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Did Jeff Bezos Ever List Himself as Hispanic?
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With Elizabeth Warren back in the news as she launches her Presidential campaign, it’s interesting to wonder whether Richest Man in the World Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon and owner of the Washington Post, ever used his Spanish surname to apply for ethnic preferences. If not, why not?

Exactly who qualifies for racial/ethnic preferences is an interesting but highly obscure question. Bezos is a fun test case. We are not supposed to think about who exactly qualifies for affirmative action, in part because nobody seems to know the real rules, second because if you think about it, you come to the realization that, Elizabeth Warren aside, white people generally behave pretty honorably over not exploiting ambiguities in quotas for their own benefits (which is why Warren’s opportunism remains a big story).

Bezos, who was born in New Mexico, is Cowboy-American on his mother’s side. A cousin is country singer George Strait. His maternal grandfather was a high official in the Atomic Energy Commission. Bezos bought his grandfather’s ranch in south-central Texas and expanded it to a Texas-sized 469 square miles.

His biological father was named Jorgensen. When Jeff was four, his mother married an anti-Communist refugee from Cuba who adopted little Jeff and gave him his last name.

Granted, Miguel Bezos looks like a heftier Clint Eastwood crossed with William Hurt, or maybe Captain Sullenberger.

The Census long made explicit that “Hispanic” was not a “racial” and thus biological category, it was an “ethnic” category. You could be of any race and still qualify as being of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. But that leaves open all sorts of questions, like does having a Hispanic stepfather qualify you for low interest SBA minority development loans and government contracting minority preferences?

Mr. Bezos, an engineer, worked for Exxon for 30 years and appears to have done well: e.g., Jeff attended public school in Houston’s River Oaks, the most expensive neighborhood in Houston.

There’s no evidence that Bezos needed affirmative action to get ahead. He was a star student:

He was high school valedictorian, a National Merit Scholar,[19][20] and a Silver Knight Award winner in 1982.[19] In 1986, he graduated from Princeton University with a 4.2 grade point average and Bachelor of Science degrees in electrical engineering and computer science and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

And after about a half dozen years he left the corporate world, where there is some affirmative action, for the start-up world, where there was very little back then. Bezos is, obviously, an extraordinarily good businessman and was always recognized as having tremendous potential.

So, did Jeff Bezos ever check the Hispanic box? If not, why not?

 
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  1. “Affirmative action” is a euphemism for giving preferences to needy mediocrities from low-IQ populations. Next question

    • Replies: @anon
  2. Of course he did. Otherwise he would have never hired himself and Amazon would never have existed.

    Don’t you realize what a humanitarian he is?

  3. “Affirmative action “ is a euphemism for giving entitled lightweight s from low-IQ populations their gibmedats. Next question

  4. …and Miguel Bezos looks more like William Hurt.

  5. rufus says:

    Well even if its not a racial category, its not transitory at or until certain stages of life Steve. My mom marries an Argentine at age 12. Im now hispanic ? I dont think early 80s Princeton would recognize that either. This was well before immivasion took grip, and people would have been straightforward about asking of your physiognomy or background with little qualms. He was and is a physics nut, and Princeton, The Institute for Advanced Study, where Einstein was permanent resident scholar, were and are the center for that.

    Parenthetically , I had a friend whose father was an officer in the Air Force and married a Spanish woman in Europe. Listed himself as hispanic on an MBA application at Michigan. Now in biotech in San Fran, after his BA in Chem. It happens, but not here Im guessing.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @stillCARealist
  6. Bordon says:

    What exactly is honorable about allowing yourself to be treated as a second class citizen? Foolish seems more appropriate

  7. Fun fact: Jeff’s mom played Trudy on Miami Vice.

  8. syonredux says:

    Speaking of the never-ending war against White people:

    Noah Berlatsky: White kids, racism and the way privileged parenting props up an unjust system
    White children are everywhere, but their whiteness is too often invisible and unspoken.

    This past October, my son and his classmates lobbied their small private school to change the official holiday of Columbus Day to Native People’s Day. My son wrote a short letter to the faculty explaining why they shouldn’t celebrate white imperialism, and that native peoples were too often ignored or erased or pushed to the side in discussions of American history. Some parents didn’t like the change, but the teachers and administration were supportive, and they changed the name.

    We sent our son to a school that taught and encouraged anti-racism. But teaching people to be anti-racist doesn’t necessarily address the structure of racism itself. In fact, racist structures often determine who does and does not have access to these kinds of educational opportunities. One of our ongoing societal challenges will be figuring out ways to move beyond individual education and address the root issues of inequality — and our role in upholding them.

    Hagerman found important differences in the ways that parents talked to their children about race, and important differences in the ways that kids responded. But she also found that white parents — even anti-racist white parents — actively reproduce inequality.

    It may seem like there’s already more than enough writing about white children. After all, the vast majority of children’s literature is about white kids. But, Hagerman told me by phone, “while there is a lot of writing about white kids, there is not a lot from a critical race perspective. Much of the developmental psychology literature uses white kids as the sample, but doesn’t interrogate what whiteness means or how it situates them in society.” White children are everywhere, but their whiteness is effectively invisible and unspoken.

    Yet, as Hagerman told me, “all of these families in their own ways were participating in the reproduction of racial inequality.” Children were sent to private school, or when they went to public school benefited from private tutors or enrichment classes. Even community service can reproduce racist ideas. It’s hard to see people as equals when you always have power over them, or when your primary experience with them involves giving them charity.

    The spectacle of well-intentioned people working, half unconsciously, to solidify and perpetuate their own power is not an encouraging one. “I feel like my findings are pretty dismal,” Hagerman admits. “When you have people who have a lot of wealth alongside this racial privilege, they’re ultimately making decision that benefit their own kids, and I don’t know how you really interrupt that.”

    Of course, as a parent, you want the best possible future for your child. But the best possible future should include a society that isn’t organized around racism. Hagerman’s book is a careful, painful and convincing argument that when white people give their children advantages, they are often disadvantaging others. Racism is so hard to overturn, in part, because white people prop it up when they work to make sure their children succeed.

    Noah Berlatsky is a freelance writer. He edits the online comics-and-culture website The Hooded Utilitarian and is the author of the book “Wonder Woman: Bondage and Feminism in the Marston/Peter Comics, 1941-1948.”

    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/white-kids-racism-way-privileged-parenting-props-unjust-system-ncna953951?cid=sm_npd_nn_tw_ma

  9. Elizabeth Warren aside, white people generally behave pretty honorably over not exploiting ambiguities in quotas for their own benefits (which is why Warren’s opportunism is a big story)

    She’s so intersectional she should be called “Pokemonhontas”.

    Bezos, who was born in New Mexico…

    I’ve been reading a very iStevish book by another Albuquerque native (or Burqueño), Alex Cuardo, called Brazillionaires. He spent six years in São Paulo working for Bloomberg– the company, not the man. He quotes some local as saying São Paulo “is what would happen if New York threw up on L.A.”

    While we see Miami as dangerous, Brazilians and other Latin Americans love it for its safety– the richest people in the hemisphere can drive around freely with their windows open. In São Paulo, they need helicopters. It’s the world’s most whirlybirded city, with over 500. (Though traffic is as much a reason for that as is kidnapping.)

    The city also hosts the largest accumulations of Italians, Lebanese, and Japanese outside their mother countries: “…at lunch buffets you’ll see people put sushi and kibbeh and cannelloni all on the same plate.”

    That’s my kind of diversity. One with a sneeze guard.

  10. donut says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    She didn’t age well but then she started out with a handicap .

  11. Merde says:

    My ancestors lived under Spanish domination for generations and had many of their country’s greatest artistic treasures carted back to Spain. Shouldn’t Anglo-America provide some compensation for this crime? Or is their suffering nothing because they were Dutch?

  12. Flip says:

    Bezos bought his grandfather’s ranch in south-central Texas and expanded it to a Texas-sized 469 square miles.

    Wow. That’s bigger than Singapore, Andorra, or Liechtenstein.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    , @FPD72
  13. @syonredux

    Berlatsky:

    The spectacle of well-intentioned people working, half unconsciously, to solidify and perpetuate their own power is not an encouraging one.

    Strike “well-intentioned” and he’s describing his own Tribe.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
  14. Flip says:

    It was easier to get into Princeton if you applied to the Engineering School and were from an underrepresented Western state.

    • Replies: @Rufus
  15. eded says:

    Are hispanic international students from Latin America counted as “hispanics” in American college admissions? Do they qualify for affirmative action? Are there separate categories for international vs domestic hispanic students or are they lumped together?

    A friend of mine teaches at elite private international schools in Latin America. The more elite the school the more graduates they send to the US. Instruction is in english and they have American curriculums including AP classes. The students generally consist of a majority of locals from the political and economic elite and a few children of international executives and diplomatic staff.

    The thing is these Latin American hispanic international students are exceedingly wealthy and privileged. It seems ridiculous for US colleges to partly achieve their diversity goals/quotas by recruiting the children of the Latin American elite and elbowing out less privileged American hispanics.

    I suspect that when Americans think of hispanics benefitting from Aff. Action they think of the child of the Mexican-American construction worker, not the child of a Mexican oligarch. Though the oligarchs kid is going to be much better prepared for college. Allowing the college to have to make less of a compromise on test scores and grades.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    , @Bill
  16. @Merde

    My ancestors lived under Spanish domination for generations and had many of their country’s greatest artistic treasures carted back to Spain. Shouldn’t Anglo-America provide some compensation for this crime? Or is their suffering nothing because they were Dutch?

    Yes, as another suppressed-Hispanic of 100% Dutch ancestry, I suffer from the same ethnic epigenetic post-traumatic stress disorder! Who will listen to our voices? Where is our justice?

    For compensation, I suggest we each be issued the rights to a Rembrandt, or maybe a couple of Rubens. It’s the least that they can do for us.

  17. Lowe says:
    @syonredux

    People like this Berlatsky should be the first to send their children to low quality public schools. They should set an example for everyone else, and if they won’t then they should be publicly reminded of it on Twitter, non-stop.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  18. @Merde

    Your handle is cracking me up.

    Dutch Americans suffering under the memories of Spanish tyranny. Interrogate Spanishness!

  19. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @rufus

    I figure claim it if you can get it. Better you than some 75 IQ indio pissant. If everyone did the system explodes.

    My dad had a friend who changed his name to Roberto Eduardo Leon and made a fortune on government contracts.

  20. @rufus

    I know a guy who was born in Italy, then moved to Argentina by his parents as a kid. He grew up speaking Spanish and Italian. Now, in the US, he looks white, but sounds very Spanish. He bristles at being called “Hispanic”, and asserts that he is a “Latino.”

    He’s just a white dude. This is all such a big, fat, faking game.

    • Replies: @rufus
  21. Anonymous[117] • Disclaimer says:

    Bezos is a monopolist. He literally holds sway over every retailer. Are you an entrepreneur with a great new product growing in popularity? No matter what is it will be counterfeited and available on Amazon immediately!

    The Chinese use amazon to flood the world with illegal knockoffs. What percentage of Bezos’ fortune is from counterfeit goods?

    Trump and his justice dept are asleep at the wheel as usual.

    DOWN WITH JORGENSEN.

    (Steve, wiki spells it two e’s)

  22. @Flip

    But not as many tax advantages.

  23. Anon[879] • Disclaimer says:

    Bezos bought his grandfather’s ranch in south-central Texas and expanded it to a Texas-sized 469 square miles.

    For comparison, the land area of the city of Los Angeles is also 469 square miles; The land area of the City and County of San Francisco is one tenth of that, 47 square miles.

    Jeff Bezos owns a contiguous land area in Texas equal to the city of Los Angeles, and ten times the area of San Francisco.

    He should build a Great Pyramid or a Sphinx there. Or maybe an Ozymandias statue.

    Percy Shelley’s “Ozymandias”

    I met a traveller from an antique land
    Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
    Stand in the desert… near them, on the sand,
    Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
    And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
    Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
    Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
    The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed;

    And on the pedestal these words appear:
    ‘My name is Ozymandias, king of kings;
    Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’
    Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
    Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
    The lone and level sands stretch far away.

    Maybe swap in “hairless pate” for “wrinkled lip.”

    And somehow work in a line about the nearby “Clock of the Long Now”:

    “The Titan’s stilled antikythera bides”

  24. @syonredux

    It’s not like he couldn’t find a place to live that isn’t privileged to reduce the unfairness to other people’s kids.

  25. Give him a few tats, and Bezos could readily pass for a Latino gang-banger. Maybe looking like a bad-ass was his real edge.

    Legend has it that early on in the Amazon story, a major consulting firm sent Bezos a letter outlining ways they could make Amazon profitable, but would essentially lobotomise the model: Bezos’ reply was reportedly “Profits are for pu****s.”

  26. Better question would be why Bezos has such an ax to grind against white people.

  27. from wikipedia:
    “The term Hispanic (Spanish: hispano or hispánico) broadly refers to the people, nations, and cultures that have a historical link to the Spanish language or the country of Spain, depending on the context. ”

    *most* of the current USA mainland was once owned or controlled by spain…spain owned/controlled all the land west of the mississippi all the way into the 1800s…spain also used to control/own florida and some of the american south…

    Thus any white american who has ancestors who were living in america in the 1800s ought to be able to claim hispanic heritage…

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
  28. epebble says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Forget the father; the mother looks obviously Hispanic. Not the Iberian but Indian kind. Just based on her looks, Jeff would definitely qualify for the label Hispanic.

    • Replies: @epebble
    , @Rufus
  29. epebble says:
    @epebble

    Also, does the name Amazon indicate a subliminal homage to his heritage? He could have named it Mississippi or Columbia or Nile.

    • Replies: @Rufus
    , @Hypnotoad666
  30. trelane says:

    The advantage of affirmative action is proportional to the degree to which a disadvantaged minority approaches and converges upon the white mean. Bezos is exceptional and therefore gains nothing from AA. It is the mediocre minority that stands to gain the most from AA, such as Neil deGrasse Tyson or Lester Holt. Affirmative action incentivizes mediocrity of the minority.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  31. KunioKun says:

    I am curious about but too lazy to research what kind of things he studied in the early 1980s CS and EE classes. Was implementing a linked list or a red-black tree a major accomplishment in those days? I imagine he had to take hideous Signals and Systems. That class is hard as hell regardless of decade.

    In the early 1980s were Hispanics engaging in flight from white or the opposite? If it was the latter it would explain why he never bothered to check Hispanic.

    • Replies: @Rufus
  32. @Reg Cæsar

    Both the city and the state of São Paulo are notably safe for our Brazilian standards. There’s so many people packed in here that it’s quite an accomplishment for us to be unlike most of the country.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  33. Rufus says:
    @Flip

    Applied from Florida. Did some honors work at UF.

  34. Rufus says:
    @Song For the Deaf

    No sign of that. Largely apolitical as far as donations. Raised on a ranch in Texas and by a Cuban stepfather.

    • Replies: @Song For the Deaf
  35. Rufus says:
    @KunioKun

    That and he has no genetic heritage south of the English Channel.

  36. FPD72 says:
    @Flip

    469 square miles is a bit over 300,000 acres, which makes it less than half the size of the 825,000 acre King Ranch in south Texas. So Bezos’ spread might well be “Texas sized” but it is far from being the largest ranch in Texas.

  37. Rufus says:
    @epebble

    He has no heridatary links to spain nor south America. Mother married a Cuban after divorcing his father.

  38. Rufus says:
    @epebble

    Scots, English German. Settled in Texas since early 1800s.

  39. I didn’t know Bezos was from Albuquerque. That’s interesting because the second richest man in the world also got his start in Albuquerque as well. I guess Albuquerque is a good place to be from if you want to be a gazillionaire.

    After Gates read the January 1975 issue of Popular Electronics, which demonstrated the Altair 8800, he contacted Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS), the creators of the new microcomputer, to inform them that he and others were working on a BASIC interpreter for the platform.[49] In reality, Gates and Allen did not have an Altair and had not written code for it; they merely wanted to gauge MITS’s interest. MITS president Ed Roberts agreed to meet them for a demo, and over the course of a few weeks they developed an Altair emulator that ran on a minicomputer, and then the BASIC interpreter. The demonstration, held at MITS’s offices in Albuquerque, was a success and resulted in a deal with MITS to distribute the interpreter as Altair BASIC. Paul Allen was hired into MITS,[50] and Gates took a leave of absence from Harvard to work with Allen at MITS in Albuquerque in November 1975. They named their partnership “Micro-Soft” and had their first office located in Albuquerque.[50] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Gates#Microsoft

    Another fun-fact about Bill Gates is that according to Wikipedia “He scored 1590 out of 1600 on the Scholastic Aptitude Tests (SAT)” (under the old scoring system, obviously). But according to Nassim Taleb this must be a mere coincidence because standardized tests aren’t measuring anything important.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Peter Johnson
  40. @Reg Cæsar

    The city also hosts the largest accumulations of Italians, Lebanese, and Japanese outside their mother countries

    Cyberpunk as hell.

  41. Tim says:

    You mean there’s a “New” Mexico?

  42. @epebble

    Also, does the name Amazon indicate a subliminal homage to his heritage? He could have named it Mississippi or Columbia or Nile.

    Well, the idea is that it is the biggest retailer, so naming it after the second or third biggest rivers simply wouldn’t have had the same cache.

  43. So, did Jeff Bezos ever check the Hispanic box? If not, why not?

    I am not sure you would have to “check a box” exactly. A lot of elite colleges used to require a picture and did in-person interviews by local alums. Any reference to one’s “Hispanic” culture in an essay or application would also probably work. As long as Princeton believed it could plausibly count him as “Hispanic” for its stats they would have probably “checked the box” for him, so to speak.

    But all the evidence is that he would have easily gotten in regardless.

    Indeed, another factor in his favor is being from New Mexico. At least in the old days elite colleges tried to get geographic diversity and have at least a few students from each state. So if you were a star from a generally low-performing state like New Mexico you really had a leg up.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  44. @Hypnotoad666

    Bezos went to high school in Miami, after having lived in River Oaks in Houston. Being super rich he now has houses everywhere. But, it kind of seems like his heart belongs in ranch country in inland Texas and New Mexico.

  45. @Song For the Deaf

    Better question would be why Bezos has such an ax to grind against white people.

    When in Rome. He ain’t no fool; he got rich by knowing what sells and how.

  46. @Hypnotoad666

    Pedantic quibble time: The Amazon is the biggest only in terms of volume (the Nile is generally considered to be longer) and the word is “cachet” not “cache”.

  47. Is this Cuban connection supposed to explain why many say that Amazon, like many of America’s bigly companies and government agencies, employs mostly minorities, rather than white-privileged citizens?

    All of the Cubans I know are professionals. Several of them have multiple degrees. The wealthy fled when Castro took over, confiscating many estates. It is not likely that such people comprise the majority of Amazon’s employees since we have learned via Bernie Sanders that many of Amazon’s employees, like so many of corporate America’s mom-dominated back-office and call center employees, qualify for welfare.

    To qualify for any but a negligible amount of welfare, you must stay under the income limits in a single-breadwinner household with US-born kids, meaning that you have to work part time for low wages or in a temp capacity, skipping the welfare during working months if your wages exceed the income limits. All of those not-working-very-hard womb producers likewise get refundable child tax credits up to $6,431 to make up the difference between what American employers pay and what living expenses cost.

    This includes a disproportionate number of minorities, including non-citizen minorities, explaining one of the reasons that companies like Amazon hire more minorities: they can pay them less, or employ them on a part-time / temp basis, since .gov pays most of their bills. Albeit, Amazon and other companies are also giving many of the middle-class and upper-middle-class jobs to foreign nationals.

    From what I have seen in adulthood, including an instance where a Cuban employee was fired for dissing a Mexican customer in Spanish, the Hispanic ethnicity includes many different factional groups. But by at least the third grade, if not earlier, most average white people recognize the difference between ethnicity and race, and some scientists dispute the whole concept of race.

    It is minorities who make the biggest deal out of race & ethnicity since all of them—Hispanics included—have legal workplace protections based on race. They have these protections in hiring and retention, based on the concept that their “race” puts them at a disadvantage to white-privileged citizens, even when they are not really racial minorities, but just in ethnic groups—ethnic groups with subcategories that regard themselves as superior to other subcategories in the same ethnic group.

    So-called minorites have these protections, even though they are the overwhelmingly majority in many workplaces. We don’t call majority-minority workplaces racist, even when minorites constitute 80-90% of the employees. We don’t grant whites protection against this racism, though it is pretty glaring in areas where minorities still make up a small percentage of the population. They won’t for long.

    Foreign nationals, too, have legal protections in workplaces that white citizens do not have in their own country.

    They have legal protections in hiring and retention, not counting the economic advantages that many foreign nationals have through layered welfare benefits (free food, rental assistance, monthly cash assistance, electricity assistance), all of which pump up their earned income per kid produced, in addition to refundable child tax credits up to $6,431, to reward them for sex, reproduction in single-breadwinner households and part-time or temp work that keeps them below the income limits for the programs during working months.

    We are constantly told how hard immigrants work, even though they consume more welfare than citizens and even though you cannot qualify for welfare unless you stay below the income limits by working only part time, as you pump out kid after kid that you cannot afford to feed.

    This pay for sex and reproduction from the US government makes it easy for many in womb-productive households, including many foreign nationals, to undercut many US citizens in their own country’s labor market.

    The bickering over whether it is race or ethnicity does not matter; what matters is the underecutting of underemployed US citizens in our own country, especially by foreign nationals.

    Many of them do not come here in the spirit of the previous generations of non-welfare-consuming legal immigrants who assimilated. They do not learn the language. Or, if they do, they still strive to maintain the traditions of the cultures they left behind, as this country is seeing cultural genocide in its nascent stages.

    They either collect tons of pay-per-birth welfare, undercutting citizens by accepting rock-bottom pay or truncated hours, or they take the scarce, higher-wage jobs, as the US middle class erodes, neighborhood by neighborhood.

    In the public square, they advocate constantly for policies that benefit the countries they left behind.

    Because their presence benefits the economic elites who own our politicians, providing them with a cheap, welfare-fueled laborforce or an expedient temp-worker pool, foreign nationals from everywhere have far, far more sway over what US elected officials do than voters.

    That is not a republic; that is some type of oligarchy.

    It is incredible that US companies are trucking immigrants in here by the millions—year after year, decade after decade—instead of hiring and training underemployed US citizens.

    Many of these big companies have advantages, bestowed upon them by our elected government, which was given a clear mandate by voters in 2016 to reduce mass-scale, legal immigration and to stop welfare-fed illegal immigration.

    But voting simply does not matter when corporate lobbyists control politicians.

    I don’t care how much inter-generational wealth is being generated by elites in this rigged anti-Republic.. By the time the great great grandchildren of elites roll around, their DNA content dwindles to single digits.

    The legacy of the movers and shakers is not a DNA legacy, but history itself.

    The familial riches may still be passing down at the point when heirs have only single digits of the current movers and shakers’ DNA or even when it sinks to Elizabeth Warren / Native American DNA decimals.

    History forgets everyone else, just like ancestors do.

    But history will remember today’s elites for destroying a once-great Republic, fracturing it into warring, ethnic encampments, solely based on accessing cheap, welfare-buttressed foreign labor without investing in the human capital in their own nation, whereas the childless George Washington and the childless James Madison, who passed on zero inter-generational wealth to DNA legacies, will be remembered for helping to create a Republic that lasted for a long time.

  48. @Hypnotoad666

    Yeah, I think of the Amazon’s mouth specifically; it disgorges five times as much water as #2 (the Congo). Like Bezos’ company dominating online (if not all) retail commerce.

    I don’t believe the Amazon River’s vastness is widely appreciated. It’s not extraordinarily wide for a river that long but it’s incredibly deep — more like a thousand-mile-long fjord than like a normal river.

  49. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Fun fact: Jeff’s mom played Trudy on Miami Vice.

    I don’t think this is correct.

    Trudy on Miami Vice was played by a woman named Olivia Brown.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olivia_Brown

    Jeff Bezos’ mother is Jacklyn Gise. She became pregnant with him when she was 16.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/09/04/amazon-founder-jeff-bezos-from-son-of-teen-mom-to-the-worlds-richest.html

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    , @Anon
  50. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Of the two, Allen was the better programmer, but neither was so outstanding that the major players would have sought to hire them for any particularly important task: and mainstream CS considered BASIC a bad thing, very destructive to future programmers in building bad habits.

    ( I knew programmers’ kids in high school whose fathers specifically kept their kids from having to do BASIC in high school, going as far as to have them put in the bonehead shop math class so as to get around the requirement. We had the godawful HP 3000 Time Share Basic on surplus airline ticket counter Hazeltine terminals via dialup or later a fractional T1 to the HP3000, the same one that had all the school grades for the Parkway school system. (I knew the one guy that actually did get into it: he was caught but lawyered up bigtime and they wound up getting him away from school by giving him a diploma in exchange for signing a NDA. Wound up being a CS/EE professor.) The year after I graduated they dumpstered the terminals and bought Apple II’s. )

    And almost all actually useful 8 bit software was written wholly or largely in assembler anyway. It was not until the 68000 and 286/386 processors came out that applications were written commonly fully in higher level languages on micros. On the 16 bit environments typically critical parts would be hand coded in assembler and other parts in C or Pascal.

    Gates was a business genius, but Microsoft software was never considered particularly good by anyone anywhere until the Win NT environment (written by the guys that wrote VMS) became standard: except that Microsoft Office and in particular Word was considered an excellent app by secretaries used to the Wang word processing system. Microsoft succeeded wildly because of the use of PC-DOS by IBM , and later the successful cleanroom re-engineering of the PC BIOS that made 100 percent PC compatible computers a supercommodity buildable by thousands of shops and hobbyists from randomly sourced parts. Had it not been for that, better home/hobby systems like the Atari and Amiga might have been more cost effective, as they were in Europe, and the DOS/Windows environment would not have had the level of ubiquity it did.

  51. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    You’re joking, right? Right? ‘Cause if you’re not, then the question wouldn’t be if Jeff checked the Hispanic box but the black box.

  52. @Lowe

    People like this Berlatsky should be the first to send their children to low quality public schools.

    In Israel.

  53. @Song For the Deaf

    You have to go along to get along.

    • Replies: @Song For the Deaf
  54. jorgensen is a name from denmark or germany.

    if you read or watch interviews with bezos he talks about entering princeton and planning to become a physicist. but after taking rigorous physics classes there, he realized the top couple students are significantly better than him at thinking like a physicist, and that instead of doing anything cutting edge in physics, he would spend most of his time reading what leading scientists were doing, and trying to understand it, rather than doing pioneering physics work himself. and he said, the world doesn’t need mediocre physicists. so he changed his career goals after a few years of that. this lifelong interest in physics is probably what fuels his interest in rockets and his foray into blue origins.

    so i’m guessing bezos would perform in the 150 range on wechsler tests, and 1500 range on the old SAT.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
  55. @Anonymous

    It’s getting hopeless around here since Ron instituted open admissions.

  56. bill gates has dramatically more academic brainpower than bezos. he was smarter than most of the professors at harvard, and dropped out after 2 or 3 years, probably realizing they had little to teach him, and that he had more interesting and important stuff to do than sit in classes for 4 years. one of his math professors said that gates was the smartest person he had ever encountered. when he was at harvard, gates developed a math algorithm in a couple days that was the best algorithm for solving a particular math, and later, biology problem, that had ever been invented. it was still the fastest, most accurate algorithm 30 or 40 years later, until a team of researchers using a supercomputer found one that was like 5% more efficient.

    the old SAT is more difficult than the wechsler. that is to say, if you answer every question correctly on the wechsler within the time limit, you are said to have performed at the 160 level. that is the ceiling of the test. but the old SAT had a ceiling higher than that. if you answered every question correctly on the old SAT, psychologists calculate that you would have performed at the 170 level. more people are able to answer every question correctly on the wechsler, than were able to answer every question correctly on the old SAT.

    i always assumed gates answered every question correctly on the old SAT, but 1590 is pretty close. his business partner, paul allen, did answer every question correctly. this gives some perspective. gates appears to clearly have been the smarter guy, in the common sense of the term, and was better at technical stuff than allen, too. so for practical purposes, even at the extreme high end, when two guys can perform the same at the limit of one of the hardest tests, there can be a really big divergence between their real world capability.

    paul allen wasted the last decade of his life building a stupid airplane that will probably never work out. on the spectrum of technical problems and how difficult they are, designing new aircraft to do what allen wanted his to do, is really not that hard compared to some of the stuff he could have been working on, or problems that other people at his tested ability level or below, were working on. but worse, other people who probably had less tested academic ability than him, solved the technical problem that stratolaunch was trying to solve, in better ways. so even his implementation was not as good.

    another person who scored 1590 on the old SAT was ben bernanke. but he struck everybody as an extremely orthodox, bland, and uninteresting thinker, who never offered any interesting insight or original thought in his field, and presented overwhelmingly as just another jewish economist, of which there are many.

  57. @trelane

    Affirmative action incentivizes mediocrity of the minority.

    Back in the 90s my mentor used to say of ‘trade policy’ (tariffs, quotas and subsidies):

    Trade policy is like academic tenure: those who need it, don’t deserve it; those who deserve it, don’t need it

    Never a truer word spoken – and it generalises to anyone who seeks to use public policy to force their agenda onto the demos.

    Importantly, state intervention in aid of some or other group is never actually enough to ’tilt’ the field to their (absolute) advantage; it is also highly contingent on the ‘downtrodden’ maintaining their underclass status in the eyes the polis… which is hard to maintain if there are deliberate tilts in your favour..

    I apply that to any interest group who bleats that government to mandate an advantage for their kith; that includes anti-immigrationists, pro-whitey types, mewling (white, straight) male cucks whining about how everything’s tilted towards coons and chicks and fags and ladyboys…

    My response is always

    Get up on your fucking hind legs and compete, you weak bitches.

    • Troll: Hippopotamusdrome
    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
  58. Anon[217] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    “Jeff Bezos’ mother is Jacklyn Gise. She became pregnant with him when she was 16.”

    Something that’s never spoken of is whether it might be the case that children born to teenaged mothers, and not necessarily older teens, are perhaps smarter and healthier, with less of a mutagenic load, than kids born to “older” mothers, 20 and up.

    Fertility starts to fall after about 25, depending on the study. But most fertility charts start at 20. You hear that having kids in your 40s, and maybe late 30s, exposes you to the risk of birth defects. But wouldn’t there be problems of a less-than-birth-defect level starring to show up even in your 20s?

    I’m extrapolating from the recent genetics book Innate here, although he doesn’t discuss this specifically (for good reason).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @epebble
  59. Anon[217] • Disclaimer says:

    How do you get a 4.2 grade point average at Princeton? I understand the thing with AP classes in high school, but that wouldn’t apply at a university.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  60. Toris says:

    What a shame. No one likes to mention the old money WASP lines “Bezos” comes from. Richest man in the world? In an age of BLM, minority rights, etc? What a family story! Minority customers of Amazon would be well intrigued. History/reality is what it is, but it’s interesting how the media wilfully ignores his family history. World’s richest man! The slaves, the deaths, the Mexicans, the deaths, the Native Americans, the deaths. Why aren’t you peasants interested?

  61. Pericles says:
    @prime noticer

    one of his math professors said that gates was the smartest person he had ever encountered. when he was at harvard, gates developed a math algorithm in a couple days that was the best algorithm for solving a particular math, and later, biology problem, that had ever been invented. it was still the fastest, most accurate algorithm 30 or 40 years later, until a team of researchers using a supercomputer found one that was like 5% more efficient.

    What’s this? Never heard of it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  62. LondonBob says:
    @prime noticer

    Jorgensen is Danish or Nowegian, maybe you get it in Germany too.

  63. Anon[879] • Disclaimer says:
    @prime noticer

    On the SAT and similar tests, they “audition” new questions in every test, and those do not count in the score for that test. They are trying to determine how hard the questions are, so when they debut them in a future test the scoring will be backward consistent.

    So you can miss some questions and still get a perfect score.

    And tactically, you don’t want to spend too much time on any single question.

  64. @Pericles

    A guy who worked for me at the most successful marketing research start-up of the 1980s then went to Microsoft and got to know Bill Gates well. He said Gates was significantly smarter than the founder of the marketing research company, who was very impressive.

  65. @Anon

    You get a 4.3 for an A+. I got seven A+s at Rice U., but I only averaged a 3.81 GPA because I didn’t do that well in several classes I either wasn’t cut out for or didn’t much like. I had pretty much the same GPA from high school through business school because I couldn’t be bothered or wasn’t able to get a good grade in some classes. Bezos, in contrast, did extremely well (A+) in the majority of his classes and very well (A or A-) in the rest.

    It’s by no means inexplicable why Bezos is the richest man in the world.

  66. @Anon

    LeBron James, the current greatest basketball player, is age 34 and his mother is only age 50.

    On the other hand, Zion Williamson, a Duke Freshman, is the new LeBron at 6′-7″ and 285 pounds. His mom was his middle school coach. “Sampson ran track at Livingstone College in the 1970s” and was a high jumper. So that makes her pretty old when she had Zion.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    , @Reg Cæsar
    , @anon
  67. anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    @Meretricious

    racial redistribution, By the time soviet collapse jews eventualize realized white nations were far too intelligent conscientious and productive to ever flip commie, but in the meantime there destabilizing mischief with blacks women and fags was doing extraordinarily. They realized they could transition from class communism to race/gender communism if only they had more non whites thus we got population replacement affirmative action. come to america we will give you and your family and village welfare until we can set you up with a white mans job. Hey its good for the jews

  68. I have a two second cousins [that is, my cousin’s daughters] who bear the surname “Sonia” from their Puerto Rican grandfather, “Raymondo” whom we knew simply as “Raymond.” As a kid I didn’t know he was PR and didn’t consider him anything but a white guy. The girls are dead white. I wonder how many of their co-workers are surprised that they don’t identify as “Hispanic?” One’s a Harvard graduate – she got in the hard way, via an outstanding academic record at a private high school.

  69. Pericles says:
    @Steve Sailer

    LeBron James, the current greatest basketball player, is age 34 and his mother is only age 50.

    Lebron’s son was furthermore conceived when Lebron was 19 and the mother 17. (Wikipedia and arithmetic so tells me.)

  70. @adreadline

    Both the city and the state of São Paulo are notably safe for our Brazilian standards. There’s so many people packed in here that it’s quite an accomplishment for us to be unlike most of the country.

    You’re a genuine paulista? So was I, for almost thirty years. But it was the capital of Minnesota, not its own eponymous state. The ending -ite has never appealed to me, but I can’t escape it. Native Brooklynite, St Paulite, married a Wisconsinite.Paulista has so much more flair.

    I spent my adolescence in upstate New York, and am a bossa buff, so I’ve always been fascinated by the states of Rio and São Paulo outside those cities. I’ve heard that Fluminense’s core support comes from Rio state outside the city. If so, they’d be analogous to our Buffalo Bills.

    John Derbyshire once cited an opera singer whom he didn’t know whether was Portuguese or Brazilian. I learned that she was born in Botafogo. I kidded him that she and Fluminense fan Tom Jobim would have been at odds, but he hates soccer, so maybe he wouldn’t appreciate the import of this fact.

    • Replies: @adreadline
  71. @Steve Sailer

    So that makes her pretty old when she had Zion.

    In many cases (not at all suggesting either of these), a child born to an unwed teen was passed off as the mother’s mother’s child, and grew up thinking his mother was his sister. That this happened among blacks as well as whites shows that the stigma was potent even in their community once.

  72. @Kratoklastes

    I apply that to any interest group who bleats that government to mandate an advantage for their kith; that includes anti-immigrationists

    Then let the Guatamalans stay in Guatamala and create their own private Wakandia then.

  73. Bill says:
    @eded

    You count as hispanic if you check the box.

  74. MarcB. says:

    New Mexico and West Texas still have sizable populations descended from Spanish settler stock who did not mix with indigenous Mexican populations nor consider them hermanos. Many are visibly phenotypically Western European despite some intermarriage with Navajos. The modern perception of what constitutes Hispanic seems to be influenced by the Chicano movements of the 1970s equating it with brown skin.

    • Replies: @The Man From K Street
  75. @Hypnotoad666

    But of course Gates and Paul Allen are both originally from Seattle, where they attended the same elite prep school.

  76. @prime noticer

    bill gates has dramatically more academic brainpower than bezos. he was smarter than most of the professors at harvard, and dropped out after 2 or 3 years, probably realizing they had little to teach him, and that he had more interesting and important stuff to do than sit in classes for 4 years. one of his math professors said that gates was the smartest person he had ever encountered. when he was at harvard, gates developed a math algorithm in a couple days that was the best algorithm for solving a particular math, and later, biology problem, that had ever been invented. it was still the fastest, most accurate algorithm 30 or 40 years later, until a team of researchers using a supercomputer found one that was like 5% more efficient.

    If true, very impressive. But, I wouldn’t put too much weight on it. There are cognitive scientists, mathematicians…galore, who are almost geniuses, had done immensely more in their areas & who had not been too successful financially.

    It’s American type Capitalism & Gates’ other personality traits, I’d say…..

  77. I have problem with identifying all these Native American types & physiognomies. This girl is Aussie Peruvian with NA “blood”in her, but I wouldn’t have guessed.

    Quien sabe?

  78. @propagandist hacker

    *most* of the current USA mainland was once owned or controlled by spain…spain owned/controlled all the land west of the mississippi all the way into the 1800s…spain also used to control/own florida and some of the american south…”

    Substitute “claimed” for “owned” and “controlled” in the above tract and it will be far closer to the truth.

  79. @Reg Cæsar

    I had the privilege of being able to travel, years ago, through the states of São Paulo, Rio, and Minas Gerais. It’s just my opinion, but I didn’t get to see anything fascinating in all of Rio. In my brief experience, the border between Rio and Minas may mark a human divide more prominent than the border between Rio and São Paulo, but it’s best to let others confirm or refute this by themselves.

    There seems to be a significant number of foreigners which become enamored of our country as soon as they come in. I had classes with two American professors, both apparently coming from ”sunny states” (one from Stanford, the other from a small-town Florida university). Last I checked, they are tenured professors at the university I go to, so it’d look like they’re taking a considerable risk by living here, but I doubt this somewhat. Life in the Brazilian Southeast — specially far from Rio (the city) and outside the capitals of São Paulo and Belo Horizonte — is not hell. But I don’t know how things are in the United States, so I have no idea of what they left behind.

    And yes, I am a paulista, a genuine one, I guess, if being born and living here all my life suffices. I’ve been one for just under 30 years. (Many people from my city in particular have their roots in the Brazilian Northeast; whether that makes them less genuine paulistas can be argued, but that’s already way too many words from me)

  80. epebble says:
    @Anon

    Interesting hypothesis. Steve Jobs was also born to a young unmarried Joanne Carole Schieble (from a Syrian father), but she was 23. In Steve’s case, his greatness is attributed to nurture (adopted son of Paul Reinhold Jobs) and not his biological father whereas for Bezos, it is attributed to nature (biological father Jorgensen). Barack Obama was also born to a unwed teen.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
  81. @epebble

    Teen, yes, but she was married three months after getting knocked up with baby Barry. Barry’s paternity is still questionable..

  82. @MarcB.

    And it would be really fascinating if Bezos tirned out to be descended from that Nuevamexicano elite that incidentally threw in their lot with the Confederacy in 1861. They already had private militias to guard their lands from Apache depredations and to keep an eye on the Butterfield stagecoach trade route, and these nicely transitioned into CSA units.

    • Replies: @Toris
  83. Lagertha says:

    wow. I never knew Bezos’ father was a Norwegian/Dane!!!

    Maybe his flaky mother could not deal with a right-wing Norwegian real man….got bored….married a Cuban (WTF?), when Jeff was a pre-schooler. He should embrace his Scandinavian roots. The Scandis and the Scots really, really were the makers, the early engineering geniuses. I hope he joins the Sons of Norway! – great saunas (and private lakes) in the Mountain West and Midwest!

    • Replies: @Lagertha
  84. Lagertha says:
    @Lagertha

    He was a Los Alamos kid!?! – I understand his ruthlessness more, now. Having seen the compound, most kids would want to go anywhere (even Princeton 🙁 ) hahaaa! I understand him, now, …Bell Labs was familiar. I hope he stays away from human eugenics.

  85. Toris says:
    @The Man From K Street

    Well, he is descended from minor elites, not along those lines though. I actually have a lot of respect for some of what his ancestors accomplished, but in an age of pulling down Confederate statues, his family lines won’t fare to well with publicity. Doesn’t go down well in our age of empire (world order building) when your descendants were passing along negroes in their wills, hunting down runaway slaves, letting slaves die whilst relocating, killing Natives, Mexicans, etc. No, he’s just a self made “Bezos”.
    (Gise was a good start, why do you all stop there?)

    Looking forward to the Wash. Post write up any day now.

  86. @Rufus

    He owns the Washington Post, which along with the Grey Lady is one of the most anti-white publications in the country. They weren’t anti-white before he bought the paper.

  87. @ben tillman

    He isn’t going along to get along. His personal blog, the WaPo, is one of the prime drivers of the movement.

  88. MEH 0910 says:

    Finding Your Roots: Season Five premier:

    https://www.pbs.org/video/grandparents-and-other-strangers-lh0g6g/

    Finding Your Roots

    Grandparents and Other Strangers

    Season 5 Episode 1 | 52m 41s

    Host Henry Louis Gates, Jr. helps actor Andy Samberg and author George R. R. Martin answer some family mysteries when DNA detective work uncovers new branches of their family trees. The DNA analysis upends family history and reveals new relatives.

  89. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

    Washington Post:

    Jeff Bezos announces divorce from MacKenzie Bezos after 25 years together

    Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos and MacKenzie Bezos arrive at the 2018 Vanity Fair Oscar party in Beverly Hills. (Danny Moloshok/Reuters)

    • Replies: @epebble
  90. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  91. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

  92. anon[264] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Supposedly, Lebron’s teammate during his first stint with the Cavs was seeing a lot of his mom, and Lebron wasn’t too happy about that.

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