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  1. Careful, you might be dealing with a school shooter.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Wow.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    Lauren Wilford wasn't alive at the time of the Grover Cleveland shooting in San Diego in 1979. She wasn't even alive for the tenth anniversary Grover Cleveland shooting in Stockton in 1989. However, she was an elevator operator on the Space Needle for a summer, and that must qualify her for something.


    https://www.linkedin.com/in/lauren-wilford-56525548/

    As for Miss Spencer, she's evidence for my hypothesis (about male criminals) that the meanest ones in prison are the virgins, because they've committed the worst crimes at the youngest age.

    , @Duke84
    She really didn't like Mondays.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    https://euvsdisinfo.eu/uploads/2017/09/Sk%C3%A6rmbillede-2017-09-09-kl.-11.53.39_finalfinal.png
  2. What a great parody! Did you get it from the Babylon Bee?

  3. as long as we can go back to Boston and Van Halen, i’m in.

    • Agree: Digital Samizdat
    • Replies: @Jim Christian

    as long as we can go back to Boston and Van Halen, i’m in.
     
    If you ever get to see them, you can never really go home. In Atkinson, NH (I live a mile out from there, had no idea he had a home here) Boston's front guy, singer Brad Delp killed himself in his own bathroom, lit a couple of charcoal grills and took a nap. He even gave the cops and fire fighters a warning note at the front door and on the way to the bathroom that there was CO poisoning going on. He was dead when they finally got in.

    Not sure you can get back home with Van Halen, either.
  4. Women in the 70s didn’t have eyebrows like furry caterpillars.

    • Replies: @Bizarro World Observer
    Sure they did. Trust me, I was there.

    Not to mention armpits ...
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    Women in the 70s didn’t have eyebrows like furry caterpillars.
     
    No, you must be thinking about their muffs.
  5. Couldn’t recognize one snippet of dialogue.

    I guess I don’t get chicks.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    Nah, you just didn't watch unwatchable movies from the 1970s. Which just shows you have taste/ the good luck to have avoided them.

    I, unfortunately, wasted a lot of time watching "classic" and "revered" and "critically-acclaimed" movies from this era thinking I was being intellectual before I realized they were all garbage and I had wasted my time. About the only good films of the 70s were genre pictures: Eastwood westerns, scifi, horror, kids pictures, gangster pictures (e.g. The Godfather is a gangster picture), etc.

    Then I went back and found that the Golden Era pictures had gold in every category and really held up well and put the 1970s era to shame. The 1970s were awful for cinema, and the attempts of the Left to rewrite the era as one of brilliant artistic pictures is laughable; 90% of 1970s "classic" films suck.

    , @The Alarmist

    I guess I don’t get chicks.
     
    Have you tried a Burt Reynolds mustache and a Trans Am?
  6. Off the topic. But ,I couldn’t resist.
    Miscegenation seems to be the biggest threat to Whites.
    I mean just look at the number of Interracial couples and their influence.
    Blacks who are born and raised in the West are the luckiest folks.
    They are great athletes and when they hit the Jackpot, they go on to grab a blonde and have babies with her.
    I was pleasantly surprised that Lindsey Vonn, the blue eyed blonde American beauty of Norwegian descent has decided to marry an ugly but rich Black Canadian NHL player.
    Seriously, she could have got almost any White hunk from NFL and have beautiful babies but she chose Subban.
    Similarly, In Tennis Two Indian(dots) players married White tennis female players. Allison Riske and Sam Murray married Indian players.
    A Ukrainian player called Svitolina is in relationship with a French Negro.

    Can anybody explain to me why is this phenomena so rampant nowadays??

    Lindsey Vonn was a huge surprise as I thought she just plays with her Black pets for a few days and moves on to greener pastures. It’s so weird.
    I guess, what Tiny Duck says is becoming the truth.
    More and more white women are in relationships with Blacks and other non whites.

    • Replies: @Prodigal son
    True....Pew research recently reported that 24%of Black male marriages were to non-Black females in 2017

    Thus more than 1 in 5 Black men who got married had a white wife. But only 1 in 25 Black females married a white guy.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    I was pleasantly surprised that Lindsey Vonn, the blue eyed blonde American beauty of Norwegian descent has decided to marry an ugly but rich Black Canadian NHL player.
     
    Okay, come back after she has a child or two and the "rich Black Canadian NHL player" has moved on to wife number 2 (then 3, then 4 then 5). This can go on until the victims recognize the swindle. Vonn will wonder why she was abandoned, and maybe some white cuck will rescue her (it might be worth it for the cuck, who knows). But hockey bigman won't be walking the daughter down the aisle on wedding day.
  7. I suppose this is why most “adult” movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable. Depressingly, unsexily dressed bland women lecturing us with the same hostile feminist cliches mixed with some therapy-laden pseudoscientific jargon. Like really boring nails on a chalkboard.

    Woody Allen for some reason thought this sort of idea was superior to his previous slapstick farces. Of course, Woody also thinks molesting his own daughter is ok, so I guess that explains that.

    At least in previous eras when the director wanted to lecture us with feminist nonsense they’d make the females look sexually attractive and avoid these wanna-be intellectual but really nagging tones.

    One of the reasons the 1970s failed in their attempts to revive the “screwball” genre was the fact that 1930s and 40s screwball women were feminine, beautiful, and funny. In the 1970s women were uglified and determined to hide their femininity as much as possible. Can you imagine Carole Lombard or Myrna Loy or Rosalind Russell looking as drab and sounding as lecturing as this? Talk about unfunny! The closest you could think of was Katherine Hepburn, and she was famously “box office poison” until she learned to act and hide her feminazi disdain and act like she actually liked the men with her (as she did with Cary Grant in Bringing up Baby, where she played a rich ditz similar to a Carole Lombard role).

    Comedian Denis Leary had a bit where he joked that, growing up in the 1970s, the fashions were so ugly that the people were all wearing clothes guaranteed not to get them laid despite the sexual revolution. Combine that with these look-down-their-noses-and-condescend attitudes and I think it was the most perfect birth control for these women.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    So in the same post you insult Woody Allen and you praise Denis Leary?! That says more about you than anything else.
    , @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/ThatRebecca/status/1169266657375608832

    https://twitter.com/THR/status/1169278402811105284
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    "I suppose this is why most ... movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable."

    If you mean Ingmar Bergman's movies from the 1970s (let's include all of his movies) then yes, you are correct. Swedes are even more prone to navel-gazing than American blacks, which is saying something. If you are including films like Apocalypse Now (1979), The Parallax View (1974), The Man Who Would Be King (1975), The French Connection (1971), Deliverance (1972), Dirty Harry (1971), Clockwork Orange (1971), The Last Detail (1973), Phase IV (1974), The Taking Of Pelham 123 (1974), Jaws (1975), The Three Musketeers (1973), The Four Musketeers (1974), Across 110th Street (1972), Mr. Majestyk (1974), White Lightning (1973), Earthquake (1974), Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid (1973), Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia (1974), Papillon (1973), The Deer Hunter (1978), Let's Scare Jessica To Death (1971), Conquest Of The Planet Of The Apes (1972), Klute (1971), Soylent Green (1973), The Omega Man (1971), Zardoz (1974), Rollerball (1975), Picnic At Hanging Rock (1975), Rocky (1976), Network (1976), The Exorcist (1973), Barry Lyndon (1975), The Kremlin Letter (1970), The Andromeda Strain (1971), Get Carter (1971), Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (1978), Jeremiah Johnson (1972), The Conversation (1974), and the list goes on, then you don't know what you're talking about.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    I suppose this is why most “adult” movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable.
     
    You were not there when I was watching "Once is not Enough" on the first night out with my girlfriend's parents.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0073190/characters/nm0882853?ref_=tt_cl_t7

    Brenda Vaccaro playing Linda Riggs said something like, "well, I screwed my way into this job, I can screw my way into another." I fought the impulse, but it did not work. I burst out laughing and it took me the better part of two minutes to suppress it. And I laughed again at the end of random intervals all the way home.

    Her parents were not amused.

    But it was not boring. Sick and deranged, yes, but not boring.
  8. @Kronos
    Careful, you might be dealing with a school shooter.

    https://allthatsinteresting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/brenda-spencer-looking-down.jpg

    Wow.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    Perhaps it’s a bit vulgar given the the crime and circumstances. But the “I don’t like Monday’s” is the funniest legal reply to why someone performed a crime since Connery's ending lines in “The Great Train Robbery” (1978.)

    https://youtu.be/zMNUcNokvkU


    But going about dressed in 1970s fashion seems a bit odd. Why not 1920s or 1880s? I never lived through the 1970s but it does appear to be the waiting room from the 1960s to the 1980s.

    -Someone else said that but I can’t remember who.
  9. First three impressions/guesses:

    1. I’ve never seen such a symmetrically plain woman.

    2. Her boyfriend MUST be a beta male. That emboldens her as the sexless alpha bitch.

    3. Can’t say I miss the girls from Brown University. She went there, or somewhere like it.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad


    1. I’ve never seen such a symmetrically plain woman.
     
    Solid observation. I didn't have my finger on it--but that's it.
    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    1. I’ve never seen such a symmetrically plain woman.
     
    You mean to say that her face is symmetrical but she's nevertheless not above average in attractiveness?

    I suppose the glasses could be doing a lot of work producing an illusion of symmetry . . .
    , @ricpic
    Her skin isn't bad...if she'd do something about the eyebrows and hair...and smile occasionally.
  10. OT:

    Holocaust ‘masterpiece’ causes uproar at Venice film festival

    Venice (AFP) – A searing adaptation of one of most controversial books about the Holocaust divided critics at the Venice film festival Wednesday, with some fighting each other in the dark to get out of its first screening.

    https://news.yahoo.com/holocaust-masterpiece-causes-uproar-venice-film-festival-113454316.html

    The comments are entertaining.

    • Replies: @El Dato

    with some fighting each other in the dark to get out of its first screening
     
    Gas chamber blues!

    He said the film was a warning of what can happen when Europe turns inward as it was doing now, drawing a parallel between the attitudes to migrant children fleeing wars in Syria, Libya and Afghanistan and the rejection and abuse his hero suffers.
     
    The usual crock of "the only salvation lies in immigration". Like accusing a patient of a deadly disease that he's only getting what he deserves because he hasn't been GOOD in his life.

    Syria, Libya and Afghanistan are disasters that don't drop out of the sky. They are results of so-called "outwardness", hysterical minds, often female, and being instrumented by certain countries.

    Marhoul said the film took 11 years to make.

    "I didn't know when I started that this story would become much more accented by what happened in Europe three years ago, when so many people came here to save their lives," he said.
     

    So why not make a movie about immigration.

    Basically there isn't really any specific message. It's indulgence in torture fantasy.

  11. @Daniel H
    Couldn't recognize one snippet of dialogue.

    I guess I don't get chicks.

    Nah, you just didn’t watch unwatchable movies from the 1970s. Which just shows you have taste/ the good luck to have avoided them.

    I, unfortunately, wasted a lot of time watching “classic” and “revered” and “critically-acclaimed” movies from this era thinking I was being intellectual before I realized they were all garbage and I had wasted my time. About the only good films of the 70s were genre pictures: Eastwood westerns, scifi, horror, kids pictures, gangster pictures (e.g. The Godfather is a gangster picture), etc.

    Then I went back and found that the Golden Era pictures had gold in every category and really held up well and put the 1970s era to shame. The 1970s were awful for cinema, and the attempts of the Left to rewrite the era as one of brilliant artistic pictures is laughable; 90% of 1970s “classic” films suck.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    One of my most unpopular takes on Twitter was that ‘80s movies were better than ‘70s movies in the same genres (with a couple of exceptions).

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1038218996359806976?s=21
    , @Kronos
    At least you get to avoid the computer graphic overload.

    -Look! All the objects in the scene are 100% physically real! Also, slower camera direction angle transition is nice.
  12. That clip feels very Woody Allen. I could see Mia Farrow or Diane Keaton in black and white spouting just those lines.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Meryl Streep in "Manhattan" and "Kramer vs. Kramer.
    , @Lurker
    Yes, same here.

    Or is it that she has a Diane Keaton vibe, giving the lines a Woody Allen feel?
  13. @R.G. Camara
    I suppose this is why most "adult" movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable. Depressingly, unsexily dressed bland women lecturing us with the same hostile feminist cliches mixed with some therapy-laden pseudoscientific jargon. Like really boring nails on a chalkboard.

    Woody Allen for some reason thought this sort of idea was superior to his previous slapstick farces. Of course, Woody also thinks molesting his own daughter is ok, so I guess that explains that.

    At least in previous eras when the director wanted to lecture us with feminist nonsense they'd make the females look sexually attractive and avoid these wanna-be intellectual but really nagging tones.

    One of the reasons the 1970s failed in their attempts to revive the "screwball" genre was the fact that 1930s and 40s screwball women were feminine, beautiful, and funny. In the 1970s women were uglified and determined to hide their femininity as much as possible. Can you imagine Carole Lombard or Myrna Loy or Rosalind Russell looking as drab and sounding as lecturing as this? Talk about unfunny! The closest you could think of was Katherine Hepburn, and she was famously "box office poison" until she learned to act and hide her feminazi disdain and act like she actually liked the men with her (as she did with Cary Grant in Bringing up Baby, where she played a rich ditz similar to a Carole Lombard role).

    Comedian Denis Leary had a bit where he joked that, growing up in the 1970s, the fashions were so ugly that the people were all wearing clothes guaranteed not to get them laid despite the sexual revolution. Combine that with these look-down-their-noses-and-condescend attitudes and I think it was the most perfect birth control for these women.

    So in the same post you insult Woody Allen and you praise Denis Leary?! That says more about you than anything else.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    Yeah, I insult an insular filmmaker/child molester who made far more entertaining and clever films in the distant past and whose movies on the whole (witha few exceptions) became turgid wordy boringness based on psychobabble and soulmates nonsense that have been overpraised because he is the same ethnicity as many of the critics and people who employ critics. .

    And then praised a dude's early standup bit who nailed an aspect of the 1970s that applied to this girl's clothing.

    I must be a heathen barbarian! (/sarcasm).

    Seriously, the fact that you tried to shame me with your supercilious "Woody Allen is a comedic genius/Leary is an unfunny buffoon" nonsensical dichotomy says more about you and your low IQ than anything else.

    , @J.Ross
    ... wait, who did Denis molest?
  14. Ummm, how is that substantially different from the women of 2019? They’re all still nuts. The sexbots can’t get here soon enough. Then we can stop listening to women altogether, and then they’ll lose every last scrap of the political power they’ve bought with their sexual “favors.”

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    I am dismayed by the number of seemingly intelligent white women who are in the vanguard of the ridiculous yet dangerous Woke cultural revolution. That being said I think there are reasons why you may not be popular with the ladies.
  15. Don’t forget that chick with the SLS/SLO/SLA and Sissy Spacik in a few movies though I think not Carrie.

  16. This review is wordy, but I was impressed that Lauren Wilford comprehends the Danish sense of humor. Or even knows it exists. Europeans tend to view humor itself as juvenile, something to leave behind. The Danes and the Finns are refreshing, if subtle, exceptions.

    I’M A FEMINIST, AND I LOVED THE NEON DEMON
    WRITTEN BY LAUREN WILFORD

    • Replies: @gutta percha
    I love Refn, and you'll find his movies are SO much more enjoyable when you don't overthink them. Milo for President 2020!
    , @bomag

    ...I was impressed that Lauren Wilford comprehends the Danish sense of humor. Or even knows it exists
     
    If I read her Linkedin correctly, she's a National Merit Scholar.
    , @Spect3r
    Ah... what European countries have you visited?
    Because as a south European i can tell you that yuo are dead wrong.
  17. gutta percha [AKA "gp"] says:

    Read the Bible. For thousands of years, we knew that women were weak, stupid, disobedient, scheming and treacherous. Around the year 1900, we forgot all that, and that’s how we got the debacle of the Kavanaugh hearings, and many other societal face-slaps, follies and failures. All you guys who like your women bosses and politicians, raise your hands.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Ummm, how is that substantially different from the women of 2019? They’re all still nuts."

    As Alt Right leader would say, spoken like a true gamma.

    "Then we can stop listening to women altogether..."

    Who is this "we"?

    "Read the Bible. For thousands of years, we knew that women were weak, stupid, disobedient, scheming and treacherous."

    Replace "women" with "men and women" and you would hit the mark.

    "Around the year 1900, we forgot all that, and that’s how we got the debacle of the Kavanaugh hearings, and many other societal face-slaps, follies and failures.."

    Is that you, Roosh V?
  18. @Digital Samizdat
    That clip feels very Woody Allen. I could see Mia Farrow or Diane Keaton in black and white spouting just those lines.

    Meryl Streep in “Manhattan” and “Kramer vs. Kramer.

    • Replies: @Laurence Whelk
    I have found Meryl Streep tedious since "Sophie's Choice". Every time she appears on screen I can hear Jon Lovitz exclaiming "Acting!".

    https://youtu.be/dmZSkWBJwBU
    , @NickG

    Meryl Streep in “Manhattan” and “Kramer vs. Kramer.
     
    Both were dire pretentious dross.
    , @gutta percha
    I want to give a shout-out to Kramer vs Kramer. It does a great job of depicting the agony that kids feel when they are tortured by divorcing parents, and unflinchingly criticizes the lunacy of women during their era of "liberation." Great acting all around, including a stand-out performance by the child actor. It is a deeply serious, tragic drama. It chronicled some of the major causes of the ongoing destruction of our society, as true today as it was then.
  19. @Reg Cæsar
    This review is wordy, but I was impressed that Lauren Wilford comprehends the Danish sense of humor. Or even knows it exists. Europeans tend to view humor itself as juvenile, something to leave behind. The Danes and the Finns are refreshing, if subtle, exceptions.


    I’M A FEMINIST, AND I LOVED THE NEON DEMON
    WRITTEN BY LAUREN WILFORD

    I love Refn, and you’ll find his movies are SO much more enjoyable when you don’t overthink them. Milo for President 2020!

  20. Not quite every woman.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Notable female roles in 70s films...

    Nurse Ratched in CUCKOO'S NESt
    Dunaway in CHINATOWN
    Christie in MCCABE AND MRS MILLER
    The mother in HAROLD AND MAUDE. (What a great mom.)
    Spacek in Carrie
    Bergen in Oliver's Story
    Streep in Deer Hunter
    Mcgraw in Love Story
    Carroll in Claudine
    Shields in Pretty Baby
    Ross in Stepford Wives
    O'Neal in Bad News Bears
    Manz in The Wanderers
    Adams in Days of Heaven and Body Snatchers




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=reJAzTE980s
  21. @R.G. Camara
    I suppose this is why most "adult" movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable. Depressingly, unsexily dressed bland women lecturing us with the same hostile feminist cliches mixed with some therapy-laden pseudoscientific jargon. Like really boring nails on a chalkboard.

    Woody Allen for some reason thought this sort of idea was superior to his previous slapstick farces. Of course, Woody also thinks molesting his own daughter is ok, so I guess that explains that.

    At least in previous eras when the director wanted to lecture us with feminist nonsense they'd make the females look sexually attractive and avoid these wanna-be intellectual but really nagging tones.

    One of the reasons the 1970s failed in their attempts to revive the "screwball" genre was the fact that 1930s and 40s screwball women were feminine, beautiful, and funny. In the 1970s women were uglified and determined to hide their femininity as much as possible. Can you imagine Carole Lombard or Myrna Loy or Rosalind Russell looking as drab and sounding as lecturing as this? Talk about unfunny! The closest you could think of was Katherine Hepburn, and she was famously "box office poison" until she learned to act and hide her feminazi disdain and act like she actually liked the men with her (as she did with Cary Grant in Bringing up Baby, where she played a rich ditz similar to a Carole Lombard role).

    Comedian Denis Leary had a bit where he joked that, growing up in the 1970s, the fashions were so ugly that the people were all wearing clothes guaranteed not to get them laid despite the sexual revolution. Combine that with these look-down-their-noses-and-condescend attitudes and I think it was the most perfect birth control for these women.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    In the 2000s, Woody Allen publicly told Scarlet Johansenn to cut back on the partying or she'd win up like Lindsey Lohan. He said that she had the talent to have a Meryl Streep-like career if she lived a Meryl Streep-like life.

    I presume that had an effect because Scar-Jo became a better actress than I had expected in the last decade.

    , @MEH 0910
    JOJO RABBIT | Official Trailer [HD] | FOX Searchlight
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tL4McUzXfFI

    Published on Sep 3, 2019
    Writer director Taika Waititi (THOR: RAGNAROK, HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE), brings his signature style of humor and pathos to his latest film, JOJO RABBIT, a World War II satire that follows a lonely German boy (Roman Griffin Davis as JoJo) whose world view is turned upside down when he discovers his single mother (Scarlett Johansson) is hiding a young Jewish girl (Thomasin McKenzie) in their attic. Aided only by his idiotic imaginary friend, Adolf Hitler (Taika Waititi), Jojo must confront his blind nationalism.
     
    , @Pericles
    "Not to mention Woody is my cousin's uncle or something. We get along so well."
    , @ScarletNumber
    Wow, Penelope Cruz is really sexy.
    , @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    I must admit I don't "get" the Scarlett Johansson thing. Is she supposed to be the most beautiful? I find her a bit on the plain side - quite ordinary in many ways. Is she supposed to be the best actress? I've never seen the acting talent. De Gustibus . . .
  22. @ScarletNumber
    So in the same post you insult Woody Allen and you praise Denis Leary?! That says more about you than anything else.

    Yeah, I insult an insular filmmaker/child molester who made far more entertaining and clever films in the distant past and whose movies on the whole (witha few exceptions) became turgid wordy boringness based on psychobabble and soulmates nonsense that have been overpraised because he is the same ethnicity as many of the critics and people who employ critics. .

    And then praised a dude’s early standup bit who nailed an aspect of the 1970s that applied to this girl’s clothing.

    I must be a heathen barbarian! (/sarcasm).

    Seriously, the fact that you tried to shame me with your supercilious “Woody Allen is a comedic genius/Leary is an unfunny buffoon” nonsensical dichotomy says more about you and your low IQ than anything else.

    • Agree: slumber_j
    • Replies: @Pericles
    In other words, you prefer his earlier, funnier movies?
    , @ScarletNumber
    You're the one who felt the need to include Woody Allen and Denis Leary in the same post.

    Vox Day also hates Woody Allen for some inexplicable reason. Are you ripping him off?

    Here is Leary getting torn to shreds by the late Greg Giraldo on Tough Crowd

    https://youtu.be/ymltNm4p2VY?t=195
    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    I've seen exactly one Woody Allen movie: Mighty Aphrodite, because the girl I was dating at the time was hot and loved romcom's and I thought young Mira Sorvino was hot as well.

    I wasn't impressed.
  23. A wicked little movie

    • Replies: @El Dato
    Holy damn Jodie Foster looks even more lovely than usual.
    , @James J. O'Meara
    Kudos for bringing up a great, largely forgotten flick.
  24. @Kronos
    Careful, you might be dealing with a school shooter.

    https://allthatsinteresting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/brenda-spencer-looking-down.jpg

    Lauren Wilford wasn’t alive at the time of the Grover Cleveland shooting in San Diego in 1979. She wasn’t even alive for the tenth anniversary Grover Cleveland shooting in Stockton in 1989. However, she was an elevator operator on the Space Needle for a summer, and that must qualify her for something.

    https://www.linkedin.com/in/lauren-wilford-56525548/

    As for Miss Spencer, she’s evidence for my hypothesis (about male criminals) that the meanest ones in prison are the virgins, because they’ve committed the worst crimes at the youngest age.

  25. Well, I’d say Pam Grier, but I haven’t seen…(which were great, I don’t care about you political affillation) . I forgot my point, but I don’t know about not going back, and I don’t about most of you, I’d go black for that broad. If you don’t believe me, check out Foxy, and all that. At the time it was fantastic. All natutal.

    Smoking hot ta $#$’s. The 1973 Pam Grier would smoke most any actress nowadays. Including Johannson.

    Not saying anything political, but the facts are the facts.

  26. @R.G. Camara
    Nah, you just didn't watch unwatchable movies from the 1970s. Which just shows you have taste/ the good luck to have avoided them.

    I, unfortunately, wasted a lot of time watching "classic" and "revered" and "critically-acclaimed" movies from this era thinking I was being intellectual before I realized they were all garbage and I had wasted my time. About the only good films of the 70s were genre pictures: Eastwood westerns, scifi, horror, kids pictures, gangster pictures (e.g. The Godfather is a gangster picture), etc.

    Then I went back and found that the Golden Era pictures had gold in every category and really held up well and put the 1970s era to shame. The 1970s were awful for cinema, and the attempts of the Left to rewrite the era as one of brilliant artistic pictures is laughable; 90% of 1970s "classic" films suck.

    One of my most unpopular takes on Twitter was that ‘80s movies were better than ‘70s movies in the same genres (with a couple of exceptions).

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    First, that's Davos-attending, Tennesee Coates-promoting, abortion-loving Megan McCardle you're retweeting there. As if such a loathsome, ignorant, evil creature deserves to be noticed, or have her "light-hearted" opinion considered. .

    Second, far more 80's movies are eminently rewatchable than 70's. But that's true of most eras compared to the 1970s: 1990s movies, 2000s movies, 1950s movies, 1940s movies, 1930s movies....all have more rewatchable, entertaining, artistic films than the 1970s.

    , @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese
    , @Forbes
    The '70s were the first decade of rampant on-screen sex and nudity as the pendulum swung hard in the opposite direction from the '50s when married couples were portrayed on-screen as sleeping in separate beds.

    The sex and nudity were over-the-top, gratuitous, and unnecessary for plot or character development. Also, the fashion attire was ugly. YMMV.

    McArdle was born in 1973.
    , @ziel
    Everything sucked in the 70's because we were, strangely, relatively impoverished - and so 'production values' sucked in 70's movies. But the film-makers compensated by utilizing grimey sets and downscale milieus. Look at Sutherland's apartment in "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" - or even Brooke Adams's upscale apartment - and imagine how those would be staged today. But 70's movies were more realistic - not everyone had a Vulcan stove, streets were grimey. Overall, movies felt far more real. So I think Megan was right - everything sucked in the 70's, but movies, incongruously, were - as a result - good!
  27. @Dave Pinsen
    One of my most unpopular takes on Twitter was that ‘80s movies were better than ‘70s movies in the same genres (with a couple of exceptions).

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1038218996359806976?s=21

    First, that’s Davos-attending, Tennesee Coates-promoting, abortion-loving Megan McCardle you’re retweeting there. As if such a loathsome, ignorant, evil creature deserves to be noticed, or have her “light-hearted” opinion considered. .

    Second, far more 80’s movies are eminently rewatchable than 70’s. But that’s true of most eras compared to the 1970s: 1990s movies, 2000s movies, 1950s movies, 1940s movies, 1930s movies….all have more rewatchable, entertaining, artistic films than the 1970s.

  28. Anonymous[202] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kylie
    Not quite every woman.

    https://youtu.be/8lFQ0RSP3Gs

    Notable female roles in 70s films…

    Nurse Ratched in CUCKOO’S NESt
    Dunaway in CHINATOWN
    Christie in MCCABE AND MRS MILLER
    The mother in HAROLD AND MAUDE. (What a great mom.)
    Spacek in Carrie
    Bergen in Oliver’s Story
    Streep in Deer Hunter
    Mcgraw in Love Story
    Carroll in Claudine
    Shields in Pretty Baby
    Ross in Stepford Wives
    O’Neal in Bad News Bears
    Manz in The Wanderers
    Adams in Days of Heaven and Body Snatchers

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    This guy gets it -- this is twitter thot satire, depending on one stumbled-across accessory and a misremembered stereotype, but the performance doesn't really resemble any actual, y'know, 70s actress performance. It's like if a kid wrote a comedy sketch about people in the 80s being totally unable to communicate because they didn't have smart phones.
    , @ScarletNumber
    Ellen Burstyn in Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore
    Faye Dunaway in Network
    Sally Field in Norma Rae and Smokey & the Bandit
    Diane Keaton in Annie Hall
    Liza in Cabaret
  29. @Steve Sailer
    Meryl Streep in "Manhattan" and "Kramer vs. Kramer.

    I have found Meryl Streep tedious since “Sophie’s Choice”. Every time she appears on screen I can hear Jon Lovitz exclaiming “Acting!”.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Yeah, the old charge about Streep. "She's all technique." Frankly, after watching all the half-trained slobs out there, I don't mind mind watching someone who's technically accomplished.
    , @Bugg
    Even worse, when the dingo ate her baby.
  30. Anonymous[202] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    One of my most unpopular takes on Twitter was that ‘80s movies were better than ‘70s movies in the same genres (with a couple of exceptions).

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1038218996359806976?s=21

    How were the ’70s better than, say, the ’80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren’t there better movies in most genres in the ’80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?

    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s… before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin’s importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President’s Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent’s Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan’s Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes’ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who’ll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana’s Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn’t Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L’Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman’s Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend’s Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman’s March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur’s Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It’s You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette’s Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman’s Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter’s Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven’s Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner’s Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    • Replies: @syonredux
    My eyes glazed over. Is Fat City in there? It's an exquisite film, one of Huston's best.
    , @J.Ross
    Forgot "Pulp."
    , @BenKenobi
    dude, try the fuckin' [MORE] button.
    , @Lot
    Your list proves Dave’s point. I’ve seen about 20% of both your lists. All the 80s list is good, but the 70s is a mix of good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown).
    , @Pat Kittle
    Wouldn't it have been easier to list the movies that did NOT make your cut?
    , @Hhsiii
    Thanks. Great list. Loved a lot of those.
    , @Jim Christian
    Is Fast Times At Ridgemont High there? That one encouraged little girls to be sluts, taught them that abortion is no big deal and depicted kids in general to pound down copious amounts of marijuana. Pulp Fiction got them started on heroin. Kids copy. Girls especially, copy.
    , @James J. O'Meara
    https://www.counter-currents.com/2015/03/to-live-die-in-l-a/
    , @James J. O'Meara
    https://www.counter-currents.com/2015/03/to-live-die-in-l-a/
    , @Art Deco
    Do you have any hobbies other than watching movies?

    While we're at it Barry Lyndon was the most soporific mess I've ever had to sit through, with the exception of Withnail and I (which Stanley Kauffman thought was the candy).
    , @silviosilver
    How many movies on that 70s list are British? I feel like I've watched a ton of British movies from the 70s (that Glenda Jackson - she good) but only a couple that I recognized on that list.
    , @ricpic
    Never tire of watching Day Of The Jackal. Talk about pure professionalism.
    , @danand

    “For instance, Friedkin’s importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in LA that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.”
     

    #202,

    I agree with you on To Live & Die in LA; both William Petersen’s & Willem Dafoe’s performances were memorable. It’s always been a little odd to me that none of the movie buffs I’ve conversed with say they have seen it, nor do they have any awareness of it. Especially so given the impression it left me with.
    , @anon
    How could you have included Syd & Nancy, but left out Repo Man?
  31. @Anonymous
    Notable female roles in 70s films...

    Nurse Ratched in CUCKOO'S NESt
    Dunaway in CHINATOWN
    Christie in MCCABE AND MRS MILLER
    The mother in HAROLD AND MAUDE. (What a great mom.)
    Spacek in Carrie
    Bergen in Oliver's Story
    Streep in Deer Hunter
    Mcgraw in Love Story
    Carroll in Claudine
    Shields in Pretty Baby
    Ross in Stepford Wives
    O'Neal in Bad News Bears
    Manz in The Wanderers
    Adams in Days of Heaven and Body Snatchers




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=reJAzTE980s

    This guy gets it — this is twitter thot satire, depending on one stumbled-across accessory and a misremembered stereotype, but the performance doesn’t really resemble any actual, y’know, 70s actress performance. It’s like if a kid wrote a comedy sketch about people in the 80s being totally unable to communicate because they didn’t have smart phones.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    but the performance doesn't really resemble any actual, y'know, 70s actress performance.
     
    To be fair, I think she focused on contemporary roles. Movies set in the moment of the 70s.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sOk0I7fg-Q
  32. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/ThatRebecca/status/1169266657375608832

    https://twitter.com/THR/status/1169278402811105284

    In the 2000s, Woody Allen publicly told Scarlet Johansenn to cut back on the partying or she’d win up like Lindsey Lohan. He said that she had the talent to have a Meryl Streep-like career if she lived a Meryl Streep-like life.

    I presume that had an effect because Scar-Jo became a better actress than I had expected in the last decade.

    • Replies: @Altai
    She still seems to have borked her voice up like Lohan. I wonder too if her Jewish identity makes her liable to think he did nothing wrong either.
    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Naaah, Scarlet J is a nothing, she excels at playing numbed creatures whose souls are dead, maybe she's drawing from autobiography, who knows.

    The only real electric top-shelf actress these days is Jennifer Lawrence, who is alive in every cell in her body and loving every second of it. Honestly I don't know how she does it, that level of concentration would kill me in half an hour. I don't even like half of her movies, it's just that she's a genuine screen presence, haven't seen anything like it since the terrifying Priscilla Smith in Elektra and Medea. Well, that's stage, but still. I suppose maybe Patti Smith might count, on her good days.

    70s is salvageable for McCabe and Mrs Miller, Apocalypse Now, and the mighty Nashville. Also lots of great trashy B movies.

    The 80s I missed, becuz too busy paying attention to the Wooster Group. If you weren't watching "L.S.D.", well, I just hope the John Hughes movies were cute.
    , @donvonburg

    In the 2000s, Woody Allen publicly told Scarlet Johansenn to cut back on the partying or she’d win up like Lindsey Lohan. He said that she had the talent to have a Meryl Streep-like career if she lived a Meryl Streep-like life.
     
    A man can be a total rotter and still be right about some things. Adolf Hitler, Arthur Miller, LBJ, William Burroughs, L.Ron Hubbard, 'Col.' Tom Parker, and a surprising number of people in the film and music industries generally come to mind. Allen (Konigsberg) is in that rank.
    , @AnotherDad

    In the 2000s, Woody Allen publicly told Scarlet Johansenn to cut back on the partying or she’d win up like Lindsey Lohan. He said that she had the talent to have a Meryl Streep-like career if she lived a Meryl Streep-like life.
     
    What she really needs to do--both to be more "streepish" and to have a good and happy life--is find a good guy who actually wants to be with her for the duration and have more babies before it is too late.
  33. @Laurence Whelk
    I have found Meryl Streep tedious since "Sophie's Choice". Every time she appears on screen I can hear Jon Lovitz exclaiming "Acting!".

    https://youtu.be/dmZSkWBJwBU

    Yeah, the old charge about Streep. “She’s all technique.” Frankly, after watching all the half-trained slobs out there, I don’t mind mind watching someone who’s technically accomplished.

  34. @ScarletNumber
    So in the same post you insult Woody Allen and you praise Denis Leary?! That says more about you than anything else.

    … wait, who did Denis molest?

  35. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    My eyes glazed over. Is Fat City in there? It’s an exquisite film, one of Huston’s best.

  36. @Ripple Earthdevil
    OT:

    Holocaust 'masterpiece' causes uproar at Venice film festival

    Venice (AFP) - A searing adaptation of one of most controversial books about the Holocaust divided critics at the Venice film festival Wednesday, with some fighting each other in the dark to get out of its first screening.

    https://news.yahoo.com/holocaust-masterpiece-causes-uproar-venice-film-festival-113454316.html

    The comments are entertaining.

    with some fighting each other in the dark to get out of its first screening

    Gas chamber blues!

    He said the film was a warning of what can happen when Europe turns inward as it was doing now, drawing a parallel between the attitudes to migrant children fleeing wars in Syria, Libya and Afghanistan and the rejection and abuse his hero suffers.

    The usual crock of “the only salvation lies in immigration”. Like accusing a patient of a deadly disease that he’s only getting what he deserves because he hasn’t been GOOD in his life.

    Syria, Libya and Afghanistan are disasters that don’t drop out of the sky. They are results of so-called “outwardness”, hysterical minds, often female, and being instrumented by certain countries.

    Marhoul said the film took 11 years to make.

    “I didn’t know when I started that this story would become much more accented by what happened in Europe three years ago, when so many people came here to save their lives,” he said.

    So why not make a movie about immigration.

    Basically there isn’t really any specific message. It’s indulgence in torture fantasy.

  37. @Anonymous
    A wicked little movie


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vjrg6KevP70

    Holy damn Jodie Foster looks even more lovely than usual.

  38. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    Forgot “Pulp.”

  39. @prime noticer
    as long as we can go back to Boston and Van Halen, i'm in.

    as long as we can go back to Boston and Van Halen, i’m in.

    If you ever get to see them, you can never really go home. In Atkinson, NH (I live a mile out from there, had no idea he had a home here) Boston’s front guy, singer Brad Delp killed himself in his own bathroom, lit a couple of charcoal grills and took a nap. He even gave the cops and fire fighters a warning note at the front door and on the way to the bathroom that there was CO poisoning going on. He was dead when they finally got in.

    Not sure you can get back home with Van Halen, either.

    • Replies: @donvonburg
    A good friend of mine tells the story.

    He was in one of the old Musicland stores in the late 70s and they had on the wall a color monitor, excellent for its day, showing excellent resolution video footage of one of Janis Joplin's concerts. For all its quality, it could have been a live feed.

    A moppet watching tells her friend, "I want to go see her in concert!"

    My friend could not resist. "Kid, if you get go to see her in concert live,

    you aren't coming back".
  40. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    dude, try the fuckin’ [MORE] button.

  41. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    Your list proves Dave’s point. I’ve seen about 20% of both your lists. All the 80s list is good, but the 70s is a mix of good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown).

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    I actually counted, lol. I've seen 14% of the 70s list and 15% of the 80s list, and that's including movies I didn't even finish watching because I got bored.

    That reminds me, to this day I still haven't watched ET, and I grew up in the 80s, and it's one of those movies that every kid watched. I just never liked the look of that dopey looking alien. It didn't seem like the kind of "animal" I would ever want as a friend. Neverending Story is similar. Every kid except me saw it, and again because the main animal in it did nothing for me.
    , @Buzz Mohawk

    ...plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now...)
     
    Finally, someone else who realizes how bad Apocalypse Now is!

    The "Ride of the Valkyries" is a great scene though.
    , @Hhsiii
    Love Chinatown. Apocalypse has some great scenes but confusing and yup, plodding.
    , @Dieter Kief
    Barry Lyndon is all style and (artsy) grace and - humor, lots of it - style, ruse, wit & humor. I saw it at a Christmas holiday, the city was all covered in fog, low temperatures, clumsy jacket, and I remember how I felt when I left the movie-theater: Lightheaded and full of joy! Obviously, there' two of them out - most likely lots of 'em!
    , @Gordo

    actively bad (Deliverance)
     
    blasphemer!
    , @Vinteuil

    ...good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown)...
     
    Heh. Set the cat among the pigeons, much?
    , @Vinteuil
    Btw - I wonder why you put "Deliverance" in the "actively bad" category. I finally saw it for the first time on one of those little back-of-the-seat-in-front-of-you screens on a flight to Prague, last May, 'cause it was featured, & it was a "classic," & I hadn't seen it before, so why not?

    Anyway, I thought it was really interesting - even engrossing. There were some serious themes in play. Some of the acting was downright charismatic. All in all, definitely more worth the time it took to watch than any of the comic-book movies that seem to dominate the cineplexes today.

    So what's your beef?

    Not necessarily disagreeing, just curious,

    P.S.: Mark Steyn's review is worth reading:

    https://www.steynonline.com/8803/deliverance

  42. People who wear ridiculous fashion accessories (like this bimbo’s GoggleGlasses) simply because they’re trendy are really hard to take seriously.

  43. @Steve Sailer
    Wow.

    Perhaps it’s a bit vulgar given the the crime and circumstances. But the “I don’t like Monday’s” is the funniest legal reply to why someone performed a crime since Connery’s ending lines in “The Great Train Robbery” (1978.)

    But going about dressed in 1970s fashion seems a bit odd. Why not 1920s or 1880s? I never lived through the 1970s but it does appear to be the waiting room from the 1960s to the 1980s.

    -Someone else said that but I can’t remember who.

  44. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    Wouldn’t it have been easier to list the movies that did NOT make your cut?

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
  45. @Steve Sailer
    In the 2000s, Woody Allen publicly told Scarlet Johansenn to cut back on the partying or she'd win up like Lindsey Lohan. He said that she had the talent to have a Meryl Streep-like career if she lived a Meryl Streep-like life.

    I presume that had an effect because Scar-Jo became a better actress than I had expected in the last decade.

    She still seems to have borked her voice up like Lohan. I wonder too if her Jewish identity makes her liable to think he did nothing wrong either.

  46. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/ThatRebecca/status/1169266657375608832

    https://twitter.com/THR/status/1169278402811105284

    JOJO RABBIT | Official Trailer [HD] | FOX Searchlight

    Published on Sep 3, 2019
    Writer director Taika Waititi (THOR: RAGNAROK, HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE), brings his signature style of humor and pathos to his latest film, JOJO RABBIT, a World War II satire that follows a lonely German boy (Roman Griffin Davis as JoJo) whose world view is turned upside down when he discovers his single mother (Scarlett Johansson) is hiding a young Jewish girl (Thomasin McKenzie) in their attic. Aided only by his idiotic imaginary friend, Adolf Hitler (Taika Waititi), Jojo must confront his blind nationalism.

  47. @R.G. Camara
    Nah, you just didn't watch unwatchable movies from the 1970s. Which just shows you have taste/ the good luck to have avoided them.

    I, unfortunately, wasted a lot of time watching "classic" and "revered" and "critically-acclaimed" movies from this era thinking I was being intellectual before I realized they were all garbage and I had wasted my time. About the only good films of the 70s were genre pictures: Eastwood westerns, scifi, horror, kids pictures, gangster pictures (e.g. The Godfather is a gangster picture), etc.

    Then I went back and found that the Golden Era pictures had gold in every category and really held up well and put the 1970s era to shame. The 1970s were awful for cinema, and the attempts of the Left to rewrite the era as one of brilliant artistic pictures is laughable; 90% of 1970s "classic" films suck.

    At least you get to avoid the computer graphic overload.

    -Look! All the objects in the scene are 100% physically real! Also, slower camera direction angle transition is nice.

  48. If you look at IMDB’s list of 100 best actresses in 1970s horror films, I think you only see two women wearing glasses, and those are relatively tasteful frames.

    https://www.imdb.com/list/ls070858073/

  49. @Daniel H
    Couldn't recognize one snippet of dialogue.

    I guess I don't get chicks.

    I guess I don’t get chicks.

    Have you tried a Burt Reynolds mustache and a Trans Am?

    • LOL: Alden
  50. @Lot
    Your list proves Dave’s point. I’ve seen about 20% of both your lists. All the 80s list is good, but the 70s is a mix of good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown).

    I actually counted, lol. I’ve seen 14% of the 70s list and 15% of the 80s list, and that’s including movies I didn’t even finish watching because I got bored.

    That reminds me, to this day I still haven’t watched ET, and I grew up in the 80s, and it’s one of those movies that every kid watched. I just never liked the look of that dopey looking alien. It didn’t seem like the kind of “animal” I would ever want as a friend. Neverending Story is similar. Every kid except me saw it, and again because the main animal in it did nothing for me.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
    Last time I saw the movie ET I finished the popcorn my wife and I were eating, opened the door to the garage to toss the empty bag, looked to the left and saw the headless skinned, gutted deer carcass, hung earlier in the day, dripping blood into a bucket. It was like someone grabbed my head from behind and shoved it in a cold bucket of water.
    , @Lurker
    I too have never seen ET.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    That reminds me, to this day I still haven’t watched ET...
     
    When Star Wars came out in 1977, I noticed the line at the theater and thought, I'll catch it later, when the crowds die down.

    I still haven't seen it.
  51. @Steve Sailer
    In the 2000s, Woody Allen publicly told Scarlet Johansenn to cut back on the partying or she'd win up like Lindsey Lohan. He said that she had the talent to have a Meryl Streep-like career if she lived a Meryl Streep-like life.

    I presume that had an effect because Scar-Jo became a better actress than I had expected in the last decade.

    Naaah, Scarlet J is a nothing, she excels at playing numbed creatures whose souls are dead, maybe she’s drawing from autobiography, who knows.

    The only real electric top-shelf actress these days is Jennifer Lawrence, who is alive in every cell in her body and loving every second of it. Honestly I don’t know how she does it, that level of concentration would kill me in half an hour. I don’t even like half of her movies, it’s just that she’s a genuine screen presence, haven’t seen anything like it since the terrifying Priscilla Smith in Elektra and Medea. Well, that’s stage, but still. I suppose maybe Patti Smith might count, on her good days.

    70s is salvageable for McCabe and Mrs Miller, Apocalypse Now, and the mighty Nashville. Also lots of great trashy B movies.

    The 80s I missed, becuz too busy paying attention to the Wooster Group. If you weren’t watching “L.S.D.”, well, I just hope the John Hughes movies were cute.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    Last Detail is an under appreciated gem, as is its director Hal Ashby.
    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Man, you said it. The 70s had the BEST trashy B movies

    Let's give a special mention to my most favorite trashy 70s B movie, 'Framed,' starring the incomparable Joe Don Baker

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HK0bUT1t6lE
    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    "The only real electric top-shelf actress these days is Jennifer Lawrence, "

    She's never once played a character I would consider likable.
  52. @Lot
    Your list proves Dave’s point. I’ve seen about 20% of both your lists. All the 80s list is good, but the 70s is a mix of good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown).

    …plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now…)

    Finally, someone else who realizes how bad Apocalypse Now is!

    The “Ride of the Valkyries” is a great scene though.

    • Replies: @El Dato

    Finally, someone else who realizes how bad Apocalypse Now is!
     
    With two people, you can open a club!

    Also, Read the f*cking book

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpX_WeJalbc

    , @CBTerry
    Bayreuth deserves royalties from that movie.
    , @Lot
    “Finally, someone else who realizes how bad Apocalypse Now is!

    The “Ride of the Valkyries” is a great scene though.”

    Agree that it was a superb scene within a pretentious snorefest.

    Deliverance was similar: the Dueling Banjos scene and the short setup before it was a classic, the rest of the movie both bad and offensive.
  53. @Steve Sailer
    In the 2000s, Woody Allen publicly told Scarlet Johansenn to cut back on the partying or she'd win up like Lindsey Lohan. He said that she had the talent to have a Meryl Streep-like career if she lived a Meryl Streep-like life.

    I presume that had an effect because Scar-Jo became a better actress than I had expected in the last decade.

    In the 2000s, Woody Allen publicly told Scarlet Johansenn to cut back on the partying or she’d win up like Lindsey Lohan. He said that she had the talent to have a Meryl Streep-like career if she lived a Meryl Streep-like life.

    A man can be a total rotter and still be right about some things. Adolf Hitler, Arthur Miller, LBJ, William Burroughs, L.Ron Hubbard, ‘Col.’ Tom Parker, and a surprising number of people in the film and music industries generally come to mind. Allen (Konigsberg) is in that rank.

  54. @Buzz Mohawk

    ...plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now...)
     
    Finally, someone else who realizes how bad Apocalypse Now is!

    The "Ride of the Valkyries" is a great scene though.

    Finally, someone else who realizes how bad Apocalypse Now is!

    With two people, you can open a club!

    Also, Read the f*cking book

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    I did "Read the f*cking book," forty years ago. It is a Conrad story. The movie does not do it justice. Maybe none could. I think it's funny how people automatically think Apocalypse Now is a great film just because it is based on a great book. It is a failed attempt, probably because the director didn't know how he was going to do it when he started, and couldn't figure out how to end it when he was finished.
  55. @Jim Christian

    as long as we can go back to Boston and Van Halen, i’m in.
     
    If you ever get to see them, you can never really go home. In Atkinson, NH (I live a mile out from there, had no idea he had a home here) Boston's front guy, singer Brad Delp killed himself in his own bathroom, lit a couple of charcoal grills and took a nap. He even gave the cops and fire fighters a warning note at the front door and on the way to the bathroom that there was CO poisoning going on. He was dead when they finally got in.

    Not sure you can get back home with Van Halen, either.

    A good friend of mine tells the story.

    He was in one of the old Musicland stores in the late 70s and they had on the wall a color monitor, excellent for its day, showing excellent resolution video footage of one of Janis Joplin’s concerts. For all its quality, it could have been a live feed.

    A moppet watching tells her friend, “I want to go see her in concert!”

    My friend could not resist. “Kid, if you get go to see her in concert live,

    [MORE]

    you aren’t coming back”.

  56. Point of order – 1970s Super 8 or 16mm wasn’t generally shot in portrait mode.

    • Replies: @Thirdtwin
    And the word was "super", not "terrific".
  57. @Steve Sailer
    Meryl Streep in "Manhattan" and "Kramer vs. Kramer.

    Meryl Streep in “Manhattan” and “Kramer vs. Kramer.

    Both were dire pretentious dross.

    • Replies: @Alden
    Agree agree agree agree. Saw them in TV decades later. Kramer was insane. That’s really not how family divorce court works as anyone who’s ever gotten divorced or worked for a family law firm knows. Family court judges hate all that petty garbage that other parent doesn’t go to soccer games because they work Saturdays. Or who didn’t buy new shoes.

    The only 70’s movie I remember seeing wasGodfather. 4 little ones, both working and commuting, real estate investing and being landlords we didn’t have time. Husband preferred occasional rock concerts to weekly movies anyway. We’re both readers not movie goers. TV’s for little kids so they can watch cartoons and animal shows.

    Janis Joplin was a tenant. We evicted her for non payment of rent and spent a weekend cleaning out her trash after she moved. She even clogged up the little gas tubes under the stove burners with grease and gunk. Pure vinegar got rid of the grease and gunk.

    As I remember, except for long straight maxi skirts 70’s women’s clothes were beautiful. Long red hair, butter scotch colored deer skin skirts with laces instead of zippers, Afghani sheepskin coats those were the days! . Pretty flower print or bright colored Dresses and skirts instead of black pantsuits for work and black men’s T shirts and shabby black pants for leisure

    BBB is my motto, ban black and beige. 70’s dresses had fitted waists and belts. This years dresses are just a mass of fabric flowing from shoulder to mid calf no bust no waist no hip. At one time that style was 7th 8th month maternity wear. Now it’s for everybody and has a label size 2 or 4. Maybe size 2 is the new code for 200 pounds
  58. @Eyok
    First three impressions/guesses:

    1. I’ve never seen such a symmetrically plain woman.

    2. Her boyfriend MUST be a beta male. That emboldens her as the sexless alpha bitch.

    3. Can’t say I miss the girls from Brown University. She went there, or somewhere like it.

    1. I’ve never seen such a symmetrically plain woman.

    Solid observation. I didn’t have my finger on it–but that’s it.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Meaningless gibberish. A figure is either symmetrical or it's not. There is no such thing is "symmetrically plain."

    And yes there are a lot (the majority) of plain white women like this in liberal arts colleges and UMC in general, with no ass, no tits, tall-ish, who think they are all that because they are white.

  59. @Buzz Mohawk

    ...plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now...)
     
    Finally, someone else who realizes how bad Apocalypse Now is!

    The "Ride of the Valkyries" is a great scene though.

    Bayreuth deserves royalties from that movie.

  60. @Reg Cæsar
    This review is wordy, but I was impressed that Lauren Wilford comprehends the Danish sense of humor. Or even knows it exists. Europeans tend to view humor itself as juvenile, something to leave behind. The Danes and the Finns are refreshing, if subtle, exceptions.


    I’M A FEMINIST, AND I LOVED THE NEON DEMON
    WRITTEN BY LAUREN WILFORD

    …I was impressed that Lauren Wilford comprehends the Danish sense of humor. Or even knows it exists

    If I read her Linkedin correctly, she’s a National Merit Scholar.

  61. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/ThatRebecca/status/1169266657375608832

    https://twitter.com/THR/status/1169278402811105284

    “Not to mention Woody is my cousin’s uncle or something. We get along so well.”

  62. @R.G. Camara
    Yeah, I insult an insular filmmaker/child molester who made far more entertaining and clever films in the distant past and whose movies on the whole (witha few exceptions) became turgid wordy boringness based on psychobabble and soulmates nonsense that have been overpraised because he is the same ethnicity as many of the critics and people who employ critics. .

    And then praised a dude's early standup bit who nailed an aspect of the 1970s that applied to this girl's clothing.

    I must be a heathen barbarian! (/sarcasm).

    Seriously, the fact that you tried to shame me with your supercilious "Woody Allen is a comedic genius/Leary is an unfunny buffoon" nonsensical dichotomy says more about you and your low IQ than anything else.

    In other words, you prefer his earlier, funnier movies?

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    Best line in Stardust Memories, from the aliens.

    Or else Daniel Stern claiming to have played Ensign Pulver in a summer stock production of Mr. Roberts.
  63. @El Dato

    Finally, someone else who realizes how bad Apocalypse Now is!
     
    With two people, you can open a club!

    Also, Read the f*cking book

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpX_WeJalbc

    I did “Read the f*cking book,” forty years ago. It is a Conrad story. The movie does not do it justice. Maybe none could. I think it’s funny how people automatically think Apocalypse Now is a great film just because it is based on a great book. It is a failed attempt, probably because the director didn’t know how he was going to do it when he started, and couldn’t figure out how to end it when he was finished.

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    I think it’s funny how people automatically think Apocalypse Now is a great film just because it is based on a great book.
     
    It's usually a bad idea to try to make a movie out of a great book. If it really is a great book it's probably unfilmable. Film and the novel are just too different. You're better off picking an interesting but flawed book. If you think that adapting a great book is a fine idea then you probably don't understand film.

    Lots of great movies were based on mediocre or actively lousy books.

    With genre fiction you have a better chance. There have been very good movies based on very good genre novels - The Maltese Falcon, Vertigo (although Hitchcock's film is better than the book), Blade Runner, Double Indemnity, Solaris (the original Soviet movie not the goddawful American remake), The Village of the Damned (the 1960 version not John Carpenter's disastrous remake), Hitchcock's version of The 39 Steps).

    And even with genre movies there are plenty of examples of great movies based on lousy books (The Shining, Don't Look Now, The Birds).
    , @black sea
    John Milius wrote the screenplay. He did because he had been told in film school that no one had ever been able to make a successful film version of Heart of Darkness, so of course he took this as a challenge. At least, that was his explanation of how he got into it.

    Coppola originally wanted to shoot it as a low-budget on the Sacramento River, but of course that changed. Harvey Keitel started out as the Willard character, but it wasn't working so they had to bring in Martin Sheen, which was a great choice.

    I love it.
    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Anybody can be forgiven for not liking Apocalypse Now, it's such a huge, crazy, shambling creature, it's easy to see how a reasonable person might hate it. However, if you get yourself into a certain frame of mind, it's highly rewarding. It may not be a great film, strictly speaking, but it is a great..... something. I saw it on its opening night when I was a little kid, and I was totally hypnotized. (I'm not sure, but I think on opening night it had a different ending, and then it got cut up again and changed shortly after,that's how nutty Coppola was at the time, and that's how much clout he had in the wake of The Godfather.). Probably seen it at least 20 times since then.

    It's a different animal than "Heart of Darkness," it uses that as the base material and then turns into something entirely different. The two closest analogs to my mind are Bergman's "Persona" and Disney's "Frozen": in all three movies, an ostensibly ordinary person is forced to undergo a difficult journey in order to confront an enchanted person, with devastating consequences. I think maybe Coppola was really talking to himself: the ordinary skilled craftsman in him who made The Godfather, confronting the visionary madman he also had inside him.

    Plus, one of the great opening lines in cinema.... "Saigon. (pause) Shit."
  64. @silviosilver
    I actually counted, lol. I've seen 14% of the 70s list and 15% of the 80s list, and that's including movies I didn't even finish watching because I got bored.

    That reminds me, to this day I still haven't watched ET, and I grew up in the 80s, and it's one of those movies that every kid watched. I just never liked the look of that dopey looking alien. It didn't seem like the kind of "animal" I would ever want as a friend. Neverending Story is similar. Every kid except me saw it, and again because the main animal in it did nothing for me.

    Last time I saw the movie ET I finished the popcorn my wife and I were eating, opened the door to the garage to toss the empty bag, looked to the left and saw the headless skinned, gutted deer carcass, hung earlier in the day, dripping blood into a bucket. It was like someone grabbed my head from behind and shoved it in a cold bucket of water.

  65. She reminds me of only one particular woman in a 1970’s movie, which is the lady with the waistless pants that Clint Eastwood was trying to bring in to LA for a trial – The Gauntlet. She sounds EXACTLY like her, and I think that’s who she had in her head doing this funny parody.

    I like how they shot up the house so much in the beginning that it just finally collapsed. That’s a lot of lead.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    Sandra Locke, Eastwood's gal pal for more than a decade

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/sondra-locke-death-obituary-clint-eastwood-overshadowed-age-a8711871.html

  66. @AnotherDad


    1. I’ve never seen such a symmetrically plain woman.
     
    Solid observation. I didn't have my finger on it--but that's it.

    Meaningless gibberish. A figure is either symmetrical or it’s not. There is no such thing is “symmetrically plain.”

    And yes there are a lot (the majority) of plain white women like this in liberal arts colleges and UMC in general, with no ass, no tits, tall-ish, who think they are all that because they are white.

  67. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    Thanks. Great list. Loved a lot of those.

  68. @Lot
    Your list proves Dave’s point. I’ve seen about 20% of both your lists. All the 80s list is good, but the 70s is a mix of good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown).

    Love Chinatown. Apocalypse has some great scenes but confusing and yup, plodding.

  69. @Laurence Whelk
    I have found Meryl Streep tedious since "Sophie's Choice". Every time she appears on screen I can hear Jon Lovitz exclaiming "Acting!".

    https://youtu.be/dmZSkWBJwBU

    Even worse, when the dingo ate her baby.

  70. @Kronos
    Careful, you might be dealing with a school shooter.

    https://allthatsinteresting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/brenda-spencer-looking-down.jpg

    She really didn’t like Mondays.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    https://youtu.be/2AB9zPfXqQQ
  71. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    Is Fast Times At Ridgemont High there? That one encouraged little girls to be sluts, taught them that abortion is no big deal and depicted kids in general to pound down copious amounts of marijuana. Pulp Fiction got them started on heroin. Kids copy. Girls especially, copy.

  72. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/ThatRebecca/status/1169266657375608832

    https://twitter.com/THR/status/1169278402811105284

    Wow, Penelope Cruz is really sexy.

  73. @R.G. Camara
    Yeah, I insult an insular filmmaker/child molester who made far more entertaining and clever films in the distant past and whose movies on the whole (witha few exceptions) became turgid wordy boringness based on psychobabble and soulmates nonsense that have been overpraised because he is the same ethnicity as many of the critics and people who employ critics. .

    And then praised a dude's early standup bit who nailed an aspect of the 1970s that applied to this girl's clothing.

    I must be a heathen barbarian! (/sarcasm).

    Seriously, the fact that you tried to shame me with your supercilious "Woody Allen is a comedic genius/Leary is an unfunny buffoon" nonsensical dichotomy says more about you and your low IQ than anything else.

    You’re the one who felt the need to include Woody Allen and Denis Leary in the same post.

    Vox Day also hates Woody Allen for some inexplicable reason. Are you ripping him off?

    Here is Leary getting torn to shreds by the late Greg Giraldo on Tough Crowd

  74. @Buzz Mohawk
    I did "Read the f*cking book," forty years ago. It is a Conrad story. The movie does not do it justice. Maybe none could. I think it's funny how people automatically think Apocalypse Now is a great film just because it is based on a great book. It is a failed attempt, probably because the director didn't know how he was going to do it when he started, and couldn't figure out how to end it when he was finished.

    I think it’s funny how people automatically think Apocalypse Now is a great film just because it is based on a great book.

    It’s usually a bad idea to try to make a movie out of a great book. If it really is a great book it’s probably unfilmable. Film and the novel are just too different. You’re better off picking an interesting but flawed book. If you think that adapting a great book is a fine idea then you probably don’t understand film.

    Lots of great movies were based on mediocre or actively lousy books.

    With genre fiction you have a better chance. There have been very good movies based on very good genre novels – The Maltese Falcon, Vertigo (although Hitchcock’s film is better than the book), Blade Runner, Double Indemnity, Solaris (the original Soviet movie not the goddawful American remake), The Village of the Damned (the 1960 version not John Carpenter’s disastrous remake), Hitchcock’s version of The 39 Steps).

    And even with genre movies there are plenty of examples of great movies based on lousy books (The Shining, Don’t Look Now, The Birds).

  75. @Buzz Mohawk
    I did "Read the f*cking book," forty years ago. It is a Conrad story. The movie does not do it justice. Maybe none could. I think it's funny how people automatically think Apocalypse Now is a great film just because it is based on a great book. It is a failed attempt, probably because the director didn't know how he was going to do it when he started, and couldn't figure out how to end it when he was finished.

    John Milius wrote the screenplay. He did because he had been told in film school that no one had ever been able to make a successful film version of Heart of Darkness, so of course he took this as a challenge. At least, that was his explanation of how he got into it.

    Coppola originally wanted to shoot it as a low-budget on the Sacramento River, but of course that changed. Harvey Keitel started out as the Willard character, but it wasn’t working so they had to bring in Martin Sheen, which was a great choice.

    I love it.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Thanks. That's interesting. It certainly was a heroic effort. Maybe the Vietnam War wasn't such a good vehicle for The Heart of Darkness -- or maybe it was just "too soon" after the war. I don't think the movie as a whole captures the war or the book, but one would have to be a moron not to get its message and not to appreciate its impressive parts.

    We all love things others don't, and it's okay to express our opinions. Hey, Marianne has something to say about that:

    https://quotesbywomen.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/m-williamson-2-quote-final.jpg
  76. @Anonymous
    Notable female roles in 70s films...

    Nurse Ratched in CUCKOO'S NESt
    Dunaway in CHINATOWN
    Christie in MCCABE AND MRS MILLER
    The mother in HAROLD AND MAUDE. (What a great mom.)
    Spacek in Carrie
    Bergen in Oliver's Story
    Streep in Deer Hunter
    Mcgraw in Love Story
    Carroll in Claudine
    Shields in Pretty Baby
    Ross in Stepford Wives
    O'Neal in Bad News Bears
    Manz in The Wanderers
    Adams in Days of Heaven and Body Snatchers




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=reJAzTE980s

    Ellen Burstyn in Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore
    Faye Dunaway in Network
    Sally Field in Norma Rae and Smokey & the Bandit
    Diane Keaton in Annie Hall
    Liza in Cabaret

  77. @Lot
    Your list proves Dave’s point. I’ve seen about 20% of both your lists. All the 80s list is good, but the 70s is a mix of good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown).

    Barry Lyndon is all style and (artsy) grace and – humor, lots of it – style, ruse, wit & humor. I saw it at a Christmas holiday, the city was all covered in fog, low temperatures, clumsy jacket, and I remember how I felt when I left the movie-theater: Lightheaded and full of joy! Obviously, there’ two of them out – most likely lots of ’em!

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Barry Lyndon is the perfect movie for a certain kind of theatregoer (who would probably also enjoy The Duellists) but I can understand people finding it pretentious or insufferable. I enjoyed Electra Glide In Blue, having had it recommended as Robert Blake's best performance, but it bombed when it first came out, and that makes sense given the wrong impression that it's an action movie or a standard entertainment.
    , @Lot
    I didn’t mean to bash Barry Lyndon, it was overall moderately entertaining. And I watched it in 2016, I can imagine it seemed better by the standards of the time.
  78. @Anonymous
    A wicked little movie


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vjrg6KevP70

    Kudos for bringing up a great, largely forgotten flick.

  79. @NickG
    Point of order - 1970s Super 8 or 16mm wasn't generally shot in portrait mode.

    And the word was “super”, not “terrific”.

  80. Speaking of Allen, I think the chick in the clip is most reminiscent of his second(?) wife in Annie Hall, the one who can’t finish sex with him because there was a siren outside, and now has a headache “like Oswald in Ghosts.” On the other hand, she properly condescends to his preferring to watch basketball than attend a NY Jewish Intellectuals party: “What is so fascinating|about a group of pituitary cases
    trying to stuff a ball through a hoop?”

  81. @Buzz Mohawk
    I did "Read the f*cking book," forty years ago. It is a Conrad story. The movie does not do it justice. Maybe none could. I think it's funny how people automatically think Apocalypse Now is a great film just because it is based on a great book. It is a failed attempt, probably because the director didn't know how he was going to do it when he started, and couldn't figure out how to end it when he was finished.

    Anybody can be forgiven for not liking Apocalypse Now, it’s such a huge, crazy, shambling creature, it’s easy to see how a reasonable person might hate it. However, if you get yourself into a certain frame of mind, it’s highly rewarding. It may not be a great film, strictly speaking, but it is a great….. something. I saw it on its opening night when I was a little kid, and I was totally hypnotized. (I’m not sure, but I think on opening night it had a different ending, and then it got cut up again and changed shortly after,that’s how nutty Coppola was at the time, and that’s how much clout he had in the wake of The Godfather.). Probably seen it at least 20 times since then.

    It’s a different animal than “Heart of Darkness,” it uses that as the base material and then turns into something entirely different. The two closest analogs to my mind are Bergman’s “Persona” and Disney’s “Frozen”: in all three movies, an ostensibly ordinary person is forced to undergo a difficult journey in order to confront an enchanted person, with devastating consequences. I think maybe Coppola was really talking to himself: the ordinary skilled craftsman in him who made The Godfather, confronting the visionary madman he also had inside him.

    Plus, one of the great opening lines in cinema…. “Saigon. (pause) Shit.”

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I also enjoyed "Apocalypse Now." It's full of great, memorable scenes. The shorter theatrical release is better than the director's cut, which was too long and tedious.

    Shortly after I saw it I was at a party where a man I didn't know asked if I'd seen it, and if I had, did I like it? I told him I had seen it and liked it a lot, which annoyed the man greatly. He demanded that I explain how I could have liked the movie. What was I supposed to say? I liked it, he didn't, neither of us was going to change his subjective reaction.
  82. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese
  83. @gutta percha
    Read the Bible. For thousands of years, we knew that women were weak, stupid, disobedient, scheming and treacherous. Around the year 1900, we forgot all that, and that's how we got the debacle of the Kavanaugh hearings, and many other societal face-slaps, follies and failures. All you guys who like your women bosses and politicians, raise your hands.

    “Ummm, how is that substantially different from the women of 2019? They’re all still nuts.”

    As Alt Right leader would say, spoken like a true gamma.

    “Then we can stop listening to women altogether…”

    Who is this “we”?

    “Read the Bible. For thousands of years, we knew that women were weak, stupid, disobedient, scheming and treacherous.”

    Replace “women” with “men and women” and you would hit the mark.

    “Around the year 1900, we forgot all that, and that’s how we got the debacle of the Kavanaugh hearings, and many other societal face-slaps, follies and failures..”

    Is that you, Roosh V?

    • Replies: @gutta percha
    "As Alt Right leader would say, spoken like a true gamma."

    You may very well be right! Please define "gamma," so I can know for sure.

    I'm not "Roosh V." I'm just an ordinary garden-variety misogynist. It's a hatred we learn, not one that we are born with.

    The video at the top of this post is Sailer's Rashomon. Some people see it as a distillation of 70's movie tropes. I see only another typically annoying woman.

    , @Kronos
    Keep in mind technology has been able to sustain a exponential growth rate in stupidity. People can broadcast stupid across the globe in the blink of an eye. It’s been able to enable our quickest impulse response without any time to digest and reflect.

    https://theswansblog.com/content/images/2017/09/20170919-dumbfounding-franklin-hyperbole-like-old-man-yelling-at-cloud.jpg
  84. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese
  85. @Reg Cæsar
    This review is wordy, but I was impressed that Lauren Wilford comprehends the Danish sense of humor. Or even knows it exists. Europeans tend to view humor itself as juvenile, something to leave behind. The Danes and the Finns are refreshing, if subtle, exceptions.


    I’M A FEMINIST, AND I LOVED THE NEON DEMON
    WRITTEN BY LAUREN WILFORD

    Ah… what European countries have you visited?
    Because as a south European i can tell you that yuo are dead wrong.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Ah… what European countries have you visited?
    Because as a south European i can tell you that yuo are dead wrong.
     
    Every one NW of a line from Finland to Portugal, save Ireland and Wales. Sadly, not Italy or Greece yet. Maybe they're an exception to what I've observed elsewhere-- continentals are deadpan.

    Danes and Finns exploit this trait for humor, and are good at it. The rest? Not so much. German humor seems especially infantile, probably a release from their normal earnestness.
  86. @black sea
    John Milius wrote the screenplay. He did because he had been told in film school that no one had ever been able to make a successful film version of Heart of Darkness, so of course he took this as a challenge. At least, that was his explanation of how he got into it.

    Coppola originally wanted to shoot it as a low-budget on the Sacramento River, but of course that changed. Harvey Keitel started out as the Willard character, but it wasn't working so they had to bring in Martin Sheen, which was a great choice.

    I love it.

    Thanks. That’s interesting. It certainly was a heroic effort. Maybe the Vietnam War wasn’t such a good vehicle for The Heart of Darkness — or maybe it was just “too soon” after the war. I don’t think the movie as a whole captures the war or the book, but one would have to be a moron not to get its message and not to appreciate its impressive parts.

    We all love things others don’t, and it’s okay to express our opinions. Hey, Marianne has something to say about that:

  87. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    Do you have any hobbies other than watching movies?

    While we’re at it Barry Lyndon was the most soporific mess I’ve ever had to sit through, with the exception of Withnail and I (which Stanley Kauffman thought was the candy).

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    Some great scenes. The Battle Never Mentioned, marching into fire to the tune of British Grenadiers. Also the scene where Barry looks on jealously as the captain dances with the local lass.
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    Who is Jack Chiclets? Please respond to my Winnemucca post office box ( I will never EVER let it go).
    , @Vinteuil

    Barry Lyndon was the most soporific mess I’ve ever had to sit through
     
    Interesting - not the opinion I'd have expected from you...so cautious, so careful, so methodical, but Barry Lyndon puts you to sleep?
    , @dr kill
    I defy anyone to show me a worse film than 'Boxing Helena'.
  88. The Parallax View was among the best 70s flicks — perhaps in part because, once Paula Prentiss got blown up, it had no females whatsoever.

  89. @Digital Samizdat
    That clip feels very Woody Allen. I could see Mia Farrow or Diane Keaton in black and white spouting just those lines.

    Yes, same here.

    Or is it that she has a Diane Keaton vibe, giving the lines a Woody Allen feel?

  90. Rollerball was clearly the cinematic highlight of the mid-70s, and aside from Maude Adams floating through once of twice there were no females around to gum things up with any discussion of feelings or sexual politics

  91. @silviosilver
    I actually counted, lol. I've seen 14% of the 70s list and 15% of the 80s list, and that's including movies I didn't even finish watching because I got bored.

    That reminds me, to this day I still haven't watched ET, and I grew up in the 80s, and it's one of those movies that every kid watched. I just never liked the look of that dopey looking alien. It didn't seem like the kind of "animal" I would ever want as a friend. Neverending Story is similar. Every kid except me saw it, and again because the main animal in it did nothing for me.

    I too have never seen ET.

  92. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    How many movies on that 70s list are British? I feel like I’ve watched a ton of British movies from the 70s (that Glenda Jackson – she good) but only a couple that I recognized on that list.

  93. @Eyok
    First three impressions/guesses:

    1. I’ve never seen such a symmetrically plain woman.

    2. Her boyfriend MUST be a beta male. That emboldens her as the sexless alpha bitch.

    3. Can’t say I miss the girls from Brown University. She went there, or somewhere like it.

    1. I’ve never seen such a symmetrically plain woman.

    You mean to say that her face is symmetrical but she’s nevertheless not above average in attractiveness?

    I suppose the glasses could be doing a lot of work producing an illusion of symmetry . . .

  94. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/ThatRebecca/status/1169266657375608832

    https://twitter.com/THR/status/1169278402811105284

    I must admit I don’t “get” the Scarlett Johansson thing. Is she supposed to be the most beautiful? I find her a bit on the plain side – quite ordinary in many ways. Is she supposed to be the best actress? I’ve never seen the acting talent. De Gustibus . . .

  95. @Pericles
    In other words, you prefer his earlier, funnier movies?

    Best line in Stardust Memories, from the aliens.

    Or else Daniel Stern claiming to have played Ensign Pulver in a summer stock production of Mr. Roberts.

  96. @Art Deco
    Do you have any hobbies other than watching movies?

    While we're at it Barry Lyndon was the most soporific mess I've ever had to sit through, with the exception of Withnail and I (which Stanley Kauffman thought was the candy).

    Some great scenes. The Battle Never Mentioned, marching into fire to the tune of British Grenadiers. Also the scene where Barry looks on jealously as the captain dances with the local lass.

  97. gutta percha [AKA "gp"] says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Meryl Streep in "Manhattan" and "Kramer vs. Kramer.

    I want to give a shout-out to Kramer vs Kramer. It does a great job of depicting the agony that kids feel when they are tortured by divorcing parents, and unflinchingly criticizes the lunacy of women during their era of “liberation.” Great acting all around, including a stand-out performance by the child actor. It is a deeply serious, tragic drama. It chronicled some of the major causes of the ongoing destruction of our society, as true today as it was then.

  98. @Eyok
    First three impressions/guesses:

    1. I’ve never seen such a symmetrically plain woman.

    2. Her boyfriend MUST be a beta male. That emboldens her as the sexless alpha bitch.

    3. Can’t say I miss the girls from Brown University. She went there, or somewhere like it.

    Her skin isn’t bad…if she’d do something about the eyebrows and hair…and smile occasionally.

  99. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    Never tire of watching Day Of The Jackal. Talk about pure professionalism.

  100. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Naaah, Scarlet J is a nothing, she excels at playing numbed creatures whose souls are dead, maybe she's drawing from autobiography, who knows.

    The only real electric top-shelf actress these days is Jennifer Lawrence, who is alive in every cell in her body and loving every second of it. Honestly I don't know how she does it, that level of concentration would kill me in half an hour. I don't even like half of her movies, it's just that she's a genuine screen presence, haven't seen anything like it since the terrifying Priscilla Smith in Elektra and Medea. Well, that's stage, but still. I suppose maybe Patti Smith might count, on her good days.

    70s is salvageable for McCabe and Mrs Miller, Apocalypse Now, and the mighty Nashville. Also lots of great trashy B movies.

    The 80s I missed, becuz too busy paying attention to the Wooster Group. If you weren't watching "L.S.D.", well, I just hope the John Hughes movies were cute.

    Last Detail is an under appreciated gem, as is its director Hal Ashby.

  101. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    “For instance, Friedkin’s importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in LA that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.”

    #202,

    I agree with you on To Live & Die in LA; both William Petersen’s & Willem Dafoe’s performances were memorable. It’s always been a little odd to me that none of the movie buffs I’ve conversed with say they have seen it, nor do they have any awareness of it. Especially so given the impression it left me with.

    • Agree: Lot
    • Replies: @Hhsiii
    It’s great.
  102. @Dave Pinsen
    One of my most unpopular takes on Twitter was that ‘80s movies were better than ‘70s movies in the same genres (with a couple of exceptions).

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1038218996359806976?s=21

    The ’70s were the first decade of rampant on-screen sex and nudity as the pendulum swung hard in the opposite direction from the ’50s when married couples were portrayed on-screen as sleeping in separate beds.

    The sex and nudity were over-the-top, gratuitous, and unnecessary for plot or character development. Also, the fashion attire was ugly. YMMV.

    McArdle was born in 1973.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    The sex and nudity were over-the-top, gratuitous, and unnecessary for plot or character development. Also, the fashion attire was ugly.

    Due to the ugliness of the fashion attire, the nudity was welcome.

  103. @Jack D
    Women in the 70s didn't have eyebrows like furry caterpillars.

    Sure they did. Trust me, I was there.

    Not to mention armpits …

    • Replies: @Jack D
    I was too. And Scandinavian girls with furry legs (doesn't look that bad when their hair is blond). But I never saw eyebrows like that except on Henry Kissinger.
  104. @Anonymous

    How were the '70s better than, say, the '80s for movies? Except for horror (The Exorcist), weren't there better movies in most genres in the '80s? The Empire Strikes Back > Star Wars, etc.?
     
    80s were underestimated but there is romance about the 70s(or first half of the decade) because of the rise of New Hollywood and emergence of personal artists comparable to European writer-directors. The process really began in the late 60s but really took off in the 70s... before it imploded from self-indulgence and then was sideswiped by rise of Spielberg and Lucas. The element of novelty made people over-estimate the 70s and the rise of blockbusters and mindless teen sex comedies made people overlook the many gems of the 80s. And it makes for odd comparisons. For instance, Friedkin's importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in La that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.

    Scorsese began the 80s powerfully with Raging Bull but mostly failed to make a mark before he really came back with Goodfellas in 1990.

    Overall, the early 70s were far more significant to film-as-art than the 80s, but many personal films were duds. But the greatest peaks of the 70s tower over most of the works of the 80s.

    70s peaks:

    Siberiade
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Stalker
    Barry Lyndon
    The Emigrants
    The New Land
    Eraserhead
    Taxi Driver
    Husbands
    The Wanderers
    Chinatown
    THX 1138
    Elektra(Jansco)
    Harold and Maude
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller
    Vengeance Is Mine
    Days of Heaven
    Seven Beauties
    Apocalyse Now
    Aguirre: The Wrath of God
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Love and Death
    Sleeper
    Badlands
    Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
    The Last Detail
    Last Tango in Paris
    F for Fake
    Duck You Sucker
    Patton
    Macbeth(Polanski)
    A Clockwork Orange
    Mean Streets
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    The Day of the Jackal
    Dersu Uzala
    Providence
    Lullaby of the Earth
    That Obscure Object of Desire
    Kaseki
    Lancelot du Lac
    The Conformist
    Nashville
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Exorcist
    Swept Away
    The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
    The French Connection
    Deliverance
    The Phoenix (Ichikawa)
    Jaws
    Tess
    The Ascent
    Man of Marble
    The Judge and the Assassin

    Other notable 70s flicks:

    Zardoz
    Paper Chase
    Pink Panther Strikes Again
    Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
    Straw Dogs
    Ballad of Cable Hogue
    The Getaway
    Little Big Man
    The Hellstrom Chronicle
    The Iceman Cometh
    Murmur of the Heart
    Lacombe, Lucien
    The Heartbreak Kid
    Love and Anarchy
    Wicker Man
    Get Carter
    Parallax View
    All the President's Men
    Dirty Harry
    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    Rocky
    Woodstock
    Tree of the Wooden Clogs
    The Last Picture Show
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    The Tenant
    Castle of Sand
    Papillon
    Frenzy
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    Zabriskie Point
    Zatoichi Meets Yojimbo
    Ali: Fears Eat the Soul
    Tristana
    The Soldier of Orange
    Padre Padrone
    Solaris
    Two English Girls
    Story of Adele H.
    Wild Child
    Carrie
    The Beguiled
    Bananas
    Star Wars
    Hard Times
    The Passenger
    The Killer Elite
    Halloween
    Kramer vs Kramer
    American Graffiti
    Junior Bonner
    Wise Blood
    The Middleman (Satyajit Ray)
    Saturday Night Fever
    Coming Home
    Harlan County USA
    The Deer Hunter
    The Mirror
    Distant Thunder
    Being There
    An Unmarried Woman
    Carnal Knowledge
    Cooley High
    The Serpent's Egg
    Kings of the Road
    Sometimes a Great Notion
    Night Moves
    King Lear (Kozintsev)
    Ludwig
    The Clockmaker of St. Paul
    All That Jazz
    The Hired Hand
    Sleeping Dogs
    Crime and Punishment (USSR)
    Ryan's Daughter
    Love Story
    M*A*S*H
    Dodes'ka-den
    French Connection II
    The Man Who Would be King
    The Last Valley
    Sleuth
    Breaking Away
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Rabid
    Conquest of the Planet of the Apes
    Escape from the Planet of the Apes
    Alien
    Straight Time
    Le Cercle Rouge
    Cries and Whispers
    The Magic Flute
    Autumn Sonata
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Nicholas and Alexandra
    Five Easy Pieces
    Black Stallion
    They Call Me Trinity
    The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three
    Two-Lane Blacktop
    Castle of Cagliostro
    Claudine
    Who'll Stop the Rain
    Emperor of the North
    The Twelve Chairs
    The Great Santini
    The Go-Between
    Ulzana's Raid
    State of Siege
    The Confession
    The Innocent
    The Assassination of Trotsky
    Bread and Chocolate
    Moscow Doesn't Believe in Tears

    But the 80s had their share of great ones:

    Once Upon a Time in America
    The Shining
    Blade Runner
    Full Metal Jacket
    Time of the Gypsies
    Excalibur
    Makioka Sisters
    Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
    To Live and Die in L.A.
    Raging Bull
    When Father Was Away on Business
    Kagemusha
    House of Games
    Midnight Run
    Laputa: Castle in the Sky
    Something Wild
    The Flight of the Eagle
    Das Boot
    Sans Soleil
    L'Argent
    Prince of the City
    The Draughtsman's Contract
    My Beautiful Launderette
    Year of Living Dangerously
    Passage to India
    King of Comedy
    Long Riders
    Ran
    Wolfen
    Walker
    Atlantic City
    The Last Emperor
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Ballad of Narayama
    Himatsuri
    Sunday in the Country
    Family Game
    The Thing
    Life and Nothing But
    Breaker Morant
    E.T.
    Distant Voices, Still Lives
    Mystic Pizza
    Miracle Mile
    Where is the Friend's Home?
    Moonlighting
    Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
    Fanny and Alexander
    Risky Business
    Sherman's March
    Pelle the Conqueror
    Melvin and Howard
    Local Hero
    Empire of the Sun
    Lost in America
    Utu
    Broadway Danny Rose
    Crimes and Misdemeanors
    Radio Days
    Do You Remember Dolly Bell?
    Death of a Salesman
    The Terminator
    Gonza the Spearman
    Eijanaika
    MacCarthur's Children
    Diner
    Ragtime
    Platoon
    The Killing Fields
    The Mission
    Scarface
    The Runaway Train
    Rikyu
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
    Hope and Glory
    Yes Madam
    Police Story
    Baby It's You
    Osterman Weekend
    Blow Out
    Danton
    Au Revoir Les Enfants
    Palombella Rossa
    Cinema Paradiso
    The Bounty
    The Road Warrior
    Fandango
    Spaceballs
    Chariots of Fire
    Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan
    Revolution
    A Christmas Story
    Airplane!
    Blue Velvet
    The Right Stuff
    Personal Best
    Hey Babu Riba
    Night of the Shooting Stars
    The Vanishing
    Hoosiers
    Jean de Florette
    Born on the Fourth of July
    Violent Cop
    Tampopo
    Coup de Torchon
    Dead Ringers
    Videodrome
    The Verdict
    Sid & Nancy
    Tron
    Babette's Feast

    And some others:

    Poltergeist
    Empire Strikes Back
    Pee Wee Herman's Big Adventure
    Tucker: The Man and His Dreams
    Peggy Sue Got Married
    Zelig
    Southern Comfort
    Tin Men
    Salvador
    Cruising
    Dressed to Kill
    Broadcast News
    Come and See
    Nostalghia
    Cutter's Way
    The Sacrifice
    The Sure Thing
    Fitzcarraldo
    Monsieur Hire
    Big
    Ariel
    The Dead
    Wings of Desire
    Heaven's Gate
    Housekeeping
    Reds
    Kindergarten (USSR)
    The Hit
    The Natural
    Wall Street
    Romancing the Stone
    Marianne and Juliane
    Yeleen
    Casualties of War
    Blood Simple
    Stranger than Paradise
    Down by Law
    Urban Cowboy
    Black Rain (Imamura)
    Places in the Heart
    Entre Nous
    Home and the World
    Tootsie
    My Neighbor Totoro
    And the Ship Sails On
    Smash Palace
    No Way Out
    Amadeus
    Mephisto
    Ordinary People
    Scandal
    Bull Durham
    Deathtrap
    Superman II
    Monty Python: The Meaning of Life
    History of the World: Part I
    Trip to Bountiful
    Elephant Man
    Stop Making Sense
    Pathfinder
    The Seventh Continent
    Gandhi
    Tender Mercies
    Kaos
    Rasputin
    Shoah
    Manon of the Spring
    Urusei Yatsura: Only You
    An Enemy of the People
    Modern Romance
    After Hours
    Vagabond
    Dead Zone
    Shy People
    Always(Spielberg)
    Scanners
    The Horse Thief
    Coal Miner's Daughter
    The Woman Next Door
    Gates of Heaven
    Falcon and the Snowman
    The Official Story
    The Long Good Friday
    Gallipoli
    1984
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
    Fat Man and Little Boy
    Never Cry Wolf
    Light of Day
    Identification of a Woman
    Things Change
    Desert Bloom
    I am the Cheese

    How could you have included Syd & Nancy, but left out Repo Man?

  105. @R.G. Camara
    I suppose this is why most "adult" movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable. Depressingly, unsexily dressed bland women lecturing us with the same hostile feminist cliches mixed with some therapy-laden pseudoscientific jargon. Like really boring nails on a chalkboard.

    Woody Allen for some reason thought this sort of idea was superior to his previous slapstick farces. Of course, Woody also thinks molesting his own daughter is ok, so I guess that explains that.

    At least in previous eras when the director wanted to lecture us with feminist nonsense they'd make the females look sexually attractive and avoid these wanna-be intellectual but really nagging tones.

    One of the reasons the 1970s failed in their attempts to revive the "screwball" genre was the fact that 1930s and 40s screwball women were feminine, beautiful, and funny. In the 1970s women were uglified and determined to hide their femininity as much as possible. Can you imagine Carole Lombard or Myrna Loy or Rosalind Russell looking as drab and sounding as lecturing as this? Talk about unfunny! The closest you could think of was Katherine Hepburn, and she was famously "box office poison" until she learned to act and hide her feminazi disdain and act like she actually liked the men with her (as she did with Cary Grant in Bringing up Baby, where she played a rich ditz similar to a Carole Lombard role).

    Comedian Denis Leary had a bit where he joked that, growing up in the 1970s, the fashions were so ugly that the people were all wearing clothes guaranteed not to get them laid despite the sexual revolution. Combine that with these look-down-their-noses-and-condescend attitudes and I think it was the most perfect birth control for these women.

    “I suppose this is why most … movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable.”

    If you mean Ingmar Bergman’s movies from the 1970s (let’s include all of his movies) then yes, you are correct. Swedes are even more prone to navel-gazing than American blacks, which is saying something. If you are including films like Apocalypse Now (1979), The Parallax View (1974), The Man Who Would Be King (1975), The French Connection (1971), Deliverance (1972), Dirty Harry (1971), Clockwork Orange (1971), The Last Detail (1973), Phase IV (1974), The Taking Of Pelham 123 (1974), Jaws (1975), The Three Musketeers (1973), The Four Musketeers (1974), Across 110th Street (1972), Mr. Majestyk (1974), White Lightning (1973), Earthquake (1974), Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid (1973), Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia (1974), Papillon (1973), The Deer Hunter (1978), Let’s Scare Jessica To Death (1971), Conquest Of The Planet Of The Apes (1972), Klute (1971), Soylent Green (1973), The Omega Man (1971), Zardoz (1974), Rollerball (1975), Picnic At Hanging Rock (1975), Rocky (1976), Network (1976), The Exorcist (1973), Barry Lyndon (1975), The Kremlin Letter (1970), The Andromeda Strain (1971), Get Carter (1971), Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (1978), Jeremiah Johnson (1972), The Conversation (1974), and the list goes on, then you don’t know what you’re talking about.

    • Replies: @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Jeremiah Johnson (1972)

     

    Everything a movie should be, and none of the things it shouldn't be.
    , @Alden
    The 70’s 3 and 4 Musketeers were the absolutely totally best of all the Musketeer movies.

    Except for the outdoor scenes. They were filmed in a brown beige desert region of Spain. They actually took place in northwest France, western France and in and around Paris and south east England some of the greenest rainiest regions in Europe.

    Everything just sublime, costumes Michael York, Richelieu Chaplin as the Queen except for the outdoor scenes everything was perfect Raquel Welch and her gold dress and perfect shade of brown hair. Faye Dunaway’s cheekbones. All the Queen’s clothes

    Totally a visual delight
  106. @Art Deco
    Do you have any hobbies other than watching movies?

    While we're at it Barry Lyndon was the most soporific mess I've ever had to sit through, with the exception of Withnail and I (which Stanley Kauffman thought was the candy).

    Who is Jack Chiclets? Please respond to my Winnemucca post office box ( I will never EVER let it go).

  107. @Lot
    Your list proves Dave’s point. I’ve seen about 20% of both your lists. All the 80s list is good, but the 70s is a mix of good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown).

    actively bad (Deliverance)

    blasphemer!

  108. @gutta percha
    Ummm, how is that substantially different from the women of 2019? They're all still nuts. The sexbots can't get here soon enough. Then we can stop listening to women altogether, and then they'll lose every last scrap of the political power they've bought with their sexual "favors."

    I am dismayed by the number of seemingly intelligent white women who are in the vanguard of the ridiculous yet dangerous Woke cultural revolution. That being said I think there are reasons why you may not be popular with the ladies.

    • Replies: @gutta percha
    "I think there are reasons why you may not be popular with the ladies."

    There are. Unlike most men, I'm fine with that.
  109. @Dieter Kief
    Barry Lyndon is all style and (artsy) grace and - humor, lots of it - style, ruse, wit & humor. I saw it at a Christmas holiday, the city was all covered in fog, low temperatures, clumsy jacket, and I remember how I felt when I left the movie-theater: Lightheaded and full of joy! Obviously, there' two of them out - most likely lots of 'em!

    Barry Lyndon is the perfect movie for a certain kind of theatregoer (who would probably also enjoy The Duellists) but I can understand people finding it pretentious or insufferable. I enjoyed Electra Glide In Blue, having had it recommended as Robert Blake’s best performance, but it bombed when it first came out, and that makes sense given the wrong impression that it’s an action movie or a standard entertainment.

    • Replies: @James J. O'Meara
    I remember Rolling Stone promoting the hell out of EGB, for some reason, I think 'cause Chicago's producer was involved. Saw it on TV a couple years ago, seemed pretty good after all.
    , @Anonymous
    The Duellists is interesting for the class dynamics involved. Most people just dismiss the guy who starts all the duels as crazy. No - he's a poor boy from a poor background who specifically picks fights with his supposed social superiors. It wouldn't have been allowed before the Revolution. By forcing these people to fight him he forces them to acknowledge him as an equal.
  110. @Kronos
    Careful, you might be dealing with a school shooter.

    https://allthatsinteresting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/brenda-spencer-looking-down.jpg

    • Replies: @Kronos
    Now that’s just animal abuse.
  111. @silviosilver
    I actually counted, lol. I've seen 14% of the 70s list and 15% of the 80s list, and that's including movies I didn't even finish watching because I got bored.

    That reminds me, to this day I still haven't watched ET, and I grew up in the 80s, and it's one of those movies that every kid watched. I just never liked the look of that dopey looking alien. It didn't seem like the kind of "animal" I would ever want as a friend. Neverending Story is similar. Every kid except me saw it, and again because the main animal in it did nothing for me.

    That reminds me, to this day I still haven’t watched ET…

    When Star Wars came out in 1977, I noticed the line at the theater and thought, I’ll catch it later, when the crowds die down.

    I still haven’t seen it.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    Damn dude, that is seriously pretty shocking.

    You've probably missed any chance you had to actually enjoy it, but you should probably still see it because... well, just because, you know.

    Or if you can't be bothered doing that, watch the youtube channel Cinema Sins review of it for a bit of a laugh.
  112. @Reg Cæsar
    https://euvsdisinfo.eu/uploads/2017/09/Sk%C3%A6rmbillede-2017-09-09-kl.-11.53.39_finalfinal.png

    Now that’s just animal abuse.

  113. @Steve Sailer
    In the 2000s, Woody Allen publicly told Scarlet Johansenn to cut back on the partying or she'd win up like Lindsey Lohan. He said that she had the talent to have a Meryl Streep-like career if she lived a Meryl Streep-like life.

    I presume that had an effect because Scar-Jo became a better actress than I had expected in the last decade.

    In the 2000s, Woody Allen publicly told Scarlet Johansenn to cut back on the partying or she’d win up like Lindsey Lohan. He said that she had the talent to have a Meryl Streep-like career if she lived a Meryl Streep-like life.

    What she really needs to do–both to be more “streepish” and to have a good and happy life–is find a good guy who actually wants to be with her for the duration and have more babies before it is too late.

  114. @Lot
    Your list proves Dave’s point. I’ve seen about 20% of both your lists. All the 80s list is good, but the 70s is a mix of good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown).

    …good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown)…

    Heh. Set the cat among the pigeons, much?

  115. @Lot
    Your list proves Dave’s point. I’ve seen about 20% of both your lists. All the 80s list is good, but the 70s is a mix of good movies with a lot of meh (Barry Lyndon), actively bad (Deliverance), and plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now, One Flew Over, Chinatown).

    Btw – I wonder why you put “Deliverance” in the “actively bad” category. I finally saw it for the first time on one of those little back-of-the-seat-in-front-of-you screens on a flight to Prague, last May, ’cause it was featured, & it was a “classic,” & I hadn’t seen it before, so why not?

    Anyway, I thought it was really interesting – even engrossing. There were some serious themes in play. Some of the acting was downright charismatic. All in all, definitely more worth the time it took to watch than any of the comic-book movies that seem to dominate the cineplexes today.

    So what’s your beef?

    Not necessarily disagreeing, just curious,

    P.S.: Mark Steyn’s review is worth reading:

    https://www.steynonline.com/8803/deliverance

    • Replies: @Lot
    It offensively plays poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred (both not true), and also just wasn’t very entertaining or interesting.

    “definitely more worth the time it took to watch than any of the comic-book movies that seem to dominate the cineplexes today.”

    The only comic book movies I’ve seen in my life were the three 1989 to 1995 Batman movies when I was a kid. I liked all three more than Deliverance. The bits of the newer ones I’ve seen on TV didn’t seem very good.

    I think movies on planes seem better because you have less oxygen in your brain and are bored and stuck sitting.
  116. @Bizarro World Observer
    Sure they did. Trust me, I was there.

    Not to mention armpits ...

    I was too. And Scandinavian girls with furry legs (doesn’t look that bad when their hair is blond). But I never saw eyebrows like that except on Henry Kissinger.

  117. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Naaah, Scarlet J is a nothing, she excels at playing numbed creatures whose souls are dead, maybe she's drawing from autobiography, who knows.

    The only real electric top-shelf actress these days is Jennifer Lawrence, who is alive in every cell in her body and loving every second of it. Honestly I don't know how she does it, that level of concentration would kill me in half an hour. I don't even like half of her movies, it's just that she's a genuine screen presence, haven't seen anything like it since the terrifying Priscilla Smith in Elektra and Medea. Well, that's stage, but still. I suppose maybe Patti Smith might count, on her good days.

    70s is salvageable for McCabe and Mrs Miller, Apocalypse Now, and the mighty Nashville. Also lots of great trashy B movies.

    The 80s I missed, becuz too busy paying attention to the Wooster Group. If you weren't watching "L.S.D.", well, I just hope the John Hughes movies were cute.

    Man, you said it. The 70s had the BEST trashy B movies

    Let’s give a special mention to my most favorite trashy 70s B movie, ‘Framed,’ starring the incomparable Joe Don Baker

    • Replies: @Dave
    For the love of God... is that Terry Bradshaw ?
  118. @SunBakedSuburb
    "I suppose this is why most ... movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable."

    If you mean Ingmar Bergman's movies from the 1970s (let's include all of his movies) then yes, you are correct. Swedes are even more prone to navel-gazing than American blacks, which is saying something. If you are including films like Apocalypse Now (1979), The Parallax View (1974), The Man Who Would Be King (1975), The French Connection (1971), Deliverance (1972), Dirty Harry (1971), Clockwork Orange (1971), The Last Detail (1973), Phase IV (1974), The Taking Of Pelham 123 (1974), Jaws (1975), The Three Musketeers (1973), The Four Musketeers (1974), Across 110th Street (1972), Mr. Majestyk (1974), White Lightning (1973), Earthquake (1974), Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid (1973), Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia (1974), Papillon (1973), The Deer Hunter (1978), Let's Scare Jessica To Death (1971), Conquest Of The Planet Of The Apes (1972), Klute (1971), Soylent Green (1973), The Omega Man (1971), Zardoz (1974), Rollerball (1975), Picnic At Hanging Rock (1975), Rocky (1976), Network (1976), The Exorcist (1973), Barry Lyndon (1975), The Kremlin Letter (1970), The Andromeda Strain (1971), Get Carter (1971), Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (1978), Jeremiah Johnson (1972), The Conversation (1974), and the list goes on, then you don't know what you're talking about.

    Jeremiah Johnson (1972)

    Everything a movie should be, and none of the things it shouldn’t be.

  119. @Art Deco
    Do you have any hobbies other than watching movies?

    While we're at it Barry Lyndon was the most soporific mess I've ever had to sit through, with the exception of Withnail and I (which Stanley Kauffman thought was the candy).

    Barry Lyndon was the most soporific mess I’ve ever had to sit through

    Interesting – not the opinion I’d have expected from you…so cautious, so careful, so methodical, but Barry Lyndon puts you to sleep?

    • Replies: @Alden
    I never saw Barry Lyndon till they had the video at block busters. Absolutely loved loved loved it. Best parts were what put you to sleep. All those long shots were based on 18th century English and French paintings of wealthy people and their grand landscapes and houses. You must like a fast moving plot and action. I like looking at beautiful pictures. Different movies for different people

    It’s based on a true story of a long legal battle between husband and wife. She was a countess in her own right and great heiress in her own right. Like all women with a bit of money, she had a marriage contract preserving her money capital and property for herself and any children, just generous spousal support for husband

    BUT

    Elizabeth 1’s handlers, Cecil father and son made their fortunes by marrying the wealthiest heiresses in Britain. They told Elizabeth to sign the law they made giving all a married woman’s property earnings income and possessions to the husband. As always, ER 1 did as Cecil told her.

    IN REACTION

    Parents attorneys and guardians of women with money and income of their own created air tight marriage contracts that kept the money out of the hands of greedy or improvident husbands like Barry Lyndon.

    It was a family and marriage law attorneys full employment act.

    The real Barry Lyndon was Andrew Stoney. The real countess was Scots. At one point, he locked his countess up in one of her castles to force her to sign away her marriage contract so he could invoke the English law giving him everything.

    I think the Countess was a Bowes Lyon Countess but couldn’t find her name with a quick internet search. It was a major scandal at the time.

    Different movies for different folks. That’s why you fell asleep and I loved loved loved it. Husband didn’t like it either. He called it the art museum movie and read a book.

  120. @NickG

    Meryl Streep in “Manhattan” and “Kramer vs. Kramer.
     
    Both were dire pretentious dross.

    Agree agree agree agree. Saw them in TV decades later. Kramer was insane. That’s really not how family divorce court works as anyone who’s ever gotten divorced or worked for a family law firm knows. Family court judges hate all that petty garbage that other parent doesn’t go to soccer games because they work Saturdays. Or who didn’t buy new shoes.

    The only 70’s movie I remember seeing wasGodfather. 4 little ones, both working and commuting, real estate investing and being landlords we didn’t have time. Husband preferred occasional rock concerts to weekly movies anyway. We’re both readers not movie goers. TV’s for little kids so they can watch cartoons and animal shows.

    Janis Joplin was a tenant. We evicted her for non payment of rent and spent a weekend cleaning out her trash after she moved. She even clogged up the little gas tubes under the stove burners with grease and gunk. Pure vinegar got rid of the grease and gunk.

    As I remember, except for long straight maxi skirts 70’s women’s clothes were beautiful. Long red hair, butter scotch colored deer skin skirts with laces instead of zippers, Afghani sheepskin coats those were the days! . Pretty flower print or bright colored Dresses and skirts instead of black pantsuits for work and black men’s T shirts and shabby black pants for leisure

    BBB is my motto, ban black and beige. 70’s dresses had fitted waists and belts. This years dresses are just a mass of fabric flowing from shoulder to mid calf no bust no waist no hip. At one time that style was 7th 8th month maternity wear. Now it’s for everybody and has a label size 2 or 4. Maybe size 2 is the new code for 200 pounds

  121. @J.Ross
    Barry Lyndon is the perfect movie for a certain kind of theatregoer (who would probably also enjoy The Duellists) but I can understand people finding it pretentious or insufferable. I enjoyed Electra Glide In Blue, having had it recommended as Robert Blake's best performance, but it bombed when it first came out, and that makes sense given the wrong impression that it's an action movie or a standard entertainment.

    I remember Rolling Stone promoting the hell out of EGB, for some reason, I think ’cause Chicago’s producer was involved. Saw it on TV a couple years ago, seemed pretty good after all.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    And it was very much a generational conflict statement without being obviously pro-hippie: the police department's marksmanship target is a blown-up still of Easy Rider, police planting evidence and relying on intimidation is a major theme.
    Chicago's producer pursued it like a life project and Chicago itself did the music and played bit parts.
  122. @Vinteuil

    Barry Lyndon was the most soporific mess I’ve ever had to sit through
     
    Interesting - not the opinion I'd have expected from you...so cautious, so careful, so methodical, but Barry Lyndon puts you to sleep?

    I never saw Barry Lyndon till they had the video at block busters. Absolutely loved loved loved it. Best parts were what put you to sleep. All those long shots were based on 18th century English and French paintings of wealthy people and their grand landscapes and houses. You must like a fast moving plot and action. I like looking at beautiful pictures. Different movies for different people

    It’s based on a true story of a long legal battle between husband and wife. She was a countess in her own right and great heiress in her own right. Like all women with a bit of money, she had a marriage contract preserving her money capital and property for herself and any children, just generous spousal support for husband

    BUT

    Elizabeth 1’s handlers, Cecil father and son made their fortunes by marrying the wealthiest heiresses in Britain. They told Elizabeth to sign the law they made giving all a married woman’s property earnings income and possessions to the husband. As always, ER 1 did as Cecil told her.

    IN REACTION

    Parents attorneys and guardians of women with money and income of their own created air tight marriage contracts that kept the money out of the hands of greedy or improvident husbands like Barry Lyndon.

    It was a family and marriage law attorneys full employment act.

    The real Barry Lyndon was Andrew Stoney. The real countess was Scots. At one point, he locked his countess up in one of her castles to force her to sign away her marriage contract so he could invoke the English law giving him everything.

    I think the Countess was a Bowes Lyon Countess but couldn’t find her name with a quick internet search. It was a major scandal at the time.

    Different movies for different folks. That’s why you fell asleep and I loved loved loved it. Husband didn’t like it either. He called it the art museum movie and read a book.

    • Replies: @Vinteuil
    ...you fell asleep and I loved loved loved it...

    No, it's Art Deco who found it "soporific."
  123. @Art Deco
    Do you have any hobbies other than watching movies?

    While we're at it Barry Lyndon was the most soporific mess I've ever had to sit through, with the exception of Withnail and I (which Stanley Kauffman thought was the candy).

    I defy anyone to show me a worse film than ‘Boxing Helena’.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    You may have a winner there.
    , @J.Ross
    Was it technically inept or are you just objecting to one man's quest to fight hypergamy? That and a zombie flick are all that came of the hottest girl in Twin Peaks.
    Have you seen Bakshi's Heavy Traffic or Coonskin? What about Valley of the Wolves: Palestine, or the second Expendables flick?
    I've got it: Hope Floats!
    , @JMcG
    Cabin Boy with Chris Elliott. I thought his tv show was funny, but that was the worst movie I can imagine.
  124. @Buzz Mohawk

    ...plodding pretentious snorefests (Apocalypse Now...)
     
    Finally, someone else who realizes how bad Apocalypse Now is!

    The "Ride of the Valkyries" is a great scene though.

    “Finally, someone else who realizes how bad Apocalypse Now is!

    The “Ride of the Valkyries” is a great scene though.”

    Agree that it was a superb scene within a pretentious snorefest.

    Deliverance was similar: the Dueling Banjos scene and the short setup before it was a classic, the rest of the movie both bad and offensive.

  125. @American
    Off the topic. But ,I couldn't resist.
    Miscegenation seems to be the biggest threat to Whites.
    I mean just look at the number of Interracial couples and their influence.
    Blacks who are born and raised in the West are the luckiest folks.
    They are great athletes and when they hit the Jackpot, they go on to grab a blonde and have babies with her.
    I was pleasantly surprised that Lindsey Vonn, the blue eyed blonde American beauty of Norwegian descent has decided to marry an ugly but rich Black Canadian NHL player.
    Seriously, she could have got almost any White hunk from NFL and have beautiful babies but she chose Subban.
    Similarly, In Tennis Two Indian(dots) players married White tennis female players. Allison Riske and Sam Murray married Indian players.
    A Ukrainian player called Svitolina is in relationship with a French Negro.

    Can anybody explain to me why is this phenomena so rampant nowadays??

    Lindsey Vonn was a huge surprise as I thought she just plays with her Black pets for a few days and moves on to greener pastures. It's so weird.
    I guess, what Tiny Duck says is becoming the truth.
    More and more white women are in relationships with Blacks and other non whites.

    True….Pew research recently reported that 24%of Black male marriages were to non-Black females in 2017

    Thus more than 1 in 5 Black men who got married had a white wife. But only 1 in 25 Black females married a white guy.

    • Replies: @Alden
    Were those marriages of black men to White women or black men to non black women of all races? How could they? Even for a green card.
  126. @Dieter Kief
    Barry Lyndon is all style and (artsy) grace and - humor, lots of it - style, ruse, wit & humor. I saw it at a Christmas holiday, the city was all covered in fog, low temperatures, clumsy jacket, and I remember how I felt when I left the movie-theater: Lightheaded and full of joy! Obviously, there' two of them out - most likely lots of 'em!

    I didn’t mean to bash Barry Lyndon, it was overall moderately entertaining. And I watched it in 2016, I can imagine it seemed better by the standards of the time.

    • Replies: @Vinteuil
    All of Kubrick's movies get better, and more interesting, with repeated viewing. Even The Shining & Eyes Wide Shut.
  127. Tv was better. You had Lyndsey Wagner in Bionic Woman, Cheryl Ladd in Charlie’s Angels, and so on.

  128. @SunBakedSuburb
    I am dismayed by the number of seemingly intelligent white women who are in the vanguard of the ridiculous yet dangerous Woke cultural revolution. That being said I think there are reasons why you may not be popular with the ladies.

    “I think there are reasons why you may not be popular with the ladies.”

    There are. Unlike most men, I’m fine with that.

  129. @Dave Pinsen
    One of my most unpopular takes on Twitter was that ‘80s movies were better than ‘70s movies in the same genres (with a couple of exceptions).

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1038218996359806976?s=21

    Everything sucked in the 70’s because we were, strangely, relatively impoverished – and so ‘production values’ sucked in 70’s movies. But the film-makers compensated by utilizing grimey sets and downscale milieus. Look at Sutherland’s apartment in “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” – or even Brooke Adams’s upscale apartment – and imagine how those would be staged today. But 70’s movies were more realistic – not everyone had a Vulcan stove, streets were grimey. Overall, movies felt far more real. So I think Megan was right – everything sucked in the 70’s, but movies, incongruously, were – as a result – good!

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Everything sucked in the 70’s because we were, strangely, relatively impoverished – and so ‘production values’ sucked in 70’s movies
     
    Production values sucked in 70’s movies because the studio system collapsed in the late 50s. The studio system was an incredibly efficient way of making movies that were very professional and very p0lished. Plus TV had crippled Hollywood financially. Plus Hollywood had crippled itself financially with a series of ludicrously expensive box office bombs in the 60s (Dr Dolittle, Hello Dolly, Darling Lili, etc) and even the movies that did well at the box office (like Cleopatra) were so expensive they lost money. Plus the New American Cinema that critics loved so much was generally seen by the public as pretentious trash so they stayed home. Plus there was the cult of realism, a reaction against the glitz and glamour of 50s Hollywood, so movie-makers were making movies that looked cheap and tawdry as an Artistic Statement.

    Society in the 70s was actually less impoverished than it is today.
  130. gutta percha [AKA "gp"] says:
    @Corvinus
    "Ummm, how is that substantially different from the women of 2019? They’re all still nuts."

    As Alt Right leader would say, spoken like a true gamma.

    "Then we can stop listening to women altogether..."

    Who is this "we"?

    "Read the Bible. For thousands of years, we knew that women were weak, stupid, disobedient, scheming and treacherous."

    Replace "women" with "men and women" and you would hit the mark.

    "Around the year 1900, we forgot all that, and that’s how we got the debacle of the Kavanaugh hearings, and many other societal face-slaps, follies and failures.."

    Is that you, Roosh V?

    “As Alt Right leader would say, spoken like a true gamma.”

    You may very well be right! Please define “gamma,” so I can know for sure.

    I’m not “Roosh V.” I’m just an ordinary garden-variety misogynist. It’s a hatred we learn, not one that we are born with.

    The video at the top of this post is Sailer’s Rashomon. Some people see it as a distillation of 70’s movie tropes. I see only another typically annoying woman.

  131. @Spect3r
    Ah... what European countries have you visited?
    Because as a south European i can tell you that yuo are dead wrong.

    Ah… what European countries have you visited?
    Because as a south European i can tell you that yuo are dead wrong.

    Every one NW of a line from Finland to Portugal, save Ireland and Wales. Sadly, not Italy or Greece yet. Maybe they’re an exception to what I’ve observed elsewhere– continentals are deadpan.

    Danes and Finns exploit this trait for humor, and are good at it. The rest? Not so much. German humor seems especially infantile, probably a release from their normal earnestness.

  132. @Vinteuil
    Btw - I wonder why you put "Deliverance" in the "actively bad" category. I finally saw it for the first time on one of those little back-of-the-seat-in-front-of-you screens on a flight to Prague, last May, 'cause it was featured, & it was a "classic," & I hadn't seen it before, so why not?

    Anyway, I thought it was really interesting - even engrossing. There were some serious themes in play. Some of the acting was downright charismatic. All in all, definitely more worth the time it took to watch than any of the comic-book movies that seem to dominate the cineplexes today.

    So what's your beef?

    Not necessarily disagreeing, just curious,

    P.S.: Mark Steyn's review is worth reading:

    https://www.steynonline.com/8803/deliverance

    It offensively plays poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred (both not true), and also just wasn’t very entertaining or interesting.

    “definitely more worth the time it took to watch than any of the comic-book movies that seem to dominate the cineplexes today.”

    The only comic book movies I’ve seen in my life were the three 1989 to 1995 Batman movies when I was a kid. I liked all three more than Deliverance. The bits of the newer ones I’ve seen on TV didn’t seem very good.

    I think movies on planes seem better because you have less oxygen in your brain and are bored and stuck sitting.

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    It offensively plays poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred (both not true),
     
    In that respect Deliverance was just an extreme example of an attitude that was, and is, all-pervasive in the American entertainment industry. Watch some American TV of the 60s. Again and again you'll find rural Americans portrayed as violent knuckle-dragging rednecks out to get poor innocent city folk who are foolish enough to venture outside the big city.
    , @Vinteuil

    It offensively plays poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred (both not true)
     
    OK, I realize that stereotyping poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred has, in the past, and continues, now, to lead to some bad stuff - but is it really "not true?"
  133. @R.G. Camara
    Yeah, I insult an insular filmmaker/child molester who made far more entertaining and clever films in the distant past and whose movies on the whole (witha few exceptions) became turgid wordy boringness based on psychobabble and soulmates nonsense that have been overpraised because he is the same ethnicity as many of the critics and people who employ critics. .

    And then praised a dude's early standup bit who nailed an aspect of the 1970s that applied to this girl's clothing.

    I must be a heathen barbarian! (/sarcasm).

    Seriously, the fact that you tried to shame me with your supercilious "Woody Allen is a comedic genius/Leary is an unfunny buffoon" nonsensical dichotomy says more about you and your low IQ than anything else.

    I’ve seen exactly one Woody Allen movie: Mighty Aphrodite, because the girl I was dating at the time was hot and loved romcom’s and I thought young Mira Sorvino was hot as well.

    I wasn’t impressed.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    You should see Sleeper, Bananas, Hannah and Her Sisters, and Annie Hall. Those are the indispensable Allens, everything else he did was a curiosity you can do without. Although I've heard good things about Midnight in Paris and enjoyed What's Up, Tiger Lily?, EYAWTKASBWATS ("WHAT AM I DOING HERE?!"), and Love and Death. Zelig was influential but has aged terribly, it's lost all its intrigue and the pacing is now wrong.
  134. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Naaah, Scarlet J is a nothing, she excels at playing numbed creatures whose souls are dead, maybe she's drawing from autobiography, who knows.

    The only real electric top-shelf actress these days is Jennifer Lawrence, who is alive in every cell in her body and loving every second of it. Honestly I don't know how she does it, that level of concentration would kill me in half an hour. I don't even like half of her movies, it's just that she's a genuine screen presence, haven't seen anything like it since the terrifying Priscilla Smith in Elektra and Medea. Well, that's stage, but still. I suppose maybe Patti Smith might count, on her good days.

    70s is salvageable for McCabe and Mrs Miller, Apocalypse Now, and the mighty Nashville. Also lots of great trashy B movies.

    The 80s I missed, becuz too busy paying attention to the Wooster Group. If you weren't watching "L.S.D.", well, I just hope the John Hughes movies were cute.

    “The only real electric top-shelf actress these days is Jennifer Lawrence, ”

    She’s never once played a character I would consider likable.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Not interested in likeable, interested in electric. Does anybody actually LIKE Elektra? Jennifer Lawrence really, REALLY needs to play Cordelia and Portia and Isabella, and get it on film before she gets too old, which is really soon. Steven and Jeffrey, will you please get going on this?

    For those of you complaining about Deliverance, please keep in mind that James Dickey was a poet before he was anything else.
  135. @Achmed E. Newman
    She reminds me of only one particular woman in a 1970's movie, which is the lady with the waistless pants that Clint Eastwood was trying to bring in to LA for a trial - The Gauntlet. She sounds EXACTLY like her, and I think that's who she had in her head doing this funny parody.

    I like how they shot up the house so much in the beginning that it just finally collapsed. That's a lot of lead.
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Thank you. I didn't look it up because I thought it would come to me. I know she was in more Clint Eastwood movies.
  136. I don’t think anyone has mentioned one of the big let-down flops of the early 70s, despite a stellar cast and crew — Catch-22. MASH stole all the anti-war black-comedy thunder. People remember Hot Lips Houlihan and not Nurse Duckett

  137. @dr kill
    I defy anyone to show me a worse film than 'Boxing Helena'.

    You may have a winner there.

  138. @danand

    “For instance, Friedkin’s importance in film history owes to his two 70s flicks, French Connection and Exorcist, but his best film by far is To Live and Die in LA that neither got the critical or commercial success it warranted.”
     

    #202,

    I agree with you on To Live & Die in LA; both William Petersen’s & Willem Dafoe’s performances were memorable. It’s always been a little odd to me that none of the movie buffs I’ve conversed with say they have seen it, nor do they have any awareness of it. Especially so given the impression it left me with.

    It’s great.

  139. @James J. O'Meara
    I remember Rolling Stone promoting the hell out of EGB, for some reason, I think 'cause Chicago's producer was involved. Saw it on TV a couple years ago, seemed pretty good after all.

    And it was very much a generational conflict statement without being obviously pro-hippie: the police department’s marksmanship target is a blown-up still of Easy Rider, police planting evidence and relying on intimidation is a major theme.
    Chicago’s producer pursued it like a life project and Chicago itself did the music and played bit parts.

  140. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Anybody can be forgiven for not liking Apocalypse Now, it's such a huge, crazy, shambling creature, it's easy to see how a reasonable person might hate it. However, if you get yourself into a certain frame of mind, it's highly rewarding. It may not be a great film, strictly speaking, but it is a great..... something. I saw it on its opening night when I was a little kid, and I was totally hypnotized. (I'm not sure, but I think on opening night it had a different ending, and then it got cut up again and changed shortly after,that's how nutty Coppola was at the time, and that's how much clout he had in the wake of The Godfather.). Probably seen it at least 20 times since then.

    It's a different animal than "Heart of Darkness," it uses that as the base material and then turns into something entirely different. The two closest analogs to my mind are Bergman's "Persona" and Disney's "Frozen": in all three movies, an ostensibly ordinary person is forced to undergo a difficult journey in order to confront an enchanted person, with devastating consequences. I think maybe Coppola was really talking to himself: the ordinary skilled craftsman in him who made The Godfather, confronting the visionary madman he also had inside him.

    Plus, one of the great opening lines in cinema.... "Saigon. (pause) Shit."

    I also enjoyed “Apocalypse Now.” It’s full of great, memorable scenes. The shorter theatrical release is better than the director’s cut, which was too long and tedious.

    Shortly after I saw it I was at a party where a man I didn’t know asked if I’d seen it, and if I had, did I like it? I told him I had seen it and liked it a lot, which annoyed the man greatly. He demanded that I explain how I could have liked the movie. What was I supposed to say? I liked it, he didn’t, neither of us was going to change his subjective reaction.

    • Replies: @gutta percha
    Was anybody else forced to write a ten page essay on "Heart of Darkness" in school? Ugh. I actually authored mine myself, unlike the far smarter students who purchased theirs, thereby avoiding having to read that tedious crap. I wrote that Marlowe was as big a POS as his employers were, but it was a stretch to fill ten pages. I don't remember my grade. The Roeg movie adaptation was worse than the novel, an achievement that must have taken great effort.
  141. @dr kill
    I defy anyone to show me a worse film than 'Boxing Helena'.

    Was it technically inept or are you just objecting to one man’s quest to fight hypergamy? That and a zombie flick are all that came of the hottest girl in Twin Peaks.
    Have you seen Bakshi’s Heavy Traffic or Coonskin? What about Valley of the Wolves: Palestine, or the second Expendables flick?
    I’ve got it: Hope Floats!

  142. @Jack D
    Women in the 70s didn't have eyebrows like furry caterpillars.

    Women in the 70s didn’t have eyebrows like furry caterpillars.

    No, you must be thinking about their muffs.

  143. @Forbes
    The '70s were the first decade of rampant on-screen sex and nudity as the pendulum swung hard in the opposite direction from the '50s when married couples were portrayed on-screen as sleeping in separate beds.

    The sex and nudity were over-the-top, gratuitous, and unnecessary for plot or character development. Also, the fashion attire was ugly. YMMV.

    McArdle was born in 1973.

    The sex and nudity were over-the-top, gratuitous, and unnecessary for plot or character development. Also, the fashion attire was ugly.

    Due to the ugliness of the fashion attire, the nudity was welcome.

  144. @American
    Off the topic. But ,I couldn't resist.
    Miscegenation seems to be the biggest threat to Whites.
    I mean just look at the number of Interracial couples and their influence.
    Blacks who are born and raised in the West are the luckiest folks.
    They are great athletes and when they hit the Jackpot, they go on to grab a blonde and have babies with her.
    I was pleasantly surprised that Lindsey Vonn, the blue eyed blonde American beauty of Norwegian descent has decided to marry an ugly but rich Black Canadian NHL player.
    Seriously, she could have got almost any White hunk from NFL and have beautiful babies but she chose Subban.
    Similarly, In Tennis Two Indian(dots) players married White tennis female players. Allison Riske and Sam Murray married Indian players.
    A Ukrainian player called Svitolina is in relationship with a French Negro.

    Can anybody explain to me why is this phenomena so rampant nowadays??

    Lindsey Vonn was a huge surprise as I thought she just plays with her Black pets for a few days and moves on to greener pastures. It's so weird.
    I guess, what Tiny Duck says is becoming the truth.
    More and more white women are in relationships with Blacks and other non whites.

    I was pleasantly surprised that Lindsey Vonn, the blue eyed blonde American beauty of Norwegian descent has decided to marry an ugly but rich Black Canadian NHL player.

    Okay, come back after she has a child or two and the “rich Black Canadian NHL player” has moved on to wife number 2 (then 3, then 4 then 5). This can go on until the victims recognize the swindle. Vonn will wonder why she was abandoned, and maybe some white cuck will rescue her (it might be worth it for the cuck, who knows). But hockey bigman won’t be walking the daughter down the aisle on wedding day.

  145. God that’s brilliant. I think I’m in love.

  146. @MikeatMikedotMike
    I've seen exactly one Woody Allen movie: Mighty Aphrodite, because the girl I was dating at the time was hot and loved romcom's and I thought young Mira Sorvino was hot as well.

    I wasn't impressed.

    You should see Sleeper, Bananas, Hannah and Her Sisters, and Annie Hall. Those are the indispensable Allens, everything else he did was a curiosity you can do without. Although I’ve heard good things about Midnight in Paris and enjoyed What’s Up, Tiger Lily?, EYAWTKASBWATS (“WHAT AM I DOING HERE?!”), and Love and Death. Zelig was influential but has aged terribly, it’s lost all its intrigue and the pacing is now wrong.

  147. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Man, you said it. The 70s had the BEST trashy B movies

    Let's give a special mention to my most favorite trashy 70s B movie, 'Framed,' starring the incomparable Joe Don Baker

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HK0bUT1t6lE

    For the love of God… is that Terry Bradshaw ?

  148. @R.G. Camara
    I suppose this is why most "adult" movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable. Depressingly, unsexily dressed bland women lecturing us with the same hostile feminist cliches mixed with some therapy-laden pseudoscientific jargon. Like really boring nails on a chalkboard.

    Woody Allen for some reason thought this sort of idea was superior to his previous slapstick farces. Of course, Woody also thinks molesting his own daughter is ok, so I guess that explains that.

    At least in previous eras when the director wanted to lecture us with feminist nonsense they'd make the females look sexually attractive and avoid these wanna-be intellectual but really nagging tones.

    One of the reasons the 1970s failed in their attempts to revive the "screwball" genre was the fact that 1930s and 40s screwball women were feminine, beautiful, and funny. In the 1970s women were uglified and determined to hide their femininity as much as possible. Can you imagine Carole Lombard or Myrna Loy or Rosalind Russell looking as drab and sounding as lecturing as this? Talk about unfunny! The closest you could think of was Katherine Hepburn, and she was famously "box office poison" until she learned to act and hide her feminazi disdain and act like she actually liked the men with her (as she did with Cary Grant in Bringing up Baby, where she played a rich ditz similar to a Carole Lombard role).

    Comedian Denis Leary had a bit where he joked that, growing up in the 1970s, the fashions were so ugly that the people were all wearing clothes guaranteed not to get them laid despite the sexual revolution. Combine that with these look-down-their-noses-and-condescend attitudes and I think it was the most perfect birth control for these women.

    I suppose this is why most “adult” movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable.

    You were not there when I was watching “Once is not Enough” on the first night out with my girlfriend’s parents.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0073190/characters/nm0882853?ref_=tt_cl_t7

    Brenda Vaccaro playing Linda Riggs said something like, “well, I screwed my way into this job, I can screw my way into another.” I fought the impulse, but it did not work. I burst out laughing and it took me the better part of two minutes to suppress it. And I laughed again at the end of random intervals all the way home.

    Her parents were not amused.

    But it was not boring. Sick and deranged, yes, but not boring.

  149. gutta percha [AKA "gp"] says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    I also enjoyed "Apocalypse Now." It's full of great, memorable scenes. The shorter theatrical release is better than the director's cut, which was too long and tedious.

    Shortly after I saw it I was at a party where a man I didn't know asked if I'd seen it, and if I had, did I like it? I told him I had seen it and liked it a lot, which annoyed the man greatly. He demanded that I explain how I could have liked the movie. What was I supposed to say? I liked it, he didn't, neither of us was going to change his subjective reaction.

    Was anybody else forced to write a ten page essay on “Heart of Darkness” in school? Ugh. I actually authored mine myself, unlike the far smarter students who purchased theirs, thereby avoiding having to read that tedious crap. I wrote that Marlowe was as big a POS as his employers were, but it was a stretch to fill ten pages. I don’t remember my grade. The Roeg movie adaptation was worse than the novel, an achievement that must have taken great effort.

  150. @MikeatMikedotMike
    "The only real electric top-shelf actress these days is Jennifer Lawrence, "

    She's never once played a character I would consider likable.

    Not interested in likeable, interested in electric. Does anybody actually LIKE Elektra? Jennifer Lawrence really, REALLY needs to play Cordelia and Portia and Isabella, and get it on film before she gets too old, which is really soon. Steven and Jeffrey, will you please get going on this?

    For those of you complaining about Deliverance, please keep in mind that James Dickey was a poet before he was anything else.

    • Replies: @black sea

    For those of you complaining about Deliverance, please keep in mind that James Dickey was a poet before he was anything else.
     
    Actually, the novel is well worth reading on its own merits and is in a number of ways more interesting than the film. Dickey's four main characters are a bit too much "types," but his gift for description is remarkable and he definitely has a feel for narrative. This is how he describes the beginning of the "Dueling Banjos" scene:

    He came back and behind him was an albino boy with pink eyes like a white rabbit’s; one of them stared off at a furious and complicated angle. That was the eye he looked at us with, and with his face set in another direction. The sane, rational eye was fixed on something that wasn’t there, somewhere in the dust of the road. ‘Git yer banjo,’ the old man said, and then to Drew, ‘Come on, play us a little something.’
     
  151. @SunBakedSuburb
    "I suppose this is why most ... movies from the 1970s are so dreadfully boring and unwatchable."

    If you mean Ingmar Bergman's movies from the 1970s (let's include all of his movies) then yes, you are correct. Swedes are even more prone to navel-gazing than American blacks, which is saying something. If you are including films like Apocalypse Now (1979), The Parallax View (1974), The Man Who Would Be King (1975), The French Connection (1971), Deliverance (1972), Dirty Harry (1971), Clockwork Orange (1971), The Last Detail (1973), Phase IV (1974), The Taking Of Pelham 123 (1974), Jaws (1975), The Three Musketeers (1973), The Four Musketeers (1974), Across 110th Street (1972), Mr. Majestyk (1974), White Lightning (1973), Earthquake (1974), Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid (1973), Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia (1974), Papillon (1973), The Deer Hunter (1978), Let's Scare Jessica To Death (1971), Conquest Of The Planet Of The Apes (1972), Klute (1971), Soylent Green (1973), The Omega Man (1971), Zardoz (1974), Rollerball (1975), Picnic At Hanging Rock (1975), Rocky (1976), Network (1976), The Exorcist (1973), Barry Lyndon (1975), The Kremlin Letter (1970), The Andromeda Strain (1971), Get Carter (1971), Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (1978), Jeremiah Johnson (1972), The Conversation (1974), and the list goes on, then you don't know what you're talking about.

    The 70’s 3 and 4 Musketeers were the absolutely totally best of all the Musketeer movies.

    Except for the outdoor scenes. They were filmed in a brown beige desert region of Spain. They actually took place in northwest France, western France and in and around Paris and south east England some of the greenest rainiest regions in Europe.

    Everything just sublime, costumes Michael York, Richelieu Chaplin as the Queen except for the outdoor scenes everything was perfect Raquel Welch and her gold dress and perfect shade of brown hair. Faye Dunaway’s cheekbones. All the Queen’s clothes

    Totally a visual delight

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    The 70’s 3 and 4 Musketeers were the absolutely totally best of all the Musketeer movies.
     
    Agreed. Awesome casts. Oliver Reed! Plus Charlton Heston was a superb Richelieu.

    Also Richard Lester's slightly later Royal Flash is very underrated.
  152. @Prodigal son
    True....Pew research recently reported that 24%of Black male marriages were to non-Black females in 2017

    Thus more than 1 in 5 Black men who got married had a white wife. But only 1 in 25 Black females married a white guy.

    Were those marriages of black men to White women or black men to non black women of all races? How could they? Even for a green card.

  153. @Duke84
    She really didn't like Mondays.

  154. @Corvinus
    "Ummm, how is that substantially different from the women of 2019? They’re all still nuts."

    As Alt Right leader would say, spoken like a true gamma.

    "Then we can stop listening to women altogether..."

    Who is this "we"?

    "Read the Bible. For thousands of years, we knew that women were weak, stupid, disobedient, scheming and treacherous."

    Replace "women" with "men and women" and you would hit the mark.

    "Around the year 1900, we forgot all that, and that’s how we got the debacle of the Kavanaugh hearings, and many other societal face-slaps, follies and failures.."

    Is that you, Roosh V?

    Keep in mind technology has been able to sustain a exponential growth rate in stupidity. People can broadcast stupid across the globe in the blink of an eye. It’s been able to enable our quickest impulse response without any time to digest and reflect.

  155. • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Carol dropped out of the top 1000 names given to baby girls some years ago.

    When there are two spellings (for girls; another for boys), it will lower the ranking-- true of Stephen/Steven as well-- but that isn't the main factor here. Carol disappeared in 2007, Carole in 1978.

    Compare that with the many spellings, and more misspellings, of Michaela now in the top 1000.


    https://www.ssa.gov/cgi-bin/babyname.cgi
  156. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Not interested in likeable, interested in electric. Does anybody actually LIKE Elektra? Jennifer Lawrence really, REALLY needs to play Cordelia and Portia and Isabella, and get it on film before she gets too old, which is really soon. Steven and Jeffrey, will you please get going on this?

    For those of you complaining about Deliverance, please keep in mind that James Dickey was a poet before he was anything else.

    For those of you complaining about Deliverance, please keep in mind that James Dickey was a poet before he was anything else.

    Actually, the novel is well worth reading on its own merits and is in a number of ways more interesting than the film. Dickey’s four main characters are a bit too much “types,” but his gift for description is remarkable and he definitely has a feel for narrative. This is how he describes the beginning of the “Dueling Banjos” scene:

    He came back and behind him was an albino boy with pink eyes like a white rabbit’s; one of them stared off at a furious and complicated angle. That was the eye he looked at us with, and with his face set in another direction. The sane, rational eye was fixed on something that wasn’t there, somewhere in the dust of the road. ‘Git yer banjo,’ the old man said, and then to Drew, ‘Come on, play us a little something.’

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    "an albino boy's with pink eyes like a white rabbit's; one of them stared off at a furious and complicated angle."

    A furious and complicated angle. Robert Penn Warren, your three o'clock is here.

    Like I said, James Dickey was a poet before all else. Read "The Strength of Fields" or "The Bee" some time. It'll put some hairs on yer chest.
  157. @Known Fact
    Sandra Locke, Eastwood's gal pal for more than a decade

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/sondra-locke-death-obituary-clint-eastwood-overshadowed-age-a8711871.html

    Thank you. I didn’t look it up because I thought it would come to me. I know she was in more Clint Eastwood movies.

  158. @Reg Cæsar

    That reminds me, to this day I still haven’t watched ET...
     
    When Star Wars came out in 1977, I noticed the line at the theater and thought, I'll catch it later, when the crowds die down.

    I still haven't seen it.

    Damn dude, that is seriously pretty shocking.

    You’ve probably missed any chance you had to actually enjoy it, but you should probably still see it because… well, just because, you know.

    Or if you can’t be bothered doing that, watch the youtube channel Cinema Sins review of it for a bit of a laugh.

  159. @black sea

    For those of you complaining about Deliverance, please keep in mind that James Dickey was a poet before he was anything else.
     
    Actually, the novel is well worth reading on its own merits and is in a number of ways more interesting than the film. Dickey's four main characters are a bit too much "types," but his gift for description is remarkable and he definitely has a feel for narrative. This is how he describes the beginning of the "Dueling Banjos" scene:

    He came back and behind him was an albino boy with pink eyes like a white rabbit’s; one of them stared off at a furious and complicated angle. That was the eye he looked at us with, and with his face set in another direction. The sane, rational eye was fixed on something that wasn’t there, somewhere in the dust of the road. ‘Git yer banjo,’ the old man said, and then to Drew, ‘Come on, play us a little something.’
     

    “an albino boy’s with pink eyes like a white rabbit’s; one of them stared off at a furious and complicated angle.”

    A furious and complicated angle. Robert Penn Warren, your three o’clock is here.

    Like I said, James Dickey was a poet before all else. Read “The Strength of Fields” or “The Bee” some time. It’ll put some hairs on yer chest.

  160. @ziel
    Everything sucked in the 70's because we were, strangely, relatively impoverished - and so 'production values' sucked in 70's movies. But the film-makers compensated by utilizing grimey sets and downscale milieus. Look at Sutherland's apartment in "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" - or even Brooke Adams's upscale apartment - and imagine how those would be staged today. But 70's movies were more realistic - not everyone had a Vulcan stove, streets were grimey. Overall, movies felt far more real. So I think Megan was right - everything sucked in the 70's, but movies, incongruously, were - as a result - good!

    Everything sucked in the 70’s because we were, strangely, relatively impoverished – and so ‘production values’ sucked in 70’s movies

    Production values sucked in 70’s movies because the studio system collapsed in the late 50s. The studio system was an incredibly efficient way of making movies that were very professional and very p0lished. Plus TV had crippled Hollywood financially. Plus Hollywood had crippled itself financially with a series of ludicrously expensive box office bombs in the 60s (Dr Dolittle, Hello Dolly, Darling Lili, etc) and even the movies that did well at the box office (like Cleopatra) were so expensive they lost money. Plus the New American Cinema that critics loved so much was generally seen by the public as pretentious trash so they stayed home. Plus there was the cult of realism, a reaction against the glitz and glamour of 50s Hollywood, so movie-makers were making movies that looked cheap and tawdry as an Artistic Statement.

    Society in the 70s was actually less impoverished than it is today.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Also, 70s movies look crummy today often because the film stock has faded colors. Technicolor dye separations and Kodachrome held up fairly well whereas the chemistry in camera stock like 5247 and the release print stocks have horribly faded. I saw AMC showings of Dean Martin in two films, 1970's Airport and the unfinished 1962 Something's Got to Give a few years back.
    Airport was all faded and crummy looking. SGTG looked like a current release colorwise.

    The Seventies were the Sixties for middle class Middle America, but those who behaved were still in the happy days, so to speak, and for those who didn't the chickens usually hadn't come home to roost. High school educated people could still get union jobs and real estate to salary ratio was pretty good, and if you avoided the war zones crime wasn't a problem.

  161. @Lot
    It offensively plays poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred (both not true), and also just wasn’t very entertaining or interesting.

    “definitely more worth the time it took to watch than any of the comic-book movies that seem to dominate the cineplexes today.”

    The only comic book movies I’ve seen in my life were the three 1989 to 1995 Batman movies when I was a kid. I liked all three more than Deliverance. The bits of the newer ones I’ve seen on TV didn’t seem very good.

    I think movies on planes seem better because you have less oxygen in your brain and are bored and stuck sitting.

    It offensively plays poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred (both not true),

    In that respect Deliverance was just an extreme example of an attitude that was, and is, all-pervasive in the American entertainment industry. Watch some American TV of the 60s. Again and again you’ll find rural Americans portrayed as violent knuckle-dragging rednecks out to get poor innocent city folk who are foolish enough to venture outside the big city.

    • Replies: @Corn
    “ Watch some American TV of the 60s. Again and again you’ll find rural Americans portrayed as violent knuckle-dragging rednecks out to get poor innocent city folk who are foolish enough to venture outside the big city.”

    Andy Taylor and Barney Fife sure were savage.
  162. @Alden
    The 70’s 3 and 4 Musketeers were the absolutely totally best of all the Musketeer movies.

    Except for the outdoor scenes. They were filmed in a brown beige desert region of Spain. They actually took place in northwest France, western France and in and around Paris and south east England some of the greenest rainiest regions in Europe.

    Everything just sublime, costumes Michael York, Richelieu Chaplin as the Queen except for the outdoor scenes everything was perfect Raquel Welch and her gold dress and perfect shade of brown hair. Faye Dunaway’s cheekbones. All the Queen’s clothes

    Totally a visual delight

    The 70’s 3 and 4 Musketeers were the absolutely totally best of all the Musketeer movies.

    Agreed. Awesome casts. Oliver Reed! Plus Charlton Heston was a superb Richelieu.

    Also Richard Lester’s slightly later Royal Flash is very underrated.

  163. I’m so glad we’ve finally moved on from this post. My first though this morning was “Shelley Duvall!”

  164. @Alden
    I never saw Barry Lyndon till they had the video at block busters. Absolutely loved loved loved it. Best parts were what put you to sleep. All those long shots were based on 18th century English and French paintings of wealthy people and their grand landscapes and houses. You must like a fast moving plot and action. I like looking at beautiful pictures. Different movies for different people

    It’s based on a true story of a long legal battle between husband and wife. She was a countess in her own right and great heiress in her own right. Like all women with a bit of money, she had a marriage contract preserving her money capital and property for herself and any children, just generous spousal support for husband

    BUT

    Elizabeth 1’s handlers, Cecil father and son made their fortunes by marrying the wealthiest heiresses in Britain. They told Elizabeth to sign the law they made giving all a married woman’s property earnings income and possessions to the husband. As always, ER 1 did as Cecil told her.

    IN REACTION

    Parents attorneys and guardians of women with money and income of their own created air tight marriage contracts that kept the money out of the hands of greedy or improvident husbands like Barry Lyndon.

    It was a family and marriage law attorneys full employment act.

    The real Barry Lyndon was Andrew Stoney. The real countess was Scots. At one point, he locked his countess up in one of her castles to force her to sign away her marriage contract so he could invoke the English law giving him everything.

    I think the Countess was a Bowes Lyon Countess but couldn’t find her name with a quick internet search. It was a major scandal at the time.

    Different movies for different folks. That’s why you fell asleep and I loved loved loved it. Husband didn’t like it either. He called it the art museum movie and read a book.

    …you fell asleep and I loved loved loved it…

    No, it’s Art Deco who found it “soporific.”

  165. @Lot
    I didn’t mean to bash Barry Lyndon, it was overall moderately entertaining. And I watched it in 2016, I can imagine it seemed better by the standards of the time.

    All of Kubrick’s movies get better, and more interesting, with repeated viewing. Even The Shining & Eyes Wide Shut.

  166. @Lot
    It offensively plays poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred (both not true), and also just wasn’t very entertaining or interesting.

    “definitely more worth the time it took to watch than any of the comic-book movies that seem to dominate the cineplexes today.”

    The only comic book movies I’ve seen in my life were the three 1989 to 1995 Batman movies when I was a kid. I liked all three more than Deliverance. The bits of the newer ones I’ve seen on TV didn’t seem very good.

    I think movies on planes seem better because you have less oxygen in your brain and are bored and stuck sitting.

    It offensively plays poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred (both not true)

    OK, I realize that stereotyping poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred has, in the past, and continues, now, to lead to some bad stuff – but is it really “not true?”

    • Replies: @donvonburg

    OK, I realize that stereotyping poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred has, in the past, and continues, now, to lead to some bad stuff – but is it really “not true?”
     
    In a few places it is, but mostly not. Most Southern whites aren't that poor, and they are violent generally only when provoked. Violate the code of honor and fisticuffs generally ensue, depending on the severity, but death or really serious injuries, maiming, crippling is rare.

    Don't insult their mothers, their wives, their religion or their sense of dignity, and don't fool with other men's women. Don't steal, don't bear false witness, don't engage in fraud. And don't be a buttinski, or a pedant. If you are an outsider, talk less, listen more.

    If you can get along by following the rules you'll find the South amenable as far as people go, though the summer heat and humidity, the bugs, etc, are what they are. I'd live almost anywhere in he South over New York or New Jersey.
  167. @dfordoom

    It offensively plays poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred (both not true),
     
    In that respect Deliverance was just an extreme example of an attitude that was, and is, all-pervasive in the American entertainment industry. Watch some American TV of the 60s. Again and again you'll find rural Americans portrayed as violent knuckle-dragging rednecks out to get poor innocent city folk who are foolish enough to venture outside the big city.

    “ Watch some American TV of the 60s. Again and again you’ll find rural Americans portrayed as violent knuckle-dragging rednecks out to get poor innocent city folk who are foolish enough to venture outside the big city.”

    Andy Taylor and Barney Fife sure were savage.

  168. @dr kill
    I defy anyone to show me a worse film than 'Boxing Helena'.

    Cabin Boy with Chris Elliott. I thought his tv show was funny, but that was the worst movie I can imagine.

  169. I’m astonished Logan’s Run wasn’t mentioned. Jenny Agutter did a fairly decent job. Farrah Fawcett was also in that but she had no idea how to act then.

    I am not at all astonished no one mentioned Union City with Pat Benatar and Deborah Harry, but someone should have.

    • Replies: @donvonburg
    Logan's Run was one of the decade's best films, a SF film that made you really think, and it had a magnificently decadent style. Union City was a complete failure at conveying the essence of the Cornell Woolrich story it was based on, though Harry showed promise and looked good in the fashions of the day. The real talent in that movie was the late Dennis Lipscomb, whose career just never took off.
  170. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @dfordoom

    Everything sucked in the 70’s because we were, strangely, relatively impoverished – and so ‘production values’ sucked in 70’s movies
     
    Production values sucked in 70’s movies because the studio system collapsed in the late 50s. The studio system was an incredibly efficient way of making movies that were very professional and very p0lished. Plus TV had crippled Hollywood financially. Plus Hollywood had crippled itself financially with a series of ludicrously expensive box office bombs in the 60s (Dr Dolittle, Hello Dolly, Darling Lili, etc) and even the movies that did well at the box office (like Cleopatra) were so expensive they lost money. Plus the New American Cinema that critics loved so much was generally seen by the public as pretentious trash so they stayed home. Plus there was the cult of realism, a reaction against the glitz and glamour of 50s Hollywood, so movie-makers were making movies that looked cheap and tawdry as an Artistic Statement.

    Society in the 70s was actually less impoverished than it is today.

    Also, 70s movies look crummy today often because the film stock has faded colors. Technicolor dye separations and Kodachrome held up fairly well whereas the chemistry in camera stock like 5247 and the release print stocks have horribly faded. I saw AMC showings of Dean Martin in two films, 1970’s Airport and the unfinished 1962 Something’s Got to Give a few years back.
    Airport was all faded and crummy looking. SGTG looked like a current release colorwise.

    The Seventies were the Sixties for middle class Middle America, but those who behaved were still in the happy days, so to speak, and for those who didn’t the chickens usually hadn’t come home to roost. High school educated people could still get union jobs and real estate to salary ratio was pretty good, and if you avoided the war zones crime wasn’t a problem.

  171. Anonymous[206] • Disclaimer says:

    I think she got the basic look correct, not so sure about the Streep/Keaton impression. This is a certain type of “prestige” 70s distaff role that Jane Fonda used to attempt (poorly). Not so many actual 70s films were all that talky, which I consider a Tarantino/Whedon disease. When I imagine a generic 70s A-movie, I’m thinking slow-paced, low-on-action, borderline-preposterous a la “Black Sunday.” Someone mentioned the surprisingly distinctive Pelham 123, which has another very odd turn from Robert Shaw

  172. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1169839414098268161

    Carol dropped out of the top 1000 names given to baby girls some years ago.

    When there are two spellings (for girls; another for boys), it will lower the ranking– true of Stephen/Steven as well– but that isn’t the main factor here. Carol disappeared in 2007, Carole in 1978.

    Compare that with the many spellings, and more misspellings, of Michaela now in the top 1000.

    https://www.ssa.gov/cgi-bin/babyname.cgi

  173. @Anonymous
    I'm astonished Logan's Run wasn't mentioned. Jenny Agutter did a fairly decent job. Farrah Fawcett was also in that but she had no idea how to act then.

    I am not at all astonished no one mentioned Union City with Pat Benatar and Deborah Harry, but someone should have.

    Logan’s Run was one of the decade’s best films, a SF film that made you really think, and it had a magnificently decadent style. Union City was a complete failure at conveying the essence of the Cornell Woolrich story it was based on, though Harry showed promise and looked good in the fashions of the day. The real talent in that movie was the late Dennis Lipscomb, whose career just never took off.

  174. @Vinteuil

    It offensively plays poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred (both not true)
     
    OK, I realize that stereotyping poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred has, in the past, and continues, now, to lead to some bad stuff - but is it really "not true?"

    OK, I realize that stereotyping poor rural southern whites as violent and inbred has, in the past, and continues, now, to lead to some bad stuff – but is it really “not true?”

    In a few places it is, but mostly not. Most Southern whites aren’t that poor, and they are violent generally only when provoked. Violate the code of honor and fisticuffs generally ensue, depending on the severity, but death or really serious injuries, maiming, crippling is rare.

    Don’t insult their mothers, their wives, their religion or their sense of dignity, and don’t fool with other men’s women. Don’t steal, don’t bear false witness, don’t engage in fraud. And don’t be a buttinski, or a pedant. If you are an outsider, talk less, listen more.

    If you can get along by following the rules you’ll find the South amenable as far as people go, though the summer heat and humidity, the bugs, etc, are what they are. I’d live almost anywhere in he South over New York or New Jersey.

    • Agree: Vinteuil
  175. @J.Ross
    This guy gets it -- this is twitter thot satire, depending on one stumbled-across accessory and a misremembered stereotype, but the performance doesn't really resemble any actual, y'know, 70s actress performance. It's like if a kid wrote a comedy sketch about people in the 80s being totally unable to communicate because they didn't have smart phones.

    but the performance doesn’t really resemble any actual, y’know, 70s actress performance.

    To be fair, I think she focused on contemporary roles. Movies set in the moment of the 70s.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    That's quite a trailer: just put the camera in one corner of the living room for a single minute-long take with no close-ups to let you know who the stars of the movie are.

    They're not making trailers like they used to!

  176. @Anonymous

    but the performance doesn't really resemble any actual, y'know, 70s actress performance.
     
    To be fair, I think she focused on contemporary roles. Movies set in the moment of the 70s.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sOk0I7fg-Q

    That’s quite a trailer: just put the camera in one corner of the living room for a single minute-long take with no close-ups to let you know who the stars of the movie are.

    They’re not making trailers like they used to!

  177. Anonymous[164] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    Barry Lyndon is the perfect movie for a certain kind of theatregoer (who would probably also enjoy The Duellists) but I can understand people finding it pretentious or insufferable. I enjoyed Electra Glide In Blue, having had it recommended as Robert Blake's best performance, but it bombed when it first came out, and that makes sense given the wrong impression that it's an action movie or a standard entertainment.

    The Duellists is interesting for the class dynamics involved. Most people just dismiss the guy who starts all the duels as crazy. No – he’s a poor boy from a poor background who specifically picks fights with his supposed social superiors. It wouldn’t have been allowed before the Revolution. By forcing these people to fight him he forces them to acknowledge him as an equal.

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