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List of Bookmarks

From Amazon:

Don’t Touch My Hair Hardcover

by Emma Dabiri

Hardcover
$13.57
‘Groundbreaking’ Guardian

Straightened. Stigmatised. ‘Tamed’. Celebrated. Erased. Managed. Appropriated. Forever misunderstood. Black hair is never ‘just hair’. This book is about why black hair matters. Emma Dabiri takes us from pre-colonial Africa, through the Harlem Renaissance, Black Power and on to today’s Natural Hair Movement, the Cultural Appropriation Wars and beyond. We look at everything from hair capitalists like Madam C.J. Walker in the early 1900s to the rise of Shea Moisture today, from women’s solidarity and friendship to ‘black people time’, forgotten African scholars and the dubious provenance of Kim Kardashian’s braids. The scope of black hairstyling ranges from pop culture to cosmology, from prehistoric times to the (afro)futuristic. Uncovering sophisticated indigenous mathematical systems in black hairstyles, alongside styles that served as secret intelligence networks leading enslaved Africans to freedom, Don’t Touch My Hair proves that far from being only hair , black hairstyling culture can be understood as an allegory for black oppression and, ultimately, liberation.

From Barnes & Noble:

Don’t Touch My Hair!
by Sharee Miller

An entertaining picture book that teaches the importance of asking for permission first as a young girl attempts to escape the curious hands that want to touch her hair.

It seems that wherever Aria goes, someone wants to touch her hair. In the street, strangers reach for her fluffy curls; and even under the sea, in the jungle, and in space, she’s chased by a mermaid, monkeys, and poked by aliens…until, finally, Aria has had enough!

Author-illustrator Sharee Miller takes the tradition of appreciation of black hair to a new, fresh, level as she doesn’t seek to convince or remind young readers that their curls are beautiful–she simply acknowledges black beauty while telling a fun, imaginative story.

And from Amazon:

You Can’t Touch My Hair: And Other Things I Still Have to Explain

Paperback – October 4, 2016
by Phoebe Robinson (Author), Jessica Williams (Foreword)

Praise for You Can’t Touch My Hair
Featured in NPR Weekend Edition, New York Magazine, Refinery 29, and Cosmo

“A must-read…Phoebe Robinson discusses race and feminism in such a funny, real, and specific way, it penetrates your brain and stays with you.”—Ilana Glazer, co-creator and co-star of Broad City

“Phoebe Robinson has a way of casually, candidly rough-housing with tough topics like race and sex and gender that makes you feel a little safer and a lot less alone. If something as wise and funny as You Can’t Touch My Hair exists in the world, we can’t all be doomed. Phoebe is my hero and this book is my wife.”—Lindy West, New York Times bestselling author of Shrill

“You Can’t Touch My Hair is the book we need right now. Robinson makes us think about race and feminism in new ways, thanks to her whip-smart comedy and expert use of a pop culture reference. The future is very bright because Robinson and her book are in it.”—Jill Soloway, creator of Transparent

 
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  1. OT: why can’t Basketball Americans pronounce the “d” in “student” yet have no problem with the “d” in the middle of “fifty”? Discuss.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @JMcG
    , @William Badwhite
  2. I don’t want to touch your hair. I don’t want to see your hair. I don’t want to see you. I want to live in a country where I don’t see, hear or smell you. I don’t want to think about you – stop rudely projecting your crazy into my world. Go. Away. Far. Away. Africa comes to mind.

    • Replies: @Realist
    , @Bernie
  3. These people have lost it. Their hair is one of the least interesting things about black people.

    Nobody cares about your hair!!

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    , @Realist
  4. Really? Originally it was the black girls wanting to play with the white girls’ hair. Typical.

    Also, my hair has always refused to adapt to styling trends. I have better character because my self-esteem wasn’t built hairdo by hairdo.

    Stop being egocentric black folk. Not all the rest of us have great hair either. Get over it.

  5. J.Ross says:

    >This book is why black hair matters.
    … so, as long as I don’t read that book, I never have to hear about this confected fluff ever again?

  6. Nobody gives an F about your hair.

    It’s best for everybody if you maintain residence in Africa, where your hair is well suited to the climate, and you can get sufficient vitamin D.

    Start a publishing company in Afrika and sell your books there.

  7. I thought this was a post about dueling, where offended parties stand back-to-back, march twenty steps, then turn and shoot each other with smooth-bore, black-powder flintlock pistols. Then, having both missed, they move seamlessly to fisticuffs and try to beat one another to death with their hands. Instead, we have “appreciation of black hair. ” Really?

  8. Lot says:

    The study discussed in the prior post looked for white ancestry in blacks, but controlled by skin color. In other words, how do blacks with dark skin but a lot of white ancestry do?

    That got me looking for African Americans with features that show a lot if white ancestry but with black skin.

    I know of such a lady IRL, but can’t think of a famous example. Here’s a possible extreme case:

    I think her looks are of a black skinned mulatta.

    Sometimes east Africans have this look, but any Heritage American Blacks?

  9. anon[369] • Disclaimer says:

    really? this is beyond parody.

    • Agree: Lancelot Link
  10. Is asking to touch the hair actually a common occurence with these people? I went to school with quite a few blacks and I can honestly say I never thought abput touching their hair and I can’t remember anyone else asking to do it either.

    It’s really just about dealing with the insecurity of knowing that no one likes their hair isn’t it?

  11. Anon[254] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve Googled images of women’s hair, and despite the fact that most American women are white, most of the images are of black women, specifically the high yellow type. Either Google is very biased and trying to push those images, or black women are the most hair-obsessed morons I’ve ever come across. It’s probably both.

  12. Lot says:
    @Laurence Whelk

    The strong “d” in fifty is an newer affection that spread by rap culture. You probably notice it boys more, right?

    Try saying fifty in a sentence in black English while dropping the middle sound, e.g. “I got fi-ee dollars.” Now try with a t, so fitee. They both sound like the way it would have been said in black English 20 years ago.

    Since the new affected way with a d is irregular, over time it may disappear.

  13. @Lot

    Those are hair extensions. You totally blew it.

    • Replies: @Thirdeye
  14. Charon says:

    This book is about why black hair matters.

    This, after Black Lives Matter. Is this progress?

    Anyone care to hazard a guess about what comes next? I’ll guarantee you it’s another body part. And before this trend plays out, it’s going to get mighty nasty.

    It seems that wherever Aria goes, someone wants to touch her hair.

    And it’s no accident that Aria is fictional.

  15. BenKenobi says:

    All the while my manuscript for “I Don’t Want to Touch Your Hair” keeps getting rejected by publishers!

    I tell ya, Clown World…

    • Replies: @Thirdtwin
  16. This is such a fascinating cultural phenomenon. Several points and questions.

    1. I will admit to an ignorance of African American culture. So I have to ask, are there really so many people going around touching black women’s hair?

    2. Assuming there aren’t, then what is the cause of this, for lack of a better word, mass hallucination?

    3. Natural African hair is one of the largest differences in
    Physical appearance between American blacks and other races. So black hair is a strong symbol of “blackness.”

    4. It seems to me that black women relax their hair (i.e. deblack it) more than other races change their hair. I’ll exclude dying grey hair since that is age, not race related. On some level might many black women feel guilty about changing their hair style to a less “black” look?

    5. Could this hair touching hallucination be a way to counter this guilt? If you think everyone wants to touch your hair, that means that others find your hair attractive, which would compensate for the fact that you don’t find your natural hair attractive (hence you change it.)

    Way too much thinking about hair…

  17. Coemgen says:

    No doubt these “hair touchers” are draped in white sheets adorned with nooses a-dangling.

  18. Tiny Duck says:

    I teach school and I can conform that white students cannot stop touching Black Students hair. Very disrespectful but the Black Students are good natured about

    Relatedly the white girls cannot stop touching Black Males in general. I have to suspend white females for what can only be called molestation and harassment

    Read Nikole Hannah Jones

    • LOL: Alfa158
  19. inertial says:

    Being a black woman in America means contending with old prejudices and fresh absurdities every day. Comedian Phoebe Robinson has experienced her fair share over the years: she’s been unceremoniously relegated to the role of “the black friend,” as if she is somehow the authority on all things racial; she’s been questioned about her love of U2 and Billy Joel (“isn’t that…white people music?”); she’s been called “uppity” for having an opinion in the workplace; she’s been followed around stores by security guards; and yes, people do ask her whether they can touch her hair all. the. time. Now, she’s ready to take these topics to the page—and she’s going to make you laugh as she’s doing it.

  20. Not Raul says:

    Is there some hair-touching epidemic going on that I don’t know about?

    [Damn it! I can’t find the “textures interest me” clip from Sprockets.]

  21. Not Raul says:
    @Lot

    Seriously, get that girl a green card.

  22. Aria has had enough!

    Haven’t we all?

    Perfect name for the little diva. This obsession is verging on the, shall we say, kinky.

    Emma Dabiri=

    Me, I’m a braid.
    Me, I barmaid.
    A bi mermaid.

    “Ma, I’m a bride!”

  23. “styles that served as secret intelligence networks leading enslaved Africans to freedom”: Aha, braiding hair to convey information. Looks like the Inca knotting technique of
    https://www.ancient.eu/Quipu/
    Who is culturally appropriating whom?

    Have there been any UFO reports of space aliens examining people not by probing their ani but by touching their hair?

  24. black sea says:

    I’m in my late 50s and have never — so far as I can recall — touched a black person’s hair.

    I don’t recall every seeing a white person ask to touch a black person’s hair, or touch their hair without asking. I must’ve seen a white person touch a black person’s hair at some point, but probably somewhat incidentally, i.e. after an interception or touchdown football players will embrace on the sidelines, or a coach will put his hand on the back of the player’s neck, and no doubt during one of these celebrations, I’ve witnessed a white player or coach brush up against a black player’s hair, but that isn’t the focus of such celebrations and I’ve never really seen any reason to dwell on it.

    I’ve never heard a white person say they would like to touch a black person’s hair, but don’t feel comfortable asking to do so.

    I have heard that in the past touching a black person’s hair was believed to bring good luck, and perhaps this is the origin of this myth.

    I do believe that blacks are finding it increasingly difficult to come up with specific and persuasive examples of white injustice or mistreatment, and so are forced to fall back on “micro-aggressions,” “black bodies,” hair-touching mania, and pumpkin spiced latte.

    I also believe that a lot of blacks view life as a series of hustles and con-games, and while complaining about such trivial and manufactured grievances probably strikes them as faintly absurd, it seems to work on enough woke-whites to keep the game going, so what the hell?

    I can see the possibility that black women would like to believe that lots of People of Non-Color are fascinated with their hair and wish to touch it, because, well . . . human nature.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @Mr McKenna
  25. @NJ Transit Commuter

    So I have to ask, are there really so many people going around touching black women’s hair?

    I believe it is the equivalent of every white writer re-imagining their whole adolescence as being the most precocious, outcast’d rebel in a fifty mile radius instead of truthfully reflecting upon themselves as being just sort of dorky and naive.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  26. Alfa158 says:
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    1. No.
    2. The whole meme is a fabrication used as yet another club to beat Whites.
    3. 4. 5. You got it.

  27. Slightly OT:

    Jemele Hill, erstwhile ESPN scold, proposes that black athletes abandon big-name NCAA colleges and take their talents to HBCUs instead:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/10/black-athletes-should-leave-white-colleges/596629/

    She sums it up:

    If promising black student athletes chose to attend HBCUs in greater numbers, they would, at a minimum, bring some welcome attention and money to beleaguered black colleges, which invested in black people when there was no athletic profit to reap. More revolutionarily, perhaps they could disrupt the reign of an “amateur” sports system that uses the labor of black folks to make white folks rich.

  28. I can’t believe people would be lining up to touch Sharee Miller’s hair.

    Dabiri on the other hand has an interesting look

    https://www.thersa.org/events/speakers/emma-dabiri

    (though in some photos she goes full Sideshow Bob)

    http://thandiekay.com/tag/emma-dabiri/

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  29. Mr. Anon says:
    @black sea

    I’ve never heard a white person say they would like to touch a black person’s hair, but don’t feel comfortable asking to do so.

    I have heard that in the past touching a black person’s hair was believed to bring good luck, and perhaps this is the origin of this myth.

    I do believe that blacks are finding it increasingly difficult to come up with specific and persuasive examples of white injustice or mistreatment, and so are forced to fall back on “micro-aggressions,” “black bodies,” hair-touching mania, and pumpkin spiced latte.

    I was going to add the same observation. I have never heard a white person express any particular interest in a black person’s hair at all, ever, let alone express a desire to touch it.

    BTW, I’m contemplating writing a book entitled Don’t touch my pumpkin-spiced latte.

  30. Mr. Anon says:

    Who knew that Tony Manero had inspired so many black women?

  31. @NJ Transit Commuter

    It seems to me that black women relax their hair (i.e. deblack it) more than other races change their hair.

    Definitely so. When I first went to live in Bermuda in 1980, I noticed that all the women had straight hair, but that nearly all the men had tight curly or ‘nappy’ hair. At first I thought this was actually a sex difference, because I could not believe that ALL the women straightened their hair–but actually they did, or wore wigs to make it look like they did.

  32. A woman acquaintance of mine had a kid with a black guy. Suffice it to say that she became a single mother early on.

    The little daughter seemed not to have a care in the world, or almost. The thing is, her playmates had these grooming rituals that they would bond over. They would brush, comb and braid each other’s hair, and she felt left out. It wasn’t that they wanted to touch her hair, it was that they didn’t.

    I have a feeling that the reality is closer to that than what we’re told in those books.

  33. @black sea

    I have heard that in the past touching a black person’s hair was believed to bring good luck, and perhaps this is the origin of this myth.

    A myth I’ve never once heard, but which doubtless was propagated by black women. And if there were any truth to it, it’s the black recipient who would enjoy the good luck.

    I do believe that blacks are finding it increasingly difficult to come up with specific and persuasive examples of white injustice or mistreatment, and so are forced to fall back on “micro-aggressions,” “black bodies,” hair-touching mania, and pumpkin spiced latte.

    Bingo.

    I also believe that a lot of blacks view life as a series of hustles and con-games, and while complaining about such trivial and manufactured grievances probably strikes them as faintly absurd, it seems to work on enough woke-whites to keep the game going, so what the hell?

    And Bingo Again.

  34. @Lot

    I think her looks are of a black skinned mulatta.

    I don’t know what you mean. She could easily be a Haitiana.

  35. Roger says:

    I was once a tourist in a county where everyone had straight black hair. I had strangers ask to touch my (very ordinary) hair.

    I cannot imagine taking offense at the request.

    • Replies: @craig nelsen
  36. Paul says:

    The cultural appropriation by black people who straighten their hair should come to a screeching halt!

    • Agree: Charon
  37. The only real-life example of hair touching I’ve ever personally heard about was in the 90s, a blonde woman I knew went backpacking for a while in rural China, and Chinese would walk up and touch her very gold-colored hair without asking. As she described it, they were guileless and seemed just amazed to see such a thing in person.

  38. Kyle says:

    When I was in 5th grade I stuck my finger into a black kids afro. I just had to know what the hell was holding it all up. He was not enthused and I’m still not sure what the secret is. Some sort of greasy hair gel.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
  39. Anon[732] • Disclaimer says:

    Poor traumatised-for-life Alva Johnson had her kissed-by-Trump suit tossed out by the Obama judge.
    Rather than turn her cheek, if only she had ducked her head and had him make contact with her hair.
    $$$$$

  40. Mr. Blank says:
    @NJ Transit Commuter

    To the extent that it’s a real thing, it’s mostly a chick thing, because women are obsessed with hair. It’s definitely not a guy thing. Where I come from, a guy asking to touch another guy’s hair, no matter the races involved, would have been the about the gayest thing you could imagine.

    More specifically, I think it’s s a little girl thing. My wife teaches elementary school and says she’s occasionally seen the “can I feel your hair?” stuff with her female students — in other words, it’s a combination of natural childhood curiosity and natural childhood lack of political correctness. But I’ve never heard of it anywhere else.

    I get the sense that black women who were raised primarily among whites are the ones with the biggest hang-ups about this. I’ve never known black women who grew up around other blacks to have an issue with it — quite the opposite, in fact. Like most women, they’re usually thrilled to talk about their hair.

  41. JimB says:
    @Lot

    Isn’t the “d” in fifty a running joke in early South Park episodes before Isaac Hayes quit. Chef’s elderly dad keeps telling a story about getting panhandled by the Loch Ness monster for “fiddy” dollars.

    • Replies: @FakeScotsman
  42. Virginia Erases American History from Streets: Jefferson Davis Highway Now Richmond Highway

    Jefferson Davis Highway — named for the Congressman, Senator, Secretary of War, and president of the Confederacy — will now be called Richmond Highway on the portion of the road that runs through Arlington County, Virginia.

    Wait ’til someone tells them that Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy!

    Coincidentally, the actual city of Richmond recently renamed The Boulevard to “Arthur Ashe Boulevard” to memorialize some black dude who hit a tennis ball, and also to counteract the racist implications of the word “Boulevard”.

  43. El Dato says:

    The Black Prisoner: “I will not be straightened, stigmatised, tamed, celebrated, erased, managed, appropriated or forever misunderstood. Black hair is never ‘just hair’!”

    black hairstyling culture can be understood as an allegory for black oppression and, ultimately, liberation

    Next: Quantum Chromodynamics and Asymptotic Freedom as allegory for black oppression and, ultimately, liberation.

  44. El Dato says:
    @Lot

    Lt. Uhura (the JJ Abrams Generation), I presume?

  45. black sea says:
    @inertial

    YOU CAN’T TOUCH MY HAIR

    So, is this what MC Hammer was on about back in the day?

    • LOL: silviosilver
  46. @Giant Duck

    Funny, I used to know a black woman who visited China and said they would touch her hair, too. But she never claimed white people did it in America.

    • Replies: @Chriscom
  47. jim jones says:

    One of my Malaysian students has a couple of little kids who are fascinated by the fact that my hair is grey, when they ask why I just tell them it is because I am getting old. And yes, they do like to touch it.

  48. @Known Fact

    Ms Dabiri is “Irish-Nigerian” (Ibo I wonder?), pretty (and quite pale), studying “Visual Sociology” at Goldsmiths, surely the most woke uni in the UK, and follows a long line of attractive feminists who really hate hate hate that being attractive is such an asset 😉

    “There came a shift for me at around age 15. I guess I was just growing up, but the attention I got from boys increased dramatically. I remained crippled by the same self doubt, but in many ways I now had what girls are taught to desire – the attention of boys.”

    Yes, we’ve all worried that our daughters have those school classes on “how to get a boy”.

  49. @Jasper Been

    Not true. While once riding a Straßenbahn in Vienna, I saw an old Austrian dude reach over and pat the afro of a young black boy. I tell you Austrians cause most of the trouble and get little of the blame.

    • Replies: @Jasper Been
  50. @Mister.Baseball

    THAT’S NOT- oh wait, it, uh, is true.

  51. Charon says:
    @inertial

    she’s been called “uppity” for having an opinion in the workplace;

    NEVER happened.

    she’s been followed around stores by security guards;

    Because she was shoplifting?

    and yes, people do ask her whether they can touch her hair all. the. time.

    NO. THEY. DON’T.

    Can someone please write an app that appends these sorts of corrections to just about everything black people say?

  52. @Giant Duck

    That’s ironic as Chinese women are also amazed by Giant Ducks.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  53. anonymous[289] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    It’s called a glottal stop. “I axed her was she goin to Ma*ha*an”.

  54. @Roger

    There was a family of white Americans who lived in my building while I was teaching English at a university in Shanxi, China. The two boys attended a Chinese elementary school near one of the buildings where I taught and sometimes our walks home after class would coincide. They were both very gregarious and, when this happened, they would each take up a position on either side of me and simultaneously tell me about their day.

    On the long walk back, older Chinese women, laughing and exclaiming to each other, were constantly running up and touching the two boys’ blond hair. The two boys, long used to it, never missed a beat. They completely ignored the women. If the women were treating the boys like exotic zoo exhibits, the boys were treating the women like flies–only brushing them away absently when there were too many hands or a hand was in front of their faces.

  55. @Lot

    Wow. Steve or some Unzgorithm deep-sixed my comment. Never seen that before…

  56. Since other commenters don’t want to, I’ll admit. I have wanted to touch kinky Afros before. I also like touching new dog breeds, etc, that I meet to see what they feel like. It’s human nature.

    Anyhow, I think maybe Steve found an exception to Rule 34. I have never seen pr0n on this subject.

  57. when in high school a million years ago, worked a summer or two as a clerk for pet rabies vaccination clinics which were held around the DC metro area… a number of the DC areas we went to were probably at least 95% black… it happened a number of times where kids hanging around woud dare each other to run up and touch my blonde shaggy hair… i am betting a LOT of these kids never had been close to a white person in their young lives, and they hadnt had any experience with straight, blonde haired, blue-eyed devils… it was kind of weird the first few times, but then i essentially ignored it…
    #straighthairmatters ? ? ?
    .
    proving that -of course!- different looking nekkid apes are interested in the difference of other nekkid apes who look different… yeah, that is simply awful… *snort*

    • Replies: @black sea
  58. Dan Smith says:

    I’m getting ready to write “I Don’t Want to Touch Your F-ing Hair.”

    • Replies: @E. Rekshun
  59. Though not a mainstream phenomenon, there must be some African Americans who hate being black in majority white country so much that they move to one of the more prosperous and peaceful majority black countries. Anyone have any info of such diaspora of black americans. There must be some in Caribbean. There could be some in Ghana. There are Norwegian diasporas in Spain and Thailand.

    • Replies: @Woodsie
  60. @Lot

    I think your example is the beneficiary of massive western styling to hide what is likely an almost purely bred African.

    Nose job, rounding eye makeup, manicured oversized eyebrows, false eyelashes, weave styled to appear as western in profile, clothing.

    Take it all away and you’re left with this:

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Lurker
  61. Author-illustrator Sharee Miller takes the tradition of appreciation of black hair to a new, fresh, level as she doesn’t seek to convince or remind young readers that their curls are beautiful

    Neo-Fetishism.

    https://i0.wp.com/www.tastingsardinia.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/sardinia-black-sheep.jpg?fit=1201%2C800

  62. @Tiny Duck

    Tiny Duck says, “I teach school …?”

    Yeah, that explains a lot about skoolin’ these days.

    By the way, waterfowl, teachers don’t suspend pupils. At least make up a self-consistent fantasy, troll.

  63. countenance says: • Website

    The whole irony is that black women have a bad habit of wanting to touch and play around with the hair of white women.

    • Replies: @Stealth
  64. Other than my own hair, my parents’ hair as an inquisitive infant, and the hair of various girlfriends, I’ve never touched anyone’s hair.

    Certainly never touched a stranger’s hair, or asked to touch it, let alone thought about doing so…not even when checking out an attractive woman…hair wouldn’t top the list of contact I would want to make if they allowed.

    The only instances I’ve seen of people who are not couples touching each others’ hair are little girls who braid each other’s hair at day camp and the like, and barbers. Not once have I witnessed anyone randomly touching some black person’s hair or asking to do so.

    I agree with the other commentators this is a lie born of the fact that most people, including blacks themselves, find black hair in its natural state to be less attractive and most unlikely to be voluntarily targeted for touching.

  65. Gordo says:

    I can’t see a White man wanting to touch an African woman’s hair, I wouldn’t.

    But, just in case, any concerned African woman could live free and safe in Africa thousands of miles from my potential aggression.

  66. Thirdtwin says:
    @BenKenobi

    Same with my book, “Wash Your Hair”. Although now that I think about it, maybe they let it ripen to ward off touchers.

  67. 95Theses says:

    Only two books? Oh, c’mon, Steve!

    Amazon is teeming with titles of overwrought tales of woe, defiance, and some celebratory on the common theme of Black self-absorption with their hair – though I would argue it’s actually a fixation with the hair of White folks.

    Afros: A Celebration Of Natural Hair
    Going-natural: How to Fall in Love With Nappy Hair
    I Can Do My Own Nappy Hair
    I Loveee My Nappy Hair!
    Kinky Hair is Queenly Hair
    Nappy Hair State of Mind
    Asenath and the Origin of Nappy Hair
    Nappy Hair 101
    Black Afrikan Hair and the Insanity of the Black Blond Psyche: why every Black Afrikan must wear their spiritually divine, nappy hair natural!
    My Hair Still Nappy
    Afro State of Mind: Memories of a Nappy Headed Black Girl
    It Is Not Just The Hair. Prayers,Blessings, Affirmations and Declarations for Your Afro-Kinky Hair Journey

    There’s also one in journal format,
    Nappy Hair Don’t Care

    and a novel,
    Sculptured Nails and Nappy Hair

    Also, let’s not forget the infamous Nappy Hair, whose reading succeeded in getting a teacher fired.

    And finally, a hopeful sounding title one might be lead to believe will possibly bring some sanity to the discussion, Locked in, Locked out by a Strand of Hair and More: Where Have Knowledge and Reason Gone?

    Oh, and this list is anything but exhaustive.

  68. Dumbo says:

    Blacks should be happy that they have much less tendency to go bald, also I think their hair gets greyer later, they can also get more creative with their haircuts, etc.

    Personally, I get more tempted to touch natural blond hair, but to each is own.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  69. Anon[125] • Disclaimer says:

    Except among children in grade school and as an ironic joke, has this ever happened? Is there a single verified instance of a white person expressing interest in touching a black woman’s hair?

  70. Arclight says:

    Don’t touch my hair = pay attention to meeeeeeeeee!

    This issue is not about non-blacks being overly inquisitive, it’s about them not giving black women the attention and praise they feel is their due.

  71. frongoozi says:
    @Tiny Duck

    Dear Mr. Duck: I can confirm what you conform. I attended Archbishop Carroll H.S. (Wash. D.C.) – half black, half white – back in the 70s. The thing is, Duck, a hand leaves a big impression of itself in an Afro. By the end of the day, my African-American classmates would have hand prints covering their hair, from ear-to-ear. In the mornings, as soon as a “Caucasian” would “feel the ‘fro,” they’d take out their pick and try to put things right. But by fourth period or so they’d just give up, and soon their heads would be be plastered with five-fingered palm prints. They hated it, of course, but they were a diffident lot. This was the 70s, and we white people were the bosses! Darn it, if The Boss wanted to feel your hair, what could you do? That’s all stopped now, now that they’re writing books about it… I suppose it’s for the best. Still, I do feel my age when I’m standing in line behind a large one. I have to pull myself up short: “No, no,” I remind myself, “We can’t do that any more. We need to stop that….”

  72. black sea says:
    @art guerrilla

    I used to know a guy who taught English in rural Alabama back in the 1970s. One day toward the end of class, he had the students come to his desk so he could give feedback on each one’s paper. As he was tutoring one student, he felt fingers on his scalp. Behind him, one student said to another, “Feel of his hair. Ain’t it pretty!”

  73. Chriscom says:
    @Herbert West

    Same here, an African-American colleague who traveled to China said the same thing. She very occasionally posts the don’t touch my hair thing but I don’t know if this has happened in the U. S. as well.

  74. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:

    Why would anybody want to touch black women’s – often very smelly and greasy-looking – hair? Plus, hair can contain a lot of germs.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4113666/Stomach-churning-images-reveal-gruesome-bacteria-lurking-hair-skin-lungs-gut-mouth.html

    • Agree: Duke84
  75. c matt says:

    In South America, they call the black hairstyle “el dos veinte”. Meaning, “the 220” – a reference to the voltage used down there and the theory that the hairstyle is caused by coming into contact with the electrical current.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  76. Realist says:
    @Laurence Whelk

    I don’t want to touch your hair. I don’t want to see your hair. I don’t want to see you. I want to live in a country where I don’t see, hear or smell you. I don’t want to think about you – stop rudely projecting your crazy into my world. Go. Away. Far. Away. Africa comes to mind.

    Yes, great ideas.

  77. “A must-read…Phoebe Robinson discusses race and feminism in such a funny, real, and specific way, it penetrates your brain and stays with you.”—Ilana Glazer, co-creator and co-star of Broad City

    Is touching Jewish women’s hair allowed?

  78. @Lot

    Wait till you find out what makeup is…….

  79. Realist says:
    @Jasper Been

    Nobody cares about your hair!!

    Au contraire it is great for removing the toughest grease and grime.

  80. Woodsie says: • Website
    @Tactical Errorist

    I have a friend (American born) whose parents are from Ghana, and he has visited the country multiple times. He grew up and still lives in a dangerous slum (da Bronx) where his car is vandalized if he doesn’t park it directly in front of his own house. He would like to move to New Jersey or anywhere safe, but his mother refuses to leave the neighborhood. I should add they own their own home, and my friend supports his mom and sisters (Dad split long ago) and he pays the mortgage. When we first met he made a point of introducing himself by saying, “I’m an African,” differentiating himself from American Blacks. But he will not be moving back to Ghana.

  81. I think it was John Derbyshire who noted the obsession of blacks with their own Negritude.

  82. @Laurence Whelk

    They also seem to have an issue with “th”. First, Second, Third, Forff, Fiff, etc

    • Replies: @Anon
  83. Bernie says:
    @Laurence Whelk

    Nodody does and that is the point. Whites dont really ask to touch black girls hair. It is just a myth that blacks like to perpetrate to hector whites and make themselves feel better. Kind of like faking hate crimes.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  84. Anon[149] • Disclaimer says:

    I always thought black women’s hair looked rather creepy. It resembles greasy wire. I’ve never wanted to touch it. Your average ghetto black women on welfare spends 99% of her time surrounded by other ghetto blacks, and almost never comes in contact with whites at all who potentially might want to touch it. It’s likely that black women are just complaining about other black women who want to touch their hair, and they’re just projecting their annoyance onto whites again, like they always do.

  85. Mork says:

    I went to high school in the 1980s. The blacks kids used to use jerry curl juice in their hair. It smelled awful. There was no way I would want to touch it.

    I have thick, wavy, brown, rock star- like hair (though rapidly turning grey). I have had more than one black guy comment on it, eg, “You have great hair!” I don’t know if they were gay.

    I’ve had a lot of Asian girls comment on it and touch it. They like how “soft” and “light” it is. Calling my hair light seemed ridiculous, like Clint Eastwood being called Blondi in the The Good, the Bad….. I never complained as it helped lead to intimate encounters.

  86. Years ago I worked at a plant manufacturing transformers/inductors for lighting. To speed the assembly line, they actually had tiny handheld torches to solder wires. To ignite the torches, they had pilot lights protected by a funnel so you wouldn’t accidentally set yourself on fire. One day, a Black woman with an Afro-hairstyle, reached over and placed her Fro in the pilot lamp, causing human ignition condition. Fortunately, coworkers jumped on her and patted it out.

    So, sometimes people HAVE to touch Black Women’s Hair!

  87. I have worked with inner city black kids and never had a desire to touch their hair. Yet many of the younger ones couldn’t resist touching mine. I just chalk that up to the curiosity of young children, and they did not offend me.

    • Replies: @Cortes
  88. Thirdeye says:
    @miss marple

    Nope. Nobody sells dread string hair extensions.

  89. Thirdeye says:
    @Lot

    East Africans are African – South Asian admixtures.

  90. anon215 says:

    The whole idea that whites are going about touching black people fur is so ridiculous that it makes me wonder if all of these “don’t touch my hair” articles are actually written by white SUPREEEEEEEMIST sock accounts, just for yuks.

  91. nymom says:
    @Giant Duck

    Yes I have heard that from students when they returned from Travel Abroad Programs in China. Blondes and red-haired boys as well as girls (probably girls more because their hair is usually worn longer) could have their hair stoked when out in public…

    They never mentioned taking offense, they just realized many of these people had never seen a person with this color hair before and were fascinated by it…

  92. J.Ross says:
    @Bernie

    This. Blaxploitation movies always have a scene where white men are just itching for the chance to rape the first mannish black woman they can get alone. This is a confected ethnic grievance, composed for the purpose of group unity and militant agitation, like the book of Exodus or the pram scene in Potemkin. It is in fact the very thing lefties say they are preventing when they censor scientific data and police statistics.

  93. @Dan Smith

    I’m getting ready to write “I Don’t Want to Touch Your F-ing Hair.”

    “and Neither does Anyone Else!”

  94. Who knew their was such a huge “do not touch my Black hair” market to justify three books on the subject. Ahhhh It would be fun to get a peak at Amazon’s data on sales and more specifically the demographics on the sales. I’m guessing about 95% women, of which at least 70% are Black. The White women who purchase would be woke Oberlin grad types, who need to validate their wokeness.

  95. @Kyle

    ” Some sort of greasy hair gel.”

    So that’s what causes those irregular spots on the windows of the public transit trains and buses.

  96. Corvinus says:

    Sailer’s iron rule of femme fatalism —> A sardonic, prototypical Alt Right piece in which a male author offers “staccato grievance commentary”™ about some obscure female writer’s vignette as “proof” of the widespread influence of an Ivory Tower concept.

  97. @JimB

    I believe you mean Tree Dollars & Fiddy Cents.
    About Tree Fiddy.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  98. Corvinus says:

    Awesome! Mr. Sailer knows black people…or does he?

  99. Cortes says:
    @Kolya Krassotkin

    In the late 1970s my very Danish looking girlfriend (looooooong straight blonde hair) was pawed by women in Italy and Spain who examined right down to the scalp for some signs of dyeing. In public.

    At crosswalks. In restaurants. Like that.

    And the same thing occurred with an ugly guy * I attended a course with in Northern Spain in 1977. He was pawed constantly by local women looking at his silvery blond hair while ignoring yours truly with his dark curls and spectacular good looks.

    Not that I’m bitter…

    * His face had more craters than the Sea of Tranquillity.

  100. The herculean effort we must expend to refraining from touching that stuff is Reparations in Full!

  101. Lot says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    You are more observant than me if you can tell she has a nose job. And her eyebrow grooming and makeup doesn’t seem like massive styling to me for a fashionable young woman. I see so many with excessively manicured eyebrows and lots of makeup, she kept hers to a tasteful conservative level.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  102. I wish you could touch my hair, but it has departed.

  103. Duke84 says:

    I never once had a desire to touch their nasty hair.

  104. Our Germanic ancestors also took the offence seriously, seeing it as a grievous insult, whether to freeborn men or their slaves. Hence, it was encoded as a specific type of offence.

    “4. If anyone seizes a native freeman violently by the hair, if with one hand, let him pay two solidi; if with both hands, four solidi; moreover, let the fine be set at six solidi.
    5. If anyone seizes a freedman or another’s slave violently by the hair, either with one hand or with both, it is pleasing that determination of punishment be made as in the case of blows, whether against a freeman, a freedman, or a slave, and so also assessment of both composition and fine is required in cases of this kind.”

    Burgundian Code 6th century AD.

    As was commonly the case at the time, the Burgundians were a slave owning society.

  105. @Dumbo

    Awesome! What’s that above the tail rotor, a strake of some sort? Better keep that rotor rpm up and the cyclic forward or you fitten ta bust yo ass, girl!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  106. @inertial

    I kinda feel for her. My advice would be to stay away from closets of any sort, especially those under stairwells in residential structures. Nobody like to be mistaken for a mop.

  107. @Lot

    “You are more observant than me if you can tell she has a nose job.”

    Thanks for the slight disguised as a compliment. I suppose you can’t tell that’s not her real hair, either.

    The rest of your observations are off base. The very point of the styling is to make her look less African. And fake eyelashes, nose rings, lip liner and heavy inner eye makeup are not “conservative” levels.

  108. Lurker says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    Some/all of that maybe the case but she would still look way better than Grace Jones.

  109. Yngvar says:

    An image search for “natural hair” will return only lots of negro ladies. It’s a touchy subject.

  110. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Negroes and Helos don’t mix very well, I would not think.

  111. For the archives, German, Austrian, and Swiss media on black womanry’s hair-related woes and throes. Translations by Google.

    https://sz-magazin.sueddeutsche.de/neue-fotografie/schwarze-haare-diskriminierung-rassismus-87347
    »I want to portray diversity«
    Black people are still being discriminated racially for their hair. With her project »Hair Stories«, photographer Sol Bela Mele questions widespread ideals of beauty.

    https://www.bento.de/politik/der-bachelor-ernestine-palmert-grapscht-ungefragt-die-afro-haare-von-andrej-mangold-a-6712537c-b57b-4e0f-b99c-5f12dd2f0c88
    justice
    No, Ernestine, you can not just grab some awesome Afro hair

    https://www.jetzt.de/kleiner-drei/ueber-die-stigmatisierung-von-afros
    Why Afros are always political too
    Alice’s hair is frizzy and black – and therefore much more than a simple hairstyle.

    https://taz.de/Ueber-Rassismus-reden/!5369117/
    Talk about racism
    Good Hair, Bad Hair

    They ask you if they are real and if you wash them. The message is clear: you do not belong here.

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/de/annadushime/19-dinge-die-nur-schwarze-frauen-verstehen
    black history month
    21 problems that only black women understand

    1. You really can not hear the question, “Are your real hairs?”

    2. You have become accustomed to the fact that people, since your schooldays, want to touch your hair without being asked.

    https://editionf.com/afrohaar-ist-politisch
    Do not touch my hair: I am so tired that strange people hold my hair

    Most black people in Germany have a strange experience: Strangers grab our hair as a matter of course. After the last incident, I decided to write a text about why I’m tired and why Afrohaar is political.

    https://www.wienerzeitung.at/nachrichten/politik/oesterreich/543779-Einmal-Afro-bitte.html?em_no_split=1
    “Afro once, please!”
    Cult to smooth hair movement against the dictates of smooth hair also sets in Vienna.

    https://www.vice.com/de/article/j5e893/maenner-waeren-lieber-arbeitslos-als-in-frauenberufen-zu-arbeiten
    racism
    Black women are still being discriminated for their hair
    Researchers at the Perception Institute have investigated whether people have subconscious prejudices against natural-haired hair. The results of her research are as sad as they are daunting.

    https://www.nzz.ch/international/haarpracht-als-kampf-fuer-gleichberechtigung-notizen-zu-meinem-afro-ld.1307850
    Denigrating the hair of black women belongs to North America like basketball
    The issue of black hair is deeply rooted in North America’s struggle for equality.

    (The NZZ is a former centrist-conservative Swiss broadsheet. Since it got an new chief editor it’s drifted remarkably to the right, half its senior staff left. Yet they can’t help themselves publishing progressive pabulum occasionally, seems like they just can’t ditch all those low-paid girl journalists…)

  112. Stealth says:
    @countenance

    And white men. A black woman at a previous place of employment used to put her hands in my hair frequently until I asked her to stop.

  113. MEH 0910 says:
    @Tiny Duck

    I have to suspend white females for what can only be called molestation and harassment

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