. That is what you get when you give failures vastly increased budgets.
  43. Clyde says:
    @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    Spill the beans. How did the Russians hack the last election? How did they change a few million votes, presumably from Hillary to Donald Trump?

    Read More
  44. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Mr. Anon
    Yes, certainly what the CIA needs is more homosexuals. That worked out so well for Britain's MI-6.

    The Cambridge Five

    I’ll get J Edgar on it, right after he finishes ironing his party dress.

    Read More
  45. @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    Please walk us through the details of this remarkable “hack”. I’m especially interesting in how Col. Sanders’ secret recipe of seven herbs and spices, sorry, the famous seventeen intelligence agencies cracked the case:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Intelligence_Community#Organization

    I guess the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency captured satellite images of Russian ships carrying pre-stuffed ballot boxes? I’m certain you’re right though. We’ve all heard the testimony that Vladimir Putin took premature ballots out of Wisconsin incubators and left them to die on the floor. We all saw Colin Powell at the UN wave around a test tube of Russia’s magic vote zapping powder. Maybe I’m thinking of something else?

    Read More
  46. Tiny Duck says:

    It is imperative that white christians become amino duty and a marginalized group.

    It is the only way mankind can progress

    All People of Color and sexually diverse agree with me

    Read More
    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    "It is imperative that white christians become amino duty and a marginalized group.

    It is the only way mankind can progress

    All People of Color and sexually diverse agree with me"

    - amino duty? This time you've gone too far.
    , @SteveRogers42
    Does xir just slip these howlers into his screeds to see if anyone's actually reading them?

    Clearly, what zhe meant to say was "glutamine obligation".
  47. @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    The phrase “hack the election” doesn’t even mean anything unless you’re talking about actual vote tallying. The things that go into influencing which lever people pull on election day are so many, so varied, and so unpredictable that saying the Russians “hacked the election” is about as sensible as a single man saying he elected a politician in an election with a 1000000 to 999999 result. Actually, it’s less sensible, because the man has a definite effect, whereas how do you measure the Russians’ effect and prove it wasn’t zero?

    Furthermore, all claims about Russia I’ve seen suffer from the same lack of context. For example, let’s say team Trump met with Russian representatives 100 times during the election. Oh my god! Except, there are 3 important pieces of information missing–how often did team Hillary meet with Russia, how often do US presidential campaigns usually meet with Russians, and how often did team Trump meet with other other countries? I see this same lack of context in all coverage of Russian “election hacking” I’ve read (admittedly, not all by a long shot).

    Read More
  48. @eah
    https://twitter.com/ForeignPolicy/status/906548828307902464

    Yes, the US war machine needs to fly into a murderous rage when its global gays are harmed. It needs to be like the mohawk wearing biker in Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior when his catamite is killed by an alt-right boomerang:

    Read More
  49. Thea says:

    This is the CIA that under Bush I didn’t see the fall of the USSR coming? That didn’t do anything to stop 9/11 and in fact helped by supporting ” no profiling policies ” under Bush II? That helped get us into permanent wars?

    I don’t think they will ever be relevant no matter who they hire. Mainly they spy on decent Americans and ignore bad guys.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Nonsense. 911 was a huge CIA success story. Permanent war? Another great success for the CIA although to be fair we should include the other alphabet agencies.
  50. @Daniel Chieh
    The incentives for the CIA(and many government agencies for that matter) is to fail in non-catastrophic ways: the more they fail, the more resources they can request at the next week. At the very least, success does not usually bring more resources; it usually causes cutbacks if success is permanent or significant.

    With such a broken incentive structure, its not surprising that their performance is spotty.

    After 9/11 the CIA should have been disbanded, along with a dozen or so other agencies. They all failed horribly – that time not non-catastrophically – and still no one resigned, was fired, was even demoted. Did DC think it a triumph for our intelligence services? They must have because they were all rewarded with vastly increased budgets. You are rewarded for a good job. If you subsidize something – in this case complete failure on every level – you will get more if it. That is an iron clad economic law. The response to 9/11, more than 9/11 itself, showed the US as a country in severe, if not terminal, decline. In this case there would have been a “diversity office” with many personnel, all well paid, who set up the invitation and arrangements. That is what you get when you give failures vastly increased budgets.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    Nor did any Air Force generals get sacked. Contrast with Kimmel and Short after Pearl Harbor.

    Things that make ya go "Hmmmm".
  51. Paul Rise says:
    @Opinionator
    Where do you observe Sessions NOT trying to put it into action?

    I think I agree with the intent of your question. Sessions can’t do anything outside the legal boundaries set for him by decades of pro immigration and silly criminals rights legislation. He can prioritize existing enforcement efforts, which it seems like he is doing ( including going after MS 13, an international gang associated with illegals).

    He has to wait for the courts to say Trumps new executive orders are constitutional, and for the congress to pass new immigration security laws (probably a pipedream).

    Read More
  52. Wilkey says:

    Matthew Shepard, LOL. I’m still wondering if playwrite Moises Kaufman, who wrote The Laramie Project about Shepard’s murder (or at least the aftermath), is going to write a play about the Pulse Nightclub attack. Orlando is a much bigger town than Laramie. There are so many more people he could mock and ridicule.

    Read More
  53. songbird says:

    The skin part certainly makes more sense than your typical push for diversity. The days where a guy can claim to be a Circassian are probably over. But, still, it is pretty specious, you can hire locals, or better yet, not get involved. Most of the work the CIA does is summarizing newspapers in embassies, etc.

    Of course, technically, diversity sets a country up to be easily infiltrated. Plenty of Chinese-Americans in high positions in America. Probably about zero whites in high positions in China. That fount of diversity, the UN headquarters in NYC, traditionally has been one of the greatest centers of espionage. Some people believe officials there were involved in the planning of 9/11.

    Read More
  54. “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”

    But it would work so much better if this guy was openly gay?

    Sometimes the logic does take one’s breath away.

    Chris Stevens in Libya was a perfect choice for the region, right? Because all diversity is the same everywhere, you know. If in Libya they don’t know a gay ambassador is just like a Muslim, because diversity, they will have to learn it, those savages.

    Read More
    • LOL: Hibernian
    • Replies: @Forbes
    CIA hasn't hired agents to "walk around" anywhere in forever. Field Agents create local sources (assets) who do actual intelligence gathering (spying).

    People who write such drivel about "walk[ing] around" know less than nothing--they're writing fiction.
  55. gwood says: • Website

    “More White, More Male, More Jesus”
    They could certainly use James Jesus Angleton back.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Some say Jesus, others say Hey Zeus.

    The latter want their own Godlike eminence to validate their theory, as long as someone else pays for it.
  56. Big Bill says:
    @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    You are wrong. It was MI-5 and the Democrats who hacked the election (with their pee memo). This is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and the Democrats and British intelligence are quite proud about it).

    No, wait! It was Russian prostitutes working for the FSB who ratted Trump out on his hotel pee party, and told the MI-5 agent, who told the Democrats, who … who … aw hell … I give up. :)

    Read More
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    No, wait! It was Mexico which hacked the election by sending waves of illegal aliens across the border who then voted fraudulently in our election. This is not even a controversial statement.
  57. @for-the-record
    I had read somewhere that Shepard’s murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    There's a book about the subject: The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, by Stephen Jimenez that was published in 2014. From a Guardian article reviewing the book:

    But the Matthew Shepard story is not yet finished. A new twist came last year with the publication of another book, this one by investigative journalist Stephen Jimenez, who has spent 13 years interviewing more than 100 people with a connection to the case. His conclusion, outlined in The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, is that the grotesque murder was not a hate crime, but could instead be blamed on crystal meth, a drug that was flooding Denver and the surrounding area at the time of Matthew’s death. This new theory has, understandably, caused a lot of anger ...

    Jimenez found that Matthew was addicted to and dealing crystal meth and had dabbled in heroin. He also took significant sexual risks and was being pimped alongside Aaron McKinney, one of his killers, with whom he’d had occasional sexual encounters. He was HIV positive at the time of his death.

    “This does not make the perfect poster boy for the gay-rights movement,” says Jimenez. “Which is a big part of the reason my book has been so trashed.”

    Matthew’s drug abuse, and the fact that he knew one of his killers prior to the attack, was never explored in court. Neither was the rumour that the killers knew that he had access to a shipment of crystal meth with a street value of $10,000 which they wanted to steal.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

     

    I read the book. It’s logical, well researched and persuasive.

    Conclusion: Shepard’s killing was drug related. If I recall correctly, at least one of the killers was also gay.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    It was also a fairly typical gay - on - gay murder where the actors are known to one another - beat the victim to a pulp and set him on fire.
    No surprise that Gay activists want to suppress the truth.
  58. @for-the-record
    I had read somewhere that Shepard’s murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    There's a book about the subject: The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, by Stephen Jimenez that was published in 2014. From a Guardian article reviewing the book:

    But the Matthew Shepard story is not yet finished. A new twist came last year with the publication of another book, this one by investigative journalist Stephen Jimenez, who has spent 13 years interviewing more than 100 people with a connection to the case. His conclusion, outlined in The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, is that the grotesque murder was not a hate crime, but could instead be blamed on crystal meth, a drug that was flooding Denver and the surrounding area at the time of Matthew’s death. This new theory has, understandably, caused a lot of anger ...

    Jimenez found that Matthew was addicted to and dealing crystal meth and had dabbled in heroin. He also took significant sexual risks and was being pimped alongside Aaron McKinney, one of his killers, with whom he’d had occasional sexual encounters. He was HIV positive at the time of his death.

    “This does not make the perfect poster boy for the gay-rights movement,” says Jimenez. “Which is a big part of the reason my book has been so trashed.”

    Matthew’s drug abuse, and the fact that he knew one of his killers prior to the attack, was never explored in court. Neither was the rumour that the killers knew that he had access to a shipment of crystal meth with a street value of $10,000 which they wanted to steal.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

     

    Read More
  59. @GW
    How many votes did they change? In which states?

    First things first: Who are “they” and what did “they” do?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon

    Who are “they”
     
    Russians.


    what did “they” do?
     
    That's what he wants to know too, implying the answer is "nothing significant".
  60. OT: The children of post 1965 immigrants are just so frigging grateful! Little Yankee Doodle Dandies they are!

    Read More
  61. res says:
    @Jack Hanson
    The Gospel of St. Matthew, written by a homosexual journo, tore apart the narrative around Matt Shepard and revealed him as a meth dealer who was killed by his boyfriend over drugs.

    The point and sputter was amazing when it wasn't ignored totally.

    I assume you mean this book?

    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Matt-Hidden-Matthew-Shepard/dp/1586422146

    The one/five star review split is a classic pattern for books like this.

    Long excerpt from one of the review comments follows. I think it is from a local former meth user who knew Aaron and worth a look if you are interested in that case.

    [MORE]

    Chicksly 3 years ago In reply to an earlier post Report abuse
    Lots of opinions… I wish they weren’t based upon media coverage though. I lived in Laramie for 23 years and went to school with Aaron. I know the bar owner and the police officers involved. It’s a small town. Let me give you some insight on how the town works. It is owned by the University. Without the University Laramie would be nothing. When this originally happened hate crimes were not prominent, especially in WY. Drugs on the other hand were a huge deal everywhere. The University didn’t want our cute little college town to be known as a meth capital and lose students (money). No parent would send their child to a town well known for drugs. They spun this story to look as if it were based on Matt being gay instead of a drug related crime. I’m sure they had no idea this would spiral out of control and become national news. Did you guys hear about the man that was thrown out of a car on the interstate and ran over multiple times killing him?? I didn’t think so… Also drug related and happened around the same time. The victim wasn’t gay so it was brushed under the rug. Though I am happy gay rights and hate crimes have become more and more important, this is not what took place in Laramie. As a local and at that time a meth user (9 years clean), I can attest to this being a drug related crime. Aaron was known to “swing that way” from time to time. So why would he kill because someone hit on him that he had already slept with? Meth is an ugly drug and it can make you feel invincible and take you out of reality.

    On another note, I am happy to see the author mentioned my friend Daphne Sulk. She was murdered about a year before Matt and got zero media attention. I knew both her and her killer (who was also in the meth scene). She was a troubled girl that wanted a baby to feel the love she wasn’t receiving at home. She was trying to straighten her life out. She didn’t quite make it. God rest her soul and Matthew’s as well. I think of them often and wonder what they could have been. This was a tragic crime and none of this information makes it ok to kill another human being.

    So here you go. Here are your “known facts” There is no use arguing over who is right and who is wrong. It doesn’t bring Matthew back. Here are some facts for you: Matthew was killed in a gruesome manor. He was taken way before his time. It doesn’t matter how good of a person he was or that he was a troubled young man. Nobody deserves what happened to him.

    I don’t care if you believe me or not and don’t have time for internet arguments so I probably wont reply back after this. I’m assuming you will discredit me in some way to support your own opinions. But I was there. I lived this. I lived my hometown being overrun by media. I lived the swat team with guns guarding the court house. I did the candlelight vigils for Matthew. Now I have to deal with people’s opinions of my town every time they ask where I’m from. “You hate gays in Wyoming” is usually what I hear. Breaks my heart considering I have lots of gay friends and a gay uncle. Sad what the media has done to WY. And most of all, I live with the memory of Matthew and that will be a positive one no matter what his troubles may have been.

    Thanks for listening.

    Read More
  62. BenKenobi says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    Yes, this is one of those cases where I feel like its safe to say that the CIA has been pretty incompetent and will, regardless of any wrangling and whatnot, continue to remain incompetent.

    Daniel “Chieh” Guevara, I have a slightly OT question to ask you, as I feel the subject matter is in your wheelhouse.

    How does one correctly pronounce “baizuo”? Is it the intuitive “BY-zu-OH” or something like “BAY-chu-OH” or “Bay-zwoh”?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Its "bye-tswaw"

    Google translate for 白左 is accurate as well.
  63. Lugash says:

    LOL, that website. Still interesting that Nada came from Nowhere, Montana. It’s not uncommon for field officers to be from the hinterlands, but seems odd for an analyst. I can’t find anything about her family… dad or mom was Agency who retired to Montana and got the daughter a job?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lugash
    And Nada had an odd switch to another college:

    When MSU moved from the quarter system to the semester system, the rotation of classes also changed. Bakos realized that it would take longer to graduate, so she transferred to the University of Utah, where she completed her degree in international economics.

    Bakos spent four years at MSU—1987–1991—and she said the university provided a strong academic environment. She added that several of her professors were influential in her life.
     
    This was after a serious car accident, but it's still odd to switch school after you're almost done. Kind of like how a certain president switched schools...
    , @ben tillman

    LOL, that website. Still interesting that Nada came from Nowhere, Montana. It’s not uncommon for field officers to be from the hinterlands, but seems odd for an analyst.
     
    It might be more interesting -- or more odd -- that someone named Nothing came from nowhere.
  64. The Z Blog says: • Website
    @O'Really
    I had read somewhere that Shepard's murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    Not only that, one of his killers was, at one time, having sex with him and therefore a homosexual. That was conveniently left out of the NYTimes narrative. They have also refused to give back that Pulitzer too. It sits next to a plaque of Walter Duranty.

    Read More
  65. LondonBob says:
    @guest
    I remember that Good Shepherd movie, with Matt Damon as a WASP robot. He meets with Bobby DeNiro as "Wild Bill" Donovan at one of them exclusive Skull and Bones retreats, or something like that. This is during WWII, but before Pearl Harbor. Donovan informs him that he's looking for patriotic young men "from the right backgrounds" to run an intelligence service. That means Skull and Bones WASP-types. Who are stereotypical spooks in the public imagination to this day.

    Donovan explicitly mentions no Jews and no blacks, though I don't know why he singles them out. He also mentions few Catholics because he's a Catholic. "Donovan" being a decidedly un-WASP name. This is said for the audience, I believe, because in reality he'd just have to say the right sort of people and leave it at that.

    I suppose this was all a mistake, because the Damon-bot screws up and gets turned by the Russians. Maybe if the CIA had fewer John Wasps and more Shitavius Jacksons it wouldn't have a legacy of ashes.

    By the way, there was one really good line in that movie. Joe Pesci is playing a mobster, and he's going on with the usual nonsense about WASPs being devoid of culture. Something like, "Italians have families and church, Irish have their homeland, Jews have tradition, even blacks have music. What do you have?"

    Damon's response is perfect: "The United States of America. The rest of you are just visiting."

    The Damon character was James Angleton, CIA counterintelligence chief. Likely architect of the JFK assassination, Israeli asset, great chum of the mafia and someone so inept at capturing Soviet spies some suspected he was one himself. Interesting chap. Jefferson Morley has a book coming out about him shortly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico

    so inept at capturing Soviet spies some suspected he was one himself
     
    Not surprising for the CIA, but it is also true that during the Cold War the Communist countries spared zero expense for their intelligence agencies, whereas their counterparts in the Western powers had to defend their existence and their scope politically. The differential was sufficiently strong to convince many reasonably in-the-know people in the Free World, by the late 1970s, that the U.S.S.R. might win the Cold War.
  66. LondonBob says:
    @DFH

    “This isn’t just about today’s diversity issue. It’s about tomorrow’s lack of diversity that will erode the agency,” Bakos told FP. “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”
     
    This adds a whole new dimension to invade the world, invite the world; we need to invite the people we've just invaded here, so we can get them to spy on their compatriots.

    How did the CIA ever cope with all these pale, stale old white men in the past when it was conducting operations ins Latin America/Africa/Southeast Asia?

    Segragationist America had no problem recruiting the likes of Freddy Lugo, Orlando Bosch, Herminio Diaz Garcia etc. Didn’t stop the inspiration for Colonel Kurtz Tony Po having great success in SE Asia either.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    I think a more interesting question is whether CIA actions, then or now, are a reflection of the elected government officials - the POTUS, for example - or are they actually the result of long-standing policies that transcend presidential administrations.

    Does the CIA actually serve the American people as reflected in their chosen leaders, or does it serve the "Deep State", that combination of corporations, think-tanks, military leaders, big banks, etc. ?

    Has America benefited from the CIA as whole since its inception in 1947?

    Since you mentioned Herminio Diaz Garcia and Orlando Bosch in particular, I bet I can guess your answer.

    "Am I talking to the wife of Orlando Letelier?"
    "Yes."
    "No, you are his widow."
    , @SteveRogers42
    Or Felix ("Say goodnight, Che") Rodriguez:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%c3%a9lix_Rodr%c3%adguez_(soldier)
  67. Forbes says:
    @candid_observer
    “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”

    But it would work so much better if this guy was openly gay?

    Sometimes the logic does take one's breath away.

    Chris Stevens in Libya was a perfect choice for the region, right? Because all diversity is the same everywhere, you know. If in Libya they don't know a gay ambassador is just like a Muslim, because diversity, they will have to learn it, those savages.

    CIA hasn’t hired agents to “walk around” anywhere in forever. Field Agents create local sources (assets) who do actual intelligence gathering (spying).

    People who write such drivel about “walk[ing] around” know less than nothing–they’re writing fiction.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    This was the argument for female US Army Rangers: that a couple would be more inconspicuous "gathering intel".

    Which is absolute horseshit and not one of their missions. The closest they have to any intel gathering is Ranger Recon Detachment, which is not the clandestine nonsense some staff puke dreamed up.
    , @fnn

    CIA hasn’t hired agents to “walk around” anywhere in forever. Field Agents create local sources (assets) who do actual intelligence gathering (spying).
     
    Remember this guy?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7t50kaqGxQs
  68. Forbes says:

    The issue of Diversity Mandate is curious. One goes so far to wonder if the writer understands that elections have consequences? And that policy is the perogative of the administration?

    Read More
  69. Lugash says:
    @Lugash
    LOL, that website. Still interesting that Nada came from Nowhere, Montana. It's not uncommon for field officers to be from the hinterlands, but seems odd for an analyst. I can't find anything about her family... dad or mom was Agency who retired to Montana and got the daughter a job?

    And Nada had an odd switch to another college:

    When MSU moved from the quarter system to the semester system, the rotation of classes also changed. Bakos realized that it would take longer to graduate, so she transferred to the University of Utah, where she completed her degree in international economics.

    Bakos spent four years at MSU—1987–1991—and she said the university provided a strong academic environment. She added that several of her professors were influential in her life.

    This was after a serious car accident, but it’s still odd to switch school after you’re almost done. Kind of like how a certain president switched schools…

    Read More
    • Replies: @3g4me
    @36 Lugash: "And Nada had an odd switch to another college:"

    FWIW, there used to be quite a large Mormon contingent at the Agency. I'm talking more than 20 years ago, so that may no longer be true, but if it continue than Utah makes a certain sense.

    As someone with family and friends who used to work for said Agency, I can attest the "diversity" mantra goes way back. The push for womyn case officers began under Reagan and merely intensified under Clinton. That was the era when they went from standard business attire (shirt and tie) to a "casual campus"environment. They also began, in the '80s, to allot valuable and expensive case officer training (Field Tradecraft and so on) to analysts who would never use such skills and were analysts precisely because they had been found unsuitable/incapable as case officer material. This was in the name of "fairness," because it wasn't right that men willing to risk their lives got to have all the "fun."

    @23 Twinkie: "The U.S. has ALWAYS been relatively weak in human intelligence. Part of that is cultural, part is institutional, and part legal. "

    Succinct and quite true.

    "But it’s unfair to rate its effectiveness simply based on public information."

    Also true. The Agency has always had its fair share of brown-nosers and people who rise above their ability level due to heavy cultivation of the "right" people, but there at least used to be a contingent that took their duties and the protection of the American nation seriously.
    , @Anonymous
    I found O's transfer to Columbia (btw, when's that being renamed?) was plausible as a yuppie-careerist move. Eagle Rock is a likable enough little neighborhood in So Cal circles but if you're someone dead set on achieving generic fame you want to have a national-level colonial-aged institution stamped next to your name for the c.v. Barry was surely aware by then that he'd get accepted anywhere & jump the short line of transfer applicants. I find it funny that he chose William F. Buckley Jr.-endorsed Columbia as opposed to Stanford, Princeton or Georgetown, but as a clueless Hawaiian he might have assumed it was more authentically black, soul food, grits, Nubian, whatever due to Harlem's proximity.

    I leave the door open for some uncited reason why he fled Oxy. And then there's the fact that he hates Europe, right? Which was established in his 1st autobiography. College machers have tried to transfer for flimsier reasons than that, though it's usually pointless if not deleterious on educational, diploma-filling, and social grounds.
  70. fnn says:
    @dr kill
    A cursory review of the subject. There is an American High School in Riyadh. Our youngest two sons attended. The kid was disturbed.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    “He suffered periods of depression, possibly as a result of being gang raped a few years earlier while on holiday in Morocco.”

    I wonder if that was that before or after he became a “drug-addicted prostitute”? And do Westerners *still* go to Morocco for Gay sex tourism? It seems like a completely unnecessary risk these days.

    Read More
    • Replies: @StillCARealist
    Camille Paglia commented on gay men getting abused sexually while out cruising and never complaining about it. Seems to be a risk that goes with the territory. Who on earth would want such a life? No wonder they end up on drugs and forever messed up.
  71. as says:

    (1) Matthew Shepard was killed by another gay man. The two had occasionally had homosexual relations.

    (2) Shepard had AIDS.

    Read More
  72. @O'Really
    I had read somewhere that Shepard's murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    I had read somewhere that Shepard’s murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    As I recall, fag, prostitute, druggie/dealer, murdered by another–sometime sex partner–fag, prostitute druggie over drugs.

    The “Matthew Shepard”–cue hushed tones–narrative is as phony as the Trayvon! narrative, the Michael Brown “Gentle Giant” and “hands up, don’t shoot” narrative, the Duke Lacrosse narrative, the U of Virginia frat boy rapist narrative, the “mattress girl” narrative, the Charlottesville narrative, the Heather Heyer narrative … on and on and on.

    A few of these crashed and burned before being welded into the average person’s consciousness, but most have been successful–Shepard particularly.

    Ron Unz’s comments on “American Pravda” are spot on.

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  73. Rod1963 says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    The CIA seems to produce more self-promoters than any part of the U.S. government with the possible exception of the Navy SEALs. Ex-CIA agents write books about their service, work as TV pundits, run for President as wanna-be spoilers, etc. While ex-Navy SEALs write airplane books about how being frogman gave them insight you can use as a corporate executive.

    At least the SEALs accomplish some concrete tasks, killing or guarding VIPs, respectively. I can't see much benefit to the CIA now though. I bet the NYPD's agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel than the CIA does. And, AFAIK, they don't wreck other countries, leaving vacuums for jihadis to fill.

    There are no incentives for the CIA to be competent. None. They missed the run up to 9/11 and no one was fired or disciplined. Same with the FBI. Again with the Boston bombing, and the San Bernadino jihadis. No one got fired or even disciplined. It’s a joke.

    Remember the case of Aldrich Ames, a legacy man. He started out as a agent in Rome whose job was primarily to get drunk every day and be rousted by Italian cops. It got so bad his boss transferred him to Langley to a office job where he apparently slept on the job a lot. When he started living in a mansion and driving to work in a Jag no one paid attention to it. They thought he might have a Colombian connection.

    It was the FBI who found out he was spying for the Russians. The agency had no internal security worth a shit.

    All that happens is they get more and more money. It’s just like a school that produces lots of morons. They get more money.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Now that Trump's open to working with Dems, he ought to try to whip up a deal to cut the budgets of the CIA and the military while sparing the grunts. Add it to a bill with a handful of broadly popular ideas such as raising the federal minimum wage.

    There isn't much point to the CIA today. The low level, proximate threat of Muslim terrorism is best handled via immigration enforcement. The CIA and the Defense Department maintain the fiction that Muslim terror groups overseas are like Bond movie villains, but the real threat is local Muslim nutters who claim affiliation with them. It's like bombing Yankee Stadium because a thug in a Yankees hat murdered someone in Los Angeles.

    As for higher level threats, the CIA didn't predict the fall of the USSR. It just doesn't seem useful, except perhaps in funding covert wars that usually seem to backfire on us.
  74. @guest
    I remember that Good Shepherd movie, with Matt Damon as a WASP robot. He meets with Bobby DeNiro as "Wild Bill" Donovan at one of them exclusive Skull and Bones retreats, or something like that. This is during WWII, but before Pearl Harbor. Donovan informs him that he's looking for patriotic young men "from the right backgrounds" to run an intelligence service. That means Skull and Bones WASP-types. Who are stereotypical spooks in the public imagination to this day.

    Donovan explicitly mentions no Jews and no blacks, though I don't know why he singles them out. He also mentions few Catholics because he's a Catholic. "Donovan" being a decidedly un-WASP name. This is said for the audience, I believe, because in reality he'd just have to say the right sort of people and leave it at that.

    I suppose this was all a mistake, because the Damon-bot screws up and gets turned by the Russians. Maybe if the CIA had fewer John Wasps and more Shitavius Jacksons it wouldn't have a legacy of ashes.

    By the way, there was one really good line in that movie. Joe Pesci is playing a mobster, and he's going on with the usual nonsense about WASPs being devoid of culture. Something like, "Italians have families and church, Irish have their homeland, Jews have tradition, even blacks have music. What do you have?"

    Damon's response is perfect: "The United States of America. The rest of you are just visiting."

    I’ve been trying to get this movie from the library ever since Steve Sailer mentioned/embedded that one scene, maybe more than once. It sounds pretty good. Anyway, when I saw the name Shepard at the top of Steve’s excerpt of the Foreign Policy article, I figured he was going to write about the stuff you did.

    What the hell a talk by the parents of an alleged meth-head, and more-than-alleged homo who got killed horrifically killed in Wyoming 20 years back, about more diversity in employment, HAS TO DO AT ALL with an out-of-control unaccountable US Feral Government agency that has caused havoc around the world for the last 50 years and is the very basic core of the Deep State is way below my pay grade, apparently.

    Does anyone wonder how I thought of my URL? Stupidity levels CANNOT go much higher, as when things take place for which we cannot even fathom the quality of stupid involved, has stupidity even happened at all? It’s like the tree in the forest thing, basically.

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  75. Former CIA Head Boob John “Leprechaun Baby Boomer” Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Former CIA Head Boob John “Leprechaun Baby Boomer” Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.
     
    Remember the good old days when FBI agents were micks from Fordham and CIA officers were WASPs from Yale?

    Remember the 2009 Camp Chapman suicide bombing in Khost, Afghanistan which killed 5 CIA officers and 2 CIA contractors? The Jordanian doctor came to the base to provide intel on Al Qaeda. The CIA thought he was their asset. But he was actually an Al Qaeda operative and suicide bomber. He was vetted by the CIA and not even patted down before entering the base. The CIA chief of the base was a 45-year old woman and Penn State political science major. She was killed. The backgrounds of the other CIA killed don't include former former Skulls and Bones Yalies. They are former military, former law enforcement, and a 30-year old female who before joining the CIA was a Colby College econ major whose senior thesis was titled, "Faithless Heathens: Scriptural Economics of Judaism, Christianity and Islam."

    , @Hibernian
    What is your evidence, any at all, for the last phrase of your sentence? Anyone with any more than a very passing familiarity with the Catholic Left in America (heavily Irish) knows it overlaps very little with those who resemble characters in "The Departed." Apparently you inhabit the same bubble as Art Deco.
    , @Alden
    Brennan probably hates all Americans who aren't anti White pro communist pro Muslim anti Christian lefties. Whatever his motivations it's not the old Boston Irish vs Boston Puritan conflict.

    This is 2017, not 1917.
    , @ben tillman

    Former CIA Head Boob John “Leprechaun Baby Boomer” Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.
     
    As Seymour Hersh said, the attempt to smear Trump with the stupid Russia thing was "a Brennan operation".
    , @SteveRogers42
    Likely Muslim convert.
  76. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Frau Katze
    I read the book. It's logical, well researched and persuasive.

    Conclusion: Shepard's killing was drug related. If I recall correctly, at least one of the killers was also gay.

    It was also a fairly typical gay – on – gay murder where the actors are known to one another – beat the victim to a pulp and set him on fire.
    No surprise that Gay activists want to suppress the truth.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    Jimenez got the impression that even the police weren't anxious for him to dig around the details of drug dealing.

    It was a very murky episode.
  77. Nico says:
    @inertial

    “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”
     
    And talking about LGBTQXYZ rights will help this how?

    “As we explained to the Shepards, CIA decided on a Pride month event with a national security focus..."
     
    Pride month event...with a national security focus. This is from the Onion, right?

    “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”

    That’s an understatement. But you can’t have someone so abjectly clueless about intelligence gathering making HR recommendations for an intelligence organization, either.

    In most cases, intelligence case officers *don’t* directly infiltrate the countries or institutions they attempt to glean information from. More typically they set up shop posing as generic citizens from the area (if it’s the same country) or as diplomatic personnel or expat détaché workers (in a foreign country) and spend their time spotting, recruiting and training “agents,” usually ordinary people already well-integrated into the target structure, who are persuaded/bribed/blackmailed into betraying their country or employer.

    There usually isn’t a good reason to employ case officers who can easily pass for locals, and there may be very good reasons, for questions of trust and character, sure, but also for the safety of the case officer: a naturalized American citizen from, say, Pakistan is going to be more easily detected and read out as a defector and is also going to be more difficult to protect.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    I imagine the person who said the thing about walking in Baghdad while white has seen too many James Bond movies. For the purposes of this post let's pretend James Bond is a CIA officer.

    In those movies he always ends up doing everything himself. He's a horrible spy, actually, though he is a damn good killer and a survivor. Or if I'm being generous let's say he's good at one play, which is to attract the attention of the bad guys, get them to tell him their secrets because they can't resist showing off or something, then miraculously not be gruesomely murdered multiple times.

    If you pay attention to the plot, he's always given a cover identity. Usually he poses as a rich import-export businessman playboy who likes card games. Might as well be wearing a "Hello, I'm a spy" nametag. He has contacts to meet, a guy who will be assassinated in front of him. Or a girl he gets to have sex with once before she's assassinated in front of him. Or maybe she tries to assassinate him. He must have sex with a girl who wants to murder him at least once per movie.

    Anyway, he always has a mission. That could be a commando mission, like he's his own Seal Team Six. It's usually some sort of basic spy stuff. Developing assets, making contacts. The mission gets thrown out the window immediately because in an early scene he'll walk into a room, the bad guy will recognize him as threat, and then he'll have to do everything himself instead of handling other people. So I can see how people get the mistaken impression spies do everything themselves.

  78. @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    Mr Akuleyev, I’ve read some good opinions from you in the comments here, at times (especially on nationalism, immigration, etc). However, when you let it slip that you believe in the entire Global Climate Disruption(TM) hoax, and now this blanket statement about election hacking, you become hard to take seriously.

    Do you mean influence on the ’16 presidential election via hacking of email accounts? That’s one story, and not anything too worrisome for me. As 2 repliers already asked/told you, actual hacking into voting data is another story – do you maintain that it happened?

    Americans have much more to worry about from the agency that happens to be part of the original subject of this post, along with it’s psychopathic-brother agency, the NSA. Both of these Deep State Cold War would-be-relics have switched to being the enemies of the American people, just so that they would not be actual relics.

    Russian hackers seem to be all about useless attempts at SQL-injection hacking of websites, and filling up blog comment sections with unreadable ads for viagra. I don’t think your Motherland is virtually-sending their best, Peter.*

    * except for the IMILFS, of course.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    There are three separate issues on hacking which both the left and the right like to conflate.

    1. Did the Russians try to "hack" (i.e. use subterfuge to influence) the election?
    2. Did it matter?
    3. Did Trump know about it?

    1. Yes, almost certainly (and probably quite a few elections before this one)
    2. Almost certainly not in a decisive way, and probably no more than Israeli hacks or Chinese hacks which no one talks about.
    3. Probably not. But he doesn't do himself any favors by being so dismissive of the malice the Russian government has towards the US and democracy in general.

  79. John “Leprechaun” Brennan Pushes Open Borders Mass Immigration And Muslim Importation.

    John Brennan thinks of ways the CIA can further destroy the United States:

    https://goo.gl/images/Kxon4V

    Steve Bannon is my next favorite leprechaun, right after my own blood relations named Sullivan. Bannon is Virginia Irish, just like my Irish blood is Southern.

    Boston, New York or Philadelphia Irish are different from Irish who went to the South. How so? Don’t know, but they are different.

    Obama is a mulatto first in the same way Brennan is a leprechaun first.

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  80. Nico says:
    @for-the-record
    I had read somewhere that Shepard’s murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    There's a book about the subject: The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, by Stephen Jimenez that was published in 2014. From a Guardian article reviewing the book:

    But the Matthew Shepard story is not yet finished. A new twist came last year with the publication of another book, this one by investigative journalist Stephen Jimenez, who has spent 13 years interviewing more than 100 people with a connection to the case. His conclusion, outlined in The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, is that the grotesque murder was not a hate crime, but could instead be blamed on crystal meth, a drug that was flooding Denver and the surrounding area at the time of Matthew’s death. This new theory has, understandably, caused a lot of anger ...

    Jimenez found that Matthew was addicted to and dealing crystal meth and had dabbled in heroin. He also took significant sexual risks and was being pimped alongside Aaron McKinney, one of his killers, with whom he’d had occasional sexual encounters. He was HIV positive at the time of his death.

    “This does not make the perfect poster boy for the gay-rights movement,” says Jimenez. “Which is a big part of the reason my book has been so trashed.”

    Matthew’s drug abuse, and the fact that he knew one of his killers prior to the attack, was never explored in court. Neither was the rumour that the killers knew that he had access to a shipment of crystal meth with a street value of $10,000 which they wanted to steal.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

     

    I didn’t read the book and I don’t know whether anything in the book is necessarily true: one needs to keep in mind it was all gleaned from secondhand sources. However, most likely a lot of it is true. I do know the author is reputed to be a man of integrity and nuance. Of course, as far as motives go, a forensic investigation won’t reveal what was on someone’s mind, and one reason why the notion of “hate crimes” is such a sham in the first place is that motivation is not necessary to secure a conviction for first-degree murder: the prosecution needs only to show that the event was premeditated. And a nasty motivation can move the judge or jury to impose a harsher penalty. In reality, “hate crime” laws are merely a stepping-stone towards blasphemy laws protecting The Narrative (such laws already exist in numerous countries, of course). The Narrative functions as a state religion in many ways (more so under some governments than under others), but not making spiritual pretensions they do not fear falling afoul of the First Amendment.

    As far as Matthew Shepard was concerned, I remember that at the time nothing I saw in the press suggested that this was a “hate crime” the way they were defining the term, and I was puzzled as to why people kept saying that it was. That was my first taste of the bad faith of SJWs. In the end, there is no reason to believe Shepard was murdered because of his sexual orientation, and there are numerous reasons to suspect he was murdered for some other reason.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    "motivation is not necessary to secure a conviction for first-degree murder"

    That's one way to put it. A more informative way would be to say: motive is not an element of crime. Hate crimes upturn centuries of Western jurisprudence in criminalizing motive.
    , @Frau Katze
    Not necessarily true?

    I would say the author didn't hide the areas he couldn't figure out or or people who wouldn't help. He noted every such item like that.

    There's was lots of that given that drug trafficking is a dangerous business.

    He noted that even police weren't encouraging him.

    I still think it was well worth reading. Organized crime is murky (although these guys didn't seem terribly organized).
  81. Edwhy says:
    @Mr. Anon
    Yes, certainly what the CIA needs is more homosexuals. That worked out so well for Britain's MI-6.

    The Cambridge Five

    And the Catholic Church.

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  82. Nico says:
    @Twinkie

    Ex-CIA agents write books about their service, work as TV pundits, run for President as wanna-be spoilers, etc.
     
    1. Washouts and the greedy do. Successful and capable officers who had long careers do not. They retire and quietly fade away. Or they consult a little and tend to their hobbies.

    2. "Agents" are foreign human assets the Agency recruits and are run by case officers. This isn't the FBI.

    3. The U.S. has ALWAYS been relatively weak in human intelligence. Part of that is cultural, part is institutional, and part legal. No one else has our signal intelligence capability, however. So while we may be very bad at reading intentions, we are without peer in understanding capabilities.

    4. I have my own criticisms of the intelligence community, with the CIA in particular. But it's unfair to rate its effectiveness simply based on public information. Failures are often publicized, but successes won't be declassified for a long time, if ever.

    And, AFAIK, they don’t wreck other countries, leaving vacuums for jihadis to fill.
     
    Those "wrecks" occur usually as a result of political decisions made by elected officials.

    I’m glad to see I’m not the only one on here who has something like a clue how intelligence gathering actually works. Of course, I’ll admit I only know because I read James Bond n’existe pas (“James Bond Doesn’t Exist”), the recent autobiography of François Waroux, a former French government/military case officer, while I was on holiday this summer. If you read French, I highly recommend the book. Waroux is no washout, nor is he greedy: he outlines the path of his career and the day-to-day how-to of intelligence gathering without betraying any still-classified information of any specific case he worked on. The book is thus somewhat short on insights into the workings of the world from the 1960s through the 1980s, but not completely bare of them: his depiction of life in Ethiopia under the Derg is quite an eye-opener, and Waroux recalls writing a report many decades ago that Benazir Bhutto could eventually be a prime target for assassination by political and religious opponents.

    The French are of course much more competent than the Americans in human intelligence gathering – their expertise in the area is renowned worldwide – but it is interesting to ponder the cultural differences that make this possible. The American mind is thoroughly infected by P.C. or buzzwords or both in all layers of society, across all stripes of ideology. Much of this cultural rot can be found in France, as well, but the top layer of society escapes largely unscathed. It is interesting that the Republic preaches “liberty, fraternity, equality” and “human rights” through all its institutions and notably its brainwashing public schools but the top 2 to 5 percent of the population knows things do not work like that. Why is this? The complete answer is rather complex but here’s one important hint: when you get to the upper levels of French hierarchies public or private, whatever their beliefs and political positions today you will rarely find a specimen that did not attend Catholic schools as a child.

    For a revealing example of this phenomenon, see the 2016 book Un président ne devrait pas dire ça… : Les secrets d’un quinquennat (“A President Shouldn’t Say That…: The Secrets of a Five-Year Term”). The book is a compilation of then-unpublished interviews then-president François Hollande gave to investigative journalists Gérard Davet et Fabrice Lhomme all throughout his mandate. He loathed Donald Trump, unsurprisingly (and he never made a secret of his disdain in public), but there are some very revealing tidbits:

    For the public and health sectors, the 35-hour work week “was ill-conceived.”

    “I think the Americans have the same problem that we do, apart from the institutional crisis: pauperization of the middle classes, fear of immigration, damaged morale, Muslims…

    The French national football team needs to organize some “brain workouts” and is composed of thugs “with no regularity, no values… thrown from the poverty of the ghetto into extreme wealth with no grooming.”

    There is “too much influx, immigration that should not be happening” in France.

    Islam and its revindications of “places of worship and recognition” is a problem for France.

    French justice is a pathologically “lax institution” and “all these prosecutors and high magistrates just hide away behind pretenses of virtue.”

    The French Socialist Party (to which he belongs) is “in need of liquidation, should commit hara-kiri.”

    The Grand Ouest Airport for which the scope was written in 53 years ago and which has attracted ferocious opposition “will probably never see the light of day.”

    Hollande acknowledges (such acknowledgment is unprecedented for any French president in or out of office) authorizing four assassinations during his mandate (the Action Service calls such actions, Operation Homo [as in "man," not "gay]).

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  83. Mr. Anon says:
    @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    Except it isn’t a hoax, the Russians did hack the election.

    In what sense did they “hack the election” (whatever the Hell that means)? How many votes did they change, and in what precincts?

    Just repeating something doesn’t make it true, although you and most of the Democratic Party seem to think it does.

    You know who might actually have “hacked” the election (in the sense of engaging in vote fraud)?

    The Democratic Party:

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/09/08/election-commission-alleges-new-hampshire-voter-fraud/

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    This article is not quite so dismissive of the allegations: http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2017/09/08/if-voter-fraud-by-out-state-democrats-managed-to-sway-new-hampshire-elections-implications-are-huge.html
    , @Wilkey
    In what sense did they “hack the election” (whatever the Hell that means)? How many votes did they change, and in what precincts?

    He means they had information about a candidate they didn't like (kinda like whoever released th Trump "pussy grabbing" tape) and then gave it to the press (or Wikileaks). Telling people the nasty shit you know about a candidate you don't like is now referred to as "hacking an election."

    Speaking of which, where's the scandal over the pussy-grabbing tape and all the other known information dumped on America long after the GOP had nominated him and it was too late to pick another candidate? More than anything else we have President Trump because these people waited until after the nomination was sealed to say anything. But suddenly they're indignant that the Russians may have gotten involved? Were we ever really stupid enough to think that foreign governments *weren't* trying to turn U.S. elections? FFS, what about all the effort Mexico exerts to get their diaspora in the US to affect US elections? Next to Mexico the Russians are effing pikers. They've managed to sneak over a tenth of their population into the US and get an entire party and the whole Fortune 500 on board with it.

    But I will say that it''s nice to know the Democrats are now worried about voter fraud. Perhaps now they'll support voter ID laws - or look into the race in New Hampshire.
  84. guest says:
    @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    What does “hack the election” mean? Some Russian did something with a computer having some connection to last year’s electoral process in the U.S.? As Adam Sandler might say, “well, a-whoopedie-doo.”

    Read More
  85. guest says:
    @Nico

    “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”
     
    That's an understatement. But you can't have someone so abjectly clueless about intelligence gathering making HR recommendations for an intelligence organization, either.

    In most cases, intelligence case officers *don't* directly infiltrate the countries or institutions they attempt to glean information from. More typically they set up shop posing as generic citizens from the area (if it's the same country) or as diplomatic personnel or expat détaché workers (in a foreign country) and spend their time spotting, recruiting and training "agents," usually ordinary people already well-integrated into the target structure, who are persuaded/bribed/blackmailed into betraying their country or employer.

    There usually isn't a good reason to employ case officers who can easily pass for locals, and there may be very good reasons, for questions of trust and character, sure, but also for the safety of the case officer: a naturalized American citizen from, say, Pakistan is going to be more easily detected and read out as a defector and is also going to be more difficult to protect.

    I imagine the person who said the thing about walking in Baghdad while white has seen too many James Bond movies. For the purposes of this post let’s pretend James Bond is a CIA officer.

    In those movies he always ends up doing everything himself. He’s a horrible spy, actually, though he is a damn good killer and a survivor. Or if I’m being generous let’s say he’s good at one play, which is to attract the attention of the bad guys, get them to tell him their secrets because they can’t resist showing off or something, then miraculously not be gruesomely murdered multiple times.

    If you pay attention to the plot, he’s always given a cover identity. Usually he poses as a rich import-export businessman playboy who likes card games. Might as well be wearing a “Hello, I’m a spy” nametag. He has contacts to meet, a guy who will be assassinated in front of him. Or a girl he gets to have sex with once before she’s assassinated in front of him. Or maybe she tries to assassinate him. He must have sex with a girl who wants to murder him at least once per movie.

    Anyway, he always has a mission. That could be a commando mission, like he’s his own Seal Team Six. It’s usually some sort of basic spy stuff. Developing assets, making contacts. The mission gets thrown out the window immediately because in an early scene he’ll walk into a room, the bad guy will recognize him as threat, and then he’ll have to do everything himself instead of handling other people. So I can see how people get the mistaken impression spies do everything themselves.

    Read More
    • Agree: Nico
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Bond isn't a spy, he is an assassin with a license to kill, as Ian Fleming makes clear in his books. The SAS has a long history of walking around hostile cities intel gathering, the US has sought to emulate this capability in recent years, I believe.
  86. eah says:
    @eah
    https://twitter.com/ForeignPolicy/status/906548828307902464

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    • Replies: @eah
    https://twitter.com/nontolerantman/status/906951315921797120
  87. eah says:
    @eah
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DJYjExLW4AA1EMV.jpg

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  88. guest says:
    @Nico
    I didn't read the book and I don't know whether anything in the book is necessarily true: one needs to keep in mind it was all gleaned from secondhand sources. However, most likely a lot of it is true. I do know the author is reputed to be a man of integrity and nuance. Of course, as far as motives go, a forensic investigation won't reveal what was on someone's mind, and one reason why the notion of "hate crimes" is such a sham in the first place is that motivation is not necessary to secure a conviction for first-degree murder: the prosecution needs only to show that the event was premeditated. And a nasty motivation can move the judge or jury to impose a harsher penalty. In reality, "hate crime" laws are merely a stepping-stone towards blasphemy laws protecting The Narrative (such laws already exist in numerous countries, of course). The Narrative functions as a state religion in many ways (more so under some governments than under others), but not making spiritual pretensions they do not fear falling afoul of the First Amendment.

    As far as Matthew Shepard was concerned, I remember that at the time nothing I saw in the press suggested that this was a "hate crime" the way they were defining the term, and I was puzzled as to why people kept saying that it was. That was my first taste of the bad faith of SJWs. In the end, there is no reason to believe Shepard was murdered because of his sexual orientation, and there are numerous reasons to suspect he was murdered for some other reason.

    “motivation is not necessary to secure a conviction for first-degree murder”

    That’s one way to put it. A more informative way would be to say: motive is not an element of crime. Hate crimes upturn centuries of Western jurisprudence in criminalizing motive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    That’s one way to put it. A more informative way would be to say: motive is not an element of crime. Hate crimes upturn centuries of Western jurisprudence in criminalizing motive.
     
    A more correct version would point out that while motive itself isn't an element, intent is. Many criminal statutes require intent, specific intent, often demonstrable only via motive. Why did the African assault the woman and leave her disfigured and brain damaged? The why is integral to the crime - was it an Assault w/Intent to Rob? Was it an Assault w/Intent to Maim? Was it an Assault w/Intent to Murder, or just an Assault and Battery? How can prosecutors prove Intent without Motive? Even subdivisions of Homicide depend on Intent, which again often requires a theory or evidence of motive. How else do we distinguish between Murder (premeditated) vs Manslaughter? Did our criminal intend the specific consequences of his action or was it all a giant accident? The Intent must be proven and Motive often provides that proof.
  89. JohnnyD says:

    I’m pretty sure it would be a bad idea to have gay spies prancing around Bagdad or any other city in that region…

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  90. res says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Except it isn’t a hoax, the Russians did hack the election.
     
    In what sense did they "hack the election" (whatever the Hell that means)? How many votes did they change, and in what precincts?

    Just repeating something doesn't make it true, although you and most of the Democratic Party seem to think it does.

    You know who might actually have "hacked" the election (in the sense of engaging in vote fraud)?

    The Democratic Party:

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/09/08/election-commission-alleges-new-hampshire-voter-fraud/

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  91. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Twinkie

    I bet the NYPD’s agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel
     
    Yup, the Mossad sure does. And please, NYPD "international liaison intelligence officer," not "agent."

    I bet the NYPD’s agents overseas get more useful counterterrorism intel

    Yup, the Mossad sure does. And please, NYPD “international liaison intelligence officer,” not “agent.”

    Lol, my thoughts exactly.

    Charlie Ben-Naim, a veteran NYPD police detective of Israeli origin who married a native New Yorker, was chosen to open the department’s Israeli branch.

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/nypd-opens-local-branch-in-kfar-saba/

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  92. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Opinionator
    First things first: Who are "they" and what did "they" do?

    Who are “they”

    Russians.

    what did “they” do?

    That’s what he wants to know too, implying the answer is “nothing significant”.

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  93. Art Deco says:
    @for-the-record
    I had read somewhere that Shepard’s murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    There's a book about the subject: The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, by Stephen Jimenez that was published in 2014. From a Guardian article reviewing the book:

    But the Matthew Shepard story is not yet finished. A new twist came last year with the publication of another book, this one by investigative journalist Stephen Jimenez, who has spent 13 years interviewing more than 100 people with a connection to the case. His conclusion, outlined in The Book of Matt: Hidden Truths about the Murder of Matthew Shepard, is that the grotesque murder was not a hate crime, but could instead be blamed on crystal meth, a drug that was flooding Denver and the surrounding area at the time of Matthew’s death. This new theory has, understandably, caused a lot of anger ...

    Jimenez found that Matthew was addicted to and dealing crystal meth and had dabbled in heroin. He also took significant sexual risks and was being pimped alongside Aaron McKinney, one of his killers, with whom he’d had occasional sexual encounters. He was HIV positive at the time of his death.

    “This does not make the perfect poster boy for the gay-rights movement,” says Jimenez. “Which is a big part of the reason my book has been so trashed.”

    Matthew’s drug abuse, and the fact that he knew one of his killers prior to the attack, was never explored in court. Neither was the rumour that the killers knew that he had access to a shipment of crystal meth with a street value of $10,000 which they wanted to steal.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

     

    I wouldn’t take Jimenez thesis terribly seriously, and local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy. Shepard had been in Laramie all of six weeks at the time of his death. He’d lived in Casper as a youngster (halfway across the state) then abroad for the last years of high school, then on the east coast, then Fort Collins. Socially, he was a professional class kid very distant from Henderson and McKinney (both employed by a roofing company and living in trailer parks with their girlfriends / baby-mammas) and under ordinary circumstances would have hardly had occasion to cross paths with them. The notion that he’d developed some regular association with McKinney in that brief span of time beggars belief. Jimenez claims (IIRC) they were acquainted in Fort Collins, but his evidence for that was next-to-nothing.

    What it looks like is a robbery gone bad (in part because the perpetrators were strung out on meth). This has been understood for some time (see JoAnn Wipijewski’s article published about a year or so later). The media manufactured a social fiction for their own purposes. Dennis Shepard was initially resistant to efforts to use his son’s death in this way.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Ah, art deco shows up and in his tiresome pedantic way tells us there is nothing to worry about. No need for facts, just breezy argument by assertion


    You're a worst poster than tiny duck ffs.

    , @Nico

    local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy
     
    Enough people - both civilians and officials - in that locality have told tales about the crime and naturally have appearances to keep up that I think such claims should be treated with skepticism. I haven't read the Jimenez book but maybe it's fair to apply that standard to the assertions of his interlocutors, as well.
    , @Vinteuil
    "...I wouldn’t take Jimenez thesis terribly seriously, and local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy..."

    Got any evidence? Got any links? Or are we just supposed to accept your say-so about the say-so of "local law enforcement in Wyoming?"

    I mean, what could be more credible than that?
  94. Art Deco says:

    I seriously doubt there are any employees ‘disheartened’ at not having to attend a useless lecture by Judy Shepard, except, perhaps, for the HR nuisances who arranged the talk.

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  95. @Big Bill
    You are wrong. It was MI-5 and the Democrats who hacked the election (with their pee memo). This is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and the Democrats and British intelligence are quite proud about it).

    No, wait! It was Russian prostitutes working for the FSB who ratted Trump out on his hotel pee party, and told the MI-5 agent, who told the Democrats, who ... who ... aw hell ... I give up. :)

    No, wait! It was Mexico which hacked the election by sending waves of illegal aliens across the border who then voted fraudulently in our election. This is not even a controversial statement.

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  96. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Charles Pewitt
    Former CIA Head Boob John "Leprechaun Baby Boomer" Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.


    Former CIA Head Boob John “Leprechaun Baby Boomer” Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.

    Remember the good old days when FBI agents were micks from Fordham and CIA officers were WASPs from Yale?

    Remember the 2009 Camp Chapman suicide bombing in Khost, Afghanistan which killed 5 CIA officers and 2 CIA contractors? The Jordanian doctor came to the base to provide intel on Al Qaeda. The CIA thought he was their asset. But he was actually an Al Qaeda operative and suicide bomber. He was vetted by the CIA and not even patted down before entering the base. The CIA chief of the base was a 45-year old woman and Penn State political science major. She was killed. The backgrounds of the other CIA killed don’t include former former Skulls and Bones Yalies. They are former military, former law enforcement, and a 30-year old female who before joining the CIA was a Colby College econ major whose senior thesis was titled, “Faithless Heathens: Scriptural Economics of Judaism, Christianity and Islam.”

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  97. @BenKenobi
    Daniel "Chieh" Guevara, I have a slightly OT question to ask you, as I feel the subject matter is in your wheelhouse.

    How does one correctly pronounce "baizuo"? Is it the intuitive "BY-zu-OH" or something like "BAY-chu-OH" or "Bay-zwoh"?

    Its “bye-tswaw”

    Google translate for 白左 is accurate as well.

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  98. @Forbes
    CIA hasn't hired agents to "walk around" anywhere in forever. Field Agents create local sources (assets) who do actual intelligence gathering (spying).

    People who write such drivel about "walk[ing] around" know less than nothing--they're writing fiction.

    This was the argument for female US Army Rangers: that a couple would be more inconspicuous “gathering intel”.

    Which is absolute horseshit and not one of their missions. The closest they have to any intel gathering is Ranger Recon Detachment, which is not the clandestine nonsense some staff puke dreamed up.

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  99. Ivy says:
    @gwood
    "More White, More Male, More Jesus"
    They could certainly use James Jesus Angleton back.

    Some say Jesus, others say Hey Zeus.

    The latter want their own Godlike eminence to validate their theory, as long as someone else pays for it.

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  100. @Art Deco
    I wouldn't take Jimenez thesis terribly seriously, and local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy. Shepard had been in Laramie all of six weeks at the time of his death. He'd lived in Casper as a youngster (halfway across the state) then abroad for the last years of high school, then on the east coast, then Fort Collins. Socially, he was a professional class kid very distant from Henderson and McKinney (both employed by a roofing company and living in trailer parks with their girlfriends / baby-mammas) and under ordinary circumstances would have hardly had occasion to cross paths with them. The notion that he'd developed some regular association with McKinney in that brief span of time beggars belief. Jimenez claims (IIRC) they were acquainted in Fort Collins, but his evidence for that was next-to-nothing.

    What it looks like is a robbery gone bad (in part because the perpetrators were strung out on meth). This has been understood for some time (see JoAnn Wipijewski's article published about a year or so later). The media manufactured a social fiction for their own purposes. Dennis Shepard was initially resistant to efforts to use his son's death in this way.

    Ah, art deco shows up and in his tiresome pedantic way tells us there is nothing to worry about. No need for facts, just breezy argument by assertion

    You’re a worst poster than tiny duck ffs.

    Read More
    • Troll: Kevin C.
    • Replies: @AM

    You’re a worst poster than tiny duck ffs.
     
    Tiny Duck is either performance art or so drunk on PC as to be comic relief.

    The Art Decos of the world are rather more dangerous when they end up, like salmon returning to their spawning grounds, in academic and bureaucratic positions.
    , @Art Deco
    It's easy to rile assholes, Jack. And amusing on occasion.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Based on the context of what he has written, Art Deco would appear to be a reference librarian. That is the pedastal from which he presumes to lecture everyone about everything. He is a non-entity. Hell, I wouldn't listen to him even when he said "shhhhh".
  101. 3g4me says:
    @Lugash
    And Nada had an odd switch to another college:

    When MSU moved from the quarter system to the semester system, the rotation of classes also changed. Bakos realized that it would take longer to graduate, so she transferred to the University of Utah, where she completed her degree in international economics.

    Bakos spent four years at MSU—1987–1991—and she said the university provided a strong academic environment. She added that several of her professors were influential in her life.
     
    This was after a serious car accident, but it's still odd to switch school after you're almost done. Kind of like how a certain president switched schools...

    @36 Lugash: “And Nada had an odd switch to another college:”

    FWIW, there used to be quite a large Mormon contingent at the Agency. I’m talking more than 20 years ago, so that may no longer be true, but if it continue than Utah makes a certain sense.

    As someone with family and friends who used to work for said Agency, I can attest the “diversity” mantra goes way back. The push for womyn case officers began under Reagan and merely intensified under Clinton. That was the era when they went from standard business attire (shirt and tie) to a “casual campus”environment. They also began, in the ’80s, to allot valuable and expensive case officer training (Field Tradecraft and so on) to analysts who would never use such skills and were analysts precisely because they had been found unsuitable/incapable as case officer material. This was in the name of “fairness,” because it wasn’t right that men willing to risk their lives got to have all the “fun.”

    @23 Twinkie: “The U.S. has ALWAYS been relatively weak in human intelligence. Part of that is cultural, part is institutional, and part legal. ”

    Succinct and quite true.

    “But it’s unfair to rate its effectiveness simply based on public information.”

    Also true. The Agency has always had its fair share of brown-nosers and people who rise above their ability level due to heavy cultivation of the “right” people, but there at least used to be a contingent that took their duties and the protection of the American nation seriously.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    The CIA and FBI are both heavily Mormon. Something like over a 3rd of the FBI belongs to the Mormon Mafia, as its known.
    , @SteveRogers42
    Did they learn nothing from the Cyril Figgis debacle?
  102. Nico says:
    @Art Deco
    I wouldn't take Jimenez thesis terribly seriously, and local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy. Shepard had been in Laramie all of six weeks at the time of his death. He'd lived in Casper as a youngster (halfway across the state) then abroad for the last years of high school, then on the east coast, then Fort Collins. Socially, he was a professional class kid very distant from Henderson and McKinney (both employed by a roofing company and living in trailer parks with their girlfriends / baby-mammas) and under ordinary circumstances would have hardly had occasion to cross paths with them. The notion that he'd developed some regular association with McKinney in that brief span of time beggars belief. Jimenez claims (IIRC) they were acquainted in Fort Collins, but his evidence for that was next-to-nothing.

    What it looks like is a robbery gone bad (in part because the perpetrators were strung out on meth). This has been understood for some time (see JoAnn Wipijewski's article published about a year or so later). The media manufactured a social fiction for their own purposes. Dennis Shepard was initially resistant to efforts to use his son's death in this way.

    local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy

    Enough people – both civilians and officials – in that locality have told tales about the crime and naturally have appearances to keep up that I think such claims should be treated with skepticism. I haven’t read the Jimenez book but maybe it’s fair to apply that standard to the assertions of his interlocutors, as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Enough people – both civilians and officials – in that locality have told tales about the crime and naturally have appearances to keep up that I think such claims should be treated with skepticism.

    Who? You have to begin with the assumption that everyone is lying and / or stupid with the exception of Stephen Jimenez. I don't think that's very prudent.
  103. @Opinionator
    Where do you observe Sessions NOT trying to put it into action?

    Well, NOT arresting the mayors of these Sanctuary cities, for starters. Although I’d love to see Seattle’s Ed Murray – ahem – “go down” first, I think the best bet for a first strike would be Austin, where the neo-commie mayor would get no support from the state governor, a Republican.

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  104. Nico says:
    @guest
    "How did the CIA ever cope..."

    This is tricky, because I think the CIA really sucked at its job. (Unless I misunderstand its job, because I suppose people made money and got power off their work.) But the way they coped was to develop assets. You know, spy stuff. They helped create the monster of radical jihadism they're now fighting just fine. So what's the big deal about walking around Baghdad? I know we've invaded a lot of that part of the world lately, but it's not like our foreign policy just discovered the Middle East.

    Not that I expect Foreign Policy magazine to know recent history.

    This reminds me of the Diversity Machine's self-justification in business. White people will be drowned out in the marketplace. The Others are coming, so we better hire them and learn how to be sensitive to their needs and what-not. Otherwise we'll lose money!

    Meanwhile, we already developed modernity and bourgeois manners. Everything we need for diverse commerce to function. Others will learn our ways. (Or starve!) But, oops, we dumped all that nonsense. Now we have to make it up as we go. Conveniently, the Diversity Machine can teach us how, for a fee.

    In the case of the CIA, the fee may include national security.

    This is tricky, because I think the CIA really sucked at its job… Not that I expect Foreign Policy magazine to know recent history.

    The two are linked, actually. As Twinkie points out in a later post, cultural factors are one of several reasons why the U.S. is not particularly brilliant in the gathering of human intelligence (and as I point out later on down, the French are way, way ahead in this department, and are recognized worldwide among intelligence organizations). And in fact, these same cultural factors explain why the U.S. intelligentsia, including Foreign Policy and The New York Times, so regularly get diplomacy so wrong.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    There is a short but magisterial book on razvestia -- information obtained first-hand or by theft, rather than inference or official sources -- by a defected KGB muckity-muck at University of Michigan, which describes Americans letting Pearl Harbor happen because after all the Japanese Ambassador had mentioned nothing at the embassy dinner; then again it also describes Russians nearly getting caught because, after meticulous preparation and elaborate legends, they got homesick for table-talk and drinking songs with a fellow Russian, leaving Goering's brown paper office wondering why an official Magyar, Czech, Pole and Lett were meeting for dinner every night.
  105. @LondonBob
    Segragationist America had no problem recruiting the likes of Freddy Lugo, Orlando Bosch, Herminio Diaz Garcia etc. Didn't stop the inspiration for Colonel Kurtz Tony Po having great success in SE Asia either.

    I think a more interesting question is whether CIA actions, then or now, are a reflection of the elected government officials – the POTUS, for example – or are they actually the result of long-standing policies that transcend presidential administrations.

    Does the CIA actually serve the American people as reflected in their chosen leaders, or does it serve the “Deep State”, that combination of corporations, think-tanks, military leaders, big banks, etc. ?

    Has America benefited from the CIA as whole since its inception in 1947?

    Since you mentioned Herminio Diaz Garcia and Orlando Bosch in particular, I bet I can guess your answer.

    “Am I talking to the wife of Orlando Letelier?”
    “Yes.”
    “No, you are his widow.”

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  106. Vinteuil says:
    @Art Deco
    I wouldn't take Jimenez thesis terribly seriously, and local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy. Shepard had been in Laramie all of six weeks at the time of his death. He'd lived in Casper as a youngster (halfway across the state) then abroad for the last years of high school, then on the east coast, then Fort Collins. Socially, he was a professional class kid very distant from Henderson and McKinney (both employed by a roofing company and living in trailer parks with their girlfriends / baby-mammas) and under ordinary circumstances would have hardly had occasion to cross paths with them. The notion that he'd developed some regular association with McKinney in that brief span of time beggars belief. Jimenez claims (IIRC) they were acquainted in Fort Collins, but his evidence for that was next-to-nothing.

    What it looks like is a robbery gone bad (in part because the perpetrators were strung out on meth). This has been understood for some time (see JoAnn Wipijewski's article published about a year or so later). The media manufactured a social fiction for their own purposes. Dennis Shepard was initially resistant to efforts to use his son's death in this way.

    “…I wouldn’t take Jimenez thesis terribly seriously, and local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy…”

    Got any evidence? Got any links? Or are we just supposed to accept your say-so about the say-so of “local law enforcement in Wyoming?”

    I mean, what could be more credible than that?

    Read More
    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Got any evidence? Got any links? Or are we just supposed to accept your say-so about the say-so of “local law enforcement in Wyoming?”

    You can accept what I say or not. You can accept what Jimenez says or you can accept contemporary news accounts, the accounts of JoAnn Wipejewski, and the work of local law enforcement professionals. People here are quite attracted to conspiracy theories and off-center and eccentric takes on public events which incorporate officialdom scamming the public. I don't think that's an intelligent way to look at the world and it tends to have a self-aggrandizing aspect.

    Use your noggin. Shepard had been in town for six weeks, registered at the University of Wyoming. How likely is it that he'd met this pair even once, much less been McKinney's regular butt-buddy? How likely is it that this frail and inept haut bourgeois was a drug dealer (and not a street level dealer) and the local police and local prosecutors learn absolutely nothing of it? (Now ask yourself how likely it is that Stephen Jimenez took an advance on a book and had to produce something which wasn't a rehash of what was already known?).
  107. fnn says:
    @Forbes
    CIA hasn't hired agents to "walk around" anywhere in forever. Field Agents create local sources (assets) who do actual intelligence gathering (spying).

    People who write such drivel about "walk[ing] around" know less than nothing--they're writing fiction.

    CIA hasn’t hired agents to “walk around” anywhere in forever. Field Agents create local sources (assets) who do actual intelligence gathering (spying).

    Remember this guy?

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  108. Nico says:
    @LondonBob
    The Damon character was James Angleton, CIA counterintelligence chief. Likely architect of the JFK assassination, Israeli asset, great chum of the mafia and someone so inept at capturing Soviet spies some suspected he was one himself. Interesting chap. Jefferson Morley has a book coming out about him shortly.

    so inept at capturing Soviet spies some suspected he was one himself

    Not surprising for the CIA, but it is also true that during the Cold War the Communist countries spared zero expense for their intelligence agencies, whereas their counterparts in the Western powers had to defend their existence and their scope politically. The differential was sufficiently strong to convince many reasonably in-the-know people in the Free World, by the late 1970s, that the U.S.S.R. might win the Cold War.

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  109. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Lugash
    And Nada had an odd switch to another college:

    When MSU moved from the quarter system to the semester system, the rotation of classes also changed. Bakos realized that it would take longer to graduate, so she transferred to the University of Utah, where she completed her degree in international economics.

    Bakos spent four years at MSU—1987–1991—and she said the university provided a strong academic environment. She added that several of her professors were influential in her life.
     
    This was after a serious car accident, but it's still odd to switch school after you're almost done. Kind of like how a certain president switched schools...

    I found O’s transfer to Columbia (btw, when’s that being renamed?) was plausible as a yuppie-careerist move. Eagle Rock is a likable enough little neighborhood in So Cal circles but if you’re someone dead set on achieving generic fame you want to have a national-level colonial-aged institution stamped next to your name for the c.v. Barry was surely aware by then that he’d get accepted anywhere & jump the short line of transfer applicants. I find it funny that he chose William F. Buckley Jr.-endorsed Columbia as opposed to Stanford, Princeton or Georgetown, but as a clueless Hawaiian he might have assumed it was more authentically black, soul food, grits, Nubian, whatever due to Harlem’s proximity.

    I leave the door open for some uncited reason why he fled Oxy. And then there’s the fact that he hates Europe, right? Which was established in his 1st autobiography. College machers have tried to transfer for flimsier reasons than that, though it’s usually pointless if not deleterious on educational, diploma-filling, and social grounds.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    There was a regular Oxy->Columbia transfer path for engineering majors when I was looking at colleges in 1975, so it was pretty routine to transfer from Occidental to Columbia. Plus Columbia was pretty easy to get into in 1981.
  110. Wilkey says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Except it isn’t a hoax, the Russians did hack the election.
     
    In what sense did they "hack the election" (whatever the Hell that means)? How many votes did they change, and in what precincts?

    Just repeating something doesn't make it true, although you and most of the Democratic Party seem to think it does.

    You know who might actually have "hacked" the election (in the sense of engaging in vote fraud)?

    The Democratic Party:

    http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/09/08/election-commission-alleges-new-hampshire-voter-fraud/

    In what sense did they “hack the election” (whatever the Hell that means)? How many votes did they change, and in what precincts?

    He means they had information about a candidate they didn’t like (kinda like whoever released th Trump “pussy grabbing” tape) and then gave it to the press (or Wikileaks). Telling people the nasty shit you know about a candidate you don’t like is now referred to as “hacking an election.”

    Speaking of which, where’s the scandal over the pussy-grabbing tape and all the other known information dumped on America long after the GOP had nominated him and it was too late to pick another candidate? More than anything else we have President Trump because these people waited until after the nomination was sealed to say anything. But suddenly they’re indignant that the Russians may have gotten involved? Were we ever really stupid enough to think that foreign governments *weren’t* trying to turn U.S. elections? FFS, what about all the effort Mexico exerts to get their diaspora in the US to affect US elections? Next to Mexico the Russians are effing pikers. They’ve managed to sneak over a tenth of their population into the US and get an entire party and the whole Fortune 500 on board with it.

    But I will say that it”s nice to know the Democrats are now worried about voter fraud. Perhaps now they’ll support voter ID laws – or look into the race in New Hampshire.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Telling people the nasty shit you know about a candidate you don’t like is now referred to as “hacking an election.”
     
    Yes. It's a corruption of the term "hacking". It's like the old rap on attack ads - people were always complaining about political "attack ads". I never saw anything wrong with them. There's nothing wrong with pointing out the deficiencies (or outright crimes) of your opponent. There was a joke about them: What's the difference between a political ad and a political attack ad? The attack ad contains a fact.

    As to the "Russia hacked our democracy" meme - it is ridiculous bulls**t. Anyone in Washington could name half a dozen countries that routinely exert far more influence in our internal affairs than Russia does. Russian might not even be in the top ten.
    , @SteveRogers42
    Speaking of things that never happened, wassup with all the lawsuits by all the chicas who were so callously assaulted by The Don on airplanes, at parties, etc? Prior to the election, these strong empowered wymyn were coming out of the woodwork to report all sorts of heinous rub-and-tickle. Now? Crickets,
  111. @anon
    It was also a fairly typical gay - on - gay murder where the actors are known to one another - beat the victim to a pulp and set him on fire.
    No surprise that Gay activists want to suppress the truth.

    Jimenez got the impression that even the police weren’t anxious for him to dig around the details of drug dealing.

    It was a very murky episode.

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  112. @Nico
    I didn't read the book and I don't know whether anything in the book is necessarily true: one needs to keep in mind it was all gleaned from secondhand sources. However, most likely a lot of it is true. I do know the author is reputed to be a man of integrity and nuance. Of course, as far as motives go, a forensic investigation won't reveal what was on someone's mind, and one reason why the notion of "hate crimes" is such a sham in the first place is that motivation is not necessary to secure a conviction for first-degree murder: the prosecution needs only to show that the event was premeditated. And a nasty motivation can move the judge or jury to impose a harsher penalty. In reality, "hate crime" laws are merely a stepping-stone towards blasphemy laws protecting The Narrative (such laws already exist in numerous countries, of course). The Narrative functions as a state religion in many ways (more so under some governments than under others), but not making spiritual pretensions they do not fear falling afoul of the First Amendment.

    As far as Matthew Shepard was concerned, I remember that at the time nothing I saw in the press suggested that this was a "hate crime" the way they were defining the term, and I was puzzled as to why people kept saying that it was. That was my first taste of the bad faith of SJWs. In the end, there is no reason to believe Shepard was murdered because of his sexual orientation, and there are numerous reasons to suspect he was murdered for some other reason.

    Not necessarily true?

    I would say the author didn’t hide the areas he couldn’t figure out or or people who wouldn’t help. He noted every such item like that.

    There’s was lots of that given that drug trafficking is a dangerous business.

    He noted that even police weren’t encouraging him.

    I still think it was well worth reading. Organized crime is murky (although these guys didn’t seem terribly organized).

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  113. @fnn
    "He suffered periods of depression, possibly as a result of being gang raped a few years earlier while on holiday in Morocco."


    I wonder if that was that before or after he became a "drug-addicted prostitute"? And do Westerners *still* go to Morocco for Gay sex tourism? It seems like a completely unnecessary risk these days.

    Camille Paglia commented on gay men getting abused sexually while out cruising and never complaining about it. Seems to be a risk that goes with the territory. Who on earth would want such a life? No wonder they end up on drugs and forever messed up.

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  114. Hibernian says:
    @guest
    I remember that Good Shepherd movie, with Matt Damon as a WASP robot. He meets with Bobby DeNiro as "Wild Bill" Donovan at one of them exclusive Skull and Bones retreats, or something like that. This is during WWII, but before Pearl Harbor. Donovan informs him that he's looking for patriotic young men "from the right backgrounds" to run an intelligence service. That means Skull and Bones WASP-types. Who are stereotypical spooks in the public imagination to this day.

    Donovan explicitly mentions no Jews and no blacks, though I don't know why he singles them out. He also mentions few Catholics because he's a Catholic. "Donovan" being a decidedly un-WASP name. This is said for the audience, I believe, because in reality he'd just have to say the right sort of people and leave it at that.

    I suppose this was all a mistake, because the Damon-bot screws up and gets turned by the Russians. Maybe if the CIA had fewer John Wasps and more Shitavius Jacksons it wouldn't have a legacy of ashes.

    By the way, there was one really good line in that movie. Joe Pesci is playing a mobster, and he's going on with the usual nonsense about WASPs being devoid of culture. Something like, "Italians have families and church, Irish have their homeland, Jews have tradition, even blacks have music. What do you have?"

    Damon's response is perfect: "The United States of America. The rest of you are just visiting."

    “Damon’s response is perfect: ‘The United States of America. The rest of you are just visiting.’”

    Wasn’t that same line in one of the Godfather films?

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Casino?

    WEBB
    Mr Rothstein. Your people never will
    understand the way it works out here.
    You're all just our guests. But you
    act like you're at home. Let me tell
    you somethin', partner... you ain't
    home. But that's where we're gonna
    send you if it harelips the Governor.
    (Pause.)
    Thank you for your time.
     
  115. Hibernian says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Former CIA Head Boob John "Leprechaun Baby Boomer" Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.


    What is your evidence, any at all, for the last phrase of your sentence? Anyone with any more than a very passing familiarity with the Catholic Left in America (heavily Irish) knows it overlaps very little with those who resemble characters in “The Departed.” Apparently you inhabit the same bubble as Art Deco.

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  116. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Hibernian
    "Damon’s response is perfect: 'The United States of America. The rest of you are just visiting.'"

    Wasn't that same line in one of the Godfather films?

    Casino?

    WEBB
    Mr Rothstein. Your people never will
    understand the way it works out here.
    You’re all just our guests. But you
    act like you’re at home. Let me tell
    you somethin’, partner… you ain’t
    home. But that’s where we’re gonna
    send you if it harelips the Governor.
    (Pause.)
    Thank you for your time.

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  117. @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    I have a dream. It is a dream of peace, harmony and quiet solitude. But the dream begins with your tail, and the tail of Mike Pompeo, being lashed together. Then the two of you are thrown over a clothesline. And after about 90 seconds the peace, harmony and quiet solitude of my dream ensue, causing me to once again embrace the Karmic resolution of a nettlesome matter.

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  118. @O'Really
    Sessions is a massive disappointment -- we thought we knew him as a fighter for these last 30 years. His behavior in office has been enigmatic at best.

    Sessions pulled the plug on DACA. He ought to get credit for that.

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  119. @Anonymous
    I found O's transfer to Columbia (btw, when's that being renamed?) was plausible as a yuppie-careerist move. Eagle Rock is a likable enough little neighborhood in So Cal circles but if you're someone dead set on achieving generic fame you want to have a national-level colonial-aged institution stamped next to your name for the c.v. Barry was surely aware by then that he'd get accepted anywhere & jump the short line of transfer applicants. I find it funny that he chose William F. Buckley Jr.-endorsed Columbia as opposed to Stanford, Princeton or Georgetown, but as a clueless Hawaiian he might have assumed it was more authentically black, soul food, grits, Nubian, whatever due to Harlem's proximity.

    I leave the door open for some uncited reason why he fled Oxy. And then there's the fact that he hates Europe, right? Which was established in his 1st autobiography. College machers have tried to transfer for flimsier reasons than that, though it's usually pointless if not deleterious on educational, diploma-filling, and social grounds.

    There was a regular Oxy->Columbia transfer path for engineering majors when I was looking at colleges in 1975, so it was pretty routine to transfer from Occidental to Columbia. Plus Columbia was pretty easy to get into in 1981.

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    • Replies: @Ivy
    Columbia also participated in a 3+2 program that was once popular. Students from smaller liberal arts colleges could finish their Gen Ed requirements and then transfer to another school such as Columbia like a neighbor did to finish up in a more technical field.
  120. Alden says:

    1. The men who killed Matthew Sheperd are gay.

    2. The murders were wholesale drug dealers, meth cookers and weed growers.

    3. They killed Matthew because he was one of their retail drug dealers at his college. He took drugs from them on commission but didn’t pay them what he owed after he sold them. Standard problem in the drug business.

    A gay criminal cheats other gay criminals and gets killed for it.

    How many millions of hours have been wasted since 1970 by employees sitting in these goofy 2 shoes multicultural propaganda meetings?

    But the private sector loves them as much as government loves them.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The guy who killed Matthew Shepard tried to kill somebody else later that night.
    , @Art Deco
    The men who killed Matthew Sheperd are gay.

    They were both rough-cut working-class chaps employed by a roofing company. Both were living in trailers with girlfriends and at least one of the (IIRC, both) had sired a child. (McKinney did admit to a tryst with a cousin about six years earlier). You lard enough implausibilities on top of each other, it all collapses.
  121. Alden says:
    @Anonymous

    Former CIA Head Boob John “Leprechaun Baby Boomer” Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.
     
    Remember the good old days when FBI agents were micks from Fordham and CIA officers were WASPs from Yale?

    Remember the 2009 Camp Chapman suicide bombing in Khost, Afghanistan which killed 5 CIA officers and 2 CIA contractors? The Jordanian doctor came to the base to provide intel on Al Qaeda. The CIA thought he was their asset. But he was actually an Al Qaeda operative and suicide bomber. He was vetted by the CIA and not even patted down before entering the base. The CIA chief of the base was a 45-year old woman and Penn State political science major. She was killed. The backgrounds of the other CIA killed don't include former former Skulls and Bones Yalies. They are former military, former law enforcement, and a 30-year old female who before joining the CIA was a Colby College econ major whose senior thesis was titled, "Faithless Heathens: Scriptural Economics of Judaism, Christianity and Islam."

    Affirmative Action in action!!!

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  122. @Alden
    1. The men who killed Matthew Sheperd are gay.

    2. The murders were wholesale drug dealers, meth cookers and weed growers.

    3. They killed Matthew because he was one of their retail drug dealers at his college. He took drugs from them on commission but didn't pay them what he owed after he sold them. Standard problem in the drug business.

    A gay criminal cheats other gay criminals and gets killed for it.

    How many millions of hours have been wasted since 1970 by employees sitting in these goofy 2 shoes multicultural propaganda meetings?

    But the private sector loves them as much as government loves them.

    The guy who killed Matthew Shepard tried to kill somebody else later that night.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Didn't know that. From the beginning of the nationwide crusade about an obscure murder of a criminal by other criminals I knew the media was lying.
  123. Alden says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Former CIA Head Boob John "Leprechaun Baby Boomer" Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.


    Brennan probably hates all Americans who aren’t anti White pro communist pro Muslim anti Christian lefties. Whatever his motivations it’s not the old Boston Irish vs Boston Puritan conflict.

    This is 2017, not 1917.

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  124. Alden says:
    @Steve Sailer
    The guy who killed Matthew Shepard tried to kill somebody else later that night.

    Didn’t know that. From the beginning of the nationwide crusade about an obscure murder of a criminal by other criminals I knew the media was lying.

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  125. @Lugash
    LOL, that website. Still interesting that Nada came from Nowhere, Montana. It's not uncommon for field officers to be from the hinterlands, but seems odd for an analyst. I can't find anything about her family... dad or mom was Agency who retired to Montana and got the daughter a job?

    LOL, that website. Still interesting that Nada came from Nowhere, Montana. It’s not uncommon for field officers to be from the hinterlands, but seems odd for an analyst.

    It might be more interesting — or more odd — that someone named Nothing came from nowhere.

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  126. @Charles Pewitt
    Former CIA Head Boob John "Leprechaun Baby Boomer" Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.


    Former CIA Head Boob John “Leprechaun Baby Boomer” Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.

    As Seymour Hersh said, the attempt to smear Trump with the stupid Russia thing was “a Brennan operation”.

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  127. guest says:
    @Jack Hanson
    IIRC the Russians try to turn him through his son, who was seduced by a Russian asset. Damon's character kills the asset surreptiously (has her thrown out of a plane) .

    “has her thrown out of a plane”

    Along with his grandchild, whom she was carrying. Oops.

    The final scene between Damon and the Russian who keeps trying to trap him (known as Ulysses) is ambiguous and very espionage-y, but I will give my interpretation:

    The Russian asset seduced Damon’s son and got him to spill the beans on the Bay of Pigs invasion. Damon must never allow that fact to come to light. His son could be tried for treason, and his career would be ruined. Furthermore, the son intends to marry the girl, which would mean the Russians would have an asset within Damon’s family. That can’t happen.

    Ulysses knows everything. He could out the son’s mistake any time he wants. In their final meeting, Ulysses says to Damon something like, “There may come when I ask a favor of you.” They don’t shake hands or anything, but I don’t get the feeling Damon turns him down. Ulysses also asks whether Damon is okay with their asset joining his family. Duh, no.

    Then one of Ulysses’ men asks Damon for a dollar bill. Damon gives him one, and says the word “cardinal” in a sentence. If you recall, earlier in the movie a highly placed CIA asset in the Kremlin communicates with Damon through a dollar bill, and his codename is “Cardinal.”

    The implication, to me at least, is that Ulysses is offering a quid pro quo: Damon gives them the identity of the American asset, and in exchange the Russians kill the son’s fiance. Easy-peasy.

    Alternatively, the guy Damon hands the dollar bill to could himself be the asset. In which case Damon wasn’t turned. But the axe remains over Damon’s head, and that favor Ulysses may or may not ask of him in future hangs there.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    I took that scene in a different light: that Damon had turned Ulysses' aide, and had the inside track on his foe.
  128. wren says:
    @wren
    I guess I am still stuck thinking Brennan is a communist, islamophile who cleared out Obama's passport file so that he could become president.

    I wish Trump would declare an investigation of Brennan.

    There are too many strange things coming out now that seem to fit the conspiracy theories, rather than the other way around.

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  129. @TangoMan
    Diversity enriches again? Who was on watch?

    That article was impressive for all of the names being dropped. Then there was the dog which didn't bark:

    Commanding Officer
    CDR A. J. Sanchez

    Executive Officer
    CDR J. L. Sanchez

    At least Los Dos Amigos could walk around Baghdad, habla-ing Espanol with the locals. That seems to be the criteria du jour, according to Nada Bakos.

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  130. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Rod1963
    There are no incentives for the CIA to be competent. None. They missed the run up to 9/11 and no one was fired or disciplined. Same with the FBI. Again with the Boston bombing, and the San Bernadino jihadis. No one got fired or even disciplined. It's a joke.

    Remember the case of Aldrich Ames, a legacy man. He started out as a agent in Rome whose job was primarily to get drunk every day and be rousted by Italian cops. It got so bad his boss transferred him to Langley to a office job where he apparently slept on the job a lot. When he started living in a mansion and driving to work in a Jag no one paid attention to it. They thought he might have a Colombian connection.

    It was the FBI who found out he was spying for the Russians. The agency had no internal security worth a shit.

    All that happens is they get more and more money. It's just like a school that produces lots of morons. They get more money.

    Now that Trump’s open to working with Dems, he ought to try to whip up a deal to cut the budgets of the CIA and the military while sparing the grunts. Add it to a bill with a handful of broadly popular ideas such as raising the federal minimum wage.

    There isn’t much point to the CIA today. The low level, proximate threat of Muslim terrorism is best handled via immigration enforcement. The CIA and the Defense Department maintain the fiction that Muslim terror groups overseas are like Bond movie villains, but the real threat is local Muslim nutters who claim affiliation with them. It’s like bombing Yankee Stadium because a thug in a Yankees hat murdered someone in Los Angeles.

    As for higher level threats, the CIA didn’t predict the fall of the USSR. It just doesn’t seem useful, except perhaps in funding covert wars that usually seem to backfire on us.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    I imagine if one tried to defund the CIA you'd see a propaganda blitz unmatched by anything with the exception of trying to cut the funding of the USMC.
  131. Art says:

    The CIA has become a Deep State player.

    The CIA has become an extra-constitutional power base in America. It is taking over the role of the State Department. It targets and uses killer drones (a military job).

    The CIA is trouble. It NEVER wins – it may take years – but we end up losing every covert war they touch.

    We need spies – we need information gathers – NOT policy makers that kill people. The CIA does not think peace – it thinks covert action.

    We need to think and declare war before we ignore the sovereignty of other nations. That is congress’s business.

    “We the people” have a measure of control over our military – but not the CIA – this must change.

    Think Peace — Art

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  132. @3g4me
    @36 Lugash: "And Nada had an odd switch to another college:"

    FWIW, there used to be quite a large Mormon contingent at the Agency. I'm talking more than 20 years ago, so that may no longer be true, but if it continue than Utah makes a certain sense.

    As someone with family and friends who used to work for said Agency, I can attest the "diversity" mantra goes way back. The push for womyn case officers began under Reagan and merely intensified under Clinton. That was the era when they went from standard business attire (shirt and tie) to a "casual campus"environment. They also began, in the '80s, to allot valuable and expensive case officer training (Field Tradecraft and so on) to analysts who would never use such skills and were analysts precisely because they had been found unsuitable/incapable as case officer material. This was in the name of "fairness," because it wasn't right that men willing to risk their lives got to have all the "fun."

    @23 Twinkie: "The U.S. has ALWAYS been relatively weak in human intelligence. Part of that is cultural, part is institutional, and part legal. "

    Succinct and quite true.

    "But it’s unfair to rate its effectiveness simply based on public information."

    Also true. The Agency has always had its fair share of brown-nosers and people who rise above their ability level due to heavy cultivation of the "right" people, but there at least used to be a contingent that took their duties and the protection of the American nation seriously.

    The CIA and FBI are both heavily Mormon. Something like over a 3rd of the FBI belongs to the Mormon Mafia, as its known.

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  133. @guest
    "has her thrown out of a plane"

    Along with his grandchild, whom she was carrying. Oops.

    The final scene between Damon and the Russian who keeps trying to trap him (known as Ulysses) is ambiguous and very espionage-y, but I will give my interpretation:

    The Russian asset seduced Damon's son and got him to spill the beans on the Bay of Pigs invasion. Damon must never allow that fact to come to light. His son could be tried for treason, and his career would be ruined. Furthermore, the son intends to marry the girl, which would mean the Russians would have an asset within Damon's family. That can't happen.

    Ulysses knows everything. He could out the son's mistake any time he wants. In their final meeting, Ulysses says to Damon something like, "There may come when I ask a favor of you." They don't shake hands or anything, but I don't get the feeling Damon turns him down. Ulysses also asks whether Damon is okay with their asset joining his family. Duh, no.

    Then one of Ulysses' men asks Damon for a dollar bill. Damon gives him one, and says the word "cardinal" in a sentence. If you recall, earlier in the movie a highly placed CIA asset in the Kremlin communicates with Damon through a dollar bill, and his codename is "Cardinal."

    The implication, to me at least, is that Ulysses is offering a quid pro quo: Damon gives them the identity of the American asset, and in exchange the Russians kill the son's fiance. Easy-peasy.

    Alternatively, the guy Damon hands the dollar bill to could himself be the asset. In which case Damon wasn't turned. But the axe remains over Damon's head, and that favor Ulysses may or may not ask of him in future hangs there.

    I took that scene in a different light: that Damon had turned Ulysses’ aide, and had the inside track on his foe.

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    • Replies: @guest
    That's plausible, but as the movie ends we see Damon read his father's suicide note, which is all about how he betrayed his country. Then Damon looks sad and defeated to me. Though admittedly it's hard to read his emotions.

    I wonder why they'd end that way if he had the inside track on Ulysses. Except that the movie is obviously not very pro-CIA, and was bound not to have a happy ending no matter what. Also, with the murder of his unborn grandchild they could've been going with a "gain the world but lose your soul" thing.

  134. @Dave Pinsen
    Now that Trump's open to working with Dems, he ought to try to whip up a deal to cut the budgets of the CIA and the military while sparing the grunts. Add it to a bill with a handful of broadly popular ideas such as raising the federal minimum wage.

    There isn't much point to the CIA today. The low level, proximate threat of Muslim terrorism is best handled via immigration enforcement. The CIA and the Defense Department maintain the fiction that Muslim terror groups overseas are like Bond movie villains, but the real threat is local Muslim nutters who claim affiliation with them. It's like bombing Yankee Stadium because a thug in a Yankees hat murdered someone in Los Angeles.

    As for higher level threats, the CIA didn't predict the fall of the USSR. It just doesn't seem useful, except perhaps in funding covert wars that usually seem to backfire on us.

    I imagine if one tried to defund the CIA you’d see a propaganda blitz unmatched by anything with the exception of trying to cut the funding of the USMC.

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  135. LondonBob says:
    @guest
    I imagine the person who said the thing about walking in Baghdad while white has seen too many James Bond movies. For the purposes of this post let's pretend James Bond is a CIA officer.

    In those movies he always ends up doing everything himself. He's a horrible spy, actually, though he is a damn good killer and a survivor. Or if I'm being generous let's say he's good at one play, which is to attract the attention of the bad guys, get them to tell him their secrets because they can't resist showing off or something, then miraculously not be gruesomely murdered multiple times.

    If you pay attention to the plot, he's always given a cover identity. Usually he poses as a rich import-export businessman playboy who likes card games. Might as well be wearing a "Hello, I'm a spy" nametag. He has contacts to meet, a guy who will be assassinated in front of him. Or a girl he gets to have sex with once before she's assassinated in front of him. Or maybe she tries to assassinate him. He must have sex with a girl who wants to murder him at least once per movie.

    Anyway, he always has a mission. That could be a commando mission, like he's his own Seal Team Six. It's usually some sort of basic spy stuff. Developing assets, making contacts. The mission gets thrown out the window immediately because in an early scene he'll walk into a room, the bad guy will recognize him as threat, and then he'll have to do everything himself instead of handling other people. So I can see how people get the mistaken impression spies do everything themselves.

    Bond isn’t a spy, he is an assassin with a license to kill, as Ian Fleming makes clear in his books. The SAS has a long history of walking around hostile cities intel gathering, the US has sought to emulate this capability in recent years, I believe.

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    • Replies: @Nico
    You're right: Bond isn't a spy ("case officer") but rather a covert operations officer. Even so, he's about the last person you'd want to task with such delicate missions: flamboyant, indiscreet, totally the wrong temperament for the job. The work of intelligence gathering does occasionally involve sexual sabotage but not so flagrantly, regularly or nonchalantly. Blackmail is more likely. In real life Bond would be dead many times over.
    , @guest
    "Bond isn't a spy, he is an assassin with a license to kill"

    But he doesn't just assassinate people. He goes undercover, investigates things, and runs operations. For instance, in the recent version of Casino Royale, Bond thwarts a terrorist attack, which costs the bad guy--an international terrorist financier--money. To get back his money, he enters into or holds a poker tournament. Can't remember which. Bond enters the tournament, hoping to make the bad guy lose. Which is supposed to induce him to turn himself over to the British government and become their asset.

    That's obviously a lot more than an assassination plot, though Bond originally causes the bad guy's misfortune while trying to assassinate other people. Arguing over whether entering a poker tournament under an assumed identity to induce a bad guy to become an asset of British intelligence can be properly called spying sounds like splitting hairs at best to me.
  136. @Achmed E. Newman
    Mr Akuleyev, I've read some good opinions from you in the comments here, at times (especially on nationalism, immigration, etc). However, when you let it slip that you believe in the entire Global Climate Disruption(TM) hoax, and now this blanket statement about election hacking, you become hard to take seriously.

    Do you mean influence on the '16 presidential election via hacking of email accounts? That's one story, and not anything too worrisome for me. As 2 repliers already asked/told you, actual hacking into voting data is another story - do you maintain that it happened?

    Americans have much more to worry about from the agency that happens to be part of the original subject of this post, along with it's psychopathic-brother agency, the NSA. Both of these Deep State Cold War would-be-relics have switched to being the enemies of the American people, just so that they would not be actual relics.

    Russian hackers seem to be all about useless attempts at SQL-injection hacking of websites, and filling up blog comment sections with unreadable ads for viagra. I don't think your Motherland is virtually-sending their best, Peter.*

    * except for the IMILFS, of course.

    There are three separate issues on hacking which both the left and the right like to conflate.

    1. Did the Russians try to “hack” (i.e. use subterfuge to influence) the election?
    2. Did it matter?
    3. Did Trump know about it?

    1. Yes, almost certainly (and probably quite a few elections before this one)
    2. Almost certainly not in a decisive way, and probably no more than Israeli hacks or Chinese hacks which no one talks about.
    3. Probably not. But he doesn’t do himself any favors by being so dismissive of the malice the Russian government has towards the US and democracy in general.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Peter, your Q-1 and A-1 make my point. Your premise of the question ("use subterfuge to influence") is the problem here. Maybe it's your grasp on the language or culture, but 98% of Americans would tell you "hacking" means the same as breaking into a computer system, whether logging in, changing data in a database, erasing files, adding files, whatever. "Hacking" absolutely does not mean, in English, to just underhandedly influence events.

    You answer to question 2 makes the point I would make, and others have already. Mexican high officials influence US elections openly, as do black groups in some areas. I could see the Chinese having some underhanded influence, but their best efforts have been to simply pay off one of the Clintons fairly openly. It worked really well. The Israelis are up at a whole nother level both the open influence and the more secret - and I would NOT rule out any actual hacking by them.

    Face it Peter, the argument is whether some Russian computer types have changed data in the Diebold voting systems. Yes or no? Even you would say no (or there is no evidence at least, right?).

    After all that, I will say that I DON'T LIKE the computer voting systems, as it leaves no method for checking votes - the ability to cheat is much higher with the computer systems,.

    , @Daniel Chieh
    Yes, it is the Russians who are malicefully telling us not to build up any walls and to let in as many immigrants as possible who can swing states blue. They also have aggressively built their nation close to so many of our military bases!
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    But he doesn’t do himself any favors by being so dismissive of the malice the Russian government has towards the US and democracy in general.
     
    Even if they Russian government has malice toward the US and democracy (not necessarily a bad thing at this point in time), it's called diplomacy. What happened to the old Democrat politicians' fears that "Ronnie Raygun is gonna get the world blown up!" "These guys are warmongers! Unilateral disarmament now!" during the Cold War days. OK, you may not remember that, or not have been here, but I do and was.

    Now, the Democrat cntrl-left, along with their Red wing of their party buddies across the aisle, are all "Hey, Russia is the evil empire uhhh country! Box them in with NATO, embargo them, fight them in Syria, fight them in the Baltics, fight them on the beaches, fight them on the ski slopes, argue with them at the coffee shops!" What was the turnaround about? Is it simply that the left is butthurt that Communism didn't kill enough people to make an omelot, and they hate the people that outlasted the Bolsheviks? Is it that they just don't want white people to have any country to themselves? I think it may just be that the neocons love playing these games of Risk with the people of the world, and with the Cold War over, they need to keep the game going, with the help of the Deep State, who don't want to become obsolete. Diplomacy just won't do for them.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    Look at your own verbiage. When you break it down like this, you say the Russians "try to hack". In your original post, you said the Russians actually did it ("hacked"). This is a huge, huge difference and why people are jumping on you.

    As you mention (Chinese and Israeli efforts) and as I mentioned above, there is a context of election subterfuge that is entirely missing from the reporting and makes Russiagate a farce as far as I can tell.
    , @guest
    The conflation is yours, my friend. Why not just say Russians tried to influence the election and hacked into stuff toward that end? Hacking an election is a completely different thing. It's not merely shorthand for the same idea. It's a different idea.

    An idea picked on purpose, by the way, to mislead the public.
  137. duncsbaby says:
    @Tiny Duck
    It is imperative that white christians become amino duty and a marginalized group.

    It is the only way mankind can progress

    All People of Color and sexually diverse agree with me

    “It is imperative that white christians become amino duty and a marginalized group.

    It is the only way mankind can progress

    All People of Color and sexually diverse agree with me”

    - amino duty? This time you’ve gone too far.

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  138. Nico says:
    @LondonBob
    Bond isn't a spy, he is an assassin with a license to kill, as Ian Fleming makes clear in his books. The SAS has a long history of walking around hostile cities intel gathering, the US has sought to emulate this capability in recent years, I believe.

    You’re right: Bond isn’t a spy (“case officer”) but rather a covert operations officer. Even so, he’s about the last person you’d want to task with such delicate missions: flamboyant, indiscreet, totally the wrong temperament for the job. The work of intelligence gathering does occasionally involve sexual sabotage but not so flagrantly, regularly or nonchalantly. Blackmail is more likely. In real life Bond would be dead many times over.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    He's a famous covert guy, which is of course an oxymoron. The bad guys all know his name.

    A couple of witty touches in Casino Royale, the last good Bond movie, IMO, were Chris Cornell titling his theme song, "You Know My Name" and Bond checking in at the hotel under his own name, since the bad guy was already expect him.
  139. AM says:
    @Jack Hanson
    Ah, art deco shows up and in his tiresome pedantic way tells us there is nothing to worry about. No need for facts, just breezy argument by assertion


    You're a worst poster than tiny duck ffs.

    You’re a worst poster than tiny duck ffs.

    Tiny Duck is either performance art or so drunk on PC as to be comic relief.

    The Art Decos of the world are rather more dangerous when they end up, like salmon returning to their spawning grounds, in academic and bureaucratic positions.

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  140. @O'Really
    I had read somewhere that Shepard's murder was drug-related, not gay-bashing. Does anyone know if this was ever verified?

    There was a 60 Minutes story on this where they interviewed people who said that the killers were gay as well and the motive was robbery.

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  141. This is a pretty funny clip of Nikonov talking about how the declining US couldn’t even stop the Russians from electing a US President.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?Feature=youtu.be&v=1qLxLOv7LWg&t=3113

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  142. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Thea
    This is the CIA that under Bush I didn't see the fall of the USSR coming? That didn't do anything to stop 9/11 and in fact helped by supporting " no profiling policies " under Bush II? That helped get us into permanent wars?

    I don't think they will ever be relevant no matter who they hire. Mainly they spy on decent Americans and ignore bad guys.

    Nonsense. 911 was a huge CIA success story. Permanent war? Another great success for the CIA although to be fair we should include the other alphabet agencies.

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  143. @Peter Akuleyev
    Except it isn't a hoax, the Russians did hack the election. That is not even a controversial statement outside the US (and Russians are quite proud of their accomplishment).

    There’s a lot more evidence that Israel and Mexico interfered in US elections than there is of Russian interference.

    Vote fraud is the cultivated expertise of illegal Mexicans, Neo-Cohens, and Democrats.

    Vote fraudsters naturally oppose a state-issued photo ID for voting.

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  144. @Peter Akuleyev
    There are three separate issues on hacking which both the left and the right like to conflate.

    1. Did the Russians try to "hack" (i.e. use subterfuge to influence) the election?
    2. Did it matter?
    3. Did Trump know about it?

    1. Yes, almost certainly (and probably quite a few elections before this one)
    2. Almost certainly not in a decisive way, and probably no more than Israeli hacks or Chinese hacks which no one talks about.
    3. Probably not. But he doesn't do himself any favors by being so dismissive of the malice the Russian government has towards the US and democracy in general.

    Peter, your Q-1 and A-1 make my point. Your premise of the question (“use subterfuge to influence”) is the problem here. Maybe it’s your grasp on the language or culture, but 98% of Americans would tell you “hacking” means the same as breaking into a computer system, whether logging in, changing data in a database, erasing files, adding files, whatever. “Hacking” absolutely does not mean, in English, to just underhandedly influence events.

    You answer to question 2 makes the point I would make, and others have already. Mexican high officials influence US elections openly, as do black groups in some areas. I could see the Chinese having some underhanded influence, but their best efforts have been to simply pay off one of the Clintons fairly openly. It worked really well. The Israelis are up at a whole nother level both the open influence and the more secret – and I would NOT rule out any actual hacking by them.

    Face it Peter, the argument is whether some Russian computer types have changed data in the Diebold voting systems. Yes or no? Even you would say no (or there is no evidence at least, right?).

    After all that, I will say that I DON’T LIKE the computer voting systems, as it leaves no method for checking votes – the ability to cheat is much higher with the computer systems,.

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  145. @Peter Akuleyev
    There are three separate issues on hacking which both the left and the right like to conflate.

    1. Did the Russians try to "hack" (i.e. use subterfuge to influence) the election?
    2. Did it matter?
    3. Did Trump know about it?

    1. Yes, almost certainly (and probably quite a few elections before this one)
    2. Almost certainly not in a decisive way, and probably no more than Israeli hacks or Chinese hacks which no one talks about.
    3. Probably not. But he doesn't do himself any favors by being so dismissive of the malice the Russian government has towards the US and democracy in general.

    Yes, it is the Russians who are malicefully telling us not to build up any walls and to let in as many immigrants as possible who can swing states blue. They also have aggressively built their nation close to so many of our military bases!

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  146. @Peter Akuleyev
    There are three separate issues on hacking which both the left and the right like to conflate.

    1. Did the Russians try to "hack" (i.e. use subterfuge to influence) the election?
    2. Did it matter?
    3. Did Trump know about it?

    1. Yes, almost certainly (and probably quite a few elections before this one)
    2. Almost certainly not in a decisive way, and probably no more than Israeli hacks or Chinese hacks which no one talks about.
    3. Probably not. But he doesn't do himself any favors by being so dismissive of the malice the Russian government has towards the US and democracy in general.

    But he doesn’t do himself any favors by being so dismissive of the malice the Russian government has towards the US and democracy in general.

    Even if they Russian government has malice toward the US and democracy (not necessarily a bad thing at this point in time), it’s called diplomacy. What happened to the old Democrat politicians’ fears that “Ronnie Raygun is gonna get the world blown up!” “These guys are warmongers! Unilateral disarmament now!” during the Cold War days. OK, you may not remember that, or not have been here, but I do and was.

    Now, the Democrat cntrl-left, along with their Red wing of their party buddies across the aisle, are all “Hey, Russia is the evil empire uhhh country! Box them in with NATO, embargo them, fight them in Syria, fight them in the Baltics, fight them on the beaches, fight them on the ski slopes, argue with them at the coffee shops!” What was the turnaround about? Is it simply that the left is butthurt that Communism didn’t kill enough people to make an omelot, and they hate the people that outlasted the Bolsheviks? Is it that they just don’t want white people to have any country to themselves? I think it may just be that the neocons love playing these games of Risk with the people of the world, and with the Cold War over, they need to keep the game going, with the help of the Deep State, who don’t want to become obsolete. Diplomacy just won’t do for them.

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  147. Art Deco says:
    @Vinteuil
    "...I wouldn’t take Jimenez thesis terribly seriously, and local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy..."

    Got any evidence? Got any links? Or are we just supposed to accept your say-so about the say-so of "local law enforcement in Wyoming?"

    I mean, what could be more credible than that?

    Got any evidence? Got any links? Or are we just supposed to accept your say-so about the say-so of “local law enforcement in Wyoming?”

    You can accept what I say or not. You can accept what Jimenez says or you can accept contemporary news accounts, the accounts of JoAnn Wipejewski, and the work of local law enforcement professionals. People here are quite attracted to conspiracy theories and off-center and eccentric takes on public events which incorporate officialdom scamming the public. I don’t think that’s an intelligent way to look at the world and it tends to have a self-aggrandizing aspect.

    Use your noggin. Shepard had been in town for six weeks, registered at the University of Wyoming. How likely is it that he’d met this pair even once, much less been McKinney’s regular butt-buddy? How likely is it that this frail and inept haut bourgeois was a drug dealer (and not a street level dealer) and the local police and local prosecutors learn absolutely nothing of it? (Now ask yourself how likely it is that Stephen Jimenez took an advance on a book and had to produce something which wasn’t a rehash of what was already known?).

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I don’t think that’s an intelligent way to look at the world and it tends to have a self-aggrandizing aspect.
     
    Yet you think an intelligent way to look at the world is to believe every newspaper account and government statistic you read while squirreled away at the circulation desk of the library you work at.

    You are an idiot with a thesaurus who squandered a lot of time educating yourself to no good purpose. What you deem to be an intelligent way to look at the world is not a useful guide to an intelligent way to look at the world.

    , @Vinteuil
    ArtDeco, you mention JoAnn Wypijewski (not Wipejewski) but do not link - presumably because you know she generally supports Jimenez' account. Please see here:

    https://www.thenation.com/article/laramie-revisited-myth-matthew/

    ...and here:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    It's perfectly clear from your further remarks that you have zero - I mean, really, zero - experience of the gay demimonde. I mean, you think it would take six weeks for these guys to hook up? Try six *hours* and you'd be nearer the mark.

    btw - the drive from Casper to Laramie takes about two hours.
  148. Art Deco says:
    @Alden
    1. The men who killed Matthew Sheperd are gay.

    2. The murders were wholesale drug dealers, meth cookers and weed growers.

    3. They killed Matthew because he was one of their retail drug dealers at his college. He took drugs from them on commission but didn't pay them what he owed after he sold them. Standard problem in the drug business.

    A gay criminal cheats other gay criminals and gets killed for it.

    How many millions of hours have been wasted since 1970 by employees sitting in these goofy 2 shoes multicultural propaganda meetings?

    But the private sector loves them as much as government loves them.

    The men who killed Matthew Sheperd are gay.

    They were both rough-cut working-class chaps employed by a roofing company. Both were living in trailers with girlfriends and at least one of the (IIRC, both) had sired a child. (McKinney did admit to a tryst with a cousin about six years earlier). You lard enough implausibilities on top of each other, it all collapses.

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  149. Art Deco says:
    @Nico

    local law enforcement in Wyoming have said the notion that Shepard was middle-management in a drug distribution network is a fantasy
     
    Enough people - both civilians and officials - in that locality have told tales about the crime and naturally have appearances to keep up that I think such claims should be treated with skepticism. I haven't read the Jimenez book but maybe it's fair to apply that standard to the assertions of his interlocutors, as well.

    Enough people – both civilians and officials – in that locality have told tales about the crime and naturally have appearances to keep up that I think such claims should be treated with skepticism.

    Who? You have to begin with the assumption that everyone is lying and / or stupid with the exception of Stephen Jimenez. I don’t think that’s very prudent.

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    • Troll: Nico
    • Replies: @Nico

    You have to begin with the assumption that everyone is lying and / or stupid with the exception of Stephen Jimenez.
     
    You selectively 1. forget my reply from above where I admit a priori to not having read his book, and 2. cut out my acknowledgement IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE VERY SENTENCE YOU QUOTE that, not having read the book, for all I know my misgivings about the truth-peddlers could apply to Jimenez as well. Between this and your dismissive hairsplitting of almost everything I have written recently (and that of many others here as well from the looks of it), I conclude your bad faith. Have a nice day.
  150. Art Deco says:
    @Jack Hanson
    Ah, art deco shows up and in his tiresome pedantic way tells us there is nothing to worry about. No need for facts, just breezy argument by assertion


    You're a worst poster than tiny duck ffs.

    It’s easy to rile assholes, Jack. And amusing on occasion.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    You are the asshole here.

    You are a tiresome pedantic bore, and there is nothing amusing about you.

    Dipshit.

    , @Jack Hanson
    Running to "I troll u/doing it for da lolz" after essays and essays of effortposting is a huge tell for someone who gets that he's not only wrong, but massively wrong and trying to save face.
  151. Mr. Anon says:
    @Wilkey
    In what sense did they “hack the election” (whatever the Hell that means)? How many votes did they change, and in what precincts?

    He means they had information about a candidate they didn't like (kinda like whoever released th Trump "pussy grabbing" tape) and then gave it to the press (or Wikileaks). Telling people the nasty shit you know about a candidate you don't like is now referred to as "hacking an election."

    Speaking of which, where's the scandal over the pussy-grabbing tape and all the other known information dumped on America long after the GOP had nominated him and it was too late to pick another candidate? More than anything else we have President Trump because these people waited until after the nomination was sealed to say anything. But suddenly they're indignant that the Russians may have gotten involved? Were we ever really stupid enough to think that foreign governments *weren't* trying to turn U.S. elections? FFS, what about all the effort Mexico exerts to get their diaspora in the US to affect US elections? Next to Mexico the Russians are effing pikers. They've managed to sneak over a tenth of their population into the US and get an entire party and the whole Fortune 500 on board with it.

    But I will say that it''s nice to know the Democrats are now worried about voter fraud. Perhaps now they'll support voter ID laws - or look into the race in New Hampshire.

    Telling people the nasty shit you know about a candidate you don’t like is now referred to as “hacking an election.”

    Yes. It’s a corruption of the term “hacking”. It’s like the old rap on attack ads – people were always complaining about political “attack ads”. I never saw anything wrong with them. There’s nothing wrong with pointing out the deficiencies (or outright crimes) of your opponent. There was a joke about them: What’s the difference between a political ad and a political attack ad? The attack ad contains a fact.

    As to the “Russia hacked our democracy” meme – it is ridiculous bulls**t. Anyone in Washington could name half a dozen countries that routinely exert far more influence in our internal affairs than Russia does. Russian might not even be in the top ten.

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  152. Mr. Anon says:
    @Art Deco
    Got any evidence? Got any links? Or are we just supposed to accept your say-so about the say-so of “local law enforcement in Wyoming?”

    You can accept what I say or not. You can accept what Jimenez says or you can accept contemporary news accounts, the accounts of JoAnn Wipejewski, and the work of local law enforcement professionals. People here are quite attracted to conspiracy theories and off-center and eccentric takes on public events which incorporate officialdom scamming the public. I don't think that's an intelligent way to look at the world and it tends to have a self-aggrandizing aspect.

    Use your noggin. Shepard had been in town for six weeks, registered at the University of Wyoming. How likely is it that he'd met this pair even once, much less been McKinney's regular butt-buddy? How likely is it that this frail and inept haut bourgeois was a drug dealer (and not a street level dealer) and the local police and local prosecutors learn absolutely nothing of it? (Now ask yourself how likely it is that Stephen Jimenez took an advance on a book and had to produce something which wasn't a rehash of what was already known?).

    I don’t think that’s an intelligent way to look at the world and it tends to have a self-aggrandizing aspect.

    Yet you think an intelligent way to look at the world is to believe every newspaper account and government statistic you read while squirreled away at the circulation desk of the library you work at.

    You are an idiot with a thesaurus who squandered a lot of time educating yourself to no good purpose. What you deem to be an intelligent way to look at the world is not a useful guide to an intelligent way to look at the world.

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  153. @Peter Akuleyev
    There are three separate issues on hacking which both the left and the right like to conflate.

    1. Did the Russians try to "hack" (i.e. use subterfuge to influence) the election?
    2. Did it matter?
    3. Did Trump know about it?

    1. Yes, almost certainly (and probably quite a few elections before this one)
    2. Almost certainly not in a decisive way, and probably no more than Israeli hacks or Chinese hacks which no one talks about.
    3. Probably not. But he doesn't do himself any favors by being so dismissive of the malice the Russian government has towards the US and democracy in general.

    Look at your own verbiage. When you break it down like this, you say the Russians “try to hack”. In your original post, you said the Russians actually did it (“hacked”). This is a huge, huge difference and why people are jumping on you.

    As you mention (Chinese and Israeli efforts) and as I mentioned above, there is a context of election subterfuge that is entirely missing from the reporting and makes Russiagate a farce as far as I can tell.

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  154. Mr. Anon says:
    @Art Deco
    It's easy to rile assholes, Jack. And amusing on occasion.

    You are the asshole here.

    You are a tiresome pedantic bore, and there is nothing amusing about you.

    Dipshit.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    You are a tiresome pedantic bore, and there is nothing amusing about you.

    And yet you keep coming back for more.
  155. @Peter Akuleyev
    This is a pretty funny clip of Nikonov talking about how the declining US couldn't even stop the Russians from electing a US President.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?Feature=youtu.be&v=1qLxLOv7LWg&t=3113

    Pretty funny as in ludicrous, yes.

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  156. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jack Hanson
    Ah, art deco shows up and in his tiresome pedantic way tells us there is nothing to worry about. No need for facts, just breezy argument by assertion


    You're a worst poster than tiny duck ffs.

    Based on the context of what he has written, Art Deco would appear to be a reference librarian. That is the pedastal from which he presumes to lecture everyone about everything. He is a non-entity. Hell, I wouldn’t listen to him even when he said “shhhhh”.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Whoa! Whodda thunk a pedantic bore who exists in a bubble can have not only nothing to say, but be consistently wrong while doing so.
  157. @guest
    "motivation is not necessary to secure a conviction for first-degree murder"

    That's one way to put it. A more informative way would be to say: motive is not an element of crime. Hate crimes upturn centuries of Western jurisprudence in criminalizing motive.

    That’s one way to put it. A more informative way would be to say: motive is not an element of crime. Hate crimes upturn centuries of Western jurisprudence in criminalizing motive.

    A more correct version would point out that while motive itself isn’t an element, intent is. Many criminal statutes require intent, specific intent, often demonstrable only via motive. Why did the African assault the woman and leave her disfigured and brain damaged? The why is integral to the crime – was it an Assault w/Intent to Rob? Was it an Assault w/Intent to Maim? Was it an Assault w/Intent to Murder, or just an Assault and Battery? How can prosecutors prove Intent without Motive? Even subdivisions of Homicide depend on Intent, which again often requires a theory or evidence of motive. How else do we distinguish between Murder (premeditated) vs Manslaughter? Did our criminal intend the specific consequences of his action or was it all a giant accident? The Intent must be proven and Motive often provides that proof.

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    • Replies: @guest
    Using motive to establish intent isn't the same thing as motive itself being criminal. Intent and motive are different things, though both involve mental states. Very often, intent is established pro forma. Like when "intent to distribute" is added on to a charge of drug possession. You have intent if you posses a certain amount by definition.

    Motive is routinely used to convince juries of guilt regardless of a need to demonstrate intent. Juries need to be told stories, and characters in stories have motives. That's the way people understand these things. Also, the defense will be trying to raise doubt by introducing the fact that people who aren't on trial have motives. So prosecutors better be prepared to explain why their supposed criminal did what they suppose he did.

    None of which has anything to do with the point at issue. You're talking about trial tactics. The issue is the fact that "hate crimes" revolutionized the law by rendering motive an element of crime. It wasn't criminal to posses motive before. Not even through the backdoor of intent.

  158. Art Deco says:
    @Mr. Anon
    You are the asshole here.

    You are a tiresome pedantic bore, and there is nothing amusing about you.

    Dipshit.

    You are a tiresome pedantic bore, and there is nothing amusing about you.

    And yet you keep coming back for more.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    You are routinely hated here yet you smugly proclaim others to be masochists for responding to your word vomit while you continue to come back.

    That's how far up your own ass you are with your lack of self awareness.
    , @Mr. Anon
    That's a reply worthy of Truth - a fan of yours by the way (aren't you proud?). Internet poseurs such as yourself always claim that because people pay attention to you you must be important. You aren't. Most people here just want you to go away. Your posts are crap. But even crap gets noticed, when the toilet backs up.

    You are assuming I read any of the drivel you post. I don't. I pass right over it or at most skim over it, and cut right to the only fitting reply to a horse's ass like you - an insult.
  159. @Jack Hanson
    I imagine if one tried to defund the CIA you'd see a propaganda blitz unmatched by anything with the exception of trying to cut the funding of the USMC.

    They’d just up the drug business

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  160. Vinteuil says:
    @Art Deco
    Got any evidence? Got any links? Or are we just supposed to accept your say-so about the say-so of “local law enforcement in Wyoming?”

    You can accept what I say or not. You can accept what Jimenez says or you can accept contemporary news accounts, the accounts of JoAnn Wipejewski, and the work of local law enforcement professionals. People here are quite attracted to conspiracy theories and off-center and eccentric takes on public events which incorporate officialdom scamming the public. I don't think that's an intelligent way to look at the world and it tends to have a self-aggrandizing aspect.

    Use your noggin. Shepard had been in town for six weeks, registered at the University of Wyoming. How likely is it that he'd met this pair even once, much less been McKinney's regular butt-buddy? How likely is it that this frail and inept haut bourgeois was a drug dealer (and not a street level dealer) and the local police and local prosecutors learn absolutely nothing of it? (Now ask yourself how likely it is that Stephen Jimenez took an advance on a book and had to produce something which wasn't a rehash of what was already known?).

    ArtDeco, you mention JoAnn Wypijewski (not Wipejewski) but do not link – presumably because you know she generally supports Jimenez’ account. Please see here:

    https://www.thenation.com/article/laramie-revisited-myth-matthew/

    …and here:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    It’s perfectly clear from your further remarks that you have zero – I mean, really, zero – experience of the gay demimonde. I mean, you think it would take six weeks for these guys to hook up? Try six *hours* and you’d be nearer the mark.

    btw – the drive from Casper to Laramie takes about two hours.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    It’s perfectly clear from your further remarks that you have zero – I mean, really, zero – experience of the gay demimonde. I mean, you think it would take six weeks for these guys to hook up? Try six *hours* and you’d be nearer the mark.

    Jimenez account from his 'informants' contends they were regular associates, not just that the crossed paths with each other. And, again, it requires that McKinney be quite a patchwork of incongruous parts. (And that his association with Shepard go undiscovered by law enforcement).

    , @Art Deco
    she generally supports Jimenez’ account

    She wrote nothing about Shepard and McKinney being cogs in rival drug rings, or about McKinney being on the Down Low
    , @Mr. Anon

    It’s perfectly clear from your further remarks that you have zero – I mean, really, zero – experience of the gay demimonde.
     
    Now, now. Don't sell Art Deco short there. He might surprise you.
  161. The complaint of more whites, more males, more Christians in the CIA implies the DC swamp expects less wars for Greater Israel under Trump and less imposition of the American democracy and diversity scheme onto foreign nations.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    The complaint of more whites, more males, more Christians in the CIA implies the DC swamp expects less wars for Greater Israel

    Since there have never been any 'wars for Greater Israel', it's difficult to see how the 'DC swamp' can expect 'less' [sic] of them.
  162. @3g4me
    @36 Lugash: "And Nada had an odd switch to another college:"

    FWIW, there used to be quite a large Mormon contingent at the Agency. I'm talking more than 20 years ago, so that may no longer be true, but if it continue than Utah makes a certain sense.

    As someone with family and friends who used to work for said Agency, I can attest the "diversity" mantra goes way back. The push for womyn case officers began under Reagan and merely intensified under Clinton. That was the era when they went from standard business attire (shirt and tie) to a "casual campus"environment. They also began, in the '80s, to allot valuable and expensive case officer training (Field Tradecraft and so on) to analysts who would never use such skills and were analysts precisely because they had been found unsuitable/incapable as case officer material. This was in the name of "fairness," because it wasn't right that men willing to risk their lives got to have all the "fun."

    @23 Twinkie: "The U.S. has ALWAYS been relatively weak in human intelligence. Part of that is cultural, part is institutional, and part legal. "

    Succinct and quite true.

    "But it’s unfair to rate its effectiveness simply based on public information."

    Also true. The Agency has always had its fair share of brown-nosers and people who rise above their ability level due to heavy cultivation of the "right" people, but there at least used to be a contingent that took their duties and the protection of the American nation seriously.

    Did they learn nothing from the Cyril Figgis debacle?

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  163. guest says:
    @Jack Hanson
    I took that scene in a different light: that Damon had turned Ulysses' aide, and had the inside track on his foe.

    That’s plausible, but as the movie ends we see Damon read his father’s suicide note, which is all about how he betrayed his country. Then Damon looks sad and defeated to me. Though admittedly it’s hard to read his emotions.

    I wonder why they’d end that way if he had the inside track on Ulysses. Except that the movie is obviously not very pro-CIA, and was bound not to have a happy ending no matter what. Also, with the murder of his unborn grandchild they could’ve been going with a “gain the world but lose your soul” thing.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    "Gain the world but lose your soul" was how I took it. The entire movie is about compromising to win and becoming colder and colder to do so. Smiley followed a similar arc in Le Carr's novels.

    I say that he subverted Ulysses' aide based off the name of their contact (Cardinal) and the peculiar choice of words, plus the reaction of the aide.
  164. guest says:
    @LondonBob
    Bond isn't a spy, he is an assassin with a license to kill, as Ian Fleming makes clear in his books. The SAS has a long history of walking around hostile cities intel gathering, the US has sought to emulate this capability in recent years, I believe.

    “Bond isn’t a spy, he is an assassin with a license to kill”

    But he doesn’t just assassinate people. He goes undercover, investigates things, and runs operations. For instance, in the recent version of Casino Royale, Bond thwarts a terrorist attack, which costs the bad guy–an international terrorist financier–money. To get back his money, he enters into or holds a poker tournament. Can’t remember which. Bond enters the tournament, hoping to make the bad guy lose. Which is supposed to induce him to turn himself over to the British government and become their asset.

    That’s obviously a lot more than an assassination plot, though Bond originally causes the bad guy’s misfortune while trying to assassinate other people. Arguing over whether entering a poker tournament under an assumed identity to induce a bad guy to become an asset of British intelligence can be properly called spying sounds like splitting hairs at best to me.

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    • Replies: @LondonBob
    You should read the original Casino Royale book, although the film is relatively faithful, as our most of the film's based on the books. Very easy reading.
  165. Ivy says:
    @Steve Sailer
    There was a regular Oxy->Columbia transfer path for engineering majors when I was looking at colleges in 1975, so it was pretty routine to transfer from Occidental to Columbia. Plus Columbia was pretty easy to get into in 1981.

    Columbia also participated in a 3+2 program that was once popular. Students from smaller liberal arts colleges could finish their Gen Ed requirements and then transfer to another school such as Columbia like a neighbor did to finish up in a more technical field.

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  166. guest says:
    @Peter Akuleyev
    There are three separate issues on hacking which both the left and the right like to conflate.

    1. Did the Russians try to "hack" (i.e. use subterfuge to influence) the election?
    2. Did it matter?
    3. Did Trump know about it?

    1. Yes, almost certainly (and probably quite a few elections before this one)
    2. Almost certainly not in a decisive way, and probably no more than Israeli hacks or Chinese hacks which no one talks about.
    3. Probably not. But he doesn't do himself any favors by being so dismissive of the malice the Russian government has towards the US and democracy in general.

    The conflation is yours, my friend. Why not just say Russians tried to influence the election and hacked into stuff toward that end? Hacking an election is a completely different thing. It’s not merely shorthand for the same idea. It’s a different idea.

    An idea picked on purpose, by the way, to mislead the public.

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  167. guest says:
    @Stan d Mute

    That’s one way to put it. A more informative way would be to say: motive is not an element of crime. Hate crimes upturn centuries of Western jurisprudence in criminalizing motive.
     
    A more correct version would point out that while motive itself isn't an element, intent is. Many criminal statutes require intent, specific intent, often demonstrable only via motive. Why did the African assault the woman and leave her disfigured and brain damaged? The why is integral to the crime - was it an Assault w/Intent to Rob? Was it an Assault w/Intent to Maim? Was it an Assault w/Intent to Murder, or just an Assault and Battery? How can prosecutors prove Intent without Motive? Even subdivisions of Homicide depend on Intent, which again often requires a theory or evidence of motive. How else do we distinguish between Murder (premeditated) vs Manslaughter? Did our criminal intend the specific consequences of his action or was it all a giant accident? The Intent must be proven and Motive often provides that proof.

    Using motive to establish intent isn’t the same thing as motive itself being criminal. Intent and motive are different things, though both involve mental states. Very often, intent is established pro forma. Like when “intent to distribute” is added on to a charge of drug possession. You have intent if you posses a certain amount by definition.

    Motive is routinely used to convince juries of guilt regardless of a need to demonstrate intent. Juries need to be told stories, and characters in stories have motives. That’s the way people understand these things. Also, the defense will be trying to raise doubt by introducing the fact that people who aren’t on trial have motives. So prosecutors better be prepared to explain why their supposed criminal did what they suppose he did.

    None of which has anything to do with the point at issue. You’re talking about trial tactics. The issue is the fact that “hate crimes” revolutionized the law by rendering motive an element of crime. It wasn’t criminal to posses motive before. Not even through the backdoor of intent.

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    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    None of which has anything to do with the point at issue. You’re talking about trial tactics. The issue is the fact that “hate crimes” revolutionized the law by rendering motive an element of crime. It wasn’t criminal to posses motive before. Not even through the backdoor of intent.
     
    Tell that tale to the many many men convicted and sentenced solely on evidence of motive. On the practical level you're raising a distinction without a difference especially as you concede "trial tactics" which by definition include bringing forth evidence. And it's no more criminal to possess motive than to possess a gun. Both are perfectly legal until they're used in a crime (ie Assault) when both the gun and the motive become enhancements. Let's say I hit Bob. Now I'll hit him with my gun while shouting, "I hate all you filthy Bobs." I began with a misdemeanor assault, but my gun made it a felony as did my intent to harm him solely because he's a filthy Bob. My legal gun and legal opinion on filthy Bobs are now both criminalized and subject me to greater punishment despite the fact that the end result (Bob was struck) is the same. My example in murder/manslaughter/negligent homicide earlier is an especially obvious one where motive matters on the only level that counts.

    You could argue that hate crime laws are violations of free speech rights and I'd agree, but when any speech is used to establish Intent that goes out.
  168. @Art Deco
    You are a tiresome pedantic bore, and there is nothing amusing about you.

    And yet you keep coming back for more.

    You are routinely hated here yet you smugly proclaim others to be masochists for responding to your word vomit while you continue to come back.

    That’s how far up your own ass you are with your lack of self awareness.

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  169. @Art Deco
    It's easy to rile assholes, Jack. And amusing on occasion.

    Running to “I troll u/doing it for da lolz” after essays and essays of effortposting is a huge tell for someone who gets that he’s not only wrong, but massively wrong and trying to save face.

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  170. @Mr. Anon
    Based on the context of what he has written, Art Deco would appear to be a reference librarian. That is the pedastal from which he presumes to lecture everyone about everything. He is a non-entity. Hell, I wouldn't listen to him even when he said "shhhhh".

    Whoa! Whodda thunk a pedantic bore who exists in a bubble can have not only nothing to say, but be consistently wrong while doing so.

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  171. @guest
    That's plausible, but as the movie ends we see Damon read his father's suicide note, which is all about how he betrayed his country. Then Damon looks sad and defeated to me. Though admittedly it's hard to read his emotions.

    I wonder why they'd end that way if he had the inside track on Ulysses. Except that the movie is obviously not very pro-CIA, and was bound not to have a happy ending no matter what. Also, with the murder of his unborn grandchild they could've been going with a "gain the world but lose your soul" thing.

    “Gain the world but lose your soul” was how I took it. The entire movie is about compromising to win and becoming colder and colder to do so. Smiley followed a similar arc in Le Carr’s novels.

    I say that he subverted Ulysses’ aide based off the name of their contact (Cardinal) and the peculiar choice of words, plus the reaction of the aide.

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  172. Nico says:
    @Art Deco
    Enough people – both civilians and officials – in that locality have told tales about the crime and naturally have appearances to keep up that I think such claims should be treated with skepticism.

    Who? You have to begin with the assumption that everyone is lying and / or stupid with the exception of Stephen Jimenez. I don't think that's very prudent.

    You have to begin with the assumption that everyone is lying and / or stupid with the exception of Stephen Jimenez.

    You selectively 1. forget my reply from above where I admit a priori to not having read his book, and 2. cut out my acknowledgement IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE VERY SENTENCE YOU QUOTE that, not having read the book, for all I know my misgivings about the truth-peddlers could apply to Jimenez as well. Between this and your dismissive hairsplitting of almost everything I have written recently (and that of many others here as well from the looks of it), I conclude your bad faith. Have a nice day.

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  173. Art Deco says:
    @Vinteuil
    ArtDeco, you mention JoAnn Wypijewski (not Wipejewski) but do not link - presumably because you know she generally supports Jimenez' account. Please see here:

    https://www.thenation.com/article/laramie-revisited-myth-matthew/

    ...and here:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    It's perfectly clear from your further remarks that you have zero - I mean, really, zero - experience of the gay demimonde. I mean, you think it would take six weeks for these guys to hook up? Try six *hours* and you'd be nearer the mark.

    btw - the drive from Casper to Laramie takes about two hours.

    It’s perfectly clear from your further remarks that you have zero – I mean, really, zero – experience of the gay demimonde. I mean, you think it would take six weeks for these guys to hook up? Try six *hours* and you’d be nearer the mark.

    Jimenez account from his ‘informants’ contends they were regular associates, not just that the crossed paths with each other. And, again, it requires that McKinney be quite a patchwork of incongruous parts. (And that his association with Shepard go undiscovered by law enforcement).

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  174. Art Deco says:
    @Joe Franklin
    The complaint of more whites, more males, more Christians in the CIA implies the DC swamp expects less wars for Greater Israel under Trump and less imposition of the American democracy and diversity scheme onto foreign nations.

    The complaint of more whites, more males, more Christians in the CIA implies the DC swamp expects less wars for Greater Israel

    Since there have never been any ‘wars for Greater Israel’, it’s difficult to see how the ‘DC swamp’ can expect ‘less’ [sic] of them.

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  175. Art Deco says:
    @Vinteuil
    ArtDeco, you mention JoAnn Wypijewski (not Wipejewski) but do not link - presumably because you know she generally supports Jimenez' account. Please see here:

    https://www.thenation.com/article/laramie-revisited-myth-matthew/

    ...and here:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    It's perfectly clear from your further remarks that you have zero - I mean, really, zero - experience of the gay demimonde. I mean, you think it would take six weeks for these guys to hook up? Try six *hours* and you'd be nearer the mark.

    btw - the drive from Casper to Laramie takes about two hours.

    she generally supports Jimenez’ account

    She wrote nothing about Shepard and McKinney being cogs in rival drug rings, or about McKinney being on the Down Low

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  176. @LondonBob
    Segragationist America had no problem recruiting the likes of Freddy Lugo, Orlando Bosch, Herminio Diaz Garcia etc. Didn't stop the inspiration for Colonel Kurtz Tony Po having great success in SE Asia either.

    Or Felix (“Say goodnight, Che”) Rodriguez:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%c3%a9lix_Rodr%c3%adguez_(soldier)

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    • Replies: @LondonBob
    The CIA seemed to have more Latinos than they knew what to do with after Cuba, almost get the impression a lot of their exploits south of the border were make work programs.
  177. @Autochthon

    [The] navy admits it is using under-trained sailors and uncertified ships as senior officials begin probe into the two aircraft carrier collisions that left seventeen dead.
     
    That's an interesting way to describe destroyers. I mean, they are equipped with helos, so, technicially, they do "carry aircraft," but "aircraft carrier" is a very specific term of art which describes a particular sort of vessel....

    Carry on, intrepid reporters.

    In coverage of the latest hurricane relief, I was informed by the corporate media that several “battleships” were en route to the coast of Florida. I have noticed this before…it seems to be the way that half-educated reporters describe any surface ship without a flight deck.

    I expected better naval savvy from the Brits, though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Ho ho! That is rich, since I don't think even any third-rate navy in the world has a battleship in service (the Missouri was decommissioned in 1992!). Maybe the journalists are inspired by the classic game from Milton Bradley or the turd Hollywood christened with that same name.

    I mean, at least aircraft carriers are still around...even if they aren't easily confused with destroyers by even deaf or blind people....

    On a less zany note: It used to be that, even during times of peace, a great many, if not most, men of any age could be expected to have served in the military during youth, even if only milling about smartly on routine cruises or doddering around in a garrison. This meant folk were generally not complete idiots about how the military worked – even if you'd not served in it, your dad or your uncle or your cousin or whoever had, and he'd told you enough stories or written you enough letters that you had a basic idea of things.

    The end of all this coincides with the end of the middle class and social mobility. The dregs of society or those without better hope enlist, a few cagey louts with a penchant for gaming sinecures from the bureaucracy get commissions (cf., Pournelle's Iron Law of Bureaucracy, from an earlier post under Steve's note honouring him...), and no else knows or cares anything about it.
  178. @Tiny Duck
    It is imperative that white christians become amino duty and a marginalized group.

    It is the only way mankind can progress

    All People of Color and sexually diverse agree with me

    Does xir just slip these howlers into his screeds to see if anyone’s actually reading them?

    Clearly, what zhe meant to say was “glutamine obligation”.

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  179. @Cwhatfuture
    After 9/11 the CIA should have been disbanded, along with a dozen or so other agencies. They all failed horribly - that time not non-catastrophically - and still no one resigned, was fired, was even demoted. Did DC think it a triumph for our intelligence services? They must have because they were all rewarded with vastly increased budgets. You are rewarded for a good job. If you subsidize something - in this case complete failure on every level - you will get more if it. That is an iron clad economic law. The response to 9/11, more than 9/11 itself, showed the US as a country in severe, if not terminal, decline. In this case there would have been a "diversity office" with many personnel, all well paid, who set up the invitation and arrangements. That is what you get when you give failures vastly increased budgets.

    Nor did any Air Force generals get sacked. Contrast with Kimmel and Short after Pearl Harbor.

    Things that make ya go “Hmmmm”.

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    • Replies: @guest
    Back in '41 government may have been more accountable to the public and itself. One big difference is that they had foreknowledge to cover up. I'm not talking conspiracy theories here. Actual foreknowledge that has come out. In the very least, Marshall knew Japan was going to declare war hours before the attack. We cracked their code. He chose to bypass his hotlines and warn the fleet via a telegram that ended up unread in some in-box at Pearl.

    If there was foreknowledge of 9/11, nothing so "hmmmm"-y as that has come to light. The term "scapegoat" gets thrown around a lot, but Kimmel and Short were definitely scapegoated. They didn't have as pressing a reason to scapegoat anyone after 9/11, I guess.
  180. Mr. Anon says:
    @Art Deco
    You are a tiresome pedantic bore, and there is nothing amusing about you.

    And yet you keep coming back for more.

    That’s a reply worthy of Truth – a fan of yours by the way (aren’t you proud?). Internet poseurs such as yourself always claim that because people pay attention to you you must be important. You aren’t. Most people here just want you to go away. Your posts are crap. But even crap gets noticed, when the toilet backs up.

    You are assuming I read any of the drivel you post. I don’t. I pass right over it or at most skim over it, and cut right to the only fitting reply to a horse’s ass like you – an insult.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    I think that's the fourth post you've written flashing your middle finger and telling me I'm not worthy of your attention. Your record for one thread was eight, IIRC. Show, don't tell.
  181. Mr. Anon says:
    @Vinteuil
    ArtDeco, you mention JoAnn Wypijewski (not Wipejewski) but do not link - presumably because you know she generally supports Jimenez' account. Please see here:

    https://www.thenation.com/article/laramie-revisited-myth-matthew/

    ...and here:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/26/the-truth-behind-americas-most-famous-gay-hate-murder-matthew-shepard

    It's perfectly clear from your further remarks that you have zero - I mean, really, zero - experience of the gay demimonde. I mean, you think it would take six weeks for these guys to hook up? Try six *hours* and you'd be nearer the mark.

    btw - the drive from Casper to Laramie takes about two hours.

    It’s perfectly clear from your further remarks that you have zero – I mean, really, zero – experience of the gay demimonde.

    Now, now. Don’t sell Art Deco short there. He might surprise you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Nah, he's probably the only guy on Grindr not getting any action!
  182. @Charles Pewitt
    Former CIA Head Boob John "Leprechaun Baby Boomer" Brennan went to Fordham, supported the Communist Party in the presidential election of 1976, supports open borders mass immigration, wants to flood the United States with Muslims and most likely hates people who have English ancestry.


    Likely Muslim convert.

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  183. J.Ross says: • Website

    The Matthew Shephard story is as it is ritually consecrated on NPR is completely false. But hey, they got a musical out of it, starring the post upon which he was supposedly crucified.

    http://www.musicaltoronto.org/2017/02/26/feature-musical-tributes-matthew-shepard/

    Note: don’t get this confused with the other Matthew Shepard musical, “Not In My Town,” which doesn’t have any singing inaminate objects. But hey, I’m sure we’ll all be impressed when the Broadway show about the elimination of Orthodox Christians from CIA occupied Syria hits theatres!
    Another gay Christ who should not have been mourned or gotten anyone jailed was that idiot at a top college whose roomates supposedly outed him to his parents, resulting, the story goes, in his suicide. This guy was bullying his roomates by bringing home sex partners (illicit because of dorm policy, not homophobia), thereby forcing them to both leave for the evening and cover up rule violations.

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  184. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Nico

    This is tricky, because I think the CIA really sucked at its job... Not that I expect Foreign Policy magazine to know recent history.
     
    The two are linked, actually. As Twinkie points out in a later post, cultural factors are one of several reasons why the U.S. is not particularly brilliant in the gathering of human intelligence (and as I point out later on down, the French are way, way ahead in this department, and are recognized worldwide among intelligence organizations). And in fact, these same cultural factors explain why the U.S. intelligentsia, including Foreign Policy and The New York Times, so regularly get diplomacy so wrong.

    There is a short but magisterial book on razvestia — information obtained first-hand or by theft, rather than inference or official sources — by a defected KGB muckity-muck at University of Michigan, which describes Americans letting Pearl Harbor happen because after all the Japanese Ambassador had mentioned nothing at the embassy dinner; then again it also describes Russians nearly getting caught because, after meticulous preparation and elaborate legends, they got homesick for table-talk and drinking songs with a fellow Russian, leaving Goering’s brown paper office wondering why an official Magyar, Czech, Pole and Lett were meeting for dinner every night.

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  185. @Wilkey
    In what sense did they “hack the election” (whatever the Hell that means)? How many votes did they change, and in what precincts?

    He means they had information about a candidate they didn't like (kinda like whoever released th Trump "pussy grabbing" tape) and then gave it to the press (or Wikileaks). Telling people the nasty shit you know about a candidate you don't like is now referred to as "hacking an election."

    Speaking of which, where's the scandal over the pussy-grabbing tape and all the other known information dumped on America long after the GOP had nominated him and it was too late to pick another candidate? More than anything else we have President Trump because these people waited until after the nomination was sealed to say anything. But suddenly they're indignant that the Russians may have gotten involved? Were we ever really stupid enough to think that foreign governments *weren't* trying to turn U.S. elections? FFS, what about all the effort Mexico exerts to get their diaspora in the US to affect US elections? Next to Mexico the Russians are effing pikers. They've managed to sneak over a tenth of their population into the US and get an entire party and the whole Fortune 500 on board with it.

    But I will say that it''s nice to know the Democrats are now worried about voter fraud. Perhaps now they'll support voter ID laws - or look into the race in New Hampshire.

    Speaking of things that never happened, wassup with all the lawsuits by all the chicas who were so callously assaulted by The Don on airplanes, at parties, etc? Prior to the election, these strong empowered wymyn were coming out of the woodwork to report all sorts of heinous rub-and-tickle. Now? Crickets,

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  186. @SteveRogers42
    In coverage of the latest hurricane relief, I was informed by the corporate media that several "battleships" were en route to the coast of Florida. I have noticed this before...it seems to be the way that half-educated reporters describe any surface ship without a flight deck.

    I expected better naval savvy from the Brits, though.

    Ho ho! That is rich, since I don’t think even any third-rate navy in the world has a battleship in service (the Missouri was decommissioned in 1992!). Maybe the journalists are inspired by the classic game from Milton Bradley or the turd Hollywood christened with that same name.

    I mean, at least aircraft carriers are still around…even if they aren’t easily confused with destroyers by even deaf or blind people….

    On a less zany note: It used to be that, even during times of peace, a great many, if not most, men of any age could be expected to have served in the military during youth, even if only milling about smartly on routine cruises or doddering around in a garrison. This meant folk were generally not complete idiots about how the military worked – even if you’d not served in it, your dad or your uncle or your cousin or whoever had, and he’d told you enough stories or written you enough letters that you had a basic idea of things.

    The end of all this coincides with the end of the middle class and social mobility. The dregs of society or those without better hope enlist, a few cagey louts with a penchant for gaming sinecures from the bureaucracy get commissions (cf., Pournelle’s Iron Law of Bureaucracy, from an earlier post under Steve’s note honouring him…), and no else knows or cares anything about it.

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  187. @guest
    Using motive to establish intent isn't the same thing as motive itself being criminal. Intent and motive are different things, though both involve mental states. Very often, intent is established pro forma. Like when "intent to distribute" is added on to a charge of drug possession. You have intent if you posses a certain amount by definition.

    Motive is routinely used to convince juries of guilt regardless of a need to demonstrate intent. Juries need to be told stories, and characters in stories have motives. That's the way people understand these things. Also, the defense will be trying to raise doubt by introducing the fact that people who aren't on trial have motives. So prosecutors better be prepared to explain why their supposed criminal did what they suppose he did.

    None of which has anything to do with the point at issue. You're talking about trial tactics. The issue is the fact that "hate crimes" revolutionized the law by rendering motive an element of crime. It wasn't criminal to posses motive before. Not even through the backdoor of intent.

    None of which has anything to do with the point at issue. You’re talking about trial tactics. The issue is the fact that “hate crimes” revolutionized the law by rendering motive an element of crime. It wasn’t criminal to posses motive before. Not even through the backdoor of intent.

    Tell that tale to the many many men convicted and sentenced solely on evidence of motive. On the practical level you’re raising a distinction without a difference especially as you concede “trial tactics” which by definition include bringing forth evidence. And it’s no more criminal to possess motive than to possess a gun. Both are perfectly legal until they’re used in a crime (ie Assault) when both the gun and the motive become enhancements. Let’s say I hit Bob. Now I’ll hit him with my gun while shouting, “I hate all you filthy Bobs.” I began with a misdemeanor assault, but my gun made it a felony as did my intent to harm him solely because he’s a filthy Bob. My legal gun and legal opinion on filthy Bobs are now both criminalized and subject me to greater punishment despite the fact that the end result (Bob was struck) is the same. My example in murder/manslaughter/negligent homicide earlier is an especially obvious one where motive matters on the only level that counts.

    You could argue that hate crime laws are violations of free speech rights and I’d agree, but when any speech is used to establish Intent that goes out.

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  188. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Nico
    You're right: Bond isn't a spy ("case officer") but rather a covert operations officer. Even so, he's about the last person you'd want to task with such delicate missions: flamboyant, indiscreet, totally the wrong temperament for the job. The work of intelligence gathering does occasionally involve sexual sabotage but not so flagrantly, regularly or nonchalantly. Blackmail is more likely. In real life Bond would be dead many times over.

    He’s a famous covert guy, which is of course an oxymoron. The bad guys all know his name.

    A couple of witty touches in Casino Royale, the last good Bond movie, IMO, were Chris Cornell titling his theme song, “You Know My Name” and Bond checking in at the hotel under his own name, since the bad guy was already expect him.

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  189. guest says:
    @SteveRogers42
    Nor did any Air Force generals get sacked. Contrast with Kimmel and Short after Pearl Harbor.

    Things that make ya go "Hmmmm".

    Back in ’41 government may have been more accountable to the public and itself. One big difference is that they had foreknowledge to cover up. I’m not talking conspiracy theories here. Actual foreknowledge that has come out. In the very least, Marshall knew Japan was going to declare war hours before the attack. We cracked their code. He chose to bypass his hotlines and warn the fleet via a telegram that ended up unread in some in-box at Pearl.

    If there was foreknowledge of 9/11, nothing so “hmmmm”-y as that has come to light. The term “scapegoat” gets thrown around a lot, but Kimmel and Short were definitely scapegoated. They didn’t have as pressing a reason to scapegoat anyone after 9/11, I guess.

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    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    The actual story of Pearl Harbor is a bitter pill, indeed. Many, many suspicious incidents at the high command level.

    Regarding 9/11, my point was simple incompetence. Four airliners off course and incommunicado for a long time, and yet no fighters sent up for a look-see? I recall a story about a couple of UNARMED F-16's who got to NY airspace after the fact, but that was it. I also remember that when Payne Stewart's death plane flew off-course over Deplorable territory in 1999, it was attended by multiple F-16's.

    I would have thought that several high-ranking USAF types would have been relieved of command after 9/11, but evidently that level of performance is A-OK.
  190. LondonBob says:
    @guest
    "Bond isn't a spy, he is an assassin with a license to kill"

    But he doesn't just assassinate people. He goes undercover, investigates things, and runs operations. For instance, in the recent version of Casino Royale, Bond thwarts a terrorist attack, which costs the bad guy--an international terrorist financier--money. To get back his money, he enters into or holds a poker tournament. Can't remember which. Bond enters the tournament, hoping to make the bad guy lose. Which is supposed to induce him to turn himself over to the British government and become their asset.

    That's obviously a lot more than an assassination plot, though Bond originally causes the bad guy's misfortune while trying to assassinate other people. Arguing over whether entering a poker tournament under an assumed identity to induce a bad guy to become an asset of British intelligence can be properly called spying sounds like splitting hairs at best to me.

    You should read the original Casino Royale book, although the film is relatively faithful, as our most of the film’s based on the books. Very easy reading.

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  191. LondonBob says:
    @SteveRogers42
    Or Felix ("Say goodnight, Che") Rodriguez:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%c3%a9lix_Rodr%c3%adguez_(soldier)

    The CIA seemed to have more Latinos than they knew what to do with after Cuba, almost get the impression a lot of their exploits south of the border were make work programs.

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  192. @guest
    Back in '41 government may have been more accountable to the public and itself. One big difference is that they had foreknowledge to cover up. I'm not talking conspiracy theories here. Actual foreknowledge that has come out. In the very least, Marshall knew Japan was going to declare war hours before the attack. We cracked their code. He chose to bypass his hotlines and warn the fleet via a telegram that ended up unread in some in-box at Pearl.

    If there was foreknowledge of 9/11, nothing so "hmmmm"-y as that has come to light. The term "scapegoat" gets thrown around a lot, but Kimmel and Short were definitely scapegoated. They didn't have as pressing a reason to scapegoat anyone after 9/11, I guess.

    The actual story of Pearl Harbor is a bitter pill, indeed. Many, many suspicious incidents at the high command level.

    Regarding 9/11, my point was simple incompetence. Four airliners off course and incommunicado for a long time, and yet no fighters sent up for a look-see? I recall a story about a couple of UNARMED F-16′s who got to NY airspace after the fact, but that was it. I also remember that when Payne Stewart’s death plane flew off-course over Deplorable territory in 1999, it was attended by multiple F-16′s.

    I would have thought that several high-ranking USAF types would have been relieved of command after 9/11, but evidently that level of performance is A-OK.

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  193. Brutusale says:
    @Mr. Anon

    It’s perfectly clear from your further remarks that you have zero – I mean, really, zero – experience of the gay demimonde.
     
    Now, now. Don't sell Art Deco short there. He might surprise you.

    Nah, he’s probably the only guy on Grindr not getting any action!

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  194. Art Deco says:
    @Mr. Anon
    That's a reply worthy of Truth - a fan of yours by the way (aren't you proud?). Internet poseurs such as yourself always claim that because people pay attention to you you must be important. You aren't. Most people here just want you to go away. Your posts are crap. But even crap gets noticed, when the toilet backs up.

    You are assuming I read any of the drivel you post. I don't. I pass right over it or at most skim over it, and cut right to the only fitting reply to a horse's ass like you - an insult.

    I think that’s the fourth post you’ve written flashing your middle finger and telling me I’m not worthy of your attention. Your record for one thread was eight, IIRC. Show, don’t tell.

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  195. guest says:
    @Art Deco
    I think that's the fourth post you've written flashing your middle finger and telling me I'm not worthy of your attention. Your record for one thread was eight, IIRC. Show, don't tell.

    “Show, don’t tell”

    Huh?

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  196. “This isn’t just about today’s diversity issue. It’s about tomorrow’s lack of diversity that will erode the agency,” Bakos told FP. “You can’t hire someone who’s typically white American to walk around Baghdad.”

    Because having a Gay White male walking around Baghdad would make all the difference in the world.

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  197. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Twinkie

    Ex-CIA agents write books about their service, work as TV pundits, run for President as wanna-be spoilers, etc.
     
    1. Washouts and the greedy do. Successful and capable officers who had long careers do not. They retire and quietly fade away. Or they consult a little and tend to their hobbies.

    2. "Agents" are foreign human assets the Agency recruits and are run by case officers. This isn't the FBI.

    3. The U.S. has ALWAYS been relatively weak in human intelligence. Part of that is cultural, part is institutional, and part legal. No one else has our signal intelligence capability, however. So while we may be very bad at reading intentions, we are without peer in understanding capabilities.

    4. I have my own criticisms of the intelligence community, with the CIA in particular. But it's unfair to rate its effectiveness simply based on public information. Failures are often publicized, but successes won't be declassified for a long time, if ever.

    And, AFAIK, they don’t wreck other countries, leaving vacuums for jihadis to fill.
     
    Those "wrecks" occur usually as a result of political decisions made by elected officials.

    I have the impression the CIA and State Department and NSA are weak in foreign languages. Seems like it has been that way for decades.

    Read More
  198. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Twinkie

    Ex-CIA agents write books about their service, work as TV pundits, run for President as wanna-be spoilers, etc.
     
    1. Washouts and the greedy do. Successful and capable officers who had long careers do not. They retire and quietly fade away. Or they consult a little and tend to their hobbies.

    2. "Agents" are foreign human assets the Agency recruits and are run by case officers. This isn't the FBI.

    3. The U.S. has ALWAYS been relatively weak in human intelligence. Part of that is cultural, part is institutional, and part legal. No one else has our signal intelligence capability, however. So while we may be very bad at reading intentions, we are without peer in understanding capabilities.

    4. I have my own criticisms of the intelligence community, with the CIA in particular. But it's unfair to rate its effectiveness simply based on public information. Failures are often publicized, but successes won't be declassified for a long time, if ever.

    And, AFAIK, they don’t wreck other countries, leaving vacuums for jihadis to fill.
     
    Those "wrecks" occur usually as a result of political decisions made by elected officials.

    I have the impression the CIA and State Department and NSA are weak in foreign languages. Seems like it has been that way for decades.

    Read More
  199. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @guest
    I remember that Good Shepherd movie, with Matt Damon as a WASP robot. He meets with Bobby DeNiro as "Wild Bill" Donovan at one of them exclusive Skull and Bones retreats, or something like that. This is during WWII, but before Pearl Harbor. Donovan informs him that he's looking for patriotic young men "from the right backgrounds" to run an intelligence service. That means Skull and Bones WASP-types. Who are stereotypical spooks in the public imagination to this day.

    Donovan explicitly mentions no Jews and no blacks, though I don't know why he singles them out. He also mentions few Catholics because he's a Catholic. "Donovan" being a decidedly un-WASP name. This is said for the audience, I believe, because in reality he'd just have to say the right sort of people and leave it at that.

    I suppose this was all a mistake, because the Damon-bot screws up and gets turned by the Russians. Maybe if the CIA had fewer John Wasps and more Shitavius Jacksons it wouldn't have a legacy of ashes.

    By the way, there was one really good line in that movie. Joe Pesci is playing a mobster, and he's going on with the usual nonsense about WASPs being devoid of culture. Something like, "Italians have families and church, Irish have their homeland, Jews have tradition, even blacks have music. What do you have?"

    Damon's response is perfect: "The United States of America. The rest of you are just visiting."

    It seems an unlikely line. Antagonism for WASPs is more of a Jewish and sometimes Irish thing than an Italian thing.

    Read More
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