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From NPR:

A Medical School Tradition Comes Under Fire For Racism

September 5, 2018 5:01 AM ET
MARA GORDON

Senior medical student Giselle Lynch has plenty of accomplishments to list when she applies for a coveted spot in an ophthalmology residency program this fall.

But one box she won’t be able to check when she submits her application is one of the highest academic awards medical students can receive, election to the honor society Alpha Omega Alpha.

It’s not because she didn’t excel. It’s because her medical school, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, put a moratorium on student nominations because it determined the selection process discriminates against students of color.

The award is open to the top 25 percent of a medical school’s graduating class and can be a valuable career boost, making students more competitive for desirable residencies and jobs.

Icahn administrators say the disparities in the selection process reflect deeper issues of racial inequality in medical education.

“AOA perpetuates systems that are deeply flawed,” says Dr. David Muller, the dean for medical education at Icahn. “We can’t justify putting people who are historically at a disadvantage at an even greater disadvantage. It just doesn’t seem fair to dangle in front of our students an honorific that we know people are not equally eligible for.”

Over the past five years, around 3 percent of students chosen for the distinction at Icahn were from a racial background that is underrepresented in medicine, which includes blacks and Latinos. In that same period, about 18 percent to 20 percent of each graduating class at Icahn came from those groups.

The school made the change after Lynch led a group of fellow students in an effort to fight inequality at Icahn. The students collected data on how many students from underrepresented minorities were nominated to the honor society at Icahn and presented it in a series of meetings with school leadership last year.

Lynch, who is black, recalls one particularly moving meeting when they showed photographs of Icahn’s past AOA students — and black and Latino faces were conspicuously sparse.

“Where are we? We’re nowhere here,” says Lynch, remembering her reaction. “AOA is an award of student excellence. What was the argument that was being perpetuated about us if we’re not being included?”

Announced in May of this year, the decision at Icahn was a controversial one, because many students and faculty fear that not participating in the award puts Icahn students at a disadvantage when competing for slots in residency programs. …

Sure, not rewarding excellence in medical studies will likely get more patients dead in the long run, but dead patients are a small price to pay for reducing the number of microaggressions wounding the amour propre of the diverse.

 
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  1. anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    Oh Carl Icahn, the gift that just keeps on giving.

    Q: Is Icahn an even worse human being than David Geffen of UCLA Med fame?

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    , @Anon
    , @hhsiii
  2. toddfelman says: • Website

    “Sure, not rewarding excellence in medical studies will likely get more patients dead in the long run, but dead patients are a small price of to pay for reducing the number of microaggressions wounding the amour propre of the diverse.”

    finally, eugenics in action…

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @pyrrhus
    , @Buffalo Joe
  3. OT

    No post on the NYT article by Pence (or whoever wrote it)?

  4. jdoyle says: • Website

    finally eugenics in action..

  5. Realist says:

    Lynch deserves what happened to her.

  6. Well, I think that’s peanuts compared to the fact that incompetent students of color are admitted and often allowed to graduate due to affirmative action policies.

  7. “Sure, not rewarding excellence in medical studies will likely get more patients dead ….”

    In this case, just blind, so, no-harm-no-foul.

  8. anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    Lynch, who is black, recalls one particularly moving meeting when they showed photographs of Icahn’s past AOA students — and black and Latino faces were conspicuously sparse.

    Incidentally, this performance probably constitutes the ‘scientific method’ for them.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  9. Ed says:
    @reiner Tor

    Please tell us you don’t actually think Pence wrote it?

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  10. Ed says:

    What a bizarre article and reasoning used to change the honorific process. I’m going to look up the doctor profiled and write him. They complain that the process is too subjective than they remove objective measures such as grades and tests as a main basis of determination.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @James Speaks
  11. Not exactly OT:

    From The Guardian

    Why is the curriculum so white in business schools?

    We hardly ever get a chance to talk about race in class,” a business school student recently remarked to me. We had just finished a discussion on racial colour-blindness. She was right. In business schools, diversity tends to be “mere decoration” while the focus stays on the “bottom line”.

    This is perverse since UK and US business schools have the most popular (and lucrative) university courses, often with highly diverse students from all over the world. In 2015/16, management courses in the UK had the third highest proportion of students of colour, after medicine and law.

    However, as with all British BAME [black, Asian and minority ethnic] undergraduates, business management students of colour are significantly less likely to gain a 2:1 or a first class degree, even where they have the same prior attainment as their white counterparts.

    At first glance, you might assume this discrepancy is the result of socio-economic disadvantage or poor schooling. But after adjusting for other factors (including prior attainment), there remains an unexplained 15-point attainment gap between white and BAME students.

    The answer to closing the gap is to decolonise the curriculum in business schools. Most business curricula are largely based on knowledge produced by white men from North America and other anglophone countries of the global north. Issues of diversity, racial prejudice, historically-entrenched inequities and underrepresentation are barely considered.

    Business schools also take a worryingly racially colour-blind approach…

    Even a talented writer for The Onion couldn’t make this up.

  12. Anon[296] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    What was the argument that was being perpetuated about us if we’re not being included?”

    Inclusion, the new PC meme.

    Everyone should bitch about not being ‘included’.

    It is endless.

    “Why wasn’t I included by Harvard?”
    “Why wasn’t I included by the NBA?”
    “Why wasn’t I included by Goldman Sachs”?

    Of course, the ‘I’ means far less than the I-dentity.

    So, even if YOU don’t get in, you should be satisfied with someone who is representative of you getting in.

    We are told that tribalism is bad, but PC is tribal in making us identify with the few who are like us who do make it. So, if you’re Mexican and not included, be happy that someone like you has been included. Such identification is supposed to matter a lot. But where is the guarantee that someone who is like you does make it will serve the interests of you and your people?
    All those white GOP politicians hardly do anything for whites. And non-whites who make it just ending serving globo-homo Power.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    , @Hhsiii
  13. @Ed

    I don’t know nor care who wrote it. It deserves a post, doesn’t it?

    And I think it’s likely a high-ranking official. Otherwise it’d be a pretty strange lie by the NYT. Yes, it could actually be Pence, for all I know. It’s pretty low-risk for him, for example he cannot be fired (Trump probably cannot even admit publicly that the Vice President selected by him hates his guts and thinks he’s unfit for office), and he has a very low chance of becoming a president on his own. He also cannot be very fond of Trump the person. Though maybe he’s just too much of a coward to do something like writing an article for a liberal paper.

  14. @anonymous

    Sounds like a pay-per-view match no one would watch.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  15. Anon[449] • Disclaimer says:

    not rewarding excellence in medical studies will likely get more patients dead in the long run

    I wouldn’t necessarily worry about this, because people will just not go to black doctors at all. It’s too much trouble to try to parse all the variables, med school, internship, awards, to try to figure out if you got the one black doctor in a thousand who’s not an affirmative action case.

    Although, at a hospital or HMO you probably cannot ask for another doctor.

    At some point the choice of doctor will become compelled. Isn’t that how it is in the U.K.?

    As far as this award goes, just give 18 to 20 percent percent of them to the top blacks and Hispanics, and award the rest as usual. Make that very obvious, so that the black recipients’ awards are devalued.

    Membership can help students secure training in competitive specialties and is a predictor of success in academic medicine.

    It was a predictor of success. Now that only works if you’re white.

    A 2017 study in JAMA Internal Medicine showed that nationwide, black and Asian students were less likely than their white counterparts to be selected for the honor.

    Dr. Dowin Boatright, the study’s lead author and an assistant professor of emergency medicine at Yale, hypothesizes that the disparities may be related to racial inequalities in grading and standardized tests, a phenomenon well-documented in medical education literature. Grading based on clinical performance is subjective, he notes, since it often reflects a global assessment of a student rather than technical skills or performance on a test.

    “You’re graded on things that are completely vulnerable to bias, like, ‘How good is this medical student?’ ” Boatright says.

    Why Asian? Bad bedside manner?

    I like the way they lump grading and standardized tests together. What’s the balance? Why does Dr. Boatright not know what the test and grade disparities are? Isn’t finding that out part of doing such a study?

    At some point in the article they might have mentioned disparities in incoming MCAT scores, as well as undergraduate SAT scores, and the “holisticification” that has to be done in order to get an 18 to 20 percent NAM memdical school class.

    They are not going to have any trouble getting black clinical performance up. “Dr. Smith, you are rating your black students lower than your white students. Maybe you just don’t belong in this job?” The message will be communicated. And the favoritism that blacks get will be completely hidden and unauditable. But there are still those pesky standardized tests. But where there’s a will there’s a way.

  16. @PiltdownMan

    So much for “Rule, Britannia”.

  17. IHTG says:
    @reiner Tor

    It’s some bowtie-wearing deputy nobody has ever heard of.

    • Agree: L Woods
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  18. @reiner Tor

    Pence is not a senior appointed official. In fact, Pence is not appointed in any way, but is elected. And by the way, Pence could say anything he likes, and the president could not fire him. This is just basic constitutional law – the vice-president does not “work” for the president, and the president has no power to remove him on his own. Of course, the president could always choose a different running mate for his next term.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @reiner Tor
  19. @PiltdownMan

    No, I think that article must indeed come from the Onion.

    How do I know? If it were really from The Guardian, then the following:

    Issues of diversity, racial prejudice, historically-entrenched inequities and underrepresentation are barely considered.

    would instead read:

    Issues around diversity, racial prejudice, historically-entrenched inequities and underrepresentation are barely considered.

    • LOL: PiltdownMan
  20. Joe Walker says: • Website

    “Where are we? We’re nowhere here,” says Lynch, remembering her reaction. “AOA is an award of student excellence. What was the argument that was being perpetuated about us if we’re not being included?”

    That your race is less intelligent, on average, than others. This is a sad fact but a fact none the less. In a sane society, we don’t sacrifice the lives of patients to make less intelligent racial minorities feel better about themselves.

    • Agree: Federalist
  21. @Hapalong Cassidy

    Van Buren dropped his VP, Richard Johnson, from the ticket in 1840, so Johnson ran for re-election as an independent candidate for VP. His “rambling, incoherent” speeches on the stump trail set off at least one riot, but he still got 48 electoral votes.

  22. Altai says:

    The award is open to the top 25 percent of a medical school’s graduating class and can be a valuable career boost, making students more competitive for desirable residencies and jobs.

    I notice how the percentage of Black and Latino students in the top 25% is left unmentioned in the article just the proportion in the graduating class on the whole.

    Also what percentage of Asians and Jews are in the top 25% versus eventual AOA members and the class as a whole?

    And, as always, class background is totally ignored.

    • Replies: @Trevor H.
  23. @IHTG

    Maybe. It should get a post.

  24. @Hapalong Cassidy

    Did they write it was an appointed official? I haven’t read the article, and I wanted to inform myself from Steve’s post and the comments, as I usually do in such matters.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    , @Alfa158
  25. Anon[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    Having read bios of both it is close, but I think Geffen is in the lead.

  26. “AOA is an award of student excellence. What was the argument that was being perpetuated about us if we’re not being included?”

    You are not allowed to give an honest answer to this question without losing your job. Don’t even try. This was hammered home back in April 1987, when Al Campanis, the longtime VP and general manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers was asked by Ted Koppel on Nightline why there were few black managers and no black general managers in Major League Baseball adding, “Is there still much prejudice in baseball today?”

    Campanis’ replied, “No, I don’t believe it’s prejudice. I truly believe they may not have some of the necessities to be, let’s say, a field manager or perhaps a general manager.”

    He was out of his job in 48 hours and never forgiven.

    I recall Campanis as one of the first casualties of the pc war. I’m sure Koppel still takes great pride in his role in that.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    , @Jack D
  27. @PiltdownMan

    ” a worryingly racially colour-blind approach”

    My generation were taught MLK and “content of character > colour of skin“. We didn’t realise that was just one click of the ratchet.

    “Have you not heard the story of my countryman who went to Dublin to hear the Chartist preach?

    Brothers“, he cried, “Is not one man as good as another?

    Aye“, shouted Paddy, “And a divilish bit better, too!

    You laugh, Smithson – but that “divilish bit better” will be the ruin of this country.”

    John Fowles, The French Lieutenant’s Woman.

  28. unit472 says:

    It beggars belief that blacks and latinos would account for 18-20% of admissions at any medical school given the limited number of openings and the number of applicants. That these Affirmative Action admissions also appear to graduate in equal numbers is even more disturbing. It is one thing to give an opportunity to a marginal student and quite another to admit him/her into a critical profession just to meet some extraneous criteria.

    Folks, this is where it gets serious. We have no choice as to who will be our doctors when we arrive at hospital. We have to rely on the profession to weed out those who are substandard. You’d think even Supreme Court Justices would have second thoughts on applying social engineering standards to a field that requires science but apparently not. Of course Ruth Bader Ginsburg, when she requires hospitalization, does not have to go to D.C. General. She can check into the National Institute of Health facilities!You can’t.

    An anecdote. During my most recent hospitalization a Nigerian female doctor wanted me to lay flat on the operating table. I said I could not do this unless she wanted to put me on a general anesthetic. She said she couldn’t do the procedure that way. Somehow a white female doctor came in and managed it. Later, a black man in a white coat came into my room and asked how I was doing and then used his stethoscope to examine me. He was a ‘hospitalist’, an MD with no function except to wander the halls and ask patients how they are doing and charge you $ 400 for the visit.

  29. Anon[449] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Funny post/observation at Philip Greenspun’s blog:

    Trump was “paranoid” about a deep-state conspiracy

    New York Times on Donald Trump’s mental health:

    March 4, 2017: he is frustrated by his rocky debut and increasingly paranoid about what he sees as the Vast Deep-State Conspiracy.

    March 18, 2017: Consumed by his paranoia about the deep state, Donald Trump has disappeared into the fog of his own conspiracy theories.

    June 17, 2017: His paranoia about the Deep State…

    August 20, 2018: the assertion of Trump and company that all of the tweeter in chief’s woes are the product of a vast deep-state conspiracy

    Definition of paranoia: a mental condition characterized by delusions of persecution, unwarranted jealousy, or exaggerated self-importance, typically elaborated into an organized system. It may be an aspect of chronic personality disorder, of drug abuse, or of a serious condition such as schizophrenia in which the person loses touch with reality.

    What is the reality? Today the same paper that called Donald Trump “paranoid” for thinking that some of the people ostensibly working for him were actually working against him published “I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration,” subtitled “I work for the president but like-minded colleagues and I have vowed to thwart parts of his agenda and his worst inclinations.” The article is from “a[n anonymous] senior official in the Trump administration.”

    Is it now fair to say that Donald Trump’s shortcomings do not meet the clinical definition of paranoia? Or is it instead an example of “Just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean they aren’t after you.”? (Catch-22)

    https://blogs.harvard.edu/philg/

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  30. @Steve Sailer

    Richard Johnson invaded Canada, defeated the British army at the Battle of the Thames, burned a Shawnee refugee camp and killed Chief Tecumseh so that’s probably worth 48 electoral votes on its own.

    • Replies: @Dmon
    , @Fred Boynton
  31. Pericles says:

    O/T yet on topic:

    Some of his neighbors are just surprised that the imam next door was capable of masterminding an attack.

    Massive lol. There’s more, all of it encouraging for the future.

    https://theintercept.com/2018/09/03/las-ramblas-terrorist-attacks-es-satty/

  32. TTSSYF says:
    @reiner Tor

    It’s not interesting enough to post. It’s merely part of a multi-pronged effort on the part of the media, Dems, and Never Trumpers to sway voters in the upcoming elections.

  33. TTSSYF says:
    @Anon

    Along the same lines as what Andrew Cuomo said; i.e., that America won’t be great until every one of us (I don’t think he said “every citizen”) is “fully engaged” — whatever that means.

  34. @Anon

    “I wouldn’t necessarily worry about this, because people will just not go to black doctors at all….”

    Certainly those who are aware of affirmative action in med schools will not. That is the only rational course, since we cannot rely on the med schools to sort properly.

    But of course, how many are aware of this issue? I’d say a tiny minority. The vast majority are good people who are simply unaware and they will be hurt, which is a shame.

    And then there are the good-whites who will seek out NAM doctors to virtue signal. They will also be hurt, but this falls into the category of karma (the Tibbettsian variety).

  35. @reiner Tor

    Now that I think about it more I’m not sure. And I’ve thought of a plausible reason as to why it might be Pence: he’s sending a message. Something to the effect of “If, uh, something were to happen to Mr. Trump – not saying that something would – but if it did, I’m totally on board with you guys. You can count on me.”

  36. Anondoc says:

    I am a doctor (white male) who graduated AOA within the last ten years. I first applied to medical school with a 27 MCAT and 3.3 GPA. Abysmal. Based on current publicly available statistics, as a white, I had a 25% chance. Of I were Asian, a 15% chance. Of I were black, a 75% chance. In order to go to medical school, I had to get a master’s degree from a 1 to 2 year program which matches a 1st year med school curriculum, along with retaking the MCAT and apply again.

    Now, if I had been accepted initially, I probably would have been disadvantaged compared to my peers who did better than me in university, on standardized tests and probably in general knowledge. However, if I were black, I would have more than likely been accepted and thrown into the med school curriculum. The real disadvantage may come with being accepted and coming against stronger peers which breeds resentment.

    Just my two cents.

  37. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Mr. Sailer, you’re contributing to the degradation of this website. If commenter “reiner Tor” who started this hijacking wanted to read your thoughts on an unrelated publication in the NYT, shouldn’t he have been expected to write to you at the email address you’ve provided?

    But as you’ve not only condoned, but here endorsed, the glopping up of this comment thread with “OT” discussion, please explain why. You’ve been careful not to plant your feet about Trump, etc., since the summer of 2015. Does cherry-picking among these annoying comments allow you to maintain that distanced detachment?

    My comments — pertinent, pointed, and polite — often stay whimmed for hours. I’ve been told by other commenters that this may be due to your sleeping during the morning hours, but many times comments by those with “real handles” keep rolling in. In “moderating at whim,” do you consider whether a commenter has sent you money?

    In rereading this before hitting “Publish Comment,” I am aware that it’s scattershot and whiny. Fittingly, though, so here goes…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anon
    , @Kylie
  38. jim jones says:

    There was some huckster on UK radio recently claiming that there are no Black students at Oxbridge not because of racism but because of “subconscious racism”

    • Replies: @Joe Schmoe
  39. ic1000 says:
    @PiltdownMan

    > The answer to closing the gap is to decolonise the curriculum

    Catchy phrase, I like it! Is it translated from French (1789), Russian (1917), Chinese (1958), Chinese (1966), Zulu (2018), or Venezuelan (2018)?

    Our beloved elites, inspired by the very best.

    • Replies: @Trevor H.
  40. Dmon says:
    @Another Canadian

    Not to mention one of the all time great campaign slogans:
    “Rumsee dumsee, rumsee dumsee, Colonel Johnson killed Tecumsee”

  41. Flip says:

    Dick Morris on the Democrats

  42. Arclight says:

    We are at a curious place in which right-thinking people decry any outcome that doesn’t fit their expectation of ‘equity’ as institutional racism while at the same time having clear evidence easily at hand that what we should not expect equal outcomes at all. The evidence continues to pile up – will our elites just get ever more Orwellian in how they describe this phenomenon, or will we reach a point where reality is just too overwhelming?

    • Replies: @ogunsiron
  43. ic1000 says:

    Dear Ms. Giselle Lynch and Dr. David Muller,

    I’m curious about an issue that crack NPR journalist Mara Gordon somehow overlooked. Flyover country gentile whites make up what percentage of the U.S. population, and the Mt. Sinai student body, and Alpha Omega Alpha inductees? Same questions for middle- and upper- class Ashkenazis.

    Everybody knows that Disparate Impact reasoning is compelling when it comes to Blacks and Hispanics. If you braved the Auxiliary Thought Police and applied your butterknife to these other minority identities, what would you conclude?

  44. hhsiii says:
    @anonymous

    My father knew Icahn going back to the ‘60s. He’s a funny, personable guy, the couple of times I met him. Gets added points for ragging on Bill Ackman. And he supported Trump. I’m sure he isn’t exactly a nice guy to get where he is. Although he doesn’t seem to be a hypocrite about it. He’s leagues better than Geffen. At least he isn’t a member of the Velvet Mafia.

  45. Trevor H. says:
    @PiltdownMan

    “We hardly ever get a chance to talk about race in class,” a business school student recently whined

    The poor dears. However will they survive? And in business school yet. I mean, if *business* isn’t all about skin color what purpose could it possibly serve?

    • LOL: bomag
  46. AndrewR says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    What he said might have been what he really thought but it was very crudely stated. He spoke thoughtlessly and he paid for it. All humans have always had and will always have a need to carefully choose their words around other people. Nothing “PC” about it. It’s basic human social psychology.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  47. Hail says: • Website

    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City

    “AOA perpetuates systems that are deeply flawed,” says Dr. David Muller, the dean for medical education at Icahn. “We can’t justify putting people who are historically at a disadvantage at an even greater disadvantage. [...]

    Who is David Muller of Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai, NYC?

    David Muller, MD
    Dean for Med Educ

    Press Mentions:
    The Mount Sinai Medical Center Received a High Safety Rating in The
    July 28, 2018
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Student Named to Forbes’ 2017 30 Under 30 List
    January 10, 2017

    Other Languages: Hebrew

    Case closed.

  48. sabril says:
    @Anon

    To an extent you are right, but how do you know if it’s a black radiologist who is evaluating your slides for cancer? What if you are in surgery and a black anaesthesiologist walks into the room?

    Also, if you reject a black doctor, at times it may be tricky to do it in such a way that you are not suspected of Racism, which will surely undermine the medical care you receive.

  49. Ibound1 says:

    There is one positive to all of this: If you find a white male doctor who graduated from any kind of prestigious program or with any kind of award, then you know he must be extremely smart. In fact, just getting admitted to a medical school means he is smarter. Find that guy and you are in good hands.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Alfa158
  50. Trevor H. says:
    @Altai

    All of those factors are ignored. They are almost always ignored. Because the principal purpose is to push white people aside. This is one of those convenient instances when Jews are no longer white, mind you.

  51. Hhsiii says:
    @Anon

    No argument was being perpetuated. Res ipsa loquitor.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
  52. Trevor H. says:
    @ic1000

    The awarding of advanced honours and degrees will soon be pretty much like an episode of Black Jeopardy.

  53. Trevor H. says:
    @ic1000

    They would conclude that You Are Racist.

    Then they wouldn’t even have to think about it.

  54. Mr. Anon says:

    “It just doesn’t seem fair to dangle in front of our students an honorific that we know people are not equally eligible for.”

    Imagine! A merit-based mark-of-distinction that is not equally distributed!

    I don’t think there are enough 50+ white guys who have gotten Olympic Gold Metals in the 100 m dash. That really isn’t fair. Some kind of remedy is warranted.

  55. Amen says:

    And student activists at Icahn aren’t celebrating yet. Lynch says she now wants to focus on discrimination in grading and medical school admissions. This, she says, can help address the dearth of minority physicians in different specialities — a problem with negative consequences for the health of minority patients.

    As long as these affirmative-action doctors only treat their own affirmative-action patients, I’m fine with that. The problem is most of them do not want to serve their own “community”, which are often in dangerous and poverty stricken neighborhoods, so they end up treating the rest of us.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  56. BenKenobi says:
    @unit472

    Horror movie idea: Unit 731, but with affirmative-action blacks (as the medical staff).

  57. This all comes back to the logically false concept of disparate impact. If certain groups are underrepresented by a certain award, that does not mean the award is discriminatory on the basis of group identity.

    Disparate impact is one of the most evil, mistaken, false, misleading ideas ever to infect human thought. It only survives because the majority of human beings are so simple-minded that they fall for it.

    Everybody pays the price. The most guilty here are the ones smart enough to know that disparate impact is a falsehood and yet use it to further their own causes.

    Logic: It’s not just for proofs and programming anymore.

    • Agree: res, Mr. Rational
  58. kihowi says:
    @Hail

    There will always be expensive hospitals where the top of the class ends up. Jews make a lot of money. Where’s the problem?

  59. Anonymous[215] • Disclaimer says:
    @reiner Tor

    It seems like the ultimate(?) Beltway clickbaitburger. I guess neither of the White House’s full-time film projectionists is appointed so they can be ruled out. Trump is thin-skinned and very motivated to manipulate dumbass journalists, so of course he would be furious about the latest media hero showing him up, even anonymously– but he shouldn’t be. The detrimental effect on his support from these sniveling gossipy junior-high episodes is zero at most; let ‘em squawk.

    Also, a guy writing at The Week has pointed out that bravely collaborating with the NYT to anonymously bash one’s elected boss in scurrilous terms (no Mark Felt useful dirt, in other words) isn’t, technically speaking, a good look.

    Andrew Ferguson compared the release of a Woodward book to a local variation on Halloween, coming around every year so they take home their candy bags to compare with each other. Such is Washington.

  60. @reiner Tor

    It’s clearly a parody of QAnon meant to trick liberals, but I guess the NYT explanation isn’t completely impossible. The three possibilities for authorship — it really is how a trump official of some kind (likely not “high ranking” as we would understand it) feels, it’s written by a trump official in jest, or it’s made up out of whole cloth, share equal probability between them.

  61. @Anon

    “I work for the president but like-minded colleagues and I have vowed to thwart parts of his agenda and his worst inclinations.”

    Where was a guy like this when Dubya decided to invade Iraq? Where was this guy when Obama decided to put more troops into Afghanistan and later to destabilize Libya?

    Oh yeah–those were things the Deep State wanted done.

    Donald Trump not wanting to invade more Middle Eastern countries and not wanting more Muslim and Hispanic immigrants is what makes this guy consider him crazy.

    • Agree: Cagey Beast, Liza
  62. @Hhsiii

    No argument was being perpetuated. Res ipsa loquitor.

    Race ipsa loquitor.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @hhsiii
  63. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Sorry, but it seems that logic is just for proofs and programming anymore.

    The people of this country are becoming exceptionally infantile, and many — especially those in power — would have it no other way.

    Great comment, sir.

  64. anon[113] • Disclaimer says:
    @unit472

    Folks, this is where it gets serious. We have no choice as to who will be our doctors when we arrive at hospital.

    It also gets serious with airline pilots. I’ve never had a black pilot on a flight – have any of you? I wonder if the elites are avoiding implementing affirmative action in this industry because the elites fly a lot and even if you are in first class you have no way to guarantee you won’t get a black pilot. Without question affirmative action pilots would crash planes and kill thousands of people.

  65. AndrewR says:

    Sailer, control your autism long enough to do a post on the op ed and the book

  66. L Woods says:

    Of course, when white males are underrepresented in any desirable socioeconomic capacity, it’s just because they’re genetically inferior “losers.” No right to be “included” for them.

  67. How are we going to confront the fact that our society would rather destroy itself than acknowledge racial differences in intelligence?

  68. Alfa158 says:
    @reiner Tor

    So far I haven’t seen any evidence establishing that the article was written by a government official at all. Given the degraded state of “journalism” it is entirely probable that it was a fabrication by someone in the NYT. There’s no shortage of examples of such fabrications, and of editorial supervisors swallowing them uncritically because they were narratives they want to believe.
    Additionally, even if it wasnt, then what constitutes a senior official in the Trump administration? The Department of Housing and Urban Development is part of the Executive branch. Could a senior official in that department be described as a senior official in the Trump administration?
    There isn’t enough substance for Steve to open a thread on unless or until it moves beyond the phase of, “I have a tip top tippety top secret source who tells me you’re beating your wife”.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Reg Cæsar
  69. GU says:

    Reminds me of people complaining that law reviews (prestigious for law school students) are “too white.” This despite the fact that criteria for admission were 1L grades (all based on blindly graded exams) and/or an anonymous write-on competition. There was literally no way for racial bias to play a role. That was the problem — it lays bare the skill gap and effort gap between the ethnicities.

    I understand many law schools now reserve spots for NAMs on law review. Still waiting for the NFL to reserve cornerback slots for non-blacks . . .

  70. Screwtape says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    And the price is actually in the form of debt.

    The unearned “benefits” that are distributed to the rainbow are granted in the present, but the real costs are extracted from the (presumed) benefits that will (won’t) accrue in the future.

    These policies borrow from the future generations to appease the deranged feelz of the present, driven by the hateful and false concept of equality of outcome.

    From the zero-sum nature of deep skill positions like medicine, to the demoralizing affects of active discrimination watering down competency and merit standards, to the myriad of disincentives these handouts create, the real costs are yet to come.

    Not long ago these things were somewhat confined in terms of scale and impact. But tokenism and gushing over the talented tenth has given way to an all-out replacement scheme in which the only solution is moar!

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  71. anon[332] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Disparate impact seems to underpin much of modern PC bureaucracy.

    Does anyone have an idea about what it would take for it to be invalidated as a legal principle?

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Desiderius
    , @Joe Schmoe
  72. @ic1000

    One clarification here. You say,

    Everybody knows that Disparate Impact reasoning is compelling when it comes to Blacks and Hispanics.

    No. Such reasoning is compelling only to the majority of the public, which is simple-minded. Disparate impact is a logical fallacy.

    However, I support your general argument, which I interpret as being that white gentiles in America are indeed discriminated against in favor of others who are white but not gentile.

    Ron Unz himself has given ample statistical proof of this, to wit: The proportion of very smart gentile whites is vastly underrepresented in, for example, admissions to Ivy League colleges.

    There is a subset of the white category that is enjoying favoritism — not only in academics, but also in entertainment, journalism, media in general, and foreign policy — all out of proportion to its size. This much is clear.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  73. Remember “Regents of the Univ. of Cal. v. Bakke?” Where the SC said that it was acceptable to use race as “one factor” in determining selections?

    Well the guy, Patrick Chavis, who “got Bakke’s spot” at the medical school eventually had his license revoked for “gross negligence, incompetence and repeated negligent acts” by the Medical Board of California.

    Chavis was killed in LA at age 50 in a carjacking gone bad.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @anon
    , @Mr. Rational
  74. pyrrhus says:
    @toddfelman

    Of course, there is a fix for this problem, which would cause the whole scheme to backfire…Never go to a medical professional (or any professional) who is a minority.

    • Replies: @Sarah Toga
  75. pyrrhus says:
    @ic1000

    Of course, real people are less interested in Disparate Impact (or in my case, couldn’t care less) than they are in the Impact on their own health of having dumb people with medical degrees.

  76. Marat says:

    We had one minority candidate in 2002 who had significant difficulty getting through our program. The school bent over backwards with tutoring help and he did pass the board.

    By then, it was already a given that you would learn Spanish in your spare time (what spare time?) or you wouldn’t stand a chance for specializing, due to the patient profiles at the rotation clinics. Since then, the boards have been redesigned to show “achievement” along the way, instead of it all occurring on 2-3 days of high stress performance (and some luck – or absence of any significant bad luck).

  77. @Anon

    “I wouldn’t necessarily worry about this, because people will just not go to black doctors at all.“

    Often one doesn’t get a choice. I found out my kidney transplant surgeon was black the day of the surgery. Seemed competent enough, but there ended up being complications that dragged on for six months.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Father O'Hara
  78. APilgrim says:

    Too bad, that God gave all the HIGH IQs to: Asians, Caucasians & Jews.

    Nigras, Meskins, Indians, & Muhammadans … NOT so much.

    Stupid People don’t make the Honor Roll … duh!

  79. Jack D says:
    @PiltdownMan

    The answer to closing the gap is to decolonise the curriculum in business schools.

    I totally agree, but not just in the business schools. We need to decolonise the curriculum in our med schools (Pasteur is a dead white male – let’s get rid of his racist germ theory where certain people are considered to be “infected” and bring back witch doctors), engineering schools (Eiffel – another DWM – vines are a superior building material to steel and Von Braun was an outright Nazi) and so on. Only when the entire curriculum is decolonised will it be possible to close the gap. Comrade Pol Pot made some admirable progress in decolonising the Cambodian curriculum but sadly his mission was interrupted by outside forces before he could complete his work and show the world the shining progress that would result from a decolonised curriculum. Wakanda provides an example of what is possible and the fact that it is entirely fictional should be no impediment to its use as a role model.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    , @jim jones
    , @CCZ
  80. @Hail

    (((NPR)))
    (((Icahn))) School of Medicine
    (((Mount Sinai)))
    (((New York City)))
    (((Dr. David Muller)))

  81. @Buzz Mohawk

    That portion is the modern day version of the Calvinist Elect. Jews are merely along with the ride of the SWPL menace.

    Jews will always be found near the ruling class. Doesn’t make them rulers.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  82. @Alfa158

    It’s a Bush holdover in Foggy Bottom.

  83. Jack D says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    The Left doesn’t want an honest debate (or an honest election) about anything because they know they will lose. This has been true since the days of the Bolsheviks.

    Step 1 in any Lefist plan to participate in any debate or election is to try to rig the game in advance.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  84. Anonymous[169] • Disclaimer says:

    The extent of affirmative action in medicine would shock and terrify the public if it were ever to come to their attention. The establishment has been pretty good about consciously avoiding collecting and publishing data on certain things (e.g., malpractice rates by race) but the academic difficulties of black medical students (lower MCAT scores, higher remediation/failure rates) are still well documented, albeit in a “how can we help them” kind of way.

    For those interested I recommend Bernard Davis’ book Storm Over Biology; he details a controversy he was involved in at Harvard Medical School in which the administration voted to award a degree to a black student who had failed his licensing exams multiple (five?) times and never actually passed them. He also discusses the numerous underhanded tricks of administrators (eliminating class rank, allowing a greater number of attempts at remediation, lowering required scores on licensing exams) to mask black underperformance.

  85. @Another Canadian

    “invaded Canada” should be enough to make him a national hero and get him elected. Why doesn’t he have a monument on the National Mall? Why don’t we finish what he started?

    • Replies: @njguy73
  86. Jack D says:
    @Desiderius

    When I was touring Poland I got really good at figuring out where the former Jewish neighborhoods were in larger Polish cities (in shtetls, the entire shtetl was often the Jewish neighborhood). It was never the central square but it was 1 square over from the central square. Usually there is very little vestige left but if you look closely you will find a hint as to the former character of the neighborhood – a memorial where the former synagogue was or some other hint.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  87. @Desiderius

    Then are truly smart members of “the Calvinist Elect” overrepresented above the truly smart, white gentile, non-Calvinist Elect, as much as truly smart Jews are? Show me the numbers.

    I suspect yours is yet another version of the same argument that “Protestant, Puritan, New England Blue-Bloods” are still the stratosphere of American society and that anybody who piggybacks on them and manipulates their politics is not using tribal favoritism and verbal mind games as tools to insert their people into their ruling class in overly large numbers — resulting in changes to America that will ruin it.

    Whatever you want to say about those Blue-Bloods who give others an excuse to do their thing, they have always been a part of us. Those others who have inserted themselves into that orbit have not been, are not, and never will be.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  88. @ic1000

    From A Tree Grows in Brooklyn:

    [Sissy, who has suffered multiple stillbirths at home, announces she is going to give birth in a hospital]

    Sissy told them they were way behind the times; that midwives were things of the past. Besides,
    she informed them proudly, she had no say in the matter. Her Steve insisted on the doctor and
    the hospital. And that wasn’t all.

    Sissy was going to have a Jewish doctor!

    “Why, Sissy? Why?” asked her shocked sisters.

    “Because Jewish doctors are more sympathetic than Christian ones at a time like that.”

    “I’ve nothing against the Jews,” began Katie, “but …”

    “Look! Just because Dr. Aaronstein’s, people look at a star when they pray and our people look
    at a cross has nothing to do with whether he’s a good doctor or not.”

    “But I’d think you’d want a doctor of your own faith around at a time of …” (Katie was going to
    say, “death” but checked herself in time) … “birth.”

    “Oh, sugar!” said Sissy contemptuously.

    “Like should stick to like. You don’t see Jews calling in Christian doctors,” said Evy, thinking she
    had made a telling point.

    “Why should they,” countered Sissy, “when they and everybody else knows that the Jewish
    doctors are smarter.”

  89. @Jack D

    Self-separated. Not a ghetto, but an exclusive club — by choice.

    You may have toured part of Eastern Europe, but I own a home there. I have stood at the Christian, Protestant church where my wife’s grandfather, a Christian, was lined up and shot, for no apparent reason, with other Christian members of his village, by Stalin’s army.

    You know, those good ol’ Bolsheviks.

    There is no museum in Washington D.C. for my wife’s grandfather.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  90. Hubbub says:

    What was the argument that was being perpetuated about us if we’re not being included?

    No argument. You’re not included because you don’t meet the criteria – it’s that simple. Mediocrity.

  91. @reiner Tor

    As the 1990′s, nationally something like 51 percent of black medical graduates never passed their state medical boards for getting licensed. The comparable percentage for whites was 12 percent, although I’m sure that is next on the diversity agenda.

  92. JimB says:

    It just doesn’t seem fair to dangle in front of our students an honorific that we know people are not equally eligible for.

    How about letting everyone in America be president for for 100 milliseconds every year.

  93. istevefan says:

    Every time I see an article like this I think of the late Lawrence Auster. Among the many things he foretold, he wrote that standards to which non-whites could not measure up would be lowered or dropped. I wish he was still here.

    • Agree: TTSSYF, Mr. Rational
  94. Anonymous[218] • Disclaimer says:

    From the way the first paragraph is written, I suspect the NPR reporter is trying to convince her readers just how crazy this whole thing is, without coming out and saying so. After all, if soon-to-be Dr. Lynch is really as bright as all that, then by campaigning against the honors society, she’s shooting herself in the foot for the sake of racial solidarity.

  95. “It just doesn’t seem fair to dangle in front of our students an honorific that we know people are not equally eligible for.”

    That’s about the size of it: if everyone is not equally honorable, it is not fair.

    Death of a nation.

    Chisel it on the tombstone.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  96. anonymous[145] • Disclaimer says:

    i have a child who just started fourth year, will be interviewing for an ortho residency. AOA membership helps in the competitive specialties, but not as important as STEP scores and clinical grades, which are not nearly as subjective as suggested in this article–there’s a lot of testing alongside evaluations. STEP scores, of course, are entirely objective. Bottom line: not a single minority student in the class pursuing a competitive residency has scores and grades remotely comparable to White and Asian students.

  97. Pence was, is, and always will be a RINO and he’d become President if Trump were removed from office. He is present at enough White House meetings and is surely enough a part of the White House grapevine that he’d be able to collect juicy gossip like that in the NYT oped. He could definitely have arranged the anonymity to write or collaborate in the writing of this hit piece. Describing the writer as an administration official might well be a clever way of directing attention away from Pence. The bottom line is that Pence has motive, means and opportunity, the triad that assure a successful indictment or grand jury arraignment.

    There are other reasons I wouldn’t be too quick to remove Pence from a list of likely suspects. I have never trusted him. The general consensus is that Trump chose Pence to generate some support from within the stoopid party’s establishment. Obviously that didn’t work and ultimately it may only have served to introduce an establishment viper into Trump’s administration. As far as I can ascertain, Pence has provided little support for Trump and seems to have been caught undermining the administration on several occasions.

    Given the possibility, as small as it might be, that Pence played a role in the production of the NYT’s hit piece, it is interesting to speculate on an appropriate response from Trump should this actually prove to be the case. Clearly Trump can’t “fire” Spence. Could he or should he ask Pence to resign? Could Trump publicly announce that because of Pence’s despicable and disruptive treachery, the man will become an isolated nonentity in the administration; denied all access to meetings and information, denied any further public or private role in the administration, and supervised relentlessly to prevent further disruptive behavior? The latter response would make Pence’s Vice Presidency so untenable as to almost ensure a resignation assuming the man has any vestigial sense of honor.

    All of the foregoing is based on a speculation but it is not an unreasonable speculation.

  98. Jack D says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    There were no Jewish ghettos (in the Italian sense of Jews literally being locked into their neighborhood at night) in Poland until the Nazis set them up. “Exclusive club” makes its sound cushy like they were drinking champagne there under crystal chandeliers. More like “exclusive slum” (many of the Jews of Poland were as poor as church mice).

    My mother’s family suffered from the Soviet occupation also – my grandfather was sent to a Soviet prison and returned with his health permanently broken and the rest of the family deported to the other side of the Urals (thus saving their life when the Germans came later, but at the time it seemed like (it was) a tragedy). If there is no museum of Bolshevik atrocities in Washington (or in Moscow or any of the E. European capitals) then there should be. But Bolshevism is not synonymous with Judaism. Bolshevism was a multi-ethnic enterprise – Stalin and Beria Georgian, Lenin Russian, etc. There were some Jews in there too but they were deracinated Jews who expressly rejected Jewish belief and practice.

    But the difference is, there are still Poles in Poland (actually Poland is more mono-ethnic now that it ever was in history) but the Jewish community is all but extinct.

    Anyway, I don’t know what your response has to do with my post – my point was that Jews literally resided NEXT to the seat of power, not in it.

  99. It just doesn’t seem fair to dangle in front of our students an honorific that we know people are not equally eligible for.

    This is completely oxymoronic. An honorific that people are not equally eligible for? The whole point of honorifics is that they are selective, is it not? This is a blatant abuse of language and logic that was stated by—let me stress—Dr. David Muller, the dean for medical education at Icahn.

    So here we have a doctor and a college dean who is either unable to grasp simple logical relationships or who feels no obligation to apply logic in the face of Sacred Diversity. He is either supremely stupid or criminally corrupt, there is no third possibility.

    I can take a minor amount of solace from the knowledge that, just as in the case with asset bubbles, this counterfactual Leftism will reach its high crescendo of nonsense right before self-liquidating in a blazing reality check. But also as is the case with bubbles, the return to normalcy is not some pain-free adjustment that merely cancels out the effects of the previous irrationality. There are all sorts of opportunity costs and collateral damage associated with bubbles, which is why careful stewards of the economy, if we could ever get any, would try to see to it that they never happened.

    This has to be infuriating not only to anyone who cares about the medical discipline but to anyone who cares about truth and common sense. In this case, the collateral damage of the bursting diversity bubble is going to result in a shortage of qualified doctors, a ransacking of the reputations of institutions and societies, and a raft of improperly promoted quacks who will have to be painstakingly weeded out of the profession, if they ever can be. The damage done to the health and pocketbooks of patients will never fully be known. What a horrible, criminal, ridiculous shame.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  100. ogunsiron says:

    Disparate impact will dispatch every instance of selection for excellence.
    They’re going after all of them. They’re zealous, and jealous.

  101. Andy says:

    what to expect from a school that sold its soul in order to be named after a Wall Street speculator? What integrity can we expect from a place like this?

  102. APilgrim says:

    There were the lofty AOA students, and the vast Sea of P (Passing) students.

    Often, the Black Medical Students could not pass. Even when they started several months early, had tutoring, and were allowed an extra year at the end.

    They are just not smart enough, to make it.

  103. APilgrim says:

    … The AΩA student, resident, fellow, faculty, and alumni nomination and election process provides each school’s Dean the latitude to identify a pool of candidates using five primary criteria – scholastic competence, professionalism, leadership, community service, and research – as qualifications in the selection of candidates. Scholastic competence refers to the qualities of becoming and being an excellent doctor with a holistic evaluation of knowledge, skills, attitude, care of the patient, medical decision making, compassion, empathy, altruism, and teamwork. Each Chapter may develop its own metrics/rubric to weight the criteria as best fits its local environment, and then select 16 percent of its graduating class, 25 residents/fellows, three faculty, and three alumni as new members of AΩA. This 16% is realized using a holistic evaluation with a further emphasis on leadership capabilities, ethical standards, fairness in dealing with colleagues, demonstrated potential for achievement in medicine, and a record of service to the school and community. … http://alphaomegaalpha.org/

  104. Hail says: • Website
    @reiner Tor

    The author, whoever it was, used the Mike Pence word “lodestar” :

    Hotly debated was the author’s use of the word “lodestar,” which pops up frequently in speeches by Vice President Mike Pence. Could the anonymous figure be someone in Pence’s orbit? Other reporters argued that the term may have been included to throw people off.

    The evidence against it being Pence himself is strong:

    • Replies: @JerryC
  105. Lynch, who is black…

    What a difference a comma makes!

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  106. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    Medicine is a field that historically Jews have specialized in and monopolized, like the media and finance. Having more of the medical field be filled with less competent people means you’re effectively monopolizing the field for the competent doctors that remain. You’re getting rid of potential competition.

    It’s like if you needed a license to practice journalism, and increasingly apportioned the licenses to illiterates. The remaining literates with licenses would increasingly monopolize the field and have a premium for their work.

    • Replies: @Hail
  107. Does the medical school at St George’s University in Grenada qualify? How diverse is that? After all, US Marines died for that– literally.

  108. Yeah, right, opthalmology is usually life or death.

    And did you ever actually meet an actual All-American white doctor?

    Golf, anyone?

    Sheesh, the people you think are superior.

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
  109. anon[183] • Disclaimer says:

    The official will be just senior enough to give the NYT cover. Assistant cabinet position? Trump needs something to counter the Nike fiasco.

    • Replies: @dr kill
  110. ogunsiron says:
    @Arclight

    Looks like this particular tide of brown sludge is still flowing and rising.
    One after the other, communities of people that you thought filled with thinkers, they bend the knee.
    Physics will bend the knee if it hasn’t started yet. Civil engineering will keep on bending the knee. It’s also not just the brown and black tide that’s rising. There’s also the “front hole” tide of bacterial vaginosis infected secretions.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  111. ogunsiron says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Disparate Impact theory seeks to ultimately cut off the head of civilization itself.

  112. EdwardM says:

    Remember when affirmative action was said to “level the playing field”? Blacks suffer from society’s racist boot on their neck for 18 years, so we will give them preference to get into college. Then the playing field is level!

    Well, not really, for they also suffer for four years at America’s racist, retrograde, oppressive colleges, so we will give them preference to get into medical school. Finally, there, where everyone is smart and capable, the playing field is level!

    Er, well, they must suffer four years of racism in medical school, from racist professors to racist petri dishes to racist cadavers. No doubt, blacks must be given preference in selection into residencies to level the playing field. Then hiring for their first post-residency jobs. Then promotion to department head, chief of staff, etc., until the playing field is level.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  113. @Alfa158

    So far I haven’t seen any evidence establishing that the article was written by a government official at all

    It was written by Jayson Blair!

    Additional reporting by Michael Bellesiles, Tawana Brawley and Crystal Gail Mangum.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  114. @reiner Tor

    Yes, it could actually be Pence, for all I know. It’s pretty low-risk for him, for example he cannot be fired (Trump probably cannot even admit publicly that the Vice President selected by him hates his guts and thinks he’s unfit for office), and he has a very low chance of becoming a president on his own.

    No. Beyond Pence’s seemingly high character, if he is ambitious there’s all sorts of upside to staying loyal:
    – Trump is an old guy and may–unlikely–decide to pack it in. Say “I Made America Great Again” and exit.
    – Trump could have health issues and decide to leave office. Or more unlikely be impeached and convicted.
    – Trump’s presidency could be–he’s got to get behind his nationalist themes and make progress–quite successful and Pence inherit the mantle.
    – Trump could lose in 2020, and Pence could–if he’s smart and been a decent study–figure out how to tap into Trump’s nationalist themes (focus a lot on Steveish themes like “affordable family formation”) without Trump’s personal baggage and be the Republican candidate in 2024.

    In contrast being a rat and sellout dooms any further aspirations.

    No, like IHTG says, the NYT’s “high administration official” means some 3rd tier nebbish in a bow tie.

    • Agree: Escher
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  115. ogunsiron says:
    @Jack D

    More like “exclusive slum” (many of the Jews of Poland were as poor as church mice)
    —–
    I read that eastern european jews started experiencing poverty only when their population exploded so much (thanks to being much better off, for centuries, than their christian neighbors) that they ran out of economic niches in their eastern european environment.
    Many jews around 1880 may have been poor, but their grandparents weren’t poor at all.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  116. It’s going to come to the point soon where degrees from American and other Anglosphere countries will be worthless due to the institutions’ obsession with political correctness over the quality of the curriculum. Degrees from places like Russia will be worth their weight in gold in the future and students will be clamouring to get into universities where the quality of instruction is the first priority.

    “You have a degree in from the Flint, Michigan school of medicine, with your speciality from the Detroit School of Ophthalmology and Rap Music studies, I see. We have no openings here but I understand down at the state prison they are looking for someone to fix broken glasses and give rap dancing instruction. Would you be interested?”

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Johann Ricke
  117. peterike says:
    @Jack D

    But the difference is, there are still Poles in Poland (actually Poland is more mono-ethnic now that it ever was in history) but the Jewish community is all but extinct.

    You don’t need a lot. Ukraine is like 0.2% Jewish, yet Jews represent a large portion of the oligarchs in that beleaguered nation.

    • Replies: @snorlax
  118. @AnotherDad

    What if it was created by someone not in the administration at all, to sow distrust as part of the ongoing psych-ops? It’s not like we expect the New York Times to have ethical standards.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  119. JerryC says:
    @Hail

    Free minds, free markets and free people? I guess we can surmise that the anonymous author is a Reason Magazine subscriber.

  120. Kyle says:
    @reiner Tor

    Who cares? The vice presidency is where political careers go to die. His appointment was just evangelical dog whistling.

  121. @Jack D

    “Wakanda…..is entirely fictional…”

    You people are so stewed in implicit white bias that you can’t even see that this is hate speech, pure and simple.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  122. MEH 0910 says:

    OT:

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  123. @toddfelman

    todd, Perfect for this story….”The blind leading the blind.”

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  124. @Almost Missouri

    “It just doesn’t seem fair to dangle in front of our students an honorific that we know people are not equally eligible for.”

    “It just doesn’t seem considerate to dangle in front of our students an honorific that we know people are not equally qualified for.”

  125. @anonymous

    anony, twice a year the Buffalo news publishes a photo list of Senior Scholar Athletes for WNY. Ms., soon to be Dr. Lynch, would have to wonder if any students of color, who excelled in sports, lived in WNY. Oh wait, you need to be a starter and on the honor roll for the previous semester. Damn those pesty requirements.

  126. Whiskey says: • Website

    Or Pence figures a Blue Wave equals impeachment and he is signaling to Dems he is a safe caretaker.

    Impeachment makes Pence the President. Think that has not crossed his mind? Trump has no allies save the deplorables and they have never mattered.

    Not saying it’s Pence. But there are reasons of ambition for it be him.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  127. @PiltdownMan

    Pilt, sure, what MBA candidate doesn’t want to learn the African economic ratio of cows to brides.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  128. jb says:

    I think you are pushing a bit too hard here (as you do occasionally in some of your posts). It’s not at all clear to me that the elimination of a particular award is really going to result in more patient deaths.

    I think the true story here is that this is simply another example of the relentless examination of every aspect of our culture to make sure that black people aren’t disfavored — which really kind of conflicts with the narrative we are fed every day about White Supremacist America, doesn’t it?

  129. @unit472

    unit, I know I have said this before but….”Do you know what they call the student who finishes last in their class at Medical School?” “Doctor.”

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  130. snorlax says:
    @peterike

    More like 1% (in the “eligible for Israeli citizenship” sense). And FWIW the Jewish Ukrainian oligarchs seem to be mostly pro-Putin.

  131. jim jones says:
    @Jack D

    Progress is being made in South Africa:

  132. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:

    OT – Right-wing presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro stabbed in broad daylight in Brazil, the left-wing derangement is real

    https://www.dw.com/en/brazil-presidential-candidate-jair-bolsonaro-stabbed/a-45390039

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  133. While I feel that I never deserved one, why doesn’t our host bestow the cherished Golden Border any more? Diversity?

  134. Senior medical student Giselle Lynch has plenty of accomplishments to list…But one box she won’t be able to check when she submits her application is one of the highest academic awards medical students can receive, election to the honor society Alpha Omega Alpha.

    At this point I’m thinking, bummer for Ms. Lynch.

    But a few paragraphs down…

    Lynch, who is black

    Haha, fooled me. Had me thinking Lynch was the victim of a stupid new policy, when in reality she was its beneficiary.

  135. L Woods says:
    @anon

    Nah, there is (or at least was) extensively obsessive AA for aviation as well. They do seem to have somewhat given up on it in recent years however. IIRC military aviation is less Diverse now than it was some decades ago (much to older diversicrats’ chagrin).

  136. @unit472

    I feel your pain, Unit- 472. You sound like someone who might be open to what I’m gonna repeat here, as opposed to the fools that promote Socialized medicine (single-payer is the current euphemism for this). Yes, I AM talking to people like otherwise-intelligent MarkInLA! WIthout even talking about costs and efficiencies for a change, how about this? What chance would you have in picking a Doc that you know did not get through Medical School via Affirmative Action of some sort? It’s not a free choice. Your life is in the hands of the bureaucracy. Welcome to hell.

    No, don’t go telling me, “oh, but this plan now requires in-network, blah, blah, blah”. In a free market, I pick the doctor, and yes, if lots of people trust the guy over the Nigerian woman, he can charge more. That’s how freedom works, boys and girls. It might have the not-particularly-intended, but invisible-handed, effect of driving the incompetent Nigerians (not to pick particularly on that country) out of business. A free market – what a concept!

  137. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Civil Rights 2018. Blacks can sit at Starbucks without buying anything.

    Civil Rights for 2019: Blacks can rob any store. It is their right.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @CCZ
  138. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Asian complaint in academia:

    “Why am I not included when I have the grades?”

    Black complaint in academia:

    “Why am I not included when I lack the grades?”

    But then…

    Asians are allied with blacks. Go figure.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  139. Tim says:

    It’s actually been happening for a while now. Remember Mindy Kaling’s brother, Vijay Jojo Chokal-Ingam, who pretended to be black and it DID get him into medical school.

  140. @reiner Tor

    Correct. They’re all going to get into residencies and practice medicine. AΩΑ only affects (a little) whether someone will practice in Boston vs in Biloxi. And with or without AΩΑ, Jessica Lynch will ride Affirmative Action into a prestigious residency.

    The main effect of abolishing graduation honors will be to make it less obvious — to anyone who notices that black graduates are dramatically underrepresented in the top 25% of their class — that the black medical students got in on something other than merit.

    • Replies: @Joe Joe
  141. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:

    Wonder what Carl Icahn thinks of it? He normally does not suffer fools gladly. I’ll email him the link today.

    The general point remains: diversity movement and its lowered standards for all thing medic does kill.

  142. @unit472

    BTW, I’d like to correct your general disparagement of “hospitalist”, U-472″. These doctors are doing internal medicine, and they used to be called “internists” (maybe some still are). A friend of mine gets $200/hour doing 12-hour shifts. He does all the medicine that’s not surgery, specialties, or nursing care. That means admissions/discharges and making rounds. That’s some of the “how are you doing today?” stuff, but it’s not fun and games. He makes all the decisions regarding the treatment of the patients – medicines, referrals to the specialists, etc. If any patient’s health heads downhill quickly, this guy will be there to make the snap decisions. Yeah, you don’t want an AA hire for this either.

    However, that’s not to say that in our current completely dick-up healthcare system (the business part of it), you won’t get a big bill for who-knows-what?

    “Hey, it says I owe 400 bucks for treatment by a Neurologist named Gupta. I never saw the guy!”
    “Sir, calm down. Dr. Gupta saw you on the afternoon of the 9th, while you were still under. That’s why you didn’t see him. He assessed you.”
    “Assessed, my Ass! How do I really know this Dr. Gupta did anything?”
    “Sir, he assessed your torso. Trust me, the computer says Dr. Gupta was in the area playing 18 holes there. We can come up with a payment plan, if that’s the problem.”
    “Oh, yeah, you can send me .jpegs, or send me to the collection agency, your choice!”

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  143. Hail says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    It’s like if you needed a license to practice journalism, and increasingly apportioned the licenses to illiterates. The remaining literates with licenses would increasingly monopolize the field and have a premium for their work.

    I present, Exhibit A.

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
  144. @EdwardM

    “Level the playing field” is actually the opposite of what they’re doing; they’re tilting the playing field. If this were football, they’d have huge jacks under the stadium to lift one end so it’s downhill towards one team’s goal line. Or if it were basketball, they’d lower one of the baskets from ten feet to seven.

  145. Hail says: • Website
    @neutral

    Black Lives Matter (BLM) adopted support for the international Boycott Divestment and Sanctions movement (which calls on Israel to end its illegal occupation of Palestinian lands) in 2016, thus exposing itself to the Israeli governments’ extensive BDS-quashing efforts.

    I assumed BLM dropped off the map starting about Nov. 2016 because the forces that pushed it realized the mistake they’d made…helping get The Big Man elected.

    Maybe this BDS thing sealed the deal. (The ‘deal’ being giving BLM the cold shoulder.)

    BLM hasn’t been mentioned the media on any regular basis in a while now, nor have we seen any of those seemingly lined-up-and-at-the-ready stories we used to get hit with constantly, the ones that lead with the phrase “…an unarmed Black man…” with details filled in as needed.

  146. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Sure, not rewarding excellence in medical studies will likely get more patients dead in the long run

    Not rewarding sanity in powerful institutions will lead to more Wars for Israel and many more deaths.

    White folks allowed people with warped personalities(of people like Max Boots) to take over US foreign policy.

    Fish rots from the head.

    Jewish elite message: We deserve power even though we are neurotic and paranoid.

    Black message: We deserve awards even though we don’t study and make the grades.

  147. Jack D says:
    @ogunsiron

    I think it was earlier than that – Jewish prosperity collapsed starting with the partitions of Poland (18th century, not 19th). It was long enough ago that there was no family lore, neither in my family or in any other Jewish family that I know, of “back in the days when the Jews used to be few but wealthy”. Of course there were individual Jews who were wealthy but as a community the Jews of Poland were on average pretty poor in the late 19th and early 20th century, which led many of them to leave.

  148. songbird says:

    All the advocates of diversity should be given Somali doctors.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  149. Jack D says:
    @Joseph Tobin

    Maybe, but not yet. If you look at all the international ranking systems, US universities dominate the world rankings. Despite the AA BS around the margins, I’m sure that Icahn Med School (#18 in the US News rankings) is still a fine place to get a medical education. Just avoid black and Hispanic graduates.

  150. @Hail

    Who would win the hot dog eating contest? Tennessee Coates or John Podhoretz?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  151. Okay. So the empirically verifiable fact of objective reality that white and northeastern Oriental people consistently are more intelligent than others is racist (How so? “Shut up!,” they explained), but the same empirically verifiable fact of objective reality that, say, Negroes sprint faster than whites does not in any way even remotely suggest that track and field is racist?

    Got it.

    What would it take to convince these assholes? Must extraterrestrials administer the tests to eliminate any bias? Hell, it seems if the tests are constructed and administered by Negroes the invariable result would have to mean the administering Negroes were Uncle Toms.

  152. Nachum says:

    “AOA is an award of student excellence. What was the argument that was being perpetuated about us if we’re not being included?”

    Wow, it takes a special kind of stupid to make a statement like that. The answer is right there: You’re not included because, well, you’re not excellent.

  153. @Joseph Tobin

    Degrees from places like Russia will be worth their weight in gold in the future and students will be clamouring to get into universities where the quality of instruction is the first priority.

    Harvard is worth its tuition not because of the quality of instruction, but because you get to hobnob with not only the best and the brightest, but also with the somewhat less bright scions of some of the richest and most powerful people in the world. That kind of first mover advantage is hard to lose. Everyone knows that Harvard has a Special Olympics allocation for blacks. But it’s also understood that this is just Harvard playing along with the zeitgeist.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  154. MEH 0910 says:

    OT:

  155. @Harry Baldwin

    Harry, I think it was Diane Feinstein or maybe Barbara Boxer who took umbrage at an Admiral addressing them as “ma’am” instead of Senator. The same Admiral addressed the male Senators as “Sir.”

  156. Joe Joe says:
    @International Jew

    you mean Giselle Lynch. Jessica Lynch was the white teenager pretending to be a soldier who got captured by the Iraqis

    • Replies: @International Jew
  157. @Jack D

    Lenin Russian? In part, maybe.

  158. @anon

    I’ve flown with quite a few black guys and have no complaints. Also for some reason, the airlines have escaped the Eye on minority hiring so they’ve managed to keep it to minorities that can actually do the job.

    Women on the other hand…not so much. I’ve flown with only one that struck me as impressive and two or three that were downright dangerous.

    The filter for getting airline pilot jobs – either several years in the military or a long and pretty low-paid slog taking the civilian route – means that people who go through it tend to be people that are really interested in flying. Having an interest and actually giving a s*%t is half the battle in achieving competency. Airline pilot jobs are good jobs (not as good as they used to be, but still a route to a good life) but they’re hard to get.

    Where this all breaks down is the commuter airlines. Traditionally these were places where pilots could build turbine time hoping to apply to a major airline so most of them were competent, just lower total time. The lower time might be offset by them being younger and better able to function while exhausted. Today there is also a weird subset of people that have it as their career. I say “weird” because they’re very low-paid, why would you want to actually stay in that job? For an example of this, look at the Colgan Air crash in Buffalo. An incredibly incompetent Captain paired with a inexperienced and exhausted female first officer. If you ever board a commuter flight and the captain is older than about 45 and the FO is a woman, run for your life.

  159. anon[250] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hank Archer

    Well the guy, Patrick Chavis, who “got Bakke’s spot” at the medical school eventually had his license revoked for “gross negligence, incompetence and repeated negligent acts” by the Medical Board of California.

    All that proves is that the Medical Board of California is racist.

  160. njguy73 says:
    @PiltdownMan

    For instance, business school leadership curriculums extol the virtues of “charismatic” or “authentic” business leaders. But these are universalist categories perpetuating the myth that skin colour makes no difference to one’s chances of becoming a successful corporate leader.

    Sailer, didn’t you once write that African-American males should be encouraged to use their natural interpersonal charisma to excel in sales and recruiting? And that Blacks’ improvisational skills, which have served them well in jazz and basketball, could be harnessed for entrepreneurialism?

    You were coming up with ways to decolonize business school curriculum then. But who listened?

  161. njguy73 says:
    @Fred Boynton

    “invaded Canada” should be enough to make him a national hero and get him elected. Why doesn’t he have a monument on the National Mall? Why don’t we finish what he started?

    He violated Black bodies. He’ll get a momunent in the National Mall when Donald Trump gets a momument in Portland, Oregon.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Mentor_Johnson#Marriage_and_family

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  162. Alfa158 says:
    @Ibound1

    There was a study years back of students at medical schools in Southern California that found White men outperformed all other groups. The study determine that the reason was that White men on average had to have higher pre-med grades and admission test scores than Blacks, Asians, Hispanics or White women in order to be admitted to medical schools. Even if White men in general were no smarter on average than these other groups, you would still get this outcome because schools were setting a higher bar for admission on White men. That was about fifteen years ago so imagine how bad it is now.

    • Agree: Sarah Toga
    • Replies: @Ibound1
    , @Kaz
  163. Anon[449] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Disparate impact seems to underpin much of modern PC bureaucracy.

    Does anyone have an idea about what it would take for it to be invalidated as a legal principle?

    Penn Law Prof. Amy Wax of the “bourgeouse values” kerfluffle is the go-to expert here:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/amy-wax-iron-law-of-personnel-selection/

    https://www.nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-dead-end-of-disparate-impact

    https://scholarship.law.wm.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3413&context=wmlr

  164. @njguy73

    Actually, Senator Dick Johnson lost his Senate seat for trying to get his mulatto daughters with his common-law wife invited to debut at Washington debutante parties.

    I can see Christian Bale in the lead in “Vice President of the Hollow Earth.”

    “The Old, Weird America” would be another possible title.

  165. Anon[449] • Disclaimer says:
    @Desiderius

    I found out my kidney transplant surgeon was black the day of the surgery.

    Wow, oh wow!

  166. @AndrewR

    That WAS carefully, Andrew. I don’t know how Mr. Campanis could have said that in a nicer, more civil manner than that. It’s what he said or just get to lyin’.

    Get busy lyin’ or get busy dyin’ – the whole country is one big Shawshank Prison Institute for Corrections.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  167. “… an honorific that we know people are not equally eligible for.”

    This line makes me want to throw my phone

  168. @Charles Pewitt

    Let’s also enter Dick Morris in that hot dog-eating contest. He looks like quite the trencherman.

  169. @Anonymous

    What makes him “far-right”? Immigration isn’t the issue in Brazil that it is in the Anglosphere and Europe.

  170. @William Badwhite

    The commuter airlines are 180 degrees different than 5 years ago, William. What you wrote would have been the case up to then, but the Buffalo Dash-8-400 crash is actually what was one half of what changed things for pilot hiring/pay.

    The FAA and/or NTSB, as one of the many “let’s do something” ideas that come out of any crash or major incident, pushed for laws requiring an ATP license for flying a Part 121 airliner, even from the right seat (first-officer). That used to require just a Commercial License, which could be obtained with as few as 250 hours (even less if learning at a flight school).

    This change in requirements greatly decreased the supply of new pilots. Pay and working conditions improved greatly. Airline pilot jobs are easier to get than they’ve been in the last 40 years – you’ve just got to have ~ 1,000 hours (the airlines help pilots complete the ATP and finish the 1,500 hours as “restricted”). 25 years ago, even commuter airlines hired guys with usually over 2,000 hours, and 1000 multi-engine time, just as a comparison, William.

    BTW, the other half of the story is just demographics, as the pushed-to-65 ( ~ 10 years back) retirement age had lot of pilots catching up to that one.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  171. @pyrrhus

    . . . ahem . . . about that comment . . .

    Never go to a medical professional (or any professional) who is a minority.

    . . . well . . . depending on what county one resides in . . . one may now be the “minority”, due to reckless mass immigration. Prime example of reckless mass immigration: Harris County, Texas (Houston) is now only about 30% White.

    Therefore, never go to a non-White professional.

    One could argue exceptions due to certain non-Whites honestly earning achievement/merit as a recognizable pattern of their people-group, i.e., Ashkenazim physicians, who may appear White anyway.

  172. Berty says:

    Do you have anything to say about Alex Jones getting deplatformed?

  173. CCZ says:
    @Anon

    In Boston in 2019, most certainly yes.

    Rachael Rollins, black, female, multi-cultural family, “progressive” Democrat won the District Attorney primary. Yes, she will be the next DA.

    Her promises:

    Charges for which the Default is to Decline Prosecuting (unless supervisor permission is obtained).
    Trespassing
    Shoplifting (including offenses that are essentially shoplifting but charged as larceny)
    Larceny under $250
    Disorderly conduct
    Disturbing the peace
    Receiving stolen property
    Minor driving offenses, including operating with a suspend or revoked license
    Breaking and entering — where it is into a vacant property or where it is for the purpose of sleeping or seeking refuge from the cold and there is no actual damage to property
    Wanton or malicious destruction of property
    Threats – excluding domestic violence
    Minor in possession of alcohol
    Drug possession
    Drug possession with intent to distribute
    A stand alone resisting arrest charge, i.e. cases where a person is charged with resisting arrest and that is the only charge or combined with only charges that all fall under the above list of charges to decline to prosecute, e.g. resisting arrest charge combined only with a trespassing charge

    Instead of prosecuting, these cases should be (1) outright dismissed prior to arraignment or (2) where appropriate, diverted and treated as a civil infraction for which community service is satisfactory, restitution is satisfactory or engagement with appropriate community-based no-cost programming, job training or schooling is satisfactory. In the exceptional circumstances where prosecution of one of these charges is warranted, the line DA must first seek permission from his or her supervisor.

    Our workforce will reflect the diversity of the people we serve including people who speak languages other than English. In addition to unconscious bias training, our staff will receive training in serving the LGBTQ+ population and people with disabilities.  Our staff will understand that people’s social identities are complex and that everyone’s voice should be heard.

    [Resist ICE]

    Every ADA will be instructed to call Rachael directly if they see ICE or any federal agent detaining or arresting someone in or near a Suffolk County Courthouse; she will personally go to the federal courthouse and speak to the US Attorney about having that Suffolk County resident returned to Suffolk County.
    We will work urgently to end ICE access to our databases.
    Within her first 30 days, Rachael will implement a door-to-door security plan utilizing victim witness advocates and civil rights and defense attorneys to escort undocumented parties to and from the courthouse safely.
    The plan will be kept confidential for important security reasons, but we will share with the public as much of the plan as possible without jeopardizing the safety and security of the parties the plan is intended to protect.

    Time to get out of Boston.

  174. Ibound1 says:
    @Alfa158

    It’s bad …. but good. The schools have given you an easy way to find the best doctors.

  175. Anon[395] • Disclaimer says:

    Your so-called rights are merely privileges given to you by a cultural elite whom you must beg permission from.

    Colin Kapernick is a Communist, in his own words, but yet he is celebrated.

    • Replies: @dr kill
    , @Hail
  176. Redman says:
    @Anondoc

    I’m a practicing lawyer for 23 years. And I can say with high confidence that the legal profession has the same issues. And worse.

    A high percentage of blacks admitted when I was in law shool were clearly not prepared.

    The NY bar exam used to be given 2 times a year. Once in July and once in February. The February test was largely for people who had failed in July and were taking it again.

    I had a friend who took several years off after law school and decided later on to practice. He sat for the February test, and according to him the room was close to 50 percent black. That may be a bit high of an estimate, but I have no reason to doubt that it was a lot less representative of the general law school population.

    Don’t doctors need to pass similar qualifying exams irrespective of their Med School accolades, etc.?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  177. Twinkie says:
    @Anon

    Asians are allied with blacks.

    No. Educational, housing, crime, and marriage patterns say otherwise.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  178. Twinkie says:
    @unit472

    It beggars belief that blacks and latinos would account for 18-20% of admissions at any medical school given the limited number of openings and the number of applicants. That these Affirmative Action admissions also appear to graduate in equal numbers is even more disturbing.

    Black physicians fail to pass the board certification tests at very high rates, effectively preventing them from working at many hospitals and practices.

    He was a ‘hospitalist’, an MD with no function except to wander the halls and ask patients how they are doing and charge you $ 400 for the visit.

    He only sees a fraction of that $400.

  179. HA says:

    Somewhat OT: Maybe it’s just me, but sometimes I think I can tell who has been reading iSteve posts over the last few days. From Ann Coulter’s latest column:

    The New York Times is already doing a victory dance on the corpse of historical America. Recently, the newspaper hired a white male-hating bigot, Sarah Jeong, for its editorial board. In the past week alone, the Times has run articles with these headlines: “Who’s Afraid of a White Minority?” and “The Religion of Whiteness Becomes a Suicide Cult.”

    Granted, that is not proof of anything. For all I know, Steve got the idea for his columns by following Coulter’s tweets, or they both got their inspiration from reading or watching the same other pundit or helpful story-suggestor. Or else, by now the NYT is compelled, as in the story about the scorpion and the frog, to always do whatever will generate the loudest possible reflexive outcry from the likes of Coulter and Sailer. Still, one has to wonder…

  180. Lurker says:
    @Twinkie

    But not voting patterns.

    • Agree: Sarah Toga
    • Replies: @Twinkie
  181. dr kill says:
    @Anondoc

    Are you enjoying your career? Would you repeat your educational choices?

  182. dr kill says:
    @Anon

    Someone said, Trump’s economy is so good that even Kapernick found a job.

  183. eah says:

    The award is open to the top 25 percent of a medical school’s graduating class…”an honorific that we know people are not equally eligible for.”

    ‘What did he mean by this, does anyone know?’

    David Muller, M.D., is Dean for Medical Education and the Marietta and Charles C. Morchand Chair in Medical Education at The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City…Muller was born in 1964 in Tel Aviv, Israel

    • Replies: @Hail
  184. Hail says: • Website
    @Anon

    This Toure has 136,000 tweets;

    Joined Jan. 2009, meaning about 40 Tweets a day, every day, for nearly ten years.

    Matthew Yglesias would probably easily beat even that, except that he regularly deletes his entire Tweet history.

  185. Hail says: • Website
    @eah

    Why did he move to the United States?

    • Replies: @eah
    , @Sarah Toga
  186. Kaz says:
    @Alfa158

    Asians see a bigger penalty for higher grades than whites so that’s surprising to read..

  187. dr kill says:
    @anon

    Counter the Nike fiasco? Is that you, Max Kellerman?

    • Replies: @anon
  188. eah says:

    Clearly what this med school needs is ‘Double Secret Affirmative Action’ to make more ‘medical students of color’ eligible — which should be easy — after all, grades are private/confidential, so who would know, amirite?

  189. Anon7 says:

    This is the most worrisome (i.e. progressive) sentence:

    “We can’t justify putting people who are historically at a disadvantage at an even greater disadvantage.”

    I think this means that PoC’s get automatic A’s, right? Otherwise you’re dangling things out of their reach, and we know how that turns out, right?

  190. @AndrewR

    What does stats have to do with it? I was talking about civility. That reply didn’t make a lick of sense.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
  191. Twinkie says:
    @Lurker

    But not voting patterns.

    True, but voting patterns are much more unstable (over time) compared to the other factors I cited.

  192. eah says:

    Bad Medicine: The Sickening Truth About Britain’s Foreign ‘Doctors’

    …I took it upon myself to conduct an analysis of the MPTS’s list of tribunal decisions — an analysis which revealed that non-British doctors (25% of the total) are responsible for at least 80% of tribunal cases, the vast majority of them bearing Muslim, South Asian, or African names…

  193. “Where are we? We’re nowhere here,” says Lynch, remembering her reaction. “AOA is an award of student excellence.[snip]“

    Odd that someone who was able to complete a medical degree at a decent school is incapable of seeing that the second half of the quote explains the first half (and answers the question).

    In fact, the second half explains the first half in more ways than one:
    • first, the absence of ‘diverse’ AΩA members may be due to their absence from the top quartile;
    • second, if AΩA membership is an ‘award’, it’s an award for excellence, not an award of excellence. You can’t just give someone excellence. I don’t like grammar Nazis, but this dimbulb is supposed to be representative of ‘diverse’ people in the top quartile.

    On the whole ‘AΩA’ thing: if membership of one of those stupid Yank “Greeks” is available to the top quartile of graduates from a school in the global ‘next-50′ (ranked 51-100), it does not scream ‘excellence’.

    I would argue that anyone outside the top 5 or 6 students from such a school could not reliably be classed as having genuine expertise in their domain. The top quartile (ex the outright top 5 or 6) would be competent, but I would not use their services for anything that required expertise.

    Knowing what I know about my fellow students in my own area of expertise, I have always said that I would never employ anyone outside the top 4 or 5 students from a graduating class at my alma mater as domain experts (in economics, econometrics, forecasting, quantitative analysis, applied finance – you get the drift).

    The corollary to that is that I have a strong preference that any medical or dental practitioner I use, graduated at or near the top of his class – and did so at a reputable university.

    Luckily I live in a city with 2 universities whose med schools in the global top 50, so there are plenty of Melbourne (global #9) and Monash (global #39) grads plying their trade, and it’s trivial to identify the ones who were top-flight students. It helps that my mate’s brother topped his year at Melbourne (global #14 dental school) in dentistry: he’s been my tooth guy since the mid-90s; my doc finished third in his year at Melbourne (in 1977).

    Yes, it’s elitist: if someone is going to drill my gob or stick their finger up my bunghole they better have done something that makes it screamingly obvious that they know what they’re doing.
    .
    .
    But back to the Icahn frisson – and its academic administrators making fools of themselves.

    This bit strikes me as utterly fuckwitted –

    It just doesn’t seem fair to dangle in front of our students an honorific that we know people are not equally eligible for

    So… if I’m reading that right, the natural end-point that would result from this plonker’s view of pedagogy and standards, is that everyone should just get to put “M.D.” after their name … even people whose performance in the course would normally make them “not equally eligible“. Nice to know.

    What about people who don’t finish primary school or high school?

    After all, they’re “not equally eligible” for candidature in the course, the poor blighters: Icahn must immediately fling open the doors, welcome them in, and immediately award them Nobel Prizes In Everything, and Academy Awards for Best Everything.

    (Except if they’re white, obviously – coz those fuckers are balls-deep in privilege already.)

  194. @Buffalo Joe

    It was boxer. I was in the hearing room that day and know the Army general.

  195. @Ed

    The problem here is that the medical school has forgotten its purpose.

    Its purpose is to treat us and not to further the lies that sub-standard Affirmative Action students will be as good as those who gain entry based upon merit.

    This is the problem with Affirmative Action. The purposes of institutions, whatever they may be, are subverted to the cause of denying that sub-standard people are truly sub-standard.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  196. Anon[394] • Disclaimer says:

    “No post on the NYT article by Pence (or whoever wrote it)?”

    I’m sure Donald Trump dictated it himself as a means of taking attention off that new Woodward book, I believe it was. The NYT probably accepted the Op-Ed without question for publication because it came from a “reputable” source such as Mattis, Pence, Pomepo, Huckabee, or Conway (or her husband); the NYT is used to being the government’s stenographer, so they got tricked into publishing propaganda.

    Trump has had a long history of tricking the NY media into publishing things favorable to himself. I believe he tricked the Times back in the day into publishing a story alleging the Queen of England was going to buy an apartment in one of his buildings – obviously done to increase his property’s value and sell units at a higher price. In fact, Trump made his wealth doing this kind of thing. He lied to a prominent NYC journalist about his wealth – his father hadn’t yet died – who then published the claim in Forbes. Trump then used the publicity to secure huge loans which he then used to buy properties he otherwise couldn’t afford – all legal and accomplished by taking advantage of NYC rubes who aren’t as smart as they think they are.

    Alternately, this could also be an elaborate concern troll by a faction still loyal to Steven Bannon. Basically, they funnel a damaging Op-Ed to the NYT knowing that one or more of the people listed above (not including Pence) will get fired as Trump retaliates.

    It might also be an inside job by John Bolton using similar logic: Mattis is against attacking Iran (and Venezuela), so getting him fired with a fake Op-Ed might open the door for John’s War. Personally, I can’t believe a patriot like Jim Mattis would put the country in danger as Marco Rubio and company are talking about more wars by doing something that could get his ass fired. My understanding is that the Woodward book puts a target on Jim’s back…almost as if someone like Bolton was a source for the work…hmm…

  197. TTSSYF says:
    @Whiskey

    No way do I think it was Pence. He strikes me as being a genuinely honorable man. I think the same is true of Sessions.

  198. Hail says: • Website
    @Sarah Toga

    Is he moving back to Israel once he has earned enough money?

  199. @anon

    I once had an office mate tell me on an airliner he was on he heard a familiar voice and then saw the really Black face of the pilot: it was the WMAQ-TV weatherman Jim Tillman.

  200. @reiner Tor

    Can someone with some sense explain to me what people mean when they say Trump is unfit for office. He has the qualifications laid out in the constitution. He has been successful. He doesn’t have a criminal record or anything like that. He doesn’t have a bunch of huge scandals. He is not a nice guy, but neither was Sherman. He divorced his wives to get newer models, which is at least tacky and at worst disloyal, but they might have been mean spirited women, so it is hard to say. And Ronald Reagan was divorced and no one thought that alone disqualified him.

    So, what are people referring to?

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  201. TTSSYF says:
    @reiner Tor

    My money is on Omarosa, with words like “lodestar” thrown in to make it sound like Pence (apparently, he uses that word fairly frequently).

  202. anon[288] • Disclaimer says:
    @dr kill

    Nike expected Trump’s tweet. It was a feature, not a bug. Their customers eat up this shit.

  203. @Anon

    Why does Dr. Boatright not know what the test and grade disparities are? Isn’t finding that out part of doing such a study?

    Hell yes, he knows which is precisely why he doesn’t state what the test and grade disparities are. Because readers will be appalled, even fearful, when they see how big the gaps are.

    State board exams are the last line of defense. I mean, doctors from Africa have to take those boards to practice in the USA. So, when an American who has studied here can’t pass, you know he sucks.

  204. Anon[774] • Disclaimer says:

    “Or Pence figures a Blue Wave equals impeachment and he is signaling to Dems he is a safe caretaker. Impeachment makes Pence the President. … Not saying it’s Pence. But there are reasons of ambition for it be him.”

    1. Sailer should open a thread with this topic and include some of the best comments about it from this one. This is an interesting topic.

    2. Impeachment does not make Mike Pence president as you need a large number of votes in the Senate to convict; there is almost no chance of that. Democrats are already distancing themselves from that as they know it’s not going to happen.

    It could also spark a civil war or secession if it fails or even a dictatorship if Trump successfully retaliates with a military that overwhelmingly supports him, especially all the white guy special forces and colonels who’d ride to his rescue if he publicly asked them to – and certainly if the supposed charges are a bunch of nothing cooked up by a hated government just to get rid of him.

    3. Pence would be the likely suspect as he is the only official Trump cannot fire under law. However, do not rule out other possibilities:

    a. This is an elaborate concern troll by a faction loyal to Bannon that wishes to force Trump to fire their opposition.

    b. Donald Trump did this himself, funneling the effort through Mike Pence. Trump is famous for this kind of behavior. Perhaps he wishes to blame Jeff Sessions or Rod Rosenstein and use this as an excuse to fire them…or to distract from the Woodward book.

    c. Pence did indeed do this for the reasons you suggested, but being a dim-bulb, he was actually tricked into doing so by a smart guy like John Bolton who wishes to reduce his opposing influence within the administration.

    d. This was actually the work of a foreign government impersonating an administration official, probably the Russians. The aim is to get warmongers and sanctions supporters fired. Presumably, the Times would have a way of determining the legitimacy of their source…but there are ways around that. The FBI/CIA use this type of tactic all the time to sow dissension and chaos within opposition groups they target.

    e. Pence has been informed of something Mueller will say and is positioning himself to steal Trump’s job in the aftermath.

    f. Jeff Sessions or Rod Rosenstein did this and was tricked by a senior administration official into doing it. They will soon smoke out the culprit and fire him, paving the way for Trump to cancel Mueller’s little party.

    g. Either Sarah Huckabee or Kellyanne Conway is behind this. The idea would be to secure a coveted position in the media post-Trump, when their identity comes out, of course. Personally, I’ve never trusted Conway for various reasons, so she would be the more likely of the two. The article itself has a mean-girls tone to it anyhow.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  205. Anon[332] • Disclaimer says:

    “Can someone with some sense explain to me what people mean when they say Trump is unfit for office.”

    Trump violated the unspoken deal in the same way Sylvester Stallone’s character in “Rocky” violated the unspoken deal he had with Apollo Creed: “I’ll give you a shot, give you some fame and attention, but the conclusion is not in question.” In the movie, Creed is surprised that his opponent actually took the challenge seriously, as it was supposed to be just a goofy exhibition fight. Trump did the same thing. He governs seriously and attempts to accomplish what he said on the campaign trail. That kind of talk was supposed to be nothing serious – just like when both Hillary and Obama lied about renegotiating NAFTA. It wasn’t supposed to be taken seriously, but Trump DOES take it seriously.

    Trump violated the deal the democrat media establishment had with the republican party: “We’ll let you pass tax cuts and free trade deals that benefit us and your donors while hurting your base in exchange for positive coverage, but you aren’t allowed to do anything to change our demographic transformation project or do anything to help whites or challenge our voting blocks; if you are nice, some of you will even be given scraps from the table when the day comes when republicans are permanently locked out of power. You’ll be the Washington Generals to our Harlem Globetrotters.”

    He rejected the deal, and they hate him for it. Simple.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deal_with_the_Devil

  206. @jim jones

    There was some huckster on UK radio recently claiming that there are no Black students at Oxbridge not because of racism but because of “subconscious racism”

    Probably the application doesn’t ask the applicant’s race. So, the admissions dept. just has to go on qualifications.

  207. @Desiderius

    Good God! That is some scarey shit!

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  208. @Harry Baldwin

    I’d gladly take “Miss” over millennials I don’t even know calling me by my first name.

    • Replies: @Corn
  209. anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    1. Sailer should open a thread with this topic and include some of the best comments about it from this one.

    Lot had some good observations on the topic in yet another thread last night. I think it was the Mollie Tibbetts thread. He thinks it’s Mattis.

  210. eah says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I saw/remember the story — the doctor involved was cleared of wrongdoing and allowed to continue practicing.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
  211. Anonymous[449] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    I’ve been told by other commenters that this may be due to your sleeping during the morning hours, but many times comments by those with “real handles” keep rolling in.

    Someone may already have responded, but from what I understand, if you post as Anon or Anonymous you have to wait for Steve to wake up, and I agree, it’s outrageous that he sleeps so much, rather than working 24 hours a day.

    If you are a registered commenter, the blogging software autoapproves your comments, unless you have been flagged for moderation (I’d expect he’d just delete your account though if you have done something naughty like doxxed someone). This is how most blogging platforms work.

    My comments also get stuck in moderation, since I’m in Steve’s opposite time zone. That means you don’t get so many responses to your comments. But the alternative is having your string of comments more easily discovered by autistic redditors when you become the target of the net’s next two-minute hate.

    Finally, Steve doesn’t do open threads, so off-topic stuff just goes anywhere.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  212. Anon[449] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anondoc

    There are (good) med schools that you can get into without organic chem or STEM courses:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/30/nyregion/30medschools.html

    It seems to me that the STEM requirements are there to:

    1. Make sure you can understand science, since medicine is, well, sorta science, and

    2. Verify your IQ, or general cognitive chops, which your MCAT should do, but the more checks, the better.

    MCAT is being SJWified now:

    https://www.weeklystandard.com/devorah-goldman/the-politicization-of-the-mcat

    Sample questions from the MCAT (not a joke):

    1. What is the cause of the wage gap between men and women?

    – Bigotry
    – Sexism
    – Racism
    – Biological differences

    The answer is sexism. I would say none of the above: There is no wage gap when you do an apples and apples comparison, and what little there may be is biological differences.

    2. What is the cause of the lack of minorities such as African Americans or Latinos amoung university faculty members?

    – Symbolic racism
    – Institutional racism
    – Hidden racism
    – Personal bias

    The correct answer is institutional racism. Huh?

  213. Anonymous[449] • Disclaimer says:
    @Redman

    A high percentage of blacks admitted when I was in law shool were clearly not prepared.

    I had a friend who took several years off after law school and decided later on to practice. He sat for the February test, and according to him the room was close to 50 percent black. That may be a bit high of an estimate, but I have no reason to doubt that it was a lot less representative of the general law school population.

    Lately I have been doing a LinkedIn, etc., check on any black “lawyer” who shows up in the news. It is very rare that they are working as a lawyer five years out. At best they get a couple of years at a decent law firm and then to on to something much lower paying, and finally wash out of law, although often into a completely decent profession, but one that is less mentally demanding.

    And the smart ones I think can get similar pay doing easier work outside of law becasue they will be hired just for being black.

  214. TTSSYF says:
    @Joe Schmoe

    Read the latest article by John Nolte on Breitbart. It is an excellent summary of what’s going on.

  215. Anon[225] • Disclaimer says:

    “He thinks it’s Mattis.”

    I think Mattis would be a fool to do something like this; this doesn’t strike me as something a patriotic military man would do (risk getting fired and having all checks on Trump’s militarism vanish). My personal guess is Derek Lyons: free-trader, well-connected lawyer, Jeb Bush policy advisor and fundraiser, no personal loyalty to Donald Trump, was present during the Syrian gas attack, and controls the flow of information to Donald Trump (the perfect person to coordinate an internal resistance). Lyons got his current job after the previous guy was outed for some unsavory stuff, if I recall….hmm, strange coincidence.

    Derek Lyons also worked for Brett Kavanugh, meaning that he has the perfect alibi during the confirmation hearings – no one would suspect him, freeing him up to publish this attack. Out of all the possibilities mentioned so far, including Stephen Ford, I think Derek Lyons is the most likely suspect. Also, the word “lodestar” has been floating around since McCain’s funeral, meaning that Stephen Ford, a Pence speech writer, may not have necessarily been behind this. One definition of the word is “guide”, which describes Mr. Lyons’s position in the White House. My guess is that a very arrogant Harvard grad like Derek Lyons just couldn’t resist teasing his audience with this subtle clue as a demonstration of his intellectual superiority over them.

  216. Anonymous[268] • Disclaimer says:
    @William Badwhite

    I was going to make a similar points. All else being equal, blacks have lower intelligence and reaction times than whites, but have faster movements and greater physical strength (important when handling unusual g-forces in an emergency.) Women have all the same disadvantages without the compensating advantages.

  217. Anonymous[268] • Disclaimer says:
    @eah

    Do British Jews use the NHS?

  218. Anon[351] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    I’ve been told by other commenters that this may be due to your sleeping during the morning hours.

    Internet startups give a beeper to one of their staff each night who is alerted whenever the network monitoring software finds that a server is down or not performing right. The appointed staff member, if he can’t fix the problem remotely, jumps into the car in his pajamas and makes a visit to the ISP to work on the server directly in the rack.

    I’m sure that Ron could cobble something like this up for Steve. Whenever a new comment comes into the moderation queue, a beeper or mobile phone alarm could wake up Steve to immediately take care of it. He could also use it when he’s at the movie theater or out for dinner.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  219. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Thanks. I had not considered that registered commenters may have theirs sail through. This should be confirmed by the moderator(s).

    Otherwise, I maintain that threads should stay focused on the article under which they appear. Don’t you find “Hey, Steve, whatcha think about [***]” rude and distracting?

  220. AndrewR says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    This isn’t rocket science. The way he phrased it, he implied that zero blacks have what it takes to do those jobs. A much more defensible explanation would be “they’re less likely than whites to have what it takes.”

    “They are less likely to be able to” ≠ “none of them can.”

    I don’t care about innumerate people getting targeted by the PC police.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  221. Corn says:
    @Rosamond Vincy

    I’ve taken to calling women Miss lately. It’s more polite than “hey you” or “hi First Name” but women seem to like it because it doesn’t seem to imply they’re old or matronly like “ma’am”.

  222. @Father O'Hara

    It seemed kind of bait and switch since the surgeon I met with the week before was Argentinian (I think).

  223. @Buzz Mohawk

    Yeah, they’re not really part of us, as they’ll tell you. I can pass, but am increasingly disinclined to.

    They’re about as much part of us as the Norman invaders were part of England.

  224. @eah

    Sickening case. Anyone with a grain of sense would realize that either a Caesarian or an episiotomy was in order.

  225. @Anon

    Jeez Lou-freakin’-WEEZ, if my doctors are good at what they do, I don’t even care if they have Social Skills! Rather have a brilliant doctor with no bedside manner whatever than some terribly considerate practitioner who not only reassures me so excessively I’m scared to death but leaves me in pain for three days! And yes, I have experience on this point.

  226. @Anon

    It’s affirmative action for schmucks.

  227. @Anondoc

    “Based on current publicly available statistics, as a white, I had a 25% chance. Of I were Asian, a 15% chance. Of I were black, a 75% …”

    When you apply to medical school, do you have to interview / submit a photo? This would seem to put Eurasians like myself (and my progeny) at a disadvantage if we checked the “white” box. I imagine perceived lying about one’s race would be frowned upon even more than being of the wrong race to begin with.

  228. @Achmed E. Newman

    The commuter airlines are 180 degrees different than 5 years ago, William.

    Umm no. If its changed, its only gotten worse. Two years ago American Eagle had an entire new hire class quit during training upon being informed they’d be based in San Juan, PR. If you have an ATP and aren’t clinically dead, blind, or in prison, you can get hired by most commuters today.

    What you wrote would have been the case up to then, but the Buffalo Dash-8-400 crash is actually what was one half of what changed things for pilot hiring/pay.

    The dipshit didn’t grasp or remember that the Dash-8 didn’t have autothrottles. As they leveled off on the approach (using autopilot, as they should have been) he didn’t bring in additional power (which is so basic as to be second nature to anybody that’s even halfway competent) then when they got slow and he got the stickshaker, he added backpressure (exactly the wrong thing – he should have pushed the nose down) but still didn’t go to full power. There’s only one explanation for that: he didn’t know how to fly an airplane. The FO just sat there as it all happened.

    There is such a shortage of “qualified” pilots at commuters, this clown still would be hired today, then handheld through training as he busted countless check rides.

    pushed for laws requiring an ATP license for flying a Part 121 airliner, even from the right seat (first-officer). That used to require just a Commercial License, which could be obtained with as few as 250 hours (even less if learning at a flight school).

    The requirement for an ATP for any 121 is silly. And that requirement wouldn’t have kept Colgan from hiring and retaining the hack Renslow. All it does it make it even harder for commuters to hire FO’s. It means pilots need more years as flight instructors (horrible jobs) or towing signs or whatever they do to scrape up hours and some percentage of them will choose not to, thus increasing the shortage.

    The 250 hour requirement for a Commercial was set in stone in the FAR’s when I got mine in 1991.

    25 years ago, even commuter airlines hired guys with usually over 2,000 hours, and 1000 multi-engine time, just as a comparison, William.

    I was offered my first airline job in 1994 when I had 1,100 hours total and 50 in multi-engine, only about 12 in turbines. For $18,000.

    Anyway the point of my initial post was to counter whichever anon was afraid of black airline pilots. As I said I’ve flown with quite a few and have no complaints.

  229. The New York Times is trying out a new weasel-word to avoid confronting human biodiversity and its obvious effects on educational outcomes.

    This is from a recent article on Atlanta’s school system leaders, who in the past were caught cheating to raise African-American student test scores, and are now trying out alternative strategies to raise African-American student test scores:

    “High-poverty, segregated neighborhood schools like Peyton Forest have, on average, low reading and math scores.”

    Notice that according to this reporter, it is not schools with lots of African American students who have low average test scores. It is SEGREGATED schools that have low average test scores.

    Umm, what about segregated schools with Asian or white majorities? Don’t those segregated schools have unusually high average test scores? Maybe some other feature of the schools explains their poor performance rather than that they are segregated? It is clear that being segregated is not the defining feature explaining low test scores. Segregated schools are in the tails, either unusually high average test scores (segregated with high Asian or white majorities) or unusually low average test scores (segregated with high African-American majorities).

    Oh well, back to the drawing board for New York Times education reporters looking for new ways to hide the evidence for human biodiversity.

    article link: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/09/06/magazine/student-performance-atlanta-teaching.html?action=click&module=Top%20Stories&pgtype=Homepage

  230. And for all these years I thought that they awarded medical degrees etc. to those who demonstrated the necessary skills to practice medicine, regardless of color, ethnicity etc. If members of minority groups are, for whatever reason, lacking in these skills then they should have to find some other line of work.

    Well, guess I was wrong. Silly me!

  231. Edward says:
    @PiltdownMan

    The reason for this is that controls for prior attainment aren’t everything. Only around a third of White British high school students go onto university, by far the lowest of any ethnic group in the UK. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/white-british-pupils-the-least-likely-uk-ethnic-group-to-go-to-university-new-research-reveals-a6729361.html

    These students are likely to be the most motivated to study at university, whereas students from ethnic minorities are often being forced to go to university by their parents.

    It’s also useful to break down the degree attainment gap. 78.8% of White British university students attained a First-class degree or a 2:1; 72.2% of Chinese students and 70.7% of Indian students met this standard, and the gap continues to close.

    By contrast, despite already being less likely to go to university than Chinese/Indian students, only 61.8% of Pakistani university students achieve a First or a 2:1, with only 50.5% of some Black students achieving this.

    https://www.ecu.ac.uk/guidance-resources/student-recruitment-retention-attainment/student-attainment/degree-attainment-gaps/

  232. @William Badwhite

    I don’t know why you are arguing with me, William, since we are pretty much in agreement on it all. I said things turned around 180 degrees since 5 years back – that means in a good way for pilots. I know companies that came very close to furloughing pilots in 2013. That’s what I mean by it’s flipped. No, I also don’t think an ATP should be required and definitely don’t like the new ATP that can’t be obtained via regular flying. I was just stating the new laws, not promoting this point.

    I know about the Buffalo crash. If you want to talk about why the Captain responded to an immenent stall in that way, you’ll open up a big can of worms. Of course a turboprop’s not gonna have autothrottles, BTW.

    By the mid-’90′s I saw jobs where maybe 500 TT and 1,500 multi weren’t strictly required, but you’d see what people who hired had, and it was way up there past those numbers.There airlines could get lots of ex-military guys back then. Lots of places wanted 500 multi to get on to fly their Senecas and 402′s! Like all fields, it helps to know someone.

    Last two point: the check-flying is gone. That was work with good experience for pilots. Skydive flying is fun, but not really worth much after a while. Same with banner-towing. I’ve got lots of respect for Ag-flying.

    Black pilots do fine, because SIM instructors are not gonna let someone downright dangerous get through.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  233. @AndrewR

    Listen, Andrew, the guy was in broadcasting, right? He wasn’t writing a conclusion of a Master’s thesis, with the main assumptions and caveats put in. This is Mr. Baldwin’s quote from the guy:

    “I truly believe they may not have some of the necessities to be, let’s say, a field manager or perhaps a general manager.”

    He said “may not” and “they”, meaning not everyone, and that he was not absolutely sure that was the problem. “Necessities” is what he said. He didn’t even say “brain power” or something like that.

    Your sensitivity, Andrew, is not my problem. The guy talked in clear, civil, colloquial English. To me it was pretty damn clear that he was saying this in a nice way and not as a blanket absolute statement. If you fire guys like that, then, no, you can’t’ say anything.

    First they came for the innumerate,
    but Andrew R didn’t care cause he was numerate.
    He’d have added in stats at the precinct level with
    colored charts and graphs with circles and arrows.
    He’d have always added “I’m just talking statistics here.”

    Then they came for Andrew R
    and took his charts,
    with the colors, circles and arrows, and statistics,
    and flushed them down the toilet.

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @AndrewR
  234. @William Badwhite

    I think I didn’t answer your question very well before. The pay is NOT low anymore on the commuters. It’s not like a United 777 captain, but it’s very decent compared to just 5 years back. The companies treat pilots like human beings now, and not everyone wants to fly red-eyes and all over the world.

  235. @anon

    Does anyone have an idea about what it would take for it to be invalidated as a legal principle?

    It could be overturned by the Supreme Court. If some person can bring a case based on discrimination that can invalidate the premise, then the court could overturn or redefine disparate impact as the required metric for whether something is discriminatory. It shouldn’t be too hard. Also, remember, in many cases, there are very few minorities or women even trying to get into various fields. Consider medical school applications. Blacks are 12% of people in the USA. But are they 12% of medical school applicants? Let’s say they are 5% of applicants to med school. If the med school is 8% black then the med school is allegedly not discriminating. Now, consider Asians who are about 5% of the USA population. If 50% of applicants to the med school are Asian, and the school is only 25% Asian, then what? Do Asians have a case? They should especially if the courts subpoena the school’s records and find that 98% of the Asian applicants have better grades and test scores than the black students. This ain’t no well rounded liberal arts yada ya. This is medical school, a technical field. Just as we saw the small chip in the armor in the Baake case in California, we could see disparate impact gutted by a redefinition even if the words ‘disparate impact’ remain.

    • Replies: @Peter Johnson
  236. AndrewR says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Your sensitivity, Andrew, is not my problem.

    Who said it was?

    This dude getting fired 30 years ago isn’t your problem either.

    I never said I would have fired him, had I been the team owner. I would have had him issue a more accurate, defensible comment without bowing down to the PC police. Something like: “I misspoke on that day and I apologize to whomever my comment offended. What I meant to say was that maybe black men, for whatever reasons, are less likely to have what it takes to manage a team, and this possible statistical difference may account for the lack of black managers in our relatively small league.”

    This would trigger the PC police without being completely indefensible.

    If he refused to issue this corrective statement, then yes I would have fired him. But generally I think that it’s best to give someone a chance to retract their unwise statements instead of immediately dropping the hammer on them.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  237. @Achmed E. Newman

    Fair enough.

    Funny you mention check flying. I did that for awhile in a Cherokee 6, taking checks to Richmond.

    Also towed banners and dropped skydivers. The latter was fun but the airplanes were very poorly maintained.

    Ag flying is totally different and also those guys make good money so very few of them have any interest in airline flying. I have a friend that does a lot of spraying in Maryland and Delaware (both pesticides on fields but also spraying for mosquitoes in swampy areas). He makes about $150k and doesn’t work in the winter. Someone suggested to him he should apply for an airline. He said “so I can make about the same, be gone a lot, doing boring flying at night and in bad weather? Here I don’t even need an instrument rating, just a pair of sunglasses”.

  238. @AndrewR

    I have nothing against your would-be policy per your “Something like:” paragraph Andrew. That’s very accurate, and also put well. Do you expect the guy to talk like that during his color commentary day-in and day-out though? He may as well quit the broadcasting job and go to graduate school.

    The thing is, once you back down like that, I don’t care how “defensible” you say it is (and I agree). The ctrl-left or PC police will just be hungrier to get both of your asses thrown out the door. Yeah, you think team owner is the sovereign here, but wait until the whole league puts the pressure on.

    How about just let the guy speak freely? I’ve heard all kind of racist statements from the other side that don’t have the nice quality of being true.

    This dude getting fired 30 years ago isn’t your problem either.

    It was the beginning of our problems. It’s best to nip things in the bud. Just nip it, Andy!

  239. Kylie says:
    @anonymous

    Every comment I have ever submitted to iSteve has been published.

    I can assure you, therefore, that Steve publishes comments regardless of whether or not the commenter has contributed money or agrees with him.

  240. @James Speaks

    You’ve just summarized what I’ve seen called the phenomenon of social-justice “convergence”:  when organizational convergence is complete, the original purpose of the organization is tossed aside in favor of “social justice”.

    We just saw this in the case of the WSFS and the Hugo awards.  They are now the social-justice affirmative action awards, bestowing rocket-ship blessings upon works nobody wants to read and which will be forgotten in a few years except as entries on the award lists.

    The only solution in cases like this is to either purge the existing organization or form a new one with an explicit charter to keep leftist causes out by 100% dedication to patient well-being.

  241. @anon

    I’ve never had a black pilot on a flight – have any of you?

    There is a commenter elsewhere who posts as Pilot X.  He claims to be a Black pilot based in Chicago and flies frequently to Rio.  He recently celebrated what I recall might have been an Air Alaska flight crewed by 2 sistas, though I wouldn’t bet money on the accuracy of my memory.

    Faced between a plane flown by that guy or Sullenberger, I’d take Sullenberger.  OTOH I do think we should let Black people choose Pilot X and his sistas, and let it all shake out that way.

  242. @Intelligent Dasein

    the collateral damage of the bursting diversity bubble is going to result in a … a raft of improperly promoted quacks who will have to be painstakingly weeded out of the profession, if they ever can be.

    Not difficult.  They’re color-coded for convenience.  A cross-check of MCAT score and GPA and you’re done.

    The shortage issue can be dealt with by allowing them to continue to practice, but restrict them to serving their co-racials and vice versa.  Give the diverse the fruits of affirmative action, good and hard.

  243. Hibernian says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    When I was hospitalized the personnel who did good for me were the residents who initially assessed me, the nurses, the techs, and the specialists. The hospitalists were with one possible exception a joke.

  244. Hibernian says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    That’s the standard way for military personnel to address civilians. One among many things drilled into me at Ft. Dix. Don’t try to explain something that simple to Ms. Boxer.

  245. @Amen

    The problem is that they view their credential not as an enabler to serve their own people, but as a ticket to get away from them and into (the more peaceful, pleasant and prosperous) White society.

    Segregation once gave them no alternative but to devote themselves to their own.  Now everyone wants to be in White society, with or without White people.  That this can’t work in the long run doesn’t change the incentives nor influence the thinking of people with high time preference.

  246. @Hank Archer

    I could put this down to karma and opine that it would be better had it happened when he was 20 rather than 50… but given the system everything would have happened the same except the name in the Bakke suit would have been different.

  247. @William Badwhite

    Yeah, a big difference is that not any other areas of flying have CFIT crashes in which the obstacle was a 6 ft high fence post.

    The latter was fun but the airplanes were very poorly maintained.

    Yep, but that’s more encouraging for the new jumpers: “Don’t be so scared – we’re not gonna make you jump out of a perfectly good airplane.” (They go flying around with just one brake for months at a time .. and worse.)

  248. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @William Badwhite

    Question: How many flight (dual and solo) and sim hours do USAF pilots get in UPT? (I have a a ballpark idea but it has probably changed since the days where everyone went T-41/T-37/T-38).

    At what point in the average USAF pilot’s career does he have 1500TT , assuming he does no outside civilian flying and did not come in with a significant flying background?

    Just asking.

  249. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @William Badwhite

    Ag flying is totally different and also those guys make good money so very few of them have any interest in airline flying.

    Ag flying is tough to get into if you don’t grow up in a flying-farmer family: you are being entrusted with a heavy tailwheel aircraft with a $500K turbine engine on the front and the liability for application mistakes can be huge. You are also around a lot of toxic chemicals, often you will need a license for that and those licenses require arbitrary science course requirements to drive up the pay in many states. You also need to have a commercial driver’s license in most cases too.

  250. @William Badwhite

    What about being around all those chemicals all day? I would hate to see your friend have a kid who grows up calling himself “they.”

    BTW, Billy Badwhite sounds more memorable amirite?

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  251. @Joe Schmoe

    This legal route is a promising strategy and could put the reality of human biodiversity into the public domain. If a court could rule that there are some discernible differences across human ancestral lines in average preferences/abilities that acknowledgement could completely overturn the disparate impact argument. The evidence for such HBD average differences is now overwhelming, and the court system is supposed to dispassionately consider all evidence.

    If some clever lawyers could get the overwhelming evidence for HBD admitted and acknowledged, it could have a widespread positive effect on society and politics. Looking dispassionately at the evidence, disparate impact is clearly built on falsities. How can that be brought into the judicial process?

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  252. @Peter Johnson

    If some clever lawyers could get the overwhelming evidence for HBD admitted and acknowledged, it could have a widespread positive effect on society and politics.

    Getting our society into the scenario of Those Who Can See is an outcome to be sought after most vigorously.

  253. @obwandiyag

    A former coworker of mine went in for an opthalmological exam, and the doctor found worrisome signs during the examination that indicated a potentially serious underlying illness, and practically ordered him to undergo some serious diagnostic tests. When this was done, it was soon discovered that he had a seriously metastasized cancer, otherwise asymptomatic to that point. As it developed, it was beyond treatment, and after a series of treatment regimens, this former coworker passed away.

    An opthalmologist is a full-fledged M.D. with a specialty in the diagnosis and treatment of ocular diseases, but being as they are full-fledged medical doctors to begin with, they are sensitized to the ways in which diseases not specific to the eyes can also be detected during their examinations. They are not merely there to put drops on your eyes & prescribe corrective lenses or eyeglasses, after all.

    There are good reasons for specialist doctors to have received generalist medical educations first that made them aware of the detectable signs of disease processes that are not specific to their own specialties, as they can bird dog problems outside of their specialized areas, and alert their patients to these worrisome signs.

    I suspect that this never even occured to you, as you were focused instead on making a smart-assed, dismissive comment, as seems to be usual with you. Perhaps you should find somewhere else to post where the verbal equivalent of making fart noises with your armpit will garner the accolades you crave?

  254. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

    The information on the other celebrity death I had been wondering about has already been out there, but not well publicized:

    Jóhann Jóhannsson’s Cause of Death Overdose, Report Finds
    2018-08-01

    Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson’s cause of death was an overdose of cocaine. This was revealed in a recently released toxicology report from the Berlin prosecutor’s office.

    As reported in German newspaper Bild, Jóhannsson was found in his Berlin apartment on Feb. 9, 2018. An employee of his recording studio had contacted authorities, saying the composer had not been seen nor heard from in three days.

    Jóhannsson was one of Iceland’s most beloved composers. He enjoyed a successful career in his native country before rising to fame as a film composer. He was respected for his trademark fusing of minimalist and electronic elements with more traditional film score tropes.

    His soundtrack for James Marshal’s 2014 film The Theory of Everything won a Golden Globe award and an Academy Award nomination. Jóhannsson was also well known for his work with director Denis Villeneuve. He scored the films Prisoners (2013) and Sicario (2015), the latter of which also received an Oscar nod.

    Jóhannsson had been on a course of medication for illness at the time of the tragic incident. It is unknown at this time whether it may have played a part in the outcome. He was 48.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  255. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

    The Music of ‘Mandy’: How Johann Johannsson Melded Horror With Heavy Metal
    September 13, 2018

    “Mandy,” which opens Sept. 14, features the final film score by Icelandic composer Johann Johannsson, who died Feb. 9 in Berlin at the age of 48. Described in a Variety review as a “hallucinogenic mashup of Satanic-cult horror and revenge thriller [with] Nicolas Cage in full gonzo mode,” Panos Cosmatos’ film plays Johannsson’s music loud and upfront throughout
    ……

    Johannsson died of heart failure in his Berlin apartment. German media reported in June that toxicology reports indicated that cocaine was found in his system, that he had also been taking medication for the flu, and the likely cause of death was a lethal combination of the two.

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