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The New York Times comes up with a new line of attack for letting lots of violent criminals out of American prisons: in Rwanda, everybody’s favorite African dictator Paul Kagame has been letting out many of the countless Hutu perps in the 1994 genocide of Kagame’s Tutsis. (Actually, not many machete murderers were in prisons in the first place: Rwanda mostly put them in camps and had them farm for their food.) So don’t worry about letting out criminals in your country, it’s worked fine in Rwanda:

They Committed Genocide. Their Neighbors Welcomed Them Home.

Twenty-five years after they participated in one of the world’s most atrocious instances of mass violence, their experiences in Rwanda show that peace and reconciliation are possible.

By Hollie Nyseth Brehm and Laura C. Frizzell
Dr. Nyseth Brehm is an assistant professor and Ms. Frizzell is a graduate student at Ohio State University.

… What could explain such an unlikely, friendly welcome? Much of the answer lies in where many Rwandans place blame for the genocide. Sources like public school curriculums and government-run memorials paint a complex picture of the violence as rooted in Belgian colonial rule that exacerbated divisions between Hutu and Tutsi.

So, there’s no statute of limitations for blaming the white man, even though the Belgians gave Rwanda its independence 32 years before the 1994 genocide.

These sources also highlight the “bad governments”

I.e., Hutu governments. The Hutu are the majority in Rwanda so they elected a Hutu government after independence.

that discriminated against Tutsi and encouraged violence during the genocide. By placing blame on historical colonialism and governments, this dominant narrative removes some of the responsibility from the individuals who perpetrated the violence on the ground — especially the uneducated farmers who claim they were acting out of fear or were following orders. ….

There are lessons here for other nations as well, including the United States. The United States has the highest incarceration rate of any industrialized country in the world and despite recent advances, much of the stigma attached to a felony conviction remains. Our prevailing ethos of individualism means that we tend to place all of the blame for an individual’s crime squarely on their shoulders without questioning how powerful people and structures constrain the choices available to the least powerful people. To be clear, we do not suggest that people who commit crimes are blameless, or that the predominant narrative of the genocide in Rwanda is without fault. Instead, we highlight how emphasizing complex causes of violence humanizes perpetrators in meaningful ways.

From my 2003 review of “Hotel Rwanda:”

Unfortunately, the screenplay aims at self-absorbed white liberals who think all Africans look alike and that white racism is the root of all evil. The script even claims that it’s merely a white myth that Tutsis tend to be taller than Hutus, asserting that the Belgian imperialists arbitrarily assigned those identities to random Rwandans. Yet, soon the Hutu Power radio station is broadcasting the prearranged code to begin exterminating the Tutsis: “Cut down the tall trees.”

Rwanda’s true history is more instructive. The medium-height Bantu Hutu farmers arrived 2,000 years ago and drove the pygmoid hunter-gatherer Twa into the forests. Then, about the time of Cortez, the tall, slender Tutsi herdsmen invaded from the north and, according to Gary Brecher, the acerbic “War Nerd” columnist, “claimed all the land, on the legal basis that if you objected they’d kill you.”

The Tutsi rulers treated the Hutu peasantry with the same contempt the Norman lords display toward the Saxon yeomen in Sir Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe. Commenting on Rwanda’s “indigenous racism,” Congo-born sociologist Pierre L. van den Berghe reported that the Tutsis, like other aristocracies, saw themselves as “astute in political intrigue, born to command, refined, courageous, and cruel.”

The Tutsi ascendancy resembled the white pre-eminence in Latin America. Intermarriage was frequent, yet physical differences between the classes endured, just as they have in Mexico, where despite five centuries of intermarrying, the elite remains much taller and fairer than the masses. The trick is that Mexico’s most successful short, dark men often wed tall, blonde women and have more European-looking offspring, thus replenishing the caste system.

Likewise, in “Hotel Rwanda,” Cheadle’s ultra-competent Hutu executive is married to a Tutsi beauty who is taller and fairer than he is. (She’s played by Sophie Okonedo, whose mother is a Jewish Englishwoman.)

 
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  1. Methinks the subconscious intent is to let them out so they can kill us and take our land, à la South Africa.

    • Replies: @bomag
    , @Anon
  2. O

    ur prevailing ethos of individualism means that we tend to place all of the blame for an individual’s crime squarely on their shoulders without questioning how powerful people and structures constrain the choices available to the least powerful people.

    Cuz the one thing that criminals really need to hear more often is how nothing is their fault and they’re not responsible for anything ever. It’s the message of true freedom they’re being denied, and the burden of blame is destroying us all.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
  3. Off topic:Both Paul Krugman and Hillary Clint0n today have effectively called for a Civil War against Trump’s Native Born White American Working Class Voting Bl0c…….

  4. istevefan says:

    The United States has the highest incarceration rate of any industrialized country in the world

    The United States has the highest sub-saharan African population percentage of of any industrialized country in the world.

    • Replies: @Flip
    , @Art Deco
    , @Reg Cæsar
  5. Release violent felons into the estates, apartments, and neighborhoods of NYT subscribers. Then see if it’s considered a good idea.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Anon
  6. bucky says:

    Yes, it is odd how certain leftists are adamant about “combating stereotypes” about the Tutsi and Hutus. I think they do recognize the implications of recognizing the inherent tribal conflict: that these people may have their own agency and their own responsibility for their condition.

  7. Flip says:
    @istevefan

    Brazil is a better comparison than Europe.

    • Replies: @istevefan
  8. Art Deco says:
    @istevefan

    Real income levels in Brazil are similar to those of the U.S. in the 1940s. Plenty of industry.

  9. Coalition of the Fringes in Rwanda Unite Around the Belgian KKKrazy Glue

    But is it Wallonian KKKrazy Glue, or Flemish KKKrazy Glue? The Belgians aren’t united themselves.

    How about the Flemings adopting the Tutsi complaints, and the Walloons the Hutus?

    25 years ago I knew a bunch of foreign students, including a Rwandan Hutu man and a Burundian (mostly) Tutsi woman. They seemed like such friendly people. But an American friend of the woman confided that the Hutu guy, when the two were alone, told his neighbor, “We should have killed all of you!”

    I don’t know what happened to him, but she went into a nunnery.

  10. istevefan says:
    @Redneck farmer

    They are bitching about Trump suggesting that ICE should release illegals into their sanctuary cities. No way would they take the felons.

  11. istevefan says:
    @Flip

    Sure Brazil does have a higher percentage of SSA than the USA. Even though I am aware of their advanced aviation industry, Brazil just doesn’t come to my mind when discussing this issue because I see it as a comparison of first world nations with the USA being compared to EU nations, Japan, and a few others.

    But you are correct they are an industrial nation with a larger proportion of SSA than the USA. I noticed they have the third highest prison population behind the USA and China. I know they have a high murder rate, so I wonder if they just don’t have the budget to lock up more people. I imagine if they had our deep pockets, they would probably build more prisons and lock up more people given their high rates of crime.

  12. songbird says:

    I can understand why Rwandans blame Belgians – Belgium is far away and small, and it is politically expedient to externalize the blame.

    On the other hand, when white liberals blame Belgians, it is just plain hilarious. Implicit in the blame, is the idea that Africans will kill each other, like mindless robots, if white men tell them to.

  13. fish says:
    @istevefan

    No way would they take the felons.

    Think of it as tough love! If the deaths of a few NYT subscribers helps get Americas gyros spun back up then its totally worth it!

  14. @Reg Cæsar

    There is no such thing as a “nunnery.” If you mean that she took holy orders and joined a Catholic religious community in a convent, then say that.

    I thought at least people around here were aware of the dangers of language manipulation turning discourse into Wrestlemania.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    , @Logan
  15. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Nunnery is a figure of speech. Everyone knew what he meant, even you.

  16. There is no such thing as a “nunnery.” If you mean that she took holy orders and joined a Catholic religious community in a convent, then say that.

    Today is William Shakespeare’s birthday, so naturally I was drawn to his vivid term.

    And he was very likely a recusant “Papist” as well.

  17. @Jim Don Bob

    “Get thee to a nunnery!” — Hamlet to Ophelia

    • Replies: @Not Raul
  18. ATBOTL says:

    “The trick is that Mexico’s most successful short, dark men often wed tall, blonde women and have more European-looking offspring, thus replenishing the caste system.”

    Not really. Mexico’s current elite are mostly descended from men who were European immigrants who came in the late 1800’s or later. A shockingly high portion have non-Iberian names. Any dark skinned people in their blood line are indigenous and African women who had daughters with white men.

  19. I posted this elsewhere, but speaking of abolishing statute of limitations for white people, Harvard is being sued by Trayvon Martin’s lawyer, Benjamin Crump, for receiving a photograph of a slave 150 years ago.

    So they are being sued for something
    1. that wasn’t illegal at the time
    2. happened in the distant past.
    3. all victims are long dead as are their children
    4. in addition to not being illegal does not strike me as particularly immoral

  20. @Reg Cæsar

    Well, we all end up in the same place. No matter our complaints, the great equalizer awaits us 😉 I have this on good authority.

  21. Not Raul says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Considering that the Hutu gentleman would have killed her, she might have been better off following Macbeth than Hamlet.

  22. Anonymous[381] • Disclaimer says:

    You see, Germans, Poles, and Russians are the same people, but it was the Jewish ideology of communism that set them apart.

    You see, Japanese and Chinese were the same people, and the Japanese identity vs Chinese identity was purely an imperialist construct because the West used Japan against continental Asia.

  23. Mr. Sailer, have you read the 23 y/o book by Keith Richburg called Out of America? This black reporter from the Washington Post worked as a correspondent in Africa for 3 years. He pulls no punches in his assesment of the violent nature of the people of that continent, at least south of the Sahara + Ethiopia (basically the places with lots of black people).

    These were the years of the Operation “Restore Hope” in Somalia debacle, the Hutu/Tutsi genocide in Rwanda and other bouts of large-scale violence. However, the everyday violence and mayhem even in his safe (for Africa) headquarter city of Nairobi, Kenya caused Mr. Richburg to hate the place and disown the black African people, as a different people than those black people who (in the author’s opinion) were lucky their ancestors got sold into slavery.

    Then, Mr. Richburg high-tailed it to Asia, where he wouldn’t have to endure some of the grief that his people in America were still receiving, per his last blacked-out chapter.

    Peak Stupidity reviewed this book a coupla’ weeks back – Part 1 and Part 2.

    Oh, yeah, I still want to know: Did you read this one, Steve?

  24. @istevefan

    Progressives in princess palaces can’t even deal with market-rate apartment complexes, being built near their gated communities to relieve the housing crisis in CA, much less illegal aliens and felons. But when it comes to dissertation topics, those exotic, tribal rivalries from 8,000 miles away make PhD-level virtue-signaling topics.

  25. bomag says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    so they can kill us and take our land…

    …and promptly be forgiven; unlike Whitey, who must never be forgiven for the misbehavior of others.

  26. Yaka says:

    What is the National IQ of Rwanda? If we take my wild guess of 85, then their behavior as obedient man children who temporarily lapsed into “Lord of the Flies” mode seems to make sense, and would in fact, be predictable.

    It’s unfortunate that the early release of the genocider’s wasn’t pursuant on the agreement for them to be sterilized. Every little bit helps, when building a modern nation, with primitive tools.

  27. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    There are a lot of “us” in Rwanda?

    • Replies: @Anon
  28. J.Ross says: • Website

    There was a Belgian anon on a chan who laid out the case you never hear: the worst practices were native traditions or otherwise predated colonialism, and Belgians were pretty powerless to stop Africans from acting like Africans. The Belgians did hold international conferences to discuss what could be done.

  29. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Genocides are different from felons. I’m not saying it’s a good idea to release them, but the principle is different. We’d have to have locked up a fair fraction of the Kurds after the 20’s, for instance, if they were all to be considered as felons. After a civil war there has to be some sort of reconciliation, or things will just drag on forever. Though there also has to be punishment.

    Francoist Spain is a decent example of probably the optimal approach, though it still doesn’t keep leftists from holding a grudge 80 years later.

  30. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Failed edit: did you mean Tutsis?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  31. But it’s not unreasonable for Kagame to ‘blame the Belgians’ in order to foster a national myth and Hutu-Tutsi solidarity, even if it is only 33% true. In many ways Kagame is the epitome of the kind of ruler many on this site should / could get behind: a disciplined, severe, (sort of) civic nationalist with little patience for liberal human rights and a Machiavelian history of behavior, but with a long term plan for genuinely national development.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  32. Corvinus says:

    “So, there’s no statute of limitations for blaming the white man, even though the Belgians gave Rwanda its independence 32 years before the 1994 genocide.”

    Of course, our resident NOTICER neglected to offer the proper context here. Perhaps he has been hitting the links too much lately rather than the books.

    Start at 3:05, especially from 5:10 to 6:21, and end at 6:35. Pay close attention.

    More than 50 new nations were born in Africa during the great liberation in the 1950’s and 1960’s. Throughout the continent, Africans had high hopes for the future. People looked forward to rapid political and economic development. After decades of colonial rule, Africans were again in control of their destinies. But as with any new country, problems arose. A pattern developed:

    1) widespread economic disappointment that discredited initial democracies;
    2) the formation of political parties based on ethnic or religious loyalty;
    3) rival ethnic groups jockeying for position and power;
    4) political instability heightened by ethnic strife and civil war;
    5) the emergence of strict one-party rule or military dictatorship;
    6) a lack of an educated electorate and a middle class to counter authoritarian rule;
    7) trade deficits, poverty, and famine due to continued economic dependence on the West, with loans to modernize squandered by corrupt officials.

    This pattern is other than unique–Europe underwent a similar transformation in the 1300, 1400, and 1500’s as nation-states were forged.

    Scholars trace Africa’s recent problems to the colonial experience. Western imperialism had a complex and contradictory impact on Africa. Colonial rulers built roads, railroads, harbors, and cities. The new forms of transportation were meant to make the colonies profitable by linking cash crop plantations and mining operations to ports. For the majority of Africans, who were subsistence farmers, there was scant benefit from these facilities. To pay for expensive development projects, African nations exported minerals and agricultural goods to the industrial world; profits used to buy Western clothing, electronics, and automobiles.

    During the colonial period, Europeans undermined Africa’s traditional political systems. Even when they left African rulers in place, they dictated laws and told Africans how to govern. White officials shared the racial views of their day. They saw Africans as children who needed guidance, overlooking the fact that Africans had ruled themselves for centuries. Imagine that–Africans had been free! Europeans denied educated Africans top jobs in colonial governments. Suddenly, at independence, colonial powers expected African leaders to transform authoritarian colonies into democratic nations. African continental and regional stability today remains an ongoing process.

    Invade the world, invite the world. Ain’t life grand?

    “Commenting on Rwanda’s “indigenous racism,” Congo-born sociologist Pierre L. van den Berghe reported that the Tutsis, like other aristocracies, saw themselves as “astute in political intrigue, born to command, refined, courageous, and cruel.””

    Again, context is key. There always has been ethnic tension between the majority Hutus and minority Tutsis. Because cattle (tended by the Tutsis) were more valuable than crops (grown by the Hutus), the minority Tutsis indeed did become the local elite. The animosity between them, however, was heightened by the colonial powers. The Belgium government, who assumed control of the Congo from Germany in 1917, required identity cards that classified people according to their ethnicity. The Belgians made the decision to consider the Tutsis to be superior to the Hutus. Not surprisingly, the Tutsis welcomed this idea, and for the next 20 years they received better employment and educational opportunities and were offered positions as minor government officials. The Belgium government granted the Tutsis these “privileges” as a “token of their appreciation” for helping to “maintain proper order”.

    In fact, German and Belgian rule had made the dividing lines between the groups sharper. This “divide and conquer” strategy meant open support for the Tutsi monarchy and requiring all local chiefs be Tutsis, turning the Tutsis into symbols of colonial rule for the Hutu majority. No doubt that this turn of events only alienated the Hutus, which led to efforts to gain control of the government once the benevolent Europeans, after siphoning off their fair share of gimmedats and free stuff, granted the Congo their independence post-World War II.

    Invade the world, invite the world. Ain’t life grand?

  33. @Jim Don Bob

    Lots of things are figures of speech, but, being rather pungent, we agree not to use them in polite discourse. Would you like me to cite hundreds of them?

    “Nunnery” is a deliberate ideological insult, a profanation of the devoted lives of millions of Catholic women who, over many centuries, have devoted themselves to the service of Our Lord.

    Now stop being such a punk. –Heeeey, whaddaya know, that’s a figure of speech, too!

    And I bet you know what it means.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @David
  34. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Corvinus

    Whenever I hear “scholars” or “experts” without specifics, I think of the Russia House (“I do not trust such ‘experts.’”) or this:

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Corvinus
  35. @Reg Cæsar

    Shakespeare, being a man of genius, was full of vivid terms. Such as “liver of blaspheming Jew”… but in courtesy, we decline to throw them around in casual conversation.

    A thought experiment: turn off the moderation here for 24 hours, and discover with keen amazement my own dexterity with marvelous and sundry “vivid terms”.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  36. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Africa’s recent problems … on Africa … majority of Africans … African nations … Africa’s political systems

    Only an anti-African bigot would suggest all African countries suffer from the same problems.

    Europeans denied educated Africans top jobs in colonial governments.

    Yes, that’s one thing you can’t fault Tippu Tip for doing. What a pity!

  37. Lot says:

    The Tutsi may forgive the Hutu for the 1990s genocide thing, but they can never forgive the 1960s cultural appropriation and moral genocide of the Watusi craze. White Americans made trillions of dollars from this stolen dance, and the legacy of this genocide-theft has persisted for generations.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  38. Lot says:
    @J.Ross

    Wow that is one really smart rabbit, does he have a podcast?

    • Replies: @Tom-in-VA
  39. @Oleaginous Outrager

    A moral system that excuses mass murder is undoutedly helpful if your objective is making up with the killers after-the-fact.

    In terms of preventing the next genocide, however, it’s not helpful.

  40. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “liver of blaspheming Jew”

    Not kosher. But goes down well with fava beans and Chianti.

    https://bloody-disgusting.com/news/3330025/hilarious-silence-lambs-joke-missed/

  41. we tend to place all of the blame for an individual’s crime squarely on their shoulders

    Is this just sloppy writing, or is it now the rule to pluralize all third person pronouns as “they” or “their” in order to avoid “he/she” or “his/her?”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  42. @istevefan

    The United States has the highest incarceration rate of any industrialized country in the world

    The United States has the highest sub-saharan African population percentage of of any industrialized country in the world.

    Don’t be fooled. They use industrialized as a euphemism for white.

    South Africa and Brazil are also industrialized. Both have more homicides in absolute terms, not just per capita, than the US.

  43. @Hypnotoad666

    Is this just sloppy writing, or is it now the rule

    Both.

  44. These sources also highlight the “bad governments”

    I.e., Hutu governments.

    Now, now. The Tutsi government of Burundi massacred a quarter million Hutus in 1972.

    They have agency, too. Perhaps more. Though not as much as Belgians, who make great waffles and sprouts.

  45. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I donate to two organizations. Vdare.com (and hence Steve) and this nunnery:

    https://www.sistersofmary.org

    I suppose my Chief Wahoo hat offends you, too.

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
  46. Ibound1 says:

    The NAACP should name Dylan Roof as its President. The Pittsburgh synagogue killer should be named ambassador to Israel. Because of Reconstruction or King Leopold or something. Did I get that right?

  47. Sure, let’s follow the model set by a sh!thole country and set them all free to spread the love.

  48. duncsbaby says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I find it offensive that someone from the twin cities has a Chief Wahoo cap.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  49. despite recent advances, much of the stigma attached to a felony conviction remains”

    It’s a shame the NYT doesn’t unpack that a little more – what are these ‘recent advances’ which mean that felonies attract less stigma?

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  50. Bill B. says:

    I read somewhere that when the British could see that their days in a particular colony were numbered they took care to lock up the better types of anti-colonialist to help burnish their ‘rebel’ CVs.

    I would struggle to find the reference. The British did have a history of locking up people they at least half-admired.

    Of course they did not anticipate that the mass migration of the future would have the lets-all-hate-whitey sentiment following them back home.

  51. Pericles says:

    So in 25 years the Tutsis could forgive the Hutus their genocide. How about that, African-Americans? (And, ahem, others.)

  52. nebulafox says:
    @blank-misgivings

    Agreed. Every interview I’ve read featuring the man leads me to conclude that Paul Kagame is way too intelligent to buy this in private. But he’s got two pretty big political incentives that we have to keep in mind:

    1) To make sure the Hutus don’t remember some of the vengeance his bush guerillas took as they hunted down the perpetrators of the genocide across the Congolese border. They are the overwhelming numerical majority of the country. Rwanda has gone through a ridiculous amount of genuine progress under his tenure. If officially blaming the Europeans is a good way of ensuring that tribal hatreds remain dead, or at least quiet, then so be it. Singapore-one of his role models-too had to go through some massive official whitewashing about how different ethnic groups really felt about each other after the riots. If they didn’t, where would they be today?

    2) To instantly shut up any white liberal who wants to whine about human rights or violating Congolese national sovereignty and possibly muck up his plans to turn Rwanda into an African version of the Asian Tigers. That, and-entirely correctly-bringing up that he was the one who stopped the genocide, not the West. I think Kagame has a good idea of how easy it is to manipulate them emotionally.

  53. nebulafox says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I’m rather liberal on this issue, both on a personal level and a pragmatic one. Once the debt to society has been paid, it is in society’s interests for the former criminal to be reintegrated as soon as possible. If you don’t allow them to get a normal job and move on with or rebuild their life, they’ll go back to crime. This is part of why the War on Drugs has been so deleterious.

    As it turns out, this is useful for immigration restrictionists to bring up. If you tighten the labor market with less immigration, employers can’t be as spoiled as they are today. They might have to give Americans with less than perfect records another chance. We have enough problems coming up for employing lower-skilled citizens with the kinds of automation already here and coming. We don’t need to exacerbate the problem.

    (Of course, there are a fair chunk of men in the prison system who will not figure out a criminal life is not worth it and will immediately reoffend no matter what you offer them. Such men-and they are nearly always men-are called “psychopaths” or “predators”, and cannot be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with: they just need to be locked up for everybody’s protection. But if you are a long-time policeman, you get good at telling who ticks off the warning signs here and who is just a scared little punk who did something really, really stupid: which leads to interesting conversations about which Swamp Creatures on TV are higher-functioning cousins of the former.)

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  54. @Anon

    Sorry, I forgot what 99.9% of the article was about, because I was thinking about what is happening to White farmers Right Now in South Africa — and what happens to White communities in America when the US federal government gets involved.

  55. Brutusale says:
    @istevefan

    Make the enemy live up to its own book of rules.–Saul Alinsky, Rules for Radicals

  56. Corvinus says:
    @J.Ross

    How about specifically addressing the points I presented. Can you muster up an actual counter argument?

    • Replies: @Lot
  57. Tom-in-VA says:
    @Lot

    Zhe is a leadings scholar of “foxness studies,” i.e. the study of animals who think they are foxes.

  58. The claim that the Belgians “exacerbated” tensions between Tutsis and Hutus has the advantage of being completely unfalsifiable. It’s possible that relations were worse because of the Belgian occupation. Maybe they were better. There’s no clear statistical data that could tell us either way.

    The most plausible blame that could be directed at the Belgians is that by keeping a lid on the tribal tensions, and preventing the inevitable minor outbreaks of violence where the Hutu polloi would revolt and either get concessions from the Tutsi aristocracy or be forcibly reminded of their place, they allowed these tensions to simmer and ultimately explode when they left and put the former aristocracy suddenly on equal ground with their former subjects.

  59. @Corvinus

    Tiresome, ill-informed hack on everything else; expert on East African genocide.

    Clooney, is that you?

    Loved your dad and aunt growing up.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  60. @duncsbaby

    I find it offensive that someone from the twin cities has a Chief Wahoo cap.

    I found it offensive that Twins and Vikings fans could whine so much more than Cubs and Red Sox ones. So you blew the Big Game after tearing your league apart all season– we’re supposed to feel sorry for you?

    Buffalo, maybe. But not Minnesota or Denver. No way.

  61. @Corvinus

    2) the formation of political parties based on ethnic or religious loyalty;
    3) rival ethnic groups jockeying for position and power;
    4) political instability heightened by ethnic strife and civil war;

    Cf. Lee Kwan Yew.

  62. Logan says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Somebody better let Bill Shakespeare know.

  63. Corvinus says:
    @Desiderius

    “Tiresome, ill-informed hack on everything else; expert on East African genocide. Clooney, is that you? Loved your dad and aunt growing up.”

    Try for once to actually address my position with counter arguments. I thought that as an allegedly high IQ white man you would have that capability. Looks like the joke is on you.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  64. @Corvinus

    The colonial period in Africa was briefer than you might think. Apart from some truly old colonies (mainly the Portuguese ones) the colonial period started in the 1870s, didn’t fully consolidate until 1914, and ended in the 1960s.

    Belgian rule in Rwanda, which you imagine to have been so decisive, lasted just 40 years — 1922-1962. Rwanda has now been independent longer than it was a Belgian colony. In the coming years, more and more of Africa’s countries will reach the point where they’ve been independent as long as they were a colony. As these milestones are reached, and passed, blaming long-ago colonizers for today’s problems will seem more and more dubious.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Corvinus
  65. As these milestones are reached, and passed, blaming long-ago colonizers for today’s problems will seem more and more dubious.

    Do you think that will shut them up about it, IJ? Who will shut them up finally will be the Chinese, if my hopes aren’t dashed. Go for it, China, and Godspeed!

  66. Art Deco says:
    @International Jew

    Briefer than that.

    You had factory colonies (trading centers) on the coast prior to 1885. Colonial authority was confined to spots on the coast except in the subtropical and temperate zones in the far south. The Congress of Berlin and contemporaneous understandings divvied up the continent between European powers. It wasn’t until about a decade later that France and Britain began to put officials in place to exert actual authority. The European presence in the Congo was felt a few years earlier (via a multi-national force working for a private company).

  67. @nebulafox

    I don’t think anyone with any sense argues that a felony conviction should take you out of employment. The sentence should be the punishment (though in the UK, sentences are ridiculously light, unless you are white and “a racist”).

    But a lot of people are convinced that having the wrong thoughts (like James Damore) should take you out of employment.

  68. Corvinus says:
    @International Jew

    “The colonial period in Africa was briefer than you might think. Apart from some truly old colonies (mainly the Portuguese ones) the colonial period started in the 1870s, didn’t fully consolidate until 1914, and ended in the 1960s.”

    But the colonial period overall for Europe spans hundreds of years, from the 1500 and 1600’s, as the Americas were colonized. The colonial period in India and Asia began in the early and mid-1800’s. Regardless of the start time, the end result was clear.

    “Belgian rule in Rwanda, which you imagine to have been so decisive, lasted just 40 years — 1922-1962.”

    Yet their presence in that region began in 1885. Again, the end result was clear.

    “As these milestones are reached, and passed, blaming long-ago colonizers for today’s problems will seem more and more dubious.”

    Why don’t you explain how and why it is “dubious”, or even try to refute my position in part or in whole?

  69. David says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Can you name a reputable dictionary that says “nunnery” is derogatory? I can’t.

  70. Roger Scruton got fired just 5 hours after a lefty journo tweeted parts of an interview without much of the context. He then took a picture of himself celebrating by chugging champagne.

    https://spectator.us/scruton-tapes-anatomy-hit-job/

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Anonymous
  71. @Corvinus

    You’re slowly but steadily inching toward good faith. When you get there I’d enjoy nothing better.

    Say hi to Nick for me.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  72. Malcolm Y says:

    Gee, I thought the signal to kill the Tutsies sent over that radio station was playing that old song “Tut, Tut, Tutsies Goodbye”

  73. Cortes says:

    Maybe the SPLC could offer Kagame the head honcho post and then devote their offshore millions to ensuring that little BLMers can sit around the campfire singing Kumbaya with lil’ KKKers. Imagine all the people living life in peace! You may call me a dreamer but I’m not the only one.

  74. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Jim Don Bob

    Important story, good catch. It serves Scruton right for taking a job from an employer who would jettison him because a local door slammed loudly. Also, going through Douglas Murray’s summary of the worst-case interpretations of the out of context quotes, none of these should have been an issue in the first place, noting anyway that none of them were what Scruton actually said. Between this and Gavin McInnes I hope somebody notices that taking pains to not say X will only get you fired for supposedly having said X when you didn’t. We’re not dealing with a fair system.

  75. Corvinus says:
    @Desiderius

    “You’re slowly but steadily inching toward good faith. When you get there I’d enjoy nothing better.”

    That would a mischaracterization on your part. I argue in good faith. So try for once to actually address my position with counter arguments.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  76. @Corvinus

    You have to earn imperative mood. Good luck!

  77. Lot says:
    @Corvinus

    I think he did.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  78. @Corvinus

    Why don’t you explain how and why it is “dubious”, or even try to refute my position in part or in whole?

    Ok, I’ll bite.

    1. The subject was colonialism’s effect on African countries, not on Europe. Thus, if England colonized Jamaica in 1600, that has no bearing on Rwanda. Or, me misgendering someone you never heard of can not plausibly explain why you are suicidal.

    2. In any experiment, the duration and intensity of a treatment is naturally considered relevant. If the goal is to figure out why your head hurts (Congo is a shithole) right now, it’s highly relevant if you beat your head against the wall (it was colonized) recently vs a long time ago.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    , @Anonymous
  79. Anonymous[129] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    Scruton is a fool for agreeing to be interviewed by a left-wing paper like the New Statesman. These people are not his friends and he should have expected this from them.

  80. Corvinus says:
    @Lot

    There was no cogent counter argument. Are you his white knight?

    • Replies: @Lot
  81. Corvinus says:
    @International Jew

    “1. The subject was colonialism’s effect on African countries, not on Europe.”

    Actually, the subject is on colonialism’s impact on BOTH. Europe gained tremendous benefit from this endeavor. While Africa became “modernized”, it was at the expense of their personal freedom.

    “Thus, if England colonized Jamaica in 1600, that has no bearing on Rwanda.”

    Of course there is bearing–how and why England colonized Jamaica and Rwanda is at the crux of the matter.

    “In any experiment, the duration and intensity of a treatment is naturally considered relevant.”

    Except colonization and imperialism were not experiments. Europe made a calculated effort to establish control through a variety of processes to settle among and establishing control over the indigenous people of an area.

    “If the goal is to figure out why your head hurts (Congo is a shithole) right now, it’s highly relevant if you beat your head against the wall (it was colonized) recently vs a long time ago.”

    Congo is a “shithole” due to a host of factors, the genesis being European intervention that eviscerated their political, economic, and social institutions.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  82. Anonymous[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Regardless of the start time, the end result was clear.

    Indeed. The end result was higher living standards, rule of law, and a better quality of life.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  83. Anonymous[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @International Jew

    it’s highly relevant if you beat your head against the wall (it was colonized)

    Poor analogy. Colonization brought an improvement in the lives of people living in areas administered by European government.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  84. @Anonymous

    I believe you are right. However, to engage Corvinus I had to accept some of his assumptions. (As it happens, my effort was wasted, as you can see fromhis response.)

  85. Lot says:
    @Corvinus

    You have improved a bit reading Steve for a while, but still have ways to go. Blaming whitey for Africa’s problems, when Africa was far better off under colonialism, is still just trolling.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Desiderius
    , @Corvinus
  86. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    I don’t disagree with the general point, but in the most literal sense much of Africa is considerably better off now.

    worldpopulationreview.com/countries/rwanda-population/indicators/

  87. @Lot

    He’s not trolling here. For once he’s not shilling for some immediate political outcome or to destroy some hated foe. He’s still facing the Nick Diaz problem of overcoming his horrific maleducation.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  88. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    Congo is a “shithole” due to a host of factors, the genesis being European intervention that eviscerated their political, economic, and social institutions.

    Are you sure the shitholish predilections of its indigenous peoples have no bearing on the matter?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  89. Corvinus says:
    @Lot

    “Blaming whitey for Africa’s problems, when Africa was far better off under colonialism, is still just trolling.”

    So one country invading another country, taking their resources, and imposing their will lead to that country who was invaded “better”?

    Indeed, Africa received benefits–infrastructure built, increased standard of living, medical services. But Africa also had their cultural traditions denigrated, were barred from voting and running for office, had little factory development, and had a racial caste system implemented.

    Sounds like you support the building of empires like a neo-con. Of course, you do know that the “hook noses” LOVE their creation. Are you one of them?

  90. Corvinus says:
    @Desiderius

    “He’s not trolling here. For once he’s not shilling for some immediate political outcome or to destroy some hated foe.”

    I thought as an alleged high IQ, high time preference white man you would relish such an opportunity. My bad…

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  91. Corvinus says:
    @Anonymous

    “Are you sure the shitholish predilections of its indigenous peoples have no bearing on the matter?”

    You are too short for this ride. Carefully read my comments and watch the video segment that I noted.

  92. Corvinus says:
    @Anonymous

    “Indeed. The end result was higher living standards, rule of law, and a better quality of life.”

    At the expense of their own personal liberty and cultural heritage? Praytell, are you a (Jewish) neo-con, a lover of “invade the world, invite the world”?

  93. @Corvinus

    There is a balm in Gilead to heal the Zinn-sick soul.

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