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From Evonomics:

Stop Crying About the Size of Government. Start Caring About Who Controls It.
An interview with economist Daron Acemoglu by David Sloan Wilson

Economists tend to be better at thinking about abstractions than about messy empirical realities, which is fine. The problem comes when economists make some assertion about history that would not impress historians, but gets a free pass from their fellow economists because what do economists know about history.

For example, economist Steven Levitt’s abortion-cut-crime theory was wildly popular with his fellow economists since few of them remember the Crack Wars. David Card’s study of the failure of wages in Miami to fall after the Mariel Boatlift of 1980 is a lot more impressive to other economists than it is to people who remember the Great Miami Cocaine Boom of the early 1980s. And Daron Acemoglu’s idee fixe that all of history can be explained by dividing governments up into “extractive” and “inclusive” appeals to people who know even less about history than Professor Acemoglu.

In this interview with David Sloan Wilson, Acemoglu rhapsodizes about his latest discovery

The context of the paper is the US in the 19th century, which is often viewed as a society with a weak state. This is not entirely untrue. But the weakness of the US federal state is often exaggerated. What’s worse is that from this observation of state weakness, it is easy to jump to the conclusion that it was the weakness of the US state that laid the foundations of economic growth. We wanted to critically investigate this issue. This little paper starts by noting that the U.S. Postal Service, which was the largest federal agency and employer at the time, was playing a pivotal role not only in connecting the country, but bringing a range of services to distant corners of the United States. It’s also a symbol of the presence of the federal state. All of this made us wonder whether counties that got the post office became more likely to innovate and patent. The empirical evidence we present strongly supports this hypothesis: the opening of a new post office is associated with a significant increase in patenting in the county. We cannot categorically rule out other factors leading both to the introduction of new post offices and a simultaneous pickup in patenting in some counties, but our evidence suggests that this is unlikely to be driven by any obvious omitted factors or reverse causality. So what we are finding is a suggestive piece of evidence that even in the US society with its quintessentially weak federal state, state presence may have played a defining role and innovations.

Oh boy … The United States in the 19th Century, like the United Kingdom, didn’t have a “weak” state, it had a relatively well-organized one, but one that that was limited for self-imposed ideological reasons. Both ideologically limited states tended to be quite strong at what they cared about doing, and improving communications was very high on their list of priorities.

As all stamp collectors have read, the UK, for example, invented the postage stamp in 1840. Mail delivery in Victorian London was phenomenally fast, with the famous poets Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett often exchanging several love letters per day.

America tended to employ talented men to run its post office, such as Benjamin Franklin during the first 15 months of the Continental Congress. During the Republic, the Postmaster General was often the ruling party’s chief political fixer, such as James Farley under FDR and Larry O’Brien under LBJ. In early 20th Century Britain, two Postmaster Generals were future Prime Ministers. Abraham Lincoln notoriously spent the crucial opening weeks of his presidency not trying to head off secession and civil war, but instead interviewing candidates for local postmaster jobs.

It would be reasonable to point out to libertarians that even when their ideology was most widely accepted, in the mid-19th Century, the governments of the USA and the UK made famous exceptions for government postal services. But Acemoglu gets even that snarled up.

Of course, his knowledge of the present is little better than his knowledge of the past. Professor Acemoglu goes on to say:

“As a result, you have wanton police brutality against our African-American citizens, which the most powerful president on earth can do nothing about.”

For example, in Baltimore last year, you had black riots over a black career criminal dying at the hands of black cops in a city with a black police chief, black DA, and a black mayor, in a country with a black attorney general and a black president promoting #BlackLivesMatter, a campaign of anti-white agitation which appears to have led to a large increase — especially in Baltimore but also nationally — of blacks murdering blacks (the homicide rate in 2015 in the 50 biggest cities was up 16% over 2014, with the worst spikes concentrated in heavily black cities.)

It sounds, actually, as if in 21st century America, black political power correlates with a higher rate of blacks shooting each other, which certainly raises difficult questions for Professor Acemoglu’s Inclusiveness theory.

A close student of evolution, on the other hand, might come up with some interesting hypotheses for why that is.

 
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  1. RE: Communications in the 19th century,

    Here’s a book that I rather enjoyed:

    The Victorian Internet: The Remarkable Story of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century’s On-line Pioneers
    by Tom Standage

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Victorian-Internet-Remarkable-Nineteenth/dp/162040592X

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Another version of 19th century internet was the "Notes & Queries" column you saw in many journals and newspapers. People would post questions, and in subsequent editions the questions might be answered by someone who knew the answer.

    There was even a dedicated weekly journal, Notes and Queries, founded in London in 1849 as "a medium of intercommunication for literary men, artists, antiquaries, genealogists, etc."

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. “As a result, you have wanton police brutality against our African-American citizens, which the most powerful president on earth can do nothing about.”

    This economist acts like the police are killing law abiding old Black church ladies and not Omar Little types from The Wire.

    The type of Black men who are being killed by the police are not the type of men that the econonmist would want his daughter to date once she turns 18, that is if he has a daughter.

    Secretly I don’t think even Hussein Obama would want any of his daughters to date Michael Brown, if he was still alive. He would have been a bad thug influence on his daughters. He would want his daughters to date Black men who are part of the talented tenth. Significantly younger versions of Dr. Ben Carson, Thomas Sowell, Herman Cain, and Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TGGP
    It is mostly men being killed by the police, but they kill "old black church ladies" as well. The Kathryn Johnson case is notable for all the lengths the police went to cover it up and falsify evidence.

    I live in Chicago and am currently having issues with my bank because they keep trying to use the postal service to send me mail, which means I never receive it. Packages from FedEx come through, any my utility bills (perhaps they have an arrangement with the building manager), along with junk for previous tenenants.

    , @Aardvark

    Secretly I don’t think even Hussein Obama would want any of his daughters to date Michael Brown, if he was still alive. He would have been a bad thug influence on his daughters. He would want his daughters to date Black men who are part of the talented tenth.
     
    Probably would be Black men, we might extrapolate he wouldn't tolerate White men from:

    "Jonas Brothers are here, they're out there somewhere. Sasha and Malia are huge fans, but boys, don't get any ideas. Two words for you: predator drones. You will never see it coming. You think I'm joking?"

    Obama @ White House Correspondents Dinner 2014.
    , @athEIst
    Would Obama want his daughters to marry Travon(he could have been my son)Martin? I think NOT!
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  3. @syonredux
    RE: Communications in the 19th century,

    Here's a book that I rather enjoyed:

    The Victorian Internet: The Remarkable Story of the Telegraph and the Nineteenth Century's On-line Pioneers
    by Tom Standage



    http://www.amazon.com/The-Victorian-Internet-Remarkable-Nineteenth/dp/162040592X

    Another version of 19th century internet was the “Notes & Queries” column you saw in many journals and newspapers. People would post questions, and in subsequent editions the questions might be answered by someone who knew the answer.

    There was even a dedicated weekly journal, Notes and Queries, founded in London in 1849 as “a medium of intercommunication for literary men, artists, antiquaries, genealogists, etc.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Decius
    There was also the "agony column" in most newspapers. You could buy an ad (very cheaply) saying "I lost my hat at Charing Cross Station" and have a reasonable chance of getting it back. Or write about graver issues. Many used it as a sort of Craiglist "missed connections." Some found long-lost relatives that way. It only worked if lots of people read it, which apparently many did.

    Steve, I read in one book about high Victorian England that in the 2nd half the 19th century up to WW1, the mail was delivered in central London 13 times per day.
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  4. For example, in Baltimore last year, you had black riots over a black career criminal dying at the hands of black cops in a city with a black police chief, black DA, and a black mayor, in a country with a black attorney general and a black president promoting #BlackLivesMatter

    That’s a powerful line. Sums up the zeitgeist perfectly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    Yet all funded and manipulated by a satanic Hungarian.
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  5. A life-long friend is an economist who heads a university MBA program. He has some books to his credit. I have noticed that he has been wrong and often backward in the most significant claims and predictions he has made in his specialty.

    He keeps original assumptions he’s had since I knew him in high school, and all the BS has been piled on top of them. If only those givens had been true…

    Nevertheless, I remain his friend — and he still gets to run a university program.

    Anonymously, I say economics is a crock. (Excepting micro principles applied to running a business)

    Economists remind me of stockbrokers: seldom right, but perfectly happy to put on suits and get paid for being experts. No, economists are even worse, because they also gladly write things to push political agendas.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    A life-long friend is an economist who heads a university MBA program. I remain his friend — and he still gets to run a university program. Anonymously, I say economics is a crock.
     
    Proof that it is a crock. Can you think of any US University that has an economics department with a number of professors teaching the truth about mercantilism and "free trade"? Can you think of any major US economics professors who write the same?
    For proof that free trade is an "Anglo" conceit and delusion just go to any strong intelligent NE Asian nation (Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan etc) and see what is taught in their university economics departments. Somehow I doubt it is free trade theology-ideology and pro-immigration ideology. China's President once told GW Bush that his biggest challenge was providing 20 million new jobs each year. Such an attitude does not allow for immigration and I don't blame them.
    , @JackOH
    " . . . [He] has been wrong and often backward . . .". My local state university accepted a seven-figure grant from a very naïve donor. Several insiders, myself included, were shocked, because we knew the research to be funded would run into fierce opposition from internal constituencies and other potential donors. We needn't have worried. The dean who controls the grant is squandering it on celebrity speakers and vocationally oriented continuing education. There's no research at all being done. No one notices; no one seems to care.

    I'm not sure that story is helpful, but a lot of academic research is dunnage, just plain old careerist place-holding. The quality is less important than its mere existence.
    , @dc.sunsets
    All people reach most of their decisions in their impulsive, emotional cognitive path and simply use their higher (rational) cognitive path to rationalize the preexisting determination.

    This is why even highly intelligent people often cling to utterly idiotic beliefs. In fact, they are better at the rationalization, as well as being better at ignoring whatever common sense notions may underlie their biases.

    This is why our modern "rule by experts" is so laughable, and why when history inevitably repeats, it does so as tragedy.
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  6. This is probably obvious, but I’m going to state it anyway. Black majority states can be decent enough places to live, if decidedly not at Western levels of prosperity, if they are relatively small. I once went on Wikipedia and compared the standard of living in black African countries. All the half decent countries had a low population, under 10 million.

    Possible reasons:

    1. Smaller countries have more ethnic homogeneity.
    2. It’s just plain easier to run a small country well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    No, there are no real black majority and dominated countries that are decent places to live outside a few parasitic island tax havens.

    Caucasoids and Mongoloids evolved over thousands of years to develop the traits to support civilization. That just never happened for the other races.
    , @Bhroham
    It's probably true that relative homogeneity is an asset if the country has good natural resources, with Botswana being the paradigmatic example. However Swaziland and Lesotho are small, ethnically homogenous (unusually homogenous for Africa), and have a very low standard of living. These two countries seem to me to be the 'natural' size of African states based on pre-colonial political structures.
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    Your assertion contradicts what I think I know about sub-Saharan Africa. Would you please provide a definition of "half decent", list the sub-Saharan countries that you think qualify as "half decent" by this definition, and then provide evidence that they do in fact qualify. Otherwise, I'm claiming BS. I may claim BS anyway but then at least we'll be able to have a discussion.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Thursday, I have to disagree with you. The top 25 worst places to live for quality of live and economy is dominated by countries of Africa. Maybe a short camera safari, but not a play to live.
    , @Father O'Hara
    You went on Wikipedia to ascertain the quality of life. Good idea. Much safer than a hands on investigation.
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  7. It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution, love to dump all over the US Postal Service as being emblematic of government waste and incompetence, when a postal service is one of the few federal government functions explicitly mandated by the Constitution.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde
    Amazon has been threatening to start up its own delivery business. Jeff Bezos could buy the USPS and make it into Amazon's package delivery subsidiary and get it running in the black. Is LaserShip owned by them?
    , @Anonymous
    "It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution, love to dump all over the US Postal Service as being emblematic of government waste and incompetence, when a postal service is one of the few federal government functions explicitly mandated by the Constitution."

    Generally speaking, my family and I have had very good experiences with the U.S. Postal Service over many years. I agree that lines can be slow in the offices, but otherwise we've always found the delivery service to be quite good and often excellent.
    , @Anonymous

    It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution
     
    From DC Madam's secret recordings:

    [Client TC]: "I'm nervous. I've never done this before."
    [Escort]: "Just relax, and tell me what you like."
    [Client TC]: "I like the Constitution."

    , @gruff
    The principle behind the Constitutional mandating of the Post Office is worthy of consideration. The Founding Fathers wanted to guarantee a cheap reliable politically neutral communication system.

    The modern equivalent of this is not FedEx (shipping was mostly separate from mail back in 1776) but the phone system and the internet.

    Obligatory mention of The Crying of Lot 49.

    , @AndrewR
    Have you used the post office? At least in an area with a significant number of blacks? I'm sure that many people have had nothing but good experiences with the USPS, but that has not been my experience.
    , @Former Darfur
    The Constitution provides for the post office, but does not grant it a monopoly. That is granted by the Private Express Statutes, which were only enforced when Lysander Spooner competed for post business in the 1840s.

    Spooner's example is a staple of libertarian literature, as clearly even then the USPS was not a well run operation and he provided better and faster service.

    I have run into problems with both UPS and FedEx, but nothing like what I run into routinely with the USPS. It is an incredibly poorly run entity and its monopoly should have been ended decades, indeed centuries ago.

    That the GOP will do no more to end this than will the Democrats is reason enough for me to hope the GOP goes the way of the Whigs.
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  8. @Mr. Anon
    It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution, love to dump all over the US Postal Service as being emblematic of government waste and incompetence, when a postal service is one of the few federal government functions explicitly mandated by the Constitution.

    Amazon has been threatening to start up its own delivery business. Jeff Bezos could buy the USPS and make it into Amazon’s package delivery subsidiary and get it running in the black. Is LaserShip owned by them?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    The USPS has a mission to serve the entire nation and all its people. Jeff Bezos' mission is to serve Jeff Bezos.
    , @Lot
    Amazon got the USPS to start limited Sunday delivery. I also last week got my first same-day Amazon delivery. Ordered at 9am, it arrived around 5:30pm. Shipping was free.
    , @Bill
    Will that be before or after he gets Amazon running in the black?
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  9. Lot says:

    Law abiding high IQ societies will set up postal services early. that does not mean the postal service itself did much.

    As I’ve noted a before, almost all good human traits are correlated, both on an individual and group basis. Good table manners are correlated with honesty, IQ is correlated with creativity, good health is correlated with good looks, verbal IQ is correlated with math IQ. It goes on and on. A lazy social scientist could churn out 1000 studies showing one positive trait is linked to another.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Brits and the Americans had good reasons to suspend their laissez-faire principles for their postal systems.
    , @AndrewR
    >Good table manners are correlated with honesty,

    My father is living proof that this correlation is less than 1.
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  10. @Lot
    Law abiding high IQ societies will set up postal services early. that does not mean the postal service itself did much.

    As I've noted a before, almost all good human traits are correlated, both on an individual and group basis. Good table manners are correlated with honesty, IQ is correlated with creativity, good health is correlated with good looks, verbal IQ is correlated with math IQ. It goes on and on. A lazy social scientist could churn out 1000 studies showing one positive trait is linked to another.

    The Brits and the Americans had good reasons to suspend their laissez-faire principles for their postal systems.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    The single biggest market intervention by the 19th century American government was building the transcontinental railroad and other long distance routes by providing huge amounts of free land as an incentive for them to build. Short haul routes between cities did not need or receive anything like that.

    The Gadsen purchase illustrates just how much the US Gov cares about these routes.
    , @Clyde

    The Brits and the Americans had good reasons to suspend their laissez-faire principles for their postal systems.
     
    They were the internet of the day so of course had high status and respect. Post Masters has to be masters of politics and horse powered delivery technology. Like the Zuckerbergs of today once you strip away the spergy traitorousness. Strip out the pluocratic money grubbing too because Post Masters served the American people at government pay. The last Post Master General who comes to mind is James Farley who was also a high level political operative.
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    Before the Revolution, Benjamin Franklin held the post of joint post master general for the British colonies from 1753 on . He so successfully used his position to promulgate the spread Patriot propaganda and suppress Loyalist that he was dismissed from this post in 1774. I suspect that Franklin played a major role ensuring that the postal service was enshrined in the Constitution. I also suspect that this was at least partly to ensure that the new government could prevent someone like Franklin from easily subverting the new government.
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  11. @Thursday
    This is probably obvious, but I'm going to state it anyway. Black majority states can be decent enough places to live, if decidedly not at Western levels of prosperity, if they are relatively small. I once went on Wikipedia and compared the standard of living in black African countries. All the half decent countries had a low population, under 10 million.

    Possible reasons:

    1. Smaller countries have more ethnic homogeneity.
    2. It's just plain easier to run a small country well.

    No, there are no real black majority and dominated countries that are decent places to live outside a few parasitic island tax havens.

    Caucasoids and Mongoloids evolved over thousands of years to develop the traits to support civilization. That just never happened for the other races.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "No, there are no real black majority and dominated countries that are decent places to live outside a few parasitic island tax havens.

    Caucasoids and Mongoloids evolved over thousands of years to develop the traits to support civilization. That just never happened for the other races."

    And those parasitic island tax havens in the Caribbean depend on rich White people's money to survive. Without it, they become as poor and crime infested as Jamaica & Haiti.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. @Buzz Mohawk
    A life-long friend is an economist who heads a university MBA program. He has some books to his credit. I have noticed that he has been wrong and often backward in the most significant claims and predictions he has made in his specialty.

    He keeps original assumptions he's had since I knew him in high school, and all the BS has been piled on top of them. If only those givens had been true...

    Nevertheless, I remain his friend -- and he still gets to run a university program.

    Anonymously, I say economics is a crock. (Excepting micro principles applied to running a business)

    Economists remind me of stockbrokers: seldom right, but perfectly happy to put on suits and get paid for being experts. No, economists are even worse, because they also gladly write things to push political agendas.

    A life-long friend is an economist who heads a university MBA program. I remain his friend — and he still gets to run a university program. Anonymously, I say economics is a crock.

    Proof that it is a crock. Can you think of any US University that has an economics department with a number of professors teaching the truth about mercantilism and “free trade”? Can you think of any major US economics professors who write the same?
    For proof that free trade is an “Anglo” conceit and delusion just go to any strong intelligent NE Asian nation (Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan etc) and see what is taught in their university economics departments. Somehow I doubt it is free trade theology-ideology and pro-immigration ideology. China’s President once told GW Bush that his biggest challenge was providing 20 million new jobs each year. Such an attitude does not allow for immigration and I don’t blame them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    That's because those countries are run by Mandarins, of the sort that used to run our economy:

    http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/het/schools/mandarin.htm

    The golden age for the "Mandarin" economist was doubtlessly the post-war period. Perhaps the most critical event in the government-economist relationship was the publication of John Maynard Keynes's General Theory in 1936. The Keynesian Revolution found a theoretical role for interventionist, discretionary government policy in the economy.

    The new relationship was swiftly formalized and governments enlisted legions of economists to help sort all this out. Britain, France, Germany and much of the rest of Europe built up national accounts, set up welfare states, overhauled their fiscal codes, regulated or nationalized industries, coordinated trade unions and actively used their Treasuries and Central Banks for economy-wide stabilization policy. In the United States, the New Deal merged into the Employment Act of 1946 and the setting up of the Council of Economic Advisors (CEA). In Japan and, later on, in various East Asian nations, government took an even more active role, guiding capital and setting international trade policies that helped launch and guide their miraculous growth experiences. Soviet planning was overhauled with the guidance of new techniques. The emergence of newly independent nations from the ashes of colonial empires, bent on development and not averse to planning, meant a whole new set of government clients for policy-oriented economists. Multi-lateral government agencies, such as the United Nations, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, hired another army of economists.

    However, the economic disasters of the 1970s and early 1980s began to set the tide in reverse. In the rising "neo-liberal" Reagan-Thatcher era, a new set of economists were needed -- particularly those that could justify the "supply-side" fiscal policies and Monetarist experiments of the conservative governments. In the 1990s, with the wave of privatizations of state industries across the world and the collapse of socialist bloc, a whole generation of planning economists were made suddenly obsolete (albeit many reinvented themselves as "transition" specialists). Central Banks, which have grown in importance in recent years, have remained perhaps the last bastion of government where economists and their opinions still matter.
     
    , @Yak-15
    Macro is nearly a complete crock. Micro has a lot of shades of truth to it and is the closest any social science is to being truly "scientific." (Still not very close)

    Some economists are simply "know-it-alls" who think their divine least squares predictions make them masters of all knowledge. Steven Levitt comes off this way at times.

    Many universities do teach alternative macro ideas. However, much of those alternative theories are expanding upon failures in the basic theories. Most students don't get beyond the basics so this is part of the problem.

    However, even at the schools you may consider THE most free market and free trade, there are considerable numbers of professors who work refuting those orthodoxies. And tbey teach a lot of undergraduate coursework. Again, most students are too busy worrying about premed, socialism, team sports or black lives sophistry to bother.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    For proof that free trade is an “Anglo” conceit and delusion just go to any strong intelligent NE Asian nation...
     
    ...who will happily tell you that the crackers were wrong and the hated Yankees right. I can see you sure aren't Clyde Wilson.

    How are your solar-panel stocks doing, by the way? The free traders say they're hooey, like high-speed rail, but the mercantilists say they're the future.
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  13. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer
    The Brits and the Americans had good reasons to suspend their laissez-faire principles for their postal systems.

    The single biggest market intervention by the 19th century American government was building the transcontinental railroad and other long distance routes by providing huge amounts of free land as an incentive for them to build. Short haul routes between cities did not need or receive anything like that.

    The Gadsen purchase illustrates just how much the US Gov cares about these routes.

    Read More
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  14. @Clyde
    Amazon has been threatening to start up its own delivery business. Jeff Bezos could buy the USPS and make it into Amazon's package delivery subsidiary and get it running in the black. Is LaserShip owned by them?

    The USPS has a mission to serve the entire nation and all its people. Jeff Bezos’ mission is to serve Jeff Bezos.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde
    You might notice that many Amazon packages go through one or two hand offs. Such as UPS getting it from Amazon, moving it a thousand miles, then a hand off to the USPS that makes the actual delivery to your door.
    , @Anonymous
    The CPUSA also proclaims to have that, or words to that effect, as its mission.
    , @Anonymous
    Socialist dirtbags would rather force everybody to use snail mail than let a man succeed.

    Jealousy is a bitch.
    , @Desiderius

    The USPS has a mission to serve the entire nation and all its people. Jeff Bezos’ mission is to serve Jeff Bezos.
     
    see: Smith, Adam.

    see also, the First Amendment:

    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion
     
    Missions are fine things. They're not what a state is for.
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  15. @Clyde
    Amazon has been threatening to start up its own delivery business. Jeff Bezos could buy the USPS and make it into Amazon's package delivery subsidiary and get it running in the black. Is LaserShip owned by them?

    Amazon got the USPS to start limited Sunday delivery. I also last week got my first same-day Amazon delivery. Ordered at 9am, it arrived around 5:30pm. Shipping was free.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dumpstersquirrel
    "I also last week got my first same-day Amazon delivery. Ordered at 9am, it arrived around 5:30pm. Shipping was free."

    The order packers and truck driver shipped your package without requiring remuneration of any sort? Amazing stuff going on there, slaver. Kinda like how some people believe free all-you-can-eat healthcare is a fundamental human right, I suppose.......
    , @Mr. Anon
    I understand that package delivery makes money for the post-office, and that the E-tail boom has been a great boon to them. Of course, letter delivery wouldn't be such a money loser if the postal service did not offer discount rates for junk-mail.
    , @BB753
    Ordered a pair of headphones via Amazon Prime. Living within 10 miles of their distribution center, received them in 2 hours!
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  16. @Steve Sailer
    The Brits and the Americans had good reasons to suspend their laissez-faire principles for their postal systems.

    The Brits and the Americans had good reasons to suspend their laissez-faire principles for their postal systems.

    They were the internet of the day so of course had high status and respect. Post Masters has to be masters of politics and horse powered delivery technology. Like the Zuckerbergs of today once you strip away the spergy traitorousness. Strip out the pluocratic money grubbing too because Post Masters served the American people at government pay. The last Post Master General who comes to mind is James Farley who was also a high level political operative.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    LBJ's postmaster general Larry O'Brien was the guy whose office the Watergate Burglars were burgling.
    , @ganderson
    What about Wilford Brimley?
    , @Boomstick
    The central point is that postmaster positions were patronage jobs. When a new administration came in they'd hand them out as a way of cementing the loyalty of the locals across the US. As a result the postmasters were usually plugged into the party apparatus and loyal to the party in power.
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  17. Steve

    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor, Aaron Acemoglu, who has very little understanding of or respect for American or British history.

    Yet Acemoglu has nonetheless has become famous for writing a kind of vapid “Virtue Signaling” brand of pseudo economics explaining all we need to know about how bad the evil West has exploited the third world and non-white races.

    And Acemoglu having absolutely no understanding of evolution or HBD is being interview by the charlatan “Evolutionary Biologist” David Sloan Wilson who pushes the repeatedly discredited yet politically correct version of Human Evolution known as “Group Evolution Theory”.

    Well at least Acemoglu is an outspoken advocate of marijuana legalization on purely economic principles grounds.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Sloan_Wilson

    Wilson is a prominent proponent of the concept of group selection (also known as multi-level selection) in evolution. He and Elliott Sober proposed a framework called multilevel selection theory, which incorporates the more orthodox approach of gene-level selection and individual selection, in their book Unto Others. This framework argues that while genes serve as the means by which organisms’ designs are transmitted across generations, individuals and groups are vehicles for those genes and both are arenas for genes to act on.

    Just another case of the “Politically Correct” leading the “Politically Correct”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor, Aaron Acemoglu, who has very little understanding of or respect for American or British history.
     
    File this one under rootless cosmopolitan.
    Born in Turkey
    Education: London School of Economics and Political Science · University of York · Galatasaray High School
    , @Bhroham
    He's not an ethnocentric turk. He's Armenian, and is better described, as the other replyer said, as a 'rootless cosmopolitan'.
    , @yaqub the mad scientist
    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor...

    You mean he comes from that culture that exploited and oppressed a chunk of the whole globe for 500 years and was responsible for the first modern genocide?

    Seriously, call this hypocrite out, somebody.
    , @AndrewR
    Group evolution theory is PC? Hmm. Tell Kevin MacDonald that he's PC. I'm sure he could use a laugh.
    , @ben tillman

    And Acemoglu having absolutely no understanding of evolution or HBD is being interview by the charlatan “Evolutionary Biologist” David Sloan Wilson who pushes the repeatedly discredited yet politically correct version of Human Evolution known as “Group Evolution Theory”.
     
    That's a staggeringly stupid thing to say. He doesn't talk about "Group Evolutionary Theory"; his views are absolutely and indisputably correct; and his views are extremely politically incorrect.

    Wrong on all counts.

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  18. @Clyde

    The Brits and the Americans had good reasons to suspend their laissez-faire principles for their postal systems.
     
    They were the internet of the day so of course had high status and respect. Post Masters has to be masters of politics and horse powered delivery technology. Like the Zuckerbergs of today once you strip away the spergy traitorousness. Strip out the pluocratic money grubbing too because Post Masters served the American people at government pay. The last Post Master General who comes to mind is James Farley who was also a high level political operative.

    LBJ’s postmaster general Larry O’Brien was the guy whose office the Watergate Burglars were burgling.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The NBA Championship trophy is named after him:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_O'Brien_Championship_Trophy
    , @Clyde

    LBJ’s postmaster general Larry O’Brien was the guy whose office the Watergate Burglars were burgling.
     
    Definitely an operative. A John F Kennedy man who at some point ran the Democrat National Committee. I knew this by memory, but confirmed by wikipedia so as not to make an arse of myself.
    I am guessing that in his day being Post Master General involved lots of political appointments so was an important position. Some could be permanent bureaucracy appointments for useless nephews of top union goons and Democrat Party hacks.
    , @Brutusale
    As well as the last goy NBA commissioner!
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, I had a brain fart. I thought LBJ was another alphabet term for some diverse groups, Lesbian, Bi, Jerkoffs or whatever
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  19. @Mr. Anon
    The USPS has a mission to serve the entire nation and all its people. Jeff Bezos' mission is to serve Jeff Bezos.

    You might notice that many Amazon packages go through one or two hand offs. Such as UPS getting it from Amazon, moving it a thousand miles, then a hand off to the USPS that makes the actual delivery to your door.

    Read More
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  20. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Clyde

    A life-long friend is an economist who heads a university MBA program. I remain his friend — and he still gets to run a university program. Anonymously, I say economics is a crock.
     
    Proof that it is a crock. Can you think of any US University that has an economics department with a number of professors teaching the truth about mercantilism and "free trade"? Can you think of any major US economics professors who write the same?
    For proof that free trade is an "Anglo" conceit and delusion just go to any strong intelligent NE Asian nation (Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan etc) and see what is taught in their university economics departments. Somehow I doubt it is free trade theology-ideology and pro-immigration ideology. China's President once told GW Bush that his biggest challenge was providing 20 million new jobs each year. Such an attitude does not allow for immigration and I don't blame them.

    That’s because those countries are run by Mandarins, of the sort that used to run our economy:

    http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/het/schools/mandarin.htm

    The golden age for the “Mandarin” economist was doubtlessly the post-war period. Perhaps the most critical event in the government-economist relationship was the publication of John Maynard Keynes’s General Theory in 1936. The Keynesian Revolution found a theoretical role for interventionist, discretionary government policy in the economy.

    The new relationship was swiftly formalized and governments enlisted legions of economists to help sort all this out. Britain, France, Germany and much of the rest of Europe built up national accounts, set up welfare states, overhauled their fiscal codes, regulated or nationalized industries, coordinated trade unions and actively used their Treasuries and Central Banks for economy-wide stabilization policy. In the United States, the New Deal merged into the Employment Act of 1946 and the setting up of the Council of Economic Advisors (CEA). In Japan and, later on, in various East Asian nations, government took an even more active role, guiding capital and setting international trade policies that helped launch and guide their miraculous growth experiences. Soviet planning was overhauled with the guidance of new techniques. The emergence of newly independent nations from the ashes of colonial empires, bent on development and not averse to planning, meant a whole new set of government clients for policy-oriented economists. Multi-lateral government agencies, such as the United Nations, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, hired another army of economists.

    However, the economic disasters of the 1970s and early 1980s began to set the tide in reverse. In the rising “neo-liberal” Reagan-Thatcher era, a new set of economists were needed — particularly those that could justify the “supply-side” fiscal policies and Monetarist experiments of the conservative governments. In the 1990s, with the wave of privatizations of state industries across the world and the collapse of socialist bloc, a whole generation of planning economists were made suddenly obsolete (albeit many reinvented themselves as “transition” specialists). Central Banks, which have grown in importance in recent years, have remained perhaps the last bastion of government where economists and their opinions still matter.

    Read More
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  21. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    In England, the ‘Royal Mail’ as it is known, dates back to the time of King Henry VIII, way back in the 16th century. The idea of giving it the royal impratur was was to guarantee the integrity of the letter whilst in transit.
    Strangely enough due to the commercial bullshittery which was rampant during the Thatcher years and continued with vigor under Tony Blair, the British Post Office dropped that great and ancient title ‘Royal Mail’ and started calling themselves ‘Consignia’ for some unfathomable reason, for all of six months before reverting back to ‘Royal Mail’.

    Historically, the Romans had an excellent and centrally controlled mail service which utilised the famous Roman roads. Post-houses called ‘mansios’ , from whence we get the term ‘mansion’ were placed at strategic intervals along the roads. Here, the messengers could rest and change horses.
    The Persians also had an efficient post system.

    Strangely enough, the English post system of the 17th century was modelled after a Polish system.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    That's kind of like Trump buying Royal Turnberry golf course and renaming it Trump Turnberry.

    There are only about 60 golf courses in the world with the right to use Royal in the title.

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  22. @Steve Sailer
    LBJ's postmaster general Larry O'Brien was the guy whose office the Watergate Burglars were burgling.

    The NBA Championship trophy is named after him:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_O’Brien_Championship_Trophy

    Read More
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  23. @Steve Sailer
    LBJ's postmaster general Larry O'Brien was the guy whose office the Watergate Burglars were burgling.

    LBJ’s postmaster general Larry O’Brien was the guy whose office the Watergate Burglars were burgling.

    Definitely an operative. A John F Kennedy man who at some point ran the Democrat National Committee. I knew this by memory, but confirmed by wikipedia so as not to make an arse of myself.
    I am guessing that in his day being Post Master General involved lots of political appointments so was an important position. Some could be permanent bureaucracy appointments for useless nephews of top union goons and Democrat Party hacks.

    Read More
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  24. @Mr. Anon
    The USPS has a mission to serve the entire nation and all its people. Jeff Bezos' mission is to serve Jeff Bezos.

    The CPUSA also proclaims to have that, or words to that effect, as its mission.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "The CPUSA also proclaims to have that, or words to that effect, as its mission."

    Is this the left version of the reductio-ad-Hitlerum? Communists drink coffee, therefore coffee is communist, or something.

    The Postal Service actually has served the nation pretty well since its founding.

    You guys are really just making my original point for me. Thanks. Keep up the good work.

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  25. @Lot
    No, there are no real black majority and dominated countries that are decent places to live outside a few parasitic island tax havens.

    Caucasoids and Mongoloids evolved over thousands of years to develop the traits to support civilization. That just never happened for the other races.

    “No, there are no real black majority and dominated countries that are decent places to live outside a few parasitic island tax havens.

    Caucasoids and Mongoloids evolved over thousands of years to develop the traits to support civilization. That just never happened for the other races.”

    And those parasitic island tax havens in the Caribbean depend on rich White people’s money to survive. Without it, they become as poor and crime infested as Jamaica & Haiti.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But West Indian islands that are orderly enough for rich white people to want to vacation there are achieving something. These cultures that produce Tim Duncan-like personalities are doing something right.
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  26. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Acemoglu, of course says nothing at all about the ‘wanton cruelty’ perpetrated by blacks upon other blacks.

    Of course, he also fails to say that if ‘magically’ the US police ceased to have anything whatsoever to do with African Americans, the ‘wanton cruelty’ they show towards each other, would explode exponentially and make today’s violence look like the proverbial vicarage tea party.

    Read More
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  27. @anonymous-antimarxist
    Steve

    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor, Aaron Acemoglu, who has very little understanding of or respect for American or British history.

    Yet Acemoglu has nonetheless has become famous for writing a kind of vapid "Virtue Signaling" brand of pseudo economics explaining all we need to know about how bad the evil West has exploited the third world and non-white races.

    And Acemoglu having absolutely no understanding of evolution or HBD is being interview by the charlatan "Evolutionary Biologist" David Sloan Wilson who pushes the repeatedly discredited yet politically correct version of Human Evolution known as "Group Evolution Theory".

    Well at least Acemoglu is an outspoken advocate of marijuana legalization on purely economic principles grounds.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Sloan_Wilson

    Wilson is a prominent proponent of the concept of group selection (also known as multi-level selection) in evolution. He and Elliott Sober proposed a framework called multilevel selection theory, which incorporates the more orthodox approach of gene-level selection and individual selection, in their book Unto Others. This framework argues that while genes serve as the means by which organisms' designs are transmitted across generations, individuals and groups are vehicles for those genes and both are arenas for genes to act on.
     
    Just another case of the "Politically Correct" leading the "Politically Correct".

    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor, Aaron Acemoglu, who has very little understanding of or respect for American or British history.

    File this one under rootless cosmopolitan.
    Born in Turkey
    Education: London School of Economics and Political Science · University of York · Galatasaray High School

    Read More
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  28. @Mr. Anon
    The USPS has a mission to serve the entire nation and all its people. Jeff Bezos' mission is to serve Jeff Bezos.

    Socialist dirtbags would rather force everybody to use snail mail than let a man succeed.

    Jealousy is a bitch.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "Socialist dirtbags would rather force everybody to use snail mail than let a man succeed.

    Jealousy is a bitch."

    Apparently, you are too stupid to notice that I never said that FedEx should not exist.

    Libertarian assholes like the Constitution in theory, but not in practice. The USPS is actually mandated by the actually existing Constitution. By the way, every single libertarian economics professor at a public university is a hypocrite and should be fired.
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  29. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon
    It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution, love to dump all over the US Postal Service as being emblematic of government waste and incompetence, when a postal service is one of the few federal government functions explicitly mandated by the Constitution.

    “It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution, love to dump all over the US Postal Service as being emblematic of government waste and incompetence, when a postal service is one of the few federal government functions explicitly mandated by the Constitution.”

    Generally speaking, my family and I have had very good experiences with the U.S. Postal Service over many years. I agree that lines can be slow in the offices, but otherwise we’ve always found the delivery service to be quite good and often excellent.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I used to have the worst Post Office in America in my neighborhood: the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was. But the Valley Village P.O. I go to now is fine.
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  30. @Jefferson
    "No, there are no real black majority and dominated countries that are decent places to live outside a few parasitic island tax havens.

    Caucasoids and Mongoloids evolved over thousands of years to develop the traits to support civilization. That just never happened for the other races."

    And those parasitic island tax havens in the Caribbean depend on rich White people's money to survive. Without it, they become as poor and crime infested as Jamaica & Haiti.

    But West Indian islands that are orderly enough for rich white people to want to vacation there are achieving something. These cultures that produce Tim Duncan-like personalities are doing something right.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thursday
    If you look at Africa itself, countries like Gabon and Botswana don't look like hell holes either. Botswana has problems with AIDS, but it's peaceful and prosperous for an African country. Namibia is decent too.

    I should have mentioned population density. Namibia, Gabon and Botswana all have very low population density.

    The worst places in Africa tend to be the larger countries: Somalia, Sudan, Nigeria, Congo. Though there are some small, but dense places that are awful too.
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  31. @Anonymous
    In England, the 'Royal Mail' as it is known, dates back to the time of King Henry VIII, way back in the 16th century. The idea of giving it the royal impratur was was to guarantee the integrity of the letter whilst in transit.
    Strangely enough due to the commercial bullshittery which was rampant during the Thatcher years and continued with vigor under Tony Blair, the British Post Office dropped that great and ancient title 'Royal Mail' and started calling themselves 'Consignia' for some unfathomable reason, for all of six months before reverting back to 'Royal Mail'.

    Historically, the Romans had an excellent and centrally controlled mail service which utilised the famous Roman roads. Post-houses called 'mansios' , from whence we get the term 'mansion' were placed at strategic intervals along the roads. Here, the messengers could rest and change horses.
    The Persians also had an efficient post system.

    Strangely enough, the English post system of the 17th century was modelled after a Polish system.

    That’s kind of like Trump buying Royal Turnberry golf course and renaming it Trump Turnberry.

    There are only about 60 golf courses in the world with the right to use Royal in the title.

    Read More
    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    General rule of thumb is that urban post offices are horrible and suburban or rural post offices are pleasant.
    , @Bill
    So if the conglomerate which owns RC cola decided to open the Royal Crown Cola Golf Club, what would happen to them?
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  32. @Anonymous
    "It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution, love to dump all over the US Postal Service as being emblematic of government waste and incompetence, when a postal service is one of the few federal government functions explicitly mandated by the Constitution."

    Generally speaking, my family and I have had very good experiences with the U.S. Postal Service over many years. I agree that lines can be slow in the offices, but otherwise we've always found the delivery service to be quite good and often excellent.

    I used to have the worst Post Office in America in my neighborhood: the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was. But the Valley Village P.O. I go to now is fine.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Also the D.M.V. office in Van Nuys I go to is the model for the D.M.V. in The Simpsons where Homer's sisters-in-law Patty and Selma work. It used to be really bad, but around 2005 got reorganized and is okay now.
    , @Clyde

    I used to have the worst Post Office in America in my neighborhood: the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was.
     
    I read that one intently and got some laughs at the Herculean levels of incompetence. The Chicago Post Office was so backed up that mountains of mail simply could not get delivered and the cruel truth was because the management was full of black AA incompetents.
    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1994/10/24/lost-in-the-mail
    , @Anonymous
    I've never had any problems with the Post Office or with sending or receiving mail. It's always worked fine and efficiently for me.

    Many postal systems around the world provide basic banking services and savings accounts. Japan's postal savings has the most deposits in the world. They make sense since the post office already has the infrastructure of a national banking network anyway, and since the government already insures commercial deposits and since taxpayers already bail out the banks anyway. It would be good to have a low cost, no frills public option for basic banking services, rather than subsidizing private banks to take risks with our money without even giving any returns to depositors, who get essentially no interest and are charged lots of fees.
    , @jack o'fire
    There's very little reason to even go to a post office anymore. Outside of maintaining a PO Box which I did for many years, postal online services are quite handy.

    We depend (1-2K per month) on the postal service for a small percentage of our business and have had wonderful service at our residence. Our business address is another story, talking to the residential fellow he tells me the local manager puts the worst temps (did you know most new postal workers are temps?) on the business routes.

    The long-term employees take all the desirable non-walking routes off the main streets. You'd think the regional managers would tell the local postmasters to put trusted employees on the business routes, some of these temps can barely read.

    OT: The first class postage prices are going down 2 cents.
    CNN-stamp price decrease
    , @Clyde

    the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was.
     
    And to toot my horn I read it in 1994 and remembered it. It was never ending so it took me three sitdowns to read it. The New Yorker was better back then. John McPhee was one of my favorites no matter what he was writing about. The New Yorker slants more PC and more liberal these days but still has one fine article per issue. Maybe two. That are on interesting subjects with no leftist slanting. I have a feeling that contrary to its name, "The New Yorker" gets good nationwide circulation and turns a profit in dead trees editions due to its older readership. I have a friend who gets it and he gives me his copy a month later. He also gets the dead trees NY Times which is slim these days but looks great especially with the color photos.. I sometimes grab a four day old copy from him. I forgot how relaxing it is to read a newspaper this way. I just skim past the pc/leftist drop ins.

    From that 1994 era The New Yorker had a memorable 10 page treatment on madrassas in Pakistan, way ahead of its time. I can never find it in its on-line archives. Would love to reread it.

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  33. @Steve Sailer
    I used to have the worst Post Office in America in my neighborhood: the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was. But the Valley Village P.O. I go to now is fine.

    Also the D.M.V. office in Van Nuys I go to is the model for the D.M.V. in The Simpsons where Homer’s sisters-in-law Patty and Selma work. It used to be really bad, but around 2005 got reorganized and is okay now.

    Read More
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  34. @Steve Sailer
    I used to have the worst Post Office in America in my neighborhood: the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was. But the Valley Village P.O. I go to now is fine.

    I used to have the worst Post Office in America in my neighborhood: the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was.

    I read that one intently and got some laughs at the Herculean levels of incompetence. The Chicago Post Office was so backed up that mountains of mail simply could not get delivered and the cruel truth was because the management was full of black AA incompetents.

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1994/10/24/lost-in-the-mail

    Read More
    • Replies: @benjaminl
    Just to (almost) come right out and (almost) state the obvious...

    In my experience, the competence and efficiency of a given post office branch is heavily correlated with certain demographic characteristics.
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  35. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I used to have the worst Post Office in America in my neighborhood: the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was. But the Valley Village P.O. I go to now is fine.

    I’ve never had any problems with the Post Office or with sending or receiving mail. It’s always worked fine and efficiently for me.

    Many postal systems around the world provide basic banking services and savings accounts. Japan’s postal savings has the most deposits in the world. They make sense since the post office already has the infrastructure of a national banking network anyway, and since the government already insures commercial deposits and since taxpayers already bail out the banks anyway. It would be good to have a low cost, no frills public option for basic banking services, rather than subsidizing private banks to take risks with our money without even giving any returns to depositors, who get essentially no interest and are charged lots of fees.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    "It would be good to have a low cost, no frills public option for basic banking services, rather than subsidizing private banks to take risks with our money without even giving any returns to depositors, who get essentially no interest and are charged lots of fees."

    There are plenty of low fee banking options for those willing to shop around a bit, willing to keep a quite small minimum balance (often just $200 or so), who don't bounce checks, and who don't use out-of-network ATMs. I can't remember the last time I paid a banking fee of any kind other than closing costs or interest on a loan. I still maintain a small secondary account in a bank which I kept after switching most of my business to a competitor. It's only about a $200 balance, and I never touch it, but they never charge me any fees.
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  36. There’s always a demand for guys like Acemoglu who can be relied on to deny that racial differences matter, or even exist. Gladwell and Jared Diamond are two others who spring to mind. How many gifted scholars have been put off doing historical/economic/social research because they knew their conclusions would ruin their careers if they discovered race played a part in whatever they’re trying to explain? People are watching and taking notes. The SPLC includes scholars like Charles Murray, Henry Harpending and Garrett Hardin on its “List of Extremists”.

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  37. Does anyone here know if anyone has openly confronted these people with difficult questions ? The main questions being “if open societies are always successful, why do some societies become open in the first place ?” and “you have declared every successful society as open, how do we know you have not simply cherry picked to confirm your bias ?”.

    I am not even talking about Steve Sailer type of conversation, even the truest believer of equality should surely ask what causes “open society” eventually ?

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  38. FDR even went so far as to use the post office to threaten political enemies.

    FDR’s second postmaster general was Frank Walker. At the time, there was a huge radio personality named Father Charles Coughlin who also ran a political journal. Coughlin was very critical of Jewish influence, and was extremely left wing. He initially supported FDR’s new deal, but then thought it didn’t go far enough, and started sympathizing with Mussolini and Hitler and liked their extreme government interference in human affairs, as well as Hitler’s dislike of Jewish influence.

    By 1942, Walker attempted to literally shut down Father Coughlin’s mailing privileges—he had a hearing scheduled to ban Coughlin from using the U.S. mail to send his pro-fascist, anti-FDR materials to Coughlin’s numerous subscribers. But the FDR’s AG didn’t want that to become the public free speech fiasco it could have been. So he got the meeting postponed and convinced the bishop to shut Coughlin’s operation down, including the mailing list. Walker cancelled the hearing.

    In FDR’s slight defense, it was severe wartime, with the definite possibility of invasion, so a seditious, pro-Nazi leader with a large audience was a bigger problem than in peacetime. However, think about it: could you imagine someone actually being banned from using the freakin’ mail?

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Anyone familiar with Royal Oak, Michigan today would be surprised to learn that someone like Coughlin was based there.

    Incidentally, and very relevantly to this post, Royal Oak was also where a postal worker killed four [former] colleagues and himself after being fired from the USPS in 1991.

    , @Busby
    It happened in the 1840s. Postmasters were given the authority to impound "seditious literature". A policy touched off when post offices in South Carolina discovered anti-slavery tracts and booklets were being sent through the mail.
    , @Bill B.
    You're the top!
    You're the great Houdini!
    You're the top!
    You are Mussolini!

    1934 Cole Porter.
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  39. Having a reliable postal system would seem to be a requirement for a modern nation-state.

    About maybe 2000 the ambassador for a south asian country to Burma told me that he had recently solved the mystery of why no letters were being delivered to his home in Rangoon (using the old name).

    His neighbours explained that he had to bribe the postman or the mail would not be delivered, which quite shocked him. He told me that his own country was very corrupt but that at least the mail got delivered.

    (I wonder if middle-man groups like those in the Chinese diaspora had an advantage in this in being able to use their own clan/business networks?)

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  40. @Thursday
    This is probably obvious, but I'm going to state it anyway. Black majority states can be decent enough places to live, if decidedly not at Western levels of prosperity, if they are relatively small. I once went on Wikipedia and compared the standard of living in black African countries. All the half decent countries had a low population, under 10 million.

    Possible reasons:

    1. Smaller countries have more ethnic homogeneity.
    2. It's just plain easier to run a small country well.

    It’s probably true that relative homogeneity is an asset if the country has good natural resources, with Botswana being the paradigmatic example. However Swaziland and Lesotho are small, ethnically homogenous (unusually homogenous for Africa), and have a very low standard of living. These two countries seem to me to be the ‘natural’ size of African states based on pre-colonial political structures.

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  41. @anonymous-antimarxist
    Steve

    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor, Aaron Acemoglu, who has very little understanding of or respect for American or British history.

    Yet Acemoglu has nonetheless has become famous for writing a kind of vapid "Virtue Signaling" brand of pseudo economics explaining all we need to know about how bad the evil West has exploited the third world and non-white races.

    And Acemoglu having absolutely no understanding of evolution or HBD is being interview by the charlatan "Evolutionary Biologist" David Sloan Wilson who pushes the repeatedly discredited yet politically correct version of Human Evolution known as "Group Evolution Theory".

    Well at least Acemoglu is an outspoken advocate of marijuana legalization on purely economic principles grounds.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Sloan_Wilson

    Wilson is a prominent proponent of the concept of group selection (also known as multi-level selection) in evolution. He and Elliott Sober proposed a framework called multilevel selection theory, which incorporates the more orthodox approach of gene-level selection and individual selection, in their book Unto Others. This framework argues that while genes serve as the means by which organisms' designs are transmitted across generations, individuals and groups are vehicles for those genes and both are arenas for genes to act on.
     
    Just another case of the "Politically Correct" leading the "Politically Correct".

    He’s not an ethnocentric turk. He’s Armenian, and is better described, as the other replyer said, as a ‘rootless cosmopolitan’.

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  42. @Steve Sailer
    I used to have the worst Post Office in America in my neighborhood: the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was. But the Valley Village P.O. I go to now is fine.

    There’s very little reason to even go to a post office anymore. Outside of maintaining a PO Box which I did for many years, postal online services are quite handy.

    We depend (1-2K per month) on the postal service for a small percentage of our business and have had wonderful service at our residence. Our business address is another story, talking to the residential fellow he tells me the local manager puts the worst temps (did you know most new postal workers are temps?) on the business routes.

    The long-term employees take all the desirable non-walking routes off the main streets. You’d think the regional managers would tell the local postmasters to put trusted employees on the business routes, some of these temps can barely read.

    OT: The first class postage prices are going down 2 cents.
    CNN-stamp price decrease

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  43. @Mr. Anon
    It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution, love to dump all over the US Postal Service as being emblematic of government waste and incompetence, when a postal service is one of the few federal government functions explicitly mandated by the Constitution.

    It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution

    From DC Madam’s secret recordings:

    [Client TC]: “I’m nervous. I’ve never done this before.”
    [Escort]: “Just relax, and tell me what you like.”
    [Client TC]: “I like the Constitution.”

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  44. @Thursday
    This is probably obvious, but I'm going to state it anyway. Black majority states can be decent enough places to live, if decidedly not at Western levels of prosperity, if they are relatively small. I once went on Wikipedia and compared the standard of living in black African countries. All the half decent countries had a low population, under 10 million.

    Possible reasons:

    1. Smaller countries have more ethnic homogeneity.
    2. It's just plain easier to run a small country well.

    Your assertion contradicts what I think I know about sub-Saharan Africa. Would you please provide a definition of “half decent”, list the sub-Saharan countries that you think qualify as “half decent” by this definition, and then provide evidence that they do in fact qualify. Otherwise, I’m claiming BS. I may claim BS anyway but then at least we’ll be able to have a discussion.

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  45. 1. Presumably hashtagBLM can be taken as an example of the state being weakened or made less effective. I don’t necessarily agree with Acemoglu’s thesis, but I don’t know that this is a counterexample.

    2. What are UPS, FedEx, DHL, …, if not perfectly viable private alternatives to USPS?

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    What are UPS, FedEx, DHL, …, if not perfectly viable private alternatives to USPS?

    Are any of them interested in delivering letters for ~50 cents?
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  46. @Steve Sailer
    The Brits and the Americans had good reasons to suspend their laissez-faire principles for their postal systems.

    Before the Revolution, Benjamin Franklin held the post of joint post master general for the British colonies from 1753 on . He so successfully used his position to promulgate the spread Patriot propaganda and suppress Loyalist that he was dismissed from this post in 1774. I suspect that Franklin played a major role ensuring that the postal service was enshrined in the Constitution. I also suspect that this was at least partly to ensure that the new government could prevent someone like Franklin from easily subverting the new government.

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  47. Economics pretends to be a science, we all know that it is not.

    Good on you, and him, for not allowing his delusions to end your childhood friendship, although one has to suspect there is a point where …

    Mr. Sailer’s post makes it clear that this
    Acemoglu is a fool, but Acemoglu gets one style point from me, just for ignoring the split infinitive paranoia (he may well not be aware of it), and not postfixing the adverb when prefixing it is more natural.

    ‘to critically investigate this issue.’

    Not that the sentence made much sense, but kudos for placing the adverb in the best place.

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  48. @anonymous-antimarxist
    Steve

    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor, Aaron Acemoglu, who has very little understanding of or respect for American or British history.

    Yet Acemoglu has nonetheless has become famous for writing a kind of vapid "Virtue Signaling" brand of pseudo economics explaining all we need to know about how bad the evil West has exploited the third world and non-white races.

    And Acemoglu having absolutely no understanding of evolution or HBD is being interview by the charlatan "Evolutionary Biologist" David Sloan Wilson who pushes the repeatedly discredited yet politically correct version of Human Evolution known as "Group Evolution Theory".

    Well at least Acemoglu is an outspoken advocate of marijuana legalization on purely economic principles grounds.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Sloan_Wilson

    Wilson is a prominent proponent of the concept of group selection (also known as multi-level selection) in evolution. He and Elliott Sober proposed a framework called multilevel selection theory, which incorporates the more orthodox approach of gene-level selection and individual selection, in their book Unto Others. This framework argues that while genes serve as the means by which organisms' designs are transmitted across generations, individuals and groups are vehicles for those genes and both are arenas for genes to act on.
     
    Just another case of the "Politically Correct" leading the "Politically Correct".

    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor

    You mean he comes from that culture that exploited and oppressed a chunk of the whole globe for 500 years and was responsible for the first modern genocide?

    Seriously, call this hypocrite out, somebody.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Acemoglu is Armenian.
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  49. @Harry Baldwin
    Another version of 19th century internet was the "Notes & Queries" column you saw in many journals and newspapers. People would post questions, and in subsequent editions the questions might be answered by someone who knew the answer.

    There was even a dedicated weekly journal, Notes and Queries, founded in London in 1849 as "a medium of intercommunication for literary men, artists, antiquaries, genealogists, etc."

    There was also the “agony column” in most newspapers. You could buy an ad (very cheaply) saying “I lost my hat at Charing Cross Station” and have a reasonable chance of getting it back. Or write about graver issues. Many used it as a sort of Craiglist “missed connections.” Some found long-lost relatives that way. It only worked if lots of people read it, which apparently many did.

    Steve, I read in one book about high Victorian England that in the 2nd half the 19th century up to WW1, the mail was delivered in central London 13 times per day.

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    • Replies: @poolside

    There was also the “agony column” in most newspapers ... It only worked if lots of people read it, which apparently many did.
     
    When I worked for a newspaper in the '80s, we often used our own classified advertising section to find sources for stories. We'd come up with a feature idea -- say, for example, "people who collect model trains" -- than take out a classified ad asking for sources.

    It worked every time.
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  50. “It sounds, actually, as if in 21st century America, black political power correlates with a higher rate of blacks shooting each other, which certainly raises difficult questions for Professor Acemoglu’s Inclusiveness theory. A close student of evolution, on the other hand, might come up with some interesting hypotheses for why that is.”

    The domestication of plants and animals led to the advent of civilization, and not the least important animal domesticated was man himself. Finding ways to retard the reproductive fitness of those whose temperaments don’t seem to work well with civilization has been the government’s job for thousands of years. Race never had anything to do with it, not should it today. That is one of the unwritten job descriptions of the mayor of Baltimore, Detroit, and other places with large numbers of people who seem genetically incapable of modern life.

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  51. Let’s take a look at Daron Acemoglu’s argument. He says that counties that received a post office were the ones most likely to patent and “innovate.” (Whatever innovate means)

    This reasoning is bizarre as a means of demonstrating that US government played a “defining role and innovations.”

    First, most innovations probably came from counties with larger populations. It is extremely likely that the more people a town or district had, the more likely it was to have a post office.

    Second, the establishment of a post office likely comes when a town is settled and furnished with essential services. Free time to innovate will not be created until the work of building a town is complete and there are ample supplies to support the thinkers.

    Third, and this one is the most important, it is necessary to have a method to send patents requests to have them published. One cannot send in a patent or create one if he has no means to have it published. He can invent but the inventions are not officially his until someone in government acknowledges it.

    A post office is necessary for someone to send in a patent. This, by no means, would imply that post offices magically created inventors. It’s simply the practical fact that they were necessary to patenting things. This is basic industrial organization. An equivalent argument would be that the presence of schools cause more children to be born.

    This is indicative of the greater problem with economics. Regression analysis and correlations are strong statistical tools but economists, particularly the odious macro type, often use them too freely. This is why definite macro pronunciations are absurd and flimsy – there are too many changing variables and people changing their preferences to establish any reliable patterns.

    Consequently, this is the basis of why a freer market works better than a command economy.

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    • Replies: @Jeremiahjohnbalaya
    This is indicative of the greater problem with economics. Regression analysis and correlations are strong statistical tools but economists, particularly the odious macro type, often use them too freely.

    Not to mention mining for results. In this case, they found the magical four lags. From the paper:

    In column 1, we just have the one period lagged post office variable on the right-hand side. This variable is not significant. This picture changes dramatically when we add four lags of post office in column 2.2 Now the second lag is positive and significant at 10%. The third and the fourth lags are larger and more precisely estimated, and in consequence, statistically signiÖcant at less than 1%. This pattern is plausible and suggests that it is mostly the presence of post offices in the previous two decades or so that is most strongly associated with increases in patenting activity.

    I grabbed the paper because I was interested in playing around with the actual data used. There's obviously an assumption that the post-office numbers and the patent applications are fairly accurate (although there would also be an assumption that the patent application's location-of-origin is not corrupted by being associated with the post office used to transmit). But I was curious about how noisy other potentially confounding (and supposedly accounted for) data might be.

    By the way, Steve, lot's of great comments on this post.

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  52. @Anonymous
    I've never had any problems with the Post Office or with sending or receiving mail. It's always worked fine and efficiently for me.

    Many postal systems around the world provide basic banking services and savings accounts. Japan's postal savings has the most deposits in the world. They make sense since the post office already has the infrastructure of a national banking network anyway, and since the government already insures commercial deposits and since taxpayers already bail out the banks anyway. It would be good to have a low cost, no frills public option for basic banking services, rather than subsidizing private banks to take risks with our money without even giving any returns to depositors, who get essentially no interest and are charged lots of fees.

    “It would be good to have a low cost, no frills public option for basic banking services, rather than subsidizing private banks to take risks with our money without even giving any returns to depositors, who get essentially no interest and are charged lots of fees.”

    There are plenty of low fee banking options for those willing to shop around a bit, willing to keep a quite small minimum balance (often just $200 or so), who don’t bounce checks, and who don’t use out-of-network ATMs. I can’t remember the last time I paid a banking fee of any kind other than closing costs or interest on a loan. I still maintain a small secondary account in a bank which I kept after switching most of my business to a competitor. It’s only about a $200 balance, and I never touch it, but they never charge me any fees.

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  53. @Clyde

    A life-long friend is an economist who heads a university MBA program. I remain his friend — and he still gets to run a university program. Anonymously, I say economics is a crock.
     
    Proof that it is a crock. Can you think of any US University that has an economics department with a number of professors teaching the truth about mercantilism and "free trade"? Can you think of any major US economics professors who write the same?
    For proof that free trade is an "Anglo" conceit and delusion just go to any strong intelligent NE Asian nation (Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan etc) and see what is taught in their university economics departments. Somehow I doubt it is free trade theology-ideology and pro-immigration ideology. China's President once told GW Bush that his biggest challenge was providing 20 million new jobs each year. Such an attitude does not allow for immigration and I don't blame them.

    Macro is nearly a complete crock. Micro has a lot of shades of truth to it and is the closest any social science is to being truly “scientific.” (Still not very close)

    Some economists are simply “know-it-alls” who think their divine least squares predictions make them masters of all knowledge. Steven Levitt comes off this way at times.

    Many universities do teach alternative macro ideas. However, much of those alternative theories are expanding upon failures in the basic theories. Most students don’t get beyond the basics so this is part of the problem.

    However, even at the schools you may consider THE most free market and free trade, there are considerable numbers of professors who work refuting those orthodoxies. And tbey teach a lot of undergraduate coursework. Again, most students are too busy worrying about premed, socialism, team sports or black lives sophistry to bother.

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    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    Micro has a lot of shades of truth to it and is the closest any social science is to being truly “scientific.”
     
    I'd argue that demography is much more of a science. There is a core theory that has been thoroughly mathematized via the Lotka-Volterra equation in its many variant forms. The mathematics has led to many derived quantitative models with predictive power and that often provide ideas for controlling demographic phenomena. These models are readily testable/falsifiable against empirical phenomena that are easy to define and measure. For examples see, e.g., the work of Nathan Keyfitz, Ansley Coale, David Heer, et al.

    On the margins there is still plenty of room in demography for new models explaining the fine points of, e.g., changes in fertility and migration patterns. Some of the best work in fields such as economics and sociology has been done in these areas. Again, the resulting models are readily testable against real empirical data.

    Microeconomics has a long way to go before catching up, e.g., how does one define and measure marginal utility without reverting to circular reasoning.
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  54. @Mr. Anon
    It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution, love to dump all over the US Postal Service as being emblematic of government waste and incompetence, when a postal service is one of the few federal government functions explicitly mandated by the Constitution.

    The principle behind the Constitutional mandating of the Post Office is worthy of consideration. The Founding Fathers wanted to guarantee a cheap reliable politically neutral communication system.

    The modern equivalent of this is not FedEx (shipping was mostly separate from mail back in 1776) but the phone system and the internet.

    Obligatory mention of The Crying of Lot 49.

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    • Replies: @Bill
    Come on now. Obviously the Post Office is infinitely inferior to Comcast. Who are you going to believe: Murray Rothbard or your lying eyes?
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  55. Stop crying about who controls the government, worry about how large and all-powerful it is.

    You want the kind of government that if your worse enemy controlled it, you would be fine.

    The postmaster general was a big position in early America because the national government had no police force, no police power, no domestic spying function, the military was prevented from acting domestically, there was little national tax to punish enemies and reward supporters, etc. A powerful government means everyone has to expand maximum effort on political action to save their own bacon.

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  56. @Buzz Mohawk
    A life-long friend is an economist who heads a university MBA program. He has some books to his credit. I have noticed that he has been wrong and often backward in the most significant claims and predictions he has made in his specialty.

    He keeps original assumptions he's had since I knew him in high school, and all the BS has been piled on top of them. If only those givens had been true...

    Nevertheless, I remain his friend -- and he still gets to run a university program.

    Anonymously, I say economics is a crock. (Excepting micro principles applied to running a business)

    Economists remind me of stockbrokers: seldom right, but perfectly happy to put on suits and get paid for being experts. No, economists are even worse, because they also gladly write things to push political agendas.

    ” . . . [He] has been wrong and often backward . . .”. My local state university accepted a seven-figure grant from a very naïve donor. Several insiders, myself included, were shocked, because we knew the research to be funded would run into fierce opposition from internal constituencies and other potential donors. We needn’t have worried. The dean who controls the grant is squandering it on celebrity speakers and vocationally oriented continuing education. There’s no research at all being done. No one notices; no one seems to care.

    I’m not sure that story is helpful, but a lot of academic research is dunnage, just plain old careerist place-holding. The quality is less important than its mere existence.

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    • Replies: @Clyde

    I’m not sure that story is helpful, but a lot of academic research is dunnage, just plain old careerist place-holding. The quality is less important than its mere existence.
     
    Just as I suspected. Mortgages and children's tuition to pay. At least if they are married...to someone of the opposite sex. So you churn things a bit like the old time stockbrokers. Making movement seem like progress.
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  57. @Jefferson
    "As a result, you have wanton police brutality against our African-American citizens, which the most powerful president on earth can do nothing about.”

    This economist acts like the police are killing law abiding old Black church ladies and not Omar Little types from The Wire.

    The type of Black men who are being killed by the police are not the type of men that the econonmist would want his daughter to date once she turns 18, that is if he has a daughter.

    Secretly I don't think even Hussein Obama would want any of his daughters to date Michael Brown, if he was still alive. He would have been a bad thug influence on his daughters. He would want his daughters to date Black men who are part of the talented tenth. Significantly younger versions of Dr. Ben Carson, Thomas Sowell, Herman Cain, and Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    It is mostly men being killed by the police, but they kill “old black church ladies” as well. The Kathryn Johnson case is notable for all the lengths the police went to cover it up and falsify evidence.

    I live in Chicago and am currently having issues with my bank because they keep trying to use the postal service to send me mail, which means I never receive it. Packages from FedEx come through, any my utility bills (perhaps they have an arrangement with the building manager), along with junk for previous tenenants.

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    • Replies: @Big Bill

    It is mostly men being killed by the police, but they kill “old black church ladies” as well.
     
    That's the wonderful thing about the police this year. They are listening to the Negro Community. In Chicago they have ceased doing street stops (aka "profiling"), which are now down 90%+ and are letting the Negro Community deal with corner dope dealers (read: "victimless crimes") the way the Negro Community sees fit. Really, why hassle young black gangstas when no black person is going to testify.
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  58. @Clyde

    The Brits and the Americans had good reasons to suspend their laissez-faire principles for their postal systems.
     
    They were the internet of the day so of course had high status and respect. Post Masters has to be masters of politics and horse powered delivery technology. Like the Zuckerbergs of today once you strip away the spergy traitorousness. Strip out the pluocratic money grubbing too because Post Masters served the American people at government pay. The last Post Master General who comes to mind is James Farley who was also a high level political operative.

    What about Wilford Brimley?

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  59. “For example, in Baltimore last year, you had black riots over a black career criminal dying at the hands of black cops in a city with a black police chief, black DA, and a black mayor, in a country with a black attorney general and a black president promoting #BlackLivesMatter . . .”

    Is that all you got? Weak.

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  60. @Thursday
    This is probably obvious, but I'm going to state it anyway. Black majority states can be decent enough places to live, if decidedly not at Western levels of prosperity, if they are relatively small. I once went on Wikipedia and compared the standard of living in black African countries. All the half decent countries had a low population, under 10 million.

    Possible reasons:

    1. Smaller countries have more ethnic homogeneity.
    2. It's just plain easier to run a small country well.

    Thursday, I have to disagree with you. The top 25 worst places to live for quality of live and economy is dominated by countries of Africa. Maybe a short camera safari, but not a play to live.

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  61. @yaqub the mad scientist
    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor...

    You mean he comes from that culture that exploited and oppressed a chunk of the whole globe for 500 years and was responsible for the first modern genocide?

    Seriously, call this hypocrite out, somebody.

    Acemoglu is Armenian.

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    • Replies: @5371
    He's married to an ethnic Turk, though, and the current Turkish regime apparently thought him potentially sympathetic enough to consider offering him an ambassadorship.
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  62. @Mr. Anon
    It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution, love to dump all over the US Postal Service as being emblematic of government waste and incompetence, when a postal service is one of the few federal government functions explicitly mandated by the Constitution.

    Have you used the post office? At least in an area with a significant number of blacks? I’m sure that many people have had nothing but good experiences with the USPS, but that has not been my experience.

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  63. @Lot
    Law abiding high IQ societies will set up postal services early. that does not mean the postal service itself did much.

    As I've noted a before, almost all good human traits are correlated, both on an individual and group basis. Good table manners are correlated with honesty, IQ is correlated with creativity, good health is correlated with good looks, verbal IQ is correlated with math IQ. It goes on and on. A lazy social scientist could churn out 1000 studies showing one positive trait is linked to another.

    >Good table manners are correlated with honesty,

    My father is living proof that this correlation is less than 1.

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  64. @anonymous-antimarxist
    Steve

    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor, Aaron Acemoglu, who has very little understanding of or respect for American or British history.

    Yet Acemoglu has nonetheless has become famous for writing a kind of vapid "Virtue Signaling" brand of pseudo economics explaining all we need to know about how bad the evil West has exploited the third world and non-white races.

    And Acemoglu having absolutely no understanding of evolution or HBD is being interview by the charlatan "Evolutionary Biologist" David Sloan Wilson who pushes the repeatedly discredited yet politically correct version of Human Evolution known as "Group Evolution Theory".

    Well at least Acemoglu is an outspoken advocate of marijuana legalization on purely economic principles grounds.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Sloan_Wilson

    Wilson is a prominent proponent of the concept of group selection (also known as multi-level selection) in evolution. He and Elliott Sober proposed a framework called multilevel selection theory, which incorporates the more orthodox approach of gene-level selection and individual selection, in their book Unto Others. This framework argues that while genes serve as the means by which organisms' designs are transmitted across generations, individuals and groups are vehicles for those genes and both are arenas for genes to act on.
     
    Just another case of the "Politically Correct" leading the "Politically Correct".

    Group evolution theory is PC? Hmm. Tell Kevin MacDonald that he’s PC. I’m sure he could use a laugh.

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Group evolution theory is PC? Hmm. Tell Kevin MacDonald that he’s PC. I’m sure he could use a laugh.
     
    No kidding. Apparently, Lewontin didn't understand the implications and liked the idea of "group selection", so maybe that's where this strange notion comes from.
    , @ben tillman
    Delete - duplicate
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  65. @Lot
    Amazon got the USPS to start limited Sunday delivery. I also last week got my first same-day Amazon delivery. Ordered at 9am, it arrived around 5:30pm. Shipping was free.

    “I also last week got my first same-day Amazon delivery. Ordered at 9am, it arrived around 5:30pm. Shipping was free.”

    The order packers and truck driver shipped your package without requiring remuneration of any sort? Amazing stuff going on there, slaver. Kinda like how some people believe free all-you-can-eat healthcare is a fundamental human right, I suppose…….

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  66. @Steve Sailer
    LBJ's postmaster general Larry O'Brien was the guy whose office the Watergate Burglars were burgling.

    As well as the last goy NBA commissioner!

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Yeah, and he "merged" with the ABA in the same way England merged with his Irish ancestors.
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  67. @whorefinder
    FDR even went so far as to use the post office to threaten political enemies.

    FDR's second postmaster general was Frank Walker. At the time, there was a huge radio personality named Father Charles Coughlin who also ran a political journal. Coughlin was very critical of Jewish influence, and was extremely left wing. He initially supported FDR's new deal, but then thought it didn't go far enough, and started sympathizing with Mussolini and Hitler and liked their extreme government interference in human affairs, as well as Hitler's dislike of Jewish influence.

    By 1942, Walker attempted to literally shut down Father Coughlin's mailing privileges---he had a hearing scheduled to ban Coughlin from using the U.S. mail to send his pro-fascist, anti-FDR materials to Coughlin's numerous subscribers. But the FDR's AG didn't want that to become the public free speech fiasco it could have been. So he got the meeting postponed and convinced the bishop to shut Coughlin's operation down, including the mailing list. Walker cancelled the hearing.

    In FDR's slight defense, it was severe wartime, with the definite possibility of invasion, so a seditious, pro-Nazi leader with a large audience was a bigger problem than in peacetime. However, think about it: could you imagine someone actually being banned from using the freakin' mail?

    Anyone familiar with Royal Oak, Michigan today would be surprised to learn that someone like Coughlin was based there.

    Incidentally, and very relevantly to this post, Royal Oak was also where a postal worker killed four [former] colleagues and himself after being fired from the USPS in 1991.

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  68. @Steve Sailer
    But West Indian islands that are orderly enough for rich white people to want to vacation there are achieving something. These cultures that produce Tim Duncan-like personalities are doing something right.

    If you look at Africa itself, countries like Gabon and Botswana don’t look like hell holes either. Botswana has problems with AIDS, but it’s peaceful and prosperous for an African country. Namibia is decent too.

    I should have mentioned population density. Namibia, Gabon and Botswana all have very low population density.

    The worst places in Africa tend to be the larger countries: Somalia, Sudan, Nigeria, Congo. Though there are some small, but dense places that are awful too.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Somalia is physically large, but has only the population of Massachusetts. Or, I should say, the population size of Massachusetts. There's no Mogadishu Institute of Technology.

    Whatever their problems, population density isn't one of them.
    , @benjaminl
    And Botswana has diamonds...

    Steve discussed the interesting case of Ukara Island in Lake Victoria

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/an-island-where-africans-act-like-asians/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukara_Island
    https://mises.org/library/lesson-ukara

    John Reader’s Africa: Biography of a Continent provides a fascinating example of a not very African place in the heart of Africa: the island of Ukara in Lake Victoria in northwest Tanzania, in which a favorable environment leads to a Malthusian trap, which seems to lead to more Eurasian-like behavior.
     

    The island is notable for its unique indigenous system of labor-intensive mixed farming, using advanced agricultural techniques, and a correspondingly high population density.
     
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  69. I think the real takeaway here is a little different: Acemoglu, like almost everyone on earth these days, is promoting the fiction that government drives business. The Federal Reserve and other central banks talk like they are literally overseeing crews with shovels. Obama articulated the standard viewpoint well with his “you didn’t build that” comment.

    Like it or not (and most people hate it) government could disappear tomorrow and businesses that deserved to survive would do just fine.

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    • Replies: @Bill
    Exactly. Look at the era of peace and plenty which occurred just after the Western Empire fell. It may not have been as awesome as Somalia is today, but it was pretty great!
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  70. @Steve Sailer
    Acemoglu is Armenian.

    He’s married to an ethnic Turk, though, and the current Turkish regime apparently thought him potentially sympathetic enough to consider offering him an ambassadorship.

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  71. @Clyde

    A life-long friend is an economist who heads a university MBA program. I remain his friend — and he still gets to run a university program. Anonymously, I say economics is a crock.
     
    Proof that it is a crock. Can you think of any US University that has an economics department with a number of professors teaching the truth about mercantilism and "free trade"? Can you think of any major US economics professors who write the same?
    For proof that free trade is an "Anglo" conceit and delusion just go to any strong intelligent NE Asian nation (Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan etc) and see what is taught in their university economics departments. Somehow I doubt it is free trade theology-ideology and pro-immigration ideology. China's President once told GW Bush that his biggest challenge was providing 20 million new jobs each year. Such an attitude does not allow for immigration and I don't blame them.

    For proof that free trade is an “Anglo” conceit and delusion just go to any strong intelligent NE Asian nation…

    …who will happily tell you that the crackers were wrong and the hated Yankees right. I can see you sure aren’t Clyde Wilson.

    How are your solar-panel stocks doing, by the way? The free traders say they’re hooey, like high-speed rail, but the mercantilists say they’re the future.

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    • Replies: @Clyde
    Oil at $36 the other day makes solar and wind ridiculous and I can see oil staying at that price for 10 more years. Chinese are the low low cost solar panel producers so have not been hit as hard as Solyndra and other solar corporations and schemers in Europe and America. Chinese do well with their mercantilist trade policies and the proof is their high trade surpluses, then taking these excess dollars to buy US, Canadian, Australian real estate. Mercantilism has also served Korea well, Taiwan and Japan.
    Say hello to your new overseas Chinese neighbor!
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  72. @Thursday
    If you look at Africa itself, countries like Gabon and Botswana don't look like hell holes either. Botswana has problems with AIDS, but it's peaceful and prosperous for an African country. Namibia is decent too.

    I should have mentioned population density. Namibia, Gabon and Botswana all have very low population density.

    The worst places in Africa tend to be the larger countries: Somalia, Sudan, Nigeria, Congo. Though there are some small, but dense places that are awful too.

    Somalia is physically large, but has only the population of Massachusetts. Or, I should say, the population size of Massachusetts. There’s no Mogadishu Institute of Technology.

    Whatever their problems, population density isn’t one of them.

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    • Replies: @Thursday
    Somalia is about 10 million, so fair enough, it's a medium size African country.

    On density though it is 3 to 5 times more dense than Gabon-Botswana-Namibia.
    , @The most deplorable one

    There's no Mogadishu Institute of Technology.
     
    I am shocked, shocked I tell you.

    Please let it not become widely known or people might think the narrative is false.

    , @Bill B.
    Well actually...


    https://www.facebook.com/MOGADISHUINSTITUTE/
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  73. @Anonymous
    Socialist dirtbags would rather force everybody to use snail mail than let a man succeed.

    Jealousy is a bitch.

    “Socialist dirtbags would rather force everybody to use snail mail than let a man succeed.

    Jealousy is a bitch.”

    Apparently, you are too stupid to notice that I never said that FedEx should not exist.

    Libertarian assholes like the Constitution in theory, but not in practice. The USPS is actually mandated by the actually existing Constitution. By the way, every single libertarian economics professor at a public university is a hypocrite and should be fired.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    By the way, every single libertarian economics professor at a public university is a hypocrite and should be fired
     
    As is every opponent of public transit who drives on a road taken by eminent domain and built with a subsidy. Funny, though, those aren't all, or even mostly, libertarians.
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  74. @Brutusale
    As well as the last goy NBA commissioner!

    Yeah, and he “merged” with the ABA in the same way England merged with his Irish ancestors.

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  75. @Lot
    Amazon got the USPS to start limited Sunday delivery. I also last week got my first same-day Amazon delivery. Ordered at 9am, it arrived around 5:30pm. Shipping was free.

    I understand that package delivery makes money for the post-office, and that the E-tail boom has been a great boon to them. Of course, letter delivery wouldn’t be such a money loser if the postal service did not offer discount rates for junk-mail.

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  76. @Reg Cæsar
    Somalia is physically large, but has only the population of Massachusetts. Or, I should say, the population size of Massachusetts. There's no Mogadishu Institute of Technology.

    Whatever their problems, population density isn't one of them.

    Somalia is about 10 million, so fair enough, it’s a medium size African country.

    On density though it is 3 to 5 times more dense than Gabon-Botswana-Namibia.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Gabon has oil.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    I erred. The states closest to Somalia in population are Georgia, North Carolina, and Michigan. The least crowded of those, Georgia, still has four times the population density of Somalia.
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  77. Even in the Caribbean, smaller black run places, which aren’t tax havens,like St Lucia, are pretty livable, especially compared to somewhere like Jamaica. They’re dependant on tourism, of course, but that just points up that they are decent enough.

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  78. @whorefinder
    FDR even went so far as to use the post office to threaten political enemies.

    FDR's second postmaster general was Frank Walker. At the time, there was a huge radio personality named Father Charles Coughlin who also ran a political journal. Coughlin was very critical of Jewish influence, and was extremely left wing. He initially supported FDR's new deal, but then thought it didn't go far enough, and started sympathizing with Mussolini and Hitler and liked their extreme government interference in human affairs, as well as Hitler's dislike of Jewish influence.

    By 1942, Walker attempted to literally shut down Father Coughlin's mailing privileges---he had a hearing scheduled to ban Coughlin from using the U.S. mail to send his pro-fascist, anti-FDR materials to Coughlin's numerous subscribers. But the FDR's AG didn't want that to become the public free speech fiasco it could have been. So he got the meeting postponed and convinced the bishop to shut Coughlin's operation down, including the mailing list. Walker cancelled the hearing.

    In FDR's slight defense, it was severe wartime, with the definite possibility of invasion, so a seditious, pro-Nazi leader with a large audience was a bigger problem than in peacetime. However, think about it: could you imagine someone actually being banned from using the freakin' mail?

    It happened in the 1840s. Postmasters were given the authority to impound “seditious literature”. A policy touched off when post offices in South Carolina discovered anti-slavery tracts and booklets were being sent through the mail.

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  79. @Yak-15
    Let's take a look at Daron Acemoglu's argument. He says that counties that received a post office were the ones most likely to patent and "innovate." (Whatever innovate means)

    This reasoning is bizarre as a means of demonstrating that US government played a "defining role and innovations."

    First, most innovations probably came from counties with larger populations. It is extremely likely that the more people a town or district had, the more likely it was to have a post office.

    Second, the establishment of a post office likely comes when a town is settled and furnished with essential services. Free time to innovate will not be created until the work of building a town is complete and there are ample supplies to support the thinkers.

    Third, and this one is the most important, it is necessary to have a method to send patents requests to have them published. One cannot send in a patent or create one if he has no means to have it published. He can invent but the inventions are not officially his until someone in government acknowledges it.

    A post office is necessary for someone to send in a patent. This, by no means, would imply that post offices magically created inventors. It's simply the practical fact that they were necessary to patenting things. This is basic industrial organization. An equivalent argument would be that the presence of schools cause more children to be born.

    This is indicative of the greater problem with economics. Regression analysis and correlations are strong statistical tools but economists, particularly the odious macro type, often use them too freely. This is why definite macro pronunciations are absurd and flimsy - there are too many changing variables and people changing their preferences to establish any reliable patterns.

    Consequently, this is the basis of why a freer market works better than a command economy.

    This is indicative of the greater problem with economics. Regression analysis and correlations are strong statistical tools but economists, particularly the odious macro type, often use them too freely.

    Not to mention mining for results. In this case, they found the magical four lags. From the paper:

    In column 1, we just have the one period lagged post office variable on the right-hand side. This variable is not significant. This picture changes dramatically when we add four lags of post office in column 2.2 Now the second lag is positive and significant at 10%. The third and the fourth lags are larger and more precisely estimated, and in consequence, statistically signiÖcant at less than 1%. This pattern is plausible and suggests that it is mostly the presence of post offices in the previous two decades or so that is most strongly associated with increases in patenting activity.

    I grabbed the paper because I was interested in playing around with the actual data used. There’s obviously an assumption that the post-office numbers and the patent applications are fairly accurate (although there would also be an assumption that the patent application’s location-of-origin is not corrupted by being associated with the post office used to transmit). But I was curious about how noisy other potentially confounding (and supposedly accounted for) data might be.

    By the way, Steve, lot’s of great comments on this post.

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  80. @Anonymous
    The CPUSA also proclaims to have that, or words to that effect, as its mission.

    “The CPUSA also proclaims to have that, or words to that effect, as its mission.”

    Is this the left version of the reductio-ad-Hitlerum? Communists drink coffee, therefore coffee is communist, or something.

    The Postal Service actually has served the nation pretty well since its founding.

    You guys are really just making my original point for me. Thanks. Keep up the good work.

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  81. @Yak-15
    Macro is nearly a complete crock. Micro has a lot of shades of truth to it and is the closest any social science is to being truly "scientific." (Still not very close)

    Some economists are simply "know-it-alls" who think their divine least squares predictions make them masters of all knowledge. Steven Levitt comes off this way at times.

    Many universities do teach alternative macro ideas. However, much of those alternative theories are expanding upon failures in the basic theories. Most students don't get beyond the basics so this is part of the problem.

    However, even at the schools you may consider THE most free market and free trade, there are considerable numbers of professors who work refuting those orthodoxies. And tbey teach a lot of undergraduate coursework. Again, most students are too busy worrying about premed, socialism, team sports or black lives sophistry to bother.

    Micro has a lot of shades of truth to it and is the closest any social science is to being truly “scientific.”

    I’d argue that demography is much more of a science. There is a core theory that has been thoroughly mathematized via the Lotka-Volterra equation in its many variant forms. The mathematics has led to many derived quantitative models with predictive power and that often provide ideas for controlling demographic phenomena. These models are readily testable/falsifiable against empirical phenomena that are easy to define and measure. For examples see, e.g., the work of Nathan Keyfitz, Ansley Coale, David Heer, et al.

    On the margins there is still plenty of room in demography for new models explaining the fine points of, e.g., changes in fertility and migration patterns. Some of the best work in fields such as economics and sociology has been done in these areas. Again, the resulting models are readily testable against real empirical data.

    Microeconomics has a long way to go before catching up, e.g., how does one define and measure marginal utility without reverting to circular reasoning.

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  82. Shoot I missed a closing tag. Post should have been..

    [Yak-15 said] This is indicative of the greater problem with economics. Regression analysis and correlations are strong statistical tools but economists, particularly the odious macro type, often use them too freely.

    Not to mention mining for results. In this case, they found the magical four lags. From the paper:

    In column 1, we just have the one period lagged post office variable on the right-hand side. This variable is not significant. This picture changes dramatically when we add four lags of post office in column 2.2 Now the second lag is positive and significant at 10%. The third and the fourth lags are larger and more precisely estimated, and in consequence, statistically signiÖcant at less than 1%. This pattern is plausible and suggests that it is mostly the presence of post offices in the previous two decades or so that is most strongly associated with increases in patenting activity.

    I grabbed the paper because I was interested in playing around with the actual data used. There’s obviously an assumption that the post-office numbers and the patent applications are fairly accurate (although there would also be an assumption that the patent application’s location-of-origin is not corrupted by being associated with the post office used to transmit). But I was curious about how noisy other potentially confounding (and supposedly accounted for) data might be.

    By the way, Steve, lot’s of great comments on this post.

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  83. “a campaign of anti-white agitation which appears to have led to a large increase — especially in Baltimore but also nationally — of blacks murdering blacks (the homicide rate in 2015 in the 50 biggest cities was up 16% over 2014, with the worst spikes concentrated in heavily black cities.)”

    Is it really the case that the increase is only of blacks murdering other blacks? One would suppose that decreased policing of blacks would lead to an increase of blacks murdering everybody, especially given the documented black talent for ethnic out-murder.

    Even if the “blacks murdering blacks” formulation is meant to confound BLM rhetoric, it accepts the BLM assumption that only the lives of blacks matter.

    I’d try to answer this myself, but the FBI’s data ends with 2013.

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  84. It would be good to have a low cost, no frills public option for basic banking services, rather than subsidizing private banks to take risks with our money without even giving any returns to depositors, who get essentially no interest and are charged lots of fees.

    Let’s suppose that the public option bank paid higher interest on savings accounts than private enterprise banks.

    Where and how would the public option bank get the funds to pay higher interest?

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  85. …the Postmaster General was often the ruling party’s chief political fixer, such as James Farley under FDR and Larry O’Brien under LBJ.

    Postmaster General is, of course, a political-spoils appointment. But just think what might happen if you had some weak-willed, unscrupulous party hack running the P.O. They might be sorely tempted to intercept and read the opposition leaders’ mail prior to forwarding it along in a business-like way. That’s why it’s always well to have strong, incorruptible, neutral folks like Farley and O’Brien heading the operation. Just to make sure no hanky-panky takes place.

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  86. http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/articles/20399/black-victim-black-cop-black-county/

    Black cop called Jones shoots dead black student called Jones, who happens to be an acquaintance of Ta-Nehisi Coates who says police shooting of blacks is “the democratic will of the American people”.

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  87. @Steve Sailer
    LBJ's postmaster general Larry O'Brien was the guy whose office the Watergate Burglars were burgling.

    Steve, I had a brain fart. I thought LBJ was another alphabet term for some diverse groups, Lesbian, Bi, Jerkoffs or whatever

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  88. It takes a lot of verbiage to make people forget that your basic argument is that big gov’t doesn’t eat more than small gov’t.

    Sort of like how it takes a lot of verbiage to make people forget that your basic argument is that the law of supply and demand doesn’t apply to immigration and the labor market.

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  89. @Reg Cæsar

    For proof that free trade is an “Anglo” conceit and delusion just go to any strong intelligent NE Asian nation...
     
    ...who will happily tell you that the crackers were wrong and the hated Yankees right. I can see you sure aren't Clyde Wilson.

    How are your solar-panel stocks doing, by the way? The free traders say they're hooey, like high-speed rail, but the mercantilists say they're the future.

    Oil at $36 the other day makes solar and wind ridiculous and I can see oil staying at that price for 10 more years. Chinese are the low low cost solar panel producers so have not been hit as hard as Solyndra and other solar corporations and schemers in Europe and America. Chinese do well with their mercantilist trade policies and the proof is their high trade surpluses, then taking these excess dollars to buy US, Canadian, Australian real estate. Mercantilism has also served Korea well, Taiwan and Japan.
    Say hello to your new overseas Chinese neighbor!

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    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    Yeah, and those solar companies are doing so well:

    http://mishtalk.com/2016/04/01/from-10-billion-to-worthless-in-8-months-solar-hype-financial-engineering-at-its-finest/
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  90. The problem is that the United States has a white majority. As long as white continue to dominate the institutions racism and prejudice will continue to be the order of the day.

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    • Replies: @Romanian
    South Africa shows it can happen even with Whites at 10% of the population.
    , @dc.sunsets

    The problem is that the United States has a white majority. As long as white continue to dominate the institutions racism and prejudice will continue to be the order of the day.
     
    I sincerely hope this is satire.

    On the possibility it is not, I suggest separatism as a cure.

    Let me and my white, above 100 IQ fellows have a plot of land commensurate with our numbers as a percentage, and everyone else have their own plots of land as befits their preferences.

    I really, really, really am tired of people who couldn't rise above barbarism coasting along on my coattails. If blacks, browns and greens want to create their own little corners of Heaven on Earth, let them do it by themselves.

    Or are they incapable?
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  91. His reasoning leaves a lot to be desired, but I generally agree with his conclusion. We have to get over this libertarian/ish fixation over the size of government, relegate it to a back burner issue, and be more concerned over who controls the state and to whose benefit state power is exercised. Who, whom. A phrase I know everyone here is familiar with.

    https://countenance.wordpress.com/2016/01/29/coming-attractions-2/

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Certain types of people will tend to control the state, and they will have an incentive to tell other people that the size and power of the government don't matter, and not to worry about it. Which suggests that it's not simply some back burner issue.
    , @Former Darfur
    Small government constrained from abridging the freedom of association cannot implement affirmative action, the EEOC, or restrictions on who realtors and developers may or may not sell to. With these teeth pulled, all-white apartment buildings and neighborhoods are possible without raising the price so that minorities are kept out economically (which is what drives the formation of suburbs), and employers can hire who they want to, meaning NAMs are not hired unless they really benefit the organization-both in terms of their capabilities and in terms of how they affect the organization's image, esprit de corps, and ability to attract other workers.

    And of course, social redistributive programs would have to disappear.

    Libertarianism is pro-white in those senses.
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  92. @TGGP
    It is mostly men being killed by the police, but they kill "old black church ladies" as well. The Kathryn Johnson case is notable for all the lengths the police went to cover it up and falsify evidence.

    I live in Chicago and am currently having issues with my bank because they keep trying to use the postal service to send me mail, which means I never receive it. Packages from FedEx come through, any my utility bills (perhaps they have an arrangement with the building manager), along with junk for previous tenenants.

    It is mostly men being killed by the police, but they kill “old black church ladies” as well.

    That’s the wonderful thing about the police this year. They are listening to the Negro Community. In Chicago they have ceased doing street stops (aka “profiling”), which are now down 90%+ and are letting the Negro Community deal with corner dope dealers (read: “victimless crimes”) the way the Negro Community sees fit. Really, why hassle young black gangstas when no black person is going to testify.

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  93. @Mr. Anon
    It is amusing that the classical-liberal sort of Republican, who also wax rhapsodic about the Constitution, love to dump all over the US Postal Service as being emblematic of government waste and incompetence, when a postal service is one of the few federal government functions explicitly mandated by the Constitution.

    The Constitution provides for the post office, but does not grant it a monopoly. That is granted by the Private Express Statutes, which were only enforced when Lysander Spooner competed for post business in the 1840s.

    Spooner’s example is a staple of libertarian literature, as clearly even then the USPS was not a well run operation and he provided better and faster service.

    I have run into problems with both UPS and FedEx, but nothing like what I run into routinely with the USPS. It is an incredibly poorly run entity and its monopoly should have been ended decades, indeed centuries ago.

    That the GOP will do no more to end this than will the Democrats is reason enough for me to hope the GOP goes the way of the Whigs.

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  94. @countenance
    His reasoning leaves a lot to be desired, but I generally agree with his conclusion. We have to get over this libertarian/ish fixation over the size of government, relegate it to a back burner issue, and be more concerned over who controls the state and to whose benefit state power is exercised. Who, whom. A phrase I know everyone here is familiar with.

    https://countenance.wordpress.com/2016/01/29/coming-attractions-2/

    Certain types of people will tend to control the state, and they will have an incentive to tell other people that the size and power of the government don’t matter, and not to worry about it. Which suggests that it’s not simply some back burner issue.

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  95. @countenance
    His reasoning leaves a lot to be desired, but I generally agree with his conclusion. We have to get over this libertarian/ish fixation over the size of government, relegate it to a back burner issue, and be more concerned over who controls the state and to whose benefit state power is exercised. Who, whom. A phrase I know everyone here is familiar with.

    https://countenance.wordpress.com/2016/01/29/coming-attractions-2/

    Small government constrained from abridging the freedom of association cannot implement affirmative action, the EEOC, or restrictions on who realtors and developers may or may not sell to. With these teeth pulled, all-white apartment buildings and neighborhoods are possible without raising the price so that minorities are kept out economically (which is what drives the formation of suburbs), and employers can hire who they want to, meaning NAMs are not hired unless they really benefit the organization-both in terms of their capabilities and in terms of how they affect the organization’s image, esprit de corps, and ability to attract other workers.

    And of course, social redistributive programs would have to disappear.

    Libertarianism is pro-white in those senses.

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  96. I’m surprised Professor Acemoglu has the courage to show his face in public nowadays.

    His big theory that institutions are the prime driver of economic development was utterly falsified by more than ten years and trillions of dollars of US efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    It is hard to think of another economic theory that has been so zealously tested and so humiliatingly disproved (except communism, of course).

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    • Replies: @Numinous

    His big theory that institutions are the prime driver of economic development was utterly falsified by more than ten years and trillions of dollars of US efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan.
     
    The only theory that has been proven (or dis-proven, depending on your point of view) by the American misadventures of the previous decade is that pouring money into such projects has a pretty poor track record of building up institutions. Which is exactly what Acemoglu has been saying for years, if you bothered to read what he has written.
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  97. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    Somalia is physically large, but has only the population of Massachusetts. Or, I should say, the population size of Massachusetts. There's no Mogadishu Institute of Technology.

    Whatever their problems, population density isn't one of them.

    There’s no Mogadishu Institute of Technology.

    I am shocked, shocked I tell you.

    Please let it not become widely known or people might think the narrative is false.

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  98. @Thursday
    Somalia is about 10 million, so fair enough, it's a medium size African country.

    On density though it is 3 to 5 times more dense than Gabon-Botswana-Namibia.

    Gabon has oil.

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    • Replies: @Thursday
    Nigeria has oil.
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  99. @Steve Sailer
    That's kind of like Trump buying Royal Turnberry golf course and renaming it Trump Turnberry.

    There are only about 60 golf courses in the world with the right to use Royal in the title.

    General rule of thumb is that urban post offices are horrible and suburban or rural post offices are pleasant.

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  100. @Clyde

    The Brits and the Americans had good reasons to suspend their laissez-faire principles for their postal systems.
     
    They were the internet of the day so of course had high status and respect. Post Masters has to be masters of politics and horse powered delivery technology. Like the Zuckerbergs of today once you strip away the spergy traitorousness. Strip out the pluocratic money grubbing too because Post Masters served the American people at government pay. The last Post Master General who comes to mind is James Farley who was also a high level political operative.

    The central point is that postmaster positions were patronage jobs. When a new administration came in they’d hand them out as a way of cementing the loyalty of the locals across the US. As a result the postmasters were usually plugged into the party apparatus and loyal to the party in power.

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    • Replies: @Clyde
    True!
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  101. Curiously in the NYC area anyway, a lot of Chinese immigrants work for USPS.Not sure if this is true throughout the rest of the US.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Yup.
    , @FactsAreImportant
    It's true here in the suburbs of Columbus, Ohio too.
    , @Clyde

    Curiously in the NYC area anyway, a lot of Chinese immigrants work for USPS.Not sure if this is true throughout the rest of the US.
     
    With bar codes being slapped on all packages, some letters, how literate do you have to be these days. Most addresses are in computer generated type and not scribbled by pen so are more legible by humans and sorting machines.
    Many immigrants have captured certain government sectors for their own kind. How hard is this to see? Native borns need not apply unless you be black. I hear the whole NYC MTA transit is Caribbean black while 40 years ago the Irish ran it and the patronage jobs allocation. Chinese immigrants and Jamaicans/Caribbeans (yes them too!) were taught by their mommies and daddies that a gov't job is a good job with a loaded back end.
    , @poolside

    Curiously in the NYC area anyway, a lot of Chinese immigrants work for USPS.Not sure if this is true throughout the rest of the US.
     
    Definitely true in my Texas suburb. I haven't seen a white post office employee since the days of Newman on Seinfeld.
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  102. @Bugg
    Curiously in the NYC area anyway, a lot of Chinese immigrants work for USPS.Not sure if this is true throughout the rest of the US.

    Yup.

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  103. For example, in Baltimore last year, you had black riots over a black career criminal dying at the hands of black cops in a city with a black police chief, black DA, and a black mayor, in a country with a black attorney general and a black president promoting #BlackLivesMatter, a campaign of anti-white agitation which appears to have led to a large increase — especially in Baltimore but also nationally — of blacks murdering blacks

    I love reading Sailer for exactly these types of snappy come backs that are laugh out loud funny.

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  104. @JackOH
    " . . . [He] has been wrong and often backward . . .". My local state university accepted a seven-figure grant from a very naïve donor. Several insiders, myself included, were shocked, because we knew the research to be funded would run into fierce opposition from internal constituencies and other potential donors. We needn't have worried. The dean who controls the grant is squandering it on celebrity speakers and vocationally oriented continuing education. There's no research at all being done. No one notices; no one seems to care.

    I'm not sure that story is helpful, but a lot of academic research is dunnage, just plain old careerist place-holding. The quality is less important than its mere existence.

    I’m not sure that story is helpful, but a lot of academic research is dunnage, just plain old careerist place-holding. The quality is less important than its mere existence.

    Just as I suspected. Mortgages and children’s tuition to pay. At least if they are married…to someone of the opposite sex. So you churn things a bit like the old time stockbrokers. Making movement seem like progress.

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    • Replies: @JackOH
    "So you churn things a bit like the old time stockbrokers. Making movement seem like progress."

    Yep. The "'Smith' Center for the Study of X", funded by that seven-figure grant, is duly listed in the campus building directory. There's an older grad student who'll be happy to tell you the wonderful work the 'Smith' Center does. The one thing the 'Smith' Center won't do is actually study X, because the internal and external opposition is too strong. But, it'll give the false appearance of studying X, it'll develop an internal, aggrandizing constituency of its own, and, I suppose, in an indirect, big-picture way will stunt the careers of people who are willing to tackle the study of X.

    My point, I guess, is sort of obvious. More academic research isn't necessarily better; it may actually be worse than no research.
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  105. @Thursday
    This is probably obvious, but I'm going to state it anyway. Black majority states can be decent enough places to live, if decidedly not at Western levels of prosperity, if they are relatively small. I once went on Wikipedia and compared the standard of living in black African countries. All the half decent countries had a low population, under 10 million.

    Possible reasons:

    1. Smaller countries have more ethnic homogeneity.
    2. It's just plain easier to run a small country well.

    You went on Wikipedia to ascertain the quality of life. Good idea. Much safer than a hands on investigation.

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    • Replies: @Thursday
    While not the greatest places on earth, Gabon, Namibia, Botswana are all perfectly livable. I know some people are heavily invested in every last bit of black dominated Africa being a hell hole, but it isn't actually true.
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  106. @Thursday
    Somalia is about 10 million, so fair enough, it's a medium size African country.

    On density though it is 3 to 5 times more dense than Gabon-Botswana-Namibia.

    I erred. The states closest to Somalia in population are Georgia, North Carolina, and Michigan. The least crowded of those, Georgia, still has four times the population density of Somalia.

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    • Replies: @Thursday
    But, again, Somalia is 3-5 times denser than any of the more successful African countries.
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  107. @Mr. Anon
    "Socialist dirtbags would rather force everybody to use snail mail than let a man succeed.

    Jealousy is a bitch."

    Apparently, you are too stupid to notice that I never said that FedEx should not exist.

    Libertarian assholes like the Constitution in theory, but not in practice. The USPS is actually mandated by the actually existing Constitution. By the way, every single libertarian economics professor at a public university is a hypocrite and should be fired.

    By the way, every single libertarian economics professor at a public university is a hypocrite and should be fired

    As is every opponent of public transit who drives on a road taken by eminent domain and built with a subsidy. Funny, though, those aren’t all, or even mostly, libertarians.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "As is every opponent of public transit who drives on a road taken by eminent domain and built with a subsidy. Funny, though, those aren’t all, or even mostly, libertarians."

    Maybe. However I am neither opposed to eminent domain or public transit, subsidized or otherwise.
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  108. @Bugg
    Curiously in the NYC area anyway, a lot of Chinese immigrants work for USPS.Not sure if this is true throughout the rest of the US.

    It’s true here in the suburbs of Columbus, Ohio too.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    There's a DMV in a run-down Fergusonish part of Cincinnati that's staffed by strikingly attractive white recent college grads, male and female. The lines are 90% black.
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  109. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:
    @Clyde
    Oil at $36 the other day makes solar and wind ridiculous and I can see oil staying at that price for 10 more years. Chinese are the low low cost solar panel producers so have not been hit as hard as Solyndra and other solar corporations and schemers in Europe and America. Chinese do well with their mercantilist trade policies and the proof is their high trade surpluses, then taking these excess dollars to buy US, Canadian, Australian real estate. Mercantilism has also served Korea well, Taiwan and Japan.
    Say hello to your new overseas Chinese neighbor!
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  110. @whorefinder
    FDR even went so far as to use the post office to threaten political enemies.

    FDR's second postmaster general was Frank Walker. At the time, there was a huge radio personality named Father Charles Coughlin who also ran a political journal. Coughlin was very critical of Jewish influence, and was extremely left wing. He initially supported FDR's new deal, but then thought it didn't go far enough, and started sympathizing with Mussolini and Hitler and liked their extreme government interference in human affairs, as well as Hitler's dislike of Jewish influence.

    By 1942, Walker attempted to literally shut down Father Coughlin's mailing privileges---he had a hearing scheduled to ban Coughlin from using the U.S. mail to send his pro-fascist, anti-FDR materials to Coughlin's numerous subscribers. But the FDR's AG didn't want that to become the public free speech fiasco it could have been. So he got the meeting postponed and convinced the bishop to shut Coughlin's operation down, including the mailing list. Walker cancelled the hearing.

    In FDR's slight defense, it was severe wartime, with the definite possibility of invasion, so a seditious, pro-Nazi leader with a large audience was a bigger problem than in peacetime. However, think about it: could you imagine someone actually being banned from using the freakin' mail?

    You’re the top!
    You’re the great Houdini!
    You’re the top!
    You are Mussolini!

    1934 Cole Porter.

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    • Replies: @5371
    "You cannot take the Mussolini attitude here." PC Plod, to an Italian icecream seller who was refusing to move his cart, England 1934.
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  111. @Reg Cæsar

    By the way, every single libertarian economics professor at a public university is a hypocrite and should be fired
     
    As is every opponent of public transit who drives on a road taken by eminent domain and built with a subsidy. Funny, though, those aren't all, or even mostly, libertarians.

    “As is every opponent of public transit who drives on a road taken by eminent domain and built with a subsidy. Funny, though, those aren’t all, or even mostly, libertarians.”

    Maybe. However I am neither opposed to eminent domain or public transit, subsidized or otherwise.

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  112. @Clyde

    I used to have the worst Post Office in America in my neighborhood: the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was.
     
    I read that one intently and got some laughs at the Herculean levels of incompetence. The Chicago Post Office was so backed up that mountains of mail simply could not get delivered and the cruel truth was because the management was full of black AA incompetents.
    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1994/10/24/lost-in-the-mail

    Just to (almost) come right out and (almost) state the obvious…

    In my experience, the competence and efficiency of a given post office branch is heavily correlated with certain demographic characteristics.

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  113. @Thursday
    If you look at Africa itself, countries like Gabon and Botswana don't look like hell holes either. Botswana has problems with AIDS, but it's peaceful and prosperous for an African country. Namibia is decent too.

    I should have mentioned population density. Namibia, Gabon and Botswana all have very low population density.

    The worst places in Africa tend to be the larger countries: Somalia, Sudan, Nigeria, Congo. Though there are some small, but dense places that are awful too.

    And Botswana has diamonds…

    Steve discussed the interesting case of Ukara Island in Lake Victoria

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/an-island-where-africans-act-like-asians/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukara_Island

    https://mises.org/library/lesson-ukara

    John Reader’s Africa: Biography of a Continent provides a fascinating example of a not very African place in the heart of Africa: the island of Ukara in Lake Victoria in northwest Tanzania, in which a favorable environment leads to a Malthusian trap, which seems to lead to more Eurasian-like behavior.

    The island is notable for its unique indigenous system of labor-intensive mixed farming, using advanced agricultural techniques, and a correspondingly high population density.

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  114. @Reg Cæsar
    Somalia is physically large, but has only the population of Massachusetts. Or, I should say, the population size of Massachusetts. There's no Mogadishu Institute of Technology.

    Whatever their problems, population density isn't one of them.
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  115. @Steve Sailer
    Gabon has oil.

    Nigeria has oil.

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    • Replies: @Romanian
    First, Nigeria had the oil. Then Biafra had the oil, so Nigeria had to have the oil back again. So now Nigeria has the oil.
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  116. @Reg Cæsar
    I erred. The states closest to Somalia in population are Georgia, North Carolina, and Michigan. The least crowded of those, Georgia, still has four times the population density of Somalia.

    But, again, Somalia is 3-5 times denser than any of the more successful African countries.

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  117. @Father O'Hara
    You went on Wikipedia to ascertain the quality of life. Good idea. Much safer than a hands on investigation.

    While not the greatest places on earth, Gabon, Namibia, Botswana are all perfectly livable. I know some people are heavily invested in every last bit of black dominated Africa being a hell hole, but it isn’t actually true.

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  118. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Black majority states can be decent enough places to live…

    Possible reasons:

    1. Smaller countries have more ethnic homogeneity.
    2. It’s just plain easier to run a small country well.

    Reason #3. The local French military base, with it’s strangely obscure and convoluted relation to the ruling government (and which normally spends its time worrying about things like maritime safety and search & rescue), either has enough firepower to take on 3-5 local countries and win or can expand to this size very, very rapidly. It will suddenly pay attention if things get too out-of-line in the “host” country. If things get enough out of line, the Legion goes in.

    French overseas military bases

    Operation Serval

    The US seems to be catching up, though: United States Africa Command.

    So if the economy goes bad, the young can always join the Legion.

    In my more cynical moments I think there is a soft, more hidden, and more complex form of colonialism being established worldwide that, like PC, hides behind pretty white lies (“why, of course you are an independent and proud sovereign nation and worthy ally…”). We’re all being colonized by the globalists, I suppose.

    “France’s military ties with Africa strengthen”, The Economist, May 21st 2014:

    “…France currently maintains four permanent bases on the continent—Gabon, Senegal, Djibouti and in its overseas department of Réunion—which support its ongoing operations in the Central African Republic (CAR), Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Somalia. The strategic approach outlined by Mr Le Drian will increase France’s permanent presence in the region…”

    “Counterterrorism or Neo-Colonialism? The French Army in Africa”, Terrorism Monitor, Volume: 12 Issue: 5, March 6, 2014, John C. K. Daly:

    “…From 1960 to 2005, France launched 46 military operations in its former African colonies. …consistent policy for 54 years and is supported by an extensive network of bilateral Franco-African defense and military assistance treaties. …

    …Paris often sent military assistance contingent on a “legitimate” African leader’s willingness to support French interests. …”

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    One of my sons' friends joined the French Foreign Legion to escape from his pushy girlfriend. But she tracked down his new fake French name and is flying to Africa to bring him back.
    , @Desiderius

    In my more cynical moments I think there is a soft, more hidden, and more complex form of colonialism being established worldwide that, like PC, hides behind pretty white lies (“why, of course you are an independent and proud sovereign nation and worthy ally…”). We’re all being colonized by the globalists, I suppose.
     
    These days it doesn't much bother to hide itself.

    And yes, the principal front presently is the US.
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  119. @no name

    For example, in Baltimore last year, you had black riots over a black career criminal dying at the hands of black cops in a city with a black police chief, black DA, and a black mayor, in a country with a black attorney general and a black president promoting #BlackLivesMatter
     
    That's a powerful line. Sums up the zeitgeist perfectly.

    Yet all funded and manipulated by a satanic Hungarian.

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  120. @anonymous
    Black majority states can be decent enough places to live...

    Possible reasons:

    1. Smaller countries have more ethnic homogeneity.
    2. It’s just plain easier to run a small country well.



    Reason #3. The local French military base, with it's strangely obscure and convoluted relation to the ruling government (and which normally spends its time worrying about things like maritime safety and search & rescue), either has enough firepower to take on 3-5 local countries and win or can expand to this size very, very rapidly. It will suddenly pay attention if things get too out-of-line in the "host" country. If things get enough out of line, the Legion goes in.

    French overseas military bases

    Operation Serval


    The US seems to be catching up, though: United States Africa Command.


    So if the economy goes bad, the young can always join the Legion.

    In my more cynical moments I think there is a soft, more hidden, and more complex form of colonialism being established worldwide that, like PC, hides behind pretty white lies ("why, of course you are an independent and proud sovereign nation and worthy ally..."). We're all being colonized by the globalists, I suppose.

    "France's military ties with Africa strengthen", The Economist, May 21st 2014:


    "...France currently maintains four permanent bases on the continent—Gabon, Senegal, Djibouti and in its overseas department of Réunion—which support its ongoing operations in the Central African Republic (CAR), Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali and Somalia. The strategic approach outlined by Mr Le Drian will increase France's permanent presence in the region..."

     

    "Counterterrorism or Neo-Colonialism? The French Army in Africa", Terrorism Monitor, Volume: 12 Issue: 5, March 6, 2014, John C. K. Daly:


    "...From 1960 to 2005, France launched 46 military operations in its former African colonies. ...consistent policy for 54 years and is supported by an extensive network of bilateral Franco-African defense and military assistance treaties. ...

    ...Paris often sent military assistance contingent on a “legitimate” African leader’s willingness to support French interests. ..."

     

    One of my sons’ friends joined the French Foreign Legion to escape from his pushy girlfriend. But she tracked down his new fake French name and is flying to Africa to bring him back.

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    • Replies: @Boomstick
    This sounds like the premise for a movie I'd buy a ticket to.
    , @FactsAreImportant
    My nominee for comment of the year.

    I'd suggest you make a separate post devoted to this ... if not for the creepy invasion-of-privacy vibe.

    You could use a clip from the Laurel and Hardy movie where they join the French Foreign Legion so Stan can forget a girlfriend. Then he forgets her and they want to leave. But their commander has other ideas. Hilarity ensues.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gi3ggH1s-sM

    Which makes me suspect you made up the story. Are you sure you aren't just remembering the Laurel and Hardy movie?

    , @Sean
    Travelling alone through Africa is the female equivalent of volunteering to parachute into Dien Bien Phu.
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  121. “One of my sons’ friends joined the French Foreign Legion to escape from his pushy girlfriend. But she tracked down his new fake French name and is flying to Africa to bring him back.”

    Sounds like there’s a movie script or two in that!

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  122. @Steve Sailer
    One of my sons' friends joined the French Foreign Legion to escape from his pushy girlfriend. But she tracked down his new fake French name and is flying to Africa to bring him back.

    This sounds like the premise for a movie I’d buy a ticket to.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Hollywood used to make Foreign Legion movies all the time. I guess they are now too colonialist or something.
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  123. @Psmith
    1. Presumably hashtagBLM can be taken as an example of the state being weakened or made less effective. I don't necessarily agree with Acemoglu's thesis, but I don't know that this is a counterexample.

    2. What are UPS, FedEx, DHL, ..., if not perfectly viable private alternatives to USPS?

    What are UPS, FedEx, DHL, …, if not perfectly viable private alternatives to USPS?

    Are any of them interested in delivering letters for ~50 cents?

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    • Replies: @International Jew

    Are any of them interested in delivering letters for ~50 cents?
     
    If the answer is No, then the USPS is also delivering those letters at a loss. Which raises a question: is there any social benefit to all of us subsidizing first class mail?
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  124. @anonymous-antimarxist
    Steve

    So basically we have an ethnocentric Turkish American Economics professor, Aaron Acemoglu, who has very little understanding of or respect for American or British history.

    Yet Acemoglu has nonetheless has become famous for writing a kind of vapid "Virtue Signaling" brand of pseudo economics explaining all we need to know about how bad the evil West has exploited the third world and non-white races.

    And Acemoglu having absolutely no understanding of evolution or HBD is being interview by the charlatan "Evolutionary Biologist" David Sloan Wilson who pushes the repeatedly discredited yet politically correct version of Human Evolution known as "Group Evolution Theory".

    Well at least Acemoglu is an outspoken advocate of marijuana legalization on purely economic principles grounds.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Sloan_Wilson

    Wilson is a prominent proponent of the concept of group selection (also known as multi-level selection) in evolution. He and Elliott Sober proposed a framework called multilevel selection theory, which incorporates the more orthodox approach of gene-level selection and individual selection, in their book Unto Others. This framework argues that while genes serve as the means by which organisms' designs are transmitted across generations, individuals and groups are vehicles for those genes and both are arenas for genes to act on.
     
    Just another case of the "Politically Correct" leading the "Politically Correct".

    And Acemoglu having absolutely no understanding of evolution or HBD is being interview by the charlatan “Evolutionary Biologist” David Sloan Wilson who pushes the repeatedly discredited yet politically correct version of Human Evolution known as “Group Evolution Theory”.

    That’s a staggeringly stupid thing to say. He doesn’t talk about “Group Evolutionary Theory”; his views are absolutely and indisputably correct; and his views are extremely politically incorrect.

    Wrong on all counts.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    His argument does depend on group selection. Please inform us what indisputable proof exists for group selection.
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  125. @AndrewR
    Group evolution theory is PC? Hmm. Tell Kevin MacDonald that he's PC. I'm sure he could use a laugh.

    Group evolution theory is PC? Hmm. Tell Kevin MacDonald that he’s PC. I’m sure he could use a laugh.

    No kidding. Apparently, Lewontin didn’t understand the implications and liked the idea of “group selection”, so maybe that’s where this strange notion comes from.

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  126. @AndrewR
    Group evolution theory is PC? Hmm. Tell Kevin MacDonald that he's PC. I'm sure he could use a laugh.

    Delete – duplicate

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  127. The focus on post offices will seem oddly petty to laymen, but it enabled these guys to deploy a statistical technique (“instrumental variables”) that disentangled cause and effect. That’s the sort of thing that sets economist hearts pumping, and thus gets your paper published.

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    • Replies: @International Jew
    Unfortunately, this clever but otherwise broadly insignificant result is bound to become a left-wing talking point, the canonical "proof" that activist government is what made America great.

    Just as that recent finding (discussed here) that diversity creates distrust, has become "proof" that diversity makes groups smarter.

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  128. @International Jew
    The focus on post offices will seem oddly petty to laymen, but it enabled these guys to deploy a statistical technique ("instrumental variables") that disentangled cause and effect. That's the sort of thing that sets economist hearts pumping, and thus gets your paper published.

    Unfortunately, this clever but otherwise broadly insignificant result is bound to become a left-wing talking point, the canonical “proof” that activist government is what made America great.

    Just as that recent finding (discussed here) that diversity creates distrust, has become “proof” that diversity makes groups smarter.

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  129. @Harry Baldwin
    What are UPS, FedEx, DHL, …, if not perfectly viable private alternatives to USPS?

    Are any of them interested in delivering letters for ~50 cents?

    Are any of them interested in delivering letters for ~50 cents?

    If the answer is No, then the USPS is also delivering those letters at a loss. Which raises a question: is there any social benefit to all of us subsidizing first class mail?

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    • Replies: @gruff
    There was in 1789. The modern equivalent would be $10/month cellphone and internet bills.
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  130. @Steve Sailer
    I used to have the worst Post Office in America in my neighborhood: the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was. But the Valley Village P.O. I go to now is fine.

    the New Yorker ran a 10 page article in the 1990s about how horrible the Uptown P.O. in Chicago was.

    And to toot my horn I read it in 1994 and remembered it. It was never ending so it took me three sitdowns to read it. The New Yorker was better back then. John McPhee was one of my favorites no matter what he was writing about. The New Yorker slants more PC and more liberal these days but still has one fine article per issue. Maybe two. That are on interesting subjects with no leftist slanting. I have a feeling that contrary to its name, “The New Yorker” gets good nationwide circulation and turns a profit in dead trees editions due to its older readership. I have a friend who gets it and he gives me his copy a month later. He also gets the dead trees NY Times which is slim these days but looks great especially with the color photos.. I sometimes grab a four day old copy from him. I forgot how relaxing it is to read a newspaper this way. I just skim past the pc/leftist drop ins.

    From that 1994 era The New Yorker had a memorable 10 page treatment on madrassas in Pakistan, way ahead of its time. I can never find it in its on-line archives. Would love to reread it.

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  131. @International Jew

    Are any of them interested in delivering letters for ~50 cents?
     
    If the answer is No, then the USPS is also delivering those letters at a loss. Which raises a question: is there any social benefit to all of us subsidizing first class mail?

    There was in 1789. The modern equivalent would be $10/month cellphone and internet bills.

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  132. @Bill B.
    You're the top!
    You're the great Houdini!
    You're the top!
    You are Mussolini!

    1934 Cole Porter.

    “You cannot take the Mussolini attitude here.” PC Plod, to an Italian icecream seller who was refusing to move his cart, England 1934.

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  133. @Steve Sailer
    One of my sons' friends joined the French Foreign Legion to escape from his pushy girlfriend. But she tracked down his new fake French name and is flying to Africa to bring him back.

    My nominee for comment of the year.

    I’d suggest you make a separate post devoted to this … if not for the creepy invasion-of-privacy vibe.

    You could use a clip from the Laurel and Hardy movie where they join the French Foreign Legion so Stan can forget a girlfriend. Then he forgets her and they want to leave. But their commander has other ideas. Hilarity ensues.

    Which makes me suspect you made up the story. Are you sure you aren’t just remembering the Laurel and Hardy movie?

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Ever see "The Impostors" with Stanley Tucci and Oliver Platt? It's the closest thing to a modern Laurel and Hardy movie.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6NjLhtvW3o
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  134. @FactsAreImportant
    My nominee for comment of the year.

    I'd suggest you make a separate post devoted to this ... if not for the creepy invasion-of-privacy vibe.

    You could use a clip from the Laurel and Hardy movie where they join the French Foreign Legion so Stan can forget a girlfriend. Then he forgets her and they want to leave. But their commander has other ideas. Hilarity ensues.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gi3ggH1s-sM

    Which makes me suspect you made up the story. Are you sure you aren't just remembering the Laurel and Hardy movie?

    Ever see “The Impostors” with Stanley Tucci and Oliver Platt? It’s the closest thing to a modern Laurel and Hardy movie.

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  135. @Boomstick
    The central point is that postmaster positions were patronage jobs. When a new administration came in they'd hand them out as a way of cementing the loyalty of the locals across the US. As a result the postmasters were usually plugged into the party apparatus and loyal to the party in power.

    True!

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  136. @Bugg
    Curiously in the NYC area anyway, a lot of Chinese immigrants work for USPS.Not sure if this is true throughout the rest of the US.

    Curiously in the NYC area anyway, a lot of Chinese immigrants work for USPS.Not sure if this is true throughout the rest of the US.

    With bar codes being slapped on all packages, some letters, how literate do you have to be these days. Most addresses are in computer generated type and not scribbled by pen so are more legible by humans and sorting machines.
    Many immigrants have captured certain government sectors for their own kind. How hard is this to see? Native borns need not apply unless you be black. I hear the whole NYC MTA transit is Caribbean black while 40 years ago the Irish ran it and the patronage jobs allocation. Chinese immigrants and Jamaicans/Caribbeans (yes them too!) were taught by their mommies and daddies that a gov’t job is a good job with a loaded back end.

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  137. @Boomstick
    This sounds like the premise for a movie I'd buy a ticket to.

    Hollywood used to make Foreign Legion movies all the time. I guess they are now too colonialist or something.

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    • Replies: @Clyde

    Hollywood used to make Foreign Legion movies all the time.
     
    Including Laurel and Hardy and Jean Claude Van Damme http://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/Jean-Claude-Van-Damme-does-battle-with-anti-Israel-trolls-in-Jerusalem-visit-449704
    , @Bill B.
    Good book by an Englishman who joined the legion (on whim) and went on to become a leading Hong Kong businessman. Later walked to the South Pole at age 63.

    http://www.amazon.com/Legionnaire-Englishman-French-Foreign-Legion/dp/0330485806
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  138. @Steve Sailer
    Hollywood used to make Foreign Legion movies all the time. I guess they are now too colonialist or something.

    Hollywood used to make Foreign Legion movies all the time.

    Including Laurel and Hardy and Jean Claude Van Damme http://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/Jean-Claude-Van-Damme-does-battle-with-anti-Israel-trolls-in-Jerusalem-visit-449704

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  139. @FactsAreImportant
    I'm surprised Professor Acemoglu has the courage to show his face in public nowadays.

    His big theory that institutions are the prime driver of economic development was utterly falsified by more than ten years and trillions of dollars of US efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    It is hard to think of another economic theory that has been so zealously tested and so humiliatingly disproved (except communism, of course).

    His big theory that institutions are the prime driver of economic development was utterly falsified by more than ten years and trillions of dollars of US efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    The only theory that has been proven (or dis-proven, depending on your point of view) by the American misadventures of the previous decade is that pouring money into such projects has a pretty poor track record of building up institutions. Which is exactly what Acemoglu has been saying for years, if you bothered to read what he has written.

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    • Replies: @FactsAreImportant
    Source? (A pre-Iraq-invasion source, of course.)
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  140. @Clyde

    I’m not sure that story is helpful, but a lot of academic research is dunnage, just plain old careerist place-holding. The quality is less important than its mere existence.
     
    Just as I suspected. Mortgages and children's tuition to pay. At least if they are married...to someone of the opposite sex. So you churn things a bit like the old time stockbrokers. Making movement seem like progress.

    “So you churn things a bit like the old time stockbrokers. Making movement seem like progress.”

    Yep. The “‘Smith’ Center for the Study of X”, funded by that seven-figure grant, is duly listed in the campus building directory. There’s an older grad student who’ll be happy to tell you the wonderful work the ‘Smith’ Center does. The one thing the ‘Smith’ Center won’t do is actually study X, because the internal and external opposition is too strong. But, it’ll give the false appearance of studying X, it’ll develop an internal, aggrandizing constituency of its own, and, I suppose, in an indirect, big-picture way will stunt the careers of people who are willing to tackle the study of X.

    My point, I guess, is sort of obvious. More academic research isn’t necessarily better; it may actually be worse than no research.

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  141. @Tiny Duck
    The problem is that the United States has a white majority. As long as white continue to dominate the institutions racism and prejudice will continue to be the order of the day.

    South Africa shows it can happen even with Whites at 10% of the population.

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  142. @Thursday
    Nigeria has oil.

    First, Nigeria had the oil. Then Biafra had the oil, so Nigeria had to have the oil back again. So now Nigeria has the oil.

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  143. @Mr. Anon
    The USPS has a mission to serve the entire nation and all its people. Jeff Bezos' mission is to serve Jeff Bezos.

    The USPS has a mission to serve the entire nation and all its people. Jeff Bezos’ mission is to serve Jeff Bezos.

    see: Smith, Adam.

    see also, the First Amendment:

    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion

    Missions are fine things. They’re not what a state is for.

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    "see: Smith, Adam."

    See one of Bezos' disgruntled, abused, used-up employees.

    "see also, the First Amendment:

    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion

    Missions are fine things. They’re not what a state is for."

    I did not mean mission in the sense of a religious mission. Substitute the word "function" if you like. Do you deny that the Constitution explicity calls out a Congressionally authorized postal service as a legitimate function of the federal government?
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  144. @anonymous
    Black majority states can be decent enough places to live...

    Possible reasons:

    1. Smaller countries have more ethnic homogeneity.
    2. It’s just plain easier to run a small country well.



    Reason #3. The local French military base, with it's strangely obscure and convoluted relation to the ruling government (and which normally spends its time worrying about things like maritime safety and search & rescue), either has enough firepower to take on 3-5 local countries and win or can expand to this size very, very rapidly. It will suddenly pay attention if things get too out-of-line in the "host" country. If things get enough out of line, the Legion goes in.

    French overseas military bases

    Operation Serval


    The US seems to be catching up, though: United States Africa Command.


    So if the economy goes bad, the young can always join the Legion.

    In my more cynical moments I think there is a soft, more hidden, and more complex form of colonialism being established worldwide that, like PC, hides behind pretty white lies ("why, of course you are an independent and proud sovereign nation and worthy ally..."). We're all being colonized by the globalists, I suppose.

    "France's military ties with Africa strengthen", The Economist, May 21st 2014:


    "...France currently maintains four permanent bases on the continent—Gabon, Senegal, Djibouti and in its overseas department of Réunion—which support its ongoing operations in the Central African Republic (CAR), Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali and Somalia. The strategic approach outlined by Mr Le Drian will increase France's permanent presence in the region..."

     

    "Counterterrorism or Neo-Colonialism? The French Army in Africa", Terrorism Monitor, Volume: 12 Issue: 5, March 6, 2014, John C. K. Daly:


    "...From 1960 to 2005, France launched 46 military operations in its former African colonies. ...consistent policy for 54 years and is supported by an extensive network of bilateral Franco-African defense and military assistance treaties. ...

    ...Paris often sent military assistance contingent on a “legitimate” African leader’s willingness to support French interests. ..."

     

    In my more cynical moments I think there is a soft, more hidden, and more complex form of colonialism being established worldwide that, like PC, hides behind pretty white lies (“why, of course you are an independent and proud sovereign nation and worthy ally…”). We’re all being colonized by the globalists, I suppose.

    These days it doesn’t much bother to hide itself.

    And yes, the principal front presently is the US.

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  145. @Lot
    Amazon got the USPS to start limited Sunday delivery. I also last week got my first same-day Amazon delivery. Ordered at 9am, it arrived around 5:30pm. Shipping was free.

    Ordered a pair of headphones via Amazon Prime. Living within 10 miles of their distribution center, received them in 2 hours!

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  146. @FactsAreImportant
    It's true here in the suburbs of Columbus, Ohio too.

    There’s a DMV in a run-down Fergusonish part of Cincinnati that’s staffed by strikingly attractive white recent college grads, male and female. The lines are 90% black.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "There’s a DMV in a run-down Fergusonish part of Cincinnati that’s staffed by strikingly attractive white recent college grads, male and female. The lines are 90% black."

    Did they sign up for the wrong do-gooder program? Clerk for America?
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  147. @Steve Sailer
    Hollywood used to make Foreign Legion movies all the time. I guess they are now too colonialist or something.

    Good book by an Englishman who joined the legion (on whim) and went on to become a leading Hong Kong businessman. Later walked to the South Pole at age 63.

    http://www.amazon.com/Legionnaire-Englishman-French-Foreign-Legion/dp/0330485806

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  148. “Mail delivery in Victorian London was phenomenally fast”

    One of my university lecturers was from Manchester. When he was studying in London in 60s, if he was planning to go home, he would send a postcard in the morning and catch an evening train. His father would invariably be at the station to drive him home.

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  149. @Decius
    There was also the "agony column" in most newspapers. You could buy an ad (very cheaply) saying "I lost my hat at Charing Cross Station" and have a reasonable chance of getting it back. Or write about graver issues. Many used it as a sort of Craiglist "missed connections." Some found long-lost relatives that way. It only worked if lots of people read it, which apparently many did.

    Steve, I read in one book about high Victorian England that in the 2nd half the 19th century up to WW1, the mail was delivered in central London 13 times per day.

    There was also the “agony column” in most newspapers … It only worked if lots of people read it, which apparently many did.

    When I worked for a newspaper in the ’80s, we often used our own classified advertising section to find sources for stories. We’d come up with a feature idea — say, for example, “people who collect model trains” — than take out a classified ad asking for sources.

    It worked every time.

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  150. @Bugg
    Curiously in the NYC area anyway, a lot of Chinese immigrants work for USPS.Not sure if this is true throughout the rest of the US.

    Curiously in the NYC area anyway, a lot of Chinese immigrants work for USPS.Not sure if this is true throughout the rest of the US.

    Definitely true in my Texas suburb. I haven’t seen a white post office employee since the days of Newman on Seinfeld.

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  151. @Numinous

    His big theory that institutions are the prime driver of economic development was utterly falsified by more than ten years and trillions of dollars of US efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan.
     
    The only theory that has been proven (or dis-proven, depending on your point of view) by the American misadventures of the previous decade is that pouring money into such projects has a pretty poor track record of building up institutions. Which is exactly what Acemoglu has been saying for years, if you bothered to read what he has written.

    Source? (A pre-Iraq-invasion source, of course.)

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  152. @Buzz Mohawk
    A life-long friend is an economist who heads a university MBA program. He has some books to his credit. I have noticed that he has been wrong and often backward in the most significant claims and predictions he has made in his specialty.

    He keeps original assumptions he's had since I knew him in high school, and all the BS has been piled on top of them. If only those givens had been true...

    Nevertheless, I remain his friend -- and he still gets to run a university program.

    Anonymously, I say economics is a crock. (Excepting micro principles applied to running a business)

    Economists remind me of stockbrokers: seldom right, but perfectly happy to put on suits and get paid for being experts. No, economists are even worse, because they also gladly write things to push political agendas.

    All people reach most of their decisions in their impulsive, emotional cognitive path and simply use their higher (rational) cognitive path to rationalize the preexisting determination.

    This is why even highly intelligent people often cling to utterly idiotic beliefs. In fact, they are better at the rationalization, as well as being better at ignoring whatever common sense notions may underlie their biases.

    This is why our modern “rule by experts” is so laughable, and why when history inevitably repeats, it does so as tragedy.

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  153. @Tiny Duck
    The problem is that the United States has a white majority. As long as white continue to dominate the institutions racism and prejudice will continue to be the order of the day.

    The problem is that the United States has a white majority. As long as white continue to dominate the institutions racism and prejudice will continue to be the order of the day.

    I sincerely hope this is satire.

    On the possibility it is not, I suggest separatism as a cure.

    Let me and my white, above 100 IQ fellows have a plot of land commensurate with our numbers as a percentage, and everyone else have their own plots of land as befits their preferences.

    I really, really, really am tired of people who couldn’t rise above barbarism coasting along on my coattails. If blacks, browns and greens want to create their own little corners of Heaven on Earth, let them do it by themselves.

    Or are they incapable?

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  154. “two Postmaster Generals were future Prime Ministers.”

    Change to: “…two Postmasters General were future Prime Ministers.”

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    • Replies: @JohnnyGeo
    “two Postmaster Generals were future Prime Ministers.”

    Change to: “…two Postmasters General were future Prime Ministers.”

    also: "Primes Minister"
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  155. A close student of evolution, on the other hand, might come up with some interesting hypotheses for why that is.

    As a joke-delivery system, HBD generally means taking a longer time to carefully set up the punch line. The only thing missing from the topper above, besides the rimshot of course, is Steve dropping to one knee to close big with “a-good EEV-a-ning, FREEEENDS!!“, deploying jazz hands throughout.

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  156. @Steve Sailer
    One of my sons' friends joined the French Foreign Legion to escape from his pushy girlfriend. But she tracked down his new fake French name and is flying to Africa to bring him back.

    Travelling alone through Africa is the female equivalent of volunteering to parachute into Dien Bien Phu.

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  157. And now a black man gets his 15 minutes of fame posthumously …

    https://pjmedia.com/video/man-shot-while-live-streaming-video-on-facebook-graphic-video-content/

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  158. @Jefferson
    "As a result, you have wanton police brutality against our African-American citizens, which the most powerful president on earth can do nothing about.”

    This economist acts like the police are killing law abiding old Black church ladies and not Omar Little types from The Wire.

    The type of Black men who are being killed by the police are not the type of men that the econonmist would want his daughter to date once she turns 18, that is if he has a daughter.

    Secretly I don't think even Hussein Obama would want any of his daughters to date Michael Brown, if he was still alive. He would have been a bad thug influence on his daughters. He would want his daughters to date Black men who are part of the talented tenth. Significantly younger versions of Dr. Ben Carson, Thomas Sowell, Herman Cain, and Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    Secretly I don’t think even Hussein Obama would want any of his daughters to date Michael Brown, if he was still alive. He would have been a bad thug influence on his daughters. He would want his daughters to date Black men who are part of the talented tenth.

    Probably would be Black men, we might extrapolate he wouldn’t tolerate White men from:

    “Jonas Brothers are here, they’re out there somewhere. Sasha and Malia are huge fans, but boys, don’t get any ideas. Two words for you: predator drones. You will never see it coming. You think I’m joking?”

    Obama @ White House Correspondents Dinner 2014.

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Probably would be Black men, we might extrapolate he wouldn’t tolerate White men from:

    “Jonas Brothers are here, they’re out there somewhere. Sasha and Malia are huge fans, but boys, don’t get any ideas. Two words for you: predator drones. You will never see it coming. You think I’m joking?”

    Obama @ White House Correspondents Dinner 2014."

    Hussein Obama sees himself as Black only and not as a Mulatto, so he does not see the irony of prohibiting his daughters from dating White men, even though his grandfather was a White man.
    , @Almost Missouri
    Too bad Obama won't use that Federal gadgetry to protect any other American daughters from real threats. Just his own daughters from imaginary threats.
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  159. Daron Acemoglu WTF iz the world gone guffey
    Why does anyone even listen? What I would like to know, exactly who are his students! A fool is let into the kingdom and mere mortals will pay the price. My hope is that some sort of inoculation will be available.

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  160. @Desiderius
    There's a DMV in a run-down Fergusonish part of Cincinnati that's staffed by strikingly attractive white recent college grads, male and female. The lines are 90% black.

    “There’s a DMV in a run-down Fergusonish part of Cincinnati that’s staffed by strikingly attractive white recent college grads, male and female. The lines are 90% black.”

    Did they sign up for the wrong do-gooder program? Clerk for America?

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  161. @Desiderius

    The USPS has a mission to serve the entire nation and all its people. Jeff Bezos’ mission is to serve Jeff Bezos.
     
    see: Smith, Adam.

    see also, the First Amendment:

    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion
     
    Missions are fine things. They're not what a state is for.

    “see: Smith, Adam.”

    See one of Bezos’ disgruntled, abused, used-up employees.

    “see also, the First Amendment:

    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion

    Missions are fine things. They’re not what a state is for.”

    I did not mean mission in the sense of a religious mission. Substitute the word “function” if you like. Do you deny that the Constitution explicity calls out a Congressionally authorized postal service as a legitimate function of the federal government?

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  162. The problem is that the United States has a white majority. As long as white continue to dominate the institutions racism and prejudice will continue to be the order of the day.

    Dinky Dick likes to find complicated ways to say he’s a racist who hates whites.

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  163. While not the greatest places on earth, Gabon, Namibia, Botswana are all perfectly livable. I know some people are heavily invested in every last bit of black dominated Africa being a hell hole, but it isn’t actually true.

    Who are these jerks? Obviously sub-Saharan African countries fall along a spectrum of suck.

    Yet all funded and manipulated by a satanic “Hungarian” Jew.

    FIFY.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Gabon is pretty bad. I remember the African students at UCLA in 1981 rolling their eyes when President Bongo bought a mansion in the Hollywood Hills.
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  164. @Svigor

    While not the greatest places on earth, Gabon, Namibia, Botswana are all perfectly livable. I know some people are heavily invested in every last bit of black dominated Africa being a hell hole, but it isn’t actually true.
     
    Who are these jerks? Obviously sub-Saharan African countries fall along a spectrum of suck.

    Yet all funded and manipulated by a satanic "Hungarian" Jew.
     
    FIFY.

    Gabon is pretty bad. I remember the African students at UCLA in 1981 rolling their eyes when President Bongo bought a mansion in the Hollywood Hills.

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  165. @ben tillman

    And Acemoglu having absolutely no understanding of evolution or HBD is being interview by the charlatan “Evolutionary Biologist” David Sloan Wilson who pushes the repeatedly discredited yet politically correct version of Human Evolution known as “Group Evolution Theory”.
     
    That's a staggeringly stupid thing to say. He doesn't talk about "Group Evolutionary Theory"; his views are absolutely and indisputably correct; and his views are extremely politically incorrect.

    Wrong on all counts.

    His argument does depend on group selection. Please inform us what indisputable proof exists for group selection.

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    His argument does depend on group selection. Please inform us what indisputable proof exists for group selection.
     
    What are you talking about? My comment doesn't address any "argument" that could could depend on anything.

    And I didn't mention group selection. Nor did the commenter I was replying to. However, if you believe in individual selection, you believe in group selection; what you think of as individuals in that context are in fact groups. If you'd ever read Wilson, you'd know that. pages 87-98 of Unto Others couldn't make it clearer.
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  166. @gruff
    The principle behind the Constitutional mandating of the Post Office is worthy of consideration. The Founding Fathers wanted to guarantee a cheap reliable politically neutral communication system.

    The modern equivalent of this is not FedEx (shipping was mostly separate from mail back in 1776) but the phone system and the internet.

    Obligatory mention of The Crying of Lot 49.

    Come on now. Obviously the Post Office is infinitely inferior to Comcast. Who are you going to believe: Murray Rothbard or your lying eyes?

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    • Agree: gruff
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  167. @Clyde
    Amazon has been threatening to start up its own delivery business. Jeff Bezos could buy the USPS and make it into Amazon's package delivery subsidiary and get it running in the black. Is LaserShip owned by them?

    Will that be before or after he gets Amazon running in the black?

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  168. @Steve Sailer
    That's kind of like Trump buying Royal Turnberry golf course and renaming it Trump Turnberry.

    There are only about 60 golf courses in the world with the right to use Royal in the title.

    So if the conglomerate which owns RC cola decided to open the Royal Crown Cola Golf Club, what would happen to them?

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  169. @Mike1
    I think the real takeaway here is a little different: Acemoglu, like almost everyone on earth these days, is promoting the fiction that government drives business. The Federal Reserve and other central banks talk like they are literally overseeing crews with shovels. Obama articulated the standard viewpoint well with his "you didn't build that" comment.

    Like it or not (and most people hate it) government could disappear tomorrow and businesses that deserved to survive would do just fine.

    Exactly. Look at the era of peace and plenty which occurred just after the Western Empire fell. It may not have been as awesome as Somalia is today, but it was pretty great!

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  170. @Aardvark

    Secretly I don’t think even Hussein Obama would want any of his daughters to date Michael Brown, if he was still alive. He would have been a bad thug influence on his daughters. He would want his daughters to date Black men who are part of the talented tenth.
     
    Probably would be Black men, we might extrapolate he wouldn't tolerate White men from:

    "Jonas Brothers are here, they're out there somewhere. Sasha and Malia are huge fans, but boys, don't get any ideas. Two words for you: predator drones. You will never see it coming. You think I'm joking?"

    Obama @ White House Correspondents Dinner 2014.

    “Probably would be Black men, we might extrapolate he wouldn’t tolerate White men from:

    “Jonas Brothers are here, they’re out there somewhere. Sasha and Malia are huge fans, but boys, don’t get any ideas. Two words for you: predator drones. You will never see it coming. You think I’m joking?”

    Obama @ White House Correspondents Dinner 2014.”

    Hussein Obama sees himself as Black only and not as a Mulatto, so he does not see the irony of prohibiting his daughters from dating White men, even though his grandfather was a White man.

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  171. @Eustace Tilley (not)
    "two Postmaster Generals were future Prime Ministers."

    Change to: "...two Postmasters General were future Prime Ministers."

    “two Postmaster Generals were future Prime Ministers.”

    Change to: “…two Postmasters General were future Prime Ministers.”

    also: “Primes Minister”

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  172. @Aardvark

    Secretly I don’t think even Hussein Obama would want any of his daughters to date Michael Brown, if he was still alive. He would have been a bad thug influence on his daughters. He would want his daughters to date Black men who are part of the talented tenth.
     
    Probably would be Black men, we might extrapolate he wouldn't tolerate White men from:

    "Jonas Brothers are here, they're out there somewhere. Sasha and Malia are huge fans, but boys, don't get any ideas. Two words for you: predator drones. You will never see it coming. You think I'm joking?"

    Obama @ White House Correspondents Dinner 2014.

    Too bad Obama won’t use that Federal gadgetry to protect any other American daughters from real threats. Just his own daughters from imaginary threats.

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  173. “America tended to employ talented men to run its post office”

    So much for that. Bet a DMV (or DH back then) wouldn’t have required you to provide a half dozen pieces of ID when renewing a license, been filled to the brim with quasi-fascist black women, or sent you letters to remind you to renew after you told them 3x that you moved to a different state.

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  174. Dammit! Another idiot Wilson. Or maybe two, depending on how we are counting. And with an the obvious inclusion of me that makes three!

    And this, just when I thought I had cornered the market!

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    • Replies: @ben tillman
    Charles, he's a genius. Brilliant, honest, and doing work of the utmost importance. Possibly today's greatest living scientist.
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  175. @Jefferson
    "As a result, you have wanton police brutality against our African-American citizens, which the most powerful president on earth can do nothing about.”

    This economist acts like the police are killing law abiding old Black church ladies and not Omar Little types from The Wire.

    The type of Black men who are being killed by the police are not the type of men that the econonmist would want his daughter to date once she turns 18, that is if he has a daughter.

    Secretly I don't think even Hussein Obama would want any of his daughters to date Michael Brown, if he was still alive. He would have been a bad thug influence on his daughters. He would want his daughters to date Black men who are part of the talented tenth. Significantly younger versions of Dr. Ben Carson, Thomas Sowell, Herman Cain, and Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    Would Obama want his daughters to marry Travon(he could have been my son)Martin? I think NOT!

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  176. @Anonymous
    His argument does depend on group selection. Please inform us what indisputable proof exists for group selection.

    His argument does depend on group selection. Please inform us what indisputable proof exists for group selection.

    What are you talking about? My comment doesn’t address any “argument” that could could depend on anything.

    And I didn’t mention group selection. Nor did the commenter I was replying to. However, if you believe in individual selection, you believe in group selection; what you think of as individuals in that context are in fact groups. If you’d ever read Wilson, you’d know that. pages 87-98 of Unto Others couldn’t make it clearer.

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  177. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Dammit! Another idiot Wilson. Or maybe two, depending on how we are counting. And with an the obvious inclusion of me that makes three!

    And this, just when I thought I had cornered the market!

    Charles, he’s a genius. Brilliant, honest, and doing work of the utmost importance. Possibly today’s greatest living scientist.

    Read More
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