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From the New York Times:

College Admissions Scandal: Actresses, Business Leaders and Other Wealthy Parents Charged

By Jennifer Medina and Katie Benner
March 12, 2019

Federal prosecutors charged dozens of people on Tuesday in a major college admission scandal that involved wealthy parents, including Hollywood celebrities and prominent business leaders, paying bribes to get their children into elite American universities.

Thirty-three parents were charged in the case and prosecutors said there could be additional indictments to come. Also implicated were top college coaches, who were accused of accepting millions of dollars to help admit students to Wake Forest, Yale, Stanford, the University of Southern California and other schools, regardless of their academic or sports ability, officials said.

The parents included the television star Lori Loughlin and her husband, the fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli; the actress Felicity Huffman; and William E. McGlashan Jr., a partner at the private equity firm TPG, officials said.

Here’s a video of Felicity Huffman’s husband William H. Macy answering investigators’ questions in a confidence-inducing manner:

The case unveiled Tuesday was stunning in its breadth and audacity. …

The charges also underscored how college admissions have become so cutthroat and competitive that some have sought to break the rules. The authorities say the parents of some of the nation’s wealthiest and most privileged students sought to buy spots for their children at top universities, not only cheating the system, but potentially cheating other hard-working students out of a chance at a college education.

In many of the cases, prosecutors said, the students were often not aware that their parents were doctoring their test scores and lying to get them into school.

“The parents are the prime movers of this fraud,” Andrew E. Lelling, the United States attorney for the District of Massachusetts, said Tuesday during a news conference. Mr. Lelling said that those parents used their wealth to create a separate and unfair admissions process for their children. …

At the center of the sweeping financial crime and fraud case was William Singer, the founder of a college preparatory business called the Edge College & Career Network, also known as The Key. Federal prosecutors did not charge any students or universities with wrongdoing.

The authorities said Mr. Singer, who has agreed to plead guilty to the charges and cooperated with federal prosecutors, used The Key and its nonprofit arm, Key Worldwide Foundation, which is based in Newport Beach, Calif., to help students cheat on their standardized tests, and to pay bribes to the coaches who could get them into college with fake athletic credentials.

Mr. Singer used “The Key” as a front, allowing parents to funnel money into an account that would not have to pay federal taxes.

Parents paid Mr. Singer about $25 million from 2011 until February 2019 to bribe coaches and university administrators to designate their children as recruited athletes, which effectively ensured their admission, according to the indictment.

Mr. Singer is also accused of bribing Division 1 athletic coaches to tell admissions officers that they wanted certain students, even though the students did not have the necessary athletic credentials.

Interesting that there are no accounts of Liz Warren-like race fraud yet to go along with Jock Fraud. We’ll see if that develops.

Most elite universities recruit student athletes and use different criteria to admit them, often with lower grades and standardized test scores than other students. Admissions officers typically set aside a number of spots in each freshman class for coaches to recruit students to their teams.

So, these coaches agree to recruit some deadweight nonjocks in return for, what, direct bribes? Must not be real competitive sports, if you can keep your coach job while recruiting nonathletes for your team.

Mr. Singer also helped parents go to great lengths to falsely present their children as the sort of top-flight athletes that coaches would want to recruit.

Mr. Singer fabricated athletic “profiles” of students to submit with their applications, which contained teams the students had not played on and fake honors they had not won. Some parents supplied “staged photographs of their children engaged in athletic activity,” according to the authorities; and Mr. Singer’s associates also photoshopped the faces of the applicants onto images of athletes found on the internet.

That seems like a lot of work. I wonder if this guy offered Fake Grandmothers to get on the Diversity Train too? That would seem less risky to fake a story about how Madison’s maternal grandma was a poor Immigrant of Color from Gautelombia, but the Birth Certificate Office collapsed in the big earthquake and subsequent civil war, so all we have is this second hand copy of a picture of grandma chopping sugarcane as a muchacha.

It would seem cheaper to bribe a Gautelombian civil servant to provide fake documentation than an Ivy League sports coach.

But maybe Diversity Fraud is something rich white people, Liz Warren excepted, just won’t do? We’ll see …

In one example detailed in an indictment, the parents of a student applying to Yale paid Mr. Singer $1.2 million to help her get admitted. The student, who did not play soccer, was described as the co-captain of a prominent club soccer team in Southern California in order to be recruited for the Yale women’s soccer team. The coach of the Yale soccer team was bribed at least $400,000 to recruit the student.

Well, $400k …

“This girl will be a midfielder and attending Yale so she has to be very good,” Mr. Singer wrote in an email detailing instructions, adding that he would need “a soccer pic probably Asian girl.”

After the profile was created, Mr. Singer sent the fake profile to Rudolph Meredith, the head coach of the women’s soccer team at Yale, who then designated her as a recruit, even though he knew the student did not play competitive soccer, according to the complaint.

So then what? Does the coach announce that the player has a bad knee and will redshirt her freshman season, and then the player withdraws from sports as a sophomore but gets to stay at Yale?

A friend of mine got recruited to play football by an Ivy League college in the 1970s. He gave up college football after his freshman year, but they let him stay and get his degree.

In contrast, at big time football factories where they give out athletic scholarships, if you get cut from the football team, they usually revoke your scholarship so they can use it on somebody else more promising, and you are likely gone gone gone from the college.

Yale, being in the Ivy League, has no athletic scholarships, but it has generous financial aid tuition discounting for middle class parents. Presumably, these clients don’t need either, they just want to get their kids into Yale, cost be damned.

Anyway, a pattern to look for would be coaches who recruit athletes who never use scholarships because redshirt for a year and then quit sports. Scholarships are limited by the NCAA, so coaches presumably don’t want to hand them out to nonjocks in order to stay competitive and not get fired for losing. But if the Sailing Team is like the football team, well, you can redshirt a kid for a year. Does that count against scholarships, or is the assumption that the kid will use his 4 year scholarship over years 2 thru 5?

Anyway, the Ivy League doesn’t have scholarships, but they do give athletes big breaks on admissions, which is, why, say Harvard advanced to the second round of the NCAA basketball tournament a few years ago for the first time. Does any outside agency limit the number of jocks whom Harvard can accept with lower standards?

I knew a kid who got into Harvard because he’s roughly the size of LeBron James. The funny thing was that he didn’t really care about his sport all that much, he just worked really hard at his sport to get into Harvard. It was funny reading interviews with him in the Harvard Crimson because clearly the undergrad sportswriter cared a lot more about his sport than did the prize new recruit, who seemed like he just wanted to get back to his homework.

In its investigation, known internally as Operation Varsity Blues, the government focused on the role that it said the 33 indicted parents played in a scandal that also ensnared two standardized test administrators, a test proctor, and more than a dozen coaches at top schools including the University of Texas at Austin and the University of California.

Those parents were willing to pay between $15,000 and $75,000 per test, which went to college entrance exam administrators who helped their children cheat on them by giving them answers, correcting their work or even letting third parties falsely pose as their children and take the tests in their stead, according to the indictment.

I’ve been calling for a number of years for a prestigious National Commission to investigate all aspects of testing to make it more secure from cheating.

Mr. Singer instructed at least one parent, Mr. McGlashan, the partner at TPG, to claim that his son had learning disabilities in order to gain extended time for him to take his college entrance exam alone, over two days instead of one, according to court documents.

The government said that Mr. McGlashan’s son was told to take the exam at one of two test centers where Mr. Singer worked with test administrators who had been bribed to allow students to cheat — one in Houston and one in West Hollywood. And Mr. Singer told Mr. McGlashan to fabricate a reason, such as a wedding, for why their children would need to take the test in one of those locations. …

During the phone call, Mr. Singer told Mr. Caplan that nearly 800 other families had used what he called “side doors” to get their children into college. “What we do is we help the wealthiest families in the U.S. get their kids into school,” Mr. Singer said. “They want guarantees, they want this thing done.”

“There is a front door which means you get in on your own,” Mr. Singer told Mr. Caplan. “The back door is through institutional advancement, which is 10 times as much money. And I’ve created this side door in.”

I presume “institutional advancement” means writing a check directly to the college endowment. A friend told me around 2010 that he’d made some calls and found that “the Harvard number” to get an undistinguished but not flagrantly unsuitable child into Harvard College was $5 million. “Damn hedge fund guys ruin it for everybody,” he lamented about the high price of getting your child into Harvard the old fashioned way.

By the way, the legal way is tax-deductible.

So, the sales pitch here that you can bribe your way into H-Y-P-S for a few hundred thousand slipped to the right people rather than donate 10 times as much to the Endowment makes sense. (This firm set up a way for parents to deduct their payments.)

A question I had back in 2007 involved the very high returns on investment being achieved by the Yale and Harvard endowments, which seemed to raise questions (in my mind at least) about the Efficient Markets Hypothesis, which suggests you can’t beat the market in the long run without Inside Information. But who would be more likely to have their hands on some inside info than rich dads desperate to get their scions into Yale and Harvard?

Mr. Singer told Mr. Caplan that his daughter wouldn’t know that her standardized test scores had been faked.

“Nobody knows what happens,” Mr. Singer said, according to the transcript of the call. “She feels great about herself. She got a test a score, and now you’re actually capable for help getting into a school. Because the test score’s no longer an issue. Does that make sense?” …

Universities were quick to respond on Tuesday. According to the indictment, Stanford University’s head sailing coach, John Vandemoer, took financial contributions to the sailing program from an intermediary in exchange for agreeing to recommend two prospective students for admission.

From the Orange County Register:

USC fires associate AD Donna Heinel, legendary water polo coach Jovan Vavic in college admissions bribery scandal

By JOEY KAUFMAN | [email protected] | Orange County Register
PUBLISHED: March 12, 2019 at 1:55 pm |

USC fired senior associate athletic director Donna Heinel and legendary water polo coach Jovan Vavic after they were indicted in federal court earlier Tuesday as part of a nationwide college admissions bribery case.

Vavic, a 15-time national coach of the year, had led the women’s water polo team to a 19-0 start this season, and the Trojans were to face Hawaii in Honolulu on Saturday.

Okay, so a few things are starting to become clearer. Due to Title IX requiring equal numbers of male and female athletic openings, roughly speaking, American colleges have a vast oversupply of open spots in not very feminine sports like women’s water polo and even women’s basketball. So some top water polo coach like the big ex-Yugoslav water polo coach Vavic can bring in some cash on the side by admitting some girls who don’t play water polo to be on injured reserved while they pursue film studies or whatever, without it making the actual women’s water polo team notably less competitive. There are only X number of high school girls each year who care about water polo and are really good at it, and USC gets a bunch of them, so the USC coach can sell spots among his recruits and still go 19-0.

Heckuva job, Title IX!

Anyway, if American celebrities are concocting fake athletic careers for their kids, how much do you think we Americans can trust the college applications coming out of Guangdong? Just asking …

Unsilenced Science keeps track of SAT/ACT college admissions test scores by race:

The Asian scores (yellow line) have been pulling from everybody else for the last two decades.

Why?

Also, Native Americans’ test scores are in freefall. I hope that that’s just because being an American Indian isn’t cool anymore so bright Liz Warren types are going back to labeling themselves as white. Or it could be that Indians are collapsing.

 
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  1. Lori Loughlin’s daughter Olivia Jade Giannulli should have automatically been admitted to USC on the basis of prettiness. She would be an ornament to any campus in the land.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Robert E Lee
  2. It will be interesting to read the actual indictment. As usual from news reports it’s hard to tell exactly what laws were broken. It looks to me like Singer’s operation was the real crime. He paid off coaches and administrators at colleges and testing service to violate their duties to employers.

    So, funnily enough, the real victim here is probably Harvard. I’m highly confident it would be perfectly legal for them to straight-up sell places in the Freshman class (or, what the hell, even degrees). Of course there was probably knowledge with plausible deniability up above, especially given the “institutional advancement”, but that won’t prevent the proclamations of shock, outrage and disappointment.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  3. But if the Sailing Team is like the football team, well, you can redshirt a kid for a year. Does that count against scholarships, or is the assumption that the kid will use his 4 year scholarship over years 2 thru 5?

    If a player is on scholarship, he counts against the scholarship limit even if he redshirts. But Yale doesn’t give scholarships.

    And the player doesn’t have to red-shirt. He can quit right away.

    • Replies: @Anon
  4. Sounds like much ado about nothing. Unless having your father build a new teacher’s lounge is somehow different. Of course we all know the Clinton, Bush, and Obama spawn got into school based solely on ability and not who their fathers were.

    Oh No! Rich people used their money to help their kids. Life isn’t fair.

    • Agree: Bruce County
    • Replies: @Nathan
    , @Anon
    , @slumber_j
  5. Okay, that’s it. They’re both discredited. I will never again respect the Ivy League or college sports.

  6. Asian parents spend a fortune to get daughter into college, pretends to be a memeber of the Chinese National Developmental Soccer Team. What, no jobs in massage palors?

  7. Seems like you could also look for which Ivy programs were “recruiting” players with no other similar offers? Maybe sports like sailing aren’t quite the same league as football, but there are multiple sites that calculate the numbers of “stars” elite players have, and include all their “offers”

  8. I’m guessing they will frame this as how many pocs didn’t get in to Yale because of these entitled Beckys

    • Agree: Kylie
  9. Anonymous[388] • Disclaimer says:

    How much did your dad have to pay to get you into Rice, Sailer?

  10. As Steve notes, it’s SOP for schools to sell spots for donations.

    So what’s the legal theory here? I guess it must be that the any bribe money is supposed to go straight to the school as a donation, so the coaches were stealing bribe money that rightfully belonged to the school by taking their own piece of the action.

    It also seems pretty implausible that the schools could really be ignorant of “fake athletes.” Likewise, how could these kids not notice that they were recruited as athletes with high test scores when they know they never played sports and are dumb as rocks. Puhleeze.

    I am sure the schools themselves at least looked the other way, as this scam allowed them to get the kids of the rich and famous admitted (and without taking too much of a hit on their average SAT scores).

    Drain the academic swamp!

  11. Anon[205] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    As USC has seen its admissions process get tougher, it has become really difficult for pretty rich kids to get in. So there’s an unofficial quota for the scions of “old money.”

    The rich kids find USC to be overly competitive and nerdist. So they sort of just keep their distance from the rest of the student body.

    I’m not surprised Lori Loughlin’s daughter always used to diss USC and talk about how she would skip classes.

    Today’s USC is way different from what existed back in the 80s.

    • Replies: @Anon
  12. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Anyway, the Ivy League doesn’t have scholarships, but they do give athletes big breaks on admissions

    FWIW, athletic admits are almost the only way remaining for (goyische) white kids to get admitted to schools like Harvard, Yale, and Princeton.

  13. @Hypnotoad666

    Yup. Just read a “Letter to Alumni”. They’re shocked and saddened victims, fully cooperating, and do not “believe” any higher ups had knowledge.

  14. Anonymous[271] • Disclaimer says:

    Interesting that there are no accounts of Liz Warren-like race fraud yet to go along with Jock Fraud.

    Warren did not commit race fraud. She is in fact of American Indian descent.

    • LOL: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Pericles
  15. Anonymous[388] • Disclaimer says:

    I can’t wait for the movie! The quotes and antics in the indictment are golden. The kid who they planned to get in on a football scholarship but his high school didn’t have a football team. No problem, they made him a kicker and got a former NFL kicker to write a letter of recommendation who says the kid has a great leg. LMFAO!

  16. guest says:

    I don’t see why parents shouldn’t be able to buy their kids’ way into college. Everyone suspects the children of the rich and powerful anyway. And if universities lose prestige, all the better.

  17. guest says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “Drain the academic swamp!”

    The preferred slogan is: Storm the Campuses!

  18. TheJester says:

    I think this middling group among the one percent are being terribly exploited for what they did to get their children into elite schools … perhaps facing jail terms for doing what even wealthier people are continuing to do: bribe universities to accept their progeny.

    As one call-in to NPR said on the issue, “Paying $25 million to fund a building to get your child into a top school is okay … but evidently paying $15,000 to a coach to do the same is not.”

    I’m reminded that prosecutors typically track down and arrest men who pay $500 for a night with a prostitute, but, as a practical matter, ignore men paying $5,000 a night for their delights. It appears that power continues to defer to wealth … the more wealth the more deference. The same for drug transgressions.

    The people arrested in this investigation are guilty of not having enough money to do what their “betters” are doing. Kind of un-American I would say.

    Eureka! All of a sudden the reason that the Jewish lobby can violate Federal and local laws at will (with society being unable to do anything about) is exposed. It’s all about net worth trumping the rule of law. Universities are not the only ones facing this problem. It’s endemic throughout our society.

  19. The charges also underscored how college admissions have become so cutthroat and competitive…

    Because if you don’t crack into the elite, you drop down to the underclass, i.e., the bottom 75 or 80%.

    Must not be real competitive sports, if you can keep your coach job while recruiting nonathletes for your team.

    It’s not the sport, it’s the networking prospects!

    Interesting that there are no accounts of Liz Warren-like race fraud yet to go along with Jock Fraud. We’ll see if that develops…

    …and is subsequently covered up. It may have already happened; we just don’t know about it yet.

  20. Jessica Valenti Retweeted

  21. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    If core Americans would quit voting for Ivy Leaguers and attorneys for the House and Senate and elect some solid peckerwoods with state school backgrounds, a lot of this would go away.

    But Core America is not democracyworthy. They’re as bad as the negroes. In Kansas they sure as hell are anyway.

    • Agree: Kratoklastes
  22. trelane says:

    “legendary water polo coach” lol

  23. @onetwothree

    I will never again respect the Ivy League or college sports.

    Like I ever did. (Coulda’ gone too, but without enough money to get through – didn’t want anything to do with them as an 18 y/o either and Dad was not big on all the connections and power stuff – just an honest man.)

    All this Hollywood and Ivy League worship is just noise to me, but I do understand the undue influence that the people out of those places wield.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  24. MikeJa says:
    @Fabian Forge

    Reading through some of the phone transcripts, I felt bad for the parents. The Feds had a cooperating witness walking them through how he was going to scam the SAT and ACT tests. Sure it’s not a great look but without the Feds informer, I’m doubtful there’d have been a crime

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  25. @Hypnotoad666

    As Steve notes, it’s SOP for schools to sell spots for donations.

    This should draw a bright line through the blur that is the border between public and private institutions. Private schools would naturally have a lot more leeway. Church institutions, in particular, would be expected to favor their fellow congregants.

    In a free country, in general, the state would be strictly prohibited from discriminating, while the people and their private institutions could do whatever they wanted, short of fraud.

    • Replies: @Anon
  26. Tom-in-VA says:

    “Why Richard…it profits a man nothing to give his soul for the whole world…but for Wake Forest?”

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @Jack D
  27. So some top water polo coach like the big ex-Yugoslav Vavic can bring in some cash on the side by admitting some girls who don’t play water polo …

    In my day, we didn’t give people admission to college for freakin’ water polo. What’s so hard about it, unless you are deaf? “Marco.” “Polo.” It ain’t rocket surgery.

    • LOL: Old Prude, trelane
  28. @Buffalo Joe

    Indeed, the story probably would have had a much happier ending.

  29. JimB says:

    Ten years ago, professional college counselors were telling kids with Harvard aspirations to compete in fencing. Now it’s rowing. Neither sport requires much skill.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  30. @Buffalo Joe

    Asian parents spend a fortune to get daughter into college, pretends to be a memeber of the Chinese National Developmental Soccer Team. What, no jobs in massage parlors?

    Or nail salons?

    Or chamber orchestras?

  31. Wait. Aren’t these people somewhat mentally challenged and thus deserving of leniency and pity?

    In one example detailed in an indictment, the parents of a student applying to Yale paid Mr. Singer $1.2 million to help her get admitted.

    Wouldn’t it have been better to pay these bribes directly to the college of choice in the form of a donation of some sort?

  32. I think the reaction to this story will be interesting. There are two guys at National Review’s Corner that seem sincerely shocked that this is going on. I don’t know who, if anyone, should be charged with crimes for this, but I’m paying attention, so I know the ruling class places great value on these spots, and I know something about human nature, so I knew stuff like this was going on. It’s like those NR guys think our ruling class consists of people of fine character. “I ask these parents to step back and think about whether they are acting appropriately. Before going to extraordinary effort to take college slots that may rightfully belong to my child, they should consider whether they’re acting in the best interest of their children. Maybe they shouldn’t go to college.”

    On another topic, I think the rich people’s best defense may be entrapment. “I went to this guy, who turned out to be an agent of the government, to get legal help for my kid. I never would have gone along if he hadn’t sold me on the idea that this was common and acceptable. He told me that doctor’s evaluation wasn’t dishonest, and I have a doctor here who swears my kid does have ADHD.”

    • Replies: @Anon
  33. Nathan says:
    @Chris Mallory

    ” Unless having your father build a new teacher’s lounge is somehow different.”

    Yeah, the good old-fashioned type of cheating. None of this nouveau riche, middle-class B.S. At least that seems to be the problem everyone has with it – that the company behind the scam lied to the school, and thus deprived the actual oligarchs’ children their shots.

  34. @Achmed E. Newman

    …but I do understand the undue influence that the people out of those places wield.

    Yes, they do have your undues in a bunch.

  35. J.Ross says: • Website

    The Crisis of Authority is probably the most important and powerful undiscussed thing explaining 2016. The other side has been very active making the Crisis worse, betting everything on Trump being a fluke, censoring people who point out imperial nudity, buying their own movie tickets and newspaper subscriptions. What passes for our side has been doing a few good things very quietly and legally (Theranos, NXIVM, this). That’s good because after all the resolution of the Crisis of Authority should be the justified restoration of faith in institutions. The crazy dream version would involve attacking those corrupted non-profit organizations which enable insane billionaires to dictate course syllabi, news focus, and the boundaries of the discussable.
    This minor success might be the passive result of Trump straightening out priorities at the Department of Justice, or he may have been more aware. The nearer trophy in this fight is the Southern Poverty Law Center, which is nudgesold to low-information news consumers as a proper government department. Victory would be getting CultMarx out of academia or defanging the credibility of schools that tolerate it.
    But at least we have a rejoinder for the unexamined stereotype of the modern civil war being an intelligence test.
    You didn’t build that.

  36. Due to Title IX requiring equal numbers of male and female athletic openings, roughly speaking, American colleges have a vast oversupply of open spots in not very feminine sports like women’s water polo and even women’s basketball.

    I use to know a guy who was really involved in girls’ hockey. His daughters took it fairly seriously but I don’t think they were incredible athletes- just pretty good. He and his wife spent years of free time driving them to camps, tournaments, etc. over a multi-state area. Hockey, at least in the US, has become something that requires huge parental investment of both time and money for the kids to have a shot.

    This guy enjoyed the process, but also he told me that he was going to get paid back when his daughters went to college for free on athletic scholarships. He said that female goalies are in particular demand. Apparently if you bring her to all of the expensive goalie camps for years, and the girl is a decent athlete and fairly into it, you have a genuinely good shot of getting her a free ride.

    Didn’t keep up with the guy, but I do know that at least one of his daughters played on a serious college hockey team. So I think his prediction was at least partially fulfilled.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  37. gregor says:

    (((William Singer)))

    LOL

    I thought it was standard operating procedure for rich and well-connected people to more or less purchase slots. (Maybe not directly as that would be gauche, but in a wink, wink sort of way). So I don’t immediately see why you’d need a middle man like Singer rather than just paying the school directly. My guess is that cheating on tests and bribing the soccer coach can be done for a lot less than paying a straight bribe to the school. How much is it to straight up buy your way in? Seven figures? Yale is just mad that the slots were sold for too little and that they didn’t get their cut.

    • Replies: @Hail
    , @Shaq
  38. @Mr McKenna

    FWIW, athletic admits are almost the only way remaining for (goyische) white kids to get admitted to schools like Harvard, Yale, and Princeton.

    I wonder whether those matriculants would have been better off in a less anti-white university (if there is such a thing).

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  39. Nathan says:

    Hey, does anyone remember that thread a few weeks ago, when we were talking about test scores, and I stated that something had to be up with elite school admissions?

    Well…

    TOLD YOU SO!! Ha Ha! Told. You. So.

  40. Anon[205] • Disclaimer says:
    @ben tillman

    It’s pretty common for teams to let in walk-on players with high GPAs. They don’t actually play, but they boost the team GPA.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  41. @Hippopotamusdrome

    Rep. Tulsi Gabbard: “As a practicing Hindu I have been on the receiving end of Hinduphobia and bigoted attacks.”

    Those attacks have kept her from realizing her potential, and rising to become a Member of Congress, and running for President of the United States. Right?

    What kind of banana republic is this, anyway?

    • LOL: bomag
  42. There really is no end to human wickedness, but it is interesting that the reports are not really naming the university officials who accepted the bribes, who will surely be in a lot of hot water if it is found that they did not declare the bribes received on their forms 1040, even if accepting bribes and making false statements is not a terminal offense at their place of employment, which I am sure must be.

    • Replies: @Anon
  43. @guest

    I don’t see why parents shouldn’t be able to buy their kids’ way into college. Everyone suspects the children of the rich and powerful anyway. And if universities lose prestige, all the better.

    Oh come on. Transparency from Democrats and rich Republicans? Really? You clearly do not know the importance of Universities! Nor your own place as a mere American Citizen (and your standing is declining with each passing day).

  44. And for this, this Title IX crap, these bastards killed off more than 3/4ths of college wrestling programs.

    The story of the decline of college wrestling programs is a wound I bear with great pain.

    Why, I’d almost think it was a conspiracy against Midwestern/Pennsylvanian white meatheads, since that’s the traditional demographic for wrestlers.

    Recent Iowa Hawkeye wrestler Thomas Gilman, for example, helped Donald Trump campaign in Iowa. Gilman’s intro music was a Merle Haggard song, ‘Fightin’ Side of Me’

    Penn State wrestler Zain Retherford came on the mat to the dulcet tones of ‘Folsom Prison Blues.’ His father is a farmer. Not exactly Title IX material for the crazies who run colleges.

    I defy any sport short of college football to produce action like that in wrestling


    Anyone who would rather watch women’s basketball – let alone women’s water polo – than college wrestling is a God-hating loser who doesn’t belong in America.

    But, I don’t think it was a conspiracy. It was just stupidity and laziness. However, I guarantee all these lesbians and weirdos in the women’s side of athletic departments were more than happy to get rid of scholarships for honest-to-God All-American wrestlers. But don’t worry – we still have plenty of scholarship opportunities so John Calipari and other miscreants can recruit Nigerians to play hoops for one year!

  45. @guest

    One is reminded of the Catholic Church and it’s nefarious dealings with selling indulgences.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Bubba
    , @Anon
    , @Pericles
  46. I made the same point earlier on Twitter–by accepting bribes to put women on athletic teams, the coaches also opened up more slots for guys, because Title IX requirements make it much easier to to cut guys sports than drum up enough women for girls teams. So this must have been a godsend to the coaches–get paid jundreds of thousands of dollars for what they wanted anyway.

    I wonder if a college was the first one to go to the feds. Because as many have pointed out, colleges are legally allowed to accept bribes. But none of this money was going to the university–as Steve says, these were parents who could only pay hundreds of thousands, not millions.

    Moreover, colleges are very happy to accept fraudulent Chinese resumes, even though they don’t get the money directly–private schools just get cachet, not cash (publics are a different story).

    • Disagree: Tusk
    • Replies: @Tusk
    , @anonymous
  47. @Anonymous

    If core Americans would quit voting for Ivy Leaguers and attorneys for the House and Senate and elect some solid peckerwoods with state school backgrounds, a lot of this would go away.

    True.

    But Core America is not democracyworthy. They’re as bad as the negroes. In Kansas they sure as hell are anyway.

    Okay Private William Hudson, thanks for providing the winning strategy! Nobody but you could have led us out of the wilderness!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anon
  48. @Fabian Forge

    the real victim here is probably Harvard

    Yeah, it’s not like Harvard was in the news recently for discriminating against anyone.
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/affirmative-action-lawsuit-against-harvard-judge-s-hands-n971776

    • Replies: @Anon
  49. Lot says:

    Race fraud isn’t a thing in the USA. You are whatever race you claim to be as far as the US government is concerned.

    Foresighted young parents should pick a NAM race for their kid and stick to it consistently.

    This will both reduce racial disparity statistics and undermine affirmative action. Win win win!

  50. Dtbb says:

    Things like this and other scandals are why I laugh at my friends who say they prefer college over pro sports. They say the college players do it purely for the love of the game. College athletics is one of the most odious farces in this country. At least with pros you know it’s about greed.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  51. @Anon

    In Tom Wolfe’s “I Am Charlotte Simmons,” the college basketball team keeps 3 “swimmies” — tall white guys who look more like swimmers than basketball players — on the roster to boost GPA and graduation rates.

    • Replies: @atlantis_dweller
    , @Anon
  52. @Fictitious Handle

    Women’s golf team is another low-competition route to a scholarship. If your daughter can break 80 she can probably be on a golf team. Your son, however, needs to be break 70, which is hugely harder. Not that many guys like golf, but some do. Very few females like golf before, say, menopause.

  53. @Dtbb

    Most pro jocks making 8 figures love their sport. There was a funny story retired slugger Alex Rodriguez when he was dating the Wojcicki sister of 23andMe. Her female relatives complained that Alex was a terrible boyfriend because he watched baseball on TV eleven hours per day.

    My take: ARod loves baseball.

    • Replies: @ua2
    , @Bubba
  54. Kaz says:

    Population of US born asians is increasing.

    Many of those asians come from two highly intelligent working parents. The english part of the SAT/ACT is a not a barrier for US born asians so they’ll continue to pull away until that group stabilizes in population size.

    That’s my bullshit no research theory at least.

    • Replies: @SafeNow
  55. JimDandy says:

    Cool! So, I assume the next big revelation will be a gigantic MSM spotlight shining on the scandal Unz exposed in The Myth of Meritocracy. You know, the tribal networking that is responsible for the hugely disproportionate Ivy League admissions of a group that only makes up a tiny minority in America? That’s next, right? Right? Guys? Come on. Right?

  56. OT, but the NYT Magazine has published a massive article on crime in Baltimore that reads like a summary of Steve’s BLM/Ferguson Effect articles padded out with a little local color:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/magazine/baltimore-tragedy-crime.html

    It’s a colloboration with Pro Publica, authored by Alec MacGillis.

    • Replies: @Anon
  57. Anonymous[289] • Disclaimer says:

    Why is it a crime for private universities to give many different ways to be accepted there? BTW, big research universities are much more interested in elite professors and good graduate students. These sectors are much more meritocratic.

  58. I watch some SF Bay Area news mainly for weather but also, for amusement, to see how local media spin stories to fit The Narrative.

    I watched two Stanford students briefly questioned about this matter. I didn’t bother to listen. I guess they were shocked, shocked. The interesting part was that one was a girl with a Spanish last name and the other a black guy. There’s outrage at the rich paying bribes for this and that. How about some outrage at the form of political bribery called Affirmative Action?

    In other local news today, an illegal alien was nabbed for the murder in San Jose of a Nice White Lady.

  59. Back in the 1980s I read a book about the USSR by the New York Times’ Moscow correspondent. He said that Moscow University served as a pipeline to the nomenklatura and was very difficult to get into. However, there was a guy, supposedly a retired administrator, known to have pull with the admissions committee. For 1,000 rubles he would use his influence to get your child in. He sat all day on a certain bench in the park, where people could meet him. The great thing was, he offered a guarantee–if your child was not accepted, he’d return your money. Naturally, many parents availed themselves of his services and he was able to live comfortably.

    The scam was that he would actually do nothing for your child. He figured that any parent willing to invest 1,000 rubles in their child’s university education must have already seen to it that he or she was properly prepared and stood a good chance of getting in on their own. For that reason he got to keep a fair share of the money.

  60. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Lori Loughlin’s Full House character was named “Aunt Becky”. It was trending on Twitter today.

    There even was an episode where she cheats to get her kids into a prestigious preschool.

    https://www.usmagazine.com/entertainment/news/lori-loughlins-character-argued-about-preschool-scam-on-full-house/

  61. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I’m guessing they will frame this as how many pocs didn’t get in to Yale because of these entitled Beckys

    A black female CNN panelist was already doing that earlier today.

  62. mmack says:

    Steve,

    Thanks for covering this story. The minute I saw the first blurb pop up on my computer, and saw a more detailed entry at Instapundit.com, my first thought was this is right up Steve’s alley.

    I suppose I should be upset or furious about rich parents gaming the system to get their under qualified children into elite colleges, but I’m not. A few years ago there was a commotion about Chicago aldermen pulling strings to get under qualified students into magnet schools and colleges like U of I and U of Chicago. My wife’s uncle and I were talking about the stories and he was pretty upset that these kids got into U of I and his children didn’t. I asked him point blank how that was any different than giving scholarships to kids who can barely read or write but they can throw a basketball through a hoop or catch a football and run it in for a touchdown? He wasn’t happy but he saw my point.

    I’m disappointed in these people but I’m not so naive to be surprised. Praise credentials over real experience and intelligence and this is what you get. But hey, at least the Ivies didn’t admit Asian grinds who only study and cram and never do anything fun, amirite?

    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @JMcG
  63. @Harry Baldwin

    That’s a hilarious story; thanks much for posting it.

  64. Dr. X says:

    I’ve taught at low-level public colleges for twenty years. I’m completely fed up with it. There’s not a day that I go to work that I don’t wish I had been able to do something else. The probability that I will have a different job at this time next year — maybe even driving a truck — is extremely high.

    The entire system of higher education is completely corrupt, from top to bottom. Faculty and administrators who do absolutely nothing make six figures, while adjuncts making minimum wage with no benefits or job security do teaching overloads. People are hired not because of academic qualifications, but because they have dark skin, a vagina, or the correct politics — or because they’re Members of the Tribe. It’s nothing but wall-to-wall bullshit, subsidized by the government and 100% tax-free no matter how big the endowment is.

    I’m not surprised at all that rich white parents hired a guy named (((Singer))) to offer tens of thousands in bribes to get their kids into colleges that would have gladly admitted blacks and illegal aliens with IQs of 80 — or less. Nothing surprises me any more.

    Colleges aren’t about education. That’s a pretext. It’s all about the Benjamins, baby. I wouldn’t piss on a college if it were on fire.

    • Agree: densa
    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @njguy73
    , @Anonymous
  65. Tusk says:
    @education realist

    Apologies, I meant to click Agree and accidentally clicked Disagree (without knowing how to change it)

    • Replies: @res
  66. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    Ya got me there, i don’t know what “the winning strategy” is.

    Cucks are gonna cuck, and when half the electorate consists of cucks, Christian Zionists, ad defeatists and the other half consists of government and contractor employees, gibsmedat voters, and illegal steezers and cuckstain enthusiasts for same, we’re in trouble.

    That’s the electorate we have out here.

  67. Thomm says:

    A large part of the Asian advantage (which is rising, as per the chart) is the absence of single motherhood and divorce in those communities (so far).

    Among whites, single motherhood is 30%. Among blacks, almost 75%.

    The Asian advantage can largely be attributed to the low incidence of these pathologies in their communities.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  68. @Steve Sailer

    Your son, however, needs to be break 70, which is hugely harder

    No no no. Check out stroke averages of decent though not dominant D-1 college players, they’re typically around 75 or 76.

  69. Have your son declare that he is transgender on social media (the modern measure of reality) in the junior year of high school, but as a butch lesbian so that he can still wear a tux to prom with his date.

    Get the women’s sports scholarship of his choice on merit. Pay for the estrogen treatments, but then flush them down the toilet.

    After the first semester of college, your son “finds his true self again” and transitions back to male. Drop the women’s sport and pledge Sig Ep in the second semester.

  70. A WSJ reporter named Daniel Golden wrote a book on all the sort of shenanigans that go on with the children of VIPs and college admissions. A couple details I remember off the top of my head:

    -Brown had been trying to get the children of Hollywood types by relaxing admissions standards (i.e. Michael Ovitz, Dustin Hoffman, Susan Sarandon)

    -Jared Kushner’s father paid $2.5 million for both Jared and his brother to go to Harvard. He also donated a large amount of money to NYU for Jared to get a J.D.

    -Lauren Bush (GHWB’s granddaughter) was admitted to Princeton, even though she applied a month after the deadline.

    -Stephen Breyer’s son was a terrible student, but got into Stanford.

    -Bill Frist and Al Gore both had sons who attended DC prep schools and were terrible students who partied too much. But both sons got into their fathers respective alma maters (Princeton and Harvard).

    -The chairman of some congressional committee approved this $70 million dollar research contract for Princeton at the same time his daughter was applying. She was accepted.

    -He got the dean of admission for MIT to say he didn’t want too many asians because they were “textureless math grinds”. This is mentioned in The Myth of Meritocracy.

    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
  71. SafeNow says:
    @Kaz

    Agreed, the verbal SAT is no problem for US-born Asians. However, they are still not welcome at the Ivies. A young Asian-American I know with a 790 verbal SAT (+top grades, sports) was rejected by Yale. Why? Too decent, too genial; and, too much wiring and motivation.

    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    , @Olorin
  72. moshe says:

    I attended a lecture in NYU (within the past 4 years) where people were openly offering to write an article under your name for the New York Times in exchange for cash (the word they used was “coaching”).

    Of course it could have been a Trump Televangelist University sort of “coaching” but despite my “alpha-male-stuck-in-the-wrong-time-period” porro-lebowskian interest-length I actually took a few numbers and emails afterward from the nice suited fellow and the moderator lady.

    Oh, and prices.

    That’s the really cool thing. Things are so f*n good in the world that our politicians and other figures of power can be bought for pennies because for some reason…it just doesn’t matter! A mcDonalds chicken burger costs $1 ! You can get that much by asking a few strangers for 20 minutes. That aint much trouble compared to what a European King would have given for a McDonalds chicken burger a thousand years ago.

    Heck, what he would have given for Tomatoes!

    • Agree: Old Prude
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  73. Anon[399] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    At the center of the sweeping financial crime and fraud case was William Singer, the founder of a college preparatory business called the Edge College & Career Network, also known as The Key. Federal prosecutors did not charge any students or universities with wrongdoing.

    He can write a book: The Wolf of Ivy League.

    • Replies: @njguy73
  74. @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    Gabbard’s saying that to scare off attacks from the left that insinuate she has fascist pro-Hindu sympathies. But her offense-as-defense sounds weird because it implies Hindus are being attacked all over the US.

  75. anonymous[359] • Disclaimer says:
    @education realist

    There was a followup book, Reclaiming the Game, that was an in-depth analysis of college admissions regarding athletes. A separate article I came across stated that 20% of Ivy League admissions consists of recruited athletes.

    The whole admissions process is a farce. There is no vetting of information so there is every incentive to lie and cheat. The race baiters will have a field day today but there is plenty of evidence that black run schools engage in massive cheating whether it’s DC schools or this one.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/30/us/tm-landry-college-prep-black-students.html

    It’s time to just go to a lottery system.

  76. @Steve Sailer

    Our devotion to Wolfe’s work is the only cultural attitude we share, but a really right one I’d say.

  77. Anon[399] • Disclaimer says: • Website
    @Chris Mallory

    Sounds like much ado about nothing.

    Perhaps… still, the fish rots from the head.

    It all sounds very Greek to me. Greeks are notoriously and shamelessly corrupt… just like Southern Italians. Old Wasps weren’t without connections and pulling strings. How else did Bush II get into Yale business school? Still, they weren’t so shameless and brazen in their corruption.

    Some parents supplied “staged photographs of their children engaged in athletic activity,” according to the authorities; and Mr. Singer’s associates also photoshopped the faces of the applicants onto images of athletes found on the internet.

    You can’t make this stuff up.

  78. 1661er says:

    “Damn hedge fund guys ruin it for everybody,”

    William McGlashan, being a Managing Partner at TPG, is also a hedge fund guy but he wouldn’t pony up hedge fund level money. Or one had to wonder who bad his son’s real score is, if being a Yale/Stanford legacy, yet William McGlashan was willing to to pay $50k for him to get into USC?! Must would had cost an international airport level for Yale.

    And it looks like Singer had inside guy at USC football.
    https://www.marinij.com/2019/03/12/mill-valley-executive-named-in-college-bribery-scandal/

    McGlashan and an admissions fraudster also discussed creating a fake sports profile for the teen, allowing him to get into USC as a recruited athlete, authorities said. The consultant asked for a photo of the teen so it could be digitally grafted onto the face of a football kicker.

    A common themes beside sports was the fake disability claim that got the students taking the test with extended time alone, without other testers. And that help justified taking exam at special location. In McGlashan’s case

    According to the federal complaint, McGlashan used the service to get his son’s ACT exam scheduled at a “controlled” site in Southern California rather than at Marin Academy.

    A “proctor” was flown in from Tampa to administer the test and correct the bad answers later, giving the teen a score of 34 out of a possible 36, authorities allege.

    Learning disability accommodation had always been popular with rich upper class families. When I read this story, I had a flashback to an old episodes of Veronica Mars with the same abuse. ADA/IDEA/IDEAIA should be repealed to restore fairness and eliminate abuses.

    • Replies: @Anon
  79. anonymous[359] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr. X

    Yup, it’s the Liberal Academic Welfare State. I wish Trump would have taken them on by stopping the money, the federal student loans, which fueled this abomination.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  80. Bubba says:
    @Father O'Hara

    LOL and I’m calling B.S. on your PC nonsense! The Catholic Church in its maxime corruptionis was absolutely nothing compared to the indulgences paid by corporations and individuals to our rulers in governments throughout the world today.

  81. @Steve Sailer

    Women’s crew is HUGE niche sport. Relatively few programs, and fewer girls willing and able to grind out the incredibly arguous training and competition.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Brutusale
  82. anonymous[359] • Disclaimer says:
    @mmack

    There was a kid in my son’s high school class, son of a famous author, who was a druggie and didn’t get good grades. Ended up at Wesleyan instead of the low tier southern party school he thought he was going to end up at.

    My son is at U Chicago, legitimately got in based on his science research. He ran across a fellow student who needed change for the laundry machines. This person couldn’t calculate how many quarters were equal to $1.25.

  83. Hail says: • Website

    Surprised no one has so far commented on this line:

    Mr. Singer wrote in an email detailing instructions, adding that he would need “a soccer pic probably Asian girl.”

    This ungrammatical sentence leaves two possible interpretations:

    (1) “A soccer pic. Probably [for an] Asian girl.” Unlikely that he didn’t know the all-important race of the applicant he is helping scam into the Ivy League.

    (2) “A soccer pic, probably. Asian girl.” The applicant is an Asian girl and the fake sport they chose for her is tentatively soccer (“probably”).

    I am thinking (2) is a lot more likely. The applicant/scam beneficiary is Asian. Now:

    nearly 800 other families had used what he called “side doors” to get their children into college. “What we do is we help the wealthiest families in the U.S. get their kids into school,” Mr. Singer said.

    How many of these 800 families are Asian?

    My instinct is to guess that “most” may not be a bad bet; “A lot,” a sure bet. This is what they do. A time-honored tradition.

    (I am reminded of how John Derbyshire has asked repeatedly why in the world we allow Asian colonization of our higher education system at the expense of our own people.)

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  84. ua2 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I think arod loves baseball more than jeter to be honest. Arod strikes me as a guy who if he was just a league average player, would’ve gone into coaching afterwards.

    Jeter doesn’t strike me as being as big of a baseball nerd.

    • Agree: slumber_j
  85. njguy73 says:
    @Dr. X

    I’ve taught at low-level public colleges for twenty years. I’m completely fed up with it. There’s not a day that I go to work that I don’t wish I had been able to do something else. The probability that I will have a different job at this time next year — maybe even driving a truck — is extremely high.

    I hope you’re married to someone who has a job with medical, hospital, and prescription coverage.

    • Replies: @Dr. X
  86. Anon[216] • Disclaimer says:

    This very limited number of cheats will be used as evidence that standardized tests are biased and just track income (which has no correlation to intelligence anyway, they’ll say), and the number of universities dropping standardized tests will increase.

    The T.M Landry admissions cheating scandal, used to favor black kids, has already been memory-holed.

    As for Asians students, I have no opinion about whether anything’s going on or not.

    The “taking a test far from home because of a wedding” thing offers the SAT guys a pretty good way to catch cheating, I’d think. If there is more than one to a particular center, then that would raise a red flag. Even one such request could be a call for some sort of standardized boilerplate request for documentation, or maybe have someone call up dad or mom and ask for the URL of the online bridal registry — instant sphincter tightening!

    The biggest cheat is the very existence of affirmative action and racial preferencess, under whatever guise you present them. Imagine! Admintting someone whose SAT scores are way below average for the school! Call in the feds and send them all to the … oh, you’re talking “people of color,” never mind …

    Although this whole prosecution makes you wonder why this doesn’t fall into the category of “borderline illegal, but we’re not going to bother with it,” like subway turnstile jumping (but prosecuting turnstile jumping would have disparate impact), nevertheless, it’s also the sort of thing where a little legal attention can go a long way with deterrence. This is an “offender group” that does care about criminal charges. Having to plea to a criminal charge is not just part of growing up, as with other communities.

  87. Hail says: • Website
    @gregor

    (((William Singer)))

    How many of his clients were foreigners, like elite Chinese> Maybe even birth-tourism ‘citizens’ from wealthy families back in the motherland?

    This is that curious kind of story that gets held up as a vague implication of ‘White’/WASP wrongdoing but actually turns out to have few or none involved except as bit players or partly as dupes.

    Is there a full list of the names of the 33 indicted? What about the other 770 who used Singer’s services? The article only mentions four names, all of whom afaict are White-Christian.

  88. @Hypnotoad666

    Likewise, how could these kids not notice that they were recruited as athletes with high test scores when they know they never played sports and are dumb as rocks. Puhleeze.

    Maybe so. But these “children” have been raised that they are the best of the best of the best, from the best of the best of the best. You think they will let that go? Admitting to themselves that they are unabashed failures will be out of the question. It will be the professor’s fault, or a coach that doesn’t recognize their “ability”.

  89. @ua2

    ARod is a quite good baseball commentator on TV now.

    • Agree: Bubba, Dtbb
    • Replies: @anonymous
  90. Alice says:

    The indictment makes it clear this is more than not-rich-enough parents trying to buy their way in.

    The scam involved a lot of money not to the universities, but to individual coaches who cheated title ix, and a lot of money to folks who had found a way to cheat the SAT and ACT consistently. Want to have your kid get a 35 instead of a 23? Kaplan tutoring doesn’t cover that.

    But what’s most interesting is the feds got involved because the feds accidentally happened upon this. The FBI has been deeply involved in two college investigations: the fake-college-giving-out-student-visa scam, and the chinese-nationals-spies scam. While looking into one or both of those they happened across all the other things the Chinese and Indians do to fake their way in. It was so egregious, they couldn’t just ignore it.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  91. istevefan says:

    First, my main problem with this story is that it we are discussing it instead of the massive crisis at the border. I believe we are nearing a 15 year high on border crossers, and the migrants have learned that using a kid pretty much guarantees entry. Even Rush spent a lot of time on this today because he could point at Hollywood liberals and crow. But the real problem is what is happening on the border.

    Second,

    The coach of the Yale soccer team was bribed at least $400,000 to recruit the student.

    If you have $400K at your disposal, above and beyond what you are going to end up paying in tuition and room and board, why even send the kid to college in the first place? A person with wealth like that could set their kid up with a trust fund.

    Better yet they might use their influence to get their kid into some sort of internship with some firm or investment broker. I would have loved to have been taken in by some prudent investment advisors at a young age and shown the ropes. You don’t need a college degree to do this, and the real world money management education would help ensure you did not blow the trust fund.

    Also, if their kids were somewhat talented, why not hook them up with some programmers so they could literally ‘learn to code’?

    The point is adding $400K or more on top of the already outrageous cost of tuition does not seem to be a wise return on investment. Maybe if that gets you into Harvard. But USC and Georgetown aren’t in that league.

    • Agree: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @anonymous
  92. Just tuned in here. Haven’t read all the comments, but I found this interesting. From Douthat, no less.

    I think it’s probably true. When I went to college twenty years ago, professors were careful to remind us that it’s not necessarily the school a student went to, but the quality of the department (some famous schools had horrendous lib arts departments). But take, say, Megain McCain, an idiot. She graduated from Columbia. (AOC doesn’t count because she graduated from Boston U. a very overpriced, crap school for average intellects who want to say they went to school in Boston – my buddy was one of them.)

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  93. Shaq says:

    The Ivies use an Academic Index for an entire recruiting class. In rough terms, as long as the group average incoming GPA/SAT meets that index, all is well.

    Tommy Amaker at Harvard (2nd round NCAA) figured it out first – match the 3.2/1100 inner city kid with the major donor’s son’s 4.5/1600 nerdy white kid who will never play.

  94. Bubba says:
    @Steve Sailer

    That seems right, but his head sure wasn’t into playing baseball during clutch batting situations.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  95. @Harry Baldwin

    Absolutely! Football powerhouses like USC admit a large stock of pretty young white things like Olivia every year to help with recruiting black athletes and then keeping those athletes relatively pacified once on campus through freely flowing R&R. The fact this girl’s parents thought they needed to do anything special to get their hot daughter an R&R spot at USC is an even bigger sign of their childlike naivete than the dumb choice of scam they tried to pull to get that spot. Those silly whites 😉

    As a related aside, I think people here will be interested to learn there is a rather pronounced gender imbalance among white goys admitted to the Ivy League to ensure that Jewish men at those institutions have access to shiksas during their college years. It’s the only reason to admit any whites to the elite universities these days, really. The Jews are there because of power, the Asians because of brains, and the blacks and hispanics because of brawn. The whites are for entertainment. Now go cry about it haha!

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Bubba
  96. MBlanc46 says:

    Rules are for the little people. I thought that everyone knew that.

  97. @Anonymous

    If core Americans would quit voting for Ivy Leaguers and attorneys for the House and Senate and elect some solid peckerwoods with state school backgrounds, a lot of this would go away.

    Well, a Penn grad is a start. Like NYU, it’s private, but the name sounds like a state school’s. Rutgers and Temple, in contrast, are state schools which sound private.

    It is fascinating that the most conservative schools, or at the least leftist, tend to be state colleges below the flagship level. Socialism for the rich, capitalism from the poor. Or lower middle class. Right, Mrs Thatcher?

  98. Elli says:

    One easy way to fix cheating on the SATs: collect each section after completion. Or hand out different versions with same degree of difficulty. There are four sections, plus essay, plus experimental.

    Some of the students in my daughter’s school compare answers during the breaks and go back and change them. In my day, I never saw that, never heard of it.

    WASP virtues, honor, noblesse oblige, the dinosaur creed of my people.

  99. @Bubba

    That seems right, but his head sure wasn’t into playing baseball during clutch batting situations.

    In his retirement, Marv Throneberry told a reporter that he didn’t start paying attention to baseball until close to World Series time.

    The reporter wrote that many would have said that was his attitude during his career as well.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Bubba
  100. Key words:
    Jock Fraud
    Fake Grandmothers
    Gautelombian

    Plus, I’m thinking we need to keep track of all the neologisms.

  101. @Reg Cæsar

    Throneberry’s major-league career began as a pinch-runner for Eddie Robinson. Robinson is still with us!

    Robinson is the last living person to win the World Series with the Cleveland Indians, as well as the oldest living player to play on a World Series-winning team and the oldest living member of the Detroit Tigers, New York Yankees, and Washington Senators.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Robinson_(baseball)

    Oldest-living Yankee Eddie Robinson takes a New York bow

  102. Shaq says:
    @gregor

    Going rate to buy in is $10.

    Spending $1 for the side door is a calculated risk if your kid ain’t making it through the front door.

  103. Shaq says:
    @Steve Sailer

    My understanding is that women’s golf scholarships go unused at various schools. That said, a degree from said school might not be that compelling for an employer.

  104. * It’s difficult to understand how a racist like you can, in one breath, doubt children from Guandong, and yet praise Asians for their high SAT scores. Aren’t racists supposed to think the “Chinese race” is all smart, including its Guandong subset?

    * It’s hard to understand why you keep mentioning immigrants from Wahtevermala, or Pocahontas, when it’s plainly the case that the was a trick used mainly by feeble-minded native Whites.

    * It’s absurd to claim that “in my times” or “at basketball factories”, “things are / were different”. It’s like claiming that all US elections were honest, until 2016, when Putin decided to ruin them.

    * It’s unlikely that a coach has any pressure. Both college coaches and players are losers. If they were any good, they could be playing in China or wherever, and come back to US top leagues once they got over the age threshold. Football players could spend one year playing rugby, or Aussie rules, or whatnot. But the players are there for the college degree, not for sport excellence. If that is true, guess why the college coaches stick to colleges.
    ** How come ETH, Sorbonne, Tsinghua, or Karolinska don’t have sports-based admissions? I suspect that Frenchies don’t even play frisbee. Doesn’t that make them less smart than the Sailers of the US? Baceause in his time…

    * The whole discussion around “loss of scholarship” is pointless. Since more than half of Americans go to college, tuition is not a luxury item. It may sound expensive when you ignore the future financial gains, but IRL no one actually ignores them. If any of these kids lost their stipend, they can borrow from government-subsidized sources.

    • Replies: @adreadline
  105. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    I think VP Pence is university of Indiana Harris 10 th rate remedial Howard with a big step up to Hastings law. Pelosi is more powerful than Stanford Feinstein and she went to some tiny little frou-frou debutante girls college I don’t know if it even exists any more. Former radical Ca senator Boxer has a BA from ultimate prole Brooklyn college

  106. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @istevefan

    Have you read C. S. Lewis’s “The Inner Ring”? People crave exclusivity because they fear exclusion.

    These so-called “parents” live through their children and see themselves as just one or two sharp moves from breaking through to the elite. No one ever gets to the innermost circle, but college admission for the kid is next something to keep you a grinding salary man during his adolescence.

  107. @SafeNow

    Where was he eventually accepted?

  108. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous

    “I wish Trump would have …”

    would make a nice title for a blog.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  109. El Dato says:

    Some parents supplied “staged photographs of their children engaged in athletic activity,” according to the authorities”

    Finally a market for DeepFake images, generated by Generative Adversarial Neural Network, besides porn, politics and blackmail.

  110. @Aspiring Urban Planner

    Definitely worth reading:
    The Price of Admission: How America’s Ruling Class Buys Its Way into Elite Colleges–and Who Gets Left Outside the Gates https://www.amazon.com/dp/1400097975/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_CbiICbEM3RNMA

  111. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    So you’re still watching Home Run Derby?

    Boycott Ba$hball!

  112. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alice

    So it was those Chinese and Indians again, was it?

  113. El Dato says:

    Semi-OT but this is hilarious:

    Stuart White, PhD Theology and Theater (1980) writes:

    https://www.quora.com/What-kind-of-qualifications-are-required-to-get-into-HYPS-Harvard-Yale-Princeton-and-Stanford

    After a long list of improbable stuff his daughter excelled at, including becoming top thespian at local theater, lobbying (probably while reading books on differential equations in the lobby) and hooking up with senators and advocative Microsoft fogies to push STEM for females:

    And yet, even with all of this commitment to community, state and national development of computer science opportunity for K-12 students, she was still passed over by MIT and two Ivy League schools.

    I would wager that’s because at that point she was 40 years old.

  114. @MikeJa

    Yep. The instigator gets off once again.

  115. @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    What kind of banana republic is this, anyway?

    Going by our size and rigidity, I’d say we’re more of a plantain republic.

  116. @anonymous

    Have you read C. S. Lewis’s “The Inner Ring”? People crave exclusivity because they fear exclusion.

    ‘The Inner Ring’ is one of Lewis’s most brilliant essays, and that’s saying something.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  117. @Steve Sailer

    Very few females like golf before, say, menopause.

    “Mabel, what say we get a few holes in before menopause.”

    “Capital idea, Vanessa.”

  118. “…fabricate a reason, such as a wedding, for why their children would need to take the test is one of those locations.”

    Interesting. The version I read at USA Today differs slightly: “Parents were told to ‘fabricate a reason — such as a bar mitzvah or a wedding,’ that would explain why they needed to take the test elsewhere.”

    • Replies: @Jack D
  119. JMcG says:
    @mmack

    Ive been trying to settle my wife down all day. She’s madder than a wet hen about this whole scam. How can anyone be so naive as to be surprised by this

  120. JMcG says:
    @Thomm

    And cheating.

    • Replies: @Thomm
  121. @Dacian Julien Soros

    * It’s difficult to understand how a racist like you can, in one breath, doubt children from Guandong, and yet praise Asians for their high SAT scores. Aren’t racists supposed to think the “Chinese race” is all smart, including its Guandong subset?

    East Asians who are already in the United States are a distinct population, not the same as the Chinese who are still trying to get in the United States. East Asians, and the Chinese specifically, aren’t all 130+ IQ. One widely-shared estimate has the average IQ there as 105. China has 1.3 billion people. Guangdong alone has 100 million. If a tiny, minuscule percentage of Chinese families from Guangdong are dedicated in getting their kids in top American universities by fraudulent means, that’s likely already a lot of people (dozens of thousands) we’re talking about.

  122. Mr. Anon says:

    “There is a front door which means you get in on your own,” Mr. Singer told Mr. Caplan. “The back door is through institutional advancement, which is 10 times as much money. And I’ve created this side door in.”

    This guy Singer is a f**king hero. He’s just democratizing the process of bribing your kid’s way in.

    Good for him.

    Honestly, by now, anything that breeds distrust in and cynicism about Academia is a good thing.

    L.I.A.B.

    • Replies: @Ray Huffman
  123. Mr. Anon says:
    @anonymous

    “I wish Trump would have …”

    would make a nice title for a blog.

    Indeed.

  124. Thinker says:

    As much as I’m disgusted that these parents did what they did, I’m so glad they did it, because this whole thing makes a complete mockery out of the utterly corrupt holistic admissions system that our elite colleges are still shamelessly trying to defend.

    Jared Kushner’s convicted felon dad famously paid $5M to get his dim witted son into Harvard, and now he’s using that bought and paid for fake credential to destroy the country, courtesy of his even dumber FIL who bought his way into UPenn.

    The rich in this country are morally bankrupt and they have a symbiosis relationship with our elite institutions — they are either products of these elite schools or are actively participating in corrupting them through their progeny. Often both.

    The last 5 presidents of the US all went to elite colleges – Harvard, Yale, Columbia and UofP, and together they have destroyed the country to the point of no return.

    It’s time for parents of truly smart kids to wake up and realize that our elite colleges are corrupt institutions that cater to the children of the corrupt, with a few bones thrown to the black and brown horde to assuage their guilt, stop ruining their kids’ childhood making them do activities they have zero interest in just go get into these schools, and send them to their local flagship instead. Elite colleges are for suckers, and the morally bankrupt.

  125. El Dato says:
    @JimB

    Would MMA do it?

    And why rowing? Isn’t that a bit … British?

    OXFORD UNIVERSITY BOAT CLUB: OUBC was established in 1829 with the sole objective of winning The Boat Race. This annual event against Cambridge University is now one of the oldest sporting rivalries and the world’s most famous rowing race.

    • Replies: @GermanReader2
    , @slumber_j
  126. Mr. Anon says:
    @South Texas Guy

    But take, say, Megain McCain, an idiot. She graduated from Columbia.

    I believe her degree was the BADD

  127. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tom-in-VA

    “Why Richard…it profits a man nothing to give his soul for the whole world…but for Wake Forest?”

    Robert Bolt reference.

    +20 points.

  128. Thomm says:
    @JMcG

    And cheating.

    So you think Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin are Asian? I thought even you knew that much.

    I don’t think you can cheat through every single test, report, and project of K-12, college, and grad schools.

    WNs tend to memorize dumb one-liners, but they don’t carry water outside of sordid WN echo chambers.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  129. theMann says:

    If any prize is genuinely valuable, cheating is going to occur. And let’s face it, if you ain’t cheatin’ you ain’t tryin’.

    100% of the blame, and the shame, goes to the schools because

    1. They are too administratively bloated to catch any of this …or…
    2. They are in on it, and terminally corrupt.

    Same old same old though, whether grossly incompetent or willfully evil.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  130. ‘Lacrosse’ was concocted in the 1950s, complete with phony Indian backstory, to give ~8 spots a year at top flight units to the not-so-bright progeny of fringe elites.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  131. Steve: “Interesting that there are no accounts of Liz Warren-like race fraud yet to go along with Jock Fraud. We’ll see if that develops.”

    It already has:

    NYT: “[Singer] bribed college coaches, he said, to falsely certify that students had been recruited for the school’s sports teams. Prosecutors said he also falsified ethnicities and other biographical details in some cases, to take advantage of affirmative action.”

    Plus disability fraud was a big part of Singer’s M.O.

    • Agree: Triumph104
  132. njguy73 says:
    @Anon

    He can write a book: The Wolf of Ivy League.

    Yes, because montages of faking SAT scores and doctoring photographs will pack the multiplexes.

    Maybe if there’s a scene where Singer goes on a Quaalude bender before meeting a coach.

    Wait. Hold the phone.

    Have Tiffani Thiessen play Lori Loughlin in a scene where she panty-less-ly seduces Singer into forging something.

    Man, it’s hard work being this good.

  133. JMcG says:
    @Anthony Wayne

    With the gladly given help of John McPhee. Great writer, but a complete jock sniffer.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  134. JMcG says:
    @Thomm

    What happened to white trashionalist?

    • Replies: @Thomm
  135. Jack D says:
    @Tom-in-VA

    Wake Forest nowadays is better than you might imagine. It’s not a top 20 place but it’s in the next tier down with U. Michigan, Tufts, NYU, etc. Those places were no big deal in the past either but as admissions have gotten ridiculously hard at the top 10 schools, people who would have attended in the past have gotten pushed into the 11-19 ranked schools (Rice, Cornell, Notre Dame) and people who would have gotten into 11-19 type places have been pushed into places like Wake Forest and Tufts.

  136. Twinkie says:

    The Asian scores (yellow line) have been pulling from everybody else for the last two decades.

    Why?

    I suspect Asian immigration has become more cognitively selective over the past decade or two.

    By the way, when I first started to comment here years ago, I recall writing a lengthy comment about cheating (probably in response to Educational Realist’s hysterics about Asian cheating). I wrote that when I taught in college early in my career, I always caught a few students cheating every year, and they were overwhelmingly athletes.

    One of the reasons I grew rapidly disenchanted with academia (aside from the big reason, i.e. my political leanings being unacceptable to the powers-that-be in the department and being told tenure was unlikely) was that I was constantly pressured to go easy on the athletes, to forgive their cheating and to give them grades higher than warranted by their work.

    It was shocking to me, at the time, just how much athletics, even at academically elite universities, held sway over the administration. So I am not surprised at all that this segment of academia was discovered to have been involved in the latest higher education scandal.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  137. res says:
    @Tusk

    Just wait for the timer to expire then click Agree, It removes the earlier Disagree.

  138. Jack D says:
    @Alan Mercer

    Maybe they thought this would confuse the Asian parents:

    “Dear Mr. SAT, I asking for SAT of my son to take in Houston even though we living in Carifornia. We must be going Houston for bar mitzvah of son of husband #1 brother”

  139. So, the sales pitch here that you can bribe your way into H-Y-P-S for a few hundred thousand slipped to the right people rather than donate 10 times as much to the Endowment makes sense. (This firm set up a way for parents to deduct their payments.)

    “Rick, think of all the poor devils who can’t meet Renault’s price. I get it for them for half. Is that so… parasitic?” “I don’t mind a parasite. I object to a cut-rate one.”

    Funny thing is, in the good old days the truly Big Money was remarkably open about what they were doing. I recall an Ivy agreeing with a really-really-really-rich family, we’ll admit Junior but we require this nice new building, and it must be done by such-and-such a date. And it was. Fastest construction project you’ve ever seen. That building served thousands of students and faculty for many years. No faking Junior’s scores, either, everybody knew what they were getting.

    That’s the other thing, Noblesse Oblige was both reasonably transparent and it spread the benefits around, vs. Singer’s secretive cut-rate parasitism benefited nobody outside of the scam. One angle that NRx types may enjoy about this scandal is that it represents The New Class trying and failing to attain the same perks that were heretofore available only to Old Money.

  140. Anonymous[396] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie

    Has anyone ever done a decent study of the average IQ of Asian Americans? How much smarter are they than their cousins back in the Old World? Are northeast Asian Americans just as smart as south-Asian Americans? Smarter?

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  141. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @JMcG

    Several McPhee titles are on the list of must reads I have, particularly, The Curve of Binding Energy, La Place de la Concorde Suisse, and Uncommon Carriers<. All are short and readable.

  142. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Sounds apocryphal. Moscow State was not really a pipeline to the nomenklatura – just the best university in the country. One was not admitted to it the same way admissions work here. Instead, one had to apply to a specific school within the university – applied math, chemistry, physics, journalism, biology, philology, jurisprudence, etc, etc. Each school had its own unique set of four exams and the admissions were based on the top percentile of the total score from the exams + high school GPA. Corruption still existed but, as a rule, required a conspiracy and was pretty difficult to pull off.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  143. Anon[385] • Disclaimer says:
    @Robert E Lee

    USC is about a third white. That includes lots of Jews.

    Blacks and Hispanics at USC get in due to AA. Jews get in to USC due ethnic nepotism, as we see in the Ivy League schools. Asians get in on merit.

    If you’re a White gentile, USC is super tough to get into, especially since there’s no one tilting the scale for you.

    So the White gentiles there are generally really nerdy or academic. Not “hot” and “slutty.”

    The only exceptions would be the children of super wealthy donors and maybe college athletes. However, those groups are only a small percentage of admissions.

    If you want to hang out with attractive White party girls, skip USC and go to LSU.

  144. @El Dato

    Rowing is a great for female athletes, because universities field big teams in women’s sports in order to numerically offset the football team.

  145. The involvement of William H Macy is just perfect.

    Not only does it mirror his character’s hare-brained schemes in Fargo, but he’s also been shitting on working class whites for eight years in Shameless.

  146. FYI the full list of names indicted is available.

    https://www.justice.gov/usao-ma/pr/arrests-made-nationwide-college-admissions-scam-alleged-exam-cheating-athletic

    50 names so far. Only 1 Asian, Taiwanese shipping magnate, think he is the one who got the daughter into Yale. 3 Muslims, 2 of which appear Iranian. Everyone else looks white with a certain tribe likely over represented.

    Per the ring leader this method was the side door. Rather than bribing the schools directly via the back door, this method was 10x cheaper via targeting people directly making admissions decisions. Since the schools didn’t get their cut, so now it’s illegal.

    • Replies: @Anon
  147. @Mr. Anon

    This guy Singer is a f**king hero. He’s just democratizing the process of bribing your kid’s way in.

    Good for him.

    Yes, we’re moving toward the Mexican model of corruption where the benefits of bribery accrue to all member of society. I’m looking forward to the day when I’m stopped for some bullshit traffic infraction, trumped up only to generate revenue, and can cheat the state out of that lucre by offering the apprehending officer a mordida of pennies on the dollar.

    The structure of its corruption is one of the few ways in which Mexico is superior to the U.S.

    And I am dead serious about all this.

    “I hate purity, I hate goodness! I don’t want any virtue to exist anywhere. I want everyone to be corrupt to the bones.”–Winston Smith, 1984.

    • Agree: captflee
  148. El Dato says:
    @theMann

    1. They are too administratively bloated to catch any of this …or…

    And general disinterest in tackling horny questions or picking up
    phones?

    The rug on which this is built is wide and there is much space underneath.

    “Requiem for a Dream – Ivy League Edition”

  149. Twinkie says:
    @Anonymous

    Has anyone ever done a decent study of the average IQ of Asian Americans? How much smarter are they than their cousins back in the Old World?

    No formal study I am aware of, but PISA results show that East Asian-Americans do better than East Asians in East Asia.

    Are northeast Asian Americans just as smart as south-Asian Americans? Smarter?

    On average, Northeast Asians are considerably higher IQ than South Asians, but that may not be the case with immigrants in the U.S., because South Asian immigration is far more selective.

  150. It was only 2.5m in 1998.

    https://www.propublica.org/article/the-story-behind-jared-kushners-curious-acceptance-into-harvard

    “I would like to express my gratitude to Jared Kushner for reviving interest in my 2006 book, “The Price of Admission.” I have never met or spoken with him, and it’s rare in this life to find such a selfless benefactor. Of course, I doubt he became Donald Trump’s son-in-law and consigliere merely to boost my lagging sales, but still, I’m thankful.

    My book exposed a grubby secret of American higher education: that the rich buy their under-achieving children’s way into elite universities with massive, tax-deductible donations. It reported that New Jersey real estate developer Charles Kushner had pledged $2.5 million to Harvard University in 1998, not long before his son Jared was admitted to the prestigious Ivy League school. At the time, Harvard accepted about one of every nine applicants. (Nowadays, it only takes one out of twenty.)

    I also quoted administrators at Jared’s high school, who described him as a less than stellar student and expressed dismay at Harvard’s decision.”

  151. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Fabian Forge

    Ever heard of Harvard extension? They can’t join the alumni club but they can join the Harvard or Ivy League clubs in their towns Very popular with up and coming business people especially sales critters.

  152. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    I had a part time job at USC for a while. Gated locked parking lot got out of there by noon. Its very Asian Indian I saw very few Whites during the walk across campus. More blacks than UCLA

    Film school is gorgeous sandstone sort of Roman Greek McMansion style. I think Spielberg paid for most of it

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Anon
  153. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    So Tulsi Gabbard worships a statue of an elephant?

  154. @ua2

    I recall reading an account of Arod and Jeter’s friendship days, when Arod would stay with Jeter when he was in town to play the Yankees. When they got to the apartment, Arod was confused about why Jeter did not have the MLB network and would not watch baseball with him for the rest of the night.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  155. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    There are no truly private colleges.

    Once a college takes student loans or gets a federal state county or city grant for everything, gets FEMA money after tornado or earth quake takes any government money for any reason it is subject to all the affirmative action laws. In addition to tuition all colleges and universities scrabble and scrounge for government grants. They have departments whose sole job I writing grant applications.

    Because non profit foundations are tax exempt, a college that solicits and gets a grant from a non profit is subject to affirmative action even though the foundation isn’t government.

    Any private club that has a liquor license granted by the city is subject to affirmative action laws. Landlords who never took a dime of government money are subject to housing discrimination laws.

    Stores and restaurants are subject to anti discrimination laws.

    Private companies are subject to affirmative action laws.

  156. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rrrrrroger

    It does sound like entrapment. I absolutely can’t stand NR and it’s sanctimonious holier than thou pontifications.

  157. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    The only terminal offense for teachers at most colleges is not giving As to every black and Hispanic student. For non teachers it’s not getting hysterical at the latest hate hoax

  158. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Father O'Hara

    Do you know what those indulgences financed?

    Politically militarily the defense of Sicily and Italy from a serious effort by the Ottomans to conquer all of S and Central Italy including Venice and its large territory and later the navy that won the battle of Lepanto. Southern Italy was a country with its own Royal family and government,

    I don’t know why the papal army had to defend it from the Turks but that’s what happened. At the same time Hungary was in serious danger and the indulgence money sent to Rome was sent to the King of Hungary for the defense of Hungary from very serious ottoman threats.

    The indulgence money paid for the magnificent present St Peter’s Michelangelo’s Sistine chapel and St Peter’s square expansion of the Vatican library and museums. That’s how Michelangelo and the other great artists were paid for creating the great art architecture libraries and museums of us, the White European peoples of the world.

    Science, Galileo did his work not in his own, but the Vatican lobservstory the greatest in the world at the time . The indulgence money helped pay for the calendar in use all over the world today. It was way out of date, The revision was done in the greatest observatory of the day done by the greatest astronomers of the day the Vatican observatory and astronomers

    While the pope was fighting off the Turks revising the calendar and paying for great art an architecture expanding the library and museum the Protestants were reading the Jewish bible and wanking away at the sex and violence parts

    Armies and navies to fight off the Turks cost money. Libraries museums observatories art and architecture cost money Librarians museum acquisition workers artists astronomers designers architects and construction workers all need to be paid

    The indulgence money was well spent. Who cares what sky god and book of myths and fairy tales idiots read? Who cares what nonsense preachers of thousands of sects rant.

    I care about production, the result the achievements. The calendar we use today is accurate and will be good for another 800 years. The calendar is used all over the world and is a universal good for the benefit of the entire world.

    The calendar alone was worth the indulgence money.

    Not one Protestant church has an observatory, let alone one of the oldest and most highly respected in the world? What Protestant church has a halfway decent library let alone the the greatest in the world? What Protestant church has a museum let alone the greatest in the world? What Protestant church has preserved in its library 1,500 years of reports of affairs in every diocese in the world sent to a central authority monthly by every bishop?

    What American Protestant church has a comprehensive private education system of a grade school in every parish and numerous private high schools to shield its members from the Marxist horrors of the American public schools? Granted there are a few Protestant private schools but the numbers are tiny compared to the catholics

    Last the catholic hospital and health care system is the largest in the United States. The Jews, a mere 2 or 3 percent of the population have a few hospitals a large number compared to their small population.

    And how many hospitals do the Protestants have? A few pathetic St Luke’s scattered around, way, way, way fewer that the numbers of the Protestant population warrants. Too lazy to check, but the tiny population of Jews might support more hospitals than the large population of Protestants does.

    Enjoy the last few years of your book burning art and beauty destroying property confiscating closing orphanages reformation.

    • Replies: @Olorin
  159. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Louis Renault

    Harvard, isn’t that the Cambridge Mass hedge fund?

  160. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    It was a pretty good book. BUT

    A hillbilly redneck cracker prole White girl would never be admitted let alone get a scholarship to Duke even she discovered the cure for cancer for the high school science fair.

  161. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    And written as a commencement address. I wonder how many of the boys who heard it delivered were paying attention.

  162. Pericles says:
    @Anonymous

    Bribe cost big wampum, no good.

  163. Pericles says:
    @Father O'Hara

    One is reminded of the Catholic Church and it’s nefarious dealings with selling indulgences.

    Or just Jews in general.

  164. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Baltimore has beautiful beautiful
    architecture both residential commercial and public, small medium and large homes

    Another wonderful city destroyed by the Black Plague

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  165. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Wonderful! Accept bribes from maybe 400 parents a year maybe 50 kids get in that’s a good living

  166. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @1661er

    The whole discovery of autism and the rise in diagnoses of autism was rich White people trying to get their kids classified as entitled to affirmative action for the disabled.

    • Replies: @1661er
  167. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Interested Bystander

    Have you ever seen the thigh muscle development on rowers? Icky on men disgusting on women

  168. Brutusale says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson 3

    Other than the overtly white sports (hockey, crew), Ivy League athletes are seldom good enough for the teams at less anti-white universities.

    That said, Harvard fields more varsity teams than any other D1 uni. If I were a suspicious sort, I’d see that policy, with a surfeit of fringe sports, as a “legacy” admissions driver itself.

  169. Brutusale says:
    @Interested Bystander

    Additionally, as a guy whose natural inclination led him to “work” in the weight room at the fieldhouse while in school, I submit that the crew girls I knew were happy, healthy, and horny. And white.

  170. slumber_j says:
    @Fabian Forge

    So, funnily enough, the real victim here is probably Harvard.

    Check the linked article. I’m no apologist for Harvard, but unless I’m missing something, no: the real victim here is almost certainly not Harvard, as Harvard seems not to have been involved in this business at all.

  171. slumber_j says:
    @El Dato

    And why rowing? Isn’t that a bit … British?

    The Harvard and Yale crews date to the 1840s. So these schools have been rowing for a much longer time than they’ve been playing football for example, since football hadn’t yet been invented.

  172. slumber_j says:
    @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    The War on Wrestling is weird. Not only at the collegiate level, but what about when the IOC got rid of it ’cause I guess the wrestlers weren’t bribing the members with enough hookers & blow?

    It’s a great sport contested the world over, and it costs almost no money. Can’t have that, I guess.

    • Replies: @res
    , @Steve Sailer
  173. slumber_j says:
    @Chris Mallory

    Rich people used their money to help their kids.

    Well, clearly Harvard remains old-school in that regard at least:

    https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2018/10/18/day-three-harvard-admissions-trial/

  174. captflee says:

    Ray H.

    How could it be any other way, given who we have apparently imported?

    Corruption does have its charms, though. When dealing with the bureaucracy hereabouts to accomplish even the tiniest matter, endless wait times and rage inducing adherence to arcane procedure are the norm. Life was indeed simpler in the Big Sleazy, where a twenty, or the equivalent value in alcohol, would produce instantaneous results. All good, as long as you don’t ponder the big picture.

  175. @Hail

    We?

    The people allowing (sic) it don’t consider the rest of us their own people.

  176. This is in the news for one reason and one reason only:

    The students involved are smoking hot.

    Steve’s sudden interest in collegiate female pole-vaulting is probably only coincidentally playing into the same dynamic. (see Ricky Fowler’s new wife).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  177. res says:
    @slumber_j

    It’s a great sport contested the world over, and it costs almost no money. Can’t have that, I guess.

    Add to that list that it is one of the oldest Olympic events: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Olympic_Games#Events
    I hadn’t known that Pentathlon dated from the 708 BC Olympics as well.

    It is back though: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrestling_at_the_Summer_Olympics#Removal_and_reinstatement

    Here is an article about college wrestling: https://www.forbes.com/sites/kristidosh/2016/03/17/the-future-of-collegiate-wrestling-isnt-at-division-i-level

  178. MEH 0910 says:

    Finding Your Roots S05E02 Mystery Men

    • Replies: @danand
  179. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @Duke of Qin

    2 Iranians
    1 Egyptian
    1 Chinese from Taiwan
    1 Indian Subcon

  180. 1661er says:
    @Anon

    It can also be profitable for parents with the right skillsets. Out if the parents are not outright getting money for it, some are enticed by the networks of doctors/lawyers/etc. that entice them with “Medicare scooters” like marketing. That get stuff on other people’s money.
    http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/ex-mofo_partner_arrested_in_alleged_autism_fraud/

    A lawyer who until this year was a partner at Morrison & Foerster has been arrested on charges that he submitted almost $400,000 in fraudulent bills for the homeschooling of his autistic son.

    Intellectual property lawyer Jonathan Dickstein and his wife, marketing consultant Barclay Lynn, are free on bond, the San Francisco Chronicle reports.

    Prosecutors claim the couple created a dummy company, ostensibly to create treatment plans for their son, and used it to bill both the San Francisco school district and insurers for the same services. According to prosecutors, the company was not licensed to provide autism instruction, the story says.

  181. Olorin says:
    @SafeNow

    Why? Too decent, too genial; and, too much wiring and motivation.

    Mmmmm, I doubt it.

    More like “too Asian.”

    In any case that “genial decency” can be a mask for something quite different.

    You see, Asians are where your rank and file white SJW in college admin seems to be able to finally take the red pill on racial replacement and demographic war.

    Blacks and hispanics and jews are downtrodden minorities, so helping THEM is virtuous. But blacks and hispanics will never be smart enough to take over, jews will never be numerous enough…and if you point out the jewish lawyers behind blacks and hispanics against whites…well, that’s Hitler.

    Jewish SJWs in college admin never considered blacks and hispanics any real threat to their own power. More dolts to wrangle and use to get federal and state dolt-wrangling megabucks.

    But Asians–yikes, there’s two billion of them.

    I figured when the college admissions scam finally got wider attention, it would be in some form that burns white people first. The fact that jews in the Ivy League have long posed as other races–like hispanic, by virtue of, say, getting their kids born in a nation that will qualify them for hispanic AA–wasn’t ever going to get Noticed.

    Or called fraud. But honest payola for admissions without racial fraud does?

    Affirmative Action was always intended for this use. Not to help the poor downtrodden blacks and browns. But to mint new forms of advantage-to-be-taken. Racial currency.

    The sheer number of Asians that could qualify for AA is the bomb in the sub-basement.

    AA has always been payola for fraud. Often used on top of other kinds, as in the case of Ivy legacy undergrads who are from rich jewish families, but their parents got them born in hispanic-category countries, so they’d be hispanic forever. Thus the jewish element of the admissions strategy relies on ethnic nepotism, the legacy element relies on money/payola (“alumni donations”), and the AA element relies on birth tourism.

  182. Olorin says:

    Anyway, if American celebrities are concocting fake athletic careers for their kids, how much do you think we Americans can trust the college applications coming out of Guangdong?

    Hey, host–it’s all infotainment now.

  183. Olorin says:
    @Anon

    Do you know what those indulgences financed?

    Yes.

    The prostitution of the Christos among the humble faithful, and their terrorization (re: things eschatological) to build buildings holding pagan images of naked men, women, and children.

    Also war.

    And how many hospitals do the Protestants have?

    Oh good lord.

    Catholic hospitals are the Starbucks of health care. They aren’t in it for delivering health care to the masses any more than Starbucks is in it to sell coffee to the masses. They’re both real estate gentrification strategies.

    • Replies: @Anon
  184. danand says:
    @MEH 0910

    MEH 0910,

    Thanks for posting that segment. Felicity’s sure has an interesting biological legacy/history. Favorite “quip”, given what Felicity has just been accused of, is when she states “makes you feel somewhat legitimate”.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  185. Perplexed says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Conspiracy to commit tax fraud?

  186. a says:

    Elizabeth Holmes wasn’t recruited as a non-playing athlete but she supposedly was a poor student so her parents sent her to China for a summer because Stanford likes that sort of thing.

  187. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    The rich White kids keep their distance from the rest of the student body, as they have nothing in common. My guess is that’s why Lori Loughlin’s daughter had no interest in being apart of the USC campus.

    The nerdier White kids mix around freely with everybody.

    • Replies: @Anon
  188. Thea says:

    In the rest of the world “sports scholarship “ is considered a curiously American oxymoron.

    How exactly was this even supposed to work? Fudging exams and inflating grades can possibly be hidden but lack of participating in a sport for which one has a scholarship seems implausible.

  189. @moshe

    Andrew Ferguson(http://www.andrewfergusonbooks.com/) wrote Crazy U about getting his son into a good school. Spoiler alert: it worked. The kid got into U VA which has quotas for N Virginia.

  190. pontius says:

    The US college system always fascinated me, with the emphasis on getting into the right school, with the prestige associated with it. Other than the enhanced networking opportunities available at the Ivies, does the quality of the actual education received actually differ so much from one university to another? I can see how an extremely well endowed college with the latest in medical or computer gear might offer a better learning opportunity for those able to access it, but other than that, is a Harvard law grad so much better than one from a state school? Or a doctor or engineer for that matter?

    Throw in the whole Greek system and sports programs that many entire cities could not afford to fund and it all seems like an alternate universe sometimes. I quoted a business report from a professor at the State University of New York a few years ago to refute an argument about the Harley tariff of the 1980’s and the person discussing the subject with me basically dismissed it snarkily stating “Couldn’t you find a more prestigious school?” I found it quite odd.

  191. @Anon

    Baltimore has beautiful beautiful
    architecture both residential commercial and public, small medium and large homes …

    A lot of House of Cards was filmed in Baltimore because parts of it look like DC. Plus there was money thrown at the production.

  192. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Which is why it’s strange that USC students are stereotyped as rich White frat boys and sorority girls. The reality on the ground is quite different.

    The only White gentiles you’ll see at USC are those who were at the top of the class. The stereotypical White slacker surfer dude doesn’t go to these type of universities anymore.

  193. @Anonymous

    I’m retelling the story from memory and may have some specifics wrong. Unfortunately, I can’t remember the name of the book or the author.

  194. Bubba says:
    @Robert E Lee

    Football powerhouses like USC admit a large stock of pretty young white things like Olivia every year to help with recruiting black athletes and then keeping those athletes relatively pacified once on campus through freely flowing R&R.

    Yeah, Baylor tired that but they actually had alot of real rapes of white girls by their black football players (nothing like the PBFH Jackie Coakley fiction at UVA).

    http://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/24090683/baylor-university-settles-title-ix-lawsuit-which-gang-rape-8-football-players-was-alleged

  195. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Olorin

    Pagan idols, the Christos, we prods are so virtuous we spend so much time reading the Jewish bible we never bothered to establish hospitals.

    Biggest hospital and health care system in America entire separate private school system infinitely superior to the public schoools Protestants use.

    Where’s the Protestant observatory museums and libraries?

    • Replies: @Hank Yobo
  196. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    But they do have to walk around campus to go to class.

  197. Bubba says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    LOL and thanks for the wonderful memories! I never saw him play, but my older brother did and had an autographed bat from his days with the ’62 Mets (who still hold the record for most losses in a season).

    Marvelous Marv, a great man, who left us too early (as did his brother Faye)…

  198. Hank Yobo says:
    @Anon

    Where’s the Protestant observatory museums and libraries?

    The Royal Observatory at Greenwich comes to mind as does the British Museum. Both are products of a Protestant confessional state. The British Library is impressive enough as are libraries on the Ivy League campuses, a number of which were founded as Protestant seminaries.

  199. @Desiderius

    I’ve been writing about female pole vaulters along time. They are usually the daughters of athletic rich guys. Like in the movie “The Blind Side” about the rich couple where the dad was the top white basketball player in history of U. of Mississippi and his wife (played by Sandra Bullock in the movie) was head cheerleader. Their daughter went on to be win the state pole vaulting championship.

  200. @slumber_j

    Wrestling is a great sport to do, but it’s baffling to watch. I don’t know how to make it easier for casual watchers in the Olympics to make sense of the action.

  201. @william munny

    That’s a good story. ARod loves baseball!

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  202. Timmount says:

    My friend was an outstanding quarterback who lead his highschool team to the state finals. He was recruited to Yale for football. Although Yale gave no. scholarships for football every year he was instructed to go to a certain mansion at 10PM where he was handed money enough to pay for his tuition room and board.

  203. @Steve Sailer

    Just like his good bud Pete.

  204. MEH 0910 says:
    @danand

  205. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Men’s gymnastics teams died too. only a small handful left. But the loss of wrestling is even harder to understand since there’s almost no equipment needed (elite gymnastics practically needs fancy pits and such to train hard skills.)

  206. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr. X

    Get a CDL and drive a truck in the Permian. You can even get employers to pay it. It has boom and bust to it, but at least you are doing something interesting.

  207. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:

    1. I think it is interesting the several female students versus few male students (from stories so far). Have any of the MSM made this obvious observation?

    2. I find it hard to believe none of the children had any idea strings were pulled. For example when they tested at alternate centers and scores rose. Also, regardless of if they participated in the cheat, they should lose their spots if cheat tests were used for them (not on moral grounds, but just to show that cheated tests are not honored).

    3. Perhaps the drop in Indian test scores has to do with more willingness to take the test? In general our society has been pushing more and more college at more and more people. So perhaps there was an issue of apathy before (acting to concentrate better students)? Don’t think it was the Warren effect as the sort of strivers who would do that would be upper half and pull the distribution up. Bit f a mystery though.

    4. I have a few speculations on the Asian move up: improved English language of children here longer (“ABC”), H1B brain drain, cheating (offshore, more), as well as “rise of the Tiger Mother” (Asians were always smart and nerdy but the sort of intense preparation is something that has risen in the community)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  208. Anonymous[269] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    I also find it hard to believe that the student would be completely uninvolved in an application showing they were an athlete (wouldn’t you need to maintain the fraud later)? For that matter, don’t you have some responsibility for your application (like your bag at an airport)?

  209. @Harry Baldwin

    I remembered the book. It’s Russia: Broken Idols, Solemn Dreams by David Shipler.

  210. Yan Shen says:

    The Asian scores (yellow line) have been pulling from everybody else for the last two decades.

    Why?

    Since you’ve been asking this question for a while now, perhaps you could write an article attempting to decipher this phenomenon? I definitely think it’s something worth trying to get to the bottom of. My personal suspicion is that most of it can probably be explained by patterns of immigration post-2000. For instance I pointed out before that the Asian American population has skyrocketed since 2000.

    As Pew numbers show, the Asian American population has grown rapidly from around 11.8 million in 2000 to around 20.5 million in 2015, an increase of almost 73%.[19] By contrast, the non-Hispanic white population grew from around 194 million to 198 million over the same time period, an increase of only about 2%.

    I was too lazy to look up exact immigration numbers, but obviously most of that delta came from recent immigration. I believe around half of the Asian American increase post-2000 was attributable to Chinese and Indians, typically two of the highest achieving Asian American sub-groups. Furthermore, if you look at California Achievement Test data, they suggest that even certain Southeast Asian groups such as Vietnamese are probably decently self-selected relative to national IQ for the home population.

    Anecdotally all of this seems to align with the various stories in the media over the past 10-15 years about how elite STEM oriented high schools have becoming increasingly dominated by Asian American students, often from recent immigrant families. So surely the selective immigration hypothesis is more plausible than the assertion that somehow Asian Americans have figured out how to crack the test-prep system?

    If I’m remembering correctly, the recent 2016 changes to the SAT did seem to make it somewhat less g-loaded, but I was always of the impression that the old SAT was fairly g-loaded and relatively non-amenable to extensive prep, although the data did seem to suggest that the math section typically was more conducive to preparation than the verbal. Do you have data that suggests this impression is substantially false?

    In any case, it seems to me that selective immigration as an explanation for Asian American academic success surely is something that white nationalist types should embrace, since it obviously suggests that the true delta between the two groups if both were representative would be less than what it actually is.

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