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From The Tablet:

THE EVILS OF CULTURAL APPROPRIATION
How victimhood became a moral currency dependent on defining and policing the boundaries of human identity

By Claire Lehmann
June 11, 2018 • 12:00 AM

Lehmann, editor of Quillette, finds the to-do over cultural appropriation to be fairly baffling.

But I think it’s more understandable as resentment that you don’t get a check in the mail for use of your group’s intellectual property rights.

Congress treats the heirs of individual creators very nicely: while F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 novel The Great Gatsby is in the public domain in some Anglosphere countries, but won’t be in the U.S. until the end of 2020, after 95 years. (Here’s an article about Fitzgerald’s granddaughter, who seems to have been able to afford a rather complicated life from royalties from schoolteachers assigning Gatsby to their classes.)

But a lot of other things, such as musical styles, cuisines, modes of dressing, tend to be more the joint product of cultures more than identifiable individuals.

So if you assume that your great-great-great-grandfather in Louisiana maybe had something to do with the invention of jazz 120 years ago and maybe your great-great-grandmother in Mississippi was a pioneering blues singer (not that you can prove that they were), well, maybe you deserve to get a check in the mail every so often just for being black.

An economic system in which everybody had to financially compensate everybody else all the time for cultural appropriation would probably turn out to be a good deal mostly for accountants and IP lawyers. But it’s not surprising lots of people these days kind of dream about it and feel entitled to resent others for not offering them mailbox money.

 
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  1. There is something beguiling about ‘earned’ money showing up regularly in amounts sufficient for one to live life in financial freedom — you could call it the ‘About a Boy’ Syndrome (i.e. in that movie one of the main characters lives off the royalties of a Christmas song his father wrote).

    BTW, I’ll bet the Gatsby royalties are formidable; it’s even set as a standard English Lit text here in HK. Daughter C is taking that subject right now, so I’ve done my bit to build that bridge for Fitzgerald’s granddaughter and her loser boyfriend.

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  2. Anonymous[347] • Disclaimer says:

    Arthur Miller’s oeuvre goes public domain in 2095.All his children and likely his grandchildren will be dead, but their kids will have mailbox money.

    It’s nuts.

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    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    who on earth is reading Arthur Miller? He's boring and tendentious.

    I'll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It's only assigned because it's short, like The Crucible.

    I think I'm finally to the age where I can say what I actually think about "great" literature. Lots of it ain't so great.
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  3. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:

    If you want to see how national governance really works, take a few minutes to read about the Copyright Term Extension Act (CTEA) of 1998, aka the Mickey Mouse Protection Act. The owners of works were handed additional years of copyright protection, in many cases long after the creators — who accepted and perhaps even desired the earlier release of their works to the public domain — were gone.

    Congress serves those willing and able to afford the Wa$hington Whorehou$e.

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    • Replies: @Olorin
    A similar argument can be made regarding the term of corporate charters, which were originally organized to sunset after a fixed period of time for a specific set of organizational tasks, but which today are incorporated and immortal entities.

    The Founders of this republic wanted to do away with overweening power of Crown corporations just as much as of European central banking families.

    I'd like to see the Dissident Right (or whatever) visit this issue. It was taken up in the '90s by certain old-timey progressive types but quickly fell victim to the Democrats plutocrat-ascendant model later that decade.

    https://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/15/the-progressive-movement-is-a-pr-front-for-rich-democrats/
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  4. Bill P says:

    I think it’s more understandable as a new sort of sumptuary law, whereby a privileged class places restrictions on the affectations of members of an inferior class.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill P
    I should have read the article before posting. Seems she has the exact same idea I did.
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  5. Clyde says:

    OT
    Twitter CEO apologizes for eating Chick-fil-A during Pride Month
    http://www.businessinsider.com/…apology-chick-fil-a-gay-pride-month-2018-6

    Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey apologized Sunday for eating at Chick-fil-A during Pride Month. Dorsey, who had posted a photo showing he ate at the fast-food chain, said he “completely forgot” about Chick-fil-A’s background opposing same-sex marriage.

    *During Gay Ramadan these chicken sandwiches are haram, forbidden in Arab lingo. Found at this twitter stream https://twitter.com/JohnWHuber

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    • Replies: @NOTA
    There is no parody as funny as unintentional, unaware self-parody.
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  6. Arclight says:

    I think this is more a product of certain groups having been told for half a century that they are owed something (like respect) rather than having to earn it. It seems like the left has promoted the idea that the downtrodden are actually our moral superiors and would in fact be our cultural and economic superiors if only white supremacy/the patriarchy hadn’t cleverly kept them down. If you buy into this idea, they of course you will be outraged that they don’t get their due for their wonderful contributions to society. The concept of victimhood has spread past the traditional white/black division to anyone who isn’t a white male, thus the outrage exhibited by a man from a 4,000 year old culture over a random high schooler wearing a Chinese-inspired dress.

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    That dress that that girl wore wasn't even "ancient Chinese culture." It is a relic of early 20th century upper class Shanghai women.

    I imagine the bulk of that boy's anger at her was due to how sexy she is and how hot girls like him have seldom given his a short Chinese guys pike him the time of day. "Angry oriental male with perpetual blue balls in North America" is a very well-worn archetype.
    , @AndrewR
    Excuse the typos...

    Fixed: "I imagine the bulk of that boy’s anger at her was due to how sexy she is and how hot girls like her have seldom given short Chinese guys like him the time of day."

    Also, relevant - the Chinese-American left eating itself: https://www.racked.com/2016/1/26/10829826/cultural-appropriation-clothing-mixed-race

    , @J.Ross
    To this point, an item at Drudge: half of millennials polled expect to become millionaires.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5835419/More-half-Millennials-expect-millionaires-someday-according-new-study.html
    , @unpc downunder
    As far as the identity politics left goes, it isn't so much a war on white males as a war on lower-middle class white males. Rich white males are richer than they were in the 1970s. They may get gouged in divorce settlements but financially speaking they've done pretty well out of free trade, tax cuts and financial deregulation. And from an occupational perspective, the average SWJ is no threat to a rich white male anyway (as Jeff, Bill, Warren et al are well aware). No one really cares one way or the other about working class males as they are politically impotent and only do menial manual jobs. However, from a feminist/minority perspective lower-middle class white males are direct rivals for nice jobs and middle class social status.

    When a feminist or minority activist attacks "white males" and "the patriarchy" what they are really saying is "its a competitive job market, lets get those remaining not-to-difficult white collar jobs held by lower-middle class white males."

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  7. Anonymous[150] • Disclaimer says:

    I understand that Fitzgerald’s heirs are collateral beneficiaries of the intensive lobbying by the Disney company, which still earns considerable income from IP created in the 1920s.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I understand that Fitzgerald’s heirs are collateral beneficiaries of the intensive lobbying by the Disney company, which still earns considerable income from IP created in the 1920s.

     

    Who's getting the swag from the giant franchise of Winnie the Pooh? AA Milne's only child (I don't have to tell you his name) had little interest in his father's legacy, and his only child had cerebral palsy and apparently died childless. She set up a trust to help both the disabled and the southwest of England in general. I suppose that's as good a use of royalties as any.

    The Disney people were quite instrumental in upending the old US copyright laws so they wouldn't lose control of Pooh. Of course this was mostly to protect their franchise, but another reason that deserves our sympathy is that once the characters enter the public domain, they're free to use for pornographic purposes.

    Considering that all the characters except Kanga were male, that could be quite interesting.
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  8. An economic system in which everybody had to financially compensate everybody else all the time for cultural appropriation would probably turn out to be a good deal …

    … Yes, a good deal for you and me. We could sit back and collect Benjamins and checks from our PO boxes — because everything the rest of the people on Earth take for granted in modern life was created by our ancestors, right up to our parents and grandparents.

    If people didn’t want to pay us our rightful royalties under your system, they could go back to shitting on the ground, heating their hovels with wood, and eating potatoes all damn year in the dark. That would go for men-hating feminist women too, who don’t seem to realize what men do. We could just visit their cold, dark, disease-infested hovels when we need to breed.

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    • LOL: Svigor
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Not to interrupt your circlejerk, but what exactly did your ancestors (specifically your grandparents and parents) create? Please provide evidence if possible.
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  9. Bitfu says:

    Cultural appropriation is a stalling tactic by the Left as it struggles with the fact that globalism is a crappy deal for the lower classes in its base.

    First–the Left rids itself of the Deplorables (because globalism is obviously a crappy deal for Deplorables–but who cares–they’re deplorable). But the elitist Leftists don’t want the underclass within the Left to wake up and see how awful globalism will be for them, so they temporarily champion the insanity of cultural appropriation.

    As the elitist Left knows all too well, dealing with the lower classes when you have an opposing political class is easy–you simply demand redistribution from the other political class. But redistributing property and wealth is hard work–especially if you had to actually take from those within your base with more in order to give to those who have less. So what do you do? Elevate identity, and terms like ‘dignity’ to most-revered-status. [Kind of like Dixie Southerners had the terms of 'tradition' and 'heritage'.]

    This way–even though the future victims of globalization will not actually enjoy a higher quality of life from globalization–they will still have ‘dignity’, ‘status’, and some ethereal intellectual property right in some ethereal loosely defined notion of culture.

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  10. An economic system in which everybody had to financially compensate everybody else all the time for cultural appropriation would probably turn out to be a good deal …

    … For me.

    This is in response to some wags I have read who say we talk too much about what our people or ancestors did, while we ourselves haven’t done anything. Okay, let’s just talk about our own fathers, then, shall we?

    Yes, that’s right. This claim of ours is very close to home, not ancient at all. It is very relevant to our times.

    You anti-white, anti-men a**holes who want credit for dreadlocks and jazz live in homes connected to pipelines. My father quite possibly manufactured the pipe that carries your water to you and carries away your sh*t.

    He was in charge of engineering and production for seven plants across America that mass produced the long-lasting, high-quality pipe that is in the ground and in homes and buildings all over the world. Yes, “HE BUILT THAT.” My father.

    When I was a kid, he took me to a plant and showed me massive water pipes coming off the lines, ready to carry your water in a city or town somewhere. He said his pipe would last longer than the Roman aqueducts.

    Send your checks now and for the rest of your non-productive lives, or you can shut off your water and sewer systems right now.

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    • Replies: @Kylie
    Amazingly, the community organizer/asbestos remover given a presidency agrees with you.

    Just don't expect a check in the mail from him any time soon.

    https://youtu.be/YKjPI6no5ng
    , @Jim Don Bob
    My grandfather was a big wig at International Harvester which made many of the machines that planted, tended, and harvested crops. Send me a check or get your wooden plow out and be ready to harvest and thresh your grain by hand. Oh, and did I mention no diesel engines or hydraulics?
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  11. unit472 says:

    Good thing James Naismith, Abner Doubleday and Knute Rockne could not copyright basketball, baseball and the forward pass or where would Shaq, Jackie and Jerry Rice be today? By the same token what would Louis Armstrong be if he had no trumpet or B.B. King no Gibson? Can’t be a musician without a musical instrument and last time I looked Africans don’t make them.

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  12. Neoconned says:

    A Muslim Uber driver kicks 2 lesbians out of his car in Brooklyn…..thing I wanna know os….are they really “lesbians”? I’ve never met lesbian who looked like this:

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/amphtml/nidhiprakash/uber-driver-lesbian-couple-nyc

    https://www.pinknews.co.uk/2018/06/12/uber-driver-kicks-lesbian-couple-out-of-his-car-for-kissing/amp/

    These women are lesbians? What a waste….but hey I’m with Ack-med on this 1….

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    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    1. muslims don't act like this so this is obviously fake. only white Christians are militantly against homosexualty

    2. these girls have never had a real man. If a Man of Color rogered them they would be heterosexual
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  13. istevefan says:

    Interesting that when it comes to whites who express pride in what our ancestors accomplished, we are increasingly being told that we cannot take credit for something others have done. It is unearned privilege. We had no part in what the Wrights or Edison or any other individuals of the past accomplished, let alone the Ancient Greeks or Romans.

    Of course we can still take the blame for any wrongs our ancestors perpetrated, but that is another story. The bottom line is that contemporary whites cannot claim credit for prior generations because that could be used as justification for modern whites to decide they do not want to share their inheritance with others. Not only did we not inherit the achievements of our ancestors, we apparently did not inherit their real estate holdings. To dispossess a people you need to separate them from their history.

    Meanwhile nonwhites seem to have, or at least desire, collective group rights when it comes to anything perceived as positive coming from their past. And since nonwhites are to be empowered, this sort of thinking is encouraged since pride in one’s past is a good way to build group morale. Maybe this got its start with the “History Months”. Maybe not, but clearly nonwhites are being encouraged to take credit for anything from the past that might be connected to a nonwhite of their group. Remember, “we waz kangs.”

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    • Replies: @Tiny Duck
    You are purposefully leaving out the context and nuance of the different standards

    You are being intellectually dishonest
    , @Anon
    Whites have had the habit of being great borrowers and spreaders of culture for at least two thousand years. What whites don't realize is that the rest of the world is not like this at all. It's a trait that's unique to whites.

    Black and brown people are very rigid about their cultures, and not very adaptive, which is characteristic of societies that tend to be Darwinian failures. They do not add things to their cultures except slowly and reluctantly, and they do not like to see anyone outside their blood group borrowing anything from their culture. Non-whites unconsciously see a culture as marking the boundaries of a blood kin group, because they think a very tribal fashion. This is something that is hardwired into their brains. When you borrow something from a non-white culture, the blacks and browns have an unconscious reflex that assumes that you're trying to claim blood kinship with them, and they become angry and indignant.

    Culture being used as a proxy for kin groups is deeply embedded in the neural wiring for most people on the planet.
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  14. All the more reason for you to put a book out of a selection of your collected articles and blog posts. Minus the golf course posts of course.

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    wwebd said --- the golf course posts are the best.


    ---second best are the connections between people who you would think are not connected = my favorite connection was that mostly forgotten 80s DJ on LA AM radio who almost nobody but Steve talks about much but who was a lot more like Shakespeare than your average English-speaking Nobel (for literature, natch) wannabe .

    ---third best are the non-conspiracy explanations about business and sports and media and how most of the allegedly interesting details we hear about business and sports and media are just details about individual people trying to get what they wanna get (the one I remember most is about unattractive women journalists writing stories in which unattractive women similar to themselves in essential respects should be, in a more reasonable world, considered hot, but as I am an expert on unattractive women - i.e., an expert on finding them attractive, if at all possible, at their best - I only appreciate this from an intellectual point of view)


    ---fourth best, but what Sailer ought to feel proudest of - explaining the way Trump or someone like Trump could win in 2016, with the explanations starting, as far as I know, about 10 or 20 years before the all-important 2016 election cycle. Great stuff, of course, but not all that fascinating once you understand the basics, therefore only fourth best.

    well I will stop here, except to repeat that as of now the golf posts are the best. So when there are good golf posts here I am happy to chime in and say thanks!

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  15. BenKenobi says:

    cold, dark, disease-infested hovels

    You’re talkin’ about some type of dwelling, right?

    Read More
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  16. But it’s not surprising lots of people these days kind of dream about it and feel entitled to resent others for not offering them mailbox money.

    All the mailbox money ends for everybody once the central banks stop all the small ball monetary extremism. The globalized plutocrats will go for the BIG PRINT when the next round of the global financial implosion hits.

    The globalized plutocrats will pay every mailbox money bastard just what the hell they have been promised, but they won’t give them any cost of living adjustments or inflation adjusted currency increases in mailbox money. The globalized plutocracy will print their asses off, even more than they are doing now, and the purchasing power of all global currencies will evaporate.

    Inter-generational warfare will break out into the open and it will wipe out all the cowards born before 1965.

    Government worker retirement pension mailbox money, Social Security disability mailbox money, Social Security mailbox money and all the rest will be wiped out in purchasing power when the Big Print comes.

    You say the economy is booming? Good! Now raise the federal funds rate to the normal level of 6 percent. Immediate Asset Bubble Implosion. Stock, Bond and Real Estate Asset Bubbles Immediately popped.

    Read More
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  17. Tulip says:

    I disagree. The cultural appropriation spiel is not about a shakedown, its about sacralizing ethnicity.

    You can set up holy ground, and exclude the infidels, but you can also set up holy personal property, and use coercion if others “blaspheme” your personal property.

    Its not about promoting cultural “exchange”, its about promoting cultural “war”, creating a new Jerusalem in order to justify evicting the new Saracens.

    Since racialism (on top of sexualism and sexual identity-ism) has come to displace Christianity as the living religion in the West, this comes with the territory.

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  18. OFF TOPIC

    What is it with these guys named Weinstein?

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  19. Congress treats the heirs of individual creators very nicely: while F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 novel The Great Gatsby is in the public domain in some Anglosphere countries, but won’t be in the U.S. until the end of 2020, after 95 years

    This is rather recent, though. The US was for a long time behind everyone else. You got 28 years, with another 28-year renewal. Irving Berlin outlived the copyright on his earliest compositions, such as Alexander’s Ragtime Band. Irving Caesar, who wrote the words to “Swanee” (George Gershwin’s biggest-selling tune, sorry Ira) and “Tea for Two”, also lived to 101, and probably lost the rights to those.

    Then there’s the works-for-hire of the US vs the “moral rights” that European artists are afforded, Howard Roark-style. The lady who came up with the iconic Las Vegas sign was working for the city. She got a bonus, and nothing else. She wasn’t cheated; it was legitimate. That, and nobody had any idea it would be on keychains, refrigerator magnets, and beach blankets half a century later.

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Ditto the guy who invented the Smiley-Face. $25 from the ad agency. I believe the first one was green, not yellow.
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  20. I think it’s more understandable as “people with no relevant complaints to make finding a way to pick a fight just to show off”. Unless I have been poorly informed, this cultural appropriation stuff is not very popular among the Minority Masses, but mostly among middle class university activists. The complaint is barely understandable, and that’s a feature, as it allows the pseudoconflict to drag unsolved until the nutcases get tired of promoting it.

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    • Replies: @NOTA
    +1
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  21. Tiny Duck says:

    Lehmann is an overprivleged grifter taking advantage of lonely white men angry at being left behind by a more diverse and equitable world

    Quilette is nothing more than a front for racism and white supremacy with a veneer for free speech

    I hope their patreon account gets shut down

    Crytpto racist publications like quilette are why we NEED hate speech laws

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Anyone who has issues with a publication named 'Quilette' is obvious some kinda homophobe. And you are doubleplusungood, TD because Lehmann is obviously a member of the Tribe. Really don't know about you TD.
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  22. @Anonymous
    Arthur Miller’s oeuvre goes public domain in 2095.All his children and likely his grandchildren will be dead, but their kids will have mailbox money.

    It’s nuts.

    who on earth is reading Arthur Miller? He’s boring and tendentious.

    I’ll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It’s only assigned because it’s short, like The Crucible.

    I think I’m finally to the age where I can say what I actually think about “great” literature. Lots of it ain’t so great.

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    • Replies: @Daniel Williams

    I think I’m finally to the age where I can say what I actually think about “great” literature. Lots of it ain’t so great.
     
    That's rarely the point though. We read the stuff because everyone else did, and because doing so likely influenced their thoughts.

    Obviously not as big of a deal now, since there is so much content that no one south of von Neumann (brainwise) could synthesize it all, but for a long time you could become a fully educated man of our culture by reading what we've come to think of as the canon.

    , @AnotherDad
    Agreed. Miller--your "boring and tendentious" nailed it.

    I think "The Great Gatsby" has some merit and is certainly much better than anything Miller ever wrote, but i sure didn't like it in high school and wouldn't bother reading it.

    There is better 19th century American literature. I enjoyed Melville. But like a lot of older guys i simply don't have a lot of interest in fiction anymore. There is more interesting stuff to read where i actually learn stuff about the actually existing world.
    , @syonredux

    I’ll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It’s only assigned because it’s short, like The Crucible.
     
    Nah. Gatsby gets assigned because it's both short and good. For teaching purposes, that's the perfect combo. If you assign, say, Middlemarch or Moby-Dick, you know that most of the students won't read the whole thing.
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    I'm in complete agreement on Miller; it's he who should have been the neon sign designer, because that's about how subtle his works are.

    But Gatsby is good. I just reread it, since Daughter C is studying it in school. It's ideal for beginning literary analysis, since there's quite a bit going on thematically, and the characters comprise a nice mix, with some traceable character arcs. There are also some very well-written passages.

    Fitzgerald may have been a bit of a waste, but he was not a hack.

    I'm so glad (as is Daughter C) that her school is teaching Gatsby, which is one of the two novel options for the big high school exit exam in English lit here in Hong Kong. The alternative: To Kill a Mockingbird, of course.
    , @peterike
    “ It’s only assigned because it’s short, like The Crucible.”

    The Crucible gets assigned because it’s a pro-Comminist propaganda screed written by a Jew. It’s also dreadful, like all Arthur Miller’s work. Another vastly overrated Jewish writer.
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  23. anon[277] • Disclaimer says:

    The truth is that no one is going to pay up for folktales and crafts or whatever material culture is floating around. Unless it is packaged by Disney.

    The Canadian dustup over native literature is really pathetic. People are barely interested. Maybe it counts in academia and museum studies.t

    Not to mention the stories are about bad outcomes. Everyone knows and it is hardly worth any effort.

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  24. Bill P says:
    @Bill P
    I think it's more understandable as a new sort of sumptuary law, whereby a privileged class places restrictions on the affectations of members of an inferior class.

    I should have read the article before posting. Seems she has the exact same idea I did.

    Read More
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  25. Tiny Duck says:
    @istevefan
    Interesting that when it comes to whites who express pride in what our ancestors accomplished, we are increasingly being told that we cannot take credit for something others have done. It is unearned privilege. We had no part in what the Wrights or Edison or any other individuals of the past accomplished, let alone the Ancient Greeks or Romans.

    Of course we can still take the blame for any wrongs our ancestors perpetrated, but that is another story. The bottom line is that contemporary whites cannot claim credit for prior generations because that could be used as justification for modern whites to decide they do not want to share their inheritance with others. Not only did we not inherit the achievements of our ancestors, we apparently did not inherit their real estate holdings. To dispossess a people you need to separate them from their history.

    Meanwhile nonwhites seem to have, or at least desire, collective group rights when it comes to anything perceived as positive coming from their past. And since nonwhites are to be empowered, this sort of thinking is encouraged since pride in one's past is a good way to build group morale. Maybe this got its start with the "History Months". Maybe not, but clearly nonwhites are being encouraged to take credit for anything from the past that might be connected to a nonwhite of their group. Remember, "we waz kangs."

    You are purposefully leaving out the context and nuance of the different standards

    You are being intellectually dishonest

    Read More
    • Replies: @fish
    Ohs Tinys.....


    U always bein my kween!


    Lenpter “be’s nowin how to treets his”wimmins” Plitz
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  26. Kylie says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    An economic system in which everybody had to financially compensate everybody else all the time for cultural appropriation would probably turn out to be a good deal ...
     
    ... For me.

    This is in response to some wags I have read who say we talk too much about what our people or ancestors did, while we ourselves haven't done anything. Okay, let's just talk about our own fathers, then, shall we?

    Yes, that's right. This claim of ours is very close to home, not ancient at all. It is very relevant to our times.

    You anti-white, anti-men a**holes who want credit for dreadlocks and jazz live in homes connected to pipelines. My father quite possibly manufactured the pipe that carries your water to you and carries away your sh*t.

    He was in charge of engineering and production for seven plants across America that mass produced the long-lasting, high-quality pipe that is in the ground and in homes and buildings all over the world. Yes, "HE BUILT THAT." My father.

    When I was a kid, he took me to a plant and showed me massive water pipes coming off the lines, ready to carry your water in a city or town somewhere. He said his pipe would last longer than the Roman aqueducts.

    Send your checks now and for the rest of your non-productive lives, or you can shut off your water and sewer systems right now.

    Amazingly, the community organizer/asbestos remover given a presidency agrees with you.

    Just don’t expect a check in the mail from him any time soon.

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  27. I’m looking forward to those royalty checks from the descendants of sub-Saharan Africans who’ve appropriated the English language of my ancestors. I’d also like reparation payments for their constant butchering and misuse of our language.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    That’s English that they speak? I’d rather not take any credit for it.
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  28. @Reg Cæsar

    Congress treats the heirs of individual creators very nicely: while F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 novel The Great Gatsby is in the public domain in some Anglosphere countries, but won’t be in the U.S. until the end of 2020, after 95 years
     
    This is rather recent, though. The US was for a long time behind everyone else. You got 28 years, with another 28-year renewal. Irving Berlin outlived the copyright on his earliest compositions, such as Alexander's Ragtime Band. Irving Caesar, who wrote the words to "Swanee" (George Gershwin's biggest-selling tune, sorry Ira) and "Tea for Two", also lived to 101, and probably lost the rights to those.

    Then there's the works-for-hire of the US vs the "moral rights" that European artists are afforded, Howard Roark-style. The lady who came up with the iconic Las Vegas sign was working for the city. She got a bonus, and nothing else. She wasn't cheated; it was legitimate. That, and nobody had any idea it would be on keychains, refrigerator magnets, and beach blankets half a century later.

    Ditto the guy who invented the Smiley-Face. $25 from the ad agency. I believe the first one was green, not yellow.

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  29. peterike says:

    well, maybe you deserve to get a check in the mail every so often just for being black.

    I’m confused. Don’t we already do this?

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  30. Ditto the guy who invented the Smiley-Face. $25 from the ad agency. I believe the first one was green, not yellow.

    Robert Indiana’s recent obituary told how his “LOVE” sculpture, which he claimed was the most plagiarized work of art ever, started out as a message to his boyfriend after a nasty breakup. The original design started with F, not L, and the slanted U did double duty.

    Indiana was late to the lawsuit game. With trademarks that’s deadly– Amazon Bookstore Cooperative in Minneapolis took too long to sue Jeff Bezos, and was lucky to keep their own name– by licensing back from Bezos. Copyrights might work a little differently from trademarks, but in general, it’s use-it-or-lose-it, and defend-it-or-lose-it.

    A friend of mine tells me her old hometown BFFs are outraged that the new management of their Village Inn renamed it the Bucksnort. I told her to contact the owners of the Buckshot, only 16 miles away, and whom I know. That may be within their territorial rights. They might be able to neuter the rival Buck.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    That's all correct, and also why companies send so many stupid threatening letters over petty arguable infringements.

    Trademark and copyright, for all their issues, are a tenth as bad as the patent system. It wastes some of the best minds in the USA, people with the M-IQ to understand complex patents, the V-IQ to write well about them in lawsuits, and the personal qualities to put up with years of working hard on meaningless tasks.
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  31. Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    My experience is that people who pay in pocket change are trying to short-change you. You either accept that it's all there or you spend 5 minutes trying to count it all up. But when you do count it all up you generally find they didn't pay enough. They're hoping you'll be too busy to count it. Merchants who have been on the other end of these transactions know they're usually facing a con artist.

    People who pay in pocket change are scheming dirtbags, period.
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  32. AndrewR says:
    @Arclight
    I think this is more a product of certain groups having been told for half a century that they are owed something (like respect) rather than having to earn it. It seems like the left has promoted the idea that the downtrodden are actually our moral superiors and would in fact be our cultural and economic superiors if only white supremacy/the patriarchy hadn't cleverly kept them down. If you buy into this idea, they of course you will be outraged that they don't get their due for their wonderful contributions to society. The concept of victimhood has spread past the traditional white/black division to anyone who isn't a white male, thus the outrage exhibited by a man from a 4,000 year old culture over a random high schooler wearing a Chinese-inspired dress.

    That dress that that girl wore wasn’t even “ancient Chinese culture.” It is a relic of early 20th century upper class Shanghai women.

    I imagine the bulk of that boy’s anger at her was due to how sexy she is and how hot girls like him have seldom given his a short Chinese guys pike him the time of day. “Angry oriental male with perpetual blue balls in North America” is a very well-worn archetype.

    Read More
    • Agree: Malcolm X-Lax
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  33. AndrewR says:
    @Arclight
    I think this is more a product of certain groups having been told for half a century that they are owed something (like respect) rather than having to earn it. It seems like the left has promoted the idea that the downtrodden are actually our moral superiors and would in fact be our cultural and economic superiors if only white supremacy/the patriarchy hadn't cleverly kept them down. If you buy into this idea, they of course you will be outraged that they don't get their due for their wonderful contributions to society. The concept of victimhood has spread past the traditional white/black division to anyone who isn't a white male, thus the outrage exhibited by a man from a 4,000 year old culture over a random high schooler wearing a Chinese-inspired dress.

    Excuse the typos…

    Fixed: “I imagine the bulk of that boy’s anger at her was due to how sexy she is and how hot girls like her have seldom given short Chinese guys like him the time of day.”

    Also, relevant – the Chinese-American left eating itself: https://www.racked.com/2016/1/26/10829826/cultural-appropriation-clothing-mixed-race

    Read More
    • Replies: @DFH
    Similarly I believe that much of Asian women's anti-whiteism is driven by their jealousy of white women
    , @J.Ross
    Second attempt to bring this up: Eugene Gu, the Chinese-American surgeon-aspirant who made a career out of hating Trump on social media, was kicked out of his residency in its third year. Strangers claiming to be doctors claim that this is very bad, as it marks him as damaged goods, and he might not be able to complete his residency because hospitals set residency budgets altogether and not a year at a time. Multiple patients had rejected Gu as their doctor and his contract was not renewed. Gu blames racism and bemoans that working somewhere means making the enterprise look good.
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  34. Who wouldn’t like at least the idea of having the life of Will Freeman?

    (“About a Boy” …)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Antlitz Grollheim
    I took a few months off in between jobs, and I won't lie, a life of leisure is divine. You can read the classics you always wanted to, learn random things like electro-magnetism if the theory strikes you, walk around town and get to know everyone, sunbathe in parks, go for leisure drives, wake up whenever you want to...

    Imagine if all the welfare and section 8 went to people like iSteve readers. There'd be a golden age of learning and culture.
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  35. AndrewR says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    An economic system in which everybody had to financially compensate everybody else all the time for cultural appropriation would probably turn out to be a good deal ...
     
    ... Yes, a good deal for you and me. We could sit back and collect Benjamins and checks from our PO boxes -- because everything the rest of the people on Earth take for granted in modern life was created by our ancestors, right up to our parents and grandparents.

    If people didn't want to pay us our rightful royalties under your system, they could go back to shitting on the ground, heating their hovels with wood, and eating potatoes all damn year in the dark. That would go for men-hating feminist women too, who don't seem to realize what men do. We could just visit their cold, dark, disease-infested hovels when we need to breed.

    Not to interrupt your circlejerk, but what exactly did your ancestors (specifically your grandparents and parents) create? Please provide evidence if possible.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Read my second comment. If you don't like it, shut off your water and stop using your toilet. My father was one of the biggest makers of water and sewer pipe in the world, using proprietary methods and formulae that were exclusively American.

    Would you care to count the ancestors I have traced who fought in the American Revolution, or does constitutional government and the freedom to display your ignorant attitude here count?

    Do you not at least concede the point about what the European race has accomplished to create the modern world? The more important point is that we don't all individually have to have recent ancestors who did something significant; it is that we are part of an extended, racial family that has done more than any other for your quality of life.

    , @James Speaks
    If you must know, a number of schools in the rural south, and a textile mill in New England.
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  36. Lot says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Ditto the guy who invented the Smiley-Face. $25 from the ad agency. I believe the first one was green, not yellow.

     

    Robert Indiana's recent obituary told how his "LOVE" sculpture, which he claimed was the most plagiarized work of art ever, started out as a message to his boyfriend after a nasty breakup. The original design started with F, not L, and the slanted U did double duty.

    Indiana was late to the lawsuit game. With trademarks that's deadly-- Amazon Bookstore Cooperative in Minneapolis took too long to sue Jeff Bezos, and was lucky to keep their own name-- by licensing back from Bezos. Copyrights might work a little differently from trademarks, but in general, it's use-it-or-lose-it, and defend-it-or-lose-it.

    A friend of mine tells me her old hometown BFFs are outraged that the new management of their Village Inn renamed it the Bucksnort. I told her to contact the owners of the Buckshot, only 16 miles away, and whom I know. That may be within their territorial rights. They might be able to neuter the rival Buck.

    That’s all correct, and also why companies send so many stupid threatening letters over petty arguable infringements.

    Trademark and copyright, for all their issues, are a tenth as bad as the patent system. It wastes some of the best minds in the USA, people with the M-IQ to understand complex patents, the V-IQ to write well about them in lawsuits, and the personal qualities to put up with years of working hard on meaningless tasks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Trademark and copyright, for all their issues, are a tenth as bad as the patent system
     
    Interestingly, we are never told the names of Calvin's parents in Calvin and Hobbes, but his father, rather than having the generic office job seen in Blondie, Dilbert, and many other strips, is quite explicitly a patent attorney. That was Bill Watterson's father's profession.

    In his spare time, Calvin's dad likes to explain to his son how the world works. E.g., most babies come from a kit from Sears, but to save money, Calvin was a blue light special at Kmart.

    An attorney's mind at work!
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  37. OFF TOPIC

    Race Replacement

    War On Whitey

    White Genocide

    Read More
    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    That's a pretty compelling map and tweet.

    Of course, it will have no effect on the folks pushing this--their agenda is precisely "white genocide", (just not whites like them, but like us). But i think it might get through to--or at least do some work on--complacent normies.
    , @Mishra
    Good friend of mine just returned from Italy and said he was shocked at the number of Africans laying about in public places everywhere he went (and he's a card-carrying liberal). I cry for that beloved country which has always been my favorite place on earth. I cry, but from a distance now. Sort of leery of going back at this point.

    It's a bizarre strategem indeed which involves admitting to your country large numbers of people who have absolutely nothing to lose. Unfortunately my own country does it too.

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  38. Ivy says:

    Everybody knows that Jellyroll Morton invented jazz. At least that is what his character said in a play, so shouldn’t that be admissible? His heirs will have to get in line with other claimants like the Morton Salt people, the sushi hand-roll cabal and the unacknowledged bastardy group in rock ‘n roll.

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  39. @AndrewR
    Not to interrupt your circlejerk, but what exactly did your ancestors (specifically your grandparents and parents) create? Please provide evidence if possible.

    Read my second comment. If you don’t like it, shut off your water and stop using your toilet. My father was one of the biggest makers of water and sewer pipe in the world, using proprietary methods and formulae that were exclusively American.

    Would you care to count the ancestors I have traced who fought in the American Revolution, or does constitutional government and the freedom to display your ignorant attitude here count?

    Do you not at least concede the point about what the European race has accomplished to create the modern world? The more important point is that we don’t all individually have to have recent ancestors who did something significant; it is that we are part of an extended, racial family that has done more than any other for your quality of life.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I'm not sure why you label my attitude "ignorant," unless you mean that in a non-pejorative way. My attitude is primarily zetetic.

    Of course "the European race" has collectively done a disproportionate amount to "create" the modern world. Of course, that's obviously not an unalloyed good thing. Deforestation, overfishing, pollution, anthropogenic climate change, and of course nuclear weapons are horrific facts of current year life that "the European race" has inflicted on the world.

    I am obviously not completely against collective identity or collective pride, and I certainly am not into white guilt, but I do feel annoyed by the unearned sense of racial superiority many people in this corner of the internet give off. You're not Isaac Newton, you're not Ben Franklin, you're not Nikola Tesla, you're not Jonas Salk. You're not even your father. Do your own part to improve the world instead of gloating about the contributions of people whom you're only vaguely related to.

    , @Reg Cæsar

    My father was one of the biggest makers of water and sewer pipe in the world, using proprietary methods and formulae that were exclusively American.
     
    At one time, every fourth water pump in the world was made in Seneca Falls, New York. They also claimed to be the "Fire Engine Capital of the World", though nearby Elmira made the same boast.

    So this former village, now hamlet, had an enormous role in improving the quantity as well as quality of human life around the planet over the years. But what is it celebrated for? Some conclave of witches 170 years ago.
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  40. Indian tribes traditionally have a different idea of intellectual property. Things developed by the tribe belong to the tribe. In the old days it was the tribal elders. Now it would be the organized tribal government.

    It made it interesting when FSU got the rights to use the name Seminoles from the Florida Seminole tribe. This was a matter of get permission from the tribe or the NCAA would take away the rights to the name.

    So, FSU got permission from the Florida Seminole tribe.

    The larger Oklahoma Seminole tribe was upset they didn’t get a piece of the action.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ChrisZ
    There's a general "poli-sci" observation beneath your comment, Paleo. Namely, that contemporary arguments about "cultural appropriation" and the like are really about the old questions of property, ownership, and the meaning and significance of both ideas. Various societies through history have had differing answers to these questions, and those answers are not incosequential. One set of answers leaves your people in an eternal tribe, another set can lead you to a productive commercial society.

    I would conclude that the seemingly isolated issue of "cultural appropriation" is really agitation for different kind of society (perhaps, as you say, a tribal one)--but I don't think that'd be news to anyone here.

    To the point of Steve's original post: I have trouble seeing why anyone here would object to the idea that Scott Fitzgerald's heirs still profit from his work. That's really the dream of every writer: that your works will be read, bought, and support you and your children. It's no different from the situation with the heirs of a great inventor, or of the founder of an enduring company.
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  41. @stillCARealist
    who on earth is reading Arthur Miller? He's boring and tendentious.

    I'll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It's only assigned because it's short, like The Crucible.

    I think I'm finally to the age where I can say what I actually think about "great" literature. Lots of it ain't so great.

    I think I’m finally to the age where I can say what I actually think about “great” literature. Lots of it ain’t so great.

    That’s rarely the point though. We read the stuff because everyone else did, and because doing so likely influenced their thoughts.

    Obviously not as big of a deal now, since there is so much content that no one south of von Neumann (brainwise) could synthesize it all, but for a long time you could become a fully educated man of our culture by reading what we’ve come to think of as the canon.

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  42. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Arclight
    I think this is more a product of certain groups having been told for half a century that they are owed something (like respect) rather than having to earn it. It seems like the left has promoted the idea that the downtrodden are actually our moral superiors and would in fact be our cultural and economic superiors if only white supremacy/the patriarchy hadn't cleverly kept them down. If you buy into this idea, they of course you will be outraged that they don't get their due for their wonderful contributions to society. The concept of victimhood has spread past the traditional white/black division to anyone who isn't a white male, thus the outrage exhibited by a man from a 4,000 year old culture over a random high schooler wearing a Chinese-inspired dress.

    To this point, an item at Drudge: half of millennials polled expect to become millionaires.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5835419/More-half-Millennials-expect-millionaires-someday-according-new-study.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Reasonable expectation given inflation.
    , @JimB

    To this point, an item at Drudge: half of millennials polled expect to become millionaires.
     
    In inflation corrected 2030 dollars? Presently you need a few million just to retire with a middle class income.
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  43. DFH says:
    @AndrewR
    Excuse the typos...

    Fixed: "I imagine the bulk of that boy’s anger at her was due to how sexy she is and how hot girls like her have seldom given short Chinese guys like him the time of day."

    Also, relevant - the Chinese-American left eating itself: https://www.racked.com/2016/1/26/10829826/cultural-appropriation-clothing-mixed-race

    Similarly I believe that much of Asian women’s anti-whiteism is driven by their jealousy of white women

    Read More
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  44. @AndrewR
    Not to interrupt your circlejerk, but what exactly did your ancestors (specifically your grandparents and parents) create? Please provide evidence if possible.

    If you must know, a number of schools in the rural south, and a textile mill in New England.

    Read More
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  45. J.Ross says: • Website
    @AndrewR
    Excuse the typos...

    Fixed: "I imagine the bulk of that boy’s anger at her was due to how sexy she is and how hot girls like her have seldom given short Chinese guys like him the time of day."

    Also, relevant - the Chinese-American left eating itself: https://www.racked.com/2016/1/26/10829826/cultural-appropriation-clothing-mixed-race

    Second attempt to bring this up: Eugene Gu, the Chinese-American surgeon-aspirant who made a career out of hating Trump on social media, was kicked out of his residency in its third year. Strangers claiming to be doctors claim that this is very bad, as it marks him as damaged goods, and he might not be able to complete his residency because hospitals set residency budgets altogether and not a year at a time. Multiple patients had rejected Gu as their doctor and his contract was not renewed. Gu blames racism and bemoans that working somewhere means making the enterprise look good.

    Read More
    • Replies: @istevefan

    Eugene Gu, the Chinese-American ...
     
    Chinese? I recall Eugene tweeting around Veteran's Day that the US fought against "white supremacy" in WW2. He is consumed with white supremacy. He has that famous photo of himself taking a knee against white supremacy. But as a Chinese I figured he would have mentioned our fight against Japanese supremacy too.
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  46. Anon[158] • Disclaimer says:
    Read More
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  47. snorlax says:
    @J.Ross
    To this point, an item at Drudge: half of millennials polled expect to become millionaires.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5835419/More-half-Millennials-expect-millionaires-someday-according-new-study.html

    Reasonable expectation given inflation.

    Read More
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  48. ChrisZ says:
    @Paleo Liberal
    Indian tribes traditionally have a different idea of intellectual property. Things developed by the tribe belong to the tribe. In the old days it was the tribal elders. Now it would be the organized tribal government.

    It made it interesting when FSU got the rights to use the name Seminoles from the Florida Seminole tribe. This was a matter of get permission from the tribe or the NCAA would take away the rights to the name.

    So, FSU got permission from the Florida Seminole tribe.

    The larger Oklahoma Seminole tribe was upset they didn’t get a piece of the action.

    There’s a general “poli-sci” observation beneath your comment, Paleo. Namely, that contemporary arguments about “cultural appropriation” and the like are really about the old questions of property, ownership, and the meaning and significance of both ideas. Various societies through history have had differing answers to these questions, and those answers are not incosequential. One set of answers leaves your people in an eternal tribe, another set can lead you to a productive commercial society.

    I would conclude that the seemingly isolated issue of “cultural appropriation” is really agitation for different kind of society (perhaps, as you say, a tribal one)–but I don’t think that’d be news to anyone here.

    To the point of Steve’s original post: I have trouble seeing why anyone here would object to the idea that Scott Fitzgerald’s heirs still profit from his work. That’s really the dream of every writer: that your works will be read, bought, and support you and your children. It’s no different from the situation with the heirs of a great inventor, or of the founder of an enduring company.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic

    To the point of Steve’s original post: I have trouble seeing why anyone here would object to the idea that Scott Fitzgerald’s heirs still profit from his work. That’s really the dream of every writer: that your works will be read, bought, and support you and your children. It’s no different from the situation with the heirs of a great inventor, or of the founder of an enduring company.
     
    It's a nice thought, but it's pure artificial scarcity. Without the government's effective price floor from copyright, selling IP would be like selling a shovel. I can see some rationale for a writer's or inventor's lifetime--the writer/inventor is incentivized to create--but the heirs? Why should they get mailbox money off purely arbitrary government enforcement over a product that is 100% reproducible after the first sale?
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  49. Wilkey says:

    But I think it’s more understandable as resentment that you don’t get a check in the mail for use of your group’s intellectual property rights.

    Yet all these people bitching about “cultural appropriation” do so in a country founded by my ancestors (virtually all my ancestors were in the USA pre-Revolution) in the language of my ancestors, having benefitted from an industrial revolution that started in the nation of my ancestors. But my daughter is “culturally appropriating” if she wears a dress in a style invented in China. I’ll give them their clothing fashions back if they give me my country back.

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    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Hear, hear! It’s too bad that the organs of communication (well, that’s what they used to call them) that expound the cultural appropriation nonsense don’t allow us to use them to make our rebuttal.
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  50. Wilkey says:
    2370989

    I’ve always found Sowell to be a pretty decent read, but his complaint that American blacks are backwards thanks to living amongst “backwards” Scots-Irish folks was always the weak link, more like an excuse to avoid a conclusion he didn’t want to draw. So he he drops all the blame on the Scots-Irish. Somehow, for some reason, it’s OK to put the blame on them rather than blacks. I just wonder how he explains blacks in Brazil, Haiti, Jamaica, Sweden, and England.

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    • Replies: @NOTA
    I think Sowell's argument was a bit narrower than that--he points to a bunch of modern black culture that were absorbed from Southern Scots-Irish. I don't recall him arguing that this explained much of the black/white gap in outcomes. That would be consistent with the ideas in his Culture trilogy, but there can be a lot of other explanations. (Of course, the most economical explanation IMO is the IQ gap, but I know Sowell doesn't agree with that.)
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  51. istevefan says:
    @J.Ross
    Second attempt to bring this up: Eugene Gu, the Chinese-American surgeon-aspirant who made a career out of hating Trump on social media, was kicked out of his residency in its third year. Strangers claiming to be doctors claim that this is very bad, as it marks him as damaged goods, and he might not be able to complete his residency because hospitals set residency budgets altogether and not a year at a time. Multiple patients had rejected Gu as their doctor and his contract was not renewed. Gu blames racism and bemoans that working somewhere means making the enterprise look good.

    Eugene Gu, the Chinese-American …

    Chinese? I recall Eugene tweeting around Veteran’s Day that the US fought against “white supremacy” in WW2. He is consumed with white supremacy. He has that famous photo of himself taking a knee against white supremacy. But as a Chinese I figured he would have mentioned our fight against Japanese supremacy too.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    The NatSocs may have been white and they may have been supremacists but they certainly were not "white supremacists" any more than the Japanese of that era were "yellow supremacists." Of course it is interesting to note that the Japanese tried to legitimize their rule in lands conquered by them by claiming that they were freeing their victims from European colonialism. They labeled this farcical idea the "Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere."
    , @J.Ross
    Follow-up: I don't know. I assumed he was of Chinese ancestry because I'm a horrible racist and I dimly remember that being stated somewhere. Now that I look around I cannot find it. But I did come across him whining about getting subpoenaed by a Congressional committee because he is a fetal tissue transplant pioneer "even though [he] suspended [his] research." You're a pioneer in a new field, taking a few semesters off doesn't change that.
    Hmmm ... "pho is his favorite food in Tennessee."
    https://thenerdsofcolor.org/2018/02/07/southern-fried-asian-dr-eugene-gu/
    I like that it's not cultural appropriation for him to be "Southern fried" after having been in Tennessee for a few years.
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  52. Tiny Duck says:
    @Neoconned
    A Muslim Uber driver kicks 2 lesbians out of his car in Brooklyn.....thing I wanna know os....are they really "lesbians"? I've never met lesbian who looked like this:

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/amphtml/nidhiprakash/uber-driver-lesbian-couple-nyc

    https://www.pinknews.co.uk/2018/06/12/uber-driver-kicks-lesbian-couple-out-of-his-car-for-kissing/amp/

    These women are lesbians? What a waste....but hey I'm with Ack-med on this 1....

    1. muslims don’t act like this so this is obviously fake. only white Christians are militantly against homosexualty

    2. these girls have never had a real man. If a Man of Color rogered them they would be heterosexual

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    • Replies: @Jake Barnes
    Someday, maybe not today and maybe not tomorrow, but someday Tiny’s genius is going to be recognized. Maybe President Trump will give you a medal.
    , @Neoconned
    Now I know you're 1 of us....

    That being said i have no clue how you keep this act up for as long as you have & do....
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  53. JimB says:
    @J.Ross
    To this point, an item at Drudge: half of millennials polled expect to become millionaires.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5835419/More-half-Millennials-expect-millionaires-someday-according-new-study.html

    To this point, an item at Drudge: half of millennials polled expect to become millionaires.

    In inflation corrected 2030 dollars? Presently you need a few million just to retire with a middle class income.

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  54. @Buzz Mohawk

    An economic system in which everybody had to financially compensate everybody else all the time for cultural appropriation would probably turn out to be a good deal ...
     
    ... For me.

    This is in response to some wags I have read who say we talk too much about what our people or ancestors did, while we ourselves haven't done anything. Okay, let's just talk about our own fathers, then, shall we?

    Yes, that's right. This claim of ours is very close to home, not ancient at all. It is very relevant to our times.

    You anti-white, anti-men a**holes who want credit for dreadlocks and jazz live in homes connected to pipelines. My father quite possibly manufactured the pipe that carries your water to you and carries away your sh*t.

    He was in charge of engineering and production for seven plants across America that mass produced the long-lasting, high-quality pipe that is in the ground and in homes and buildings all over the world. Yes, "HE BUILT THAT." My father.

    When I was a kid, he took me to a plant and showed me massive water pipes coming off the lines, ready to carry your water in a city or town somewhere. He said his pipe would last longer than the Roman aqueducts.

    Send your checks now and for the rest of your non-productive lives, or you can shut off your water and sewer systems right now.

    My grandfather was a big wig at International Harvester which made many of the machines that planted, tended, and harvested crops. Send me a check or get your wooden plow out and be ready to harvest and thresh your grain by hand. Oh, and did I mention no diesel engines or hydraulics?

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  55. Olorin says:
    @anonymous
    If you want to see how national governance really works, take a few minutes to read about the Copyright Term Extension Act (CTEA) of 1998, aka the Mickey Mouse Protection Act. The owners of works were handed additional years of copyright protection, in many cases long after the creators -- who accepted and perhaps even desired the earlier release of their works to the public domain -- were gone.

    Congress serves those willing and able to afford the Wa$hington Whorehou$e.

    A similar argument can be made regarding the term of corporate charters, which were originally organized to sunset after a fixed period of time for a specific set of organizational tasks, but which today are incorporated and immortal entities.

    The Founders of this republic wanted to do away with overweening power of Crown corporations just as much as of European central banking families.

    I’d like to see the Dissident Right (or whatever) visit this issue. It was taken up in the ’90s by certain old-timey progressive types but quickly fell victim to the Democrats plutocrat-ascendant model later that decade.

    https://www.counterpunch.org/2013/03/15/the-progressive-movement-is-a-pr-front-for-rich-democrats/

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  56. AndrewR says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Read my second comment. If you don't like it, shut off your water and stop using your toilet. My father was one of the biggest makers of water and sewer pipe in the world, using proprietary methods and formulae that were exclusively American.

    Would you care to count the ancestors I have traced who fought in the American Revolution, or does constitutional government and the freedom to display your ignorant attitude here count?

    Do you not at least concede the point about what the European race has accomplished to create the modern world? The more important point is that we don't all individually have to have recent ancestors who did something significant; it is that we are part of an extended, racial family that has done more than any other for your quality of life.

    I’m not sure why you label my attitude “ignorant,” unless you mean that in a non-pejorative way. My attitude is primarily zetetic.

    Of course “the European race” has collectively done a disproportionate amount to “create” the modern world. Of course, that’s obviously not an unalloyed good thing. Deforestation, overfishing, pollution, anthropogenic climate change, and of course nuclear weapons are horrific facts of current year life that “the European race” has inflicted on the world.

    I am obviously not completely against collective identity or collective pride, and I certainly am not into white guilt, but I do feel annoyed by the unearned sense of racial superiority many people in this corner of the internet give off. You’re not Isaac Newton, you’re not Ben Franklin, you’re not Nikola Tesla, you’re not Jonas Salk. You’re not even your father. Do your own part to improve the world instead of gloating about the contributions of people whom you’re only vaguely related to.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Of course “the European race” has collectively done a disproportionate amount to “create” the modern world. Of course, that’s obviously not an unalloyed good thing. Deforestation, overfishing, pollution, anthropogenic climate change, and of course nuclear weapons are horrific facts of current year life that “the European race” has inflicted on the world.
     
    Primitive people also cause deforestation and manage their resources more terribly than our people ever have.

    Overfishing is corrected and those resources are managed too. You can buy all the fish you want at the store because the white man knows what he is doing. Compare that to the Japanese who will kill off the whales if people stop watching...

    Pollution has been well-managed in the United States since it became an issue, and now the EPA goes overboard with regulations to the point it has to be stopped, like all bureaucracies eventually whose purpose is to grow.

    Climate Change Is Not Anthropogenic. Earth's climate has been cyclically heating and cooling for millions of years, and the astronomical and planetary forces at work are beyond us and obviously beyond your pop-sci ability to understand.

    Nuclear weapons...hmm... The product of the most advanced people on the planet. Any others who would have come as far would have built them too, probably with more disastrous results. Really, would you prefer a universe in which one of the other two major human races had them first?

    I will again go back to my father, the industrialist, because he was there dealing with the EPA as it grew to harass his business. He taught me how it really is. You don't know what you are talking about.

    The European race has been overwhelmingly good for humanity and is now under attack. It should be defended.
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  57. I think you are mistaken to attribute the obsession with “cultural appropriation” to mail money. It’s causes are different.

    First and foremost: it isn’t ethnic minorities who complain – or at least it wasn’t them until the idea caught on. The first to point a finger on any given case of CA is almost always another “white” person or white person sock-puppeting as a minority on social media. I think it started with African Americans and in some cases, Africans (think critics of Paul Simon) criticizing cultural appropriation of AA or African culture, but it got wings when white people started accusing white people of it, everywhere.

    You will notice that outside the US people puzzle at the phenomena. People in China, for example, understand that they, for the most part, wear Blue Jeans.

    And they also understand that they regard it as a compliment when Americans “appropriate” Chinese culture. That’s – correctly – understood as cultural diplomacy and even (successful) cultural imperialism in some cases.

    When white people, accuse and harass, other white people, over cultural appropriation, or when the occasional Asian HS student who didn’t get the memo because he’s so disconnected from his homeland and his own people that he joins the – white – crowd, and casts the accusation … it has to do with something, but it isn’t for want of a check in the mail.

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  58. AndrewR says:
    @istevefan

    Eugene Gu, the Chinese-American ...
     
    Chinese? I recall Eugene tweeting around Veteran's Day that the US fought against "white supremacy" in WW2. He is consumed with white supremacy. He has that famous photo of himself taking a knee against white supremacy. But as a Chinese I figured he would have mentioned our fight against Japanese supremacy too.

    The NatSocs may have been white and they may have been supremacists but they certainly were not “white supremacists” any more than the Japanese of that era were “yellow supremacists.” Of course it is interesting to note that the Japanese tried to legitimize their rule in lands conquered by them by claiming that they were freeing their victims from European colonialism. They labeled this farcical idea the “Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.”

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  59. Lex says:

    And then there is restitution of heirless property:

    https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1226/text

    the restitution of heirless property to assist needy Holocaust survivors, and for other purposes

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  60. @stillCARealist
    who on earth is reading Arthur Miller? He's boring and tendentious.

    I'll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It's only assigned because it's short, like The Crucible.

    I think I'm finally to the age where I can say what I actually think about "great" literature. Lots of it ain't so great.

    Agreed. Miller–your “boring and tendentious” nailed it.

    I think “The Great Gatsby” has some merit and is certainly much better than anything Miller ever wrote, but i sure didn’t like it in high school and wouldn’t bother reading it.

    There is better 19th century American literature. I enjoyed Melville. But like a lot of older guys i simply don’t have a lot of interest in fiction anymore. There is more interesting stuff to read where i actually learn stuff about the actually existing world.

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  61. jJay says:

    How about real property rights?

    I was working on a family ranch in Santa Ynez this morning. The lead ranchero, Alturo, quipped about the owner’s son driving his sports car along the unpaved roads at all hours while daughter kept the dust down on her excursions. Alturo knew he was blessed to be where he was. He also knew the grandchildren (or perhaps great grandchildren) of the pioneer who established the ranch have uncalloused hands. The Law and property rights will not be enough to keep the ownership of this ranch within the family for long.

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  62. Svigor says:

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  63. Olorin says:

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  64. OT – I know pretty much everyone was HBD-conscious “in Elder Days before the Fall”, but the Guardian are having conniptions about Einstein’s travel journals.

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jun/12/einsteins-travel-diaries-reveal-shocking-xenophobia

    “Einstein’s diary entries on the biological origin of the alleged intellectual inferiority of the Japanese, Chinese, and Indians are definitely not understated and can be viewed as racist – in these instances, other peoples are portrayed as being biologically inferior, a clear hallmark of racism. The disquieting comment that the Chinese may ‘supplant all other races’ is also most revealing in this regard.”

    Most revealing or most perceptive?

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks.
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  65. fish says:
    @Tiny Duck
    You are purposefully leaving out the context and nuance of the different standards

    You are being intellectually dishonest

    Ohs Tinys…..

    U always bein my kween!

    Lenpter “be’s nowin how to treets his”wimmins” Plitz

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    • Replies: @nebulafox
    I hereby apologize for my previous responses to TD. It's very clear that fish should be the only one allowed to do so from now on.
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  66. 2370989

    Overpaid Black slob Thomas Sowell …

    Holy cow Charles. Thomas Sowell strikes me as a class act–and an actual scholar. I read his “Race and Culture, A World View” a dozen or so back. A worthwhile book. (My brother read the two follow on books as well–positive recommendation.)

    Is his “Black Rednecks and White Liberals” thesis correct? No, of course not. (Though his point about white liberal enabling of dysfunction seems spot on.) But Sowell is and economist, a “culture guy” and not a HBD guy. One assumes he wants to believe that blacks can do better. People generally want to think well of their ethnic group and put the best possible spin on it–downplay the bad, upplay the good. We see that around here from iSteve commenters. It’s human nature.

    Not having Sailer level understanding of HBD doesn’t make one “a slob” or “an asshole”. It’s not remotely like intentionally lying from people who claim to be evolutionary biologists, or “social scientists” nor like running around blaming “white racism!” for everyone else’s problems.

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    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Agreed -- Sowell is a perceptive and eloquent writer who in a more just world would be an intellectual star. I've read his intro economics book, and his book on the housing bust/2007-8 recession, and they were both excellent.
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  67. @ChrisZ
    There's a general "poli-sci" observation beneath your comment, Paleo. Namely, that contemporary arguments about "cultural appropriation" and the like are really about the old questions of property, ownership, and the meaning and significance of both ideas. Various societies through history have had differing answers to these questions, and those answers are not incosequential. One set of answers leaves your people in an eternal tribe, another set can lead you to a productive commercial society.

    I would conclude that the seemingly isolated issue of "cultural appropriation" is really agitation for different kind of society (perhaps, as you say, a tribal one)--but I don't think that'd be news to anyone here.

    To the point of Steve's original post: I have trouble seeing why anyone here would object to the idea that Scott Fitzgerald's heirs still profit from his work. That's really the dream of every writer: that your works will be read, bought, and support you and your children. It's no different from the situation with the heirs of a great inventor, or of the founder of an enduring company.

    To the point of Steve’s original post: I have trouble seeing why anyone here would object to the idea that Scott Fitzgerald’s heirs still profit from his work. That’s really the dream of every writer: that your works will be read, bought, and support you and your children. It’s no different from the situation with the heirs of a great inventor, or of the founder of an enduring company.

    It’s a nice thought, but it’s pure artificial scarcity. Without the government’s effective price floor from copyright, selling IP would be like selling a shovel. I can see some rationale for a writer’s or inventor’s lifetime–the writer/inventor is incentivized to create–but the heirs? Why should they get mailbox money off purely arbitrary government enforcement over a product that is 100% reproducible after the first sale?

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    • Replies: @International Jew

    the writer/inventor is incentivized to create–but the heirs? Why should they get mailbox money
     
    Two answers to this.

    1. If I care about my heirs' wellbeing after my death (and why wouldn't I?), then copyright extending past my death acts as an incentive to me today. Same way, when I'm old, I might plant a tree.

    2. The right to leave an inheritance should be thought of as a benefit, primarily, to me and only incidentally to my heirs. That is, I earned my money, and among the many things I could do with my money that would make me happy — renovate my kitchen, buy a boat, vacation in Tuscany — one of these is the pleasure of leaving something to my heirs. It's a pleasure like any other, and so denying me that (by confiscating it from my heirs) is just as wrong as prohibiting me from buying that boat.

    , @Svigor
    It's artificial scarcity, but that doesn't strike me as persuasive, one way or the other. Once the camel gets his nose into the tent with copyright, trademark, IP law, etc., I don't see how making them heritable is some bright line that shouldn't be crossed.

    For me the tension is between the two chilling effects; too short a period, and too little incentive is secured. Too long, and society's creativity is stifled, because over time individual works permeate the culture - they leave holes in cultural output, if made taboo.
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  68. @The Only Catholic Unionist
    Who wouldn't like at least the idea of having the life of Will Freeman?

    ("About a Boy" ...)

    I took a few months off in between jobs, and I won’t lie, a life of leisure is divine. You can read the classics you always wanted to, learn random things like electro-magnetism if the theory strikes you, walk around town and get to know everyone, sunbathe in parks, go for leisure drives, wake up whenever you want to…

    Imagine if all the welfare and section 8 went to people like iSteve readers. There’d be a golden age of learning and culture.

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  69. syonredux says:

    Off-topic:

    Hatred of Europeans, High School edition:

    A few months at Gencove ago we received an email from Demetrius Green, a science teacher from Bronx Collaborative High School was pretty unique. He wanted us to analyze the ancestries of kids from his science class to illustrate what they learned this year about DNA, human evolution, and diversity.

    They were extremely fascinated and started running around to see what their friends ancestries were like. After things calmed down they quickly realized that by combining all of their ancestries they represent almost every single region in our reference panel (some students even expressed jealousy of their peers with more diverse ancestries).

    They would be a perfect group to repopulate the planet if a catastrophic event were to wipe out the entire humanity besides them — their words not mine.

    I was decidedly not useful for this task given my shockingly boring (again, their words) ancestry (almost entirely Eastern European).

    https://medium.com/@kaja.wasik_32194/talking-to-kids-about-genetic-ancestry-88cb42cabad

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  70. @AndrewR
    I'm not sure why you label my attitude "ignorant," unless you mean that in a non-pejorative way. My attitude is primarily zetetic.

    Of course "the European race" has collectively done a disproportionate amount to "create" the modern world. Of course, that's obviously not an unalloyed good thing. Deforestation, overfishing, pollution, anthropogenic climate change, and of course nuclear weapons are horrific facts of current year life that "the European race" has inflicted on the world.

    I am obviously not completely against collective identity or collective pride, and I certainly am not into white guilt, but I do feel annoyed by the unearned sense of racial superiority many people in this corner of the internet give off. You're not Isaac Newton, you're not Ben Franklin, you're not Nikola Tesla, you're not Jonas Salk. You're not even your father. Do your own part to improve the world instead of gloating about the contributions of people whom you're only vaguely related to.

    Of course “the European race” has collectively done a disproportionate amount to “create” the modern world. Of course, that’s obviously not an unalloyed good thing. Deforestation, overfishing, pollution, anthropogenic climate change, and of course nuclear weapons are horrific facts of current year life that “the European race” has inflicted on the world.

    Primitive people also cause deforestation and manage their resources more terribly than our people ever have.

    Overfishing is corrected and those resources are managed too. You can buy all the fish you want at the store because the white man knows what he is doing. Compare that to the Japanese who will kill off the whales if people stop watching…

    Pollution has been well-managed in the United States since it became an issue, and now the EPA goes overboard with regulations to the point it has to be stopped, like all bureaucracies eventually whose purpose is to grow.

    Climate Change Is Not Anthropogenic. Earth’s climate has been cyclically heating and cooling for millions of years, and the astronomical and planetary forces at work are beyond us and obviously beyond your pop-sci ability to understand.

    Nuclear weapons…hmm… The product of the most advanced people on the planet. Any others who would have come as far would have built them too, probably with more disastrous results. Really, would you prefer a universe in which one of the other two major human races had them first?

    I will again go back to my father, the industrialist, because he was there dealing with the EPA as it grew to harass his business. He taught me how it really is. You don’t know what you are talking about.

    The European race has been overwhelmingly good for humanity and is now under attack. It should be defended.

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    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, donut
    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    ...he was there dealing with the EPA as it grew to harass his business.
     
    Pedantically editing myself here: The word should have been "company," not "business." The way I wrote that makes it seem like my father owned the Dow Jones Industrial for which he ran the production engineering of one division.

    As the EPA came on the scene, I heard a lot about it over the dinner table.

    If you want to see real pollution, go to China, which has copied our manufacturing with our money but without our pollution control.

    , @AndrewR
    Lol ok you win champ
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  71. syonredux says:
    @stillCARealist
    who on earth is reading Arthur Miller? He's boring and tendentious.

    I'll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It's only assigned because it's short, like The Crucible.

    I think I'm finally to the age where I can say what I actually think about "great" literature. Lots of it ain't so great.

    I’ll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It’s only assigned because it’s short, like The Crucible.

    Nah. Gatsby gets assigned because it’s both short and good. For teaching purposes, that’s the perfect combo. If you assign, say, Middlemarch or Moby-Dick, you know that most of the students won’t read the whole thing.

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    • Replies: @DFH
    But it's not good. It gets assigned because it's American.
    , @Kylie
    Both The Great Gatsby and Moby Dick are beautifully written. Fitzgerald and Mehville were masters of prose though I think Willa Cather and Joseph Conrad were even better.
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  72. DFH says:
    @syonredux

    I’ll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It’s only assigned because it’s short, like The Crucible.
     
    Nah. Gatsby gets assigned because it's both short and good. For teaching purposes, that's the perfect combo. If you assign, say, Middlemarch or Moby-Dick, you know that most of the students won't read the whole thing.

    But it’s not good. It gets assigned because it’s American.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    But it’s not good. It gets assigned because it’s American.
     
    No, Gatsby's quite good. I don't think that it equals Faulkner's* best work (Absalom, Absalom! , The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, A I lay Dying), but it definitely stands as one of the best Anglophone novels of the interwar period.


    *And his stuff is too difficult for the average reader, rendering him less useful for classroom purposes.

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  73. @The Anti-Gnostic

    To the point of Steve’s original post: I have trouble seeing why anyone here would object to the idea that Scott Fitzgerald’s heirs still profit from his work. That’s really the dream of every writer: that your works will be read, bought, and support you and your children. It’s no different from the situation with the heirs of a great inventor, or of the founder of an enduring company.
     
    It's a nice thought, but it's pure artificial scarcity. Without the government's effective price floor from copyright, selling IP would be like selling a shovel. I can see some rationale for a writer's or inventor's lifetime--the writer/inventor is incentivized to create--but the heirs? Why should they get mailbox money off purely arbitrary government enforcement over a product that is 100% reproducible after the first sale?

    the writer/inventor is incentivized to create–but the heirs? Why should they get mailbox money

    Two answers to this.

    1. If I care about my heirs’ wellbeing after my death (and why wouldn’t I?), then copyright extending past my death acts as an incentive to me today. Same way, when I’m old, I might plant a tree.

    2. The right to leave an inheritance should be thought of as a benefit, primarily, to me and only incidentally to my heirs. That is, I earned my money, and among the many things I could do with my money that would make me happy — renovate my kitchen, buy a boat, vacation in Tuscany — one of these is the pleasure of leaving something to my heirs. It’s a pleasure like any other, and so denying me that (by confiscating it from my heirs) is just as wrong as prohibiting me from buying that boat.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    You are right about this right.

    It is the right of everyone to care for the well-being of his heirs, because that is in his own reproductive, evolutionary interest. It is in your highest interest to leave something for your offspring, to help them succeed and further your DNA.

    It is an imperative.

    In this way, it makes sense for people of the European race to care about what their extended family has created, to preserve it, and to leave it for their heirs.

    Right now what we are doing is the large scale equivalent of spending down our family capital while we invite everyone else over to enjoy it with us. We are behaving like spoiled fools who inherited a fortune, and maybe that is what we are.

    , @AnotherDad
    Well said, IJ.
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    What's the limit? 20 or 200 years past your death? At some point the rest of us get to ask why we're enforcing your copyright to restrict supply of a now-completely-fungible good.
    , @Svigor
    I agree with 1, but 2 is covered by inheritance, so it's superfluous.
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  74. J.Ross says: • Website
    @istevefan

    Eugene Gu, the Chinese-American ...
     
    Chinese? I recall Eugene tweeting around Veteran's Day that the US fought against "white supremacy" in WW2. He is consumed with white supremacy. He has that famous photo of himself taking a knee against white supremacy. But as a Chinese I figured he would have mentioned our fight against Japanese supremacy too.

    Follow-up: I don’t know. I assumed he was of Chinese ancestry because I’m a horrible racist and I dimly remember that being stated somewhere. Now that I look around I cannot find it. But I did come across him whining about getting subpoenaed by a Congressional committee because he is a fetal tissue transplant pioneer “even though [he] suspended [his] research.” You’re a pioneer in a new field, taking a few semesters off doesn’t change that.
    Hmmm … “pho is his favorite food in Tennessee.”

    https://thenerdsofcolor.org/2018/02/07/southern-fried-asian-dr-eugene-gu/

    I like that it’s not cultural appropriation for him to be “Southern fried” after having been in Tennessee for a few years.

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  75. 2370989

    Those Scots sure are a contentious people.

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  76. OFF TOPIC

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  77. @Buzz Mohawk

    Of course “the European race” has collectively done a disproportionate amount to “create” the modern world. Of course, that’s obviously not an unalloyed good thing. Deforestation, overfishing, pollution, anthropogenic climate change, and of course nuclear weapons are horrific facts of current year life that “the European race” has inflicted on the world.
     
    Primitive people also cause deforestation and manage their resources more terribly than our people ever have.

    Overfishing is corrected and those resources are managed too. You can buy all the fish you want at the store because the white man knows what he is doing. Compare that to the Japanese who will kill off the whales if people stop watching...

    Pollution has been well-managed in the United States since it became an issue, and now the EPA goes overboard with regulations to the point it has to be stopped, like all bureaucracies eventually whose purpose is to grow.

    Climate Change Is Not Anthropogenic. Earth's climate has been cyclically heating and cooling for millions of years, and the astronomical and planetary forces at work are beyond us and obviously beyond your pop-sci ability to understand.

    Nuclear weapons...hmm... The product of the most advanced people on the planet. Any others who would have come as far would have built them too, probably with more disastrous results. Really, would you prefer a universe in which one of the other two major human races had them first?

    I will again go back to my father, the industrialist, because he was there dealing with the EPA as it grew to harass his business. He taught me how it really is. You don't know what you are talking about.

    The European race has been overwhelmingly good for humanity and is now under attack. It should be defended.

    …he was there dealing with the EPA as it grew to harass his business.

    Pedantically editing myself here: The word should have been “company,” not “business.” The way I wrote that makes it seem like my father owned the Dow Jones Industrial for which he ran the production engineering of one division.

    As the EPA came on the scene, I heard a lot about it over the dinner table.

    If you want to see real pollution, go to China, which has copied our manufacturing with our money but without our pollution control.

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  78. OFF TOPIC

    It’s all about Argentina folks!

    Mark Sanford claimed to be on the Appalachian Trail when he was really in Argentina making the beast with two backs and doing the Tango with a woman not his wife.

    Pope Tango is from Argentina. Argentina consistently wins the most crazy country award year after year. As a matter of fact, 3 years ago all other countries defaulted to Argentina without even competing.

    Tweet from 2015:

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  79. @International Jew

    the writer/inventor is incentivized to create–but the heirs? Why should they get mailbox money
     
    Two answers to this.

    1. If I care about my heirs' wellbeing after my death (and why wouldn't I?), then copyright extending past my death acts as an incentive to me today. Same way, when I'm old, I might plant a tree.

    2. The right to leave an inheritance should be thought of as a benefit, primarily, to me and only incidentally to my heirs. That is, I earned my money, and among the many things I could do with my money that would make me happy — renovate my kitchen, buy a boat, vacation in Tuscany — one of these is the pleasure of leaving something to my heirs. It's a pleasure like any other, and so denying me that (by confiscating it from my heirs) is just as wrong as prohibiting me from buying that boat.

    You are right about this right.

    It is the right of everyone to care for the well-being of his heirs, because that is in his own reproductive, evolutionary interest. It is in your highest interest to leave something for your offspring, to help them succeed and further your DNA.

    It is an imperative.

    In this way, it makes sense for people of the European race to care about what their extended family has created, to preserve it, and to leave it for their heirs.

    Right now what we are doing is the large scale equivalent of spending down our family capital while we invite everyone else over to enjoy it with us. We are behaving like spoiled fools who inherited a fortune, and maybe that is what we are.

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  80. @Charles Pewitt
    OFF TOPIC

    Race Replacement

    War On Whitey

    White Genocide

    https://twitter.com/AlfredAlbion/status/1006172508138196992

    That’s a pretty compelling map and tweet.

    Of course, it will have no effect on the folks pushing this–their agenda is precisely “white genocide”, (just not whites like them, but like us). But i think it might get through to–or at least do some work on–complacent normies.

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  81. @International Jew

    the writer/inventor is incentivized to create–but the heirs? Why should they get mailbox money
     
    Two answers to this.

    1. If I care about my heirs' wellbeing after my death (and why wouldn't I?), then copyright extending past my death acts as an incentive to me today. Same way, when I'm old, I might plant a tree.

    2. The right to leave an inheritance should be thought of as a benefit, primarily, to me and only incidentally to my heirs. That is, I earned my money, and among the many things I could do with my money that would make me happy — renovate my kitchen, buy a boat, vacation in Tuscany — one of these is the pleasure of leaving something to my heirs. It's a pleasure like any other, and so denying me that (by confiscating it from my heirs) is just as wrong as prohibiting me from buying that boat.

    Well said, IJ.

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  82. Way OT here, but an observation. I see very little coverage of two major environmental disasters in the MSM. The active volcanos in Hawaii and Guatemala are spewing billions of liters of toxic gas into the atmosphere, not to mention tons of ash. But is it because there is no way to link human activity to these chimneys? Currently every major storm, whether it be tornado, hurricane or blizzard is somehow linked to human activity, but not these volcanos. Earthquakes caused by mining, drilling and fracking, sure why not. And certainly the brown people of Guatemala are as deserving as the brown people of Puerto Rico. Where is the love? This winter all changes to weather patterns will be because Trump pulled out of the Paris Accord, not the effect of volcanic ash and gas on the atmosphere.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The 1991 Pinatubo eruption on the Philippines made the summer of 1992 quite cool in Chicago.

    Greg Maddux put up a 2.18 ERA in Wrigley Field that year, but then Cubs management let him sign a big contract with Atlanta. Perhaps the Cub brain trust figured his outstanding 1992 was a fluke caused by the cool summer due to the volcano.

    , @Brutusale
    I imagine it has been as cool an early summer in Buffalo as it has been in Boston.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Without_a_Summer
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  83. Anonymous[359] • Disclaimer says:

    So Whites should be getting paid for our groups property rights as well. Collectively, we made the modern world possible.

    Seriously.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Whites may not have been paid to create it, but we sure get paid to maintain it. Without whites working as contractors in foreign countries, all those Western-knowledge infrastructures would fall apart.
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  84. 22pp22 says:

    The extremist wing of the new NZ Maori community are world leaders at this. They claim ownership of the genome of all native species, the air, all running water (it’s a spiritual thing) and any transmission made through the atmosphere.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/5222360/Maori-don-t-own-NZs-wildlife

    My wife’s a seventh generation European Kiwi. How long before she’s considered a local? Even the Maori haven’t been here that long.

    When I lived in Britain, I don’t remember being indigenous giving me any rights at all, quite the contrary

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  85. OT: Brad Pascale, the “data guru” who used the Sailer Strategy to help Donald Trump win the presidency, is giving an interview on Fox News. The topic is: What are the Democrats doing to update their strategy? He makes it clear that the D party is making a lot of mistakes and is still out of touch with the country.

    Pascale now has the title of Campaign Manager for the Trump 2020 campaign. It is good to see him. I wonder if he knows Steve Sailer or has any connection to him?… Certainly he is familiar with the oeuvre!

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  86. Anon[143] • Disclaimer says:
    @istevefan
    Interesting that when it comes to whites who express pride in what our ancestors accomplished, we are increasingly being told that we cannot take credit for something others have done. It is unearned privilege. We had no part in what the Wrights or Edison or any other individuals of the past accomplished, let alone the Ancient Greeks or Romans.

    Of course we can still take the blame for any wrongs our ancestors perpetrated, but that is another story. The bottom line is that contemporary whites cannot claim credit for prior generations because that could be used as justification for modern whites to decide they do not want to share their inheritance with others. Not only did we not inherit the achievements of our ancestors, we apparently did not inherit their real estate holdings. To dispossess a people you need to separate them from their history.

    Meanwhile nonwhites seem to have, or at least desire, collective group rights when it comes to anything perceived as positive coming from their past. And since nonwhites are to be empowered, this sort of thinking is encouraged since pride in one's past is a good way to build group morale. Maybe this got its start with the "History Months". Maybe not, but clearly nonwhites are being encouraged to take credit for anything from the past that might be connected to a nonwhite of their group. Remember, "we waz kangs."

    Whites have had the habit of being great borrowers and spreaders of culture for at least two thousand years. What whites don’t realize is that the rest of the world is not like this at all. It’s a trait that’s unique to whites.

    Black and brown people are very rigid about their cultures, and not very adaptive, which is characteristic of societies that tend to be Darwinian failures. They do not add things to their cultures except slowly and reluctantly, and they do not like to see anyone outside their blood group borrowing anything from their culture. Non-whites unconsciously see a culture as marking the boundaries of a blood kin group, because they think a very tribal fashion. This is something that is hardwired into their brains. When you borrow something from a non-white culture, the blacks and browns have an unconscious reflex that assumes that you’re trying to claim blood kinship with them, and they become angry and indignant.

    Culture being used as a proxy for kin groups is deeply embedded in the neural wiring for most people on the planet.

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    • Replies: @NOTA
    So, I guess that explains the total lack of adoption of western science, industry, and music in, say, Japan, China, Korea and India. Also the total lack of takeup of Spanish and Catholicism in Latin America.

    Your model seems to fail to predict much of the stuff we see everyday....
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  87. sabril says:

    I agree with the other posters that cultural appropriation is not about money or balancing some kind of karmic checkbook, it’s about virtue signalling and jockeying for social status.

    Fundamentally, it’s no different from Americans who used to insist on saying the word “Nicaragua” with a Spanish accent. They are making a show of moral and intellectual superiority by pretending to be sensitive to other cultures.

    By the way, I would estimate that the ecomic value of technological and artistic innovations by European people compared to those of the rest of the world combined is something like 100 to 1.

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  88. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT This (and the obvious imminent effect on compliance) is actually instructive for progressives’ understanding of taxation.

    http://www.breitbart.com/california/2018/06/12/farmers-home-raided-guns-confiscated-after-trying-to-comply-with-ca-gun-control/

    Farmer Jeffrey Scott Kirschenmann tried to register an AR-15 with the state per California’s latest “assault weapons” ban requirements and ended up having his home raided, firearms confiscated, and faces 12 felony counts.

    Kirschermann was trying to comply with the June 30, 2018, deadline to register all “assault weapons” in the state and became snared by the flurry of laws instituted by CA Democrats over the past few years.

    KGET reports that Kischermann tried to register a firearm online and that firearm allegedly turned out to be “illegally modified” in light of recent laws. As a result, his home in Northwest Bakersfield was raided and “a dozen guns, 230 rounds of ammunition and two silencers [were] seized.”

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    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    Perfect case for "Jury Nullification." An acquaintance in Chicago was almost called up for jury duty on a gun case but unfortunately wasn't chosen.
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  89. Anon[143] • Disclaimer says:
    @bored identity
    bored identity has some candies for Uncle Sailer!


    Fasting & Furious Wuz-Small Pharoah Hates The Change Brought by The Original Portlandia's Wuz :


    https://youtu.be/ITLyCEh8v3U

    https://www.wweek.com/restaurants/2018/06/06/owner-of-downtown-food-cart-arrested-for-assaulting-customer-with-gatorade-bottle-and-sriracha/

    https://www.wweek.com/restaurants/2018/06/11/angry-portlanders-are-harassing-the-wrong-egyptian-food-cart/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgvOrypuv34

    My experience is that people who pay in pocket change are trying to short-change you. You either accept that it’s all there or you spend 5 minutes trying to count it all up. But when you do count it all up you generally find they didn’t pay enough. They’re hoping you’ll be too busy to count it. Merchants who have been on the other end of these transactions know they’re usually facing a con artist.

    People who pay in pocket change are scheming dirtbags, period.

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  90. @YetAnotherAnon
    OT - I know pretty much everyone was HBD-conscious "in Elder Days before the Fall", but the Guardian are having conniptions about Einstein's travel journals.

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jun/12/einsteins-travel-diaries-reveal-shocking-xenophobia

    "Einstein’s diary entries on the biological origin of the alleged intellectual inferiority of the Japanese, Chinese, and Indians are definitely not understated and can be viewed as racist – in these instances, other peoples are portrayed as being biologically inferior, a clear hallmark of racism. The disquieting comment that the Chinese may ‘supplant all other races’ is also most revealing in this regard."
     
    Most revealing or most perceptive?

    Thanks.

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  91. Anon[143] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    So Whites should be getting paid for our groups property rights as well. Collectively, we made the modern world possible.

    Seriously.

    Whites may not have been paid to create it, but we sure get paid to maintain it. Without whites working as contractors in foreign countries, all those Western-knowledge infrastructures would fall apart.

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  92. AndrewR says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Of course “the European race” has collectively done a disproportionate amount to “create” the modern world. Of course, that’s obviously not an unalloyed good thing. Deforestation, overfishing, pollution, anthropogenic climate change, and of course nuclear weapons are horrific facts of current year life that “the European race” has inflicted on the world.
     
    Primitive people also cause deforestation and manage their resources more terribly than our people ever have.

    Overfishing is corrected and those resources are managed too. You can buy all the fish you want at the store because the white man knows what he is doing. Compare that to the Japanese who will kill off the whales if people stop watching...

    Pollution has been well-managed in the United States since it became an issue, and now the EPA goes overboard with regulations to the point it has to be stopped, like all bureaucracies eventually whose purpose is to grow.

    Climate Change Is Not Anthropogenic. Earth's climate has been cyclically heating and cooling for millions of years, and the astronomical and planetary forces at work are beyond us and obviously beyond your pop-sci ability to understand.

    Nuclear weapons...hmm... The product of the most advanced people on the planet. Any others who would have come as far would have built them too, probably with more disastrous results. Really, would you prefer a universe in which one of the other two major human races had them first?

    I will again go back to my father, the industrialist, because he was there dealing with the EPA as it grew to harass his business. He taught me how it really is. You don't know what you are talking about.

    The European race has been overwhelmingly good for humanity and is now under attack. It should be defended.

    Lol ok you win champ

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    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    http://www.worldfuturefund.org/Reports/plastic.jpg
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  93. @Arclight
    I think this is more a product of certain groups having been told for half a century that they are owed something (like respect) rather than having to earn it. It seems like the left has promoted the idea that the downtrodden are actually our moral superiors and would in fact be our cultural and economic superiors if only white supremacy/the patriarchy hadn't cleverly kept them down. If you buy into this idea, they of course you will be outraged that they don't get their due for their wonderful contributions to society. The concept of victimhood has spread past the traditional white/black division to anyone who isn't a white male, thus the outrage exhibited by a man from a 4,000 year old culture over a random high schooler wearing a Chinese-inspired dress.

    As far as the identity politics left goes, it isn’t so much a war on white males as a war on lower-middle class white males. Rich white males are richer than they were in the 1970s. They may get gouged in divorce settlements but financially speaking they’ve done pretty well out of free trade, tax cuts and financial deregulation. And from an occupational perspective, the average SWJ is no threat to a rich white male anyway (as Jeff, Bill, Warren et al are well aware). No one really cares one way or the other about working class males as they are politically impotent and only do menial manual jobs. However, from a feminist/minority perspective lower-middle class white males are direct rivals for nice jobs and middle class social status.

    When a feminist or minority activist attacks “white males” and “the patriarchy” what they are really saying is “its a competitive job market, lets get those remaining not-to-difficult white collar jobs held by lower-middle class white males.”

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  94. @J.Ross
    OT This (and the obvious imminent effect on compliance) is actually instructive for progressives' understanding of taxation.
    http://www.breitbart.com/california/2018/06/12/farmers-home-raided-guns-confiscated-after-trying-to-comply-with-ca-gun-control/

    Farmer Jeffrey Scott Kirschenmann tried to register an AR-15 with the state per California’s latest “assault weapons” ban requirements and ended up having his home raided, firearms confiscated, and faces 12 felony counts.

    Kirschermann was trying to comply with the June 30, 2018, deadline to register all “assault weapons” in the state and became snared by the flurry of laws instituted by CA Democrats over the past few years.

    KGET reports that Kischermann tried to register a firearm online and that firearm allegedly turned out to be “illegally modified” in light of recent laws. As a result, his home in Northwest Bakersfield was raided and “a dozen guns, 230 rounds of ammunition and two silencers [were] seized.”

    Perfect case for “Jury Nullification.” An acquaintance in Chicago was almost called up for jury duty on a gun case but unfortunately wasn’t chosen.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I hope it goes to trial, but it is California, and the poor sap brought it upon his own head.
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  95. syonredux says:
    @DFH
    But it's not good. It gets assigned because it's American.

    But it’s not good. It gets assigned because it’s American.

    No, Gatsby‘s quite good. I don’t think that it equals Faulkner’s* best work (Absalom, Absalom! , The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, A I lay Dying), but it definitely stands as one of the best Anglophone novels of the interwar period.

    *And his stuff is too difficult for the average reader, rendering him less useful for classroom purposes.

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    • Replies: @Mishra
    Both Fitzgerald and Faulkner are safe in the canon because they continually show just how nasty dem wypipos really is. This warms the hearts of our cultural overseers.
    , @stillCARealist
    So you actually enjoy Faulkner. Ack. I see we wouldn't agree on too many books.

    I enjoyed both A Tale of Two Cities and War and Peace, so i can read long books. They just have to make some sense most of the time. Faulkner reads like he's on acid or something.

    Once, a friend from India got really drunk on cheap beer and went on long ramble about Indian history, his family, philosophy, religion, geography... it was a real tour de force. I thought later that I should have recorded it, transcribed it, and published a great novel.
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  96. anonymous[809] • Disclaimer says:
    @TelfoedJohn
    All the more reason for you to put a book out of a selection of your collected articles and blog posts. Minus the golf course posts of course.

    wwebd said — the golf course posts are the best.

    —second best are the connections between people who you would think are not connected = my favorite connection was that mostly forgotten 80s DJ on LA AM radio who almost nobody but Steve talks about much but who was a lot more like Shakespeare than your average English-speaking Nobel (for literature, natch) wannabe .

    —third best are the non-conspiracy explanations about business and sports and media and how most of the allegedly interesting details we hear about business and sports and media are just details about individual people trying to get what they wanna get (the one I remember most is about unattractive women journalists writing stories in which unattractive women similar to themselves in essential respects should be, in a more reasonable world, considered hot, but as I am an expert on unattractive women – i.e., an expert on finding them attractive, if at all possible, at their best – I only appreciate this from an intellectual point of view)

    —fourth best, but what Sailer ought to feel proudest of – explaining the way Trump or someone like Trump could win in 2016, with the explanations starting, as far as I know, about 10 or 20 years before the all-important 2016 election cycle. Great stuff, of course, but not all that fascinating once you understand the basics, therefore only fourth best.

    well I will stop here, except to repeat that as of now the golf posts are the best. So when there are good golf posts here I am happy to chime in and say thanks!

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  97. @Buffalo Joe
    Way OT here, but an observation. I see very little coverage of two major environmental disasters in the MSM. The active volcanos in Hawaii and Guatemala are spewing billions of liters of toxic gas into the atmosphere, not to mention tons of ash. But is it because there is no way to link human activity to these chimneys? Currently every major storm, whether it be tornado, hurricane or blizzard is somehow linked to human activity, but not these volcanos. Earthquakes caused by mining, drilling and fracking, sure why not. And certainly the brown people of Guatemala are as deserving as the brown people of Puerto Rico. Where is the love? This winter all changes to weather patterns will be because Trump pulled out of the Paris Accord, not the effect of volcanic ash and gas on the atmosphere.

    The 1991 Pinatubo eruption on the Philippines made the summer of 1992 quite cool in Chicago.

    Greg Maddux put up a 2.18 ERA in Wrigley Field that year, but then Cubs management let him sign a big contract with Atlanta. Perhaps the Cub brain trust figured his outstanding 1992 was a fluke caused by the cool summer due to the volcano.

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  98. @stillCARealist
    who on earth is reading Arthur Miller? He's boring and tendentious.

    I'll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It's only assigned because it's short, like The Crucible.

    I think I'm finally to the age where I can say what I actually think about "great" literature. Lots of it ain't so great.

    I’m in complete agreement on Miller; it’s he who should have been the neon sign designer, because that’s about how subtle his works are.

    But Gatsby is good. I just reread it, since Daughter C is studying it in school. It’s ideal for beginning literary analysis, since there’s quite a bit going on thematically, and the characters comprise a nice mix, with some traceable character arcs. There are also some very well-written passages.

    Fitzgerald may have been a bit of a waste, but he was not a hack.

    I’m so glad (as is Daughter C) that her school is teaching Gatsby, which is one of the two novel options for the big high school exit exam in English lit here in Hong Kong. The alternative: To Kill a Mockingbird, of course.

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    • Agree: syonredux
    • Replies: @syonredux

    But Gatsby is good. I just reread it, since Daughter C is studying it in school. It’s ideal for beginning literary analysis, since there’s quite a bit going on thematically, and the characters comprise a nice mix, with some traceable character arcs. There are also some very well-written passages.
     
    Well said. For classroom purposes, it just might be the ideal novel.

    I’m so glad (as is Daughter C) that her school is teaching Gatsby, which is one of the two novel options for the big high school exit exam in English lit here in Hong Kong. The alternative: To Kill a Mockingbird, of course.
     
    Well, at least your daughter didn't have a difficult choice to make.....
    , @middle aged vet . . .
    Gatsby was a good enough novel but at the time he wrote it Fitzgerald was just a callow rich kid with a wife that he did not deserve (well, with a wife who would not have been with him for a second if he were not rich - deserve never has all that much to do with it, with that sort of person, does it?); a wife who mystified him; and his assessments of male/female relationships were about as useful as similar assessments in the cheap magazines of the day.

    He actually understood that side of life pretty well when he was a few years older but by that time he had really fried his brains with severe alcohol abuse and he could not write a well-structured novel by then.

    If you know much about American literature from back in the day, you could name several novels by less-gifted authors who tried - after Fitzgerald had completely pickled his brain - to make a buck by writing a Gatsby novel but this time where the narrator understood men and women. All those novels are pretty much forgotten, although some of them - I am thinking of ones by Cozzens and O'Hara, in particular - seem to be very good.

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  99. @AnotherDad

    Overpaid Black slob Thomas Sowell ...
     
    Holy cow Charles. Thomas Sowell strikes me as a class act--and an actual scholar. I read his "Race and Culture, A World View" a dozen or so back. A worthwhile book. (My brother read the two follow on books as well--positive recommendation.)

    Is his "Black Rednecks and White Liberals" thesis correct? No, of course not. (Though his point about white liberal enabling of dysfunction seems spot on.) But Sowell is and economist, a "culture guy" and not a HBD guy. One assumes he wants to believe that blacks can do better. People generally want to think well of their ethnic group and put the best possible spin on it--downplay the bad, upplay the good. We see that around here from iSteve commenters. It's human nature.

    Not having Sailer level understanding of HBD doesn't make one "a slob" or "an asshole". It's not remotely like intentionally lying from people who claim to be evolutionary biologists, or "social scientists" nor like running around blaming "white racism!" for everyone else's problems.

    Agreed — Sowell is a perceptive and eloquent writer who in a more just world would be an intellectual star. I’ve read his intro economics book, and his book on the housing bust/2007-8 recession, and they were both excellent.

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  100. syonredux says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    I'm in complete agreement on Miller; it's he who should have been the neon sign designer, because that's about how subtle his works are.

    But Gatsby is good. I just reread it, since Daughter C is studying it in school. It's ideal for beginning literary analysis, since there's quite a bit going on thematically, and the characters comprise a nice mix, with some traceable character arcs. There are also some very well-written passages.

    Fitzgerald may have been a bit of a waste, but he was not a hack.

    I'm so glad (as is Daughter C) that her school is teaching Gatsby, which is one of the two novel options for the big high school exit exam in English lit here in Hong Kong. The alternative: To Kill a Mockingbird, of course.

    But Gatsby is good. I just reread it, since Daughter C is studying it in school. It’s ideal for beginning literary analysis, since there’s quite a bit going on thematically, and the characters comprise a nice mix, with some traceable character arcs. There are also some very well-written passages.

    Well said. For classroom purposes, it just might be the ideal novel.

    I’m so glad (as is Daughter C) that her school is teaching Gatsby, which is one of the two novel options for the big high school exit exam in English lit here in Hong Kong. The alternative: To Kill a Mockingbird, of course.

    Well, at least your daughter didn’t have a difficult choice to make…..

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    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Well, at least your daughter didn’t have a difficult choice to make…..

     

    The choice wasn't hers; it was up to her school's English department. Daughter C was waiting the issuance of the book list for the equivalent of her sophomore year with what might have seemed disproportionate anxiety. When it was posted on her school website and she saw Gatsby had been chosen, she was overjoyed. The thing is, her class prepares for the exit exam here for three solid years, and there's only one novel on the government syllabus, so students spend inordinate time and energy studying it. Imagine spending three years' worth of English lit classes in which the only novel covered is Mockingbird!

    Fortunately the rest of the English lit curriculum here is not too bad; they do The Taming of the Shrew (!), plus a pretty solid collection of short stories and poetry.

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  101. @The Last Real Calvinist
    I'm in complete agreement on Miller; it's he who should have been the neon sign designer, because that's about how subtle his works are.

    But Gatsby is good. I just reread it, since Daughter C is studying it in school. It's ideal for beginning literary analysis, since there's quite a bit going on thematically, and the characters comprise a nice mix, with some traceable character arcs. There are also some very well-written passages.

    Fitzgerald may have been a bit of a waste, but he was not a hack.

    I'm so glad (as is Daughter C) that her school is teaching Gatsby, which is one of the two novel options for the big high school exit exam in English lit here in Hong Kong. The alternative: To Kill a Mockingbird, of course.

    Gatsby was a good enough novel but at the time he wrote it Fitzgerald was just a callow rich kid with a wife that he did not deserve (well, with a wife who would not have been with him for a second if he were not rich – deserve never has all that much to do with it, with that sort of person, does it?); a wife who mystified him; and his assessments of male/female relationships were about as useful as similar assessments in the cheap magazines of the day.

    He actually understood that side of life pretty well when he was a few years older but by that time he had really fried his brains with severe alcohol abuse and he could not write a well-structured novel by then.

    If you know much about American literature from back in the day, you could name several novels by less-gifted authors who tried – after Fitzgerald had completely pickled his brain – to make a buck by writing a Gatsby novel but this time where the narrator understood men and women. All those novels are pretty much forgotten, although some of them – I am thinking of ones by Cozzens and O’Hara, in particular – seem to be very good.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks for that -- I agree Fitzgerald partially squandered what seems to have been a major talent.

    I have not read anything by O'Hara or Cozzens -- what would you recommend as a good starting novel for each?
    , @syonredux

    Gatsby was a good enough novel but at the time he wrote it Fitzgerald was just a callow rich kid with a wife that he did not deserve
     
    Which is one of the things that makes Gatsby all the more impressive.....that the same fellow who wrote This Side of Paradise had managed to develop that much in a few years....

    but by that time he had really fried his brains with severe alcohol abuse and he could not write a well-structured novel by then.
     
    The tragedy of Tender is the Night.....not as perfectly structured a book as Gatsby....but I've always admired its ambition.... the chapter where the characters visit a Great War battlefield cemetery is a really fine piece of work, perhaps the most eloquent statement about the meaning of the First World War in English.....
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  102. peterike says:
    @stillCARealist
    who on earth is reading Arthur Miller? He's boring and tendentious.

    I'll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It's only assigned because it's short, like The Crucible.

    I think I'm finally to the age where I can say what I actually think about "great" literature. Lots of it ain't so great.

    “ It’s only assigned because it’s short, like The Crucible.”

    The Crucible gets assigned because it’s a pro-Comminist propaganda screed written by a Jew. It’s also dreadful, like all Arthur Miller’s work. Another vastly overrated Jewish writer.

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  103. @syonredux

    But Gatsby is good. I just reread it, since Daughter C is studying it in school. It’s ideal for beginning literary analysis, since there’s quite a bit going on thematically, and the characters comprise a nice mix, with some traceable character arcs. There are also some very well-written passages.
     
    Well said. For classroom purposes, it just might be the ideal novel.

    I’m so glad (as is Daughter C) that her school is teaching Gatsby, which is one of the two novel options for the big high school exit exam in English lit here in Hong Kong. The alternative: To Kill a Mockingbird, of course.
     
    Well, at least your daughter didn't have a difficult choice to make.....

    Well, at least your daughter didn’t have a difficult choice to make…..

    The choice wasn’t hers; it was up to her school’s English department. Daughter C was waiting the issuance of the book list for the equivalent of her sophomore year with what might have seemed disproportionate anxiety. When it was posted on her school website and she saw Gatsby had been chosen, she was overjoyed. The thing is, her class prepares for the exit exam here for three solid years, and there’s only one novel on the government syllabus, so students spend inordinate time and energy studying it. Imagine spending three years’ worth of English lit classes in which the only novel covered is Mockingbird!

    Fortunately the rest of the English lit curriculum here is not too bad; they do The Taming of the Shrew (!), plus a pretty solid collection of short stories and poetry.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    . Imagine spending three years’ worth of English lit classes in which the only novel covered is Mockingbird!
     
    Dear God.....What sadist would subject anyone to that kind of ordeal.....
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  104. @middle aged vet . . .
    Gatsby was a good enough novel but at the time he wrote it Fitzgerald was just a callow rich kid with a wife that he did not deserve (well, with a wife who would not have been with him for a second if he were not rich - deserve never has all that much to do with it, with that sort of person, does it?); a wife who mystified him; and his assessments of male/female relationships were about as useful as similar assessments in the cheap magazines of the day.

    He actually understood that side of life pretty well when he was a few years older but by that time he had really fried his brains with severe alcohol abuse and he could not write a well-structured novel by then.

    If you know much about American literature from back in the day, you could name several novels by less-gifted authors who tried - after Fitzgerald had completely pickled his brain - to make a buck by writing a Gatsby novel but this time where the narrator understood men and women. All those novels are pretty much forgotten, although some of them - I am thinking of ones by Cozzens and O'Hara, in particular - seem to be very good.

    Thanks for that — I agree Fitzgerald partially squandered what seems to have been a major talent.

    I have not read anything by O’Hara or Cozzens — what would you recommend as a good starting novel for each?

    Read More
    • Replies: @middle aged vet . . .
    I really liked "By Love Possessed", a long novel by Cozzens, about New England in the late 40s or early 50s, and also several of his short stories. I would start with a few short stories, all of the ones I have read are really good. He was the sort of writer who shows what he thinks about the world fairly quickly. I was in the Air Force and had a job like Cozzens had in WWII (in my case 40 years later, when fortunately there was no world war) but I have not read "Guard of Honor", his book about being a staff officer in the wartime USAAF. I would start with trying "By Love Possessed", which is less famous than "Guard of Honor", simply because it is harder to write a novel that is not about war than a novel that is about war .... in my opinion .....

    Everything I have read by O'Hara has been good, the guy was a professional. Start anywhere, in other words.

    Both of them were probably pro-choice for most of their lives (or excessively pro-Griswold in the 50s, Griswold being the 50s case where the rich constiutional-bar lawyers decided they would eventually be pro-choice, whether the rest of the country wanted that or not) and I am extremely pro-life, but I don't expect writers to have good morals all the time.

    A few years ago I made a comment about O'Hara on this website and there was another commenter who told me I knew nothing about O'Hara at all (because I had mentioned that O'Hara spent a lot of time complaining about the social affronts he received, or something like that)! There are people out there who really really enjoy his writings .... so maybe there are people with strong opinions on where to start with reading O'Hara. Well, I really like the stories he wrote when he was in his 30s , but other people might recommend starting somewhere else .....
    , @syonredux

    I have not read anything by O’Hara or Cozzens — what would you recommend as a good starting novel for each?
     
    For Cozzens, my favorite is The Just and the Unjust. To my mind, it's the best courtroom novel ever written.

    O'Hara's more of a short story writer. Of his novels, the only one that I really like is Appointment In Samarra.
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  105. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Joe Stalin
    Perfect case for "Jury Nullification." An acquaintance in Chicago was almost called up for jury duty on a gun case but unfortunately wasn't chosen.

    I hope it goes to trial, but it is California, and the poor sap brought it upon his own head.

    Read More
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  106. nebulafox says:
    @fish
    Ohs Tinys.....


    U always bein my kween!


    Lenpter “be’s nowin how to treets his”wimmins” Plitz

    I hereby apologize for my previous responses to TD. It’s very clear that fish should be the only one allowed to do so from now on.

    Read More
    • Agree: Kylie, Brutusale
    • Replies: @Mishra
    http://www.unz.com/isteve/no-dogs-or-white-males-need-apply/#comment-2352184

    We need to start a petition!

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  107. Michelle says:

    I have 2 treasured pics of my formerly, very white blond young self in sombreros. My birth father, according to my DNA tests was Finnish and Swedish on his father’s side. I used to be very blond as a child. One of the pics is of my mom and stepdad and me in Tijuana. It is a tourist pic wherein they put the kid on a donkey painted like a zebra. I was decked in a sombrero and so were my mom and stepdad who were sitting in a cart following the zebra painted donkey. It was the 1960′s and my stepdad was wearing fringed moccasin boots.

    My second pic of my very blond young self is one that my mom and stepdad’s friend Pat, took with me. She was a serious Mexican Chola, dressed in all black skintight clothes and wearing a crucifix and with a cigarette dangling from her fingers, she put a sombrero on me and squatted down next to me and they snapped a pic. It is amazing and I have it posted in my cubicle at work. Mexicans have been putting sombreros on gringos forever. They do it for birthdays at El Torito’s restaurants and, I am sure, countless others. Are they trying to make gringos look exotic or foolish? You be the judge.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I wish I still had this link but someone uploaded a souvenir bag made and distributed by the Mexican tourism ministry in the '60s. It depicts a caricature of two hideous and goofy American tourists. "This must have been what we looked like to them." The website that posted it remarked on how American tourists would surely be the target market of the product.
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  108. Kylie says:
    @syonredux

    I’ll also say the same thing about The Great Gatsby. It’s only assigned because it’s short, like The Crucible.
     
    Nah. Gatsby gets assigned because it's both short and good. For teaching purposes, that's the perfect combo. If you assign, say, Middlemarch or Moby-Dick, you know that most of the students won't read the whole thing.

    Both The Great Gatsby and Moby Dick are beautifully written. Fitzgerald and Mehville were masters of prose though I think Willa Cather and Joseph Conrad were even better.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    What I like about Moby Dick is the way Melville wrote sentences that were a paragraph long. He knew how to use commas.

    Haven't read Gatsby, but I know where Fitzgerald crashed his car at the entrance to a golf club in Westport.

    , @Mishra
    The beauty of the writing in Gatsby comes and goes. Melville was a pretty consistent craftsman on the other hand. Conrad, at his best, is simply mesmerizing.
    , @syonredux

    Fitzgerald and Mehville were masters of prose though I think Willa Cather and Joseph Conrad were even better.
     
    Willa definitely deserves more respect. My Ántonia is exquisite.....although The Professor's House is probably my personal favorite of her books.
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  109. @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks for that -- I agree Fitzgerald partially squandered what seems to have been a major talent.

    I have not read anything by O'Hara or Cozzens -- what would you recommend as a good starting novel for each?

    I really liked “By Love Possessed”, a long novel by Cozzens, about New England in the late 40s or early 50s, and also several of his short stories. I would start with a few short stories, all of the ones I have read are really good. He was the sort of writer who shows what he thinks about the world fairly quickly. I was in the Air Force and had a job like Cozzens had in WWII (in my case 40 years later, when fortunately there was no world war) but I have not read “Guard of Honor”, his book about being a staff officer in the wartime USAAF. I would start with trying “By Love Possessed”, which is less famous than “Guard of Honor”, simply because it is harder to write a novel that is not about war than a novel that is about war …. in my opinion …..

    Everything I have read by O’Hara has been good, the guy was a professional. Start anywhere, in other words.

    Both of them were probably pro-choice for most of their lives (or excessively pro-Griswold in the 50s, Griswold being the 50s case where the rich constiutional-bar lawyers decided they would eventually be pro-choice, whether the rest of the country wanted that or not) and I am extremely pro-life, but I don’t expect writers to have good morals all the time.

    A few years ago I made a comment about O’Hara on this website and there was another commenter who told me I knew nothing about O’Hara at all (because I had mentioned that O’Hara spent a lot of time complaining about the social affronts he received, or something like that)! There are people out there who really really enjoy his writings …. so maybe there are people with strong opinions on where to start with reading O’Hara. Well, I really like the stories he wrote when he was in his 30s , but other people might recommend starting somewhere else …..

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks much; I'll see if I can find a copy of By Love Possessed.
    , @Mishra

    I am extremely pro-life
     
    This makes me wonder why you use the phrase "pro-choice" instead of "pro-abortion".
    , @syonredux

    I really liked “By Love Possessed”, a long novel by Cozzens, about New England in the late 40s or early 50s,
     
    Dunno.....I think that that book is overambitious and overwritten. For Cozzens, my list of must-reads would include The Just and the Unjust, Guard of Honor (perhaps the best book about the American military in WW2), Men and Brethren (excellent novel about an Episcopal clergyman), and Castway (nightmarish novel about a man stranded in a department store in a depopulated, post-apocalyptic New York).

    I would start with a few short stories, all of the ones I have read are really good.

     

    I don't think much of Cozzens as a short story writer. He was competent at it, but not nearly as good as O'Hara, who was one of the all-time greats. Indeed, if memory serves, Cozzens had O'Hara critique one of his short stories, and O'Hara thought that it was rather lacking.
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  110. @Kylie
    Both The Great Gatsby and Moby Dick are beautifully written. Fitzgerald and Mehville were masters of prose though I think Willa Cather and Joseph Conrad were even better.

    What I like about Moby Dick is the way Melville wrote sentences that were a paragraph long. He knew how to use commas.

    Haven’t read Gatsby, but I know where Fitzgerald crashed his car at the entrance to a golf club in Westport.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mishra

    What I like about Moby Dick is the way Melville wrote sentences that were a paragraph long. He knew how to use commas.
     
    Have you tried Henry James? He wrote sentences that were a page long.
    Almost impenetrable.
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  111. @AndrewR
    Lol ok you win champ

    Read More
    • Replies: @Svigor
    Definitely needs a "not to scale" note somewhere (e.g., look at US 0.3 vs China 8.8 million).
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  112. syonredux says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Well, at least your daughter didn’t have a difficult choice to make…..

     

    The choice wasn't hers; it was up to her school's English department. Daughter C was waiting the issuance of the book list for the equivalent of her sophomore year with what might have seemed disproportionate anxiety. When it was posted on her school website and she saw Gatsby had been chosen, she was overjoyed. The thing is, her class prepares for the exit exam here for three solid years, and there's only one novel on the government syllabus, so students spend inordinate time and energy studying it. Imagine spending three years' worth of English lit classes in which the only novel covered is Mockingbird!

    Fortunately the rest of the English lit curriculum here is not too bad; they do The Taming of the Shrew (!), plus a pretty solid collection of short stories and poetry.

    . Imagine spending three years’ worth of English lit classes in which the only novel covered is Mockingbird!

    Dear God…..What sadist would subject anyone to that kind of ordeal…..

    Read More
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  113. syonredux says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks for that -- I agree Fitzgerald partially squandered what seems to have been a major talent.

    I have not read anything by O'Hara or Cozzens -- what would you recommend as a good starting novel for each?

    I have not read anything by O’Hara or Cozzens — what would you recommend as a good starting novel for each?

    For Cozzens, my favorite is The Just and the Unjust. To my mind, it’s the best courtroom novel ever written.

    O’Hara’s more of a short story writer. Of his novels, the only one that I really like is Appointment In Samarra.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    Thanks; I'll start with Samarra.
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  114. syonredux says:
    @middle aged vet . . .
    Gatsby was a good enough novel but at the time he wrote it Fitzgerald was just a callow rich kid with a wife that he did not deserve (well, with a wife who would not have been with him for a second if he were not rich - deserve never has all that much to do with it, with that sort of person, does it?); a wife who mystified him; and his assessments of male/female relationships were about as useful as similar assessments in the cheap magazines of the day.

    He actually understood that side of life pretty well when he was a few years older but by that time he had really fried his brains with severe alcohol abuse and he could not write a well-structured novel by then.

    If you know much about American literature from back in the day, you could name several novels by less-gifted authors who tried - after Fitzgerald had completely pickled his brain - to make a buck by writing a Gatsby novel but this time where the narrator understood men and women. All those novels are pretty much forgotten, although some of them - I am thinking of ones by Cozzens and O'Hara, in particular - seem to be very good.

    Gatsby was a good enough novel but at the time he wrote it Fitzgerald was just a callow rich kid with a wife that he did not deserve

    Which is one of the things that makes Gatsby all the more impressive…..that the same fellow who wrote This Side of Paradise had managed to develop that much in a few years….

    but by that time he had really fried his brains with severe alcohol abuse and he could not write a well-structured novel by then.

    The tragedy of Tender is the Night…..not as perfectly structured a book as Gatsby….but I’ve always admired its ambition…. the chapter where the characters visit a Great War battlefield cemetery is a really fine piece of work, perhaps the most eloquent statement about the meaning of the First World War in English…..

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  115. @International Jew

    the writer/inventor is incentivized to create–but the heirs? Why should they get mailbox money
     
    Two answers to this.

    1. If I care about my heirs' wellbeing after my death (and why wouldn't I?), then copyright extending past my death acts as an incentive to me today. Same way, when I'm old, I might plant a tree.

    2. The right to leave an inheritance should be thought of as a benefit, primarily, to me and only incidentally to my heirs. That is, I earned my money, and among the many things I could do with my money that would make me happy — renovate my kitchen, buy a boat, vacation in Tuscany — one of these is the pleasure of leaving something to my heirs. It's a pleasure like any other, and so denying me that (by confiscating it from my heirs) is just as wrong as prohibiting me from buying that boat.

    What’s the limit? 20 or 200 years past your death? At some point the rest of us get to ask why we’re enforcing your copyright to restrict supply of a now-completely-fungible good.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew
    Quite right, there has to be a limit, and I'd say 200 years is on the high side of what's reasonable. That incentive effect is pretty attenuated, when it comes to my concern for my descendants six or eight generations away. If I accept the Dawkins' "selfish gene" idea, those descendants are not much closer to me than, say, a random European Jew today like Olga Khazan or Benjamin Netanyahu.

    So I don't have a precise opinion about how long copyright should last, but I will still stress that the moment of an author's death does not constitute any kind of abrupt watershed, when it comes to the incentive effect.

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  116. @Tiny Duck
    1. muslims don't act like this so this is obviously fake. only white Christians are militantly against homosexualty

    2. these girls have never had a real man. If a Man of Color rogered them they would be heterosexual

    Someday, maybe not today and maybe not tomorrow, but someday Tiny’s genius is going to be recognized. Maybe President Trump will give you a medal.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mishra
    On that day, everyone will be laughing.
    Only, some of us are laughing now.
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  117. Mishra says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    OFF TOPIC

    Race Replacement

    War On Whitey

    White Genocide

    https://twitter.com/AlfredAlbion/status/1006172508138196992

    Good friend of mine just returned from Italy and said he was shocked at the number of Africans laying about in public places everywhere he went (and he’s a card-carrying liberal). I cry for that beloved country which has always been my favorite place on earth. I cry, but from a distance now. Sort of leery of going back at this point.

    It’s a bizarre strategem indeed which involves admitting to your country large numbers of people who have absolutely nothing to lose. Unfortunately my own country does it too.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    It’s a bizarre strategem indeed which involves admitting to your country large numbers of people who have absolutely nothing to lose. Unfortunately my own country does it too.
     
    I thought Putin was smarter than that.
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  118. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Michelle
    I have 2 treasured pics of my formerly, very white blond young self in sombreros. My birth father, according to my DNA tests was Finnish and Swedish on his father's side. I used to be very blond as a child. One of the pics is of my mom and stepdad and me in Tijuana. It is a tourist pic wherein they put the kid on a donkey painted like a zebra. I was decked in a sombrero and so were my mom and stepdad who were sitting in a cart following the zebra painted donkey. It was the 1960's and my stepdad was wearing fringed moccasin boots.

    My second pic of my very blond young self is one that my mom and stepdad's friend Pat, took with me. She was a serious Mexican Chola, dressed in all black skintight clothes and wearing a crucifix and with a cigarette dangling from her fingers, she put a sombrero on me and squatted down next to me and they snapped a pic. It is amazing and I have it posted in my cubicle at work. Mexicans have been putting sombreros on gringos forever. They do it for birthdays at El Torito's restaurants and, I am sure, countless others. Are they trying to make gringos look exotic or foolish? You be the judge.

    I wish I still had this link but someone uploaded a souvenir bag made and distributed by the Mexican tourism ministry in the ’60s. It depicts a caricature of two hideous and goofy American tourists. “This must have been what we looked like to them.” The website that posted it remarked on how American tourists would surely be the target market of the product.

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  119. Mishra says:
    @syonredux

    But it’s not good. It gets assigned because it’s American.
     
    No, Gatsby's quite good. I don't think that it equals Faulkner's* best work (Absalom, Absalom! , The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, A I lay Dying), but it definitely stands as one of the best Anglophone novels of the interwar period.


    *And his stuff is too difficult for the average reader, rendering him less useful for classroom purposes.

    Both Fitzgerald and Faulkner are safe in the canon because they continually show just how nasty dem wypipos really is. This warms the hearts of our cultural overseers.

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  120. Mishra says:
    @nebulafox
    I hereby apologize for my previous responses to TD. It's very clear that fish should be the only one allowed to do so from now on.
    Read More
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    We also need another one for Corvy. Maybe Mike Cernovich and the Baboon Mindset?

    And this is where I'm going to yet again try to leave...

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  121. @middle aged vet . . .
    I really liked "By Love Possessed", a long novel by Cozzens, about New England in the late 40s or early 50s, and also several of his short stories. I would start with a few short stories, all of the ones I have read are really good. He was the sort of writer who shows what he thinks about the world fairly quickly. I was in the Air Force and had a job like Cozzens had in WWII (in my case 40 years later, when fortunately there was no world war) but I have not read "Guard of Honor", his book about being a staff officer in the wartime USAAF. I would start with trying "By Love Possessed", which is less famous than "Guard of Honor", simply because it is harder to write a novel that is not about war than a novel that is about war .... in my opinion .....

    Everything I have read by O'Hara has been good, the guy was a professional. Start anywhere, in other words.

    Both of them were probably pro-choice for most of their lives (or excessively pro-Griswold in the 50s, Griswold being the 50s case where the rich constiutional-bar lawyers decided they would eventually be pro-choice, whether the rest of the country wanted that or not) and I am extremely pro-life, but I don't expect writers to have good morals all the time.

    A few years ago I made a comment about O'Hara on this website and there was another commenter who told me I knew nothing about O'Hara at all (because I had mentioned that O'Hara spent a lot of time complaining about the social affronts he received, or something like that)! There are people out there who really really enjoy his writings .... so maybe there are people with strong opinions on where to start with reading O'Hara. Well, I really like the stories he wrote when he was in his 30s , but other people might recommend starting somewhere else .....

    Thanks much; I’ll see if I can find a copy of By Love Possessed.

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  122. @syonredux

    I have not read anything by O’Hara or Cozzens — what would you recommend as a good starting novel for each?
     
    For Cozzens, my favorite is The Just and the Unjust. To my mind, it's the best courtroom novel ever written.

    O'Hara's more of a short story writer. Of his novels, the only one that I really like is Appointment In Samarra.

    Thanks; I’ll start with Samarra.

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  123. Mishra says:
    @Kylie
    Both The Great Gatsby and Moby Dick are beautifully written. Fitzgerald and Mehville were masters of prose though I think Willa Cather and Joseph Conrad were even better.

    The beauty of the writing in Gatsby comes and goes. Melville was a pretty consistent craftsman on the other hand. Conrad, at his best, is simply mesmerizing.

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  124. Mishra says:
    @middle aged vet . . .
    I really liked "By Love Possessed", a long novel by Cozzens, about New England in the late 40s or early 50s, and also several of his short stories. I would start with a few short stories, all of the ones I have read are really good. He was the sort of writer who shows what he thinks about the world fairly quickly. I was in the Air Force and had a job like Cozzens had in WWII (in my case 40 years later, when fortunately there was no world war) but I have not read "Guard of Honor", his book about being a staff officer in the wartime USAAF. I would start with trying "By Love Possessed", which is less famous than "Guard of Honor", simply because it is harder to write a novel that is not about war than a novel that is about war .... in my opinion .....

    Everything I have read by O'Hara has been good, the guy was a professional. Start anywhere, in other words.

    Both of them were probably pro-choice for most of their lives (or excessively pro-Griswold in the 50s, Griswold being the 50s case where the rich constiutional-bar lawyers decided they would eventually be pro-choice, whether the rest of the country wanted that or not) and I am extremely pro-life, but I don't expect writers to have good morals all the time.

    A few years ago I made a comment about O'Hara on this website and there was another commenter who told me I knew nothing about O'Hara at all (because I had mentioned that O'Hara spent a lot of time complaining about the social affronts he received, or something like that)! There are people out there who really really enjoy his writings .... so maybe there are people with strong opinions on where to start with reading O'Hara. Well, I really like the stories he wrote when he was in his 30s , but other people might recommend starting somewhere else .....

    I am extremely pro-life

    This makes me wonder why you use the phrase “pro-choice” instead of “pro-abortion”.

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    • Replies: @middle aged vet . . .
    Mishra, thanks for noticing. Back in the 50s nobody was publicly pro-abortion, except people who were "radicals", and Cozzens and O'Hara were not radicals, I think. They were "pro-choice" on the "right to privacy" issue that the second rate legal scholars of the day promoted, with Griswold (the Supreme Court case) being the badly written bitter fruit of their mediocrity and lack of faith. Hence my historically accurate use of the "pro-choice" word: a word that, I agree with you, is purely a lie in our modern context.

    That being said, you point out a very important fact - in our use of language we often adopt popular words that we disagree with, simply because we are unaware of how nonsensical our vocabulary has become.


    In my case, however, I was just trying to be historically accurate. I am in fact, as I said, extremely pro-life. I even consider people like Sobran and Buchanan and Scalia to have been (or in Buchanan's case, to be) squishes on the subject. In other words, I think that any human being who has procured an abortion, or helped procure an abortion, or voted in a legislature for a single dime that went to finance an abortion, or even any person who has, in his or her private capacity, voted for a politician who had not publicly pledged to make the killing of fetuses under liberal abortion laws unlawful again, should be considered unfit for life for public office.
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  125. Mishra says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    What I like about Moby Dick is the way Melville wrote sentences that were a paragraph long. He knew how to use commas.

    Haven't read Gatsby, but I know where Fitzgerald crashed his car at the entrance to a golf club in Westport.

    What I like about Moby Dick is the way Melville wrote sentences that were a paragraph long. He knew how to use commas.

    Have you tried Henry James? He wrote sentences that were a page long.
    Almost impenetrable.

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    • Replies: @Macumazahn
    At least Henry James confined himself to impenetrable English.
    Try Cormac McCarthy. I love his work, but entire paragraphs of untranslated Spanish are hard to take.
    , @Kylie
    James is my favorite author. And yes, I've read all three novels by The Old Pretender, (The Wings of the Dove, The Golden Bowl and The Ambassadors).

    In his own inimitable way, he wrote novels as harrowing as any by Conrad.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    Have not. Sounds like it might be a good exercise.
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  126. Mishra says:
    @Jake Barnes
    Someday, maybe not today and maybe not tomorrow, but someday Tiny’s genius is going to be recognized. Maybe President Trump will give you a medal.

    On that day, everyone will be laughing.
    Only, some of us are laughing now.

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  127. Neoconned says:
    @Tiny Duck
    1. muslims don't act like this so this is obviously fake. only white Christians are militantly against homosexualty

    2. these girls have never had a real man. If a Man of Color rogered them they would be heterosexual

    Now I know you’re 1 of us….

    That being said i have no clue how you keep this act up for as long as you have & do….

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  128. Isn’t it cultural appropriation every time a Negro wears a business suit?

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    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    This is even more egregious

    https://vimeo.com/263985244
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  129. @Mishra

    What I like about Moby Dick is the way Melville wrote sentences that were a paragraph long. He knew how to use commas.
     
    Have you tried Henry James? He wrote sentences that were a page long.
    Almost impenetrable.

    At least Henry James confined himself to impenetrable English.
    Try Cormac McCarthy. I love his work, but entire paragraphs of untranslated Spanish are hard to take.

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  130. Kylie says:
    @Mishra

    What I like about Moby Dick is the way Melville wrote sentences that were a paragraph long. He knew how to use commas.
     
    Have you tried Henry James? He wrote sentences that were a page long.
    Almost impenetrable.

    James is my favorite author. And yes, I’ve read all three novels by The Old Pretender, (The Wings of the Dove, The Golden Bowl and The Ambassadors).

    In his own inimitable way, he wrote novels as harrowing as any by Conrad.

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    • Replies: @Mishra
    You are the first person I've ever met whose favorite author is Henry James. And since you made it through those books you are clearly made of tougher stuff than I. My sincere congratulations. I should try again some day.
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  131. Mishra says:
    @Kylie
    James is my favorite author. And yes, I've read all three novels by The Old Pretender, (The Wings of the Dove, The Golden Bowl and The Ambassadors).

    In his own inimitable way, he wrote novels as harrowing as any by Conrad.

    You are the first person I’ve ever met whose favorite author is Henry James. And since you made it through those books you are clearly made of tougher stuff than I. My sincere congratulations. I should try again some day.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    You are the first person I’ve ever met whose favorite author is Henry James. And since you made it through those books you are clearly made of tougher stuff than I. My sincere congratulations. I should try again some day.
     
    There's no shame in being defeated by late period James.Plenty of people have gotten lost in those labyrinthine sentences. My favorites are his tales from the '70s and '80s: The Bostonians, The Portrait of a Lady , Washington Square, The Aspern Papers, etc
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  132. @Mishra

    What I like about Moby Dick is the way Melville wrote sentences that were a paragraph long. He knew how to use commas.
     
    Have you tried Henry James? He wrote sentences that were a page long.
    Almost impenetrable.

    Have not. Sounds like it might be a good exercise.

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  133. @Mishra
    Good friend of mine just returned from Italy and said he was shocked at the number of Africans laying about in public places everywhere he went (and he's a card-carrying liberal). I cry for that beloved country which has always been my favorite place on earth. I cry, but from a distance now. Sort of leery of going back at this point.

    It's a bizarre strategem indeed which involves admitting to your country large numbers of people who have absolutely nothing to lose. Unfortunately my own country does it too.

    It’s a bizarre strategem indeed which involves admitting to your country large numbers of people who have absolutely nothing to lose. Unfortunately my own country does it too.

    I thought Putin was smarter than that.

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  134. @syonredux

    But it’s not good. It gets assigned because it’s American.
     
    No, Gatsby's quite good. I don't think that it equals Faulkner's* best work (Absalom, Absalom! , The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, A I lay Dying), but it definitely stands as one of the best Anglophone novels of the interwar period.


    *And his stuff is too difficult for the average reader, rendering him less useful for classroom purposes.

    So you actually enjoy Faulkner. Ack. I see we wouldn’t agree on too many books.

    I enjoyed both A Tale of Two Cities and War and Peace, so i can read long books. They just have to make some sense most of the time. Faulkner reads like he’s on acid or something.

    Once, a friend from India got really drunk on cheap beer and went on long ramble about Indian history, his family, philosophy, religion, geography… it was a real tour de force. I thought later that I should have recorded it, transcribed it, and published a great novel.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    So you actually enjoy Faulkner. Ack. I see we wouldn’t agree on too many books.
     
    Dunno. My taste in literature is quite catholic.

    I enjoyed both A Tale of Two Cities and War and Peace, so i can read long books.
     
    I like both of those....although my favorite Dickens novel is David Copperfield....and Tolstoy is the kind of author that I don't go back to very often....

    Once, a friend from India got really drunk on cheap beer and went on long ramble about Indian history, his family, philosophy, religion, geography… it was a real tour de force. I thought later that I should have recorded it, transcribed it, and published a great novel.

     

    Yeah, Faulkner has a tendency to ramble on and on. That's one of the reasons why the gulf between his failures (A Fable is surely one of the worst books ever written by a legitimately great writer) and his successes (Absalom, Absalom! yawns so wide.
    , @Anonymous
    Indians (feather) and alcohol is a dangerous combination. Indians (dot) and alcohol can be funny as hell.
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  135. NOTA says:
    @Clyde
    OT
    Twitter CEO apologizes for eating Chick-fil-A during Pride Month
    www.businessinsider.com/...apology-chick-fil-a-gay-pride-month-2018-6

    Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey apologized Sunday for eating at Chick-fil-A during Pride Month. Dorsey, who had posted a photo showing he ate at the fast-food chain, said he "completely forgot" about Chick-fil-A's background opposing same-sex marriage.

    *During Gay Ramadan these chicken sandwiches are haram, forbidden in Arab lingo. Found at this twitter stream https://twitter.com/JohnWHuber

    There is no parody as funny as unintentional, unaware self-parody.

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  136. NOTA says:
    @ThirdWorldSteveReader
    I think it's more understandable as "people with no relevant complaints to make finding a way to pick a fight just to show off". Unless I have been poorly informed, this cultural appropriation stuff is not very popular among the Minority Masses, but mostly among middle class university activists. The complaint is barely understandable, and that's a feature, as it allows the pseudoconflict to drag unsolved until the nutcases get tired of promoting it.

    +1

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  137. NOTA says:
    @Wilkey
    I've always found Sowell to be a pretty decent read, but his complaint that American blacks are backwards thanks to living amongst "backwards" Scots-Irish folks was always the weak link, more like an excuse to avoid a conclusion he didn't want to draw. So he he drops all the blame on the Scots-Irish. Somehow, for some reason, it's OK to put the blame on them rather than blacks. I just wonder how he explains blacks in Brazil, Haiti, Jamaica, Sweden, and England.

    I think Sowell’s argument was a bit narrower than that–he points to a bunch of modern black culture that were absorbed from Southern Scots-Irish. I don’t recall him arguing that this explained much of the black/white gap in outcomes. That would be consistent with the ideas in his Culture trilogy, but there can be a lot of other explanations. (Of course, the most economical explanation IMO is the IQ gap, but I know Sowell doesn’t agree with that.)

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  138. NOTA says:
    @Anon
    Whites have had the habit of being great borrowers and spreaders of culture for at least two thousand years. What whites don't realize is that the rest of the world is not like this at all. It's a trait that's unique to whites.

    Black and brown people are very rigid about their cultures, and not very adaptive, which is characteristic of societies that tend to be Darwinian failures. They do not add things to their cultures except slowly and reluctantly, and they do not like to see anyone outside their blood group borrowing anything from their culture. Non-whites unconsciously see a culture as marking the boundaries of a blood kin group, because they think a very tribal fashion. This is something that is hardwired into their brains. When you borrow something from a non-white culture, the blacks and browns have an unconscious reflex that assumes that you're trying to claim blood kinship with them, and they become angry and indignant.

    Culture being used as a proxy for kin groups is deeply embedded in the neural wiring for most people on the planet.

    So, I guess that explains the total lack of adoption of western science, industry, and music in, say, Japan, China, Korea and India. Also the total lack of takeup of Spanish and Catholicism in Latin America.

    Your model seems to fail to predict much of the stuff we see everyday….

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  139. syonredux says:
    @stillCARealist
    So you actually enjoy Faulkner. Ack. I see we wouldn't agree on too many books.

    I enjoyed both A Tale of Two Cities and War and Peace, so i can read long books. They just have to make some sense most of the time. Faulkner reads like he's on acid or something.

    Once, a friend from India got really drunk on cheap beer and went on long ramble about Indian history, his family, philosophy, religion, geography... it was a real tour de force. I thought later that I should have recorded it, transcribed it, and published a great novel.

    So you actually enjoy Faulkner. Ack. I see we wouldn’t agree on too many books.

    Dunno. My taste in literature is quite catholic.

    I enjoyed both A Tale of Two Cities and War and Peace, so i can read long books.

    I like both of those….although my favorite Dickens novel is David Copperfield….and Tolstoy is the kind of author that I don’t go back to very often….

    Once, a friend from India got really drunk on cheap beer and went on long ramble about Indian history, his family, philosophy, religion, geography… it was a real tour de force. I thought later that I should have recorded it, transcribed it, and published a great novel.

    Yeah, Faulkner has a tendency to ramble on and on. That’s one of the reasons why the gulf between his failures (A Fable is surely one of the worst books ever written by a legitimately great writer) and his successes (Absalom, Absalom! yawns so wide.

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    • Replies: @Prester John
    Always liked "Tale of Two Cities." For those who never saw it, the Hollywood version, though mawkish and hardly on the level of the book, is worth seeing because of the great Ronald Coleman who was born to play Sidney Carton.
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    When I was 11 or 12, I started reading adult fiction, and I was pretty pleased with my ability to keep up with it. I'd heard somewhere that William Faulkner was hot stuff, so I went to the public library to pick one up. I chose A Fable because it had a cool cover (a big looming cross; I can still picture it) and the blurb on the back said it was about WWI. Can't go wrong with that, I thought. Well, I've never been so thoroughly defeated by a book before or since, and I've never tried again to read it. Glad to hear I didn't miss that much.
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  140. syonredux says:
    @Mishra
    You are the first person I've ever met whose favorite author is Henry James. And since you made it through those books you are clearly made of tougher stuff than I. My sincere congratulations. I should try again some day.

    You are the first person I’ve ever met whose favorite author is Henry James. And since you made it through those books you are clearly made of tougher stuff than I. My sincere congratulations. I should try again some day.

    There’s no shame in being defeated by late period James.Plenty of people have gotten lost in those labyrinthine sentences. My favorites are his tales from the ’70s and ’80s: The Bostonians, The Portrait of a Lady , Washington Square, The Aspern Papers, etc

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  141. syonredux says:
    @Kylie
    Both The Great Gatsby and Moby Dick are beautifully written. Fitzgerald and Mehville were masters of prose though I think Willa Cather and Joseph Conrad were even better.

    Fitzgerald and Mehville were masters of prose though I think Willa Cather and Joseph Conrad were even better.

    Willa definitely deserves more respect. My Ántonia is exquisite…..although The Professor’s House is probably my personal favorite of her books.

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  142. syonredux says:
    @middle aged vet . . .
    I really liked "By Love Possessed", a long novel by Cozzens, about New England in the late 40s or early 50s, and also several of his short stories. I would start with a few short stories, all of the ones I have read are really good. He was the sort of writer who shows what he thinks about the world fairly quickly. I was in the Air Force and had a job like Cozzens had in WWII (in my case 40 years later, when fortunately there was no world war) but I have not read "Guard of Honor", his book about being a staff officer in the wartime USAAF. I would start with trying "By Love Possessed", which is less famous than "Guard of Honor", simply because it is harder to write a novel that is not about war than a novel that is about war .... in my opinion .....

    Everything I have read by O'Hara has been good, the guy was a professional. Start anywhere, in other words.

    Both of them were probably pro-choice for most of their lives (or excessively pro-Griswold in the 50s, Griswold being the 50s case where the rich constiutional-bar lawyers decided they would eventually be pro-choice, whether the rest of the country wanted that or not) and I am extremely pro-life, but I don't expect writers to have good morals all the time.

    A few years ago I made a comment about O'Hara on this website and there was another commenter who told me I knew nothing about O'Hara at all (because I had mentioned that O'Hara spent a lot of time complaining about the social affronts he received, or something like that)! There are people out there who really really enjoy his writings .... so maybe there are people with strong opinions on where to start with reading O'Hara. Well, I really like the stories he wrote when he was in his 30s , but other people might recommend starting somewhere else .....

    I really liked “By Love Possessed”, a long novel by Cozzens, about New England in the late 40s or early 50s,

    Dunno…..I think that that book is overambitious and overwritten. For Cozzens, my list of must-reads would include The Just and the Unjust, Guard of Honor (perhaps the best book about the American military in WW2), Men and Brethren (excellent novel about an Episcopal clergyman), and Castway (nightmarish novel about a man stranded in a department store in a depopulated, post-apocalyptic New York).

    I would start with a few short stories, all of the ones I have read are really good.

    I don’t think much of Cozzens as a short story writer. He was competent at it, but not nearly as good as O’Hara, who was one of the all-time greats. Indeed, if memory serves, Cozzens had O’Hara critique one of his short stories, and O’Hara thought that it was rather lacking.

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    • Replies: @middle aged vet . . .
    I will try Castaway on your recommendation.

    The main criticism of Cozzens has always been that he tried too hard, that everything he wrote was overwritten. I am not going to argue with that, there is a lot of truth to that, but he was a successful but bitter guy with immense talent who saw the bitter side of life clearly, and there are very few writers like that, so I will overlook an awful lot of his overwriting in order to see the world the way he saw it, even if I am not going to think whichever novel of his I am currently reading was perfectly written.

    And I agree, Cozzens was not the short story writer O'Hara was. O'Hara was a pro, I can't think of anyone consistently better at being interesting over the course of a short story. Although that being said, lots of O'Hara stories end too soon, he picked that trick up from Chekhov and overused it. And Cozzens at his best in the short story format is really really good, and he did not end his stories too soon, as well as I can remember ....

    Anyway, to change the subject, my favorite 20th century non-English writing prose writer is Bernanos, and if there was ever someone who knew how to overwrite a story, it was him. So I have immense tolerance for over-writing. All of his older characters were saints, or complete failures, all of his young people were saints, or complete failures, and he looked with a cold beady eye on all the popular sins of his day, bad politics, thoughtless nationalism and thoughtless internationalism, anti-Semitism, budding existentialism, druggy hedonism, money-grubbing militarism, you name it. That is my kind of writer.
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  143. @syonredux

    So you actually enjoy Faulkner. Ack. I see we wouldn’t agree on too many books.
     
    Dunno. My taste in literature is quite catholic.

    I enjoyed both A Tale of Two Cities and War and Peace, so i can read long books.
     
    I like both of those....although my favorite Dickens novel is David Copperfield....and Tolstoy is the kind of author that I don't go back to very often....

    Once, a friend from India got really drunk on cheap beer and went on long ramble about Indian history, his family, philosophy, religion, geography… it was a real tour de force. I thought later that I should have recorded it, transcribed it, and published a great novel.

     

    Yeah, Faulkner has a tendency to ramble on and on. That's one of the reasons why the gulf between his failures (A Fable is surely one of the worst books ever written by a legitimately great writer) and his successes (Absalom, Absalom! yawns so wide.

    Always liked “Tale of Two Cities.” For those who never saw it, the Hollywood version, though mawkish and hardly on the level of the book, is worth seeing because of the great Ronald Coleman who was born to play Sidney Carton.

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  144. @The Anti-Gnostic
    What's the limit? 20 or 200 years past your death? At some point the rest of us get to ask why we're enforcing your copyright to restrict supply of a now-completely-fungible good.

    Quite right, there has to be a limit, and I’d say 200 years is on the high side of what’s reasonable. That incentive effect is pretty attenuated, when it comes to my concern for my descendants six or eight generations away. If I accept the Dawkins’ “selfish gene” idea, those descendants are not much closer to me than, say, a random European Jew today like Olga Khazan or Benjamin Netanyahu.

    So I don’t have a precise opinion about how long copyright should last, but I will still stress that the moment of an author’s death does not constitute any kind of abrupt watershed, when it comes to the incentive effect.

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    • Agree: Svigor
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  145. Svigor says:
    @International Jew

    the writer/inventor is incentivized to create–but the heirs? Why should they get mailbox money
     
    Two answers to this.

    1. If I care about my heirs' wellbeing after my death (and why wouldn't I?), then copyright extending past my death acts as an incentive to me today. Same way, when I'm old, I might plant a tree.

    2. The right to leave an inheritance should be thought of as a benefit, primarily, to me and only incidentally to my heirs. That is, I earned my money, and among the many things I could do with my money that would make me happy — renovate my kitchen, buy a boat, vacation in Tuscany — one of these is the pleasure of leaving something to my heirs. It's a pleasure like any other, and so denying me that (by confiscating it from my heirs) is just as wrong as prohibiting me from buying that boat.

    I agree with 1, but 2 is covered by inheritance, so it’s superfluous.

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  146. Svigor says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    To the point of Steve’s original post: I have trouble seeing why anyone here would object to the idea that Scott Fitzgerald’s heirs still profit from his work. That’s really the dream of every writer: that your works will be read, bought, and support you and your children. It’s no different from the situation with the heirs of a great inventor, or of the founder of an enduring company.
     
    It's a nice thought, but it's pure artificial scarcity. Without the government's effective price floor from copyright, selling IP would be like selling a shovel. I can see some rationale for a writer's or inventor's lifetime--the writer/inventor is incentivized to create--but the heirs? Why should they get mailbox money off purely arbitrary government enforcement over a product that is 100% reproducible after the first sale?

    It’s artificial scarcity, but that doesn’t strike me as persuasive, one way or the other. Once the camel gets his nose into the tent with copyright, trademark, IP law, etc., I don’t see how making them heritable is some bright line that shouldn’t be crossed.

    For me the tension is between the two chilling effects; too short a period, and too little incentive is secured. Too long, and society’s creativity is stifled, because over time individual works permeate the culture – they leave holes in cultural output, if made taboo.

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  147. Svigor says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    http://www.worldfuturefund.org/Reports/plastic.jpg

    Definitely needs a “not to scale” note somewhere (e.g., look at US 0.3 vs China 8.8 million).

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  148. Anonymous[150] • Disclaimer says:

    The U.S. in the 19th century used to have very weak copyright laws, and there was rampant piracy in book publishing, especially of foreign authors. This is why popular British writers like Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde and Arthur Conan Doyle made frequent speaking tours of the U.S. – It was the only way they could make money from the popularity of their books in the U.S.

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  149. Dennis Dale says: • Website

    An economic system in which everybody had to financially compensate everybody else all the time for cultural appropriation would probably turn out to be a good deal mostly for accountants and IP lawyers. But it’s not surprising lots of people these days kind of dream about it and feel entitled to resent others for not offering them mailbox money.

    Yes, because it would mostly involve presenting an astronomical bill the vast non-white masses could never afford to pay.
    It’s like an old National Lampoon gag about black reparations: we grant them minus a list of back-charges such as auto theft devices and other diversity tax effects. They end up owing, of course.

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  150. Anonymous[381] • Disclaimer says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Lehmann is an overprivleged grifter taking advantage of lonely white men angry at being left behind by a more diverse and equitable world

    Quilette is nothing more than a front for racism and white supremacy with a veneer for free speech

    I hope their patreon account gets shut down

    Crytpto racist publications like quilette are why we NEED hate speech laws

    Anyone who has issues with a publication named ‘Quilette’ is obvious some kinda homophobe. And you are doubleplusungood, TD because Lehmann is obviously a member of the Tribe. Really don’t know about you TD.

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  151. @Mishra

    I am extremely pro-life
     
    This makes me wonder why you use the phrase "pro-choice" instead of "pro-abortion".

    Mishra, thanks for noticing. Back in the 50s nobody was publicly pro-abortion, except people who were “radicals”, and Cozzens and O’Hara were not radicals, I think. They were “pro-choice” on the “right to privacy” issue that the second rate legal scholars of the day promoted, with Griswold (the Supreme Court case) being the badly written bitter fruit of their mediocrity and lack of faith. Hence my historically accurate use of the “pro-choice” word: a word that, I agree with you, is purely a lie in our modern context.

    That being said, you point out a very important fact – in our use of language we often adopt popular words that we disagree with, simply because we are unaware of how nonsensical our vocabulary has become.

    In my case, however, I was just trying to be historically accurate. I am in fact, as I said, extremely pro-life. I even consider people like Sobran and Buchanan and Scalia to have been (or in Buchanan’s case, to be) squishes on the subject. In other words, I think that any human being who has procured an abortion, or helped procure an abortion, or voted in a legislature for a single dime that went to finance an abortion, or even any person who has, in his or her private capacity, voted for a politician who had not publicly pledged to make the killing of fetuses under liberal abortion laws unlawful again, should be considered unfit for life for public office.

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  152. @syonredux

    I really liked “By Love Possessed”, a long novel by Cozzens, about New England in the late 40s or early 50s,
     
    Dunno.....I think that that book is overambitious and overwritten. For Cozzens, my list of must-reads would include The Just and the Unjust, Guard of Honor (perhaps the best book about the American military in WW2), Men and Brethren (excellent novel about an Episcopal clergyman), and Castway (nightmarish novel about a man stranded in a department store in a depopulated, post-apocalyptic New York).

    I would start with a few short stories, all of the ones I have read are really good.

     

    I don't think much of Cozzens as a short story writer. He was competent at it, but not nearly as good as O'Hara, who was one of the all-time greats. Indeed, if memory serves, Cozzens had O'Hara critique one of his short stories, and O'Hara thought that it was rather lacking.

    I will try Castaway on your recommendation.

    The main criticism of Cozzens has always been that he tried too hard, that everything he wrote was overwritten. I am not going to argue with that, there is a lot of truth to that, but he was a successful but bitter guy with immense talent who saw the bitter side of life clearly, and there are very few writers like that, so I will overlook an awful lot of his overwriting in order to see the world the way he saw it, even if I am not going to think whichever novel of his I am currently reading was perfectly written.

    And I agree, Cozzens was not the short story writer O’Hara was. O’Hara was a pro, I can’t think of anyone consistently better at being interesting over the course of a short story. Although that being said, lots of O’Hara stories end too soon, he picked that trick up from Chekhov and overused it. And Cozzens at his best in the short story format is really really good, and he did not end his stories too soon, as well as I can remember ….

    Anyway, to change the subject, my favorite 20th century non-English writing prose writer is Bernanos, and if there was ever someone who knew how to overwrite a story, it was him. So I have immense tolerance for over-writing. All of his older characters were saints, or complete failures, all of his young people were saints, or complete failures, and he looked with a cold beady eye on all the popular sins of his day, bad politics, thoughtless nationalism and thoughtless internationalism, anti-Semitism, budding existentialism, druggy hedonism, money-grubbing militarism, you name it. That is my kind of writer.

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  153. @syonredux

    So you actually enjoy Faulkner. Ack. I see we wouldn’t agree on too many books.
     
    Dunno. My taste in literature is quite catholic.

    I enjoyed both A Tale of Two Cities and War and Peace, so i can read long books.
     
    I like both of those....although my favorite Dickens novel is David Copperfield....and Tolstoy is the kind of author that I don't go back to very often....

    Once, a friend from India got really drunk on cheap beer and went on long ramble about Indian history, his family, philosophy, religion, geography… it was a real tour de force. I thought later that I should have recorded it, transcribed it, and published a great novel.

     

    Yeah, Faulkner has a tendency to ramble on and on. That's one of the reasons why the gulf between his failures (A Fable is surely one of the worst books ever written by a legitimately great writer) and his successes (Absalom, Absalom! yawns so wide.

    When I was 11 or 12, I started reading adult fiction, and I was pretty pleased with my ability to keep up with it. I’d heard somewhere that William Faulkner was hot stuff, so I went to the public library to pick one up. I chose A Fable because it had a cool cover (a big looming cross; I can still picture it) and the blurb on the back said it was about WWI. Can’t go wrong with that, I thought. Well, I’ve never been so thoroughly defeated by a book before or since, and I’ve never tried again to read it. Glad to hear I didn’t miss that much.

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    When I was 11 or 12, I started reading adult fiction, and I was pretty pleased with my ability to keep up with it. I’d heard somewhere that William Faulkner was hot stuff, so I went to the public library to pick one up. I chose A Fable because it had a cool cover (a big looming cross; I can still picture it) and the blurb on the back said it was about WWI. Can’t go wrong with that, I thought. Well, I’ve never been so thoroughly defeated by a book before or since, and I’ve never tried again to read it. Glad to hear I didn’t miss that much.
     
    Cosmic coincidence! The first Faulkner book that I ever read was A Fable. I picked it up when I was about 14.....and could not finish the book. It was the most boring thing that I had ever read, and it put me off Faulkner for quite a while. When I was about 18, though, I decided that I would give him another shot and bought a copy of Absalom, Absalom!. Complete difference. I read that one in a single day and went on a Faulkner jag that lasted several weeks.
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  154. syonredux says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist
    When I was 11 or 12, I started reading adult fiction, and I was pretty pleased with my ability to keep up with it. I'd heard somewhere that William Faulkner was hot stuff, so I went to the public library to pick one up. I chose A Fable because it had a cool cover (a big looming cross; I can still picture it) and the blurb on the back said it was about WWI. Can't go wrong with that, I thought. Well, I've never been so thoroughly defeated by a book before or since, and I've never tried again to read it. Glad to hear I didn't miss that much.

    When I was 11 or 12, I started reading adult fiction, and I was pretty pleased with my ability to keep up with it. I’d heard somewhere that William Faulkner was hot stuff, so I went to the public library to pick one up. I chose A Fable because it had a cool cover (a big looming cross; I can still picture it) and the blurb on the back said it was about WWI. Can’t go wrong with that, I thought. Well, I’ve never been so thoroughly defeated by a book before or since, and I’ve never tried again to read it. Glad to hear I didn’t miss that much.

    Cosmic coincidence! The first Faulkner book that I ever read was A Fable. I picked it up when I was about 14…..and could not finish the book. It was the most boring thing that I had ever read, and it put me off Faulkner for quite a while. When I was about 18, though, I decided that I would give him another shot and bought a copy of Absalom, Absalom!. Complete difference. I read that one in a single day and went on a Faulkner jag that lasted several weeks.

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    Thanks for that story; obviously, I understand completely. I didn't manage any more Faulkner until I got to college.

    My signature Faulkner reading experience was with The Sound and the Fury, which I read in my 2os. I read it completely cold, i.e. not assigned for a course, and knowing nothing about its multiple-POV, temporally-swirling structure. I just started reading, and got utterly lost. But I carried on, and then way into the book I had an instantaneous flood of insight, and at once I understood the whole story -- when everything was happening, who was who, how they were related, and what they'd done to each other. I've never had another reading experience quite like it.

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  155. Fodder:

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  156. Anonymous[506] • Disclaimer says:
    @stillCARealist
    So you actually enjoy Faulkner. Ack. I see we wouldn't agree on too many books.

    I enjoyed both A Tale of Two Cities and War and Peace, so i can read long books. They just have to make some sense most of the time. Faulkner reads like he's on acid or something.

    Once, a friend from India got really drunk on cheap beer and went on long ramble about Indian history, his family, philosophy, religion, geography... it was a real tour de force. I thought later that I should have recorded it, transcribed it, and published a great novel.

    Indians (feather) and alcohol is a dangerous combination. Indians (dot) and alcohol can be funny as hell.

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  157. nebulafox says:
    @Mishra
    http://www.unz.com/isteve/no-dogs-or-white-males-need-apply/#comment-2352184

    We need to start a petition!

    We also need another one for Corvy. Maybe Mike Cernovich and the Baboon Mindset?

    And this is where I’m going to yet again try to leave…

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  158. Brutusale says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Way OT here, but an observation. I see very little coverage of two major environmental disasters in the MSM. The active volcanos in Hawaii and Guatemala are spewing billions of liters of toxic gas into the atmosphere, not to mention tons of ash. But is it because there is no way to link human activity to these chimneys? Currently every major storm, whether it be tornado, hurricane or blizzard is somehow linked to human activity, but not these volcanos. Earthquakes caused by mining, drilling and fracking, sure why not. And certainly the brown people of Guatemala are as deserving as the brown people of Puerto Rico. Where is the love? This winter all changes to weather patterns will be because Trump pulled out of the Paris Accord, not the effect of volcanic ash and gas on the atmosphere.

    I imagine it has been as cool an early summer in Buffalo as it has been in Boston.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Without_a_Summer

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  159. Dr. Doom says:

    This grifting about “cultural appropriation” is Cargo Cult Economics. If blacks lived off Jazz Today, they’d have to eat more garbage than goats. One guy playing a guitar in your local park is probably more popular than jazz is now. I hear rap is really popular in the Orient. AS LONG AS IT DOESN’T INVOLVE BLACKS IN ANY WAY, SHAPE OR FORM.
    Lets face it. These blacks are STUPID. Cartoon Stupid. They didn’t invent the wheel. They certainly didn’t invent any instruments. They were banging hollow logs. They have no history. They had no written language.
    Mexico has a fine and interesting culture. It came from Hernando Cortez and the Spanish Conquistadors. They built Mexico in the Names of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. Based on the age-old principle of White Dominance and Supremacy. When the gold, she run out, they wisely left their Mestizo Bastards behind. Now Mexico has a classless Plantation System of Haciendas where peons enjoy a wonderful life as drunken illiterate serfs.
    Nature has a hierarchy. The blacks usually call it racism. Like science, math, art, classical music, functional utilities, paying your bills, obeying the law, etc, etc. etc. Even fried chicken is racism to them…

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  160. Brute, cool spring slow start to summer but I’ll take 75 degrees over 85 anytime.

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  161. @Anonymous
    I understand that Fitzgerald's heirs are collateral beneficiaries of the intensive lobbying by the Disney company, which still earns considerable income from IP created in the 1920s.

    I understand that Fitzgerald’s heirs are collateral beneficiaries of the intensive lobbying by the Disney company, which still earns considerable income from IP created in the 1920s.

    Who’s getting the swag from the giant franchise of Winnie the Pooh? AA Milne’s only child (I don’t have to tell you his name) had little interest in his father’s legacy, and his only child had cerebral palsy and apparently died childless. She set up a trust to help both the disabled and the southwest of England in general. I suppose that’s as good a use of royalties as any.

    The Disney people were quite instrumental in upending the old US copyright laws so they wouldn’t lose control of Pooh. Of course this was mostly to protect their franchise, but another reason that deserves our sympathy is that once the characters enter the public domain, they’re free to use for pornographic purposes.

    Considering that all the characters except Kanga were male, that could be quite interesting.

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  162. @Lot
    That's all correct, and also why companies send so many stupid threatening letters over petty arguable infringements.

    Trademark and copyright, for all their issues, are a tenth as bad as the patent system. It wastes some of the best minds in the USA, people with the M-IQ to understand complex patents, the V-IQ to write well about them in lawsuits, and the personal qualities to put up with years of working hard on meaningless tasks.

    Trademark and copyright, for all their issues, are a tenth as bad as the patent system

    Interestingly, we are never told the names of Calvin’s parents in Calvin and Hobbes, but his father, rather than having the generic office job seen in Blondie, Dilbert, and many other strips, is quite explicitly a patent attorney. That was Bill Watterson’s father’s profession.

    In his spare time, Calvin’s dad likes to explain to his son how the world works. E.g., most babies come from a kit from Sears, but to save money, Calvin was a blue light special at Kmart.

    An attorney’s mind at work!

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  163. I want a royalty every time some cultural third worlder, including our own black underclass and American Indians, bitch about cultural appropriation and do not use the language of their third world ancestors. English is mine. I want my check.

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  164. @syonredux

    When I was 11 or 12, I started reading adult fiction, and I was pretty pleased with my ability to keep up with it. I’d heard somewhere that William Faulkner was hot stuff, so I went to the public library to pick one up. I chose A Fable because it had a cool cover (a big looming cross; I can still picture it) and the blurb on the back said it was about WWI. Can’t go wrong with that, I thought. Well, I’ve never been so thoroughly defeated by a book before or since, and I’ve never tried again to read it. Glad to hear I didn’t miss that much.
     
    Cosmic coincidence! The first Faulkner book that I ever read was A Fable. I picked it up when I was about 14.....and could not finish the book. It was the most boring thing that I had ever read, and it put me off Faulkner for quite a while. When I was about 18, though, I decided that I would give him another shot and bought a copy of Absalom, Absalom!. Complete difference. I read that one in a single day and went on a Faulkner jag that lasted several weeks.

    Thanks for that story; obviously, I understand completely. I didn’t manage any more Faulkner until I got to college.

    My signature Faulkner reading experience was with The Sound and the Fury, which I read in my 2os. I read it completely cold, i.e. not assigned for a course, and knowing nothing about its multiple-POV, temporally-swirling structure. I just started reading, and got utterly lost. But I carried on, and then way into the book I had an instantaneous flood of insight, and at once I understood the whole story — when everything was happening, who was who, how they were related, and what they’d done to each other. I’ve never had another reading experience quite like it.

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  165. Only idiots criticize micropayments on Youtube. Oh, yeah, and owners of Youtube.

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  166. @Buzz Mohawk
    Read my second comment. If you don't like it, shut off your water and stop using your toilet. My father was one of the biggest makers of water and sewer pipe in the world, using proprietary methods and formulae that were exclusively American.

    Would you care to count the ancestors I have traced who fought in the American Revolution, or does constitutional government and the freedom to display your ignorant attitude here count?

    Do you not at least concede the point about what the European race has accomplished to create the modern world? The more important point is that we don't all individually have to have recent ancestors who did something significant; it is that we are part of an extended, racial family that has done more than any other for your quality of life.

    My father was one of the biggest makers of water and sewer pipe in the world, using proprietary methods and formulae that were exclusively American.

    At one time, every fourth water pump in the world was made in Seneca Falls, New York. They also claimed to be the “Fire Engine Capital of the World”, though nearby Elmira made the same boast.

    So this former village, now hamlet, had an enormous role in improving the quantity as well as quality of human life around the planet over the years. But what is it celebrated for? Some conclave of witches 170 years ago.

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  167. @Macumazahn
    Isn't it cultural appropriation every time a Negro wears a business suit?

    This is even more egregious

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  168. MBlanc46 says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...
    I'm looking forward to those royalty checks from the descendants of sub-Saharan Africans who've appropriated the English language of my ancestors. I'd also like reparation payments for their constant butchering and misuse of our language.

    That’s English that they speak? I’d rather not take any credit for it.

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  169. MBlanc46 says:
    @Wilkey
    But I think it’s more understandable as resentment that you don’t get a check in the mail for use of your group’s intellectual property rights.

    Yet all these people bitching about "cultural appropriation" do so in a country founded by my ancestors (virtually all my ancestors were in the USA pre-Revolution) in the language of my ancestors, having benefitted from an industrial revolution that started in the nation of my ancestors. But my daughter is "culturally appropriating" if she wears a dress in a style invented in China. I'll give them their clothing fashions back if they give me my country back.

    Hear, hear! It’s too bad that the organs of communication (well, that’s what they used to call them) that expound the cultural appropriation nonsense don’t allow us to use them to make our rebuttal.

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