The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Due to a Lack of Mass Immigration, Japan Is Plagued by a Rising Standard of Living
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

When reading articles in the American press about problems in America, such as high prices for homes, inequality, low wages, low test scores, and so forth, it’s always fun to hit CTRL-F (or Command-F on a Mac) to see if the text string “migra” is included anywhere in the article. Normally, in articles about troubles in America, there’s no mention of the role of “immigration,” “immigrants,” “migration,” or whatever.

When reading American articles about conditions in Japan, such as increasing housing space per Japanese person, it’s interesting to try the same thing. You’ll often see that “immigration” is mentioned in the article, although not as a problem, of course. Instead, it is always The Solution for whatever is said to ail Japan.

For example, here’s a new New York Times article about how the Japanese aren’t quite as squeezed into tiny living spaces as they used to be. Of course, the cure for whatever ails Japan is immigration, even when, at the very end of the article, the reporter reveals that it isn’t actually a problem.

A Sprawl of Ghost Homes in Aging Tokyo Suburbs
By JONATHAN SOBLE AUG. 23, 2015

YOKOSUKA, Japan — Ever since her elderly neighbor moved a decade ago, Yoriko Haneda has done what she can to keep the empty house she left behind from becoming an eyesore. Ms. Haneda regularly trims its shrubs and clips its narrow strip of grass, maintaining its perfect view of the sea. …

“There are empty houses everywhere, places where nobody’s lived for 20 years, and more are cropping up all the time,” said Ms. Haneda, 77, complaining that thieves had broken into her neighbor’s house twice and that a typhoon had damaged the roof of the one next to it.

Despite a deeply rooted national aversion to waste, discarded homes are spreading across Japan like a blight in a garden. Long-term vacancy rates have climbed significantly higher than in the United States or Europe, and some eight million dwellings are now unoccupied, according to a government count. Nearly half of them have been forsaken completely — neither for sale nor for rent, they simply sit there, in varying states of disrepair.

These ghost homes are the most visible sign of human retreat in a country where the population peaked a half-decade ago and is forecast to fall by a third over the next 50 years. The demographic pressure has weighed on the Japanese economy, as a smaller work force struggles to support a growing proportion of the old, and has prompted intense debate over long-term proposals to boost immigration or encourage women to have more children. …

“Tokyo could end up being surrounded by Detroits,” said Tomohiko Makino, a real estate expert who has studied the vacant-house phenomenon.

And if you can’t trust real estate experts, such as Angelo Mozilo, who can you trust?

… Land prices in Yokosuka are down by 70 percent since their peak at the end of the 1980s.

… Japan’s population of 127 million is expected to drop by a million a year in the coming decades. Efforts to increase its low birthrate have been only modestly successful, and the public has shown no appetite for mass immigration. …

Eventually, the article reveals that the Japanese having to tear down tiny, decaying shacks that nobody wants to live in anymore isn’t really a problem.

Houses in Japan, what with all the earthquakes, fires, atom bombs, and prehistoric monster attacks, weren’t built to last. This is how things have always worked in Japan.

Hidetaka Yoneyama, a housing specialist at the Fujitsu Research Institute, a think tank, said that until recently, homes in Japan were built to last only about 30 years, when they were then expected to be torn down and rebuilt. Building quality is improving, but the market for secondhand homes remains tiny. Developers are still building more than 800,000 new homes and condominiums a year, despite the glut of vacancies.

“In the high-growth era, everyone was happy with this arrangement,” Mr. Yoneyama said. But in 20 years, he calculated, more than one-quarter of Japanese houses could be empty. “Now the tables are turned. The population is declining and no one wants to live in these old houses.”

Because they are small, falling-apart dumps, and modern Japanese people would rather live in nice new houses.

But don’t you feel sorry for the poor lonely old shacks who have nobody to live in them anymore? They’re like the sad lamp in this ad made by Spike Jonze:

Whatever the problem is, even if it’s not really a problem, immigration would solve it.

 
Hide 228 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. 5371 says:

    [Whatever the problem is, even if it’s not really a problem, immigration would solve it.]

    Even if the problem is people not having jobs any more because robots have taken them!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Bolches yarboclos pa todos.
    , @Anonymous
    But think of all the new immigrant buddies and playmates the Japanese will be able to commune with when all work is replaced by robots. They will quickly learn how true the maxim "Diversity is our Strength" really is. Like South Africa and LA.
    , @Bill Jones
    The beauty of robots is that the Ponzi schemes of the West don't apply to them.

    No 14 years of "education"
    No Medicare
    No Social Security.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/due-to-a-lack-of-mass-immigration-japan-is-plagued-by-a-rising-standard-of-living/#comment-1083135
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    A few years ago, before the MMM wreaked its havoc and ripped the guts out of the western world, the British press, the BBC etc just loooved to go on and on and on about Japan’s so-called ‘lost decade’, in some sort of self-indulgent schadenfreude ecstatic orgy of disavowal and revenge seeking. You read article after article about it. The BBC delighted in making smug, nasty, insulting little programmes highlighting it.

    Well anyways, the UK had its own little ‘lost decade’ – and then some! – in the past few years. So, the the smug media reports dried up. But what no one ever tells you is that throughout the so called ‘difficult’ period for Japan, GDP per capita, the only real true measure of national wealth and success, increased’, not least due to Japan’s stable population, whilst during the UK’s own economic disaster, GDP per capita fell substantially, due to a larger population, entirely due to mass immigration, sharing out a diminished economic cake.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    Krugman has often noted Japan's economic performance is not too bad when you adjust for its declining and aging population:

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/notes-on-japan/

    His position, which I agree with, is that Japan's gigantic, very-low-interest-debt-financed infrastructure building spree starting around 1990 was the best option available after the 80's bubble burst and threatened to drag it into a depression.

    Nearly lost among Unz's stable of, to put it politely, "tireless critics of Zionism," is Eamonn Fingleton's recent columns extolling the success of Japan's no-migration Keynesianism:

    http://www.unz.com/efingleton/nikkeis-ft-takeover/


    For a start Japanese airports are state-of-the-art and invariably these days enjoy fast public transport links to downtown areas. Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s.

    Then there are Japan’s urban skylines. These have been transformed by a huge building boom during the “lost decades” that has greatly alleviated Japan’s previous shortage of housing space. According to figures compiled by skyscraperpage.com, already as of 2012, 81 high-rise buildings taller than 152 meters (500 feet) had been constructed in Tokyo since 1989. That compares with 64 in New York, 48 in Chicago and seven in Los Angeles.

    The construction boom has produced many superlatives. The AkashiKaikyoBridge, linking two of Japan’s main islands, boasts the longest main span of any bridge in the world – no mean feat given that the engineering challenge in bridge-building increases with the cube of the span. Then there is the world’s first long-distance maglev line. Construction is well advanced, and trains will eventually run at world-record speeds of up to 350 miles an hour. Meanwhile the Tokyo Skytree skyscraper-cum-communications-tower, which was completed in 2012, boasts a height of 634 meters. This makes it the second tallest free-standing structure in the world after Dubai’s Burj Khalifa.

    Perhaps the most compelling single statistic is that just since 1989 alone, average life expectancy at birth has increased by 5.9 years – to 84.7 years from 78.8 years. This means the Japanese now typically live 4.3 years longer than Britons and 5.0 years longer than Americans.

     

    I'd add to Krugman's point further that Japan's average performance on a per capita basis is even more impressive considering that (1) it has nearly the lowest per-capita natural resources in the developed world, and this has become an increasing handicap since the long bull market in natural resources began around 1998 (2) Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. Lot says:

    They aren’t even trying very hard. One of the richest countries in the world, but with a declining population, has 127M people and 4M empty houses not for rent or sale. A truly disastrous problem only mass third world migration can solve!

    Japan was also fairly poor before 1970. Shacks is a good way to describe most of the rural housing built before then.

    The country also limits rice imports, which has the effect of causing the local price to be much higher than the world price, and in turn subsidizing rural employment. But as rice farming in Japan became super-efficient, the need to house workers in boring rural areas declined. There are plenty of counties in rural America that have 50% population declines from their peaks, and tons of abandoned houses, for the same reason.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    To say nothing of the buildings constructed along the tech belts outside Boston during the DotCom Bubble being about 65% occupied. I took a photo last week of a flock of wild turkeys who've claimed the entrance of a building across the road from a client's as their own.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:

    When you got Godzilla, no need to import more monsters.

    Read More
    • Replies: @eah
    Those Godzilla movies were really something! Else. That was back in the day when 'Made in Japan' was synonymous with being tacky and cheap. I can remember thinking how appropriate that was.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    So, Japan with very little population growth and little immigration, manages to build 800,000 ‘houses and condominiums’ per annum.
    The UK – politically committed to massive, uncontrolled immigration – and with a sharply rising population around half that of Japan’s can only manage to build around 150,000 new dwellings per year.

    If for no other reason, immigration to the UK should be curtailed due to its obvious destruction of the UK housing market – and subsequent economic crash that will be engendered by the suppressed housing boom.

    Read More
    • Replies: @George
    Why can't the UK build 240,000 houses a year?

    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30776306

    "In the past, planning was a big part of why we didn't hit our targets."

    Japanese statistics site confirms 800,000+ new dwellings.
    http://www.e-stat.go.jp/SG1/estat/ListE.do?lid=000001129318

    My guess is the in the past decade the UK has blown up as many dwellings in the middle east as they built in the UK.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. Lot says:
    @Anonymous
    A few years ago, before the MMM wreaked its havoc and ripped the guts out of the western world, the British press, the BBC etc just loooved to go on and on and on about Japan's so-called 'lost decade', in some sort of self-indulgent schadenfreude ecstatic orgy of disavowal and revenge seeking. You read article after article about it. The BBC delighted in making smug, nasty, insulting little programmes highlighting it.

    Well anyways, the UK had its own little 'lost decade' - and then some! - in the past few years. So, the the smug media reports dried up. But what no one ever tells you is that throughout the so called 'difficult' period for Japan, GDP per capita, the only real true measure of national wealth and success, increased', not least due to Japan's stable population, whilst during the UK's own economic disaster, GDP per capita fell substantially, due to a larger population, entirely due to mass immigration, sharing out a diminished economic cake.

    Krugman has often noted Japan’s economic performance is not too bad when you adjust for its declining and aging population:

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/notes-on-japan/

    His position, which I agree with, is that Japan’s gigantic, very-low-interest-debt-financed infrastructure building spree starting around 1990 was the best option available after the 80′s bubble burst and threatened to drag it into a depression.

    Nearly lost among Unz’s stable of, to put it politely, “tireless critics of Zionism,” is Eamonn Fingleton’s recent columns extolling the success of Japan’s no-migration Keynesianism:

    http://www.unz.com/efingleton/nikkeis-ft-takeover/

    For a start Japanese airports are state-of-the-art and invariably these days enjoy fast public transport links to downtown areas. Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s.

    Then there are Japan’s urban skylines. These have been transformed by a huge building boom during the “lost decades” that has greatly alleviated Japan’s previous shortage of housing space. According to figures compiled by skyscraperpage.com, already as of 2012, 81 high-rise buildings taller than 152 meters (500 feet) had been constructed in Tokyo since 1989. That compares with 64 in New York, 48 in Chicago and seven in Los Angeles.

    The construction boom has produced many superlatives. The AkashiKaikyoBridge, linking two of Japan’s main islands, boasts the longest main span of any bridge in the world – no mean feat given that the engineering challenge in bridge-building increases with the cube of the span. Then there is the world’s first long-distance maglev line. Construction is well advanced, and trains will eventually run at world-record speeds of up to 350 miles an hour. Meanwhile the Tokyo Skytree skyscraper-cum-communications-tower, which was completed in 2012, boasts a height of 634 meters. This makes it the second tallest free-standing structure in the world after Dubai’s Burj Khalifa.

    Perhaps the most compelling single statistic is that just since 1989 alone, average life expectancy at birth has increased by 5.9 years – to 84.7 years from 78.8 years. This means the Japanese now typically live 4.3 years longer than Britons and 5.0 years longer than Americans.

    I’d add to Krugman’s point further that Japan’s average performance on a per capita basis is even more impressive considering that (1) it has nearly the lowest per-capita natural resources in the developed world, and this has become an increasing handicap since the long bull market in natural resources began around 1998 (2) Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s."

    I'm driving a 1998 Infiniti I-30 with 245,000 miles on it. It's a great car.
    , @Jim
    I doubt that Japan's economic success has that much to do with this or that economic theory. The important factor is the nature of the Japanese population.
    , @neutral
    "Nearly lost among Unz’s stable of, to put it politely, “tireless critics of Zionism,”"

    Funny you mention that, because on the topic of Japan, there is one major thing that they don't have that the Western nations do have.
    , @pyrrhus
    And with few natural resources to base its economy on, Japan has been harmed far less by the bear market in commodities the last two years...
    , @Anonymous
    Painting Japan to be some kind of economic success story is wishful thinking at best.

    Debt-to-GDP is sky high-- without population growth it becomes very hard to service future debts. There are colossal obligations (pensions, etc.) that will simply be impossible for the country to meet. It isn't just Japan -- most of Europe and the US have built pension structures based on outdated economic, population, and growth models.

    So what if there's a big new house and a Lexus in the driveway? Debt-fiends look great to outsiders -- right up until the day the repo man shows up.

    Japan's xenophobic bent makes this economic change a particularly sticky wicket for them.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. K.K. says:

    We Whites are so selfish to keep all this ‘diversity’ (i.e. ‘our greatest strength’) to ourselves.

    Let’s help these poor Japanese and share with them some of this great strength, for instance by granting them a chunk of our non-European human capital, so they too can enjoy this ‘synergy’, ‘infusion of creativity’, ‘wholesome experience’, ‘social justice’ etc.

    I’d say it’s time to start sharing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    Leave the Japanese alone, they've got nothing to do with our problems.

    Besides, I don't want to see the flood of anime rappers that will result.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    IIRC, Noah Smith pitched immigration as a policy for Japan.

    Haruki Murakami’s novel The Windup Bird Chronicle, published 20 years ago, featured an abandoned house in a nice neighborhood in Tokyo.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mister Jones
    Noah Smith is the worst excuse for a "public intellectual" the USA has ever seen. If he supports something, one should do the opposite.

    Basic Malthusian dynamics indicate that a declining population should lead to an improved standard of living. In Japan, which is a low-crime, high-trust, traditional society, this is doubtless true. And you can't put a pricetag on their lack of "Diversity".
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. @Lot
    Krugman has often noted Japan's economic performance is not too bad when you adjust for its declining and aging population:

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/notes-on-japan/

    His position, which I agree with, is that Japan's gigantic, very-low-interest-debt-financed infrastructure building spree starting around 1990 was the best option available after the 80's bubble burst and threatened to drag it into a depression.

    Nearly lost among Unz's stable of, to put it politely, "tireless critics of Zionism," is Eamonn Fingleton's recent columns extolling the success of Japan's no-migration Keynesianism:

    http://www.unz.com/efingleton/nikkeis-ft-takeover/


    For a start Japanese airports are state-of-the-art and invariably these days enjoy fast public transport links to downtown areas. Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s.

    Then there are Japan’s urban skylines. These have been transformed by a huge building boom during the “lost decades” that has greatly alleviated Japan’s previous shortage of housing space. According to figures compiled by skyscraperpage.com, already as of 2012, 81 high-rise buildings taller than 152 meters (500 feet) had been constructed in Tokyo since 1989. That compares with 64 in New York, 48 in Chicago and seven in Los Angeles.

    The construction boom has produced many superlatives. The AkashiKaikyoBridge, linking two of Japan’s main islands, boasts the longest main span of any bridge in the world – no mean feat given that the engineering challenge in bridge-building increases with the cube of the span. Then there is the world’s first long-distance maglev line. Construction is well advanced, and trains will eventually run at world-record speeds of up to 350 miles an hour. Meanwhile the Tokyo Skytree skyscraper-cum-communications-tower, which was completed in 2012, boasts a height of 634 meters. This makes it the second tallest free-standing structure in the world after Dubai’s Burj Khalifa.

    Perhaps the most compelling single statistic is that just since 1989 alone, average life expectancy at birth has increased by 5.9 years – to 84.7 years from 78.8 years. This means the Japanese now typically live 4.3 years longer than Britons and 5.0 years longer than Americans.

     

    I'd add to Krugman's point further that Japan's average performance on a per capita basis is even more impressive considering that (1) it has nearly the lowest per-capita natural resources in the developed world, and this has become an increasing handicap since the long bull market in natural resources began around 1998 (2) Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market.

    “Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s.”

    I’m driving a 1998 Infiniti I-30 with 245,000 miles on it. It’s a great car.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Tacitus2016
    I had quite a boring looking Toyota from the late 90's. It was smooth and reliable with great pick up. I replaced it with something cooler. It soon dawned on me that Toyota drivetrain was far superior to this much newer car. My current VW has a tiny engine that is both turbocharged and supercharged( Twincharger). It's not as smooth as the Toyota, has worse pick up and the fuel economy in real world is only slightly better.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twincharger

    http://youtu.be/4IrJH6gz0ug (Ferrari vs Camry)
    , @TWS
    How do you get past a tree blown across the road or a flooded culvert? Wait, those aren't usually LA problems. Never mind.
    , @Bill Jones
    I hate to point out the obvious but only the great ones last that long.
    That said I had an ancient Toyota Landcrusher for a decade and a half with over 250K when the wife finally prevailed.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. unwinding says:

    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It’s not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    A substantial proportion of Japan's slow GDP growth over the last few years can be attributed to the Fukushima disaster.
    As a result *all* of Japan's nuclear capacity was shut down, and remained shut down until a few weeks ago.
    When you consider that at least a third of Japan's total generating capacity was nuclear, then you realise that this was big potatoes, and not some deadly excuse.
    Plus, add the fact that expensive fossil fuels had to be imported to make up the gap, buggering up the trade balance.

    I think the UK, the global poster child of political immigrationism, is a better comparison to Germany.
    , @Anonymous
    Anyway, the growth figures which you proudly state for Germany are hardly impressive.
    A few decades ago, those sort of numbers would have been regarded as 'stagnant' if not 'deflationary' or even 'recessionary'.
    I remember a time when the failure of the UK to grow at 3% a year was regarded as being little short of disastrous.
    Put it this way, China grows more in a couple of months than those figures you try to brag about.
    , @Bert

    Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.
     
    You shouldn't say "maybe" because it indicates that you're not even sure yourself.
    , @tbraton
    "GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1"

    I went to the bother of adding up your two sets of numbers and came up with total GDP growth (per capita) over the past five years of 11.3% for Germany and 8.2% for Japan, or a difference of roughly 0.5% a year for five years. I believe, if you were to ask the Japanese whether they would trade their restrictive immigration policies for a 0.5% annual growth rate in GDP, they would overwhelmingly say no. Why would they want to risk their relatively harmonious social structure, their ethnic unity, their low crime rate, and a generally successful social environment for the likely disruption brought on by mass immigration just for a measley 0.5% additional growth rate. Not everybody worships at the altar of artificially high GDP growth rates.
    , @Anonymous
    VW recently surpassed Toyota as the world's number 1 automaker primarily on its better sales in China, where VW makes a third of its total sales. Although the recent stock market crash and recession in China may hurt them because they're more exposed to China:

    http://www.cheatsheet.com/automobiles/volkswagen-beats-toyota-to-become-the-worlds-no-1-automaker.html
    , @anon
    Importing millions of people lowers wages in the short term but kills productivity in the long term so no Germany is cutting its own throat.
    , @Jimorbid
    As several commenters have pointed out, those figures aren't exactly strong evidence of your claim. Aside from the fact that other factors could be at work (the larger EU market which Germany has access to, for example), the period you listed is 5 years long and discarding just one of those years (2011) means Japan has outperformed Germany. Japan has also outperformed over the last 3 years. If a country is going to be transformed radically through mass immigration, is it too much to ask for a statistically-significant increase in national wealth?
    , @Anon 2
    Bulgaria, with its GDP per capita of $17,900, is indeed one of the poorest
    nations in the EU. On the other hand, Poland since its admission in 2004
    has been a star performer. Its GDP per capita is $26,200 (PPP) and rising
    rapidly, and Poland's economy with the total GDP of $999 billion (PPP) is the 6th
    largest in the 28-nation EU community. It's true that the wages in Poland
    have been kept artificially low to attract more investment, and this in turn
    attracted hundreds of thousands of temporary and not-so-temporary
    workers from Poland to Germany and UK, but that's likely to change soon.
    , @Esso
    Germany's per capita growth is especially underwhelming, considering that its economy dominates the less competitive areas in the Eurozone. On the other side of the coin there are the deficits and related crises in rest of the 330M people EZ. You've probably heard economists accuse Germany of "beggar-thy-neighbour" politics.

    Germany is to the EZ as a metropolis is to rural areas (It's a population sink, too!). Japan does not have a similar advantage.
    , @Mr. Anon
    "GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1"

    Those numbers are practically no different. You don't even make your own point. And in a very important sense Germany is doing far worse than Japan - it's taking in more immigrants.
    , @Anonymous
    Visit Japan.

    Just go.

    Go on the bullet train.

    Visit the subway system: including the underground gift shops, boutiques, and restaurants.

    Tour through some old monuments and shrines.

    Eat at a restaurant. Heck, eat at the airport: the food is great.

    Go to a bar.

    Ask for help with the concierge at the hotel --- despite the language barrier they will do their damndest to help.

    Walk the streets of Tokyo or Kyoto at 4AM, drunk, and marvel at how safe you feel, how clean the streets are.

    Drink tea in a tea house.

    Japan is doing just fine.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    My brother in law spent a month there after graduating from college before starting his full time job (he’s white but he is in tech and has an Asian culture fetish…haha). I actually asked about this two and half decades depression that Japan supposedly is in. He said that he didn’t notice any sort of decay in any of the cities that he was in. It included big metropolises such as Japan and Osaka as well as smaller cities.

    As the article indicates, most of these houses are obsolete, tiny shacks.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  12. M_Young says:

    Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe? He was ‘repurposed’ == as we would say today == into a heating unit for the very building he was digging a foundation for.

    And you know what I miss — full on Japanese-Americans. The intermarriage rate was so high there are hardly any under, say, 30, left. They were a unique community. And Tricia Toyota was better looking than Andrea Fujii.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe?"

    "Werner Herzog Reads Mike Mulligan And His Steam Shovel"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Z1R5vDG2Tg

    , @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    "Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe?"
    That's "Mike Mulligan And His Steam Shovel", my favourite book when I was kid.
    From memory "Mike" got angry and destroyed the diesel backhoe, then committed seppuku Mishima style.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. “Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market.”

    And 50 million South Koreans aren’t chicken feed as competition for 125 million Japanese: e.g., Samsung v. Sony. We’ve seen that coming for a long time, but it’s only recently really started to bite. The South Koreans really weren’t in the same league as car makers, say, until maybe as late as 2011 when they artificially depressed the value of the currency.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You should have bought that Hyundai Sonata, Steve. It's a great car with a great warranty.
    , @Anonymous Nephew
    IIRC Fingleton covered Korea/China as threat to Japan. He said Japan was concentrating on very top-end stuff like the lenses and machines used to make the latest integrated circuits.

    http://www.fingleton.net/the-japanese-electronics-industry-a-rebuttal/

    "A typical area of Japanese leadership that is completely overlooked by the declinists is the battery industry. It happens to be one of the fastest growing sectors of the global electronics industry. Batteries may seem like an old technology, but the sort of batteries that used in cellphones and laptops, not to mention hybrid cars, are a world away from traditional alkaline or acid batteries. Today’s nickel-metal hydride batteries, for instance, require super-advanced manufacturing techniques. As Fareed Zakaria has pointed out, eight of the world’s top ten battery manufacturers are based in Japan (and only one, Johnson Controls, is based in the United States).

    Then there are such fundamental areas of Japanese leadership as electronic materials. Not the least such material is semiconductor-grade silicon. Two Japanese companies, ShinEtsu and Sumco, enjoy a world duopoly. Monsanto of the United States and Wacker of Germany once successfully contested this geopolitically crucial market but they long ago dropped out: their problem was that every new generation of chip requires ever purer silicon and they just could not keep up with not-an-atom-out-of-place Japanese quality. The Japanese also are the dominant – and in many cases only – suppliers of a host of precision machinery vital in making electronics components and materials. They enjoy a monopoly in, for instance, LCD steppers, which are the key machines needed in the production of liquid crystal displays."
    , @attilathehen
    ...billion, high i.q. Chinese??? LOL!!!! Where did the industrial revolution start? Some backwater called Europe filled with round-eyed, light-skinned, high i.q.ers!!! The Japanese, Chinese, Koreans have hit their peak and it will be all downhill from now on. Remember, Asians can only copy, not invent. The Japanese were supposed to takeover the world in the mid-1980s (without Godzilla's help). And it was Capt. Matthew Perry who forced Japan to modernize and Westernize. Without his help, they would have been a third-World backwater - similar to the Philippines, Laos, all the rest of the Asiatic countries.
    , @Frank the Prof
    I rented a Kia Forte for a week. I was expecting the worst. It was the best small car I've ever driven. I've had to rent Toyotas, Mitsubishi's and Fords in recent years.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. M_Young says:

    “Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It’s not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1″

    1) Those figures aren’t exactly convincing, what with Japan’s growth exceeding Germany’s 2 of the five years. But even if they were

    2) ‘GDP Growth’, even per capita GDP growth, is really poor measure of well being. That’s probably week 8 or 9 in an Econ 102 Macro course. For example, if Germany has to build new freeways to keep up with population growth, that counts as ‘GDP growth’, but is basically a wash in terms of quality of life. Likewise if Germany has to employ more state funded teachers to teach Turkish kids, well, that’s ‘growth’ to in crude GDP terms. Again, not helpful, probably hurtful in terms of the natives quality of life.

    Read More
    • Replies: @unwinding
    The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? I've brought up for comparison Germany, which is more economically dynamic (based on higher average GDP growth per capita over the most recent 5 year period). Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It's possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data. And again the point can be made that no amount of economic dynamism is worth cohesion, but there should be a coherent answer to whether immigration is contributing dynamic outcomes to the German economy in comparison to Japan.
    , @Romanian
    The rape kit industry in Sweden is booming, I hear. Almost makes one wish to open a crime lab, too. It's a bull market, you know.
    , @Olorin
    "'Growth' in crude GDP terms" is a key concept. My recollection is that the members of FDR's brain trust who developed the GNP as a rough estimate of productive/industrial capacity to respond to the Depression insisted it never be used as a leading economic indicator.

    This is old but wraps up some of the points that were made in the Aughts, and even late '90s, by various parties questioning GDP:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/16/magazine/16GDP-t.html

    From that perspective (which would never ask the question), what is the dollar value of a Japan that gets to keep being Japanese?

    Then there's the matter of who gets to define "well being." Our political and access classes have decided that only certain people have the right to expect well being on their own terms. Not, notably, the white middle class's members whose definition of "well being" is at odds with Diversitopian religion. This is an issue that fairly begs to be viewed from an HBD/population genetics perspective.

    Having said all this, it seems that Japan is ahead of everyone else in doing just what the sustainability mavens claimed was necessary: shrinking population without genocide. Building disposable housing makes sense.

    Anyway, I'm waiting for the video where Alex Jones reads "The Fillyjonk who Believed in Disasters."

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. @Dave Pinsen
    IIRC, Noah Smith pitched immigration as a policy for Japan.

    Haruki Murakami's novel The Windup Bird Chronicle, published 20 years ago, featured an abandoned house in a nice neighborhood in Tokyo.

    Noah Smith is the worst excuse for a “public intellectual” the USA has ever seen. If he supports something, one should do the opposite.

    Basic Malthusian dynamics indicate that a declining population should lead to an improved standard of living. In Japan, which is a low-crime, high-trust, traditional society, this is doubtless true. And you can’t put a pricetag on their lack of “Diversity”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Noah Smith is the worst excuse for a “public intellectual” the USA has ever seen."

    I don't think he's quite achieved that yet.

    But I have to admit he's working on it ...

    , @Romanian
    What about Ta-Nehisi Coates? He's a favorite around here, from what I gather.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. Wilkey says:

    Japan is also plagued by a lack of Islamic terrorism.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sean the Neon Caucasian
    And also the plague of no mass immigration, illegal or otherwise. Of course, Abe's made some noise about wanting to join the elite club of importing the world's trash...but it's unpopular with the public still.
    , @White Guy In Japan
    Life in Japan is generally awful.
    -Castles and historical shrines all over the place
    -Clean, safe public transportation
    -Women under 30 usually wear bikinis to the beach
    -Legal drinking in public

    What a barren wasteland. Japan desperately needs some vibrant Muslim refugees.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. Drake says:

    A few years ago the United Nations Development Programme sponsored a study looking at which nations were expected to have the best improvement in their standard of living.

    Japan is predicted to have the highest Human Development Index in 2030, up from 11th in 2010.

    See p.40 – http://ww.rrojasdatabank.info/HDRP_2010_40.pdf

    Read More
    • Replies: @Blair


    Japan is predicted to have the highest Human Development Index in 2030, up from 11th in 2010.

     

    Is that due to Japanese improvement, or due to other countries falling due to diversity?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  18. @Wilkey
    Japan is also plagued by a lack of Islamic terrorism.

    And also the plague of no mass immigration, illegal or otherwise. Of course, Abe’s made some noise about wanting to join the elite club of importing the world’s trash…but it’s unpopular with the public still.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. @Mister Jones
    Noah Smith is the worst excuse for a "public intellectual" the USA has ever seen. If he supports something, one should do the opposite.

    Basic Malthusian dynamics indicate that a declining population should lead to an improved standard of living. In Japan, which is a low-crime, high-trust, traditional society, this is doubtless true. And you can't put a pricetag on their lack of "Diversity".

    “Noah Smith is the worst excuse for a “public intellectual” the USA has ever seen.”

    I don’t think he’s quite achieved that yet.

    But I have to admit he’s working on it …

    Read More
    • Replies: @5371
    You overestimate him. Ta-Nehisi Coates has a sharper mind than he does. I am not joking.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. @M_Young
    Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe? He was 'repurposed' == as we would say today == into a heating unit for the very building he was digging a foundation for.

    And you know what I miss -- full on Japanese-Americans. The intermarriage rate was so high there are hardly any under, say, 30, left. They were a unique community. And Tricia Toyota was better looking than Andrea Fujii.

    “Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe?”

    “Werner Herzog Reads Mike Mulligan And His Steam Shovel”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Werner Herzog Reads "Curious George:"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7T8y5EPv6Y8
    , @WowJustWow
    The Madeline video always cracks me up.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. For a long time, a major theme in the alt-right-o-sphere has been that, among the nations of the developed world, East Asian countries are conspicuously exempt from TPTB’s call for mass immigration. (“Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.”) Is that finally changing?

    If so, it raises another question: if East Asians can’t avoid living among foreigners in East Asia, will more of them want to move to Western nations?

    Read More
    • Replies: @john marzan

    For a long time, a major theme in the alt-right-o-sphere has been that, among the nations of the developed world, East Asian countries are conspicuously exempt from TPTB’s call for mass immigration. (“Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.”) Is that finally changing?
     
    singapore and HK only wants the best and the brightest non-asian immigrants... meaning mostly white people with high skills.
    , @AndrewR

    “Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.”
     
    That's not an alt-right saying. That's a retard saying. Seriously, it's designed for people with sub-90 IQs. Anyone who says that unironically loses all intellectual credibility in my book instantly.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. @Steve Sailer
    "Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe?"

    "Werner Herzog Reads Mike Mulligan And His Steam Shovel"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Z1R5vDG2Tg

    Werner Herzog Reads “Curious George:”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Werner Herzog narrates "Grizzly Man:"

    "But ze uniwerse is actually cold und cruel, und, zus, he vas eaden by a bear."

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/09/grizzly-man.html
    , @anony-mouse
    What's so surprising? H A and Margret Rey came from Germany.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. @Steve Sailer
    "Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe?"

    "Werner Herzog Reads Mike Mulligan And His Steam Shovel"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Z1R5vDG2Tg

    The Madeline video always cracks me up.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Werner Herzog reads "Madeline:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57EDxvldLD4
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. @Steve Sailer
    Werner Herzog Reads "Curious George:"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7T8y5EPv6Y8

    Werner Herzog narrates “Grizzly Man:”

    “But ze uniwerse is actually cold und cruel, und, zus, he vas eaden by a bear.”

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/09/grizzly-man.html

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. @WowJustWow
    The Madeline video always cracks me up.

    Werner Herzog reads “Madeline:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    That's hysterical!. Werner Herzog's reading of Madeline lost makes the story seem unsuitable for children.
    , @Anonymous Nephew
    Madeleine is a lovely book. I wish I'd known Paris when it was like that.
    , @Alfa158
    I think Werner Herzog reading "Please Go the ****to Sleep" is his best one.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  26. Werner Herzog: “Is there such thing as insanity among penguins?”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  27. @M_Young
    Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe? He was 'repurposed' == as we would say today == into a heating unit for the very building he was digging a foundation for.

    And you know what I miss -- full on Japanese-Americans. The intermarriage rate was so high there are hardly any under, say, 30, left. They were a unique community. And Tricia Toyota was better looking than Andrea Fujii.

    “Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe?”
    That’s “Mike Mulligan And His Steam Shovel”, my favourite book when I was kid.
    From memory “Mike” got angry and destroyed the diesel backhoe, then committed seppuku Mishima style.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Chicago's own Kafko the Clown narrates the tale of Gregor Samsa, "Bug:"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1LCQWgN9MfA
    , @Steve Sailer
    Yukio Mishima discusses his love of brutality:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPAZQ6mhRcU
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  28. Werner Herzog: When global warming causes mutant albino crocodiles to take over Europe, what kind of cave paintings will they make of us?

    http://takimag.com/article/cave_of_unanswered_questions/print#axzz3jcbNDDkV

    Read More
    • Replies: @WowJustWow
    I get the feeling Herzog wrote all his own lines in Jack Reacher: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_2u11z1ljU
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. “Tokyo might end up being surrounded by Detroits” Good one!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  30. @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    "Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe?"
    That's "Mike Mulligan And His Steam Shovel", my favourite book when I was kid.
    From memory "Mike" got angry and destroyed the diesel backhoe, then committed seppuku Mishima style.

    Chicago’s own Kafko the Clown narrates the tale of Gregor Samsa, “Bug:”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. SFG says:
    @K.K.
    We Whites are so selfish to keep all this 'diversity' (i.e. 'our greatest strength') to ourselves.

    Let's help these poor Japanese and share with them some of this great strength, for instance by granting them a chunk of our non-European human capital, so they too can enjoy this 'synergy', 'infusion of creativity', 'wholesome experience', 'social justice' etc.

    I'd say it's time to start sharing.

    Leave the Japanese alone, they’ve got nothing to do with our problems.

    Besides, I don’t want to see the flood of anime rappers that will result.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  32. @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    "Anyone remember the story of the old steamshovel who was obsoleted by a diesel backhoe?"
    That's "Mike Mulligan And His Steam Shovel", my favourite book when I was kid.
    From memory "Mike" got angry and destroyed the diesel backhoe, then committed seppuku Mishima style.

    Yukio Mishima discusses his love of brutality:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hacienda
    Always liked Mishima. Seemed to get to the heart of things. Great writer, even in translation.

    Swedes like Kawabata, Oe because they are Swedes.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  33. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    "Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market."

    And 50 million South Koreans aren't chicken feed as competition for 125 million Japanese: e.g., Samsung v. Sony. We've seen that coming for a long time, but it's only recently really started to bite. The South Koreans really weren't in the same league as car makers, say, until maybe as late as 2011 when they artificially depressed the value of the currency.

    You should have bought that Hyundai Sonata, Steve. It’s a great car with a great warranty.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde
    The old geezers here buy Hyundai Sonatas. They like the Toyota Camry and have owned them. But say they get Camry quality for $5,000 less. Sonatas are a roomy automobile.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. Jim says:
    @Lot
    Krugman has often noted Japan's economic performance is not too bad when you adjust for its declining and aging population:

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/notes-on-japan/

    His position, which I agree with, is that Japan's gigantic, very-low-interest-debt-financed infrastructure building spree starting around 1990 was the best option available after the 80's bubble burst and threatened to drag it into a depression.

    Nearly lost among Unz's stable of, to put it politely, "tireless critics of Zionism," is Eamonn Fingleton's recent columns extolling the success of Japan's no-migration Keynesianism:

    http://www.unz.com/efingleton/nikkeis-ft-takeover/


    For a start Japanese airports are state-of-the-art and invariably these days enjoy fast public transport links to downtown areas. Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s.

    Then there are Japan’s urban skylines. These have been transformed by a huge building boom during the “lost decades” that has greatly alleviated Japan’s previous shortage of housing space. According to figures compiled by skyscraperpage.com, already as of 2012, 81 high-rise buildings taller than 152 meters (500 feet) had been constructed in Tokyo since 1989. That compares with 64 in New York, 48 in Chicago and seven in Los Angeles.

    The construction boom has produced many superlatives. The AkashiKaikyoBridge, linking two of Japan’s main islands, boasts the longest main span of any bridge in the world – no mean feat given that the engineering challenge in bridge-building increases with the cube of the span. Then there is the world’s first long-distance maglev line. Construction is well advanced, and trains will eventually run at world-record speeds of up to 350 miles an hour. Meanwhile the Tokyo Skytree skyscraper-cum-communications-tower, which was completed in 2012, boasts a height of 634 meters. This makes it the second tallest free-standing structure in the world after Dubai’s Burj Khalifa.

    Perhaps the most compelling single statistic is that just since 1989 alone, average life expectancy at birth has increased by 5.9 years – to 84.7 years from 78.8 years. This means the Japanese now typically live 4.3 years longer than Britons and 5.0 years longer than Americans.

     

    I'd add to Krugman's point further that Japan's average performance on a per capita basis is even more impressive considering that (1) it has nearly the lowest per-capita natural resources in the developed world, and this has become an increasing handicap since the long bull market in natural resources began around 1998 (2) Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market.

    I doubt that Japan’s economic success has that much to do with this or that economic theory. The important factor is the nature of the Japanese population.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    Human capital is necessary but not sufficient. Japan would not have become Haiti, but both the country physically and its people would be worse off absent the huge infrastructure spending financed by gov debt. I bet their birth rate would have been even lower too, less employment and less space per person.

    Capitalism is prone to long depressive busts. The fact that diversity mongers are usually Keynsians does not mean Keynsianism is wrong. The man himself favored eugenics after all, and Japan shows it does not require mass migration.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  35. unwinding says:
    @M_Young
    "Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It’s not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1"

    1) Those figures aren't exactly convincing, what with Japan's growth exceeding Germany's 2 of the five years. But even if they were

    2) 'GDP Growth', even per capita GDP growth, is really poor measure of well being. That's probably week 8 or 9 in an Econ 102 Macro course. For example, if Germany has to build new freeways to keep up with population growth, that counts as 'GDP growth', but is basically a wash in terms of quality of life. Likewise if Germany has to employ more state funded teachers to teach Turkish kids, well, that's 'growth' to in crude GDP terms. Again, not helpful, probably hurtful in terms of the natives quality of life.

    The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? I’ve brought up for comparison Germany, which is more economically dynamic (based on higher average GDP growth per capita over the most recent 5 year period). Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It’s possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data. And again the point can be made that no amount of economic dynamism is worth cohesion, but there should be a coherent answer to whether immigration is contributing dynamic outcomes to the German economy in comparison to Japan.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    Saying Germany is more economically dynamic thanks to immigration is not particularly controversial. The standard line on Japan among "serious thinkers" is that it is economically stagnant at best, in precipitous decline at worst. Japan doesn't have to outperform Germany to support the claim that limiting immigration should be an acceptable policy option, you simply have to show that the quality of life in a post industrial country can continue to improve absent immigration. In a democracy the citizens should get to decide whether faster economic growth is worth the downside of increased immigration.
    , @M_Young
    "The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? "

    Who said anything about national cohesion? Just in crass material well being terms, it is well known that GDP is an inadequate measure, really inadequate.

    Here's an example. Suppose because of relatively good wages, many wives are able to stay home with their young children (as most in my set would like to do). Then, a wave of immigration depresses the wages of the menfolk. The women have to go to work at the newly open Walmart which serves the mass immigrant population, and the children are put in child care. Well, the increased 'economic activity' would not only be the result of the new immigrants (which wouldn't affect per capita GDP), but also the Walmart's activity and more to the point, the former 'free' work of childcare would also now be counted in GDP. The total effect would make it appear that this immigration wave drove 'real GDP growth', when in fact economic wellbeing of the receiving populations' households would actually be worse.

    Here is another example. A government official puts in motion a chain of events leading to a massive chemical spill into a river. This means that the government must print some more fiat currency to higher relatively well paid cleanup technicians. In fact, the effect is so large that it wipes out some underemployment of said technicians and the are instead working massive overtime. This two would show up as 'per capita GDP growth', even though it is just the government trying the 'make things whole'.

    This is all basic ECON 102 (Macro)
    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    First, the discussion isn't whether more immigration improves GDP growth per capita. It's whether a country that chooses to stay ethnically/racially intact by rejecting immigration can have improving material living standards. Japan shows that the answer is a resounding "Yes." And Japan's example is all the more relevant given its declining workforce, which also proves that a white country with a declining population (and not just countries with internally growing populations) could enjoy improved living standards.

    Second, as we all know, the impact of immigration on an economy (and the country as a whole) isn't just a short-term affair. The immigrants become citizens, have children and grow old. It's not hard to see how a poor Mexican immigrant could be a short-term plus for an economy but a long-term drag as he goes on disability due to a bad back and has children unwilling to work as farm laborers but unable to work in high-tech so they become welfare recipients. Therefore, for you to show a few years of slightly better numbers for Germany as compared to Japan as "proof" that immigration improves an economy is silly as best and disingenuous as worst.

    Let's see how those Muslim and black immigrants are helping Germany's economy a generation or two from now.
    , @Romanian
    Personally, I think that the reason for Germany's economic success relative to Japan is the Single Market and the fact that it is ensconced right in the middle of it. Germany exports West, East, North and South, with no restrictions, no customs, no tariffs, through great infrastructure and towards mainly less competitive countries, especially in its particular fields. The EU is almost a captive market. I can only speak for Romania without researching, but I suspect the same is true for the other countries - the EU is our biggest trading partner, to whom we export the most, but also from whom we import the most. And Germany is our biggest source for imports, as it is for most EU countries I suspect.

    Japan has China and South Korea nearby, as well as the US a pond hop away, but transfer costs are higher than for Germany and its Asian neighbors especially are also its rivals, increasingly adept at vying with Japan for market share. Japan has kept them at bay a bit by restricting access to its national markets, thereby creating a safe space from which to compete outside. Plus, Japan is exposed to political risk in China (as the Diaoyu riots showed) which can and do affect markets.
    , @Gato de la Biblioteca
    Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It’s possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    Germany also has a large market for its exports, thanks to the EU treaties, in which it enjoys a large natural advantage, thanks to shared currency and proximity, thanks to other things. Those are advantages Japan doesn't have.
    , @Harold

    We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic?
     
    Sailer doesn’t mention the economy in the original post, he mentions standard of living. Whether mass immigration is good for “economic dynamism” is another topic.
    , @Anonym
    With all due respect, f*** GDP. As a citizen I am really only concerned about GDP/ capita. GDP for the sake of GDP is pointless.

    http://www.tradingeconomics.com/germany/gdp-per-capita

    Use above to compare to Japan. Japan is not doing badly. Note the above is not PPP.

    Creating a permanent problem to solve a temporary perceived problem through immigration is retarded. There are areas now in Japan with high numbers of African migrant males pestering you on the street at night. This added vibrancy is not an improvement to standard of living. As they procreate with Japanese women they will create a permanent underclass with black qualities... more violent more criminal.

    The real fix is to reward the right people in Japan to form families. TFR is on the rise again in Japan.

    http://www.tradingeconomics.com/japan/fertility-rate-total-births-per-woman-wb-data.html

    , @ben tillman

    Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It’s possibly because of higher rates of immigration.
     
    No, that is absolutely not possible. Immigration lowers their productivity per capita. It lowers their human capital.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  36. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    A substantial proportion of Japan’s slow GDP growth over the last few years can be attributed to the Fukushima disaster.
    As a result *all* of Japan’s nuclear capacity was shut down, and remained shut down until a few weeks ago.
    When you consider that at least a third of Japan’s total generating capacity was nuclear, then you realise that this was big potatoes, and not some deadly excuse.
    Plus, add the fact that expensive fossil fuels had to be imported to make up the gap, buggering up the trade balance.

    I think the UK, the global poster child of political immigrationism, is a better comparison to Germany.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hrw-500
    Speaking of Fukushima, I spotted that article from the Daily Sheeple where they mentionned the re-opening of a nuclear reactor not far from a volcano.
    http://www.thedailysheeple.com/japan-reacts-to-worsening-fukushima-disaster-by-reopening-nuclear-plant-next-to-active-volcano_102014
    , @Romanian
    I agree that Japan's sudden withdrawal from nuclear and its reliance on fossil fuel imports affected its economy. But I don't think it is relevant for the comparison with Germany because the Germans went all Japanese when Fukushima happened and instituted the Energiewende, their own nuclear phase-out in favor of renewables (and, ironically enough, dirty coal) which had the effect of making electricity a lot dearer than it used to be, even though the states make up for some of the losses of private interests from the public purse. I cannot vouch for whether the economic effects were similar in magnitude, but I can say that the Germans shot themselves in the foot pretty hard.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/high-costs-and-errors-of-german-transition-to-renewable-energy-a-920288.html

    I wrote another comment making an argument for the Single Market as a source of better German growth than Japan, although we have to remember the Germans were once the sick man of Europe in the early 2000s and went through labor price adjustments, I think, to regain competitiveness.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. Romanian says:
    @M_Young
    "Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It’s not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1"

    1) Those figures aren't exactly convincing, what with Japan's growth exceeding Germany's 2 of the five years. But even if they were

    2) 'GDP Growth', even per capita GDP growth, is really poor measure of well being. That's probably week 8 or 9 in an Econ 102 Macro course. For example, if Germany has to build new freeways to keep up with population growth, that counts as 'GDP growth', but is basically a wash in terms of quality of life. Likewise if Germany has to employ more state funded teachers to teach Turkish kids, well, that's 'growth' to in crude GDP terms. Again, not helpful, probably hurtful in terms of the natives quality of life.

    The rape kit industry in Sweden is booming, I hear. Almost makes one wish to open a crime lab, too. It’s a bull market, you know.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  38. Romanian says:
    @Mister Jones
    Noah Smith is the worst excuse for a "public intellectual" the USA has ever seen. If he supports something, one should do the opposite.

    Basic Malthusian dynamics indicate that a declining population should lead to an improved standard of living. In Japan, which is a low-crime, high-trust, traditional society, this is doubtless true. And you can't put a pricetag on their lack of "Diversity".

    What about Ta-Nehisi Coates? He’s a favorite around here, from what I gather.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  39. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    Anyway, the growth figures which you proudly state for Germany are hardly impressive.
    A few decades ago, those sort of numbers would have been regarded as ‘stagnant’ if not ‘deflationary’ or even ‘recessionary’.
    I remember a time when the failure of the UK to grow at 3% a year was regarded as being little short of disastrous.
    Put it this way, China grows more in a couple of months than those figures you try to brag about.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  40. Hacienda says:

    Ghost homes! No problem, just give them to this girl. She’s clearly in the market for one.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  41. War for Blair Mountain [AKA "Great Battle for Blair Mountain"] says:

    There is no economic case for race-replacing The Historic Native Born White American Majority.

    Very severe labor scarcities=1)very high real wage for The Native Born White American Working Class….and…2)Native Born White Americans still a 90 percent racial majority in the US=no passage of the 1965 Immigration Reform Act….

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  42. neutral says:
    @Lot
    Krugman has often noted Japan's economic performance is not too bad when you adjust for its declining and aging population:

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/notes-on-japan/

    His position, which I agree with, is that Japan's gigantic, very-low-interest-debt-financed infrastructure building spree starting around 1990 was the best option available after the 80's bubble burst and threatened to drag it into a depression.

    Nearly lost among Unz's stable of, to put it politely, "tireless critics of Zionism," is Eamonn Fingleton's recent columns extolling the success of Japan's no-migration Keynesianism:

    http://www.unz.com/efingleton/nikkeis-ft-takeover/


    For a start Japanese airports are state-of-the-art and invariably these days enjoy fast public transport links to downtown areas. Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s.

    Then there are Japan’s urban skylines. These have been transformed by a huge building boom during the “lost decades” that has greatly alleviated Japan’s previous shortage of housing space. According to figures compiled by skyscraperpage.com, already as of 2012, 81 high-rise buildings taller than 152 meters (500 feet) had been constructed in Tokyo since 1989. That compares with 64 in New York, 48 in Chicago and seven in Los Angeles.

    The construction boom has produced many superlatives. The AkashiKaikyoBridge, linking two of Japan’s main islands, boasts the longest main span of any bridge in the world – no mean feat given that the engineering challenge in bridge-building increases with the cube of the span. Then there is the world’s first long-distance maglev line. Construction is well advanced, and trains will eventually run at world-record speeds of up to 350 miles an hour. Meanwhile the Tokyo Skytree skyscraper-cum-communications-tower, which was completed in 2012, boasts a height of 634 meters. This makes it the second tallest free-standing structure in the world after Dubai’s Burj Khalifa.

    Perhaps the most compelling single statistic is that just since 1989 alone, average life expectancy at birth has increased by 5.9 years – to 84.7 years from 78.8 years. This means the Japanese now typically live 4.3 years longer than Britons and 5.0 years longer than Americans.

     

    I'd add to Krugman's point further that Japan's average performance on a per capita basis is even more impressive considering that (1) it has nearly the lowest per-capita natural resources in the developed world, and this has become an increasing handicap since the long bull market in natural resources began around 1998 (2) Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market.

    “Nearly lost among Unz’s stable of, to put it politely, “tireless critics of Zionism,””

    Funny you mention that, because on the topic of Japan, there is one major thing that they don’t have that the Western nations do have.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Uh, oh, somebody's noticing. And how dare they not take as gospel everything that US butinskys like to tell Westerners, namely, what's wrong with their own nation that only they can help solve for them?

    "The country also limits rice imports, which has the effect of causing the local price to be much higher than the world price, and in turn subsidizing rural employment."

    Imagine that. Japanese jobs for Japanese. Japan for the Japanese and not for the rest of the world.

    "In a democracy the citizens should get to decide whether faster economic growth is worth the downside of increased immigration."

    Wow, this is wow. Even reading this sentence, that a nation should get to decide exactly who it allows into its own nation, doesn't sound all too egalitarian. I mean, doesn't Japan know how much better off it would be if it only invited in more Korean workers in the STEM related fields as well as in low paying jobs out in the fields? How come Japan doesn't have a similar program to US's F1-B Visa and just invite in about 3-5 million Koreans? Doesn't Abe know how much better off they'd be with all this vibrant diversity?

    Where's Japan's version of Jeb Bush when they truly need him in this their hour of need?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  43. Bert says:
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    You shouldn’t say “maybe” because it indicates that you’re not even sure yourself.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  44. Hacienda says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Yukio Mishima discusses his love of brutality:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPAZQ6mhRcU

    Always liked Mishima. Seemed to get to the heart of things. Great writer, even in translation.

    Swedes like Kawabata, Oe because they are Swedes.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  45. @unwinding
    The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? I've brought up for comparison Germany, which is more economically dynamic (based on higher average GDP growth per capita over the most recent 5 year period). Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It's possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data. And again the point can be made that no amount of economic dynamism is worth cohesion, but there should be a coherent answer to whether immigration is contributing dynamic outcomes to the German economy in comparison to Japan.

    Saying Germany is more economically dynamic thanks to immigration is not particularly controversial. The standard line on Japan among “serious thinkers” is that it is economically stagnant at best, in precipitous decline at worst. Japan doesn’t have to outperform Germany to support the claim that limiting immigration should be an acceptable policy option, you simply have to show that the quality of life in a post industrial country can continue to improve absent immigration. In a democracy the citizens should get to decide whether faster economic growth is worth the downside of increased immigration.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Saying Germany is more economically dynamic thanks to immigration is not particularly controversial.
     
    Well, it depends what you mean by controversial. Obviously, the statement is false, but those in the apparatus e apparatus of public opinion formation does not allow dissenting voices to be hear, so the public propaganda is one-sided, while truth-seekers are similarly unanimous in their dissent.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  46. pyrrhus says:
    @Lot
    Krugman has often noted Japan's economic performance is not too bad when you adjust for its declining and aging population:

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/notes-on-japan/

    His position, which I agree with, is that Japan's gigantic, very-low-interest-debt-financed infrastructure building spree starting around 1990 was the best option available after the 80's bubble burst and threatened to drag it into a depression.

    Nearly lost among Unz's stable of, to put it politely, "tireless critics of Zionism," is Eamonn Fingleton's recent columns extolling the success of Japan's no-migration Keynesianism:

    http://www.unz.com/efingleton/nikkeis-ft-takeover/


    For a start Japanese airports are state-of-the-art and invariably these days enjoy fast public transport links to downtown areas. Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s.

    Then there are Japan’s urban skylines. These have been transformed by a huge building boom during the “lost decades” that has greatly alleviated Japan’s previous shortage of housing space. According to figures compiled by skyscraperpage.com, already as of 2012, 81 high-rise buildings taller than 152 meters (500 feet) had been constructed in Tokyo since 1989. That compares with 64 in New York, 48 in Chicago and seven in Los Angeles.

    The construction boom has produced many superlatives. The AkashiKaikyoBridge, linking two of Japan’s main islands, boasts the longest main span of any bridge in the world – no mean feat given that the engineering challenge in bridge-building increases with the cube of the span. Then there is the world’s first long-distance maglev line. Construction is well advanced, and trains will eventually run at world-record speeds of up to 350 miles an hour. Meanwhile the Tokyo Skytree skyscraper-cum-communications-tower, which was completed in 2012, boasts a height of 634 meters. This makes it the second tallest free-standing structure in the world after Dubai’s Burj Khalifa.

    Perhaps the most compelling single statistic is that just since 1989 alone, average life expectancy at birth has increased by 5.9 years – to 84.7 years from 78.8 years. This means the Japanese now typically live 4.3 years longer than Britons and 5.0 years longer than Americans.

     

    I'd add to Krugman's point further that Japan's average performance on a per capita basis is even more impressive considering that (1) it has nearly the lowest per-capita natural resources in the developed world, and this has become an increasing handicap since the long bull market in natural resources began around 1998 (2) Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market.

    And with few natural resources to base its economy on, Japan has been harmed far less by the bear market in commodities the last two years…

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  47. Immigration is barely mentioned in the article. The article as a whole seems to be expressing concerns very close to those of your friend Jonathan Last – a rare example of such concerns getting into an MSM article.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    Is the fine art of getting your readers to read between the lines unknown to the great unwashed masses?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  48. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I wish I was stuck in a pagoda with Tricia Toyota.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  49. @Wilkey
    Japan is also plagued by a lack of Islamic terrorism.

    Life in Japan is generally awful.
    -Castles and historical shrines all over the place
    -Clean, safe public transportation
    -Women under 30 usually wear bikinis to the beach
    -Legal drinking in public

    What a barren wasteland. Japan desperately needs some vibrant Muslim refugees.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  50. Liberal Jewish economist, Dean Baker writes:
    If Japan’s workforce is struggling to support a growing elderly population why are they working fewer hours?

    http://bit.ly/1V4koM7

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  51. Blair says:
    @Drake
    A few years ago the United Nations Development Programme sponsored a study looking at which nations were expected to have the best improvement in their standard of living.

    Japan is predicted to have the highest Human Development Index in 2030, up from 11th in 2010.

    See p.40 - http://ww.rrojasdatabank.info/HDRP_2010_40.pdf

    Japan is predicted to have the highest Human Development Index in 2030, up from 11th in 2010.

    Is that due to Japanese improvement, or due to other countries falling due to diversity?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  52. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    What makes you people think Steve sailer is pro-white? He is OK with white people being bred out of existence as long as the resulting offspring are assimilated and culturally white, I mean he blocked numerous posts that the best way to deal with Asian immigrants will be to get the blacks and Latinos to attack the high iq east asians and indians instead of whites, he also does not support white nationalism because doing so would be divisive? Use your brain white people make up less than half of newborns, since Steve sailer is in favor of assimilating the nonwhites it means that the whites will be bred out of existence at this rate. You really believe that Steve sailer is pro-white? He will obviously block this message as being too divisive and his site in run under unz.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  53. eah says:
    @Priss Factor
    When you got Godzilla, no need to import more monsters.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwhRQbvuMcE

    Those Godzilla movies were really something! Else. That was back in the day when ‘Made in Japan’ was synonymous with being tacky and cheap. I can remember thinking how appropriate that was.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Francis G.
    Actually, Japanese cinema was among the best in the world, with such great directors as Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Ozu, Kobayashi, Teshigahara, etc., at the peak of their powers in the '50s and early '60s. It was only the advent of television in Japan in the late '60s that brought it to a screeching halt.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  54. In our capitalist-consumerist matrix, if you aren’t growing and expanding (despite the unfavorable triggers that would perpetuate such growth), you’re doing something wrong. Either collectively, as a culture, or individually, as a spending consumerist.

    Evidently Japan’s natural “downsizing” needs to be remedied. They need to take note of Sweden’s illustrious experiment.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Muse
    Have you ever considered that without a certain rate of growth, capital might not be able to charge enough to generate true "economic rent" in the classical economic sense? Things like cheap money, war, immigration and technological change with intellectual property protection are some of the policies that come to mind that might "create wealth", by accelerating growth above some minimum level that would then generate profit.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economic_rent

    Perhaps the wealthy can't become relatively wealthier, nor can the more modestly situated accrue wealth on a grand scale without purposely overstimulating the economy. It might explain the push for what are ultimately unsustainable policies on a macro scale by the powerful in pursuit their individual interests (profit).

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  55. The Financial Times covered this weeks ago. Does Señor Slim have a subscription to the Pink ‘Un?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Speaking of the FT, they reported on Trump's broadside against hedge fund managers, and their commenters largely backed Trump: http://on.ft.com/1V3TPq8
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  56. M_Young says:
    @unwinding
    The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? I've brought up for comparison Germany, which is more economically dynamic (based on higher average GDP growth per capita over the most recent 5 year period). Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It's possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data. And again the point can be made that no amount of economic dynamism is worth cohesion, but there should be a coherent answer to whether immigration is contributing dynamic outcomes to the German economy in comparison to Japan.

    “The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? ”

    Who said anything about national cohesion? Just in crass material well being terms, it is well known that GDP is an inadequate measure, really inadequate.

    Here’s an example. Suppose because of relatively good wages, many wives are able to stay home with their young children (as most in my set would like to do). Then, a wave of immigration depresses the wages of the menfolk. The women have to go to work at the newly open Walmart which serves the mass immigrant population, and the children are put in child care. Well, the increased ‘economic activity’ would not only be the result of the new immigrants (which wouldn’t affect per capita GDP), but also the Walmart’s activity and more to the point, the former ‘free’ work of childcare would also now be counted in GDP. The total effect would make it appear that this immigration wave drove ‘real GDP growth’, when in fact economic wellbeing of the receiving populations’ households would actually be worse.

    Here is another example. A government official puts in motion a chain of events leading to a massive chemical spill into a river. This means that the government must print some more fiat currency to higher relatively well paid cleanup technicians. In fact, the effect is so large that it wipes out some underemployment of said technicians and the are instead working massive overtime. This two would show up as ‘per capita GDP growth’, even though it is just the government trying the ‘make things whole’.

    This is all basic ECON 102 (Macro)

    Read More
    • Agree: Travis
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  57. M_Young says:

    Modern Japanese are huge compared to their recent ancestors, in contrast Americans …even limited to white Americans… are shorter and fatter.

    To be fair, the Netherlands, which has experienced a lot of immigration, has also boomed in height. And in women’s field hockey capability.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Good point. Japan's older housing stock is too small not just in square meters but in the 3rd dimension of height.

    It reminds me of visiting places where Abe Lincoln lived in Springfield, IL. First a primitive log cabin, second a pretty nice house that I could imagine modern Americans living in after upgrading the utilities. But it was too short for 6'4" Lincoln then and for 6'4" me now.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  58. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    In some old National Geographic magazines Japan was described as being densely populated and overcrowded. Yet today some are claiming they should have more people, that population decline is bad. For the past twenty years or so they’ve been portrayed as collapsing, the economy tanking, the place just going downhill. Yet somehow they seem to be getting along. If things were really so bad wouldn’t more of them be trying to emigrate? There’s all these concern trolls everywhere pretending to be worried about the welfare of the Japanese, who like to stick their nose into Japanese affairs.
    They’re smart enough to know what they’re doing and don’t need advice from foreigners whose own countries have major problems.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  59. The vast, empty space of the internet must be filled and people must make a living.

    So, vast quantities of pointless drivel must be produced.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  60. advancedatheist [AKA "RedneckCryonicist"] says:

    Japan also has a problem with mass adult male virginity, despite Japan’s normal male-to-female sex ratio, the acceptability of premarital sexual relationships and Japan’s proximity to other Asian countries with sex tourism industries that Westerners like to visit:

    Rise of Japan’s middle-aged virgins: a quarter of over-30s have never had sex

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/japan/11662500/Rise-of-Japans-middle-aged-virgins-a-quarter-of-over-30s-have-never-had-sex.html

    Atheist bloggers write frequently about how sex-negative religious upbringings can result in sexually dysfunctional adults – they have beaten up a lot on the unfortunate Duggar family in Arkansas lately. But for some reason they don’t want to discuss adult male virginity as a secular social phenomenon, probably because they can’t blame it on religion. Instead the secular ideology of feminism plays a role in men’s sexual eviction, alienation and the MGTOW trend.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  61. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    Werner Herzog reads "Madeline:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57EDxvldLD4

    That’s hysterical!. Werner Herzog’s reading of Madeline lost makes the story seem unsuitable for children.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I hadn't finished watching the entire video of Werner Herzog "reading" Madeleine when I posted my previous message, but now I realize he wasn't reading the actual words to the book.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  62. Hrw-500 says:
    @Anonymous
    A substantial proportion of Japan's slow GDP growth over the last few years can be attributed to the Fukushima disaster.
    As a result *all* of Japan's nuclear capacity was shut down, and remained shut down until a few weeks ago.
    When you consider that at least a third of Japan's total generating capacity was nuclear, then you realise that this was big potatoes, and not some deadly excuse.
    Plus, add the fact that expensive fossil fuels had to be imported to make up the gap, buggering up the trade balance.

    I think the UK, the global poster child of political immigrationism, is a better comparison to Germany.

    Speaking of Fukushima, I spotted that article from the Daily Sheeple where they mentionned the re-opening of a nuclear reactor not far from a volcano.

    http://www.thedailysheeple.com/japan-reacts-to-worsening-fukushima-disaster-by-reopening-nuclear-plant-next-to-active-volcano_102014

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  63. Svigor says:

    … Japan’s population of 127 million is expected to drop by a million a year in the coming decades. Efforts to increase its low birthrate have been only modestly successful, and the public has shown no appetite for mass immigration. …

    The American public has shown no appetite for mass immigration, either. Nor has the European public, for that matter. No, what’s different about Japan is that the elite has shown no appetite for mass immigration.

    And you can bet your arse if they ever do, it’ll be composed of populations that look a hell of a lot like the Japanese, and not Africans, Mestizos, or MENAs.

    Whatever the problem is, even if it’s not really a problem, immigration would solve it.

    Immigration is the solution in up economies and down economies, in times of war or peace, of fat and lean. In sickness and in health, ’til death do us part. Immigration is a dessert topping and a floor wax. It’s like snake oil; it’s the cure for whatever ails you, and something certainly ails you.

    Well, for white countries, anyway. But not in Israel, China, India, Japan, etc., for some strange reason.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    It's also Cowbell.
    , @Anonymous
    Whole neighborhoods around Tel Aviv are inhabited by illegal sub-Saharan African migrants. Israel also had a home-grown population of hostiles that makes up a greater fraction of the Israel's population than the French Muslims are of the French population.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  64. “And if you can’t trust real estate experts, such as Angelo Mozilo, who can you trust?”

    Donald Trump, I guess. Would someone like Donald Trump benefit from a situation where just about every major city in the Western Hemisphere has large, entrenched ghettos and barrios?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  65. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    You know, in the future, it will not surprise me in the least that the peoples of many third world nations will not deliberately instigate wars, whether civil wars or wars against neighboring nations, purely with the cynical objective in mind of using the war and its aftermath as an excuse for invoking the Geneva Refugee Convention, and thus inducing the soft-headed bastards who run the EU into ‘accepting’ them as immigrants.
    I wouldn’t be at all surprised if this was not happening presently in Syria.

    To those who will call me a cold-hearted cynical bastard, I just say this – just look who cunning and nasty some of the ‘hairy-man’ ( a vintage iStevism) scams going on at present in LA are. Do you really think that same people can’t sink to lower depths?

    Read More
    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
    I think you are right. This is probably happening in Somalia and Eritrea. Western European countries will not return refugees to these places, and so it is in the best interests of Somalis and Eritreans to keep their countries in a state of permanent war, so that their children can have a better life in Germany, Sweden, or Britain.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  66. @Steve Sailer
    "Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s."

    I'm driving a 1998 Infiniti I-30 with 245,000 miles on it. It's a great car.

    I had quite a boring looking Toyota from the late 90′s. It was smooth and reliable with great pick up. I replaced it with something cooler. It soon dawned on me that Toyota drivetrain was far superior to this much newer car. My current VW has a tiny engine that is both turbocharged and supercharged( Twincharger). It’s not as smooth as the Toyota, has worse pick up and the fuel economy in real world is only slightly better.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twincharger

    http://youtu.be/4IrJH6gz0ug (Ferrari vs Camry)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    Turbo engines are just another car part that can fail and add to the cost and complexity of the vehicle. I admire the Germans for trying so hard with their turbos, largely motivated by their wise decision to make their gas tax very high. Just not for me as long as I have a chance.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  67. @unwinding
    The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? I've brought up for comparison Germany, which is more economically dynamic (based on higher average GDP growth per capita over the most recent 5 year period). Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It's possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data. And again the point can be made that no amount of economic dynamism is worth cohesion, but there should be a coherent answer to whether immigration is contributing dynamic outcomes to the German economy in comparison to Japan.

    First, the discussion isn’t whether more immigration improves GDP growth per capita. It’s whether a country that chooses to stay ethnically/racially intact by rejecting immigration can have improving material living standards. Japan shows that the answer is a resounding “Yes.” And Japan’s example is all the more relevant given its declining workforce, which also proves that a white country with a declining population (and not just countries with internally growing populations) could enjoy improved living standards.

    Second, as we all know, the impact of immigration on an economy (and the country as a whole) isn’t just a short-term affair. The immigrants become citizens, have children and grow old. It’s not hard to see how a poor Mexican immigrant could be a short-term plus for an economy but a long-term drag as he goes on disability due to a bad back and has children unwilling to work as farm laborers but unable to work in high-tech so they become welfare recipients. Therefore, for you to show a few years of slightly better numbers for Germany as compared to Japan as “proof” that immigration improves an economy is silly as best and disingenuous as worst.

    Let’s see how those Muslim and black immigrants are helping Germany’s economy a generation or two from now.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  68. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @James Kabala
    Immigration is barely mentioned in the article. The article as a whole seems to be expressing concerns very close to those of your friend Jonathan Last - a rare example of such concerns getting into an MSM article.

    Is the fine art of getting your readers to read between the lines unknown to the great unwashed masses?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  69. @Steve Sailer
    "Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market."

    And 50 million South Koreans aren't chicken feed as competition for 125 million Japanese: e.g., Samsung v. Sony. We've seen that coming for a long time, but it's only recently really started to bite. The South Koreans really weren't in the same league as car makers, say, until maybe as late as 2011 when they artificially depressed the value of the currency.

    IIRC Fingleton covered Korea/China as threat to Japan. He said Japan was concentrating on very top-end stuff like the lenses and machines used to make the latest integrated circuits.

    http://www.fingleton.net/the-japanese-electronics-industry-a-rebuttal/

    “A typical area of Japanese leadership that is completely overlooked by the declinists is the battery industry. It happens to be one of the fastest growing sectors of the global electronics industry. Batteries may seem like an old technology, but the sort of batteries that used in cellphones and laptops, not to mention hybrid cars, are a world away from traditional alkaline or acid batteries. Today’s nickel-metal hydride batteries, for instance, require super-advanced manufacturing techniques. As Fareed Zakaria has pointed out, eight of the world’s top ten battery manufacturers are based in Japan (and only one, Johnson Controls, is based in the United States).

    Then there are such fundamental areas of Japanese leadership as electronic materials. Not the least such material is semiconductor-grade silicon. Two Japanese companies, ShinEtsu and Sumco, enjoy a world duopoly. Monsanto of the United States and Wacker of Germany once successfully contested this geopolitically crucial market but they long ago dropped out: their problem was that every new generation of chip requires ever purer silicon and they just could not keep up with not-an-atom-out-of-place Japanese quality. The Japanese also are the dominant – and in many cases only – suppliers of a host of precision machinery vital in making electronics components and materials. They enjoy a monopoly in, for instance, LCD steppers, which are the key machines needed in the production of liquid crystal displays.”

    Read More
    • Agree: JohnnyWalker123
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    Right. Japan and Germany have moved up the value scale to manufacturing more specialized components. The level of human capital is very high in these countries.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  70. @Steve Sailer
    Werner Herzog reads "Madeline:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57EDxvldLD4

    Madeleine is a lovely book. I wish I’d known Paris when it was like that.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar


    Madeleine is a lovely book. I wish I’d known Paris when it was like that.

     

    Don't watch thé TV cartoon, though. Théy give Madeline, who's what? eight? a full-fledged adult French accent. Completely unbelievable.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  71. Svigor says:

    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It’s not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    Your ideological commitment to money uber alles is making you commit errors in seeing the state of the Japanese nation. It’s doing well. Compare Japanese demographics to German demographics. This comparison makes sense as Germany is destroying itself with immigration.

    There’s a lot more to life than money. Which is why the Jews aren’t selling seats in Israel to just anybody. China could easily provide Israel with hundreds of thousands of citizens with IQs far higher than that of the vast majority of Israel’s current population. There are few economic sectors in Israel that they could not improve. Strangely, Israel doesn’t seem interested in this bounteous opportunity.

    If you hate white people and diversity and want Germany to be more like Turkey, then Germany is on the path to great success.

    For a long time, a major theme in the alt-right-o-sphere has been that, among the nations of the developed world, East Asian countries are conspicuously exempt from TPTB’s call for mass immigration. (“Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.”) Is that finally changing?

    If so, it raises another question: if East Asians can’t avoid living among foreigners in East Asia, will more of them want to move to Western nations?

    Perhaps it’s best for TPTB to ignore east Asia’s refusal of mass immigration. If they kept telling the yellows to do the right thing, and the yellows kept refusing, the whites might get ideas.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data.

    Au contraire; it’s certain that flooding white countries with non-whites will ensure that they will eventually be populated with non-whites. Equally certain is the fact that your kind of mental universe accompanies this kind of destruction. Too stupid to survive selection, one might say.

    In a democracy the citizens should get to decide whether faster economic growth is worth the downside of increased immigration.

    I see mass immigration as a form of national suicide. We tend not to view suicide with a cold eye, I fail to see why we should do so when the stakes are raised to the national level. Quite the opposite, in fact.

    We assume people have gone off the deep end when they attempt suicide. We do our best to prevent them from harming themselves until they return to sanity.

    I see no reason to do any less for white nations.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  72. WhatEvvs [AKA "Aamirkhanfan"] says:

    Forgive me for (a) going OT and (b) conspiracy-mongering, but does anyone else think that maybe the Chinese are behind the 182 bn wipeout because they want to teach Don Trump a lesson? And not just Trump, but the entire plutocrat-class. Which side of their noodles are buttered?

    Or am I just paranoid and making stuff up?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hubbub
    You are just paranoid and making things up.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  73. Alfa158 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Werner Herzog reads "Madeline:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57EDxvldLD4

    I think Werner Herzog reading “Please Go the ****to Sleep” is his best one.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  74. tbraton says:
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    “GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1″

    I went to the bother of adding up your two sets of numbers and came up with total GDP growth (per capita) over the past five years of 11.3% for Germany and 8.2% for Japan, or a difference of roughly 0.5% a year for five years. I believe, if you were to ask the Japanese whether they would trade their restrictive immigration policies for a 0.5% annual growth rate in GDP, they would overwhelmingly say no. Why would they want to risk their relatively harmonious social structure, their ethnic unity, their low crime rate, and a generally successful social environment for the likely disruption brought on by mass immigration just for a measley 0.5% additional growth rate. Not everybody worships at the altar of artificially high GDP growth rates.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  75. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    That's hysterical!. Werner Herzog's reading of Madeline lost makes the story seem unsuitable for children.

    I hadn’t finished watching the entire video of Werner Herzog “reading” Madeleine when I posted my previous message, but now I realize he wasn’t reading the actual words to the book.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  76. tbraton says:

    BTW on this week’s McLaughlin Group, Pat Buchanan was making the point that prior to the Immigration Act of 1965 we were “united” as a nation in that 97% of Americans spoke English and that now we have kids in our schools speaking “over 200 languages.” The lovely Eleanor Cliff retorted with the claim that “having 200 languages in our schools is not a bad thing.” http://www.mclaughlin.com/ (at the 9:36 mark). What a clueless dingbat!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  77. Steve, the Huffington Post has an article up of such profound stupidity that it may be deserving of the iSteve treatment in some manner or another.

    The Stunning Evolution of Millennials: They’ve Become the Ben Franklin Generation

    Sample:

    Their faith in technology is understandable. Algorithms don’t act in their own self-interest. Algorithms weren’t responsible for dreaming up sub-prime loans and nearly bringing down the financial system. Millennials didn’t trust authority and conventional sources of wisdom before the melt-down. Imagine now. Wealthpoint argues that Millennials: “…have been nickel-and-dimed through a wide variety of services, and they value simple, transparent, low-cost services.

    Why am I hearing “Never give a sucker an even break” repeating itself over and over in my mind?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  78. Brutusale says:
    @Lot
    They aren't even trying very hard. One of the richest countries in the world, but with a declining population, has 127M people and 4M empty houses not for rent or sale. A truly disastrous problem only mass third world migration can solve!

    Japan was also fairly poor before 1970. Shacks is a good way to describe most of the rural housing built before then.

    The country also limits rice imports, which has the effect of causing the local price to be much higher than the world price, and in turn subsidizing rural employment. But as rice farming in Japan became super-efficient, the need to house workers in boring rural areas declined. There are plenty of counties in rural America that have 50% population declines from their peaks, and tons of abandoned houses, for the same reason.

    To say nothing of the buildings constructed along the tech belts outside Boston during the DotCom Bubble being about 65% occupied. I took a photo last week of a flock of wild turkeys who’ve claimed the entrance of a building across the road from a client’s as their own.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    Do you know how much they want for outer Boston office space in nicer new buildings?

    During the bust here, OC office space, where a lot of the big mortgage companies that folded were located, got as low as $1/SF month. That is a third of the price of downtown LA and 1/5 good west side locations. Those prices and nice new construction they filled up in a couple years.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  79. attilathehen [AKA "Matilda"] says:
    @Steve Sailer
    "Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market."

    And 50 million South Koreans aren't chicken feed as competition for 125 million Japanese: e.g., Samsung v. Sony. We've seen that coming for a long time, but it's only recently really started to bite. The South Koreans really weren't in the same league as car makers, say, until maybe as late as 2011 when they artificially depressed the value of the currency.

    …billion, high i.q. Chinese??? LOL!!!! Where did the industrial revolution start? Some backwater called Europe filled with round-eyed, light-skinned, high i.q.ers!!! The Japanese, Chinese, Koreans have hit their peak and it will be all downhill from now on. Remember, Asians can only copy, not invent. The Japanese were supposed to takeover the world in the mid-1980s (without Godzilla’s help). And it was Capt. Matthew Perry who forced Japan to modernize and Westernize. Without his help, they would have been a third-World backwater – similar to the Philippines, Laos, all the rest of the Asiatic countries.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Asians have their traits that make them worthy competitors. Ampex invented video tape but didn't want to spend the resources necessary to make a consumer product out of it and lost out big to Sony and JVC.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  80. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Of course, anyone who has ever read Jared Diamond’s opus ‘Collapse’ will be familiar with his take on that 20 year old little punch-up in Rwanda.
    Basically, every few years Rwanda goes through a mass culling frenzied orgy of self-genocide. Diamond quoted convincing research that made a string case that the desire to increase landholdings in that Malthusian petri-dish which is Rwanda is the real, hidden, hand behind the periodic massacres.
    Just a thought, but Syria, which is providing the bulk of volkwanderung dark-ages style whole movements of peoples into high GDP Germany, had prodigious fertility in the latter half of the 20th century.
    So did Somalia
    So did Afghanistan.

    Just a warning, but if Egypt ‘pops’ due to a civil war, perhaps fuelled by the unconscious desire of the entire Egyptian population to decamp to Germany, then we really will be talking about big potatas.

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    "Just a thought, but Syria, which is providing the bulk of volkwanderung dark-ages style whole movements of peoples into high GDP Germany, had prodigious fertility in the latter half of the 20th century."

    You touch on an important point which rarely gets any mention, either on the MSM or the alternative media, namely the contribution that great population increases makes to all kinds of war, especially civil war. With respect to Syria, here is a comment I posted on TAC about four years ago:

    "tbraton says:
    May 30, 2013 at 10:53 am
    I don’t want to sound cold-hearted, but let’s put the 70,000, soon to be 100,000, dead in Syria in context. Syria’s population was only 2.4 million in 1937, only 14.2 million in 1995 (less than 20 years ago) and an estimated 26 million today. The U.S. population in 1900 was 76 million. Had U.S. population increased more than ten-fold, as Syria’s population has grown since 1937, we would now have more than 760 million people living in the U.S. There is no great shortage of Syrians in the world. The death toll in Syria pales in comparison to the civil wars being fought in the Congo. . . ."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  81. the bad reputation of the Japanese economy in western media compared to the really decent state in reality is always an interesting subject. But the comparison should not take into account the economic situation, which is actually the measure of well-being in the best-case scenario. There should also be an analysis of the risk of the worst case scenario, which means: how likely is the worst case scenario and how bad would it be. With 800.000 refugees in Germany this year (1 percent of the population) plus the regular immigration via family reunification etc. things could get really bad in Germany much more soon than doomsayers were even saying a few years ago. Some say it could be up to 2 million refugees next year (another 2.5 percent of the population of Germany). Soon the question is not: who sells most luxury cars but who has civil war and who not.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  82. Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  83. 5371 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    "Noah Smith is the worst excuse for a “public intellectual” the USA has ever seen."

    I don't think he's quite achieved that yet.

    But I have to admit he's working on it ...

    You overestimate him. Ta-Nehisi Coates has a sharper mind than he does. I am not joking.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  84. anowow says:

    Is the American Middle Class worth saving? Particularly the Upper Middle Class? They seem to have little solidarity with their poorly paid countrymen.

    Comparing the reactions of the New York Times article about white collar conditions with the cricket chirping around the Mother Jones expose on warehouse workers, I’m inclined to root for Zuckerberg et al getting all the H1B’s their plutocratic hearts could desire. Indeed, as has been pointed out, the people speaking well of the warehouses is sort of pathetic, letting you know how poorly workers are treated, like a whipped dog responding to any bone thrown to them.

    This is nothing new. My father worked in the garment industry for decades, a domestic industry that was ravaged in the 90′s. My father was in management, so he got a retirement package. The workers- little or nothing, not even retraining. He was surprised that there wasn’t any more sympathy than there was. I told him “nobody will care until the ‘burbs feel pain, until they are made to howl.” Sure enough, outsourcing wasn’t an issue, not a negative, until India started grabbing up all those IT jobs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    There is a huge amount of arrogance in the white collar world and especially in tech. Many of these people think they are so supremely talented that nobody could ever do their jobs and when you take over one of their previous jobs you see how mediocre they are. They truly believe that manual laborers are below them and deserve everything that has happened. I am glad I had undeserved stock options and was able to get out and retire.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  85. Ed says:

    Japan is one of the entities that just drives elites in the media up the wall. It’s clean, ordered without embracing many of the supposed beneficial tenets the West holds dear. They’ll complain about Japan not taking in immigrants or refugees and the doom it will cause. Yet Japan keeps chugging along. As long as a people are enjoying a first world lifestyle who needs consistent GDP growth & frothy stock markets?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  86. Lot says:
    @Jim
    I doubt that Japan's economic success has that much to do with this or that economic theory. The important factor is the nature of the Japanese population.

    Human capital is necessary but not sufficient. Japan would not have become Haiti, but both the country physically and its people would be worse off absent the huge infrastructure spending financed by gov debt. I bet their birth rate would have been even lower too, less employment and less space per person.

    Capitalism is prone to long depressive busts. The fact that diversity mongers are usually Keynsians does not mean Keynsianism is wrong. The man himself favored eugenics after all, and Japan shows it does not require mass migration.

    Read More
    • Replies: @iSteveFan

    I bet their birth rate would have been even lower too, less employment and less space per person.
     
    Japan has a livable space about the size of California which has a population of 40 million. Guys like Steve probably lament CA has too many people from its golden age where it had roughly half of today's number. Japan, however, has 127 million. Can you imagine a CA that populous? Even during WW2 when they had massive conscription and factory work, Japan's population was 80 million.

    Constant growth is not always the answer. Eventually you run out of room and that affects quality of life. The key with the Japanese is that the nation is still Japanese. They are not replacing themselves.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  87. @neutral
    "Nearly lost among Unz’s stable of, to put it politely, “tireless critics of Zionism,”"

    Funny you mention that, because on the topic of Japan, there is one major thing that they don't have that the Western nations do have.

    Uh, oh, somebody’s noticing. And how dare they not take as gospel everything that US butinskys like to tell Westerners, namely, what’s wrong with their own nation that only they can help solve for them?

    “The country also limits rice imports, which has the effect of causing the local price to be much higher than the world price, and in turn subsidizing rural employment.”

    Imagine that. Japanese jobs for Japanese. Japan for the Japanese and not for the rest of the world.

    “In a democracy the citizens should get to decide whether faster economic growth is worth the downside of increased immigration.”

    Wow, this is wow. Even reading this sentence, that a nation should get to decide exactly who it allows into its own nation, doesn’t sound all too egalitarian. I mean, doesn’t Japan know how much better off it would be if it only invited in more Korean workers in the STEM related fields as well as in low paying jobs out in the fields? How come Japan doesn’t have a similar program to US’s F1-B Visa and just invite in about 3-5 million Koreans? Doesn’t Abe know how much better off they’d be with all this vibrant diversity?

    Where’s Japan’s version of Jeb Bush when they truly need him in this their hour of need?

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    "“The country also limits rice imports, which has the effect of causing the local price to be much higher than the world price, and in turn subsidizing rural employment.”

    Imagine that. Japanese jobs for Japanese. Japan for the Japanese and not for the rest of the world."


    But, but, but...you don't appear to have any sympathy for the large, subsidized agri-businesses that grow rice in the United States. If they can't sell rice in Japan, that means we will have to import more Asians from China to help grow the domestic market for rice. I have never figured out why we grow rice in the U.S.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  88. Lot says:
    @Brutusale
    To say nothing of the buildings constructed along the tech belts outside Boston during the DotCom Bubble being about 65% occupied. I took a photo last week of a flock of wild turkeys who've claimed the entrance of a building across the road from a client's as their own.

    Do you know how much they want for outer Boston office space in nicer new buildings?

    During the bust here, OC office space, where a lot of the big mortgage companies that folded were located, got as low as $1/SF month. That is a third of the price of downtown LA and 1/5 good west side locations. Those prices and nice new construction they filled up in a couple years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Even now, it seems half the commercial RE sites covering the Route 128/Route 3 area list the rent as "negotiable".
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  89. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:
    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  90. Japan v. Germany, no immigration v. mass immigration.

    I’d like to hear this guy’s take:

    Are countries without mass immigration bored? Japanese kids do rap culture better than the inventors, to the last detail. They think it’s swell, from what they see on TeeVee.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Keep in mind that German policy has typically not been big on immigration since 1973.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  91. Romanian says:
    @unwinding
    The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? I've brought up for comparison Germany, which is more economically dynamic (based on higher average GDP growth per capita over the most recent 5 year period). Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It's possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data. And again the point can be made that no amount of economic dynamism is worth cohesion, but there should be a coherent answer to whether immigration is contributing dynamic outcomes to the German economy in comparison to Japan.

    Personally, I think that the reason for Germany’s economic success relative to Japan is the Single Market and the fact that it is ensconced right in the middle of it. Germany exports West, East, North and South, with no restrictions, no customs, no tariffs, through great infrastructure and towards mainly less competitive countries, especially in its particular fields. The EU is almost a captive market. I can only speak for Romania without researching, but I suspect the same is true for the other countries – the EU is our biggest trading partner, to whom we export the most, but also from whom we import the most. And Germany is our biggest source for imports, as it is for most EU countries I suspect.

    Japan has China and South Korea nearby, as well as the US a pond hop away, but transfer costs are higher than for Germany and its Asian neighbors especially are also its rivals, increasingly adept at vying with Japan for market share. Japan has kept them at bay a bit by restricting access to its national markets, thereby creating a safe space from which to compete outside. Plus, Japan is exposed to political risk in China (as the Diaoyu riots showed) which can and do affect markets.

    Read More
    • Replies: @iSteveFan

    Personally, I think that the reason for Germany’s economic success relative to Japan is the Single Market and the fact that it is ensconced right in the middle of it.
     
    That's a good point. Essentially Germany now has a "domestic" market of 500 million.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  92. Romanian says:
    @Anonymous
    A substantial proportion of Japan's slow GDP growth over the last few years can be attributed to the Fukushima disaster.
    As a result *all* of Japan's nuclear capacity was shut down, and remained shut down until a few weeks ago.
    When you consider that at least a third of Japan's total generating capacity was nuclear, then you realise that this was big potatoes, and not some deadly excuse.
    Plus, add the fact that expensive fossil fuels had to be imported to make up the gap, buggering up the trade balance.

    I think the UK, the global poster child of political immigrationism, is a better comparison to Germany.

    I agree that Japan’s sudden withdrawal from nuclear and its reliance on fossil fuel imports affected its economy. But I don’t think it is relevant for the comparison with Germany because the Germans went all Japanese when Fukushima happened and instituted the Energiewende, their own nuclear phase-out in favor of renewables (and, ironically enough, dirty coal) which had the effect of making electricity a lot dearer than it used to be, even though the states make up for some of the losses of private interests from the public purse. I cannot vouch for whether the economic effects were similar in magnitude, but I can say that the Germans shot themselves in the foot pretty hard.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/high-costs-and-errors-of-german-transition-to-renewable-energy-a-920288.html

    I wrote another comment making an argument for the Single Market as a source of better German growth than Japan, although we have to remember the Germans were once the sick man of Europe in the early 2000s and went through labor price adjustments, I think, to regain competitiveness.

    Read More
    • Replies: @the Dude
    completely off-topic for Romanian: your English is excellent. Much better than many native speakers, not to mention native writers. How did you get to such a high level of language skills?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  93. iSteveFan says:
    @Lot
    Human capital is necessary but not sufficient. Japan would not have become Haiti, but both the country physically and its people would be worse off absent the huge infrastructure spending financed by gov debt. I bet their birth rate would have been even lower too, less employment and less space per person.

    Capitalism is prone to long depressive busts. The fact that diversity mongers are usually Keynsians does not mean Keynsianism is wrong. The man himself favored eugenics after all, and Japan shows it does not require mass migration.

    I bet their birth rate would have been even lower too, less employment and less space per person.

    Japan has a livable space about the size of California which has a population of 40 million. Guys like Steve probably lament CA has too many people from its golden age where it had roughly half of today’s number. Japan, however, has 127 million. Can you imagine a CA that populous? Even during WW2 when they had massive conscription and factory work, Japan’s population was 80 million.

    Constant growth is not always the answer. Eventually you run out of room and that affects quality of life. The key with the Japanese is that the nation is still Japanese. They are not replacing themselves.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TWS
    Western states have a lot of liveable land locked up by the states and feds. We really don't have the room that older countries with long histories of habitation and using up all the space do.
    , @Steve Sailer
    And California has more relatively land for living than Japan does. Japanese golf courses built in the 1980s tended to be crazy engineering feats of carving fairways into mountainsides.
    , @Honesthughgrant
    Thank you. I'm always amazed how stupid people are - especially "the Japanese must grow or die" boobs.

    If the Japanese population declines by 10 million in the next ten years, that means the Japanese will be better off and less crowded. The imbalance between the young and retirement age Japanese will also go away in about 30 years.

    The idea the you should change the demographic nature of your country FOREVER to solve a short term labor shortage is some thing only a stupid Westerner could think of. The USA was the world leader in the is stupidity. They had a labor shortage in the American south and decided to "solve" it with African Slaves. How'd that work out for everyone?

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  94. iSteveFan says:
    @Romanian
    Personally, I think that the reason for Germany's economic success relative to Japan is the Single Market and the fact that it is ensconced right in the middle of it. Germany exports West, East, North and South, with no restrictions, no customs, no tariffs, through great infrastructure and towards mainly less competitive countries, especially in its particular fields. The EU is almost a captive market. I can only speak for Romania without researching, but I suspect the same is true for the other countries - the EU is our biggest trading partner, to whom we export the most, but also from whom we import the most. And Germany is our biggest source for imports, as it is for most EU countries I suspect.

    Japan has China and South Korea nearby, as well as the US a pond hop away, but transfer costs are higher than for Germany and its Asian neighbors especially are also its rivals, increasingly adept at vying with Japan for market share. Japan has kept them at bay a bit by restricting access to its national markets, thereby creating a safe space from which to compete outside. Plus, Japan is exposed to political risk in China (as the Diaoyu riots showed) which can and do affect markets.

    Personally, I think that the reason for Germany’s economic success relative to Japan is the Single Market and the fact that it is ensconced right in the middle of it.

    That’s a good point. Essentially Germany now has a “domestic” market of 500 million.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You can thank me and Winston Churchill, Bertie and others for setting the course for WWI and then WWII all in an effort to contain Germany's economy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUHIZQLMo-0

    It ended up killing 150 million Europeans*, causing the rise of Communism, Nazism to combat Communism, and Stalin raping half of Europe for half a Century, only to have Germany win and do what it was always destined to do - make stuff that other people want to buy by the crateload.

    Not only did it result in this, but in order to carry out our policy, our successors even decided to support the most murderous regime in Europe - that of Stalin - to make sure it happened.

    The result? Germany won, dominates and secures Europe, and England is left a wreck with a shell of a city only fit for selling financial instruments.

    Well Done Me! And Ed VII and Churchill! We in England are particularly proud of being best friends with Stalin!

    *The massive loss of life of young able bodied men then leading to us having to import half of the Middle east and Africa here to work, only to have them stay, changing the face of our nation and others forever

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  95. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar
    The Financial Times covered this weeks ago. Does Señor Slim have a subscription to the Pink 'Un?

    Speaking of the FT, they reported on Trump’s broadside against hedge fund managers, and their commenters largely backed Trump: http://on.ft.com/1V3TPq8

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  96. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    VW recently surpassed Toyota as the world’s number 1 automaker primarily on its better sales in China, where VW makes a third of its total sales. Although the recent stock market crash and recession in China may hurt them because they’re more exposed to China:

    http://www.cheatsheet.com/automobiles/volkswagen-beats-toyota-to-become-the-worlds-no-1-automaker.html

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  97. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:

    Libertarian’s individual-centrism means that there is no reason for a nation to militarily defend itself IF the new invading order guarantees individual liberty.

    Suppose China is about to invade Japan. According to the rules of libertarianism, there is no need to fear China’s invasion as long as Chinese invaders allow Japanese individuals to indulge in their individual freedom of thrill-seeking, sex, gambling, video games, pop music, and travel.

    According to libertarianism, one should defend one’s nation ONLY IF the invaders will take one’s individual liberty away.
    If, on the other hand, the invaders may expand individual freedom, they should be welcomed even at the price of national sovereignty. So, never mind national independence and sovereignty. If invaders offer more individual freedom — pot smoking and gambling — , they should be welcomed.

    Because of the cult of individualism in the West, there is no resistance to the massive invasion. Germans don’t see themselves as Germans above all and French don’t see themselves as French above all. They see themselves as modern individuals looking for fun. Europeans may be ‘socialist’(or social-democratic), but that too is about individualism since the idea is purely economic: it provides safety nets for individuals so that they can feel secure as individuals. It’s not like the conservative socialist idea of the European Right that stressed unity and cooperation in economic activity as a means of strengthening national bonds.

    Since Europeans see themselves as individuals primarily, they tend to see the invaders as ‘individuals looking for a better life’, and why should any individual deny another individual a ‘right to a better life’? This is what happens when identity breaks down.

    But there’s yet another problem. Even many of those who oppose the invasion do so on libertarian or individualist grounds, i.e. the newcomers “don’t share our attitudes and outlooks and ‘values’ of individual liberty.” And THAT is why the invasion should be stopped. But using this logic, any amount of invaders should be allowed IF they ‘shared western values’. So, if a 100 million Muslims and a 100 million black Africans were for ‘gay marriage’ and ‘feminism’, they should be allowed in.

    A weak argument.

    West should be defended because it is racially, culturally, territorially, and historically distinct from other peoples and civilizations. It’s really that simple.

    If Westerners are individual-centric, they will not identify with other Westerners. There will be no unity of purpose and survival.
    And they will see invaders not as another people but just some other individuals.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Priss Factor
    "But using this logic, any amount of invaders should be allowed IF they ‘shared western values’."

    Come to think of it... even though libertarians are anti-socially-conservative, they will even invoke social conservatism as the rationale for increased immigration.

    They will say American Conservatives should welcome Mexicans because the Mexers are Catholic, pro-family-values, opposed to 'gay marriage', and etc. (Never mind Mexicans are those things by habit than principle, something that doesn't matter much in Mexico.)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  98. Jimi says:

    Type in “japan per capita income” into google and a chart will pop up that shows steady income growth for the average Japanese person. The fact is the average Japanese person is better off now now then they were 5 years, 10 years, and 20 years ago.

    Obviously GDP will increase with immigrants. GDP is simply a measure of the value of goods and services produced. Import a million workers into a country and pay them a pittance to do menial work will raise the GDP. But it will also lower the per capita income.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  99. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:

    Using the logic of free movements of peoples, does it mean that rich Westerners can violate the laws of Third World nations and move there as they wish? Isn’t that imperialism?

    If non-Westerners should have the freedom to freely enter the West, then Westerners should have the freedom to freely enter the non-West.

    If any African should enter Europe, then any European should be able to enter non-Western nations regardless of their national laws on borders and immigration.

    But then… when we look at what the West did in the Middle East via invasion and Zionist mass immigration into Palestine…

    It’s like Jewish settlers/occupiers can just move into any part of West Bank.
    So, how did that turn out for the Pallies?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  100. @unwinding
    The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? I've brought up for comparison Germany, which is more economically dynamic (based on higher average GDP growth per capita over the most recent 5 year period). Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It's possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data. And again the point can be made that no amount of economic dynamism is worth cohesion, but there should be a coherent answer to whether immigration is contributing dynamic outcomes to the German economy in comparison to Japan.

    Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It’s possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    Germany also has a large market for its exports, thanks to the EU treaties, in which it enjoys a large natural advantage, thanks to shared currency and proximity, thanks to other things. Those are advantages Japan doesn’t have.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  101. @Steve Sailer
    Werner Herzog: When global warming causes mutant albino crocodiles to take over Europe, what kind of cave paintings will they make of us?

    http://takimag.com/article/cave_of_unanswered_questions/print#axzz3jcbNDDkV

    I get the feeling Herzog wrote all his own lines in Jack Reacher:

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  102. Bill M says:

    Japan has also apparently been working less and its public sentiment has shifted towards prioritizing happiness over economic growth. This has been criticized by Western economists, who say Japanese salarymen should take fewer golf breaks and accept more immigration. This sounds like Jeb Bush’s economic policy: work more hours, golf less, and accept more immigration.

    http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/japan-s-road-to-harmonious-decline

    Forget what you have heard about the hard-working Japanese salaryman: since the early 1990’s, the Japanese have drastically slackened their work habits. Indeed, Tokyo University economist Fumio Hayashi has demonstrated that the main reason behind Japan’s 20 years of stagnation has been the decrease in the quantity of work performed by the Japanese.

    The government itself has led the way here, starting with its decision to close public administration buildings on Saturdays. Japan’s banks followed suit. From 1988 to 1993, the legal work week fell 10%, from 44 hours to 40. This, as much as anything, helped to bring Japan’s long-running post-WWII economic “miracle” to its knees.

    The recent electoral triumph of Yukio Hatoyama’s untested DPJ thus confirmed the popular wish not to follow America’s free-market model. Hatoyama makes no economic sense in declaring that growth is important but that happiness comes first. Nevertheless, this sentiment does reflect the mood of many Japanese.

    Assuming that Hayashi and Takenaka are right about the causes of Japan’s stagnation, one must ask whether today’s Japanese are willing to work more in order to catch up with the United States and to lead Asia development? Stagnation is a tacit collective choice made by a country’s majority. Have the Japanese people opted for it?

    Nearly half of the Japanese population is either retired or near retirement age, and they worked very hard to achieve a high level of comfort. Thanks to them, despite the blighted economy of the “lost decade,” Japanese income is still higher than it is in Europe. Moreover, unemployment is low compared to the Western world, because the unproductive distribution sector absorbs young people who cannot find better jobs. Stagnating Japan has thus remained a peaceful and rather conservative society.

    By contrast, a higher growth rate would require fewer golf breaks for salarymen and significant immigration in a nation that is unaccustomed to foreign intrusion and different cultural habits. Are the Japanese really ready to accept such a cure?

    Most Japanese, mostly among the old generation, are satisfied with the kind of society they have built. They perceive Americans and Europeans as being obsessed with money and material ambition, and they seem ready to accept some stagnation as the price of remaining truly Japanese. Hatoyama understands this, which is why he won the recent election.

    Hatoyama’s talk about a “new age,” which sounds strange from a Western perspective, is in harmony with the Japanese way: this is a country where thousands of cult leaders offer myriad paths to Happiness, in particular a glib mishmash of New Age and Zen Buddhism.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  103. anon says: • Disclaimer

    As the population drops and the Japanese have more living space per head their fertility rate will gradually increase to a stable level.

    The lesson here being never listen to the cultural poison oozing out of the western media 24/7.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  104. Harold says:
    @unwinding
    The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? I've brought up for comparison Germany, which is more economically dynamic (based on higher average GDP growth per capita over the most recent 5 year period). Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It's possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data. And again the point can be made that no amount of economic dynamism is worth cohesion, but there should be a coherent answer to whether immigration is contributing dynamic outcomes to the German economy in comparison to Japan.

    We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic?

    Sailer doesn’t mention the economy in the original post, he mentions standard of living. Whether mass immigration is good for “economic dynamism” is another topic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    "Whether mass immigration is good for “economic dynamism” is another topic."

    Well, we have the great example of the U.S. From roughly the early 20's to 1965, the U.S. severely limited immigration. I happened to be born during that time. Despite the Great Depression of 1929-1933, the U.S. achieved relatively good economic performance, successfully fought a World War on two fronts, achieved remarkable assimilation of a population heavily weighed down with large immigrant populations and became leader of the free world. A pretty good endorsement for a program severely limiting immigration, both legal and illegal.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  105. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Lot
    Krugman has often noted Japan's economic performance is not too bad when you adjust for its declining and aging population:

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/28/notes-on-japan/

    His position, which I agree with, is that Japan's gigantic, very-low-interest-debt-financed infrastructure building spree starting around 1990 was the best option available after the 80's bubble burst and threatened to drag it into a depression.

    Nearly lost among Unz's stable of, to put it politely, "tireless critics of Zionism," is Eamonn Fingleton's recent columns extolling the success of Japan's no-migration Keynesianism:

    http://www.unz.com/efingleton/nikkeis-ft-takeover/


    For a start Japanese airports are state-of-the-art and invariably these days enjoy fast public transport links to downtown areas. Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s.

    Then there are Japan’s urban skylines. These have been transformed by a huge building boom during the “lost decades” that has greatly alleviated Japan’s previous shortage of housing space. According to figures compiled by skyscraperpage.com, already as of 2012, 81 high-rise buildings taller than 152 meters (500 feet) had been constructed in Tokyo since 1989. That compares with 64 in New York, 48 in Chicago and seven in Los Angeles.

    The construction boom has produced many superlatives. The AkashiKaikyoBridge, linking two of Japan’s main islands, boasts the longest main span of any bridge in the world – no mean feat given that the engineering challenge in bridge-building increases with the cube of the span. Then there is the world’s first long-distance maglev line. Construction is well advanced, and trains will eventually run at world-record speeds of up to 350 miles an hour. Meanwhile the Tokyo Skytree skyscraper-cum-communications-tower, which was completed in 2012, boasts a height of 634 meters. This makes it the second tallest free-standing structure in the world after Dubai’s Burj Khalifa.

    Perhaps the most compelling single statistic is that just since 1989 alone, average life expectancy at birth has increased by 5.9 years – to 84.7 years from 78.8 years. This means the Japanese now typically live 4.3 years longer than Britons and 5.0 years longer than Americans.

     

    I'd add to Krugman's point further that Japan's average performance on a per capita basis is even more impressive considering that (1) it has nearly the lowest per-capita natural resources in the developed world, and this has become an increasing handicap since the long bull market in natural resources began around 1998 (2) Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market.

    Painting Japan to be some kind of economic success story is wishful thinking at best.

    Debt-to-GDP is sky high– without population growth it becomes very hard to service future debts. There are colossal obligations (pensions, etc.) that will simply be impossible for the country to meet. It isn’t just Japan — most of Europe and the US have built pension structures based on outdated economic, population, and growth models.

    So what if there’s a big new house and a Lexus in the driveway? Debt-fiends look great to outsiders — right up until the day the repo man shows up.

    Japan’s xenophobic bent makes this economic change a particularly sticky wicket for them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @iSteveFan

    It isn’t just Japan — most of Europe and the US have built pension structures based on outdated economic, population, and growth models.
    ...

    Japan’s xenophobic bent makes this economic change a particularly sticky wicket for them.
     
    Japan is probably in better shape in this regard, because though what you state is true about first world social safety nets, it seems the US and Europe are importing third worlders who are net tax consumers and will only exacerbate the stress on the system. At least Japan is not flooding itself with future cradle-to-grave dependents.
    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    No, it's not an issue.

    Japan's debt is held almost entirely - 93% - by the Bank of Japan (70% of the debt) and Japanese trust and investment funds (23%). For a country, debt becomes a major issue when you owe it to foreigners in their own currency. Only 7% of the Japan's government debt is held by foreigners and 0% of its debt is held in foreign currencies.

    If the Japanese government has a problem paying it's debt, it will simply restructure with itself - the Bank of Japan. Now, I'm not saying that this won't disrupt their economy, but it's not the issue that you're making it out to be.

    Also, remember, when done internally, a dollar borrowed by the government is a dollar not spent by a saver. The net result is the same. It doesn't boost economic growth. Now, economic growth can be enhanced depending on how the money is spent. You might be some jeans while the government might buy an airport. The question is whether the money is spent wisely. On that question, I have no idea if the Japanese government spent the money more wisely than the Japanese people who lent them the money.

    There's also the idea that government spending need not by wise if it's done at a time when the public is panicking and unreasonably not spending its money. (Think the New Deal spending or the gov't stimulus in 2008-2009.) Again, an argument for another day.

    Regardless, your argument doesn't hold water because the Japanese government didn't borrow from foreigners like the Greeks. It borrowed for its own people and spent it on infrastructure for its own people.
    , @MarkinLA
    There are colossal obligations (pensions, etc.) that will simply be impossible for the country to meet.

    When there is no huge group of immigrants that my tax money is paying the pensions of, my tax money is going to my dad or my grandfather for his pension. I don't see a problem with that.

    If it does become a problem my dad and granddad won't mind a necessary cut. The immigrant won't be so conciliatory.

    , @Romanian
    I believe Japanese debt is mostly owned by the Japanese, who are famous savers, and is denominated in its national currency. It will be far easier to stiff these creditors for the good of the nation.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  106. @Anonymous Nephew
    Madeleine is a lovely book. I wish I'd known Paris when it was like that.

    Madeleine is a lovely book. I wish I’d known Paris when it was like that.

    Don’t watch thé TV cartoon, though. Théy give Madeline, who’s what? eight? a full-fledged adult French accent. Completely unbelievable.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  107. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    Importing millions of people lowers wages in the short term but kills productivity in the long term so no Germany is cutting its own throat.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  108. Harold says:

    I, for one, am &%$#ing sick of the constant refrain, “b-b-b-but won’t someone think of the children economy!”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  109. George says:
    @Anonymous
    So, Japan with very little population growth and little immigration, manages to build 800,000 'houses and condominiums' per annum.
    The UK - politically committed to massive, uncontrolled immigration - and with a sharply rising population around half that of Japan's can only manage to build around 150,000 new dwellings per year.

    If for no other reason, immigration to the UK should be curtailed due to its obvious destruction of the UK housing market - and subsequent economic crash that will be engendered by the suppressed housing boom.

    Why can’t the UK build 240,000 houses a year?

    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30776306

    “In the past, planning was a big part of why we didn’t hit our targets.”

    Japanese statistics site confirms 800,000+ new dwellings.

    http://www.e-stat.go.jp/SG1/estat/ListE.do?lid=000001129318

    My guess is the in the past decade the UK has blown up as many dwellings in the middle east as they built in the UK.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  110. George says:

    “Tokyo could end up being surrounded by Detroits,” Being Japanese he probably did not get the fine double entendre he concocted. Is he referring to a future without immigration or with?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  111. Anonym says:
    @unwinding
    The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? I've brought up for comparison Germany, which is more economically dynamic (based on higher average GDP growth per capita over the most recent 5 year period). Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It's possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data. And again the point can be made that no amount of economic dynamism is worth cohesion, but there should be a coherent answer to whether immigration is contributing dynamic outcomes to the German economy in comparison to Japan.

    With all due respect, f*** GDP. As a citizen I am really only concerned about GDP/ capita. GDP for the sake of GDP is pointless.

    http://www.tradingeconomics.com/germany/gdp-per-capita

    Use above to compare to Japan. Japan is not doing badly. Note the above is not PPP.

    Creating a permanent problem to solve a temporary perceived problem through immigration is retarded. There are areas now in Japan with high numbers of African migrant males pestering you on the street at night. This added vibrancy is not an improvement to standard of living. As they procreate with Japanese women they will create a permanent underclass with black qualities… more violent more criminal.

    The real fix is to reward the right people in Japan to form families. TFR is on the rise again in Japan.

    http://www.tradingeconomics.com/japan/fertility-rate-total-births-per-woman-wb-data.html

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  112. Jimorbid says:
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    As several commenters have pointed out, those figures aren’t exactly strong evidence of your claim. Aside from the fact that other factors could be at work (the larger EU market which Germany has access to, for example), the period you listed is 5 years long and discarding just one of those years (2011) means Japan has outperformed Germany. Japan has also outperformed over the last 3 years. If a country is going to be transformed radically through mass immigration, is it too much to ask for a statistically-significant increase in national wealth?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  113. On behalf of ‘HelloBrownMan’ https://www.reddit.com/r/european/comments/3i6i34/due_to_a_lack_of_mass_immigration_japan_is/cudtjqj

    “Just a few facts:

    The streets of Tokyo and all of rural Japan are overrun with two main groups that stick out like a sore thumb.

    “Gangs” or groups of Pakis/Nepalese that come here and work – some of them as cashiers. They ride their bikes everywhere in packs and stare down foreigners, especially white ones, who don’t tend to ride or walk in packs, and largely keep to themselves.

    Loud and very “proud” Chinese and Koreans – students and immigrants – who ride as if they own the sidewalk, speak loudly in cafes and restaurants, and generally make the place a whole lot less pleasant. They are extremely proud of their appearance over everything else, and take particular effort to gang up (using their instant messengers like Kakao Talk, We Chat etc) and annoy the living —- out of foreigners who want to enjoy Japan alone. One friend tells me he is always accosted by the same two Chinese students whenever they see him or he has the misfortune to walk down the same sidewalk – even in Japan this is possible. They just laugh loudly and sneer at the “white man” they recognized from the week before or whatever. Sad but it is true. Koreans are known to do the same and are particularly interested in displaying posturing style behavior – offended as they are by the mere presence of a white person.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  114. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @iSteveFan

    Personally, I think that the reason for Germany’s economic success relative to Japan is the Single Market and the fact that it is ensconced right in the middle of it.
     
    That's a good point. Essentially Germany now has a "domestic" market of 500 million.

    You can thank me and Winston Churchill, Bertie and others for setting the course for WWI and then WWII all in an effort to contain Germany’s economy.

    It ended up killing 150 million Europeans*, causing the rise of Communism, Nazism to combat Communism, and Stalin raping half of Europe for half a Century, only to have Germany win and do what it was always destined to do – make stuff that other people want to buy by the crateload.

    Not only did it result in this, but in order to carry out our policy, our successors even decided to support the most murderous regime in Europe – that of Stalin – to make sure it happened.

    The result? Germany won, dominates and secures Europe, and England is left a wreck with a shell of a city only fit for selling financial instruments.

    Well Done Me! And Ed VII and Churchill! We in England are particularly proud of being best friends with Stalin!

    *The massive loss of life of young able bodied men then leading to us having to import half of the Middle east and Africa here to work, only to have them stay, changing the face of our nation and others forever

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  115. TWS says:
    @iSteveFan

    I bet their birth rate would have been even lower too, less employment and less space per person.
     
    Japan has a livable space about the size of California which has a population of 40 million. Guys like Steve probably lament CA has too many people from its golden age where it had roughly half of today's number. Japan, however, has 127 million. Can you imagine a CA that populous? Even during WW2 when they had massive conscription and factory work, Japan's population was 80 million.

    Constant growth is not always the answer. Eventually you run out of room and that affects quality of life. The key with the Japanese is that the nation is still Japanese. They are not replacing themselves.

    Western states have a lot of liveable land locked up by the states and feds. We really don’t have the room that older countries with long histories of habitation and using up all the space do.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    How much of that land can support dense population without [often unsustainable] water diversion?
    , @TWS
    Depends on what you call, 'sustainable' and whether or not you care whether or not it's as pretty as it was when you started. Way more useful but city folks prefer pretty or 'natural' over useful.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  116. Immigrants are living in the shantytowns that Japanese just won’t live in.

    Is there anything immigrants can’t do?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  117. @Anonymous Nephew
    IIRC Fingleton covered Korea/China as threat to Japan. He said Japan was concentrating on very top-end stuff like the lenses and machines used to make the latest integrated circuits.

    http://www.fingleton.net/the-japanese-electronics-industry-a-rebuttal/

    "A typical area of Japanese leadership that is completely overlooked by the declinists is the battery industry. It happens to be one of the fastest growing sectors of the global electronics industry. Batteries may seem like an old technology, but the sort of batteries that used in cellphones and laptops, not to mention hybrid cars, are a world away from traditional alkaline or acid batteries. Today’s nickel-metal hydride batteries, for instance, require super-advanced manufacturing techniques. As Fareed Zakaria has pointed out, eight of the world’s top ten battery manufacturers are based in Japan (and only one, Johnson Controls, is based in the United States).

    Then there are such fundamental areas of Japanese leadership as electronic materials. Not the least such material is semiconductor-grade silicon. Two Japanese companies, ShinEtsu and Sumco, enjoy a world duopoly. Monsanto of the United States and Wacker of Germany once successfully contested this geopolitically crucial market but they long ago dropped out: their problem was that every new generation of chip requires ever purer silicon and they just could not keep up with not-an-atom-out-of-place Japanese quality. The Japanese also are the dominant – and in many cases only – suppliers of a host of precision machinery vital in making electronics components and materials. They enjoy a monopoly in, for instance, LCD steppers, which are the key machines needed in the production of liquid crystal displays."

    Right. Japan and Germany have moved up the value scale to manufacturing more specialized components. The level of human capital is very high in these countries.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  118. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:

    You heard of prostitutes. Now, we have pregnatutes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOhM2tv0nf8&feature=youtu.be

    White American women serving as pregnatutes to Chinese homos. Added bonus: baby will be a US citizen, yay!!!!!

    Globalism. If you’re rich, you can change laws, you can bypass laws, you can rent-a-womb, etc.

    And look at the woman’s hubby. Talk about a cuck.

    The reporters says some companies do this unethically as if there is an ethical way to do this.

    In the age of Bruce ‘Caitlyn’ Jenner–where he is praised and awarded for his ‘courage’, no less–, why should this be shocking?

    Globalism is imperialism of haves over have-nots who will debase themselves for cash.
    The woman is pregnatute but justifies her decision on the basis of ‘progress’, of course, since nothing is more sacred to globalism than the holiness of homos.

    She’s giving birth to a baby for a homo couple in China. Uhhhhhh, how cute!!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  119. Olorin says:
    @M_Young
    "Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It’s not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1"

    1) Those figures aren't exactly convincing, what with Japan's growth exceeding Germany's 2 of the five years. But even if they were

    2) 'GDP Growth', even per capita GDP growth, is really poor measure of well being. That's probably week 8 or 9 in an Econ 102 Macro course. For example, if Germany has to build new freeways to keep up with population growth, that counts as 'GDP growth', but is basically a wash in terms of quality of life. Likewise if Germany has to employ more state funded teachers to teach Turkish kids, well, that's 'growth' to in crude GDP terms. Again, not helpful, probably hurtful in terms of the natives quality of life.

    “‘Growth’ in crude GDP terms” is a key concept. My recollection is that the members of FDR’s brain trust who developed the GNP as a rough estimate of productive/industrial capacity to respond to the Depression insisted it never be used as a leading economic indicator.

    This is old but wraps up some of the points that were made in the Aughts, and even late ’90s, by various parties questioning GDP:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/16/magazine/16GDP-t.html

    From that perspective (which would never ask the question), what is the dollar value of a Japan that gets to keep being Japanese?

    Then there’s the matter of who gets to define “well being.” Our political and access classes have decided that only certain people have the right to expect well being on their own terms. Not, notably, the white middle class’s members whose definition of “well being” is at odds with Diversitopian religion. This is an issue that fairly begs to be viewed from an HBD/population genetics perspective.

    Having said all this, it seems that Japan is ahead of everyone else in doing just what the sustainability mavens claimed was necessary: shrinking population without genocide. Building disposable housing makes sense.

    Anyway, I’m waiting for the video where Alex Jones reads “The Fillyjonk who Believed in Disasters.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  120. Beliavsky says: • Website

    Off-topic for this thread, but this new NBER working paper may interest Steve and his readers.

    full paper: http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/fryer/files/gecc_final.pdf

    http://www.nber.org/papers/w21477

    Parental Incentives and Early Childhood Achievement: A Field
    Experiment in Chicago Heights
    by Roland G. Fryer, Jr., Steven D. Levitt, John A. List – #21477 (CH ED LS)
    NBER Working Paper No. 21477
    Issued in August 2015
    Abstract:
    This article describes a randomized field experiment in which parents
    were provided financial incentives to engage in behaviors designed to
    increase early childhood cognitive and executive function skills
    through a parent academy. Parents were rewarded for attendance at
    early childhood sessions, completing homework assignments with their
    children, and for their child’s demonstration of mastery on interim
    assessments. This intervention had large and statistically
    significant positive impacts on both cognitive and non-cognitive test
    scores of Hispanics and Whites, but no impact on Blacks. These
    differential outcomes across races are not attributable to
    differences in observable characteristics (e.g. family size,
    mother’s age, mother’s education) or to the intensity of engagement
    with the program. Children with above median (pre-treatment) non
    cognitive scores accrue the most benefits from treatment.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  121. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    If Japan is experiencing population decline, they should just bunch up two properties at a time, make them into 1 parcel, and then everybody in their nation can live in larger houses with bigger backyards.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  122. @Steve Sailer
    "Japan is right next to more than a billion high-IQ, low-wage, genetically similar Chinese who are intent on beating them in every market."

    And 50 million South Koreans aren't chicken feed as competition for 125 million Japanese: e.g., Samsung v. Sony. We've seen that coming for a long time, but it's only recently really started to bite. The South Koreans really weren't in the same league as car makers, say, until maybe as late as 2011 when they artificially depressed the value of the currency.

    I rented a Kia Forte for a week. I was expecting the worst. It was the best small car I’ve ever driven. I’ve had to rent Toyotas, Mitsubishi’s and Fords in recent years.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  123. Hiroshima today vs. Detroit today. And the final winner of World War II is…

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  124. AndrewR [AKA "Aiden"] says:

    “Tokyo could end up being surrounded by Detroits,” said Tomohiko Makino, a real estate expert who has studied the vacant-house phenomenon.

    Um… sorry hon, but no.

    No matter how many lots become vacant in metro Tokyo, there will be no “Detroits” popping up unless they import the population of Detroit. Of course, as a metro Detroit resident I would fully support such a proposal (not that I have anything against the japs)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  125. AndrewR [AKA "Aiden"] says:
    @TWS
    Western states have a lot of liveable land locked up by the states and feds. We really don't have the room that older countries with long histories of habitation and using up all the space do.

    How much of that land can support dense population without [often unsustainable] water diversion?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  126. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Japan v. Germany, no immigration v. mass immigration.

    I'd like to hear this guy's take:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyuJQ_UO7OE

    Are countries without mass immigration bored? Japanese kids do rap culture better than the inventors, to the last detail. They think it's swell, from what they see on TeeVee.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Qe4AZRkFYE

    Keep in mind that German policy has typically not been big on immigration since 1973.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    Maybe compared to Britain and France...still, a few hundred thousand guest workers and asylum seekers became a Muslim population of four million through family reunification. And the current immigration/asylum "debate" in Germany is totally dominated by the open borders crowd. It's going in the same direction as Britain did after 1997.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  127. BB753 says:

    It stands to reason that a shrinking population, ceteris paribus, means a bigger share of the pie for the population. Thus a higher GDP per capita. If Japan, as they say, is losing 1% of its population every year, then that loss can make up for less economic growth.
    Of course, it’s bad news for foreign investors. Good news for Japanese society as a whole. I wonder for how long the US government will let the Japanese get away with not complying with globalisation and diversity über alles.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  128. iSteveFan says:
    @Anonymous
    Painting Japan to be some kind of economic success story is wishful thinking at best.

    Debt-to-GDP is sky high-- without population growth it becomes very hard to service future debts. There are colossal obligations (pensions, etc.) that will simply be impossible for the country to meet. It isn't just Japan -- most of Europe and the US have built pension structures based on outdated economic, population, and growth models.

    So what if there's a big new house and a Lexus in the driveway? Debt-fiends look great to outsiders -- right up until the day the repo man shows up.

    Japan's xenophobic bent makes this economic change a particularly sticky wicket for them.

    It isn’t just Japan — most of Europe and the US have built pension structures based on outdated economic, population, and growth models.

    Japan’s xenophobic bent makes this economic change a particularly sticky wicket for them.

    Japan is probably in better shape in this regard, because though what you state is true about first world social safety nets, it seems the US and Europe are importing third worlders who are net tax consumers and will only exacerbate the stress on the system. At least Japan is not flooding itself with future cradle-to-grave dependents.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  129. Rob says:

    Steve, your use of pictures is marvellous, and regularly makes me laugh out loud.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  130. @Steve Sailer
    Keep in mind that German policy has typically not been big on immigration since 1973.

    Maybe compared to Britain and France…still, a few hundred thousand guest workers and asylum seekers became a Muslim population of four million through family reunification. And the current immigration/asylum “debate” in Germany is totally dominated by the open borders crowd. It’s going in the same direction as Britain did after 1997.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  131. @M_Young
    Modern Japanese are huge compared to their recent ancestors, in contrast Americans ...even limited to white Americans... are shorter and fatter.

    To be fair, the Netherlands, which has experienced a lot of immigration, has also boomed in height. And in women's field hockey capability.

    Good point. Japan’s older housing stock is too small not just in square meters but in the 3rd dimension of height.

    It reminds me of visiting places where Abe Lincoln lived in Springfield, IL. First a primitive log cabin, second a pretty nice house that I could imagine modern Americans living in after upgrading the utilities. But it was too short for 6’4″ Lincoln then and for 6’4″ me now.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    Did Lincoln build it? If so, maybe Lincoln padded his stats.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    I'm about 5'11-1/2". I met an Austrian girl once who told me I was short but also that I was muscular. She said Americans are all built. I started lifting weights for competitive swimming in early high school.

    Japanese are getting taller, but they're slim and lanky because they don't lift weights for sports. I wonder if the same is true for Europeans.

    Maybe affluent Americans are re-channeling their nutritional resources in adolescence.

    But I put my money on feeding patterns. We know from sports nutrition that nutrient timing is important in addition to nutrient content. I suspect everything from binge drinking to late-night snacking (perhaps affecting hormone release) to the decline in family dinners has been affecting heights since the 1960s.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  132. George says:

    Bloomberg has interrupted their coverage of the stock market Apocalypse to bring you this important message:

    Japanese Whisky Is Growing Scarce; Here Are New Brands to Stock Up On

    Your favorite age-statement whiskies from Hibiki and friends are drying up because of demand, so here are some cult distillers you should jump on before the world discovers them

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-08-24/japanese-whisky-is-growing-scarce-here-are-new-brands-to-stock-up-on

    Don’t have a favorite Hibiki, don’t live in a fashionable city where you can get a shot at the local, fear not, for $20 or so you can have a shot delivered.

    https://www.masterofmalt.com/samples/whisky-samples/japanese-whisky/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  133. AnonNJ says:

    Japan’s debt is currently 200% of their GDP, which is why many don’t feel how bad their economy is doing. They’ve been getting away with it because it’s largely internally funded, through the savings the Japanese built up when they economy was good. It won’t last forever.

    Immigration (especially without assimilation) has some serious drawbacks but so does a declining population. Nearly the entire developed world is going into population decline. How can you save any society that lacks the will to reproduce a future generation and a people so disinterested in their own legacy and future that they aren’t having children?

    It’s not difficult to see economic advancement, birth control, pornography, and perhaps even the high intelligence that allows us to thwart our own survival instincts as an evolutionary dead end.

    Yes, people argue that the world could do with less people but the mechanisms that have lead to low birth rates are not going to change with fewer people unless a societal collapse undoes the technology and perpetual adolescence that has left all to many people disinterested in marriage, family formation, and children and the means to avoid them. We’ve figured out how to ignore our species’ survival instincts and that won’t end well.

    Read More
    • Agree: Travis
    • Disagree: Harold
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Nearly the entire developed world is going into population decline. How can you save any society that lacks the will to reproduce a future generation and a people so disinterested in their own legacy and future that they aren’t having children?

    You have gotten all this from a less than 1% decline in a year? Start worrying when the Japanese population hits 60 million in another 60 years.
    , @Anonymous

    How can you save any society that lacks the will to reproduce a future generation and a people so disinterested in their own legacy and future that they aren’t having children?
     
    They are interested in their own legacy and future. That's why they're anti-immigration.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  134. TWS says:
    @Steve Sailer
    "Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s."

    I'm driving a 1998 Infiniti I-30 with 245,000 miles on it. It's a great car.

    How do you get past a tree blown across the road or a flooded culvert? Wait, those aren’t usually LA problems. Never mind.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  135. Anonym says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Good point. Japan's older housing stock is too small not just in square meters but in the 3rd dimension of height.

    It reminds me of visiting places where Abe Lincoln lived in Springfield, IL. First a primitive log cabin, second a pretty nice house that I could imagine modern Americans living in after upgrading the utilities. But it was too short for 6'4" Lincoln then and for 6'4" me now.

    Did Lincoln build it? If so, maybe Lincoln padded his stats.

    Read More
    • Replies: @antipater_1
    Yes, Lincoln was born in a log cabin that he built with his own hands.....
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  136. Anonym says:
    @Svigor

    … Japan’s population of 127 million is expected to drop by a million a year in the coming decades. Efforts to increase its low birthrate have been only modestly successful, and the public has shown no appetite for mass immigration. …
     
    The American public has shown no appetite for mass immigration, either. Nor has the European public, for that matter. No, what's different about Japan is that the elite has shown no appetite for mass immigration.

    And you can bet your arse if they ever do, it'll be composed of populations that look a hell of a lot like the Japanese, and not Africans, Mestizos, or MENAs.

    Whatever the problem is, even if it’s not really a problem, immigration would solve it.
     
    Immigration is the solution in up economies and down economies, in times of war or peace, of fat and lean. In sickness and in health, 'til death do us part. Immigration is a dessert topping and a floor wax. It's like snake oil; it's the cure for whatever ails you, and something certainly ails you.

    Well, for white countries, anyway. But not in Israel, China, India, Japan, etc., for some strange reason.

    It’s also Cowbell.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  137. Clyde says:

    100% OT–

    Girl Meets World star Rowan Blanchard, 13, pens poignant online essay blasting ‘white feminism’ - and earns high praise from UN Women ambassador Emma Watson

    The Disney actress was responding to a fan who asked for her views on ‘white feminism’
    She discussed the importance of incorporating diverse points of view into feminist activism, and including women of color and transgender women
    Harry Potter star Emma, 25, shared the essay with her 19 million Twitter followers, saying that Rowan had ‘hit the nail on the head’

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3209176/Girl-Meets-World-star-Rowan-Blanchard-13-pens-poignant-online-essay-blasting-white-feminism-earns-high-praise-Women-ambassador-Emma-Watson.html#ixzz3jm82Qhje

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  138. Clyde says:
    @Anonymous
    You should have bought that Hyundai Sonata, Steve. It's a great car with a great warranty.

    The old geezers here buy Hyundai Sonatas. They like the Toyota Camry and have owned them. But say they get Camry quality for $5,000 less. Sonatas are a roomy automobile.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  139. Muse says:
    @Socially Extinct
    In our capitalist-consumerist matrix, if you aren't growing and expanding (despite the unfavorable triggers that would perpetuate such growth), you're doing something wrong. Either collectively, as a culture, or individually, as a spending consumerist.

    Evidently Japan's natural "downsizing" needs to be remedied. They need to take note of Sweden's illustrious experiment.

    Have you ever considered that without a certain rate of growth, capital might not be able to charge enough to generate true “economic rent” in the classical economic sense? Things like cheap money, war, immigration and technological change with intellectual property protection are some of the policies that come to mind that might “create wealth”, by accelerating growth above some minimum level that would then generate profit.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economic_rent

    Perhaps the wealthy can’t become relatively wealthier, nor can the more modestly situated accrue wealth on a grand scale without purposely overstimulating the economy. It might explain the push for what are ultimately unsustainable policies on a macro scale by the powerful in pursuit their individual interests (profit).

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon

    Have you ever considered that without a certain rate of growth, capital might not be able to charge enough to generate true “economic rent” in the classical economic sense?
     
    That's what is driving the oligarchs but the underlying problem is the banking mafia created the situation themselves out of short-term greed.

    The *only* source of real growth is innovation leading to improved productivity and the mass immigration of cheap labor kills innovation and lowers productivity.

    It's a vicious cycle. They created the problem and all their solutions make the problem worse.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  140. @Anonymous
    Painting Japan to be some kind of economic success story is wishful thinking at best.

    Debt-to-GDP is sky high-- without population growth it becomes very hard to service future debts. There are colossal obligations (pensions, etc.) that will simply be impossible for the country to meet. It isn't just Japan -- most of Europe and the US have built pension structures based on outdated economic, population, and growth models.

    So what if there's a big new house and a Lexus in the driveway? Debt-fiends look great to outsiders -- right up until the day the repo man shows up.

    Japan's xenophobic bent makes this economic change a particularly sticky wicket for them.

    No, it’s not an issue.

    Japan’s debt is held almost entirely – 93% – by the Bank of Japan (70% of the debt) and Japanese trust and investment funds (23%). For a country, debt becomes a major issue when you owe it to foreigners in their own currency. Only 7% of the Japan’s government debt is held by foreigners and 0% of its debt is held in foreign currencies.

    If the Japanese government has a problem paying it’s debt, it will simply restructure with itself – the Bank of Japan. Now, I’m not saying that this won’t disrupt their economy, but it’s not the issue that you’re making it out to be.

    Also, remember, when done internally, a dollar borrowed by the government is a dollar not spent by a saver. The net result is the same. It doesn’t boost economic growth. Now, economic growth can be enhanced depending on how the money is spent. You might be some jeans while the government might buy an airport. The question is whether the money is spent wisely. On that question, I have no idea if the Japanese government spent the money more wisely than the Japanese people who lent them the money.

    There’s also the idea that government spending need not by wise if it’s done at a time when the public is panicking and unreasonably not spending its money. (Think the New Deal spending or the gov’t stimulus in 2008-2009.) Again, an argument for another day.

    Regardless, your argument doesn’t hold water because the Japanese government didn’t borrow from foreigners like the Greeks. It borrowed for its own people and spent it on infrastructure for its own people.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  141. @Steve Sailer
    Werner Herzog Reads "Curious George:"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7T8y5EPv6Y8

    What’s so surprising? H A and Margret Rey came from Germany.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  142. MarkinLA says:
    @attilathehen
    ...billion, high i.q. Chinese??? LOL!!!! Where did the industrial revolution start? Some backwater called Europe filled with round-eyed, light-skinned, high i.q.ers!!! The Japanese, Chinese, Koreans have hit their peak and it will be all downhill from now on. Remember, Asians can only copy, not invent. The Japanese were supposed to takeover the world in the mid-1980s (without Godzilla's help). And it was Capt. Matthew Perry who forced Japan to modernize and Westernize. Without his help, they would have been a third-World backwater - similar to the Philippines, Laos, all the rest of the Asiatic countries.

    Asians have their traits that make them worthy competitors. Ampex invented video tape but didn’t want to spend the resources necessary to make a consumer product out of it and lost out big to Sony and JVC.

    Read More
    • Replies: @attilathehen
    "The electronics division of entertainer Bing Crosby's production company, Bing Crosby Enterprises (BCE), gave the world's first demonstration of a videotape recording in Los Angeles on November 11, 1951. Developed by John T. Mullin and Wayne R. Johnson since 1950, the device gave what were described as "blurred and indistinct" images using a modified Ampex 200 tape recorder and standard quarter-inch (0.6 cm) audio tape moving at 360 inches (9.1 m) per second . ." Ampex was an American company. Markin LA, you need to get your facts straight. Are you a Jew living in LA - with an Asian spouse? The only Asians with some worthy traits as competitors are the Japanese. But that doesn't mean I want to "turn Japanese." Also, as I pointed out, it was a white, Christian male - Matthew Perry who forced the Japanese into modernization. Without Perry, the Japanese would have remained a feudal, agricultural society. The Chinese have begun to collapse. The rest of Asia, India included, is going nowhere.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  143. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:
    @Priss Factor
    Libertarian's individual-centrism means that there is no reason for a nation to militarily defend itself IF the new invading order guarantees individual liberty.

    Suppose China is about to invade Japan. According to the rules of libertarianism, there is no need to fear China's invasion as long as Chinese invaders allow Japanese individuals to indulge in their individual freedom of thrill-seeking, sex, gambling, video games, pop music, and travel.

    According to libertarianism, one should defend one's nation ONLY IF the invaders will take one's individual liberty away.
    If, on the other hand, the invaders may expand individual freedom, they should be welcomed even at the price of national sovereignty. So, never mind national independence and sovereignty. If invaders offer more individual freedom --- pot smoking and gambling --- , they should be welcomed.

    Because of the cult of individualism in the West, there is no resistance to the massive invasion. Germans don't see themselves as Germans above all and French don't see themselves as French above all. They see themselves as modern individuals looking for fun. Europeans may be 'socialist'(or social-democratic), but that too is about individualism since the idea is purely economic: it provides safety nets for individuals so that they can feel secure as individuals. It's not like the conservative socialist idea of the European Right that stressed unity and cooperation in economic activity as a means of strengthening national bonds.

    Since Europeans see themselves as individuals primarily, they tend to see the invaders as 'individuals looking for a better life', and why should any individual deny another individual a 'right to a better life'? This is what happens when identity breaks down.

    But there's yet another problem. Even many of those who oppose the invasion do so on libertarian or individualist grounds, i.e. the newcomers "don't share our attitudes and outlooks and 'values' of individual liberty." And THAT is why the invasion should be stopped. But using this logic, any amount of invaders should be allowed IF they 'shared western values'. So, if a 100 million Muslims and a 100 million black Africans were for 'gay marriage' and 'feminism', they should be allowed in.

    A weak argument.

    West should be defended because it is racially, culturally, territorially, and historically distinct from other peoples and civilizations. It's really that simple.

    If Westerners are individual-centric, they will not identify with other Westerners. There will be no unity of purpose and survival.
    And they will see invaders not as another people but just some other individuals.

    “But using this logic, any amount of invaders should be allowed IF they ‘shared western values’.”

    Come to think of it… even though libertarians are anti-socially-conservative, they will even invoke social conservatism as the rationale for increased immigration.

    They will say American Conservatives should welcome Mexicans because the Mexers are Catholic, pro-family-values, opposed to ‘gay marriage’, and etc. (Never mind Mexicans are those things by habit than principle, something that doesn’t matter much in Mexico.)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  144. Jason Bayz says: • Website

    Back in 2000, the CIA wrote a 70 page report what the world would look like in 2015(“required reading for the new president,” according to the Telegraph). One such prediction:

    In Europe and Japan, an ageing population and static birthrate means that allowing more immigration may be the only way of meeting a chronic shortage of workers.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/1379979/This-is-the-world-in-2015.html

    The Disaster is always a decade or two away.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  145. MarkinLA says:
    @anowow
    Is the American Middle Class worth saving? Particularly the Upper Middle Class? They seem to have little solidarity with their poorly paid countrymen.

    Comparing the reactions of the New York Times article about white collar conditions with the cricket chirping around the Mother Jones expose on warehouse workers, I'm inclined to root for Zuckerberg et al getting all the H1B's their plutocratic hearts could desire. Indeed, as has been pointed out, the people speaking well of the warehouses is sort of pathetic, letting you know how poorly workers are treated, like a whipped dog responding to any bone thrown to them.

    This is nothing new. My father worked in the garment industry for decades, a domestic industry that was ravaged in the 90's. My father was in management, so he got a retirement package. The workers- little or nothing, not even retraining. He was surprised that there wasn't any more sympathy than there was. I told him "nobody will care until the 'burbs feel pain, until they are made to howl." Sure enough, outsourcing wasn't an issue, not a negative, until India started grabbing up all those IT jobs.

    There is a huge amount of arrogance in the white collar world and especially in tech. Many of these people think they are so supremely talented that nobody could ever do their jobs and when you take over one of their previous jobs you see how mediocre they are. They truly believe that manual laborers are below them and deserve everything that has happened. I am glad I had undeserved stock options and was able to get out and retire.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  146. Leftist conservative [AKA "radical_centrist"] says: • Website

    why, it’s almost as if the american elite are using immigration to drive growth….

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  147. tbraton says:
    @Anonymous
    Of course, anyone who has ever read Jared Diamond's opus 'Collapse' will be familiar with his take on that 20 year old little punch-up in Rwanda.
    Basically, every few years Rwanda goes through a mass culling frenzied orgy of self-genocide. Diamond quoted convincing research that made a string case that the desire to increase landholdings in that Malthusian petri-dish which is Rwanda is the real, hidden, hand behind the periodic massacres.
    Just a thought, but Syria, which is providing the bulk of volkwanderung dark-ages style whole movements of peoples into high GDP Germany, had prodigious fertility in the latter half of the 20th century.
    So did Somalia
    So did Afghanistan.

    Just a warning, but if Egypt 'pops' due to a civil war, perhaps fuelled by the unconscious desire of the entire Egyptian population to decamp to Germany, then we really will be talking about big potatas.

    “Just a thought, but Syria, which is providing the bulk of volkwanderung dark-ages style whole movements of peoples into high GDP Germany, had prodigious fertility in the latter half of the 20th century.”

    You touch on an important point which rarely gets any mention, either on the MSM or the alternative media, namely the contribution that great population increases makes to all kinds of war, especially civil war. With respect to Syria, here is a comment I posted on TAC about four years ago:

    “tbraton says:
    May 30, 2013 at 10:53 am
    I don’t want to sound cold-hearted, but let’s put the 70,000, soon to be 100,000, dead in Syria in context. Syria’s population was only 2.4 million in 1937, only 14.2 million in 1995 (less than 20 years ago) and an estimated 26 million today. The U.S. population in 1900 was 76 million. Had U.S. population increased more than ten-fold, as Syria’s population has grown since 1937, we would now have more than 760 million people living in the U.S. There is no great shortage of Syrians in the world. The death toll in Syria pales in comparison to the civil wars being fought in the Congo. . . .”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  148. @eah
    Those Godzilla movies were really something! Else. That was back in the day when 'Made in Japan' was synonymous with being tacky and cheap. I can remember thinking how appropriate that was.

    Actually, Japanese cinema was among the best in the world, with such great directors as Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Ozu, Kobayashi, Teshigahara, etc., at the peak of their powers in the ’50s and early ’60s. It was only the advent of television in Japan in the late ’60s that brought it to a screeching halt.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  149. MarkinLA says:
    @Anonymous
    Painting Japan to be some kind of economic success story is wishful thinking at best.

    Debt-to-GDP is sky high-- without population growth it becomes very hard to service future debts. There are colossal obligations (pensions, etc.) that will simply be impossible for the country to meet. It isn't just Japan -- most of Europe and the US have built pension structures based on outdated economic, population, and growth models.

    So what if there's a big new house and a Lexus in the driveway? Debt-fiends look great to outsiders -- right up until the day the repo man shows up.

    Japan's xenophobic bent makes this economic change a particularly sticky wicket for them.

    There are colossal obligations (pensions, etc.) that will simply be impossible for the country to meet.

    When there is no huge group of immigrants that my tax money is paying the pensions of, my tax money is going to my dad or my grandfather for his pension. I don’t see a problem with that.

    If it does become a problem my dad and granddad won’t mind a necessary cut. The immigrant won’t be so conciliatory.

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    A few years back, I actually heard one politician propose an easy solution for all the empty houses in the U.S. following the bursting of the housing bubble: just admit more immigrants to fill up the empty houses. (I'm reminded of Steve Sailer's imagined dialogue for the mother black bear who invaded the suburban swimming pool in N.J.: "Where can a bear like me get a mortgage?”) The same mindless BS like the pension problem. To their credit, the Japanese seem to figured out all the nonsense spouted by Western elites and worked around their problems on their own terms.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  150. @iSteveFan

    I bet their birth rate would have been even lower too, less employment and less space per person.
     
    Japan has a livable space about the size of California which has a population of 40 million. Guys like Steve probably lament CA has too many people from its golden age where it had roughly half of today's number. Japan, however, has 127 million. Can you imagine a CA that populous? Even during WW2 when they had massive conscription and factory work, Japan's population was 80 million.

    Constant growth is not always the answer. Eventually you run out of room and that affects quality of life. The key with the Japanese is that the nation is still Japanese. They are not replacing themselves.

    And California has more relatively land for living than Japan does. Japanese golf courses built in the 1980s tended to be crazy engineering feats of carving fairways into mountainsides.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    https://books.google.co.jp/books?id=MBvqUzE0ZgEC&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&dq=japan+200+year+project+new+island&source=bl&ots=3DQQLHBa4m&sig=mVDHrlt19Lj-lY8tzNdZgpMEBhM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CBsQ6AEwAGoVChMInJ_SyY_DxwIVw6GUCh2K4AT9#v=onepage&q&f=false

    200 year plan to level mountains and build a new fifth main island. Just imagine the possibilities for course design if you could literally build from the bottom up.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  151. “Tokyo could end up being surrounded by Detroits,”

    No, that’s what immigration is for.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  152. tbraton says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Uh, oh, somebody's noticing. And how dare they not take as gospel everything that US butinskys like to tell Westerners, namely, what's wrong with their own nation that only they can help solve for them?

    "The country also limits rice imports, which has the effect of causing the local price to be much higher than the world price, and in turn subsidizing rural employment."

    Imagine that. Japanese jobs for Japanese. Japan for the Japanese and not for the rest of the world.

    "In a democracy the citizens should get to decide whether faster economic growth is worth the downside of increased immigration."

    Wow, this is wow. Even reading this sentence, that a nation should get to decide exactly who it allows into its own nation, doesn't sound all too egalitarian. I mean, doesn't Japan know how much better off it would be if it only invited in more Korean workers in the STEM related fields as well as in low paying jobs out in the fields? How come Japan doesn't have a similar program to US's F1-B Visa and just invite in about 3-5 million Koreans? Doesn't Abe know how much better off they'd be with all this vibrant diversity?

    Where's Japan's version of Jeb Bush when they truly need him in this their hour of need?

    ““The country also limits rice imports, which has the effect of causing the local price to be much higher than the world price, and in turn subsidizing rural employment.”

    Imagine that. Japanese jobs for Japanese. Japan for the Japanese and not for the rest of the world.”

    But, but, but…you don’t appear to have any sympathy for the large, subsidized agri-businesses that grow rice in the United States. If they can’t sell rice in Japan, that means we will have to import more Asians from China to help grow the domestic market for rice. I have never figured out why we grow rice in the U.S.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Farmers are a powerful political constituency in Japan, like they are in the US and France. This is generally the case in most advanced industrial societies with a strong tradition of agriculture. There are national security reasons why Japanese agriculture is protected. Remember, before WW2, Japan was embargoed and had trouble maintaining fuel imports to maintain an industrial economy. If it became dependent on food imports, blockades and embargoes would lead to starvation, not just the industrial economy being damaged.

    BTW, American farming is subsidized and coddled for national security reasons as well.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  153. attilathehen [AKA "Matilda"] says:
    @MarkinLA
    Asians have their traits that make them worthy competitors. Ampex invented video tape but didn't want to spend the resources necessary to make a consumer product out of it and lost out big to Sony and JVC.

    “The electronics division of entertainer Bing Crosby’s production company, Bing Crosby Enterprises (BCE), gave the world’s first demonstration of a videotape recording in Los Angeles on November 11, 1951. Developed by John T. Mullin and Wayne R. Johnson since 1950, the device gave what were described as “blurred and indistinct” images using a modified Ampex 200 tape recorder and standard quarter-inch (0.6 cm) audio tape moving at 360 inches (9.1 m) per second . .” Ampex was an American company. Markin LA, you need to get your facts straight. Are you a Jew living in LA – with an Asian spouse? The only Asians with some worthy traits as competitors are the Japanese. But that doesn’t mean I want to “turn Japanese.” Also, as I pointed out, it was a white, Christian male – Matthew Perry who forced the Japanese into modernization. Without Perry, the Japanese would have remained a feudal, agricultural society. The Chinese have begun to collapse. The rest of Asia, India included, is going nowhere.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  154. MarkinLA says:
    @AnonNJ
    Japan's debt is currently 200% of their GDP, which is why many don't feel how bad their economy is doing. They've been getting away with it because it's largely internally funded, through the savings the Japanese built up when they economy was good. It won't last forever.

    Immigration (especially without assimilation) has some serious drawbacks but so does a declining population. Nearly the entire developed world is going into population decline. How can you save any society that lacks the will to reproduce a future generation and a people so disinterested in their own legacy and future that they aren't having children?

    It's not difficult to see economic advancement, birth control, pornography, and perhaps even the high intelligence that allows us to thwart our own survival instincts as an evolutionary dead end.

    Yes, people argue that the world could do with less people but the mechanisms that have lead to low birth rates are not going to change with fewer people unless a societal collapse undoes the technology and perpetual adolescence that has left all to many people disinterested in marriage, family formation, and children and the means to avoid them. We've figured out how to ignore our species' survival instincts and that won't end well.

    Nearly the entire developed world is going into population decline. How can you save any society that lacks the will to reproduce a future generation and a people so disinterested in their own legacy and future that they aren’t having children?

    You have gotten all this from a less than 1% decline in a year? Start worrying when the Japanese population hits 60 million in another 60 years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AnonNJ
    The Japanese population isn't dropping faster courtesy of a long lifespan but what's going to stop the decline when they reach 60 million. Or 30 million. Or 15 million. Or 1 million? Or 1,000? What is magically going to make Japanese men and women interested giving up being single and using birth control and having more than 2 kids at any point? Courtesy of pornography and birth control pills, we've become like the wasps suckered into fertilizing figs. We go through the motions to satisfy our sexual urges without it leading to children. How does this end well for the species?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  155. tbraton says:
    @MarkinLA
    There are colossal obligations (pensions, etc.) that will simply be impossible for the country to meet.

    When there is no huge group of immigrants that my tax money is paying the pensions of, my tax money is going to my dad or my grandfather for his pension. I don't see a problem with that.

    If it does become a problem my dad and granddad won't mind a necessary cut. The immigrant won't be so conciliatory.

    A few years back, I actually heard one politician propose an easy solution for all the empty houses in the U.S. following the bursting of the housing bubble: just admit more immigrants to fill up the empty houses. (I’m reminded of Steve Sailer’s imagined dialogue for the mother black bear who invaded the suburban swimming pool in N.J.: “Where can a bear like me get a mortgage?”) The same mindless BS like the pension problem. To their credit, the Japanese seem to figured out all the nonsense spouted by Western elites and worked around their problems on their own terms.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  156. population density per sqare mile:

    Massachusetts 858
    Belgium 889
    Japan 836
    Connecticut 783

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Japan is a lot craggier than Massachusetts, much less Belgium.
    , @AnonNJ
    Population density in NJ? 1210 per square mile and we still have vast stretches of open land here. There is a lot of open space in Japan once you get out of the few major metro areas. Open space is not their problem. The cost of everything is. I've lived in Japan. Rush hour in Tokyo is far more pleasant than NYC, and that includes the guy on the train platform shoving more people in.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  157. @iSteveFan

    I bet their birth rate would have been even lower too, less employment and less space per person.
     
    Japan has a livable space about the size of California which has a population of 40 million. Guys like Steve probably lament CA has too many people from its golden age where it had roughly half of today's number. Japan, however, has 127 million. Can you imagine a CA that populous? Even during WW2 when they had massive conscription and factory work, Japan's population was 80 million.

    Constant growth is not always the answer. Eventually you run out of room and that affects quality of life. The key with the Japanese is that the nation is still Japanese. They are not replacing themselves.

    Thank you. I’m always amazed how stupid people are – especially “the Japanese must grow or die” boobs.

    If the Japanese population declines by 10 million in the next ten years, that means the Japanese will be better off and less crowded. The imbalance between the young and retirement age Japanese will also go away in about 30 years.

    The idea the you should change the demographic nature of your country FOREVER to solve a short term labor shortage is some thing only a stupid Westerner could think of. The USA was the world leader in the is stupidity. They had a labor shortage in the American south and decided to “solve” it with African Slaves. How’d that work out for everyone?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Priss Factor
    "If the Japanese population declines by 10 million in the next ten years, that means the Japanese will be better off and less crowded."

    That may be, but the trends in Japan are troubling.

    It's not just economic, which would be rational and understandable. There is a certain sexual malaise throughout the country. And Japanese have lost faith in their civilization, much like Europeans have. Japanese look to videogames, cartoons, and cutesy idol culture as what is representative of them. Something is wrong. Japan has lost the connection to their sense of tribe and to a sense of humanism, an organic reality.

    Japanese are not having kids cuz they've given up on the meaning of life. Many young Japanese have decided to shut themselves off and not even get married.
    It's a sick trend. We see it in the West too. Very troubling.

    That said, better for Japan to grow old and remain Japan than fill up greying Japan with young non-Japanese who won't give a crap about Japanese identity and culture.

    Why Japan went chose that mulatto as beauty contestant... it is a huge mistake and may be a dire trend.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  158. tbraton says:
    @Harold

    We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic?
     
    Sailer doesn’t mention the economy in the original post, he mentions standard of living. Whether mass immigration is good for “economic dynamism” is another topic.

    “Whether mass immigration is good for “economic dynamism” is another topic.”

    Well, we have the great example of the U.S. From roughly the early 20′s to 1965, the U.S. severely limited immigration. I happened to be born during that time. Despite the Great Depression of 1929-1933, the U.S. achieved relatively good economic performance, successfully fought a World War on two fronts, achieved remarkable assimilation of a population heavily weighed down with large immigrant populations and became leader of the free world. A pretty good endorsement for a program severely limiting immigration, both legal and illegal.

    Read More
    • Agree: Harold
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  159. If it was not for all the leaches we could have a nice country. Right now we are paying Puerto Ricans social security disability for not speaking English, and since the HIV travel ban was removed we are paying $2,000-$5,000 a month for medication alone per “refugee” AIDS patient. Now some of you might wander “why would a gay guy be for the HIV travel ban?” , well if low IQ stupid 3rd world moslems don’t take their medicine correctly they might create a drug resistant version of AIDS like they did with TB.

    OT: anyone want to bet the NASA employees not fired for kiddie porn are unfireable affirmative action employees?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3184951/NASA-employees-caught-buying-child-porn-site-showed-three-year-olds-abused-escape-prosecution-names-kept-secret.html

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  160. Hubbub says:
    @WhatEvvs
    Forgive me for (a) going OT and (b) conspiracy-mongering, but does anyone else think that maybe the Chinese are behind the 182 bn wipeout because they want to teach Don Trump a lesson? And not just Trump, but the entire plutocrat-class. Which side of their noodles are buttered?

    Or am I just paranoid and making stuff up?

    You are just paranoid and making things up.

    Read More
    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    Thanks, I needed that.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  161. @Hippopotamusdrome
    population density per sqare mile:

    Massachusetts 858
    Belgium 889
    Japan 836
    Connecticut 783

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OrhnhKc89A

    Japan is a lot craggier than Massachusetts, much less Belgium.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Yeah, plus the direction people are moving is toward the population centers.
    , @Brutusale
    Outside Route 495, and especially west of Worcester, Massachusetts is a collection of half-populated old mill towns and Berkshire vacation villages for members of the NYC Tribe.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  162. Most of the population here is opposed to Abe’s positions on the military and nuclear power. He is still in office because of fear about the economy, so it is not just westerners telling Japanese they have a problem.

    Moreover, you can see from the steucture of Abenomics that they’re a little desperate. The country’s financial problems are bigger than they appear because of a lack of transparency.

    Everybody should read Alex Kerr’s “Dogs and Demons”. It’s a little out of date but still very informative.

    The size of the Japanese economy is not reflected in the lifestyles of the people here. Japanese have some “things” and have access to power, food, and are healthy but in general do not have a life comparable to the US or Germany. Even technological penetration is not as deep as you would imagine. Some thing are hard to quantify. For example, cheap products from China and SE Asia are replacing Japanese ones, so the general quality of physical surroundings is declining. I bought the best broom I could find in the D2 homegoods store, and it broke the first day I had it.

    The Japanese economy is built on the human capital produced by the militarized society inherited from pre-1945. The reason young people today aren’t getting married and are working less is that they are exposed to western Media much more now via the Internet and are starting to reject their parents’ lifestyles. The state of young people is the biggest problem Japan faces now. Lots of them parrot western conventional wisdom, including pro-diversity and open borders opinions.

    Japanese people have the idea that everyone in Japan is middle-class. So the construction state, including all the excess houses, is make-work welfare. In the future, “guest workers” from the south pacific are going to look like a good idea because they don’t “deserve” the same lifestyles and welfare benefits. They will be imported cheap labor to do manual labor. The trick will be getting them to leave again. The fact that the visa situation seems to have gotten easier for foreign workers recently tells me that if Abe stays in power, he’s not going to make going home a priority. I have met South Asians here who are uneducated but have been here for a decade, so it is possible to game the system somehow. So unless the goverent makes a deportation initiative, I suspect the immigrant population is just going to slowly rise.

    Foreign expats are basically a progressive Fifth Column, and the media, despite being infamous for being pro-government, seem too much like their western counterparts to me. E.g., everybody here heard about a black body being shot (oh my god–Americans and their guns!!!) in Ferguson, but nobody saw the footage of Brown roughing up the shopkeeper or knows the details of the outcome of the case.

    Read More
    • Replies: @spandrell
    I agree with most of what you say; but compared to the hardcore leftists of the 1970s, the vague progressivism of some youngsters today is very, very mild.

    By the way, I'll be visiting Kyoto soon, it would be nice to have a Sailerites at Japan meetup. My email is at my blog.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  163. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:
    @Honesthughgrant
    Thank you. I'm always amazed how stupid people are - especially "the Japanese must grow or die" boobs.

    If the Japanese population declines by 10 million in the next ten years, that means the Japanese will be better off and less crowded. The imbalance between the young and retirement age Japanese will also go away in about 30 years.

    The idea the you should change the demographic nature of your country FOREVER to solve a short term labor shortage is some thing only a stupid Westerner could think of. The USA was the world leader in the is stupidity. They had a labor shortage in the American south and decided to "solve" it with African Slaves. How'd that work out for everyone?

    “If the Japanese population declines by 10 million in the next ten years, that means the Japanese will be better off and less crowded.”

    That may be, but the trends in Japan are troubling.

    It’s not just economic, which would be rational and understandable. There is a certain sexual malaise throughout the country. And Japanese have lost faith in their civilization, much like Europeans have. Japanese look to videogames, cartoons, and cutesy idol culture as what is representative of them. Something is wrong. Japan has lost the connection to their sense of tribe and to a sense of humanism, an organic reality.

    Japanese are not having kids cuz they’ve given up on the meaning of life. Many young Japanese have decided to shut themselves off and not even get married.
    It’s a sick trend. We see it in the West too. Very troubling.

    That said, better for Japan to grow old and remain Japan than fill up greying Japan with young non-Japanese who won’t give a crap about Japanese identity and culture.

    Why Japan went chose that mulatto as beauty contestant… it is a huge mistake and may be a dire trend.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    "Japanese are not having kids cuz they’ve given up on the meaning of life. Many young Japanese have decided to shut themselves off and not even get married.
    It’s a sick trend. We see it in the West too. Very troubling."
    I guess you are right, but still be should not forget that currently Japanese have (only very slightly, but still) a higher TFR than Ethnic Germans, Ethnic Italians, Ethnic Spain people and Polish people. So when Japanese have given up on the meaning of life that Germans, Italians and so on have even more given up on the meaning of life
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  164. Hosswire says:

    If Japan can keep out new immigrants, shouldn’t their problem solve itself?

    Low birth rate —> Fewer workers —> Higher wages for remaining workers.

    Low birth rate —> Fewer residents —> Lower real estate prices for remaining residents.

    High wages + Low real estate prices —> Affordable family formation —> Higher birthrate

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  165. @Steve Sailer
    Japan is a lot craggier than Massachusetts, much less Belgium.

    Yeah, plus the direction people are moving is toward the population centers.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  166. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @5371
    [Whatever the problem is, even if it’s not really a problem, immigration would solve it.]

    Even if the problem is people not having jobs any more because robots have taken them!

    Bolches yarboclos pa todos.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  167. @Anonym
    Did Lincoln build it? If so, maybe Lincoln padded his stats.

    Yes, Lincoln was born in a log cabin that he built with his own hands…..

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    I just googled it, the Springfield house Steve mentions is the only house Lincoln ever owned. He did not build it though. I am not sure whether there were any houses available in his price range that would suit a 6'4" guy. 6'4" was huge for back then.

    FWIW I've met Steve once and although it has been quite a while, 6'4" is very believable. So if Steve says that Lincoln's house is not big enough for a 6'4" guy, I'd say he's right.

    The original post was a joke btw.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  168. AnonNJ says:
    @MarkinLA
    Nearly the entire developed world is going into population decline. How can you save any society that lacks the will to reproduce a future generation and a people so disinterested in their own legacy and future that they aren’t having children?

    You have gotten all this from a less than 1% decline in a year? Start worrying when the Japanese population hits 60 million in another 60 years.

    The Japanese population isn’t dropping faster courtesy of a long lifespan but what’s going to stop the decline when they reach 60 million. Or 30 million. Or 15 million. Or 1 million? Or 1,000? What is magically going to make Japanese men and women interested giving up being single and using birth control and having more than 2 kids at any point? Courtesy of pornography and birth control pills, we’ve become like the wasps suckered into fertilizing figs. We go through the motions to satisfy our sexual urges without it leading to children. How does this end well for the species?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harold
    “What is magically going to make Japanese men and women interested giving up being single and using birth control and having more than 2 kids at any point?”

    Natural selection.

    , @ben tillman

    The Japanese population isn’t dropping faster courtesy of a long lifespan but what’s going to stop the decline when they reach 60 million. Or 30 million. Or 15 million. Or 1 million? Or 1,000? What is magically going to make Japanese men and women interested giving up being single and using birth control and having more than 2 kids at any point?
     
    It seems obvious to me that when family formation becomes sufficiently affordable, families will be formed, but why even ask the question? Immigration can only make the problem worse.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  169. Anon 2 says:
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    Bulgaria, with its GDP per capita of $17,900, is indeed one of the poorest
    nations in the EU. On the other hand, Poland since its admission in 2004
    has been a star performer. Its GDP per capita is $26,200 (PPP) and rising
    rapidly, and Poland’s economy with the total GDP of $999 billion (PPP) is the 6th
    largest in the 28-nation EU community. It’s true that the wages in Poland
    have been kept artificially low to attract more investment, and this in turn
    attracted hundreds of thousands of temporary and not-so-temporary
    workers from Poland to Germany and UK, but that’s likely to change soon.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  170. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @5371
    [Whatever the problem is, even if it’s not really a problem, immigration would solve it.]

    Even if the problem is people not having jobs any more because robots have taken them!

    But think of all the new immigrant buddies and playmates the Japanese will be able to commune with when all work is replaced by robots. They will quickly learn how true the maxim “Diversity is our Strength” really is. Like South Africa and LA.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  171. AnonNJ says:

    What happens when half a country’s population is 65 or older?

    http://theweek.com/articles/453219/everything-need-know-about-japans-population-crisis

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    From the linked article:
    "Left to their own devices, Japanese men aren't sure how to find wives — and many are shying away from the hunt, because they simply can't afford it. Wages have stagnated since the 1990s, while housing prices have shot up. A young Japanese man has good reason to believe that his standard of living would drop immensely if he had to house and support a wife and children — especially considering that his wife likely wouldn't be working."

    I have an easy solution for this Japanese problem: mass immigration. Works every time, or so I am told. It will also provide a solution to all those empty Japanese shacks.

    There is a mysterious cycle to human affairs. In many cases, a child of an alcoholic will abstain from alcohol. I know in my case my father started smoking when he was about 16 and remained at least a one pack a day man until the Surgeon General issued his report in the early 60's, and, despite experimenting with cigarettes, pipes and cigars in my early teens (along with neighborhood friends), I never acquired the habit. So, at some point in the future, Japanese children will start getting interested in sex again and Japanese women will start having children again. And the cycle will reverse. All without the benefit of mass immigration. If I had to speculate, declining population will result in increased income for the young worker, who will find that he can indeed afford to support a wife and children.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  172. AnonNJ says:
    @Hippopotamusdrome
    population density per sqare mile:

    Massachusetts 858
    Belgium 889
    Japan 836
    Connecticut 783

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OrhnhKc89A

    Population density in NJ? 1210 per square mile and we still have vast stretches of open land here. There is a lot of open space in Japan once you get out of the few major metro areas. Open space is not their problem. The cost of everything is. I’ve lived in Japan. Rush hour in Tokyo is far more pleasant than NYC, and that includes the guy on the train platform shoving more people in.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  173. Romanian says:
    @Anonymous
    Painting Japan to be some kind of economic success story is wishful thinking at best.

    Debt-to-GDP is sky high-- without population growth it becomes very hard to service future debts. There are colossal obligations (pensions, etc.) that will simply be impossible for the country to meet. It isn't just Japan -- most of Europe and the US have built pension structures based on outdated economic, population, and growth models.

    So what if there's a big new house and a Lexus in the driveway? Debt-fiends look great to outsiders -- right up until the day the repo man shows up.

    Japan's xenophobic bent makes this economic change a particularly sticky wicket for them.

    I believe Japanese debt is mostly owned by the Japanese, who are famous savers, and is denominated in its national currency. It will be far easier to stiff these creditors for the good of the nation.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  174. Lot says:
    @Tacitus2016
    I had quite a boring looking Toyota from the late 90's. It was smooth and reliable with great pick up. I replaced it with something cooler. It soon dawned on me that Toyota drivetrain was far superior to this much newer car. My current VW has a tiny engine that is both turbocharged and supercharged( Twincharger). It's not as smooth as the Toyota, has worse pick up and the fuel economy in real world is only slightly better.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twincharger

    http://youtu.be/4IrJH6gz0ug (Ferrari vs Camry)

    Turbo engines are just another car part that can fail and add to the cost and complexity of the vehicle. I admire the Germans for trying so hard with their turbos, largely motivated by their wise decision to make their gas tax very high. Just not for me as long as I have a chance.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  175. @Steve Sailer
    And California has more relatively land for living than Japan does. Japanese golf courses built in the 1980s tended to be crazy engineering feats of carving fairways into mountainsides.

    https://books.google.co.jp/books?id=MBvqUzE0ZgEC&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&dq=japan+200+year+project+new+island&source=bl&ots=3DQQLHBa4m&sig=mVDHrlt19Lj-lY8tzNdZgpMEBhM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CBsQ6AEwAGoVChMInJ_SyY_DxwIVw6GUCh2K4AT9#v=onepage&q&f=false

    200 year plan to level mountains and build a new fifth main island. Just imagine the possibilities for course design if you could literally build from the bottom up.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  176. Harold says:
    @AnonNJ
    The Japanese population isn't dropping faster courtesy of a long lifespan but what's going to stop the decline when they reach 60 million. Or 30 million. Or 15 million. Or 1 million? Or 1,000? What is magically going to make Japanese men and women interested giving up being single and using birth control and having more than 2 kids at any point? Courtesy of pornography and birth control pills, we've become like the wasps suckered into fertilizing figs. We go through the motions to satisfy our sexual urges without it leading to children. How does this end well for the species?

    “What is magically going to make Japanese men and women interested giving up being single and using birth control and having more than 2 kids at any point?”

    Natural selection.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  177. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @AnonNJ
    Japan's debt is currently 200% of their GDP, which is why many don't feel how bad their economy is doing. They've been getting away with it because it's largely internally funded, through the savings the Japanese built up when they economy was good. It won't last forever.

    Immigration (especially without assimilation) has some serious drawbacks but so does a declining population. Nearly the entire developed world is going into population decline. How can you save any society that lacks the will to reproduce a future generation and a people so disinterested in their own legacy and future that they aren't having children?

    It's not difficult to see economic advancement, birth control, pornography, and perhaps even the high intelligence that allows us to thwart our own survival instincts as an evolutionary dead end.

    Yes, people argue that the world could do with less people but the mechanisms that have lead to low birth rates are not going to change with fewer people unless a societal collapse undoes the technology and perpetual adolescence that has left all to many people disinterested in marriage, family formation, and children and the means to avoid them. We've figured out how to ignore our species' survival instincts and that won't end well.

    How can you save any society that lacks the will to reproduce a future generation and a people so disinterested in their own legacy and future that they aren’t having children?

    They are interested in their own legacy and future. That’s why they’re anti-immigration.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AnonNJ
    While I understand the point you are trying to make, the motivation for keeping Japan Japanese is their own comfort (preserving the "wa") more than any thought of a legacy or the future. And you should notice that my point is not that the Japanese (or Europe or even the U.S.) will be better off with massive immigration, especially if the immigrants don't assimilate, but that a country can't survive the lack of will or interest in creating more of itself internally. For a country with a population in freefall, both no immigration and massive immigration will wreck it. The problem is the sub-replacement reproduction. The childless do not inherit the Earth. They are an evolutionary dead end.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  178. @Steve Sailer
    Good point. Japan's older housing stock is too small not just in square meters but in the 3rd dimension of height.

    It reminds me of visiting places where Abe Lincoln lived in Springfield, IL. First a primitive log cabin, second a pretty nice house that I could imagine modern Americans living in after upgrading the utilities. But it was too short for 6'4" Lincoln then and for 6'4" me now.

    I’m about 5’11-1/2″. I met an Austrian girl once who told me I was short but also that I was muscular. She said Americans are all built. I started lifting weights for competitive swimming in early high school.

    Japanese are getting taller, but they’re slim and lanky because they don’t lift weights for sports. I wonder if the same is true for Europeans.

    Maybe affluent Americans are re-channeling their nutritional resources in adolescence.

    But I put my money on feeding patterns. We know from sports nutrition that nutrient timing is important in addition to nutrient content. I suspect everything from binge drinking to late-night snacking (perhaps affecting hormone release) to the decline in family dinners has been affecting heights since the 1960s.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  179. @Steve Sailer
    "Meanwhile the Japanese people are among the world’s best dressed and they drive some of the world’s best cars – in particular Lexuses and Infinitis that are a world away from the tinny little three-wheelers of the 1980s."

    I'm driving a 1998 Infiniti I-30 with 245,000 miles on it. It's a great car.

    I hate to point out the obvious but only the great ones last that long.
    That said I had an ancient Toyota Landcrusher for a decade and a half with over 250K when the wife finally prevailed.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  180. @unwinding
    The downsides of immigration in terms of national cohesion is another topic. We are dealing with the specific question of whether Japan is economically dynamic? I've brought up for comparison Germany, which is more economically dynamic (based on higher average GDP growth per capita over the most recent 5 year period). Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It's possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    The comments so far feel like an echo chamber without hard data. And again the point can be made that no amount of economic dynamism is worth cohesion, but there should be a coherent answer to whether immigration is contributing dynamic outcomes to the German economy in comparison to Japan.

    Why is Germany, a country of many similar important attributes to Japan economically, better performing in the last 5 years? It’s possibly because of higher rates of immigration.

    No, that is absolutely not possible. Immigration lowers their productivity per capita. It lowers their human capital.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  181. tbraton says:
    @AnonNJ
    What happens when half a country's population is 65 or older?

    http://theweek.com/articles/453219/everything-need-know-about-japans-population-crisis

    From the linked article:
    “Left to their own devices, Japanese men aren’t sure how to find wives — and many are shying away from the hunt, because they simply can’t afford it. Wages have stagnated since the 1990s, while housing prices have shot up. A young Japanese man has good reason to believe that his standard of living would drop immensely if he had to house and support a wife and children — especially considering that his wife likely wouldn’t be working.”

    I have an easy solution for this Japanese problem: mass immigration. Works every time, or so I am told. It will also provide a solution to all those empty Japanese shacks.

    There is a mysterious cycle to human affairs. In many cases, a child of an alcoholic will abstain from alcohol. I know in my case my father started smoking when he was about 16 and remained at least a one pack a day man until the Surgeon General issued his report in the early 60′s, and, despite experimenting with cigarettes, pipes and cigars in my early teens (along with neighborhood friends), I never acquired the habit. So, at some point in the future, Japanese children will start getting interested in sex again and Japanese women will start having children again. And the cycle will reverse. All without the benefit of mass immigration. If I had to speculate, declining population will result in increased income for the young worker, who will find that he can indeed afford to support a wife and children.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  182. @5371
    [Whatever the problem is, even if it’s not really a problem, immigration would solve it.]

    Even if the problem is people not having jobs any more because robots have taken them!

    The beauty of robots is that the Ponzi schemes of the West don’t apply to them.

    No 14 years of “education”
    No Medicare
    No Social Security.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  183. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @tbraton
    "“The country also limits rice imports, which has the effect of causing the local price to be much higher than the world price, and in turn subsidizing rural employment.”

    Imagine that. Japanese jobs for Japanese. Japan for the Japanese and not for the rest of the world."


    But, but, but...you don't appear to have any sympathy for the large, subsidized agri-businesses that grow rice in the United States. If they can't sell rice in Japan, that means we will have to import more Asians from China to help grow the domestic market for rice. I have never figured out why we grow rice in the U.S.

    Farmers are a powerful political constituency in Japan, like they are in the US and France. This is generally the case in most advanced industrial societies with a strong tradition of agriculture. There are national security reasons why Japanese agriculture is protected. Remember, before WW2, Japan was embargoed and had trouble maintaining fuel imports to maintain an industrial economy. If it became dependent on food imports, blockades and embargoes would lead to starvation, not just the industrial economy being damaged.

    BTW, American farming is subsidized and coddled for national security reasons as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AnonNJ
    If you want people to undderstand how powerful Japanese farmers are, ask them to pull up Narita Airport on Google Maps satellite view and examine the Eastern B runway. You'll notice that it is interrupted by a shrine and small farm owned by a farmer who refused to sell out, even when they started taking planes off right over his house.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  184. @Peter Akuleyev
    Saying Germany is more economically dynamic thanks to immigration is not particularly controversial. The standard line on Japan among "serious thinkers" is that it is economically stagnant at best, in precipitous decline at worst. Japan doesn't have to outperform Germany to support the claim that limiting immigration should be an acceptable policy option, you simply have to show that the quality of life in a post industrial country can continue to improve absent immigration. In a democracy the citizens should get to decide whether faster economic growth is worth the downside of increased immigration.

    Saying Germany is more economically dynamic thanks to immigration is not particularly controversial.

    Well, it depends what you mean by controversial. Obviously, the statement is false, but those in the apparatus e apparatus of public opinion formation does not allow dissenting voices to be hear, so the public propaganda is one-sided, while truth-seekers are similarly unanimous in their dissent.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  185. We should study the Japanese experience carefully. The Japanese are not going to allow mass immigration. The question is then how well will Japan maintain its standard of living with a smaller working pool and a larger retiree pool and no immigration. If they can do this, with a declining population, how much more so could the US do it with a higher birth rate and more natural resources? If the Japanese can pull it off with efficiency gains, then this answers the no immigration doomsayers definitively.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    The incoming wave of robotics will only help those countries which held out against the pressure for mass immigration.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  186. @AnonNJ
    The Japanese population isn't dropping faster courtesy of a long lifespan but what's going to stop the decline when they reach 60 million. Or 30 million. Or 15 million. Or 1 million? Or 1,000? What is magically going to make Japanese men and women interested giving up being single and using birth control and having more than 2 kids at any point? Courtesy of pornography and birth control pills, we've become like the wasps suckered into fertilizing figs. We go through the motions to satisfy our sexual urges without it leading to children. How does this end well for the species?

    The Japanese population isn’t dropping faster courtesy of a long lifespan but what’s going to stop the decline when they reach 60 million. Or 30 million. Or 15 million. Or 1 million? Or 1,000? What is magically going to make Japanese men and women interested giving up being single and using birth control and having more than 2 kids at any point?

    It seems obvious to me that when family formation becomes sufficiently affordable, families will be formed, but why even ask the question? Immigration can only make the problem worse.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AnonNJ
    First, I'm not arguing that immigration is the solution. Second, what makes family formation affordable and desirable (hint: which demographic groups have the most kids)? Third, the people who really value children have many of them, even with the high cost of children and there are plenty of people who can afford lots of children who don't have then. While the cost of family formation is part of the problem in the developed world, it's only part of the problem. Don't confuse correlation and causation.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  187. Jefferson says:

    American pop culture in the early 1980s were really obsessed with all things Japan.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cShYbLkhBc

    You can even see Japanese cultural influences in Blade Runner and The Karate Kid. There were even Japanese business men in Mr. Mom starring Michael Keaton.

    It’s funny that Japanese culture was really popular in the U.S right around the time more American households were starting to own home computers for the first time.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  188. spandrell says: • Website
    @Chrisnonymous
    Most of the population here is opposed to Abe's positions on the military and nuclear power. He is still in office because of fear about the economy, so it is not just westerners telling Japanese they have a problem.

    Moreover, you can see from the steucture of Abenomics that they're a little desperate. The country's financial problems are bigger than they appear because of a lack of transparency.

    Everybody should read Alex Kerr's "Dogs and Demons". It's a little out of date but still very informative.

    The size of the Japanese economy is not reflected in the lifestyles of the people here. Japanese have some "things" and have access to power, food, and are healthy but in general do not have a life comparable to the US or Germany. Even technological penetration is not as deep as you would imagine. Some thing are hard to quantify. For example, cheap products from China and SE Asia are replacing Japanese ones, so the general quality of physical surroundings is declining. I bought the best broom I could find in the D2 homegoods store, and it broke the first day I had it.

    The Japanese economy is built on the human capital produced by the militarized society inherited from pre-1945. The reason young people today aren't getting married and are working less is that they are exposed to western Media much more now via the Internet and are starting to reject their parents' lifestyles. The state of young people is the biggest problem Japan faces now. Lots of them parrot western conventional wisdom, including pro-diversity and open borders opinions.

    Japanese people have the idea that everyone in Japan is middle-class. So the construction state, including all the excess houses, is make-work welfare. In the future, "guest workers" from the south pacific are going to look like a good idea because they don't "deserve" the same lifestyles and welfare benefits. They will be imported cheap labor to do manual labor. The trick will be getting them to leave again. The fact that the visa situation seems to have gotten easier for foreign workers recently tells me that if Abe stays in power, he's not going to make going home a priority. I have met South Asians here who are uneducated but have been here for a decade, so it is possible to game the system somehow. So unless the goverent makes a deportation initiative, I suspect the immigrant population is just going to slowly rise.

    Foreign expats are basically a progressive Fifth Column, and the media, despite being infamous for being pro-government, seem too much like their western counterparts to me. E.g., everybody here heard about a black body being shot (oh my god--Americans and their guns!!!) in Ferguson, but nobody saw the footage of Brown roughing up the shopkeeper or knows the details of the outcome of the case.

    I agree with most of what you say; but compared to the hardcore leftists of the 1970s, the vague progressivism of some youngsters today is very, very mild.

    By the way, I’ll be visiting Kyoto soon, it would be nice to have a Sailerites at Japan meetup. My email is at my blog.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    I hope I can meet you. Kyoto's pretty interesting, I think, if you like history. I'll email you.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  189. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Svigor

    … Japan’s population of 127 million is expected to drop by a million a year in the coming decades. Efforts to increase its low birthrate have been only modestly successful, and the public has shown no appetite for mass immigration. …
     
    The American public has shown no appetite for mass immigration, either. Nor has the European public, for that matter. No, what's different about Japan is that the elite has shown no appetite for mass immigration.

    And you can bet your arse if they ever do, it'll be composed of populations that look a hell of a lot like the Japanese, and not Africans, Mestizos, or MENAs.

    Whatever the problem is, even if it’s not really a problem, immigration would solve it.
     
    Immigration is the solution in up economies and down economies, in times of war or peace, of fat and lean. In sickness and in health, 'til death do us part. Immigration is a dessert topping and a floor wax. It's like snake oil; it's the cure for whatever ails you, and something certainly ails you.

    Well, for white countries, anyway. But not in Israel, China, India, Japan, etc., for some strange reason.

    Whole neighborhoods around Tel Aviv are inhabited by illegal sub-Saharan African migrants. Israel also had a home-grown population of hostiles that makes up a greater fraction of the Israel’s population than the French Muslims are of the French population.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  190. Japan is geologically young so its mountains are steep and unusable for living. Flying from northeast to southwest you pass over continuous mountains and little sign of life. Most people live on the coastal plain.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  191. rvg says:

    Why would Japan not benefit from 70 million 105-110 IQ Indians, Jews, Arabs, Persians, and Parsses moving into the country, its knowledge economy would get a massive boost, and productivity would rise as a result, a lot of those 70 million would include cheap H-1Bs, plus how high of a IQ anyway you need to dig ditches, sweep floors, pick trash, clean septic tanks, and wipe tables with a wet tablecloth anyway? You do not need Einstein, Teller, or Fermi to walk your dog or do your gardening. If you look at a barebones welfare state like Singapore or Hong Kong where the gini coefficient is something like Brazil, importing Mexicans will not be a drain on the treasury since the amount of welfare they can get from the government is very very limited. Korea and Japan is actually a cheap labor economy, with very low wages if you look at the minimum wage as a percentage of GDP per capita per hour worked.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_minimum_wages_by_country

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  192. the Dude says:
    @Romanian
    I agree that Japan's sudden withdrawal from nuclear and its reliance on fossil fuel imports affected its economy. But I don't think it is relevant for the comparison with Germany because the Germans went all Japanese when Fukushima happened and instituted the Energiewende, their own nuclear phase-out in favor of renewables (and, ironically enough, dirty coal) which had the effect of making electricity a lot dearer than it used to be, even though the states make up for some of the losses of private interests from the public purse. I cannot vouch for whether the economic effects were similar in magnitude, but I can say that the Germans shot themselves in the foot pretty hard.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/high-costs-and-errors-of-german-transition-to-renewable-energy-a-920288.html

    I wrote another comment making an argument for the Single Market as a source of better German growth than Japan, although we have to remember the Germans were once the sick man of Europe in the early 2000s and went through labor price adjustments, I think, to regain competitiveness.

    completely off-topic for Romanian: your English is excellent. Much better than many native speakers, not to mention native writers. How did you get to such a high level of language skills?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    Why thank you!

    I'm very proud of my English skills and they've served me well in school and my line of work. I once did this test http://testyourvocab.com/ . I scored off the charts even for a native speaker. I got 41,100, over what a 60 year old in the 90th percentile would get (I'm 27). Something like 0.3% of foreigners get over 30,000.

    I can make some assumptions regarding the reasons why I score so highly. Very high intelligence, including verbal, seems to have something to do with it (though I'm not a slouch in other fields, either). Not bragging - being very cerebral is not always a good thing. I also don't fit into the pattern of men who speak less than women and with a poorer vocabulary on average, though I don't consider myself garrulous (but then, I wouldn't, would I?).

    The second is that I grew up practically bilingual. Anglophone media ruled the world, especially in post-1989 Eastern Europe. Being an introspective apartment rat, I'd spend my free time watching the same cartoons, movies and documentaries on TV on re-run, all of them in the original English (none of that monstrous dubbing that robs children of early foreign language skills these days). The brain still had high plasticity (I flatter myself that my absent mindedness today is due to my brain still having high plasticity, which makes short term memory less developed), so I wound up speaking two languages at the same level when I entered school. My talent was recognized and nurtured (we have very demanding education for people who can cut it, though no separate AP classes) - I started English in 2nd grade, and French in the 5th, Latin in the 8th, but this last one was only for a few short years. My talent and joy at using it was also recognized by my colleagues, and I'd write 5 or more homeworks in the breaks before English classes - one page reports, descriptive paragraphs, dialogues, that sort of thing. It was good practice but, in retrospect, I did them a lot of harm. Then I studied German and Russian in college, but they remained underdeveloped because of conflicting schedules with work. I tried Spanish courses but it kept mixing with Romanian in my head, as opposed to the others, which I can compartmentalize. I can understand it, like a lot of Romance language speakers, but can't speak it properly.

    I grew to love reading, but became disenchanted with the Romanian translations of foreign works in the library. Later, in college, when I finally had permanent Internet, I became a voracious reader of ebooks. Most of my reading today is in English, for work and pleasure, with the exception of original Romanian writing. The thing is that, even for foreign classics, my skills are not good enough to read them in the original and Romanian translations are often horrid. The Anglosphere has always had a very good scholarly bent towards the translation of classics, making them as good as possible, so I always end up reading the most well-regarded translation. The difference is even greater for commercial translation of new books, where all versions are done quickly, but the English one is the better one by far. I tried reading The Iron Council by China Mieville in Romanian and it was a mess. So, after buying the translated paperback, I got it on Kindle and loved it. This is the fate of all small nations, linguistically, which is why you should never be surprised at how well a Czech or a Slovene speaks English. It truly is the intellectual gateway to the world (as Russian was during the USSR, which also explains how obsessed the Afrikaner were to develop Afrikaans from a folk language into a multilaterally developed intellectual medium).

    So I speak multiple languages, but all of them poorly, compared to English, which I basically absorbed as a toddler. My French is the best developed, and I could make a Frenchman cry in outrage. I learned the other ones later, never practiced them enough, never fell in love with them, and I also transformed into an ardent Anglophile through personal inclinations and overexposure. So those skills remain vestigial, while my English has solidified to the point where a lot of my interior monologues and my dreams are in English. When I'm tired or in a rush, I even commit code-mixing and have to consciously stop myself from substituting a Romanian word that's on the tip of my tongue with an English one. It wouldn't do to speak pidgin to important people. It doesn't help that, especially for formal and scientific speech, the promiscuity of English has made it very expressive and people formed to think in it have trouble dialing down their use of concepts which only have equivalents in English. For instance, something I tell my occasional lecture attendees as an aside, is that the Romanian language has no distinct words for politics and policies, or for Commissar and Commissioner (which gives the European Commissioners some funny Soviet undertones).

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  193. @WowJustWow
    For a long time, a major theme in the alt-right-o-sphere has been that, among the nations of the developed world, East Asian countries are conspicuously exempt from TPTB's call for mass immigration. ("Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.") Is that finally changing?

    If so, it raises another question: if East Asians can't avoid living among foreigners in East Asia, will more of them want to move to Western nations?

    For a long time, a major theme in the alt-right-o-sphere has been that, among the nations of the developed world, East Asian countries are conspicuously exempt from TPTB’s call for mass immigration. (“Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.”) Is that finally changing?

    singapore and HK only wants the best and the brightest non-asian immigrants… meaning mostly white people with high skills.

    Read More
    • Replies: @rvg
    Hello? They have tons of SEA maids, and HK has tons of black Africans by Asian standards.
    , @WowJustWow
    City-states do seem to be extreme outliers compared to nation-states.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  194. Esso says:
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    Germany’s per capita growth is especially underwhelming, considering that its economy dominates the less competitive areas in the Eurozone. On the other side of the coin there are the deficits and related crises in rest of the 330M people EZ. You’ve probably heard economists accuse Germany of “beggar-thy-neighbour” politics.

    Germany is to the EZ as a metropolis is to rural areas (It’s a population sink, too!). Japan does not have a similar advantage.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  195. 5371 says:

    Germany has taken fewer non-white immigrants per capita than most countries in western Europe, even in recent years. Adjusted for population change, they have done better economically by a considerable margin.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  196. @Priss Factor
    "If the Japanese population declines by 10 million in the next ten years, that means the Japanese will be better off and less crowded."

    That may be, but the trends in Japan are troubling.

    It's not just economic, which would be rational and understandable. There is a certain sexual malaise throughout the country. And Japanese have lost faith in their civilization, much like Europeans have. Japanese look to videogames, cartoons, and cutesy idol culture as what is representative of them. Something is wrong. Japan has lost the connection to their sense of tribe and to a sense of humanism, an organic reality.

    Japanese are not having kids cuz they've given up on the meaning of life. Many young Japanese have decided to shut themselves off and not even get married.
    It's a sick trend. We see it in the West too. Very troubling.

    That said, better for Japan to grow old and remain Japan than fill up greying Japan with young non-Japanese who won't give a crap about Japanese identity and culture.

    Why Japan went chose that mulatto as beauty contestant... it is a huge mistake and may be a dire trend.

    “Japanese are not having kids cuz they’ve given up on the meaning of life. Many young Japanese have decided to shut themselves off and not even get married.
    It’s a sick trend. We see it in the West too. Very troubling.”
    I guess you are right, but still be should not forget that currently Japanese have (only very slightly, but still) a higher TFR than Ethnic Germans, Ethnic Italians, Ethnic Spain people and Polish people. So when Japanese have given up on the meaning of life that Germans, Italians and so on have even more given up on the meaning of life

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  197. @Anonymous
    You know, in the future, it will not surprise me in the least that the peoples of many third world nations will not deliberately instigate wars, whether civil wars or wars against neighboring nations, purely with the cynical objective in mind of using the war and its aftermath as an excuse for invoking the Geneva Refugee Convention, and thus inducing the soft-headed bastards who run the EU into 'accepting' them as immigrants.
    I wouldn't be at all surprised if this was not happening presently in Syria.

    To those who will call me a cold-hearted cynical bastard, I just say this - just look who cunning and nasty some of the 'hairy-man' ( a vintage iStevism) scams going on at present in LA are. Do you really think that same people can't sink to lower depths?

    I think you are right. This is probably happening in Somalia and Eritrea. Western European countries will not return refugees to these places, and so it is in the best interests of Somalis and Eritreans to keep their countries in a state of permanent war, so that their children can have a better life in Germany, Sweden, or Britain.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Besides, the Mad Max lifestyle is fun.

    Especially if you can rationalize it as allowing your children to qualify for welfare in Frankfurt.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  198. rvg says:
    @john marzan

    For a long time, a major theme in the alt-right-o-sphere has been that, among the nations of the developed world, East Asian countries are conspicuously exempt from TPTB’s call for mass immigration. (“Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.”) Is that finally changing?
     
    singapore and HK only wants the best and the brightest non-asian immigrants... meaning mostly white people with high skills.

    Hello? They have tons of SEA maids, and HK has tons of black Africans by Asian standards.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Hello? They have tons of SEA maids, and HK has tons of black Africans by Asian standards.
     
    Don't confuse guest workers with actual immigrants, who get citizenship. Look at the Gulf, or urban Switzerland.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  199. @James N. Kennett
    I think you are right. This is probably happening in Somalia and Eritrea. Western European countries will not return refugees to these places, and so it is in the best interests of Somalis and Eritreans to keep their countries in a state of permanent war, so that their children can have a better life in Germany, Sweden, or Britain.

    Besides, the Mad Max lifestyle is fun.

    Especially if you can rationalize it as allowing your children to qualify for welfare in Frankfurt.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  200. Anonym says:
    @antipater_1
    Yes, Lincoln was born in a log cabin that he built with his own hands.....

    I just googled it, the Springfield house Steve mentions is the only house Lincoln ever owned. He did not build it though. I am not sure whether there were any houses available in his price range that would suit a 6’4″ guy. 6’4″ was huge for back then.

    FWIW I’ve met Steve once and although it has been quite a while, 6’4″ is very believable. So if Steve says that Lincoln’s house is not big enough for a 6’4″ guy, I’d say he’s right.

    The original post was a joke btw.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  201. AnonNJ says:
    @Anonymous

    How can you save any society that lacks the will to reproduce a future generation and a people so disinterested in their own legacy and future that they aren’t having children?
     
    They are interested in their own legacy and future. That's why they're anti-immigration.

    While I understand the point you are trying to make, the motivation for keeping Japan Japanese is their own comfort (preserving the “wa”) more than any thought of a legacy or the future. And you should notice that my point is not that the Japanese (or Europe or even the U.S.) will be better off with massive immigration, especially if the immigrants don’t assimilate, but that a country can’t survive the lack of will or interest in creating more of itself internally. For a country with a population in freefall, both no immigration and massive immigration will wreck it. The problem is the sub-replacement reproduction. The childless do not inherit the Earth. They are an evolutionary dead end.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Nonsense.

    The only absolute evolutionary dead end - at a population level - comes from replacing the indigenous population.

    Japan is a very mountainous, crowded country. If their population is allowed to dip creating more space per head then their TFR will increase in the same way the TFR of white people moving from the overcrowded cities on the coasts to the middle.

    The people who want the Japanese to open up to mass immigration are the same people who destroyed the west.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  202. AnonNJ says:
    @ben tillman

    The Japanese population isn’t dropping faster courtesy of a long lifespan but what’s going to stop the decline when they reach 60 million. Or 30 million. Or 15 million. Or 1 million? Or 1,000? What is magically going to make Japanese men and women interested giving up being single and using birth control and having more than 2 kids at any point?
     
    It seems obvious to me that when family formation becomes sufficiently affordable, families will be formed, but why even ask the question? Immigration can only make the problem worse.

    First, I’m not arguing that immigration is the solution. Second, what makes family formation affordable and desirable (hint: which demographic groups have the most kids)? Third, the people who really value children have many of them, even with the high cost of children and there are plenty of people who can afford lots of children who don’t have then. While the cost of family formation is part of the problem in the developed world, it’s only part of the problem. Don’t confuse correlation and causation.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  203. AnonNJ says:
    @Anonymous
    Farmers are a powerful political constituency in Japan, like they are in the US and France. This is generally the case in most advanced industrial societies with a strong tradition of agriculture. There are national security reasons why Japanese agriculture is protected. Remember, before WW2, Japan was embargoed and had trouble maintaining fuel imports to maintain an industrial economy. If it became dependent on food imports, blockades and embargoes would lead to starvation, not just the industrial economy being damaged.

    BTW, American farming is subsidized and coddled for national security reasons as well.

    If you want people to undderstand how powerful Japanese farmers are, ask them to pull up Narita Airport on Google Maps satellite view and examine the Eastern B runway. You’ll notice that it is interrupted by a shrine and small farm owned by a farmer who refused to sell out, even when they started taking planes off right over his house.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  204. Mr. Anon says:
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    “GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1″

    Those numbers are practically no different. You don’t even make your own point. And in a very important sense Germany is doing far worse than Japan – it’s taking in more immigrants.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  205. WhatEvvs [AKA "Aamirkhanfan"] says:
    @Hubbub
    You are just paranoid and making things up.

    Thanks, I needed that.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  206. Brutusale says:
    @Lot
    Do you know how much they want for outer Boston office space in nicer new buildings?

    During the bust here, OC office space, where a lot of the big mortgage companies that folded were located, got as low as $1/SF month. That is a third of the price of downtown LA and 1/5 good west side locations. Those prices and nice new construction they filled up in a couple years.

    Even now, it seems half the commercial RE sites covering the Route 128/Route 3 area list the rent as “negotiable”.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  207. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @unwinding
    Your ideological commitment to lower immigration is making you commit error in seeing the state of the Japanese economy. It's not doing well. Compare the Japanese economy to the German economy. This comparison makes sense as Germany is another export orientated manufacturing economy with the second oldest population (Japan is the oldest).

    GDP growth (per capita) over the past 5 years.

    Germany (2010-14)
    4.3, 3.6 , 2.1, -0.2, 1.3

    Japan (2010-14)
    4.6, -0.3, 2.0, 1.8, 0.1

    Germany is doing better than Japan. Maybe greater German economic dynamicism has something to do with the high level of immigration Germany gets from across the EU including the poorer parts of the EU like Poland and Bulgaria.

    Visit Japan.

    Just go.

    Go on the bullet train.

    Visit the subway system: including the underground gift shops, boutiques, and restaurants.

    Tour through some old monuments and shrines.

    Eat at a restaurant. Heck, eat at the airport: the food is great.

    Go to a bar.

    Ask for help with the concierge at the hotel — despite the language barrier they will do their damndest to help.

    Walk the streets of Tokyo or Kyoto at 4AM, drunk, and marvel at how safe you feel, how clean the streets are.

    Drink tea in a tea house.

    Japan is doing just fine.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  208. @spandrell
    I agree with most of what you say; but compared to the hardcore leftists of the 1970s, the vague progressivism of some youngsters today is very, very mild.

    By the way, I'll be visiting Kyoto soon, it would be nice to have a Sailerites at Japan meetup. My email is at my blog.

    I hope I can meet you. Kyoto’s pretty interesting, I think, if you like history. I’ll email you.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  209. @john marzan

    For a long time, a major theme in the alt-right-o-sphere has been that, among the nations of the developed world, East Asian countries are conspicuously exempt from TPTB’s call for mass immigration. (“Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.”) Is that finally changing?
     
    singapore and HK only wants the best and the brightest non-asian immigrants... meaning mostly white people with high skills.

    City-states do seem to be extreme outliers compared to nation-states.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  210. Svigor says:

    Whole neighborhoods around Tel Aviv are inhabited by illegal sub-Saharan African migrants. Israel also had a home-grown population of hostiles that makes up a greater fraction of the Israel’s population than the French Muslims are of the French population.

    The problem is minuscule compared to the enormous problem the Jewish diaspora continues to push onto Western countries. Which is why you changed the subject to “whole neighborhoods” (the horror!) and the “home-grown population of hostiles” (of course they’re hostile, they’ve been treated far worse than America treated her slave population (our ancestors never carpet-bombed slaves)).

    My point stands ignored; Israel isn’t interested in high-IQ immigrants from China who could help her sort out her problems with whole neighborhoods and home-grown hostile populations. Because Jewish Supremacy (blood-n-soil for me, diversity for thee).

    Why would Japan not benefit from 70 million 105-110 IQ Indians, Jews, Arabs, Persians, and Parsses moving into the country, its knowledge economy would get a massive boost

    Still stuck in the days of carrier pigeons, eh? No need for any of them to move to Japan. In fact, their expertise is far better exploited from their home countries, where wages are rock bottom.

    Still want to see millions of Chinamen moving to Israel, though. Chinamen are far superior to Jews, so we’ll see lots of improvements in Israel should she come to her senses.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  211. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @AnonNJ
    While I understand the point you are trying to make, the motivation for keeping Japan Japanese is their own comfort (preserving the "wa") more than any thought of a legacy or the future. And you should notice that my point is not that the Japanese (or Europe or even the U.S.) will be better off with massive immigration, especially if the immigrants don't assimilate, but that a country can't survive the lack of will or interest in creating more of itself internally. For a country with a population in freefall, both no immigration and massive immigration will wreck it. The problem is the sub-replacement reproduction. The childless do not inherit the Earth. They are an evolutionary dead end.

    Nonsense.

    The only absolute evolutionary dead end – at a population level – comes from replacing the indigenous population.

    Japan is a very mountainous, crowded country. If their population is allowed to dip creating more space per head then their TFR will increase in the same way the TFR of white people moving from the overcrowded cities on the coasts to the middle.

    The people who want the Japanese to open up to mass immigration are the same people who destroyed the west.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AnonNj
    I've lived in Japan and have recently spoken to people who still do. What's causing the low birth rate isn't overcrowding any more than that's the cause of low birth rates in the *entire* developed world. We've successfully detached our instinct for sex from reproduction with birth control and abortion, have convinced ourselves that marriage and children are nothing but a burden, and believe that, with enough tax dollars, government can replace families and care for us when we are sick or old, and by the time people realize what a crock that is, it's too late for them to change the course of their lives. Bread and circuses for the technology age.

    Again, what happens when about *half* of a county's population is 65 or older? That is where Japan is headed, and their national debt is already 200% of their GDP. Who pays the taxes? Who cares for the elderly? Yes, large scale immigration will destroy Japan, but very low birth rates will *also* destroy Japan.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  212. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Cwhatfuture
    We should study the Japanese experience carefully. The Japanese are not going to allow mass immigration. The question is then how well will Japan maintain its standard of living with a smaller working pool and a larger retiree pool and no immigration. If they can do this, with a declining population, how much more so could the US do it with a higher birth rate and more natural resources? If the Japanese can pull it off with efficiency gains, then this answers the no immigration doomsayers definitively.

    The incoming wave of robotics will only help those countries which held out against the pressure for mass immigration.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  213. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Muse
    Have you ever considered that without a certain rate of growth, capital might not be able to charge enough to generate true "economic rent" in the classical economic sense? Things like cheap money, war, immigration and technological change with intellectual property protection are some of the policies that come to mind that might "create wealth", by accelerating growth above some minimum level that would then generate profit.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economic_rent

    Perhaps the wealthy can't become relatively wealthier, nor can the more modestly situated accrue wealth on a grand scale without purposely overstimulating the economy. It might explain the push for what are ultimately unsustainable policies on a macro scale by the powerful in pursuit their individual interests (profit).

    Have you ever considered that without a certain rate of growth, capital might not be able to charge enough to generate true “economic rent” in the classical economic sense?

    That’s what is driving the oligarchs but the underlying problem is the banking mafia created the situation themselves out of short-term greed.

    The *only* source of real growth is innovation leading to improved productivity and the mass immigration of cheap labor kills innovation and lowers productivity.

    It’s a vicious cycle. They created the problem and all their solutions make the problem worse.

    Read More
    • Replies: @cwhatfuture

    It’s a vicious cycle. They created the problem and all their solutions make the problem worse.
     
    That is a very nice explanation of the modern political class.
    I might rephrase it as:

    They created the problem, they lecture us on how to fix it, while all their solutions make the problem worse.

    It is the constant lecturing - hectoring really - that make it all so unbearable. Which is why I believe Trump is doing so well. He does not put up with their lectures.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  214. AndrewR [AKA "Aiden"] says:
    @WowJustWow
    For a long time, a major theme in the alt-right-o-sphere has been that, among the nations of the developed world, East Asian countries are conspicuously exempt from TPTB's call for mass immigration. ("Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.") Is that finally changing?

    If so, it raises another question: if East Asians can't avoid living among foreigners in East Asia, will more of them want to move to Western nations?

    “Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.”

    That’s not an alt-right saying. That’s a retard saying. Seriously, it’s designed for people with sub-90 IQs. Anyone who says that unironically loses all intellectual credibility in my book instantly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth
    LOL, yeah it's kind of like saying "Freedom Fries" with a straight face.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  215. @anon

    Have you ever considered that without a certain rate of growth, capital might not be able to charge enough to generate true “economic rent” in the classical economic sense?
     
    That's what is driving the oligarchs but the underlying problem is the banking mafia created the situation themselves out of short-term greed.

    The *only* source of real growth is innovation leading to improved productivity and the mass immigration of cheap labor kills innovation and lowers productivity.

    It's a vicious cycle. They created the problem and all their solutions make the problem worse.

    It’s a vicious cycle. They created the problem and all their solutions make the problem worse.

    That is a very nice explanation of the modern political class.
    I might rephrase it as:

    They created the problem, they lecture us on how to fix it, while all their solutions make the problem worse.

    It is the constant lecturing – hectoring really – that make it all so unbearable. Which is why I believe Trump is doing so well. He does not put up with their lectures.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  216. AnonNj says:
    @anon
    Nonsense.

    The only absolute evolutionary dead end - at a population level - comes from replacing the indigenous population.

    Japan is a very mountainous, crowded country. If their population is allowed to dip creating more space per head then their TFR will increase in the same way the TFR of white people moving from the overcrowded cities on the coasts to the middle.

    The people who want the Japanese to open up to mass immigration are the same people who destroyed the west.

    I’ve lived in Japan and have recently spoken to people who still do. What’s causing the low birth rate isn’t overcrowding any more than that’s the cause of low birth rates in the *entire* developed world. We’ve successfully detached our instinct for sex from reproduction with birth control and abortion, have convinced ourselves that marriage and children are nothing but a burden, and believe that, with enough tax dollars, government can replace families and care for us when we are sick or old, and by the time people realize what a crock that is, it’s too late for them to change the course of their lives. Bread and circuses for the technology age.

    Again, what happens when about *half* of a county’s population is 65 or older? That is where Japan is headed, and their national debt is already 200% of their GDP. Who pays the taxes? Who cares for the elderly? Yes, large scale immigration will destroy Japan, but very low birth rates will *also* destroy Japan.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Crap.

    A lower population will lead to lower housing costs and very low average birth rates will respond to lower housing costs

    There is *zero* chance of a population disappearing from low birth rates alone because gradually the women will be replaced by the daughters of those women who wanted kids.

    The people who want to destroy the Japanese nation by opening their borders are the same people who are trying to destroy the West in the same way.

    It's all about divide and rule.

    Japan will have a *temporary* problem with the overhang of elderly that will take some managing but the solution to temporary problems should always also be temporary.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  217. What’s the developed world coming to, people refusing to live in shitty old houses! Next you’ll be telling me they still work in factories.

    Surely the true sign of a healthy capitalist economy is people paying a fortune to live in shitty old houses. In a Davos approved “rock star”economy like Australia lower-middle class families pay a king’s ransom to live in a crappy three bedroom bungalow.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You should see the damp, 120 year old, crumbling plaster, heat-leaking, poky little 'flat conversions' that Londoners are forced to pay 1 million dollars for.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  218. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @unpc downunder
    What's the developed world coming to, people refusing to live in shitty old houses! Next you'll be telling me they still work in factories.

    Surely the true sign of a healthy capitalist economy is people paying a fortune to live in shitty old houses. In a Davos approved "rock star"economy like Australia lower-middle class families pay a king's ransom to live in a crappy three bedroom bungalow.

    You should see the damp, 120 year old, crumbling plaster, heat-leaking, poky little ‘flat conversions’ that Londoners are forced to pay 1 million dollars for.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  219. @rvg
    Hello? They have tons of SEA maids, and HK has tons of black Africans by Asian standards.

    Hello? They have tons of SEA maids, and HK has tons of black Africans by Asian standards.

    Don’t confuse guest workers with actual immigrants, who get citizenship. Look at the Gulf, or urban Switzerland.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  220. Truth says:
    @AndrewR

    “Asia for Asians, Africa for Africans, white countries for everyone.”
     
    That's not an alt-right saying. That's a retard saying. Seriously, it's designed for people with sub-90 IQs. Anyone who says that unironically loses all intellectual credibility in my book instantly.

    LOL, yeah it’s kind of like saying “Freedom Fries” with a straight face.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  221. Brutusale says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Japan is a lot craggier than Massachusetts, much less Belgium.

    Outside Route 495, and especially west of Worcester, Massachusetts is a collection of half-populated old mill towns and Berkshire vacation villages for members of the NYC Tribe.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  222. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @AnonNj
    I've lived in Japan and have recently spoken to people who still do. What's causing the low birth rate isn't overcrowding any more than that's the cause of low birth rates in the *entire* developed world. We've successfully detached our instinct for sex from reproduction with birth control and abortion, have convinced ourselves that marriage and children are nothing but a burden, and believe that, with enough tax dollars, government can replace families and care for us when we are sick or old, and by the time people realize what a crock that is, it's too late for them to change the course of their lives. Bread and circuses for the technology age.

    Again, what happens when about *half* of a county's population is 65 or older? That is where Japan is headed, and their national debt is already 200% of their GDP. Who pays the taxes? Who cares for the elderly? Yes, large scale immigration will destroy Japan, but very low birth rates will *also* destroy Japan.

    Crap.

    A lower population will lead to lower housing costs and very low average birth rates will respond to lower housing costs

    There is *zero* chance of a population disappearing from low birth rates alone because gradually the women will be replaced by the daughters of those women who wanted kids.

    The people who want to destroy the Japanese nation by opening their borders are the same people who are trying to destroy the West in the same way.

    It’s all about divide and rule.

    Japan will have a *temporary* problem with the overhang of elderly that will take some managing but the solution to temporary problems should always also be temporary.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  223. Romanian says:
    @the Dude
    completely off-topic for Romanian: your English is excellent. Much better than many native speakers, not to mention native writers. How did you get to such a high level of language skills?

    Why thank you!

    I’m very proud of my English skills and they’ve served me well in school and my line of work. I once did this test http://testyourvocab.com/ . I scored off the charts even for a native speaker. I got 41,100, over what a 60 year old in the 90th percentile would get (I’m 27). Something like 0.3% of foreigners get over 30,000.

    [MORE]

    I can make some assumptions regarding the reasons why I score so highly. Very high intelligence, including verbal, seems to have something to do with it (though I’m not a slouch in other fields, either). Not bragging – being very cerebral is not always a good thing. I also don’t fit into the pattern of men who speak less than women and with a poorer vocabulary on average, though I don’t consider myself garrulous (but then, I wouldn’t, would I?).

    The second is that I grew up practically bilingual. Anglophone media ruled the world, especially in post-1989 Eastern Europe. Being an introspective apartment rat, I’d spend my free time watching the same cartoons, movies and documentaries on TV on re-run, all of them in the original English (none of that monstrous dubbing that robs children of early foreign language skills these days). The brain still had high plasticity (I flatter myself that my absent mindedness today is due to my brain still having high plasticity, which makes short term memory less developed), so I wound up speaking two languages at the same level when I entered school. My talent was recognized and nurtured (we have very demanding education for people who can cut it, though no separate AP classes) – I started English in 2nd grade, and French in the 5th, Latin in the 8th, but this last one was only for a few short years. My talent and joy at using it was also recognized by my colleagues, and I’d write 5 or more homeworks in the breaks before English classes – one page reports, descriptive paragraphs, dialogues, that sort of thing. It was good practice but, in retrospect, I did them a lot of harm. Then I studied German and Russian in college, but they remained underdeveloped because of conflicting schedules with work. I tried Spanish courses but it kept mixing with Romanian in my head, as opposed to the others, which I can compartmentalize. I can understand it, like a lot of Romance language speakers, but can’t speak it properly.

    I grew to love reading, but became disenchanted with the Romanian translations of foreign works in the library. Later, in college, when I finally had permanent Internet, I became a voracious reader of ebooks. Most of my reading today is in English, for work and pleasure, with the exception of original Romanian writing. The thing is that, even for foreign classics, my skills are not good enough to read them in the original and Romanian translations are often horrid. The Anglosphere has always had a very good scholarly bent towards the translation of classics, making them as good as possible, so I always end up reading the most well-regarded translation. The difference is even greater for commercial translation of new books, where all versions are done quickly, but the English one is the better one by far. I tried reading The Iron Council by China Mieville in Romanian and it was a mess. So, after buying the translated paperback, I got it on Kindle and loved it. This is the fate of all small nations, linguistically, which is why you should never be surprised at how well a Czech or a Slovene speaks English. It truly is the intellectual gateway to the world (as Russian was during the USSR, which also explains how obsessed the Afrikaner were to develop Afrikaans from a folk language into a multilaterally developed intellectual medium).

    So I speak multiple languages, but all of them poorly, compared to English, which I basically absorbed as a toddler. My French is the best developed, and I could make a Frenchman cry in outrage. I learned the other ones later, never practiced them enough, never fell in love with them, and I also transformed into an ardent Anglophile through personal inclinations and overexposure. So those skills remain vestigial, while my English has solidified to the point where a lot of my interior monologues and my dreams are in English. When I’m tired or in a rush, I even commit code-mixing and have to consciously stop myself from substituting a Romanian word that’s on the tip of my tongue with an English one. It wouldn’t do to speak pidgin to important people. It doesn’t help that, especially for formal and scientific speech, the promiscuity of English has made it very expressive and people formed to think in it have trouble dialing down their use of concepts which only have equivalents in English. For instance, something I tell my occasional lecture attendees as an aside, is that the Romanian language has no distinct words for politics and policies, or for Commissar and Commissioner (which gives the European Commissioners some funny Soviet undertones).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  224. TWS says:
    @TWS
    Western states have a lot of liveable land locked up by the states and feds. We really don't have the room that older countries with long histories of habitation and using up all the space do.

    Depends on what you call, ‘sustainable’ and whether or not you care whether or not it’s as pretty as it was when you started. Way more useful but city folks prefer pretty or ‘natural’ over useful.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  225. […] is a developed nation that allows little immigration, thus winning occasionalpraise from American immigration restrictionists. If the reason for copying Japan’s […]

    Read More
  226. […] is a developed nation that allows little immigration, thus winning occasionalpraise from American immigration restrictionists. If the reason for copying Japan’s […]

    Read More
  227. […] Sie sich vor, die Bevölkerung in Deutschland würde weiter schrumpfen, was würde das bedeuten ? Wohnraum wäre wieder günstig, jede Familie könnte sich ein Haus leisten, und Familien die sich keine Kinder leisten können müssten nicht mehr für den Nachwuchs von […]

    Read More

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
A simple remedy for income stagnation