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Crop Rot Fever, Part MLXVIII
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From Fortune:

California Crops Rot as Immigration Crackdown Creates Farmworker Shortage

Chris Morris
Aug 08, 2017

Vegetable prices may be going up soon, as a shortage of migrant workers is resulting in lost crops in California.

The cost of vegetables must represent 25% or 30% of the average family’s annual income these days, so this is catastrophic news.

Farmers say they’re having trouble hiring enough people to work during harvest season, causing some crops to rot before they can be picked. Already, the situation has triggered losses of more than $13 million in two California counties alone, according to NBC News.

Thirteen … Million … Dollars!

… To make the jobs more attractive, farmers are offering salaries above minimum wage, along with paid time off and 401(k) plans, but even that’s not proving enough.

I’ve been trying to make a joke out of all the Crops Rotting in the Fields scare headlines for over a decade now, but I don’t think I’m making much progress.

I pointed out back in 2006 that you could bring back slavery and the whip and there’d still be enough crops rotting in the fields somewhere each year for the growers’ PR flacks to churn out the same press releases.

My evolutionary psychology just-so story for why this is such a perennial shtick that apparently never grows old is that agricultural peoples under Malthusian conditions must have evolved to be highly triggered by the news that some of the harvest won’t be gotten in. I bet hunter-gatherers don’t give a damn about crop rot headlines.

 
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  1. whorefinder says: • Website

    It’s amazing how the Left never pushes for a $15-an-our wage for the crop pickers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    "It’s amazing how the Left never pushes for a $15-an-our wage for the crop pickers."

    A "liberal" can be to the left of Jim Jones and Joe Stalin on absolutely every other issue. Once the topic becomes illegal immigration he immediately turns into Jefferson Davis.
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  2. TG says:

    Always we are told the same story. Without slave labor/indentured labor/child labor/immigrant labor the crops will rot in the fields the factories will grind to a halt and we will all starve.

    The slaves are freed, child labor is outlawed, indentured labor is stopped, immigration is reduced… and all that ever happens, is that wages for the many rise and profits for the few decline. Oh, the horror.

    Read More
    • Agree: ic1000
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  3. Not to mention the fact that they have us all convinced that if we don’t eat bushels of green leaves every day, we will rot and die within weeks.

    Experience, and observations of long-lived salad-less carnivores in far off lands, makes one suspect that this is mostly a myth put forth by the vegetable growers. You know those guys: big importers of cheap-laboring, democrat voters.

    Read More
    • Agree: Travis
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  4. anon says: • Disclaimer

    You are kidding. They actually considered paying over minimum wage?

    Don’t want to seem skeptical, but how exactly do they handle the 401K and paid vacation for a temporary, seasonal job.

    Read More
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  5. More of your noticing how the MSM favors the billion dollar agribusiness over the dude picking tomatoes for $15/hr.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    $15.00 Hourly?! a kingly sum paid to tomato-pickers only in your dreams. I once had a boarder who worked briefly picking berries alongside the invaders and helots. I could tell you stories....
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  6. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Whilst on the theme of man’s transition to agriculture in the neolithic and bronze ages, and its relevance to Economist-led drives to impose uncontrolled replacement third world immigration upon the west, the role of bronze age pastoralists, the all conquering, all dominant, all language imposing raping, pillaging tough guys is for some reason sidelined.

    The obvious solution to the ‘crop rotting problem’ is the reversion of excess agricultural land to pasture. Low per capita human input but high per capita income.
    Heaven’s Gate revisited or Mixtecs versus Anglo-Celts. Or even Umpah-Loompahs versus Beefmen.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    The mighty men who inspired tales of Cú Chulainn and Beowulf did not eat a lot of kale, no doubt about it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. Olorin says:

    Chris Morris
    Aug 08, 2017

    Vegetable prices may be going up soon, as a shortage of migrant workers is resulting in lost crops in California.

    Vegetable prices may be going up soon as we Agrarian-Americans turn to our late summer garden harvests rather than the supermarket.

    As for $13 million? Piffle.

    32 million American households grow vegetables. $13 million would be about $2.50 per household.

    Organic tomatoes average about $4 a pound at present; conventional about $2.50. So we can harvest one tomato as our share of that “lost” $13 million resulting from the inefficiencies of monster-scale globalist produce systems.

    Regardez:

    https://garden.org/special/pdf/2014-NGA-Garden-to-Table.pdf

    What I found most interesting is that the demographic with the highest involvement with food gardening is those households earning over $75,000 p.a.

    Big Ag ain’t no friend of the American gardener, fam. We undercut their market to the tune of tens of billions per year.

    This is part of why they use their political heft to force us to give them money in the form of EBT and other food programs.

    And now we’re getting all uppity and wanting to choke off their supply of illegal aliens.

    And though it’s an old dream of mine, we aren’t anytime soon going to be seeing food welfare programs that give people money to set up food gardens and learn the skills to make them work.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Maybe the farmers should open the fields to middle-sized entrepreneurs to pick what they can then turn around and sell, but I've noticed that the little farm stands that used to pop up in my old US haunts have virtually disappeared. Now you have little choice but to get your fruit and veg from Big Ag via the local supermarket.
    , @27 year old
    > the demographic with the highest involvement with food gardening is those households earning over $75,000 p.a.

    Who else has the time and energy not to mention the available space? Bicycling is also a higher-income activity. Biking and gardening, long the necessities of survival for the poor are now games for the rich.


    >we aren’t anytime soon going to be seeing food welfare programs that give people money to set up food gardens and learn the skills to make them work.

    1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings ("plants"). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    2. Some super white North European countries do this, they are called something like poor gardens or something. Food aid takes the form of a free garden plot.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. Wilkey says:
    @whorefinder
    It's amazing how the Left never pushes for a $15-an-our wage for the crop pickers.

    “It’s amazing how the Left never pushes for a $15-an-our wage for the crop pickers.”

    A “liberal” can be to the left of Jim Jones and Joe Stalin on absolutely every other issue. Once the topic becomes illegal immigration he immediately turns into Jefferson Davis.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. I bet hunter-gatherers don’t give a damn about crop rot headlines.

    This explains why John Durant is pro-wall.

    Read More
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  10. jim jones says:

    It turns out that some people made a lot of money from the Michelle Obama good food program:

    http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2017/08/michelle_obamas_nasty_rotty_school_lunch_guru_busted_for_corruption.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @StillCARealist
    Follow it to the LA Times link and you learn that one school district, LA Unified, provides 700,000 meals a day. There's the heart of the problem, right there. With that size of a program how could there not be some skimming and some double dealing? They talked about no accountability for the guy, Binkle, and I'm thinking, yeah, what did you expect? He's there to do some good and winds up doing well.

    Call me callous but I don't think the purpose of a school is to feed the kids.
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  11. unit472 says:

    Food seldom goes to waste. The food left in the field is eaten by deer, pigs and other animals and is thus converted into protein that the hunter will harvest.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker
    Or sold, more cheaply, as animal feed. At the very least it's still going to be compost.
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  12. @Olorin

    Chris Morris
    Aug 08, 2017

    Vegetable prices may be going up soon, as a shortage of migrant workers is resulting in lost crops in California.
     

    Vegetable prices may be going up soon as we Agrarian-Americans turn to our late summer garden harvests rather than the supermarket.

    As for $13 million? Piffle.

    32 million American households grow vegetables. $13 million would be about $2.50 per household.

    Organic tomatoes average about $4 a pound at present; conventional about $2.50. So we can harvest one tomato as our share of that "lost" $13 million resulting from the inefficiencies of monster-scale globalist produce systems.

    Regardez:

    https://garden.org/special/pdf/2014-NGA-Garden-to-Table.pdf

    What I found most interesting is that the demographic with the highest involvement with food gardening is those households earning over $75,000 p.a.

    Big Ag ain't no friend of the American gardener, fam. We undercut their market to the tune of tens of billions per year.

    This is part of why they use their political heft to force us to give them money in the form of EBT and other food programs.

    And now we're getting all uppity and wanting to choke off their supply of illegal aliens.

    And though it's an old dream of mine, we aren't anytime soon going to be seeing food welfare programs that give people money to set up food gardens and learn the skills to make them work.

    Maybe the farmers should open the fields to middle-sized entrepreneurs to pick what they can then turn around and sell, but I’ve noticed that the little farm stands that used to pop up in my old US haunts have virtually disappeared. Now you have little choice but to get your fruit and veg from Big Ag via the local supermarket.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Barnard
    This does make me wonder what the farmers who have labor intensive crops do all day if their crops are "rotting in the fields." The Midwest farmers I know who harvest seed corn, soybeans and wheat are working 80-90 weeks during harvest season. Why aren't these farmers investing in automation or out in the fields picking crops with their families if crops are rotting in the fields?
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  13. And the Brexit edition:

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/aug/05/brexit-uk-food-industry-eu-fruit-veg-pickers

    “They say after Brexit there’ll be food rotting in the fields. It’s already started”

    From John Harris, the Grauniad’s “Voice of the White working class”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Mass east European immigrant labour in British agriculture only really got started, (if you discount post 1945 'displaced persons), in year 2004 with the Brown/Blair government.

    Prior to 2004 - is that *really* such a long time ago? - I can't seem to remember either 'crops rotting in the fields' in England or even food rationing.
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  14. KM32 says:

    As I was the one who posted that link in your comments, can I finally get some automatic posting privileges? I’ve been here for years.

    Read More
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  15. MSP says:

    I was talking about this same article with someone. The number is only impressive if you have no idea how big the agricultural exports of California are. California made over 40 BILLION on agricultural exports. 13 million is .03% of that number. If you frame it in those terms it seems trivial.

    Read More
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  16. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @jimmyriddle
    And the Brexit edition:

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/aug/05/brexit-uk-food-industry-eu-fruit-veg-pickers

    "They say after Brexit there’ll be food rotting in the fields. It’s already started"


    From John Harris, the Grauniad's "Voice of the White working class".

    Mass east European immigrant labour in British agriculture only really got started, (if you discount post 1945 ‘displaced persons), in year 2004 with the Brown/Blair government.

    Prior to 2004 – is that *really* such a long time ago? – I can’t seem to remember either ‘crops rotting in the fields’ in England or even food rationing.

    Read More
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  17. Yak-15 says:

    I just bought some 32 oz cartons of organic strawberries for 1.50 in Chicago.

    This is getting dire!

    Read More
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  18. @Olorin

    Chris Morris
    Aug 08, 2017

    Vegetable prices may be going up soon, as a shortage of migrant workers is resulting in lost crops in California.
     

    Vegetable prices may be going up soon as we Agrarian-Americans turn to our late summer garden harvests rather than the supermarket.

    As for $13 million? Piffle.

    32 million American households grow vegetables. $13 million would be about $2.50 per household.

    Organic tomatoes average about $4 a pound at present; conventional about $2.50. So we can harvest one tomato as our share of that "lost" $13 million resulting from the inefficiencies of monster-scale globalist produce systems.

    Regardez:

    https://garden.org/special/pdf/2014-NGA-Garden-to-Table.pdf

    What I found most interesting is that the demographic with the highest involvement with food gardening is those households earning over $75,000 p.a.

    Big Ag ain't no friend of the American gardener, fam. We undercut their market to the tune of tens of billions per year.

    This is part of why they use their political heft to force us to give them money in the form of EBT and other food programs.

    And now we're getting all uppity and wanting to choke off their supply of illegal aliens.

    And though it's an old dream of mine, we aren't anytime soon going to be seeing food welfare programs that give people money to set up food gardens and learn the skills to make them work.

    > the demographic with the highest involvement with food gardening is those households earning over $75,000 p.a.

    Who else has the time and energy not to mention the available space? Bicycling is also a higher-income activity. Biking and gardening, long the necessities of survival for the poor are now games for the rich.

    >we aren’t anytime soon going to be seeing food welfare programs that give people money to set up food gardens and learn the skills to make them work.

    1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings (“plants”). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    2. Some super white North European countries do this, they are called something like poor gardens or something. Food aid takes the form of a free garden plot.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Hail and Well Met, Brawndo the Thirstinator!
    , @Milo Minderbinder
    1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings (“plants”). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    It's got electrolytes. It's what plants crave!
    , @Grace Jones
    > 1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings (“plants”). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    Gatorade has a lot of salt in it. You'd need plentiful rainfall to dilute it. However, you can get distilled water with SNAP, a necessity for certain houseplants that can't tolerate trace amounts of fluoride in the tap water.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. @Jack Hanson
    More of your noticing how the MSM favors the billion dollar agribusiness over the dude picking tomatoes for $15/hr.

    $15.00 Hourly?! a kingly sum paid to tomato-pickers only in your dreams. I once had a boarder who worked briefly picking berries alongside the invaders and helots. I could tell you stories….

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. @Anonymous
    Whilst on the theme of man's transition to agriculture in the neolithic and bronze ages, and its relevance to Economist-led drives to impose uncontrolled replacement third world immigration upon the west, the role of bronze age pastoralists, the all conquering, all dominant, all language imposing raping, pillaging tough guys is for some reason sidelined.

    The obvious solution to the 'crop rotting problem' is the reversion of excess agricultural land to pasture. Low per capita human input but high per capita income.
    Heaven's Gate revisited or Mixtecs versus Anglo-Celts. Or even Umpah-Loompahs versus Beefmen.

    The mighty men who inspired tales of Cú Chulainn and Beowulf did not eat a lot of kale, no doubt about it.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. @27 year old
    > the demographic with the highest involvement with food gardening is those households earning over $75,000 p.a.

    Who else has the time and energy not to mention the available space? Bicycling is also a higher-income activity. Biking and gardening, long the necessities of survival for the poor are now games for the rich.


    >we aren’t anytime soon going to be seeing food welfare programs that give people money to set up food gardens and learn the skills to make them work.

    1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings ("plants"). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    2. Some super white North European countries do this, they are called something like poor gardens or something. Food aid takes the form of a free garden plot.

    Hail and Well Met, Brawndo the Thirstinator!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. There needs to be pompously important Latin term for headlines and even entire stories apparently written by apps to convey, or at least insinuate, evil of whiteytude.

    As crops rot in the fields, so shall Muslims brace for backlash. Forever and ever.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  23. Barnard says:
    @The Alarmist
    Maybe the farmers should open the fields to middle-sized entrepreneurs to pick what they can then turn around and sell, but I've noticed that the little farm stands that used to pop up in my old US haunts have virtually disappeared. Now you have little choice but to get your fruit and veg from Big Ag via the local supermarket.

    This does make me wonder what the farmers who have labor intensive crops do all day if their crops are “rotting in the fields.” The Midwest farmers I know who harvest seed corn, soybeans and wheat are working 80-90 weeks during harvest season. Why aren’t these farmers investing in automation or out in the fields picking crops with their families if crops are rotting in the fields?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. @jim jones
    It turns out that some people made a lot of money from the Michelle Obama good food program:

    http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2017/08/michelle_obamas_nasty_rotty_school_lunch_guru_busted_for_corruption.html

    Follow it to the LA Times link and you learn that one school district, LA Unified, provides 700,000 meals a day. There’s the heart of the problem, right there. With that size of a program how could there not be some skimming and some double dealing? They talked about no accountability for the guy, Binkle, and I’m thinking, yeah, what did you expect? He’s there to do some good and winds up doing well.

    Call me callous but I don’t think the purpose of a school is to feed the kids.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. Tulip says:

    But what about wandering nomadic pastoralists?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  26. @27 year old
    > the demographic with the highest involvement with food gardening is those households earning over $75,000 p.a.

    Who else has the time and energy not to mention the available space? Bicycling is also a higher-income activity. Biking and gardening, long the necessities of survival for the poor are now games for the rich.


    >we aren’t anytime soon going to be seeing food welfare programs that give people money to set up food gardens and learn the skills to make them work.

    1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings ("plants"). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    2. Some super white North European countries do this, they are called something like poor gardens or something. Food aid takes the form of a free garden plot.

    1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings (“plants”). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    It’s got electrolytes. It’s what plants crave!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Trelane
    But Brondo's got what plants crave.

    https://youtu.be/3boy_tLWeqA
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  27. Lurker says:
    @unit472
    Food seldom goes to waste. The food left in the field is eaten by deer, pigs and other animals and is thus converted into protein that the hunter will harvest.

    Or sold, more cheaply, as animal feed. At the very least it’s still going to be compost.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  28. Indirect reference to Ted?

    Or just rolls off the tongue in a similar way? Would make a great tongue twister:

    Repeat 5 times real fast: CropRotFever..CropRotFever..CropRotFever….

    Read More
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  29. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Monsanto was in the news again about some of their toxic products. Expect that clever lawyers will prepare class action lawsuits to demand American paid healthcare for migrant vegetable pickers. Your lettuce may have a surcharge for the worker health fund. Grow your own vegetables and avoid Monsanto. They are the scourge of the world.

    Read More
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  30. To make the jobs more attractive, farmers are offering salaries above minimum wage, along with paid time off and 401(k) plans, but even that’s not proving enough.

    Before I had a fancy adult career, I would have loved to get a farm work job like this, and many other Americans would too. I did really several hard labor jobs for minimum wage with zero benefits.

    And this is hard evidence that job pay really will rise with less low skilled immigration.

    Honestly, on a strict free market labor basis, I think benefits to immigrants outweigh the costs to some pockets of locals. However, when it comes to voting rights politics, demographics, culture, social services, and welfare, I favor much more restricted and selective immigration.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RonaldB
    "I think benefits to immigrants outweigh the costs to some pockets of locals..."

    It's difficult to tell what you really mean here, since you mention elsewhere the socializing of costs versus the privatization of profit.

    But, I have lots and lots of Mexicans living around me. They're not bad neighbors, actually. They speak Spanish among themselves and their kids, and any contact between myself and them is minimal.

    But, here's the rub. They're all in labor-intensive jobs, and they don't especially take care of themselves. Not even looking at the costs of educating their kids, in a few years, they'll be burned out and requiring either social security or public assistance. I try to contract with US citizens for my services, even if I pay a few dollars more. Of course, when you have contracting work done on your house, you get the estimate from the American, and invariably, the actual labor is done by Mexican workers whose command of English is problematic, to say the least.
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  31. So far as I know crop pickers are not and have never been paid by the hour.

    Read More
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  32. guest says:

    I saw a magazine cover recently (apparently magazines still exist) with a cartoon ICE agent on the cover, assault rifle in hand, standing in a field of whatever with a farm house in the background. The headline was “Uprooted,” the subheadine something about what’ll we do if too many imm’grants are taken or scared away from working the land?

    I thought to myself, “Since when did those people put down roots? Don’t we call them ‘migrants’ for a reason?”

    Read More
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  33. @27 year old
    > the demographic with the highest involvement with food gardening is those households earning over $75,000 p.a.

    Who else has the time and energy not to mention the available space? Bicycling is also a higher-income activity. Biking and gardening, long the necessities of survival for the poor are now games for the rich.


    >we aren’t anytime soon going to be seeing food welfare programs that give people money to set up food gardens and learn the skills to make them work.

    1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings ("plants"). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    2. Some super white North European countries do this, they are called something like poor gardens or something. Food aid takes the form of a free garden plot.

    > 1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings (“plants”). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    Gatorade has a lot of salt in it. You’d need plentiful rainfall to dilute it. However, you can get distilled water with SNAP, a necessity for certain houseplants that can’t tolerate trace amounts of fluoride in the tap water.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But it has electrolytes?
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  34. Pepe says:

    THE DEMOCRATIC CASE FOR RESTRICTING IMMIGRATION

    With stricter border enforcement, employers would immediately start to feel a reduction of available labor, as is already happening. Wages would tick up. On the more gradual front, with a system that selects for skill, most immigrants coming to the United States would out-earn the native-born, raising per-capita productivity for everyone and boosting our fiscal health. With the share of low-skill workers becoming smaller, many sorts of employment would start to pay better: home care, security work, massage therapy, dishwashing, gardening, housekeeping, cleaning, construction, gardening, manufacturing. Out in the fields, agricultural wages would likewise start to rise little by little. Union drives would go better, as employers stopped being able to threaten workers with deportation. We’d see more productivity innovations as labor costs forced businesses to make better use of their human resources or to mechanize, as in Japan.

    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2017/08/the-democratic-case-for-restricting-immigration

    Read More
    • Replies: @RonaldB
    The logic doesn't quite follow.

    Suppose we have immigration of highly-skilled people. All other things being equal, they will compete with American workers on their skill level, and inevitably, drive some of the Americans out of their jobs. These skilled Americans will take jobs at the next lowest skill, providing competition for the workers at the lower skill level, displace some of them and drive down wages for them. So, filtering for skill level does not change the dynamic of increasing labor competition and lower wages.

    There is one exception to this rule, and I have not seen it described explicitly. There may be truly critical skills, without which a factor or industry absolutely cannot function. Think of a materials scientist who develops a unique means of producing integrated circuits. Importing a person with unique intelligence in this area might produce more American jobs. I think it fair to require that skilled immigrants be required to receive, not the market wage, but 2 or 3 times the market wage for their job description. This will address the claim that some immigrants provide skills that cannot be found in the American labor force. If so, then these unique individuals are obviously worth much more than the prevailing wage for that skill level. So, I think it fair to require them to be paid far higher than US workers.

    I'll give a concrete example. Recall the Bhopal disaster of 1984, where over 10,000 people died from a release of toxic gases by an insecticide company. I read an article describing how the local laws required hiring locals. The safety engineering requirements were beyond the skills of local talent, resulting in the spill. So, obviously, there are cases where foreign talent is vital for an enterprise.
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  35. @Grace Jones
    > 1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings (“plants”). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    Gatorade has a lot of salt in it. You'd need plentiful rainfall to dilute it. However, you can get distilled water with SNAP, a necessity for certain houseplants that can't tolerate trace amounts of fluoride in the tap water.

    But it has electrolytes?

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  36. Harold says:

    Well I don’t know where they come from
    But they sure do come
    I hope they comin’ for me
    And I don’t know how they do it but they sure do it good
    I hope they doin’ it for free—or nearly

    Don’t give me crop rot fever
    Crop rot fever

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  37. Here in Alaska we have fish rotting in the sea.

    According to anyone who’s anyone, Trump’s policies coupled with banner year fishing hauls are leaving not enough help to harvest the salmon.

    https://www.adn.com/opinions/2017/08/05/immigration-fight-cripples-alaska-fishing-as-foreign-help-vanishes/

    But Alaska is in bad economic waters and has 2nd highest unemployment in the US, doesn’t matter, still not enough workers.

    The guy who wrote the above op-ed is your typical liberal academic. He writes a lot about how we need income tax and higher state spending. But raising wages is too “tangled” and would involve “prying money out of unwilling hands”.

    It’s the same script California growers use. Rinse & repeat, always repeat.

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  38. RonaldB says:
    @Massimo Heitor

    To make the jobs more attractive, farmers are offering salaries above minimum wage, along with paid time off and 401(k) plans, but even that’s not proving enough.
     
    Before I had a fancy adult career, I would have loved to get a farm work job like this, and many other Americans would too. I did really several hard labor jobs for minimum wage with zero benefits.

    And this is hard evidence that job pay really will rise with less low skilled immigration.

    Honestly, on a strict free market labor basis, I think benefits to immigrants outweigh the costs to some pockets of locals. However, when it comes to voting rights politics, demographics, culture, social services, and welfare, I favor much more restricted and selective immigration.

    “I think benefits to immigrants outweigh the costs to some pockets of locals…”

    It’s difficult to tell what you really mean here, since you mention elsewhere the socializing of costs versus the privatization of profit.

    But, I have lots and lots of Mexicans living around me. They’re not bad neighbors, actually. They speak Spanish among themselves and their kids, and any contact between myself and them is minimal.

    But, here’s the rub. They’re all in labor-intensive jobs, and they don’t especially take care of themselves. Not even looking at the costs of educating their kids, in a few years, they’ll be burned out and requiring either social security or public assistance. I try to contract with US citizens for my services, even if I pay a few dollars more. Of course, when you have contracting work done on your house, you get the estimate from the American, and invariably, the actual labor is done by Mexican workers whose command of English is problematic, to say the least.

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  39. RonaldB says:
    @Pepe
    THE DEMOCRATIC CASE FOR RESTRICTING IMMIGRATION

    With stricter border enforcement, employers would immediately start to feel a reduction of available labor, as is already happening. Wages would tick up. On the more gradual front, with a system that selects for skill, most immigrants coming to the United States would out-earn the native-born, raising per-capita productivity for everyone and boosting our fiscal health. With the share of low-skill workers becoming smaller, many sorts of employment would start to pay better: home care, security work, massage therapy, dishwashing, gardening, housekeeping, cleaning, construction, gardening, manufacturing. Out in the fields, agricultural wages would likewise start to rise little by little. Union drives would go better, as employers stopped being able to threaten workers with deportation. We’d see more productivity innovations as labor costs forced businesses to make better use of their human resources or to mechanize, as in Japan.
     
    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2017/08/the-democratic-case-for-restricting-immigration

    The logic doesn’t quite follow.

    Suppose we have immigration of highly-skilled people. All other things being equal, they will compete with American workers on their skill level, and inevitably, drive some of the Americans out of their jobs. These skilled Americans will take jobs at the next lowest skill, providing competition for the workers at the lower skill level, displace some of them and drive down wages for them. So, filtering for skill level does not change the dynamic of increasing labor competition and lower wages.

    There is one exception to this rule, and I have not seen it described explicitly. There may be truly critical skills, without which a factor or industry absolutely cannot function. Think of a materials scientist who develops a unique means of producing integrated circuits. Importing a person with unique intelligence in this area might produce more American jobs. I think it fair to require that skilled immigrants be required to receive, not the market wage, but 2 or 3 times the market wage for their job description. This will address the claim that some immigrants provide skills that cannot be found in the American labor force. If so, then these unique individuals are obviously worth much more than the prevailing wage for that skill level. So, I think it fair to require them to be paid far higher than US workers.

    I’ll give a concrete example. Recall the Bhopal disaster of 1984, where over 10,000 people died from a release of toxic gases by an insecticide company. I read an article describing how the local laws required hiring locals. The safety engineering requirements were beyond the skills of local talent, resulting in the spill. So, obviously, there are cases where foreign talent is vital for an enterprise.

    Read More
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  40. Workfare. No work no eat. No free cheese. Bleak lies Spatter Soros check cashiers.

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  41. Prisoners on chain gangs. See? It’s easy to find solutions when you are not PC and practical.

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  42. Trelane says:
    @Milo Minderbinder
    1. Food stamps aka SNAP can be used for seeds and seedlings (“plants”). And you can buy Gatorade to water them with too.

    It's got electrolytes. It's what plants crave!

    But Brondo’s got what plants crave.

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