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From the NYT Opinion page:

The White Strategy
Trump’s winning coalition and its weaknesses.

By Ross Douthat, Opinion Columnist
Aug. 11, 2018

In the aftermath of the 2012 election, when just about everyone assumed Mitt Romney lost because he didn’t win enough Hispanic votes, the election analyst Sean Trende produced a dissenting take. A close look at the results across the Midwest and Appalachia revealed a large population of what Trende called “missing white voters” — a mostly working-class constituency that simply declined to turn out in the Romney-Obama contest, and that a future (and more populist) Republican might win.

Trende was misunderstood by certain critics as making a normative argument that the G.O.P. should double down on being a white party. In reality, he suggested that a Republican Party with a more populist economic message might win the missing whites and more minority votes as well.

But an explicit “double down on white voters” argument has circulated for years on the margins of conservatism,

It’s really weird who He Who Must Not Be Named is. I mean, it’s weird in the sense that You Know Who isn’t very weird, just a guy with an Excel spreadsheet who worked out the math of the Electoral College back in 2000 and saw that Karl Rove’s celebrated plan to trade amnesty for Hispanic votes didn’t make as much sense for the GOP as winning over blue collar folks in the Great Lakes region.

and it had obvious influence over Donald Trump’s campaign strategy in 2016. His mix of economic populism and deliberate racial polarization was supposed to be demographically foredoomed — but instead it won him precisely those regions Trende’s analysis had highlighted, and the presidency as well.

For a sense of why this happened, in defiance of so much prognostication, look at the new Pew analysis of the 2016 election, which relies on voter files to create a more accurate assessment of who actually voted. Compared to exit polls, a couple of things stand out: First, Pew has whites at 74 percent of all voters (CNN’s exit poll had them at 71 percent),

Exit polls have to decide ahead of time where to send pollsters to interview exiting voters. They are more worried about undersampling minority groups than undersampling whites, and they have to make sure to hire enough Spanish-speaking pollsters. For these reasons, exit polls have a long history of overestimating the Hispanic share of the vote.

and second, it has whites without a college degree, Trump’s key constituency, at 44 percent of all voters (compared to just 34 percent for CNN).

Exit poll results tend to exaggerate educational levels. My guess is that respondents tend to think things like, “I took a night class once at State, so that makes me “Postgraduate” education, right?” And exit polling is really rushed (the whole world wants to know who is going to be elected President as soon as possible), so the pollster usually doesn’t have time to answer technical questions.

In other words, both conventional polling and conventional wisdom underestimated the potential for white turnout generally and working-class white turnout specifically — and that’s why Trump’s strategy was able to carry him to victory.

The numbers offer a cautionary tale for both emerging-Democratic-majority inevitabilists and for a left whose increasing vehemence about the wickedness of “whiteness” probably encourages the white tribalism that Trump rallied and exploited.

“Probably?”

 
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  1. Congrats on the well deserved recognition, albeit in a grudging, backhand kind of way. These corporate media guys are rightly terrified to even lift the lid enough to take a peek at the significance of the 2016 election. They partially understand it though, in their own way, and hence the no-holds-barred assault on the alternative media prior to the midterms. Fingers crossed.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Ross has credited Steve by name before, but something has changed recently with Ross, where he’s trying to distance himself from both Steve and Trump, even though he’s largely on the same page as both of them.
    , @Lagertha
    It's all good. Steve is not one of those people who loses their soul and all...ok...yah...cool...
    yah...ok...yeah, ok, get it, cool, no.... (8th Grade)
  2. Ethnogenesis is most effectively implemented by attacking random members of a group for being members of that group.

    In self-defense they begin to feel a sense of solidarity with other members of that group.

    This is so profoundly obvious I’m unclear why it even needs to be mentioned.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    Not always. Sailer has catalogued the 'Flight from White' for a number of years now. Many Whites will simply attack other Whites in order to fit in with the zeitgeist or simply make up tall tales of their own ethnic background (Elizabeth Warren's supposed 'native ancestry' fits this).

    But there will be a core who do not shy away from the fight. And it is this core upon the future hinges.

    , @AndrewR
    It's so obvious that one can attack many whites for being whites and said whites will grovel or help you attack other whites instead of feeling solidarity with their fellow whites. (Real fellow whites not (((fellow whites))))
  3. Election analyst Sean Trende, dissenter. Insert joke here.

  4. In the political amnesia world of Douthat’s New York Times Steve Sailer is the prognosticator that dares not speak its name.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    In the political amnesia world of Douthat’s New York Times Steve Sailer is the prognosticator that dares not speak its name.

    Look, I'd be the last one to want to take anything away from Steve. He is absolutely remarkable. One of the greatest men of our times.

    But it doesn't take a genius to see that American nationalism could be a winning strategy with an American electorate. But neither of the two parties had that on offer.
    , @Barnard
    Yet Conservatism Inc. stooge David French is mentioned like he is some sort of authoritative source on the topic.
    , @Joe Bloggs
    Douthat even has to insert the obligatory "In reality, he suggested that a Republican Party with a more populist economic message might win the missing whites and more minority votes as well.

    What is up with this GOPe/cuckservative obsession with "winning more minority votes"?

    Is it legitimate for someone to take office with 75%-95% of the "minority vote" in some way that it would NOT be legitimate for someone to take office with 75%-95% of the white vote?

    Because, if the current dispensation in US socio-politics goes on, nothing is more certain that there will be a White Faction, or Tendency, or even Party (probably NOT called "Republicans") that will win all the elections in perpetuity.
  5. How can people with graduate degrees–from good schools even–not have voted for Hillary? I mean, how? And congrats on the little link.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    The biggest Trump supporter I know has degrees from Harvard, Princeton, and Caltech.
    , @Lagertha
    there are legions of people who voted for Trump. My relatives and my lovely Dad, taught at Stanford, MIT, Harvard, Princeton, Yale...would have all, voted for Trump (blacks & whites in the 60's) because they voted against: Nazis, Bolsheviks and Totalitarians of any ethnicity and race. Everyone (from Greatest Generation, including Europe) sent their youngest men to the front, to kill people - no one really, expected survivors/VFW survivors, fucking, yah (speaking for my Grandpa). Shit, my time is up!
  6. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    “Probably?”

    And yes–they (and Douthat is most assuredly one of ‘them’) still steadfastly refuse to believe anything they say or do had anything to do with it. It’s a kind of studied lack of self-awareness that reminds me of, oh now what is it, it was just on the tip of my tongue.

    The fun part is that ‘they’ are still wringing their hands.

  7. Anonymous[918] • Disclaimer says:

    The numbers offer a cautionary tale for both emerging-Democratic-majority inevitabilists and for a left whose increasing vehemence about the wickedness of “whiteness” probably encourages the white tribalism that Trump rallied and exploited.

    Does Douthat vote Democrat or otherwise lean left? He certainly writes as though that’s where his sympathies lie.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Douthat is a conservative Catholic on social issues and centrist on economic issues, and I believe has likely been a straight-ticket GOP voter his whole adult life.

    Also a Stevosphere member of long standing

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2014/05/from-steveosphere-on-troublesome.html

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/09/american-scene.html
    , @Alec Leamas

    Does Douthat vote Democrat or otherwise lean left? He certainly writes as though that’s where his sympathies lie.
     
    Douthat exists on the margins of elite polite society as a sort of curiosity with his TradCath views - it's expected that whether he sincerely believes it or not he has to say when called upon that downscale whites are icky and problematic.

    Who in his right mind could write this with a straight face? I mean, someone who has been paying attention?:

    His mix of economic populism and deliberate racial polarization was supposed to be demographically foredoomed — but instead it won him precisely those regions Trende’s analysis had highlighted, and the presidency as well.
     
    In this view, "racial polarization" must mean not enthusiastically offering one's self and progeny on the altar of the cult of multicultural diversity.
    , @Art Deco
    Douthat was the founder of The American Scene, a once engaging group blog which has been all but defunct for a number of years, as well as a columnist for The Atlantic. His personal social circle was made up of liberal writers from the sort of social milieux in which he was schooled (though not in which he grew up). For many years, he seemed to almost apologize for what he was advocating as he was advocating it. He improved for a time, but has at times seemed to recede to old mental habits.

    Someone did a study of who reporters, critics, and editors at The New York Times were following on Twitter. Answer: people very much like themselves, which is one source of the circle-jerk quality of American journalism. Only 10% followed Ross Douthat, who offers the paper's sole display of starboard discussion. He is, indeed, a decorative curio there.

    , @Moses
    Cucks gonna cuck.
  8. “Probably?”

    As my favourite Jewish academic and Labour Lord likes to say, it isn’t that the English hate the Labour party, it is that the English think the Labour party hates them.

    Obviously, the truth is that the English are racist for noticing…

    • Replies: @NickG

    As my favourite Jewish academic and Labour Lord likes to say, it isn’t that the English hate the Labour party, it is that the English think the Labour party hates them.

    Obviously, the truth is that the English are racist for noticing…
     
    Alas still lots of them - at least the blue collar natives - don't notice and continue to vote Labour out of habit, legacy tribal loyalty and so on.

    The UK Labour hasn't represented the interests of working class or blue collar Britons, at least outside of the ever expanding trough that is the public sector, for decades.
  9. Anonymous[918] • Disclaimer says:

    In reality, he suggested that a Republican Party with a more populist economic message might win the missing whites and more minority votes as well.

    .

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about “white tribalism.” Don’t let them. It’s a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about “white tribalism.” Don’t let them. It’s a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.
     
    Yes, I understand that inevitably those of a white nationalist inclination will support a generally nationalist agenda but so should citizens of all colours.

    If anything, black Americans are most hurt by the globalist trend of sacrificing citizenship value to boost other asset prices, because they have the least of the latter and so are most reliant on the former.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.

    , @RichardTaylor

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about “white tribalism.” Don’t let them. It’s a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.
     
    But White people are a nation. As far as White tribalism, if all we do is end up with a multicultural civic nationalism, we have accomplished nothing.
    , @TomSchmidt
    Indeed. The cracks are showing. Poor polling, as done by CNN, shows black male Trump vote share at 13%.

    https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Politics/2016/1205/Among-black-men-a-spark-of-support-for-Donald-Trump

    I have seen analyses elsewhere that show black male voting for Trump at 20%. I suspect that this percentage will rise if the nationalist economic platform improves things for the working classes, white and black.
  10. Kind of gutless of him to not link to you directly.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    In a world with a press interested in free and open inquiry into all ideas, Douthat would reply to you directly here. Given the state of the NY Times he works for, it was most likely a struggle to get that link in his column. NY Times readers may not be that curious about the links, I ran a search on "Sailer" in the comments and didn't get any hits.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    Kind of gutless of him to not link to you directly.
     
    It is a dilemma. I want Sailer to be as widely read as possible - especially the Taki articles. OTOH I don't want a herd of libtards harassing Steve when he wants to go out for breakfast. Douthat cites Sailer and it is practically a doxing.
  11. Anonymous[918] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes
    In the political amnesia world of Douthat's New York Times Steve Sailer is the prognosticator that dares not speak its name.

    In the political amnesia world of Douthat’s New York Times Steve Sailer is the prognosticator that dares not speak its name.

    Look, I’d be the last one to want to take anything away from Steve. He is absolutely remarkable. One of the greatest men of our times.

    But it doesn’t take a genius to see that American nationalism could be a winning strategy with an American electorate. But neither of the two parties had that on offer.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Anonymous[918]:

    But it doesn't take a genius to see that American nationalism could be a winning strategy.
     

    Oh yeah. How come Steve Sailer was one of the few (if only) prognosticators who publicly pointed out what was supposedly so patently obvious?

    SS publicly identified the Franklin on the ground. Trump was the only one who picked it up!

    , @Anonymous

    American nationalism could be a winning strategy with an American electorate.
     
    Aye, there's the rub. Emphasis added.
    , @JudyBlumeSussman

    But it doesn’t take a genius to see that American nationalism could be a winning strategy with an American electorate.
     
    The trouble with distinguishing genius and non-genius ideas is, both seem obvious right after you've read them. Have you done the work to figure out which kind of idea the Sailer Strategy is?
  12. I’m getting tired of Douthat’s little schtick. Ross— grow a pair.

  13. @Logan
    Ethnogenesis is most effectively implemented by attacking random members of a group for being members of that group.

    In self-defense they begin to feel a sense of solidarity with other members of that group.

    This is so profoundly obvious I'm unclear why it even needs to be mentioned.

    Not always. Sailer has catalogued the ‘Flight from White’ for a number of years now. Many Whites will simply attack other Whites in order to fit in with the zeitgeist or simply make up tall tales of their own ethnic background (Elizabeth Warren’s supposed ‘native ancestry’ fits this).

    But there will be a core who do not shy away from the fight. And it is this core upon the future hinges.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    ...or simply make up tall tales of their own ethnic background (Elizabeth Warren’s supposed ‘native ancestry’ fits this).
     
    Churchill's own Iroquois ancestry was better established, albeit never proven. Not that these people would claim him.

    That's Winston. Ward is another story.
  14. The numbers offer a cautionary tale for both emerging-Democratic-majority inevitabilists and for a left whose increasing vehemence about the wickedness of “whiteness” probably encourages the white tribalism that Trump rallied and exploited.

    The polarization is inevitable. If you see anti-Whitism, don’t bother trying to argue against it. Just expose it. Encourage the person to say the most anti-White things possible.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal

    The polarization is inevitable. If you see anti-Whitism, don’t bother trying to argue against it. Just expose it. Encourage the person to say the most anti-White things possible.
     
    Exactly. The inimitable Tyrone Trump lays out this theory at considerably greater length, in his rather idiosyncratic (and somewhat profane) style:

    https://tyronetrump.wordpress.com/2018/05/23/fascism-warfare/

    https://tyronetrump.wordpress.com/2017/12/22/subkult/
  15. @Anonymous

    In reality, he suggested that a Republican Party with a more populist economic message might win the missing whites and more minority votes as well.
     
    .

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about "white tribalism." Don't let them. It's a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about “white tribalism.” Don’t let them. It’s a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.

    Yes, I understand that inevitably those of a white nationalist inclination will support a generally nationalist agenda but so should citizens of all colours.

    If anything, black Americans are most hurt by the globalist trend of sacrificing citizenship value to boost other asset prices, because they have the least of the latter and so are most reliant on the former.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri

    "Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs."
     
    Sadly, they'll take that sop, every day of the week.
    , @TTSSYF
    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.

    But, apparently, they cannot resist it. Witness the kneeling NFL players, who can't resist hatin' on whitey, even as it so obviously damages the league and threatens their wages.

    , @snorlax
    Whites are weird (and, on an individual basis, downright irrational) in that we prefer jobs to handouts. Blacks don't want jobs, they want gibsmedats.
    , @Colin Wright
    'Yes, I understand that inevitably those of a white nationalist inclination will support a generally nationalist agenda but so should citizens of all colours.

    If anything, black Americans are most hurt by the globalist trend of sacrificing citizenship value to boost other asset prices, because they have the least of the latter and so are most reliant on the former.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.'

    This kinda depends. I suspect the introduction of the Great Society welfare programs and government sinecures via affirmative action may have seduced the black population.

    Your position implicitly assumes blacks want to work, earn a decent living, acquire the rewards of thrift, upward mobility, etc. If that were so, indeed they above all others should object to immigration.

    But what if it isn't so? What if blacks -- depending on their station in life -- either want that AFDC or want that government clerk position? What if they aren't interested in fixing cars, or becoming a carpenter, or opening that Quickee-Mart, or whatever?

    Then all of a sudden the balance shifts. Immigration may not be actually be to their benefit, but priority one is making sure the gravy train keeps running.

    That means vote Democrat.
  16. I see a lot of Steve’s stuff pop up without attribution on Breitbart and the Daily Caller. I hesitate to call these websites cowardly, but Steve IS on the SPLC shit list for calling Obama a “wigger.” For Steve’s sake, it’s better that the SPLC cloaking device remain operational. His ideas percolate up to the journalists, researchers, and politicians who matter, yet at the same time he avoids Antifa kicking in his new garage door when Don Lemon doxes him.

    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @njguy73

    I hesitate to call these websites cowardly, but Steve IS on the SPLC shit list for calling Obama a “wigger.” For Steve’s sake, it’s better that the SPLC cloaking device remain operational. His ideas percolate up to the journalists, researchers, and politicians who matter, yet at the same time he avoids Antifa kicking in his new garage door when Don Lemon doxes him.
     
    I'd be on the SPLC shit list if they knew I own a copy of "Truly Tasteless Jokes."
  17. Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can’t create a majority:

    —Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.—

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump’s coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump’s voters? I think he wouldn’t, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and “Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler” lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Trump wasn’t a good candidate? Come on. He was the best candidate. That’s why he’s POTUS.
    , @Coag

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate.
     
    He wasn’t the perfect candidate but he was by far the best candidate, and one of the best of any era in this country. Trump’s no Demosthenes and he won’t have his speeches compiled as masterpieces of literature but his ability to get unlimited free publicity with his antics is just the right tool for survival in postmodern democracy.
    , @WorkingClass
    Cotton and Pence. A war monger and a bible thumper. This Deplorable would never vote for either one.

    I have been saying since 2000 that the working class is up for grabs. If I had said white working class I would have been as smart as Steve. If working class African Americans were capable of understanding that they are working class they would be Socialists or Deplorables. Same goes for perverts, feminists and self hating whites.

    Self respecting whites are now a voting block. They are not wedded to the GOP but neither can the Democrats ask for their vote. The beauty of the Trump victory is that he defeated both parties. The truth is emerging. The working class is bigger than the political duopoly.
    , @Lucas McCrudy
    Forget Mike Pence- he's a cuck. But the others you mention are Trumpian.
    , @S. Anonyia
    I hope by Trumpy platform you are including not only the populism/nationalism but also the more pragmatic foreign policy he ran on- calling out George Bush for not keeping the U.S safe on 9/11, criticizing intervention in the Middle East, wanting to make deals with “adversaries” etc.

    Because no neocon will ever win the Presidency again. A non-isolationist Republican will never win no matter how nutty the Dems get- voters will stay home. Foreign policy is a big part of how Trump got places like Michigan and nearly got Minnesota. That’s how he got a lot of former Bernie supporters to switch over (which the media doesn’t talk about much). Trump won because he was outrageous, because he called out the powerful and slammed their ridiculousness and waste on national tv, often in a hilarious way. That was appealing to a lot of people and I really can’t imagine a Cotton or Romney style candidate doing that.
    , @Alfa158
    Good points, but regarding the lack of a link, given the accelerating repression of alternative opinions in the media, I doubt if the NYT editors would have allowed Ross to put a link to Steve in this column. (Assuming he even wanted to). Their strategy is to render the opposition voiceless and invisible. Notice that Ross didn’t even mention any names so the snowflake NYT readers won’t be tempted to go looking for sites like Unz and get turned to pillars of salt.
    , @Cagey Beast
    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and “Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler” lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    I thought about that as well but decided:

    - It's far better to err on the side of being a free speech absolutist. Planting a flag all the way out there beside Hitler's Mein Kampf gives one a lot of middle ground to play with.

    - The saying "they're going to call you a Nazi anyway" has merit. If one agrees to run through their politically correct obstacle course, they always win the game. By bypassing it, vast areas of opportunity open up. Trump got this during the election.

    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate."

    That sentence would make a lot more sense if it started with "Clinton" rather than Trump.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate.
     
    I agree that Trump was not a very good candidate. However I believe his campaign proved to be very well organized. He had a small team doing polling and data mining that paid off big in targeting their efforts.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump’s voters?
     
    No, but he would lose a lot of his current donors, and he probably wouldn't be willing to do that. Running on the Trump platform that is - the platform that Trump ran on - not the one he has been governing on, that is.

    I think he wouldn’t, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.
     
    I think that is true for Kobach. Pence, on the other hand, is a lousy candidate. He's too milquetoast. That overt christian conservative vibe is a strike to a lot of people (I know it is to me). He seems like the kind of guy who will cuck, and he probably will. Trump has proved that conservative christians will vote for a candidate who isn't one, provided he does not seek to alienate them and makes an honest effort to represent their interests.
    , @kimchilover
    I keep wondering what impact having Mein Kampf as a dead-center, yellow-highlight Featured Book has on this site. My gut tells me the cons probably outweigh the pros.
    , @gregor
    Agree Douthat is wrong there. The South serves as the model. Mississippi is 37% black, yet Republicans carry it easily. Nationally, the GOP share of the white vote has jumped to 60/40 in the last couple of elections, and it will go higher. That shift is happening much quicker than Dems can possibly bring in and naturalize foreign voters. It was a delayed reaction, but whites have now noticed what’s going on before Democrats could bring in enough reinforcements.

    I disagree entirely about Trump. He is a polarizing figure to be sure, but I think he was uniquely suited to win on a realignment platform (i.e., dissent from new-liberal globalism or whatever you want to call it). What establishment Republican would have run on a Trump platform without backing down? It is to laugh. Who else could have withstood the fierce media onslaught without wilting? Who else could have won without the donor money? I just don’t see any of the McCains or Romneys doing it and I sure as hell don’t see those guys staying in the pocket and landing counter punches like Trump did so admirably. By that I refer to the way Trump was able excite and provoke the media and use their attacks against them. Trump seemed to feed on it and it ended up serving as evidence of his populist bonafides. Same thing with the issue of “decorum.” A polite or inoffensive version of Trump would have gotten buried.

    Now that Trump has set the course, many will follow the ways of MAGA. Because MAGA will have built up momentum, these others will not need the unique savvy of Trump.

    , @International Jew

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate.
     
    I was, and still am, convinced he really wanted to lose. Every time the polls showed he was maybe narrowing the gap, he'd say or do something to blow it. He won because he ran out of time; he just didn't have enough time, between Comey's reopening of the Hillary investigation, and November 8, to think of a brand-new way to blow his lead.

    And, as with so many things, Ann Coulter's got it right: we all voted for Trump despite his many faults, because we cared so much about the National Question. The "mandate" for that (if there's such a thing) was thus far stronger than any "mandate" for national single-payer health care emanating from the election of Barack Obama. Obama won for the opposite reason: millions of people voted for him primarily because they liked him (or what he told them he was), and only secondarily because they wanted the policies on his platform. (They could have gotten those policies if they'd made Hillary their nominee.)

    , @Anonymous
    Jews are a bookish people so tend to exaggerate the influence of books on society. It's a cultural blind spot.
  18. Polarization isn’t bad as long as your side has the numbers. Perhaps Democrats are thinking long term, say, 2020 or 2022, knowing they’re screwed this year.

  19. @Anonymous

    The numbers offer a cautionary tale for both emerging-Democratic-majority inevitabilists and for a left whose increasing vehemence about the wickedness of “whiteness” probably encourages the white tribalism that Trump rallied and exploited.
     
    Does Douthat vote Democrat or otherwise lean left? He certainly writes as though that's where his sympathies lie.

    Douthat is a conservative Catholic on social issues and centrist on economic issues, and I believe has likely been a straight-ticket GOP voter his whole adult life.

    Also a Stevosphere member of long standing

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2014/05/from-steveosphere-on-troublesome.html

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/09/american-scene.html

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Lot:

    Also a Stevosphere member of long standing.
     
    Unfortunately, Douthat like most of its public figures is an anonymous surreptitious member of that clandestine organization.
    , @Prester John
    Coincidentally am re-reading "A Troublesome Inheritance" and while I agree with most of Wade's points, I still remain unconvinced that it is possible for the human mind to measure its own intelligence in any meaningful way without necessarily having to become arbitrary --indeed subjective-- or risk falling into paradox . Be that as it may, a whole industry has been built up around such as IQ so...it is what it is.
  20. @Anonymous
    In the political amnesia world of Douthat’s New York Times Steve Sailer is the prognosticator that dares not speak its name.

    Look, I'd be the last one to want to take anything away from Steve. He is absolutely remarkable. One of the greatest men of our times.

    But it doesn't take a genius to see that American nationalism could be a winning strategy with an American electorate. But neither of the two parties had that on offer.

    Anonymous[918]:

    But it doesn’t take a genius to see that American nationalism could be a winning strategy.

    Oh yeah. How come Steve Sailer was one of the few (if only) prognosticators who publicly pointed out what was supposedly so patently obvious?

    SS publicly identified the Franklin on the ground. Trump was the only one who picked it up!

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    SS publicly identified the Franklin on the ground. Trump was the only one who picked it up!
     
    Why was Trump the only one to pick it up?

    And despite proven success, why is he still the only one close to espousing nationalist views two years later?
  21. Give Steve Sailer a NYT editorial spot!!

  22. @Tim Howells
    Congrats on the well deserved recognition, albeit in a grudging, backhand kind of way. These corporate media guys are rightly terrified to even lift the lid enough to take a peek at the significance of the 2016 election. They partially understand it though, in their own way, and hence the no-holds-barred assault on the alternative media prior to the midterms. Fingers crossed.

    Ross has credited Steve by name before, but something has changed recently with Ross, where he’s trying to distance himself from both Steve and Trump, even though he’s largely on the same page as both of them.

    • Replies: @U-Bahn
    "he’s trying to distance himself from both Steve and Trump"

    Douthat and other columnists have difficult jobs. They have to tiptoe through the minefield for now. They recognize that there are many changes afoot. There will be no glory in the present media environment by being early to say what is becoming patently obvious to the average person on the street.
    , @Tim Howells
    He probably likes being employed at the New York Times.
    , @Anonymous

    even though he’s largely on the same page as both of them.
     
    What evidence have you seen of that?
    , @James Kabala
    Douthat mentioned Steve by name (albeit as part of a long list of names) as recently as April 25 of this year: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/25/opinion/california-democrats-trump-republicans.html
    , @Lagertha
    He's stuck with bills to pay. Being middle-aged sucks. You can no longer believe you can do anything.
  23. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    Trump wasn’t a good candidate? Come on. He was the best candidate. That’s why he’s POTUS.

    • Agree: jim jones, Cagey Beast
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Trump won mainly because of his platform and Hillary's well-earned unpopularity.

    A charming, less arrogant, more thoughtful, more knowledgeable candidate with Trump's broad platform and establishment-rocking agenda would have beaten Hillary in probably at least 40 states.

    , @Lot
    I think Bernie or Biden or Warren would have beat him. They just needed Hillary's support plus 85,000 more midwest votes. And part of that 85,000 could have come from Jill Stein's anti Hillary far left support.

    The Dem nomination process was totally broken as it allowed Hillary to rack up superdelegate endorsements early and muscle Biden and Warren away from even running.

    On the same topic, Jeb Bush raised $105 million before even formally entering the race using basically the same tactic. Did anyone who advised the corps to set their cash on fire this way get fired?
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    Agree.
  24. @Anonymous

    In reality, he suggested that a Republican Party with a more populist economic message might win the missing whites and more minority votes as well.
     
    .

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about "white tribalism." Don't let them. It's a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about “white tribalism.” Don’t let them. It’s a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.

    But White people are a nation. As far as White tribalism, if all we do is end up with a multicultural civic nationalism, we have accomplished nothing.

  25. @Anonymous
    In the political amnesia world of Douthat’s New York Times Steve Sailer is the prognosticator that dares not speak its name.

    Look, I'd be the last one to want to take anything away from Steve. He is absolutely remarkable. One of the greatest men of our times.

    But it doesn't take a genius to see that American nationalism could be a winning strategy with an American electorate. But neither of the two parties had that on offer.

    American nationalism could be a winning strategy with an American electorate.

    Aye, there’s the rub. Emphasis added.

  26. @Lot
    Douthat is a conservative Catholic on social issues and centrist on economic issues, and I believe has likely been a straight-ticket GOP voter his whole adult life.

    Also a Stevosphere member of long standing

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2014/05/from-steveosphere-on-troublesome.html

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/09/american-scene.html

    Lot:

    Also a Stevosphere member of long standing.

    Unfortunately, Douthat like most of its public figures is an anonymous surreptitious member of that clandestine organization.

  27. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate.

    He wasn’t the perfect candidate but he was by far the best candidate, and one of the best of any era in this country. Trump’s no Demosthenes and he won’t have his speeches compiled as masterpieces of literature but his ability to get unlimited free publicity with his antics is just the right tool for survival in postmodern democracy.

  28. What would happen if He Who Must Not Be Named meets She Who Must Be Obeyed?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    She tells him they need a new dishwasher?
  29. Steve Sailer is one of the few indispensable cultural analysts.

    The only other analyst that I’m aware of that published work hinting at this electoral strategy (or something like it) was Angelo Codevilla in his “America’s Ruling Class” an essay in The American Spectator back in July 2010. Codevilla wasn’t making an explicitly racial argument, but rather that a majority of Americans in 2010 were not represented by either party, both of which governed in the interests of the Ruling Class. It happens that then (and I think still now) this unrepresented majority is predominantly white.

    I think the reason such matters weren’t publicly discussed is that there was no money in expressing them. Even today, such discussions are greeted with shrieks of “witch, burn the witch!” I am sure the NYT comments section (if such a thing exists) is a hotbed of triggered SJW ravings in response to Douthat’s essay.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    I miss Lawrence Auster. Sailer's commentary was always a nice complement to Auster's...what I didn't get from one, I got from the other.
    , @Forbes
    Codevilla expanded that essay into a 147-page pamphlet in:
    https://www.amazon.com/Ruling-Class-Corrupted-America-About/dp/0825305586/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1534095444&sr=1-1&keywords=angelo+codevilla
  30. These elite republican pundits need to spend more time with proles. They seem to think that being supplicating will increase the share of the minority vote.

    This is exactly backward. Republicans who are unapologetic, tough and practical – while also fair – will get more respect from all but the elite minorities. For example, cracking down on illegal immigration will be more popular with Hispanic voters than open borders. Why people can’t understand that a Texan roofer named Jorge might not be happy about a couple million Central Americans suddenly showing up just confounds me. And as for black voters, you aren’t going to outdemocrat the democrats, so appeal to the types who have their lives together and dislike the BLM punks. They need a reason to vote Republican, and if you just imitate the democrats with racial platitudes there is no reason.

    Pandering will get Republicans nowhere. It will have diminishing returns for democrats as well. Now that minorities have more of their own candidates to choose from, why vote for some supplicating white sad sack?

    The way forward for Republicans is to be unapologetic Americans. That includes being unapologetic about race, culture, religion, etc. You don’t gain admirers by grovelling. Especially not among your typical working class minorities.

    Now the elite minorities are another story. They have assimilated to white elite norms of contempt for non-elite white Americans. Most of them are fully onboard with the new Morgenthau Plan for non-progressive white America. It’s a shame but it is what it is, and there’s probably not much that can be done about it besides clamping down on immigration from Asia and letting the Sarah Jeong’s of this world have it with both barrels.

    And speaking of her, that fine lady is now Ross Douthat’ s esteemed colleague. Mr. Douthat, always ready to condemn any hint of something inoffensive and normal such as white solidarity, hasn’t made a peep about Jeong’s racial trash-talking. Her employment at the Times is only going to make him look more like a hypocrite than he already does. I mean, you could make excuses for Charles Blow, but not an ungrateful little snake like her. So every time he gets on his high horse about racism, people are going to know he works for a paper that endorses racial hatred of whites.

    That can’t be a very comfortable position to be in for Ross.

    • Replies: @Alden
    “Contempt for non elite White Americans”

    Sounds just like our commenters Jeff Stryker and Jilles Dystrka.
    , @pepperinmono
    Great point about the most effective way to bleed off some minority voters is to be unapologetic.
    , @Big Bill

    Why people can’t understand that a Texan roofer named Jorge might not be happy about a couple million Central Americans suddenly showing up just confounds me.
     
    The latinx "Talented Tenth" elite managed to retcon Cesar Chavez into an anti-white open borders activist, so most latinx don't have any ideological leaders around whom to coalesce.

    The potential to snatch latinx who favor border enforcement is still there, but has not been tapped. Audacious Epigone, for example, recently posted polling data showing that latinx are divided on open borders.
  31. Are you trying to imply that Sean Trende stole your idea, Steve?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    My idea I put forward on 11/28/2000 was so obvious that the real question is why it took 12 years for anybody else to come up with it?
  32. @Anonymous
    In the political amnesia world of Douthat’s New York Times Steve Sailer is the prognosticator that dares not speak its name.

    Look, I'd be the last one to want to take anything away from Steve. He is absolutely remarkable. One of the greatest men of our times.

    But it doesn't take a genius to see that American nationalism could be a winning strategy with an American electorate. But neither of the two parties had that on offer.

    But it doesn’t take a genius to see that American nationalism could be a winning strategy with an American electorate.

    The trouble with distinguishing genius and non-genius ideas is, both seem obvious right after you’ve read them. Have you done the work to figure out which kind of idea the Sailer Strategy is?

  33. If Douthat were fired from the NYT, his replacement would almost certainly be worse. The Times may forbid mention of Sailer, or Douthat may think his career would threatened by doing so, so I would cut him some slack.

    In an article on the same subject from a mainstream conservative outlet, American Spectator, Steve Sailer is mentioned repeatedly by name:

    https://spectator.org/a-most-expected-backlash/
    A Most Expected Backlash
    SCOTT MCKAY
    August 10, 2018

    There is an essential read by Steve Sailer at Taki’s Magazine from a week ago which might well explain the cultural and political landscape better than anything else you’ve seen in recent vintage. It’s entitled “A Half Century of Amnesia,” and you should take the time to have a look.

    Sailer makes several important points, which could very easily be lost to readers not courageous enough to wade through obvious, though perhaps politically incorrect, facts, in recognizing the current cultural atmosphere which has not only given us Donald Trump in the White House but an apparent brewing sea change in the culture which the academic and media-elite Left simply isn’t recognizing (Caitlan Flanagan’s surprising piece on Jordan Peterson’s growing celebrity at the Atlantic notwithstanding). Chief among those is Sailer’s central point; namely that the Left has declared war on straight American white people for decades — and there is a natural price to pay for that hostility.

  34. @Dave Pinsen
    Ross has credited Steve by name before, but something has changed recently with Ross, where he’s trying to distance himself from both Steve and Trump, even though he’s largely on the same page as both of them.

    “he’s trying to distance himself from both Steve and Trump”

    Douthat and other columnists have difficult jobs. They have to tiptoe through the minefield for now. They recognize that there are many changes afoot. There will be no glory in the present media environment by being early to say what is becoming patently obvious to the average person on the street.

  35. The numbers offer a cautionary tale for both emerging-Democratic-majority inevitabilists and for a left whose increasing vehemence about the wickedness of “whiteness” probably encourages the white tribalism that Trump rallied and exploited.

    We can but hope!

  36. Steve,
    Hasn’t quite worked out for you as well as Nate Silver eh? I mean MSM isn’t beating down your door to get a pulse on the political climate. Strange.

    I think Dohat probably knows who you are and read you, but is too scared to name you, because then it might imply he read you. You have big PC cooties and at least one degree of separation must be maintained.

  37. @Tyrion 2

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about “white tribalism.” Don’t let them. It’s a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.
     
    Yes, I understand that inevitably those of a white nationalist inclination will support a generally nationalist agenda but so should citizens of all colours.

    If anything, black Americans are most hurt by the globalist trend of sacrificing citizenship value to boost other asset prices, because they have the least of the latter and so are most reliant on the former.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.

    “Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.”

    Sadly, they’ll take that sop, every day of the week.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    We will see. The pre-Trump Republican party offered them very little. It can take a bit of time for political perceptions to change.
  38. Sailerism… is a future we should try to avoid.

    When did new stories become editorials? This is now common but when did it start in the modern era? I know back in the old days newspapers were party outlets but in the modern era they used to pretend to be non-partisan except on the editorial page.

    The tag line seems to be tagged on at the very end. The story seemed to be fairly neutral as they acknowledged Steve’s many contributions (now that it’s fund raising time it’s sad to think that one of our most influential thinkers has no mainstream platform and has to beg for tips like a street busker) and laid out his positions on race without becoming completely hysterical, but then I suppose they had to put this in to show that it was not intended as an endorsement. Yes, Steve has been right about everything important in American politics for 20 years and all the geniuses like Rove (not to mention 100% of the left) have been wrong, but still we should avoid him.

    • Replies: @European-American
    Because it wasn’t immediately clear to me where your quote came from, here’s a bigger excerpt and a link to the April 2017 NY Magazine article linked to by Douthat as a laughable and cowardly way to reference Sailer without naming him:

    ... Sailer sees himself as having presented an intellectual justification for commonsense politics, which Donald Trump, by being ignorant of the (as Sailer put it in an email to us) “Davos Man conventional wisdom,” arrived at out of instinct.

    And he’s not entirely wrong. Sailer’s influence is impossible to understand without recognizing how far what he refers to as the conventional wisdom has drifted from the common sense of a large part of the country, creating a demand for people who are indifferent to the castigation that normally deters the airing of sometimes wrong, sometimes merely inconvenient ideas. “In 2017, I’m the voice of reason and moderation,” Sailer told us, in reference to the open ethnonationalists to his right and cosmopolitan liberals to his left. That isn’t true — Sailer is a perceptive thinker, but his views on race, for which he will inevitably be best-known, still represent the more resentful end of white opinion. Yet if current trends toward partisan and racial polarization continue unabated, Sailerism may indeed come to represent a kind of uneasy center, flanked by identitarian leftism on one side and raw white nationalism on the other. This is a future we should try to avoid.

    The Man Who Invented Identity Politics for the New Right
    By Park MacDougald and Jason Willick
    THE NEW FAR RIGHT APR. 30, 2017
    http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/04/steve-sailer-invented-identity-politics-for-the-alt-right.html

     

    , @Carbon blob
    As John Durant has noted, once the Internet made information free established news outlets pivoted wholesale into opinion-blogging.
    , @PiltdownMan

    When did new stories become editorials? This is now common but when did it start in the modern era? I know back in the old days newspapers were party outlets but in the modern era they used to pretend to be non-partisan except on the editorial page.
     
    It's hard to say. Opinion pages (as opposed to the editorial and letters page) dates back to 1970, when the New York Times introduced an opinion page opposite the editorial. Opinion columns and opinion articles were simply unknown, in newspapers through the post War years, until that point in time.

    Slanted reportage, or reportage as opinion probably dates back to the Clinton era, when newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots. I'm pretty sure it would have happened earlier, in the Reagan era, but for the fact that older generation publishers such as the current Sulzberger's grandad, Punch Sulzberger, or Katherine Graham would simply not tolerated it. It pretty much became the norm during the Bush and Obama years.

  39. @Tyrion 2

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about “white tribalism.” Don’t let them. It’s a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.
     
    Yes, I understand that inevitably those of a white nationalist inclination will support a generally nationalist agenda but so should citizens of all colours.

    If anything, black Americans are most hurt by the globalist trend of sacrificing citizenship value to boost other asset prices, because they have the least of the latter and so are most reliant on the former.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.

    But, apparently, they cannot resist it. Witness the kneeling NFL players, who can’t resist hatin’ on whitey, even as it so obviously damages the league and threatens their wages.

  40. @Tyrion 2

    “Probably?”
     
    As my favourite Jewish academic and Labour Lord likes to say, it isn't that the English hate the Labour party, it is that the English think the Labour party hates them.

    Obviously, the truth is that the English are racist for noticing...

    As my favourite Jewish academic and Labour Lord likes to say, it isn’t that the English hate the Labour party, it is that the English think the Labour party hates them.

    Obviously, the truth is that the English are racist for noticing…

    Alas still lots of them – at least the blue collar natives – don’t notice and continue to vote Labour out of habit, legacy tribal loyalty and so on.

    The UK Labour hasn’t represented the interests of working class or blue collar Britons, at least outside of the ever expanding trough that is the public sector, for decades.

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Alas still lots of them – at least the blue collar natives – don’t notice and continue to vote Labour out of habit, legacy tribal loyalty and so on.

    The UK Labour hasn’t represented the interests of working class or blue collar Britons, at least outside of the ever expanding trough that is the public sector, for decades.
     
    To be fair working class and blue collar Britons know that the Tories hate them more than Labour does. So voting to keep out the Tory scum does make some sense.
  41. @Almost Missouri

    "Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs."
     
    Sadly, they'll take that sop, every day of the week.

    We will see. The pre-Trump Republican party offered them very little. It can take a bit of time for political perceptions to change.

  42. @Steve in Greensboro
    Steve Sailer is one of the few indispensable cultural analysts.

    The only other analyst that I'm aware of that published work hinting at this electoral strategy (or something like it) was Angelo Codevilla in his "America's Ruling Class" an essay in The American Spectator back in July 2010. Codevilla wasn't making an explicitly racial argument, but rather that a majority of Americans in 2010 were not represented by either party, both of which governed in the interests of the Ruling Class. It happens that then (and I think still now) this unrepresented majority is predominantly white.

    I think the reason such matters weren't publicly discussed is that there was no money in expressing them. Even today, such discussions are greeted with shrieks of "witch, burn the witch!" I am sure the NYT comments section (if such a thing exists) is a hotbed of triggered SJW ravings in response to Douthat's essay.

    I miss Lawrence Auster. Sailer’s commentary was always a nice complement to Auster’s…what I didn’t get from one, I got from the other.

    • Agree: Abe
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I miss Lawrence Auster. Sailer’s commentary was always a nice complement to Auster’s…what I didn’t get from one, I got from the other.
     
    Agreed. I liked Lawrence Auster's site too; he was a good man. I also miss Mangan's site.
  43. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    Cotton and Pence. A war monger and a bible thumper. This Deplorable would never vote for either one.

    I have been saying since 2000 that the working class is up for grabs. If I had said white working class I would have been as smart as Steve. If working class African Americans were capable of understanding that they are working class they would be Socialists or Deplorables. Same goes for perverts, feminists and self hating whites.

    Self respecting whites are now a voting block. They are not wedded to the GOP but neither can the Democrats ask for their vote. The beauty of the Trump victory is that he defeated both parties. The truth is emerging. The working class is bigger than the political duopoly.

    • Replies: @Joe Bloggs
    The problem both parties have in assimilating the voting bloc that is the white working class is that they hate the Democrats because they (the WWC) are nationalists, but they also hate the Republicans because they (the WWC) are socialists.

    What they are waiting for is a party that will incorporate nationalism and socialism.

    Oh wait...
  44. Anon[188] • Disclaimer says:

    “Sailerism… is a future we should try to avoid.”

    Limiting immigration was the only way that could have been accomplished; Sailer advocated for that, and they didn’t listen. They thought they knew better. Turns out, the Ruling Class isn’t as smart as they thought they were.

    Things are going to get very bad in the future. If you are white – or even Asian – you should fear what the democrats will do if they win in 2020. Obama’s second term unleashed a wave of racist hate against whites, and I expect 2020 to greatly exceed that in magnitude.

    In other news: they just voted to remove Donald Trump’s star on the walk of fame. Reason? Who knows. These people are f’n idiots. Anyone who votes democrat is a monster. Don’t talk to them, don’t hire them, don’t associate with them, don’t do business with them…#walkaway.

    In other news pt.2: democrat representative Cohen called for republican congresswoman Martha Blackburn to jump off a bridge.

  45. I was just thinking (the smoke is still thick in the air) this morning about leftards mantra that “we must make it uncomfortable for whites.” And I agree. We must.

    White men in particular tend to go to work, focus on work, come home still thinking about work and deal with domestic life, then sleep, awaken, and repeat. We slept while our entire manufacturing economy was offshored. We sleep now as our Nation is subsumed by hordes of invaders.

    We must be made much more uncomfortable. Those of us reading iSteve are canaries. We are the vigilant. We notice. That we are here is prima facie evidence. Our less observant brothers must be awoken. To that end, shouldn’t we embrace “let’s make it uncomfortable for whites?”

    It’s a hard pill to swallow for those of us who are already awake. “More uncomfortable Stan?” “Are you retarded (an open question admittedly)?” But look around you, your family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, and fellow parishioners, are they awake? What exactly will it take to awaken them? Make it happen or be willing to go down with the sleeping ship says Stan.

    We hold 100% of the hard power in America. We design, build, operate, and maintain the energy, water, food, chemical, transportation, and every other fundamentally necessary ingredient of existence including the media. NYT works only because of white men. We own and know how to use all the weapons (we invented and built them!). Yet we sleep complacently as we are mocked and hated by media and our wives and children abused in the streets. This could be stopped tomorrow by a general strike. A National White Out. Just stay home. Go John Galt for a week. In any case, we need to be made uncomfortable enough that all of us see it.

    • Replies: @Boethiuss

    We must be made much more uncomfortable. Those of us reading iSteve are canaries. We are the vigilant. We notice. That we are here is prima facie evidence. Our less observant brothers must be awoken. To that end, shouldn’t we embrace “let’s make it uncomfortable for whites?”

    It’s a hard pill to swallow for those of us who are already awake. “More uncomfortable Stan?” “Are you retarded (an open question admittedly)?” But look around you, your family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, and fellow parishioners, are they awake? What exactly will it take to awaken them? Make it happen or be willing to go down with the sleeping ship says Stan.
     
    I've been commenting here for 2 to 3 years give or take. And as is typical on the internet, I've gotten into a few pissing matches about this or that. And during the last bunch of comments I wrote it occurred to me that there's a common thread of every one. Whenever I'm crossing swords with someone, the other guy is always high-handing away the prerogatives or the objections of American normies, and I'm having none of it.

    I'm not in a pissing match over this (at least not yet). but I we've got the same sort of problem here. There's a certain logic that say this ought to work but in reality it's way too far away to be practical. It's especially dubious to think we can execute something like this and the normies won't have any say in the matter. They do, and if they don't like it, we've got nothing.

    Or another example is the Unite The Right rally in Charlottesville. Not the one just now, which was basically a nonevent, but last year. To be honest, on my own behalf I don't have any strong feelings one way or the other about the "Right" demonstrators. But the reality is, if the normies can't abide those people, we can't either.

    That's unfortunately a nonstarter for most of us here but we're in a better situation that most of realize. If we can state a good case, that speaks to them, that makes sense relative to what's visible for them, the normies will absolutely give us a fair hearing. And when we get the normies on board with us, we can win.
  46. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    Forget Mike Pence- he’s a cuck. But the others you mention are Trumpian.

  47. @Jack D

    Sailerism... is a future we should try to avoid.
     
    When did new stories become editorials? This is now common but when did it start in the modern era? I know back in the old days newspapers were party outlets but in the modern era they used to pretend to be non-partisan except on the editorial page.

    The tag line seems to be tagged on at the very end. The story seemed to be fairly neutral as they acknowledged Steve's many contributions (now that it's fund raising time it's sad to think that one of our most influential thinkers has no mainstream platform and has to beg for tips like a street busker) and laid out his positions on race without becoming completely hysterical, but then I suppose they had to put this in to show that it was not intended as an endorsement. Yes, Steve has been right about everything important in American politics for 20 years and all the geniuses like Rove (not to mention 100% of the left) have been wrong, but still we should avoid him.

    Because it wasn’t immediately clear to me where your quote came from, here’s a bigger excerpt and a link to the April 2017 NY Magazine article linked to by Douthat as a laughable and cowardly way to reference Sailer without naming him:

    … Sailer sees himself as having presented an intellectual justification for commonsense politics, which Donald Trump, by being ignorant of the (as Sailer put it in an email to us) “Davos Man conventional wisdom,” arrived at out of instinct.

    And he’s not entirely wrong. Sailer’s influence is impossible to understand without recognizing how far what he refers to as the conventional wisdom has drifted from the common sense of a large part of the country, creating a demand for people who are indifferent to the castigation that normally deters the airing of sometimes wrong, sometimes merely inconvenient ideas. “In 2017, I’m the voice of reason and moderation,” Sailer told us, in reference to the open ethnonationalists to his right and cosmopolitan liberals to his left. That isn’t true — Sailer is a perceptive thinker, but his views on race, for which he will inevitably be best-known, still represent the more resentful end of white opinion. Yet if current trends toward partisan and racial polarization continue unabated, Sailerism may indeed come to represent a kind of uneasy center, flanked by identitarian leftism on one side and raw white nationalism on the other. This is a future we should try to avoid.

    The Man Who Invented Identity Politics for the New Right
    By Park MacDougald and Jason Willick
    THE NEW FAR RIGHT APR. 30, 2017
    http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/04/steve-sailer-invented-identity-politics-for-the-alt-right.html

  48. To sight you Steve takes away from who whom to a debate of ideas. I recently saw a great political cartoon showing dozens of donkeys coming to a crossroads one labled “call them racist bigots” the other “challenge thier ideas”. Douthat is not up to the challenge.

  49. Pat Buchanan was begging Nixon to after northern Catholics and the Wallace vote when the rest of the campaign (eg Bill Safire) was convinced that Nixon should go after black votes. Explaining basic fractions to Republicans has a long history.

  50. His mix of economic populism and deliberate racial polarization

    I don’t understand how anyone gets taken in by this gaslighting. It’s as obviously false as claiming Trump diminishes respect for the office by juggling every time he’s on camera.

  51. @JimB
    I see a lot of Steve’s stuff pop up without attribution on Breitbart and the Daily Caller. I hesitate to call these websites cowardly, but Steve IS on the SPLC shit list for calling Obama a “wigger.” For Steve’s sake, it’s better that the SPLC cloaking device remain operational. His ideas percolate up to the journalists, researchers, and politicians who matter, yet at the same time he avoids Antifa kicking in his new garage door when Don Lemon doxes him.

    I hesitate to call these websites cowardly, but Steve IS on the SPLC shit list for calling Obama a “wigger.” For Steve’s sake, it’s better that the SPLC cloaking device remain operational. His ideas percolate up to the journalists, researchers, and politicians who matter, yet at the same time he avoids Antifa kicking in his new garage door when Don Lemon doxes him.

    I’d be on the SPLC shit list if they knew I own a copy of “Truly Tasteless Jokes.”

    • Replies: @JimB

    I’d be on the SPLC shit list if they knew I own a copy of “Truly Tasteless Jokes.”
     
    Is Regnery the publisher and Ann Coulter the editor?
    , @Jim Don Bob

    I’d be on the SPLC shit list if they knew I own a copy of “Truly Tasteless Jokes.”
     
    I gave my teenage daughter a copy when she was about 15 and she thought it was hilarious but somehow not quite right. I told her it was just the jokes we told as a kid.

    For instance, there is a case before the WV Supreme Court to decide that if a couple gets divorced, will they still be brother and sister.

    Ba-dum!
  52. @Dan Hayes
    In the political amnesia world of Douthat's New York Times Steve Sailer is the prognosticator that dares not speak its name.

    Yet Conservatism Inc. stooge David French is mentioned like he is some sort of authoritative source on the topic.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  53. @Tyrion 2

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about “white tribalism.” Don’t let them. It’s a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.
     
    Yes, I understand that inevitably those of a white nationalist inclination will support a generally nationalist agenda but so should citizens of all colours.

    If anything, black Americans are most hurt by the globalist trend of sacrificing citizenship value to boost other asset prices, because they have the least of the latter and so are most reliant on the former.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.

    Whites are weird (and, on an individual basis, downright irrational) in that we prefer jobs to handouts. Blacks don’t want jobs, they want gibsmedats.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I want both
    , @Sam Haysom
    Eh except for the fact that as the stigma around things like disability have deceased white disability fraud has exploded.

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.
  54. @Dave Pinsen
    Ross has credited Steve by name before, but something has changed recently with Ross, where he’s trying to distance himself from both Steve and Trump, even though he’s largely on the same page as both of them.

    He probably likes being employed at the New York Times.

  55. @Dave Pinsen
    Trump wasn’t a good candidate? Come on. He was the best candidate. That’s why he’s POTUS.

    Trump won mainly because of his platform and Hillary’s well-earned unpopularity.

    A charming, less arrogant, more thoughtful, more knowledgeable candidate with Trump’s broad platform and establishment-rocking agenda would have beaten Hillary in probably at least 40 states.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    You and Lot are forgetting that winning the primary is part of the process. No one other than Trump could have both won the nomination of one of the two major parties and won the general election in 2016.
  56. @snorlax
    Whites are weird (and, on an individual basis, downright irrational) in that we prefer jobs to handouts. Blacks don't want jobs, they want gibsmedats.

    I want both

  57. This is why the Overton window matters and not just in ideology but also temperament. compared to a guy like Richard Spencer Steve seems like a bank manager.

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.

    • Troll: L Woods
    • Replies: @Anon
    The best thing he does (besides the polling analysis) is the Deep State analysis stuff. I showed a relative, who is a diehard liberal, his article "Immigration and the Deep State" and she thought it was great.
    , @Desiderius
    Sam,

    Consider the possibility that the struggles of your preferred candidates/principles may have something to do with a misconception on your/their part about what actually turns women on/off.

    Certainly your/their relative performance with that demographic might suggest that possibility could have some validity. In that case, some humility and curiosity could be in order.
    , @snorlax

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.
     
    I'd half agree but the "Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf - Adolf Hitler" is probably turning more people off at the moment.
    , @Boethiuss

    This is why the Overton window matters and not just in ideology but also temperament. compared to a guy like Richard Spencer Steve seems like a bank manager.
     
    It matters a lot, but for right now, not the way you think.

    The one clear accomplishment of the Trump Administration is that we've moved our edge of the Overton Window in our favor. And despite what most of us like to think here, that's not holding us back at the moment. We can make, in a respectable enough way, whatever arguments we need, we just can't win them.

    Right now, it's a lot more valuable for us to move their edge of the Overton Window in our favor. If the Republicans do reasonably well in November, the Sarah Jeong/Maxine Waters Left edge of nasty is a clear loser for them. That will be a significant problem considering how much of the activist Left is invested in that sort of thing.
    , @L Woods
    Concern troll is concerned.
  58. @snorlax
    Whites are weird (and, on an individual basis, downright irrational) in that we prefer jobs to handouts. Blacks don't want jobs, they want gibsmedats.

    Eh except for the fact that as the stigma around things like disability have deceased white disability fraud has exploded.

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the "jobs > handouts" norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.
    , @midtown
    Yeah, of the people I personally know who are what I would consider disability frauds, about half are white.
    , @JohnnyWalker123

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.

     

    I think most people want to work, they just want "cool" jobs.

    Taste tester, professional athlete, coach, cinematic action hero, tv personality, social media celebrity, rapper, bikini contest judge, personal assistant to Kanye West, gigolo, sports blogger, race car driver, fashion model, space fleet captain, etc. That sort of thing.
    , @George
    "life time entry level jobs and handouts."

    Work is a very broad category. Many maybe most entry level jobs are physically demanding work. After 30 it becomes harder and harder.
    , @Art Deco
    I think there are about 10 million people collecting Social Security Disability. It does appear that the understanding of what constitutes a 'disability' has grown increasingly relaxed on the part of applicants and officials alike, which is disturbing but something different than 'fraud'. The median age at which an initial award is granted is 49 and the median duration of benefits is about 8 years. The application process requires a ruling by an administrative law judge and takes about two years. Most people who apply get turned down. I cannot see that it's analogous to AFDC or general relief payments. There's another 4 million working-aged people collecting SSI. About 40% of them are mentally retarded or schizophrenic; fewer than 10% have muskuloskelital problems. You've got 14 million working-aged people collecting benefits while you have over 150 million people working. If half of these are people who would have been turned down in 1970, that amounts to 7 million people against 150 million working. I don't think that sustains your thesis.
  59. @Sam Haysom
    This is why the Overton window matters and not just in ideology but also temperament. compared to a guy like Richard Spencer Steve seems like a bank manager.

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.

    The best thing he does (besides the polling analysis) is the Deep State analysis stuff. I showed a relative, who is a diehard liberal, his article “Immigration and the Deep State” and she thought it was great.

  60. Anecdotally, I’ve seen next to no evidence for educated whites leaving the Republican Party. The poll numbers reflect a reality that I don’t see in my day-to-day interactions with that type of people.

    Not sure if the polls are being intentionally fudged or running into the same retarded assumptions that made them miss 2016.

  61. @Jack D

    Sailerism... is a future we should try to avoid.
     
    When did new stories become editorials? This is now common but when did it start in the modern era? I know back in the old days newspapers were party outlets but in the modern era they used to pretend to be non-partisan except on the editorial page.

    The tag line seems to be tagged on at the very end. The story seemed to be fairly neutral as they acknowledged Steve's many contributions (now that it's fund raising time it's sad to think that one of our most influential thinkers has no mainstream platform and has to beg for tips like a street busker) and laid out his positions on race without becoming completely hysterical, but then I suppose they had to put this in to show that it was not intended as an endorsement. Yes, Steve has been right about everything important in American politics for 20 years and all the geniuses like Rove (not to mention 100% of the left) have been wrong, but still we should avoid him.

    As John Durant has noted, once the Internet made information free established news outlets pivoted wholesale into opinion-blogging.

  62. It should not go unmentioned that the Black vote, according to the 2016 exit polls, was down 5.5% when compared to 2012. The combined margin of victory, for Trump, of a mere 80,000 votes in 3 states : Wisconsin (Milwaukee), Michigan (Detroit), and Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) meant that Hillary’s candidacy did not drive the Black turnout in those places. Hillary was a Bridge Too Far, particularly for Black males : they stayed home in 2016.

    Trump’s candidacy encouraged Whites to turnout for him. In 2016, White turnout was up 2.2% over 2012 (Romney). The White die-off continues and the Immigration Act of 1965 voters increase, so perhaps Trump cannot be re-elected in 2020 – – – but does anybody in their right mind think that either Cory Booker or Kamala Harris will win in a cakewalk in 2020? It seems that Trump has a better than even chance to repeat his “Racist Appeal” in 2020, even with the declining population of remaining White voters, who will vote for him out of frightened motives of self-preservation in 2020. Hillary won California by 29% over Trump in 2016. Kamala Harris could win California by over 50% and still lose Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania bigly because of increased White voter turnout in those 3 states.

    It is hard for Whites to forget the last four years of Obama : it seemed that he was forever agitating for corrupt Whitey to be brought to heel and that evil Whitey must be brought to heel, out of “moral necessity” – – – the arc of history is long but it leads to Justice! If there ever was a racist and a liar, it was Obama. In Obama’s political world, Whitey stinks like a fart in church and it’s always payback time for righteous Persons of Color to descend on Whitey from a great height. Obama’s favorite word in the dictionary was REVENGE.

    • Replies: @Ed
    Don’t underestimate the strength of the young white vote in particular men. In DC this summer I’ve seen near daily bus loads of teenage white boys with MAGA hats on. Sometimes entire groups have them on. If they get to the polls they could be a force. Recall Trump basically needs to hold on to FL, PA and win one of the remaining (NC, MI, WI). I have a hard time seeing Kamala succeeding where Clinton failed.
  63. Anon[337] • Disclaimer says:

    Hey, my comment on the Times article got awarded a Times Pick!

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/11/opinion/sunday/the-white-strategy.html?comments#permid=28198729

    I deliberately angled for that by wording the comment to make it appear as though I was concerned about the future of the Democratic Party, but in fact my goal was to try to pound into the stupid heads of the Republicans the fact that, as I put it in the comment, “Any strategy that can get a train-wreck like Donald Trump elected president is truly powerful!”

    If you have a Times account please feel free to head over there and upvote my comment.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Hey, Anon 337. *I'm* Anonymous 337. Ask anyone here and they will tell you this: "I served with Anonymous 337. I knew Anonymous 337. Anonymous 337 was a friend of mine. Senator, you're no Anonymous 337!"
    , @Barnard
    Your reply to Barb from Wisconsin was pretty restrained considering she blamed Comey, the Russians and gerrymandering for Trump's win. From the little I have read of the Times comments that seems representative of their readers.
  64. Trende was misunderstood by certain critics as making a normative argument

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Practical_syllogism

    Aristotle discusses the notion of the practical syllogism within his treatise on ethics, his Nicomachean Ethics. A syllogism is a three-proposition argument consisting of a major premise stating some universal truth, a minor premise stating some particular truth, and a conclusion derived from these two premises.[2] The practical syllogism is a form of practical reasoning in syllogistic form, the conclusion of which is an action. An example might be that the major premise food cures hunger and the minor premise I am hungry leads to the practical conclusion of my eating food. Note that the conclusion here is not a third proposition, like I will eat, or the occurrence of an utterance like “I will eat,” but is simply the act of eating.

    The numbers offer a cautionary tale for both emerging-Democratic-majority inevitabilists and for a left whose increasing vehemence about the wickedness of “whiteness” probably encourages the white tribalism that Trump rallied and exploited.

    The Master Algorithm: How the Quest for the Ultimate Learning Machine Will Remake Our World is a book by Pedro Domingos released in 2015. Domingos wrote the book in order to generate interest from people outside the field.

    The book outlines five tribes of machine learning: inductive reasoning, connectionism, evolutionary computation, bayes theorem and analogical modelling. The author explains these tribes to the reader by referring to more understandable processes of logic, connections made in the brain, natural selection, probability and similarity judgements. Throughout the book, it is suggested that each different tribe has the potential to contribute to a unifying “master algorithm”.

  65. @Jack D

    Sailerism... is a future we should try to avoid.
     
    When did new stories become editorials? This is now common but when did it start in the modern era? I know back in the old days newspapers were party outlets but in the modern era they used to pretend to be non-partisan except on the editorial page.

    The tag line seems to be tagged on at the very end. The story seemed to be fairly neutral as they acknowledged Steve's many contributions (now that it's fund raising time it's sad to think that one of our most influential thinkers has no mainstream platform and has to beg for tips like a street busker) and laid out his positions on race without becoming completely hysterical, but then I suppose they had to put this in to show that it was not intended as an endorsement. Yes, Steve has been right about everything important in American politics for 20 years and all the geniuses like Rove (not to mention 100% of the left) have been wrong, but still we should avoid him.

    When did new stories become editorials? This is now common but when did it start in the modern era? I know back in the old days newspapers were party outlets but in the modern era they used to pretend to be non-partisan except on the editorial page.

    It’s hard to say. Opinion pages (as opposed to the editorial and letters page) dates back to 1970, when the New York Times introduced an opinion page opposite the editorial. Opinion columns and opinion articles were simply unknown, in newspapers through the post War years, until that point in time.

    Slanted reportage, or reportage as opinion probably dates back to the Clinton era, when newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots. I’m pretty sure it would have happened earlier, in the Reagan era, but for the fact that older generation publishers such as the current Sulzberger’s grandad, Punch Sulzberger, or Katherine Graham would simply not tolerated it. It pretty much became the norm during the Bush and Obama years.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    I make a hobby of reading old newspapers and magazines — slanted reporting has been the norm from the very beginning.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots

    Aren't the black-clad anarchists who rioted against globalism during the Seattle WTO meeting the same types who now riot in support of globalism?
    , @SteveO

    Opinion columns and opinion articles were simply unknown, in newspapers through the post War years, until [1970].
     
    No, that can't be right. Columnists like Walter Lippmann on one end of the spectrum and Westbrook Pegler on the other had been around since at least the 1930s. Drew Pearson was another. I remember James J Kilpatrick and Nicholas von Hoffman in the Post back in the ... late '60s, I think? There was lots of opinion journalism in the big-city papers, nationally syndicated and local, before 1970. Wasn't it always a thing?

    What you might be thinking of is the existence of a dedicated op-ed page with regular columnists and guests. I seem to recall the Kilpatrick, von Hoffman and Jack Anderson (successor to Pearson) columns being sort of scattered through the Post prior to the op-ed innovation.

    One big difference between then and now: Everybody read these guys, even those on the other side. They more or less had to, since the newspaper was the main source of news - much more important in places like NY and DC than TV network news. You saw the columns whether you wanted to or not, and so you read them.

    Now, people only see the words of those they agree with, along with a few tame "opponents".

  66. @Sam Haysom
    This is why the Overton window matters and not just in ideology but also temperament. compared to a guy like Richard Spencer Steve seems like a bank manager.

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.

    Sam,

    Consider the possibility that the struggles of your preferred candidates/principles may have something to do with a misconception on your/their part about what actually turns women on/off.

    Certainly your/their relative performance with that demographic might suggest that possibility could have some validity. In that case, some humility and curiosity could be in order.

    • Agree: Sean
    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    What does this even mean? I’d venture im to your right on social issues. But the whole mean girl clucking at ugly people thing turns people off. I’d love to see some evidence that it doesn’t.
  67. @Sam Haysom
    This is why the Overton window matters and not just in ideology but also temperament. compared to a guy like Richard Spencer Steve seems like a bank manager.

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.

    I’d half agree but the “Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf – Adolf Hitler” is probably turning more people off at the moment.

    • Replies: @Sean
    Non Germans were immune to Hitler's charisma even prewar when he seemed a highly successful politician and statesman. We are always fooled by our own, the other can never deceive us.
    , @PiltdownMan

    I’d half agree but the “Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf – Adolf Hitler” is probably turning more people off at the moment.
     
    Yeah, I've been wondering if Ron's thrown caution to the winds—leave that gold-bordered Mein Kampf as a headline item under the masthead for a while and it is sure to attract attention from the usual suspects—Morris Dees' SPLC and Foxman and Greenblatt's ADL.
    , @El Dato
    Maybe next week we will get Norman Spinrad's The Iron Dream

    Nah, it' still under copyright.

    (also, tropes)

    Stylistic Suck: Hitler's not a very good author. As anyone who's read even a few short passages of Mein Kampf can attest, he really wasn't. He's also very repetitive:

    "racial will" appears 31 times
    "leather" appears 69 times, with loving descriptions of uniforms and flags
    "steel" appears 142 times
     
    , @Big Bill
    Ron needs to add a link to "Das Kapital" next to "Mein Kampf". Let's see what they can make of that. Throw in a link to "Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl and her Daddy" just to get their hamster wheel really spinning.
    , @Colin Wright
    'I’d half agree but the “Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf – Adolf Hitler” is probably turning more people off at the moment.'

    That's a point, but it raises an interesting question.

    Is it better to allow the Mainstream narrative to lead you to censor yourself, or is it better to express exactly what you think -- or in this case, post -- what interests you?

    Both have their pitfalls. Trying to placate the mainstream of course leads to the sort of conventional 'conservatism' we have today. What is it? It seems to consist mostly of bashing Trump and serving Israel.

    On the other hand, it's also easy to marginalize yourself. I won't even bother to spark the usual responses, but I can think of at least one category of poster here I simply skip as soon as I realize what's up. If a tree falls in forest, and everyone's plugged their ears, is there a sound?

    For myself, at least in theory I try to distinguish between groups that I would eventually like to have as allies and those I fully and frankly intend to push off the bridge as soon as it's feasible. For example, I will try to avoid being rude to women -- but I see no need to be nice to Zionists.
  68. @snorlax

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.
     
    I'd half agree but the "Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf - Adolf Hitler" is probably turning more people off at the moment.

    Non Germans were immune to Hitler’s charisma even prewar when he seemed a highly successful politician and statesman. We are always fooled by our own, the other can never deceive us.

  69. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    I hope by Trumpy platform you are including not only the populism/nationalism but also the more pragmatic foreign policy he ran on- calling out George Bush for not keeping the U.S safe on 9/11, criticizing intervention in the Middle East, wanting to make deals with “adversaries” etc.

    Because no neocon will ever win the Presidency again. A non-isolationist Republican will never win no matter how nutty the Dems get- voters will stay home. Foreign policy is a big part of how Trump got places like Michigan and nearly got Minnesota. That’s how he got a lot of former Bernie supporters to switch over (which the media doesn’t talk about much). Trump won because he was outrageous, because he called out the powerful and slammed their ridiculousness and waste on national tv, often in a hilarious way. That was appealing to a lot of people and I really can’t imagine a Cotton or Romney style candidate doing that.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Foreign policy is a big part of how Trump got places like Michigan and nearly got Minnesota
     
    Ronald Reagan ran three percentage points ahead of Hillary while losing the state. In 2016, unfortunately, the anti-Clinton vote split Minnesota.
    , @Lot
    Good comment.

    Trump's foreign policy has been generally great.

    Regarding the neo-con issue, that term has evolved several times and I think it has now lost its usefulness, except as a historical term.

    What was a fairly coherent very pro-W group 10-20 years ago has split into many different groups

    1. centrist Democrats (Max Boot)
    2. anti-Trumpers who are otherwise conventional Republicans (McCain, Frum, George Will, the Bushes)
    3. anti-Trump to neutral Trump (the Kochs, Bill Kristol, much of National Review)
    4. MAGA (Pipes, Bolton, Gingrich, Giuliani, Pompeo, Cotton)
  70. Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.

    One guy in Washington State was so sick of three years in his dead end airport job that involved lots of heavy lifting, baggage lifting. That he stole his employer’s 30 million dollar airplane for a 20 minute joy ride and crashed it. But that airplane must be worth more than the reported 30 million.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    I don't think so. $30 million is the list price of a Dash 8 brand new (and airlines often pay less than sticker) but the one that crashed was six years old. Airplanes are like cars or any other used equipment - used is worth a lot less than new. I would guesstimate its value at maybe $10 million or so.

    Not sure why this is of any importance but it's a strange idea that this plane was somehow more valuable than reported.
  71. @snorlax

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.
     
    I'd half agree but the "Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf - Adolf Hitler" is probably turning more people off at the moment.

    I’d half agree but the “Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf – Adolf Hitler” is probably turning more people off at the moment.

    Yeah, I’ve been wondering if Ron’s thrown caution to the winds—leave that gold-bordered Mein Kampf as a headline item under the masthead for a while and it is sure to attract attention from the usual suspects—Morris Dees’ SPLC and Foxman and Greenblatt’s ADL.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Ron, for all his many virtues, has a blind spot a mile wide.
  72. @PiltdownMan

    When did new stories become editorials? This is now common but when did it start in the modern era? I know back in the old days newspapers were party outlets but in the modern era they used to pretend to be non-partisan except on the editorial page.
     
    It's hard to say. Opinion pages (as opposed to the editorial and letters page) dates back to 1970, when the New York Times introduced an opinion page opposite the editorial. Opinion columns and opinion articles were simply unknown, in newspapers through the post War years, until that point in time.

    Slanted reportage, or reportage as opinion probably dates back to the Clinton era, when newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots. I'm pretty sure it would have happened earlier, in the Reagan era, but for the fact that older generation publishers such as the current Sulzberger's grandad, Punch Sulzberger, or Katherine Graham would simply not tolerated it. It pretty much became the norm during the Bush and Obama years.

    I make a hobby of reading old newspapers and magazines — slanted reporting has been the norm from the very beginning.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal

    I make a hobby of reading old newspapers and magazines — slanted reporting has been the norm from the very beginning.
     
    Of course. "Objective journalism" is, and has always been, a myth. Even if the facts are reported more or less straight on a particular story, it's still easy to lie by using selection bias and the memory hole. What's the "objective" standard for what's "news," and what isn't?

    The best you can do is to have some sense of of the overall narrative that a particular source is pushing and what the financial interests and other loyalties of its owners are. And always seek out information rather than passively consume it from a single source. Even then, it's hard to know what's being left out.
    , @Stan Adams
    I have the same hobby, and I concur.

    Have you ever heard of this site? I spend a lot of time browsing through old papers:
    http://www.newspapers.com

    If you're not willing to spring for a subscription, Google has a decent little archive. The scan quality ranges from decent to awful:
    http://news.google.com/newspapers
  73. @Sam Haysom
    Eh except for the fact that as the stigma around things like disability have deceased white disability fraud has exploded.

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.

    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the “jobs > handouts” norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.

    • Agree: Prester John
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the “jobs > handouts” norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.
     
    Perhaps, but the left has a plan for that too. A large part of the motivation for things such as the "Affordable Care Act" is to create an economic climate in which staying out of the government subsidized benefits pool is more and more difficult, acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    Among prime-age (age 25-54) individuals, 87% of Non-Hispanic White males are employed. For Black males, the employment rate is 76%. Asian and Hispanic men are nearly identical to Whites in their respective employment rates.

    Non-Hispanic Women (72%) and Black Women (73%) have a similar employment rates.
    , @Lot
    Reminds me of a convo I had with some relatives who lost their jobs in W's Depression and had to take minimum wage work.

    Them: complaining about situation

    Me: Why don't you sign up for EBT? You easily qualify, two adults three kids on 30,000 a year.

    Them: No we'd never sign up for welfare

    Me: why not you paid taxes for years, it is just getting some back

    Them: Never, we're not *****



    By the way one of them registered to vote for Trump, first time he voted in his life. His wife went Obama, Obama, Trump. I might have too, I forgot who I voted for in 2012.
  74. “Probably?”

    A more accurate term would be “perhaps”.

  75. @snorlax

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.
     
    I'd half agree but the "Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf - Adolf Hitler" is probably turning more people off at the moment.

    Maybe next week we will get Norman Spinrad’s The Iron Dream

    Nah, it’ still under copyright.

    (also, tropes)

    Stylistic Suck: Hitler’s not a very good author. As anyone who’s read even a few short passages of Mein Kampf can attest, he really wasn’t. He’s also very repetitive:

    “racial will” appears 31 times
    “leather” appears 69 times, with loving descriptions of uniforms and flags
    “steel” appears 142 times

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Wow, I didn't think I'd ever run into anyone else who read that clunker!

    On the other hand, Spinrad's Little Heroes was a pretty prescient take on where we're headed.
  76. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    Good points, but regarding the lack of a link, given the accelerating repression of alternative opinions in the media, I doubt if the NYT editors would have allowed Ross to put a link to Steve in this column. (Assuming he even wanted to). Their strategy is to render the opposition voiceless and invisible. Notice that Ross didn’t even mention any names so the snowflake NYT readers won’t be tempted to go looking for sites like Unz and get turned to pillars of salt.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal

    I doubt if the NYT editors would have allowed Ross to put a link to Steve in this column. (Assuming he even wanted to). Their strategy is to render the opposition voiceless and invisible.
     
    Yeah, they try to actively steer people away from crimethink. But part of it may also be that they're still trying to maintain some semblance of the old "And that's the way it is" model -- the media as the Voice of God; a pseudo-primary source that you must trust implicitly. The more they utilize links, the more they call people's attention to the fact that they're actually an intermediary, and that if someone has any real interest in the topic, they should read the original source, rather than simply accepting the Sulzberger Blog's opinion on what one should think about it.
  77. Party switchers, not race was the key to 2016 election.
    I disagree with the “white voter” analysis simply because it is not based on fact just opinion. There are no statistics kept anywhere on the race of a voter.
    If one seeks a reason for Trumps win one should look at the 2016 primary election vote totals for those states which allow voters to choose a candidate in either party. Simply compare vote totals in those states for Democrats and Republicans in 2016 to the primary vote totals by party in 2012 and 2008. You will find the vote totals for the R primary voters to be significantly higher in 2016. Those increases are almost exactly matched by decreases in D voter totals. This is all public information and easy to find.
    The conclusion is that a lot of Democrat voters (of all races) switched to voting Republican. This trend is real and can be supported by real facts. This is the reason Trump won the nomination and the reason he won the general election.

    • Replies: @Highlander
    There are tons of statistics compiled by race of voters. These are gleaned by various methods. Just Google "race of voter statistics."
  78. @Anonymous

    The numbers offer a cautionary tale for both emerging-Democratic-majority inevitabilists and for a left whose increasing vehemence about the wickedness of “whiteness” probably encourages the white tribalism that Trump rallied and exploited.
     
    Does Douthat vote Democrat or otherwise lean left? He certainly writes as though that's where his sympathies lie.

    Does Douthat vote Democrat or otherwise lean left? He certainly writes as though that’s where his sympathies lie.

    Douthat exists on the margins of elite polite society as a sort of curiosity with his TradCath views – it’s expected that whether he sincerely believes it or not he has to say when called upon that downscale whites are icky and problematic.

    Who in his right mind could write this with a straight face? I mean, someone who has been paying attention?:

    His mix of economic populism and deliberate racial polarization was supposed to be demographically foredoomed — but instead it won him precisely those regions Trende’s analysis had highlighted, and the presidency as well.

    In this view, “racial polarization” must mean not enthusiastically offering one’s self and progeny on the altar of the cult of multicultural diversity.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I thought Obama promoted "deliberate racial polarization," but no one at the New York Times seemed to notice..
  79. @RichardTaylor

    The numbers offer a cautionary tale for both emerging-Democratic-majority inevitabilists and for a left whose increasing vehemence about the wickedness of “whiteness” probably encourages the white tribalism that Trump rallied and exploited.
     
    The polarization is inevitable. If you see anti-Whitism, don't bother trying to argue against it. Just expose it. Encourage the person to say the most anti-White things possible.

    The polarization is inevitable. If you see anti-Whitism, don’t bother trying to argue against it. Just expose it. Encourage the person to say the most anti-White things possible.

    Exactly. The inimitable Tyrone Trump lays out this theory at considerably greater length, in his rather idiosyncratic (and somewhat profane) style:

    https://tyronetrump.wordpress.com/2018/05/23/fascism-warfare/

    https://tyronetrump.wordpress.com/2017/12/22/subkult/

  80. @Sam Haysom
    This is why the Overton window matters and not just in ideology but also temperament. compared to a guy like Richard Spencer Steve seems like a bank manager.

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.

    This is why the Overton window matters and not just in ideology but also temperament. compared to a guy like Richard Spencer Steve seems like a bank manager.

    It matters a lot, but for right now, not the way you think.

    The one clear accomplishment of the Trump Administration is that we’ve moved our edge of the Overton Window in our favor. And despite what most of us like to think here, that’s not holding us back at the moment. We can make, in a respectable enough way, whatever arguments we need, we just can’t win them.

    Right now, it’s a lot more valuable for us to move their edge of the Overton Window in our favor. If the Republicans do reasonably well in November, the Sarah Jeong/Maxine Waters Left edge of nasty is a clear loser for them. That will be a significant problem considering how much of the activist Left is invested in that sort of thing.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  81. @snorlax
    I make a hobby of reading old newspapers and magazines — slanted reporting has been the norm from the very beginning.

    I make a hobby of reading old newspapers and magazines — slanted reporting has been the norm from the very beginning.

    Of course. “Objective journalism” is, and has always been, a myth. Even if the facts are reported more or less straight on a particular story, it’s still easy to lie by using selection bias and the memory hole. What’s the “objective” standard for what’s “news,” and what isn’t?

    The best you can do is to have some sense of of the overall narrative that a particular source is pushing and what the financial interests and other loyalties of its owners are. And always seek out information rather than passively consume it from a single source. Even then, it’s hard to know what’s being left out.

  82. @ThreeCranes
    What would happen if He Who Must Not Be Named meets She Who Must Be Obeyed?

    She tells him they need a new dishwasher?

  83. “They are more worried about undersampling minority groups than undersampling whites,”

    Great. If they knew how fragile their hold on power is, they’d do something.

    Amirite?

    I fail to see what Sailer’s complaint is – Douthat linked to an article that explicitly mentioned “The Sailer Strategy” – while characterizing it as “on the margins” of conservatism. This is factually correct, and exactly what Sailer bemoans!

    A comment on the Douthat article: “Here’s the thing: the Democratic Party knows that if its share of the black vote ever falls below 85%, it will never win a presidential election again. ”

    I really don’t know that this is true – I suspect there is a grain of truth in it. I think it would depend on individual states. We don’t have one General Election, we have 50 elections. The comment might be true in the states in which the black vote is a decisive swing vote.

    • Replies: @education realist
    The black vote is never a swing vote. It's always a binary thing, on/off, counting as a factor in Dem performance only. And the only thing meant by "black vote" is "black voters where they can count as a factor."

    Blacks not turning out for Clinton, also actually giving Trump a bigger percentage of last 2 GOP presidents, are signs they aren't terribly threatened by Trump.
  84. @Dan Hayes
    Anonymous[918]:

    But it doesn't take a genius to see that American nationalism could be a winning strategy.
     

    Oh yeah. How come Steve Sailer was one of the few (if only) prognosticators who publicly pointed out what was supposedly so patently obvious?

    SS publicly identified the Franklin on the ground. Trump was the only one who picked it up!

    SS publicly identified the Franklin on the ground. Trump was the only one who picked it up!

    Why was Trump the only one to pick it up?

    And despite proven success, why is he still the only one close to espousing nationalist views two years later?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    There's a $100 bill on the sidewalk, lying there for any politician to pick up.

    Standing nearby is a political donor offering him $1,000 not to pick it up.
  85. @Dave Pinsen
    Ross has credited Steve by name before, but something has changed recently with Ross, where he’s trying to distance himself from both Steve and Trump, even though he’s largely on the same page as both of them.

    even though he’s largely on the same page as both of them.

    What evidence have you seen of that?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Ross co-wrote a book about how the GOP could and should attract the (white, implicitly) working class. He also echoed Steve's "coalition of the fringes" observation after the 2012 election. There's more evidence, but those are two examples that come immediately to mind.
  86. @Alfa158
    Good points, but regarding the lack of a link, given the accelerating repression of alternative opinions in the media, I doubt if the NYT editors would have allowed Ross to put a link to Steve in this column. (Assuming he even wanted to). Their strategy is to render the opposition voiceless and invisible. Notice that Ross didn’t even mention any names so the snowflake NYT readers won’t be tempted to go looking for sites like Unz and get turned to pillars of salt.

    I doubt if the NYT editors would have allowed Ross to put a link to Steve in this column. (Assuming he even wanted to). Their strategy is to render the opposition voiceless and invisible.

    Yeah, they try to actively steer people away from crimethink. But part of it may also be that they’re still trying to maintain some semblance of the old “And that’s the way it is” model — the media as the Voice of God; a pseudo-primary source that you must trust implicitly. The more they utilize links, the more they call people’s attention to the fact that they’re actually an intermediary, and that if someone has any real interest in the topic, they should read the original source, rather than simply accepting the Sulzberger Blog’s opinion on what one should think about it.

  87. @snorlax
    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the "jobs > handouts" norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.

    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the “jobs > handouts” norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.

    Perhaps, but the left has a plan for that too. A large part of the motivation for things such as the “Affordable Care Act” is to create an economic climate in which staying out of the government subsidized benefits pool is more and more difficult, acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.

    • Agree: snorlax
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Yes. Hence propaganda to that effect like the "Life of Julia" and the push for "universal basic income."
    , @Sleep

    A large part of the motivation for things such as the “Affordable Care Act” is to create an economic climate in which staying out of the government subsidized benefits pool is more and more difficult, acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.
     
    That, and to ensure the people depend on the government for basic life needs, and will continue to vote for higher taxes and bigger government even when they perceive the government to be otherwise hostile.
    , @Forbes

    acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.
     
    From what I've observed, the under-40 cohort has dispensed with shame--and are far from being acculturated as proud and independent. They are glued to social media making them fad and trend followers of the most banal sort. They're buying the propaganda pumped out on Facebook, et al., which is why there's so much alarm expressed about fake news or "fake news," and the need to shut down/censor alternative voices that challenge the propaganda, challenge The Narrative, or merely present alternative perspectives (even if dark conspiracy theories).

    Just ask yourself, how is Kim Kardashian a "thing"--a celebrity, a socialite, a TV personality, except for a complete lack of shame?
    , @Le Autiste Corv
    Just pitch it to them that they "earned it", like all those taxpayer-subsidized hip replacements.
  88. @Bill P
    These elite republican pundits need to spend more time with proles. They seem to think that being supplicating will increase the share of the minority vote.

    This is exactly backward. Republicans who are unapologetic, tough and practical - while also fair - will get more respect from all but the elite minorities. For example, cracking down on illegal immigration will be more popular with Hispanic voters than open borders. Why people can't understand that a Texan roofer named Jorge might not be happy about a couple million Central Americans suddenly showing up just confounds me. And as for black voters, you aren't going to outdemocrat the democrats, so appeal to the types who have their lives together and dislike the BLM punks. They need a reason to vote Republican, and if you just imitate the democrats with racial platitudes there is no reason.

    Pandering will get Republicans nowhere. It will have diminishing returns for democrats as well. Now that minorities have more of their own candidates to choose from, why vote for some supplicating white sad sack?

    The way forward for Republicans is to be unapologetic Americans. That includes being unapologetic about race, culture, religion, etc. You don't gain admirers by grovelling. Especially not among your typical working class minorities.

    Now the elite minorities are another story. They have assimilated to white elite norms of contempt for non-elite white Americans. Most of them are fully onboard with the new Morgenthau Plan for non-progressive white America. It's a shame but it is what it is, and there's probably not much that can be done about it besides clamping down on immigration from Asia and letting the Sarah Jeong's of this world have it with both barrels.

    And speaking of her, that fine lady is now Ross Douthat' s esteemed colleague. Mr. Douthat, always ready to condemn any hint of something inoffensive and normal such as white solidarity, hasn't made a peep about Jeong's racial trash-talking. Her employment at the Times is only going to make him look more like a hypocrite than he already does. I mean, you could make excuses for Charles Blow, but not an ungrateful little snake like her. So every time he gets on his high horse about racism, people are going to know he works for a paper that endorses racial hatred of whites.

    That can't be a very comfortable position to be in for Ross.

    “Contempt for non elite White Americans”

    Sounds just like our commenters Jeff Stryker and Jilles Dystrka.

  89. @Alec Leamas

    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the “jobs > handouts” norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.
     
    Perhaps, but the left has a plan for that too. A large part of the motivation for things such as the "Affordable Care Act" is to create an economic climate in which staying out of the government subsidized benefits pool is more and more difficult, acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.

    Yes. Hence propaganda to that effect like the “Life of Julia” and the push for “universal basic income.”

  90. @Lot
    Douthat is a conservative Catholic on social issues and centrist on economic issues, and I believe has likely been a straight-ticket GOP voter his whole adult life.

    Also a Stevosphere member of long standing

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2014/05/from-steveosphere-on-troublesome.html

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/09/american-scene.html

    Coincidentally am re-reading “A Troublesome Inheritance” and while I agree with most of Wade’s points, I still remain unconvinced that it is possible for the human mind to measure its own intelligence in any meaningful way without necessarily having to become arbitrary –indeed subjective– or risk falling into paradox . Be that as it may, a whole industry has been built up around such as IQ so…it is what it is.

  91. @SnakeEyes
    Kind of gutless of him to not link to you directly.

    In a world with a press interested in free and open inquiry into all ideas, Douthat would reply to you directly here. Given the state of the NY Times he works for, it was most likely a struggle to get that link in his column. NY Times readers may not be that curious about the links, I ran a search on “Sailer” in the comments and didn’t get any hits.

  92. OT,

    That awkward moment when a dedicated hack says something true:

    • Replies: @WowJustWow
    Pro tip for those who must struggle to survive in the rhetorical minefields of academia, government, and journalism: When a progressive proposal is necessarily predicated on a progressively unpalatable assumption, simply state the conclusion, and leave the assumption unspoken, even if there's so little inferential distance between the assumption and the conclusion that they can be stated in almost exactly the same words.

    That's the essence of "the fine boundary between 'I try to be sensitive to differences in learning style and their implications for diversity' and 'I understand that poor and minority students may learn differently to others.'": https://quillette.com/2018/06/25/shibboleths-that-exclude-in-the-name-of-inclusion/
  93. @Bill P
    These elite republican pundits need to spend more time with proles. They seem to think that being supplicating will increase the share of the minority vote.

    This is exactly backward. Republicans who are unapologetic, tough and practical - while also fair - will get more respect from all but the elite minorities. For example, cracking down on illegal immigration will be more popular with Hispanic voters than open borders. Why people can't understand that a Texan roofer named Jorge might not be happy about a couple million Central Americans suddenly showing up just confounds me. And as for black voters, you aren't going to outdemocrat the democrats, so appeal to the types who have their lives together and dislike the BLM punks. They need a reason to vote Republican, and if you just imitate the democrats with racial platitudes there is no reason.

    Pandering will get Republicans nowhere. It will have diminishing returns for democrats as well. Now that minorities have more of their own candidates to choose from, why vote for some supplicating white sad sack?

    The way forward for Republicans is to be unapologetic Americans. That includes being unapologetic about race, culture, religion, etc. You don't gain admirers by grovelling. Especially not among your typical working class minorities.

    Now the elite minorities are another story. They have assimilated to white elite norms of contempt for non-elite white Americans. Most of them are fully onboard with the new Morgenthau Plan for non-progressive white America. It's a shame but it is what it is, and there's probably not much that can be done about it besides clamping down on immigration from Asia and letting the Sarah Jeong's of this world have it with both barrels.

    And speaking of her, that fine lady is now Ross Douthat' s esteemed colleague. Mr. Douthat, always ready to condemn any hint of something inoffensive and normal such as white solidarity, hasn't made a peep about Jeong's racial trash-talking. Her employment at the Times is only going to make him look more like a hypocrite than he already does. I mean, you could make excuses for Charles Blow, but not an ungrateful little snake like her. So every time he gets on his high horse about racism, people are going to know he works for a paper that endorses racial hatred of whites.

    That can't be a very comfortable position to be in for Ross.

    Great point about the most effective way to bleed off some minority voters is to be unapologetic.

  94. @Desiderius
    Sam,

    Consider the possibility that the struggles of your preferred candidates/principles may have something to do with a misconception on your/their part about what actually turns women on/off.

    Certainly your/their relative performance with that demographic might suggest that possibility could have some validity. In that case, some humility and curiosity could be in order.

    What does this even mean? I’d venture im to your right on social issues. But the whole mean girl clucking at ugly people thing turns people off. I’d love to see some evidence that it doesn’t.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    A) not much room there

    B) being afraid of women turns them off
    , @Intelligent Dasein
    To be perfectly honest (and I know I'm going to get junked for saying this here), I think talking about race and ethnicity at all is generally a nonstarter. And this is not because "normies" are too thoroughly indoctrinated in multiculturalism to absorb the discussion, but because it really is far too Procrustean a bed into which to fit the vital issues of the day. The kind of people who frequent places like Unz may have difficulty remembering that ethnological studies just aren't a priority for most people. Once you start throwing in a lot of HBD terms, genetics, IQ, and evolution, you've effectively glazed the eyes of 90% of the audience, and you're left preaching to a very odd choir. The average person doesn't really want to have a conversation about race at all. He wants to forget about it; he wants this whole silly subject to leave him the heck alone. He doesn't want to have to have an opinion about it, not one he is obliged to confess in public anyway, and especially not one that he has to carefully tailor in order to avoid suspicion of thought-crime.

    This should suggest what ought to be a proper populist strategy: Dismantle those legal and social structures which lead to the emergence of a racial grievance industry. President Trump could take a huge step in this direction simply by announcing that Affirmative Action and federal hiring quotas will no longer be enforced. The Left will raise an unprecedented outcry over this and will probably sue and demonstrate like never before, but it's hard to argue with the substance of the decision. Since the opposite of preferential treatment is "meritocracy," the inherent fairness of the proposal will win over that portion of the public who really matters. Let everyone who takes the opposite side be forced to buy in to the explicit proposition that certain ethnics are entitled to special treatment at public expense. They will never succeed at getting that ratified into law, nor will it ever be accepted by the general population. Once individuals and private institutions know that they are free to associate with whom they please, the grievance industry will dry up for lack of profit.

    The only two things even making this an issue are the Warren Court laws and the welfare state. The liquidating of these two pernicious influences is a difficult but politically attainable goal. The effort should be focused there.
  95. “One straightforward way to demonstrate that you are Harvard material might be to denounce Harvard as racist.”

    The Reihan Salam article Douthat links to is actually pretty good, if you imagine him as a narrator taking on the role of a disinterested naturalist studying a curious phenomenon, allowing the reader infer the article for himself as a description of a holiness-spiraling civilizational death trap.

  96. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and “Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler” lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    I thought about that as well but decided:

    – It’s far better to err on the side of being a free speech absolutist. Planting a flag all the way out there beside Hitler’s Mein Kampf gives one a lot of middle ground to play with.

    – The saying “they’re going to call you a Nazi anyway” has merit. If one agrees to run through their politically correct obstacle course, they always win the game. By bypassing it, vast areas of opportunity open up. Trump got this during the election.

  97. @candid_observer
    OT,

    That awkward moment when a dedicated hack says something true:

    https://twitter.com/OrwellNGoode/status/1028287383349940224

    Pro tip for those who must struggle to survive in the rhetorical minefields of academia, government, and journalism: When a progressive proposal is necessarily predicated on a progressively unpalatable assumption, simply state the conclusion, and leave the assumption unspoken, even if there’s so little inferential distance between the assumption and the conclusion that they can be stated in almost exactly the same words.

    That’s the essence of “the fine boundary between ‘I try to be sensitive to differences in learning style and their implications for diversity’ and ‘I understand that poor and minority students may learn differently to others.’”: https://quillette.com/2018/06/25/shibboleths-that-exclude-in-the-name-of-inclusion/

    • Replies: @Anon
    Could you give us more examples?
    , @El Dato
    That link was just a polite and highly volubile way of saying to the PC brigade that they are unsufferable assholes.

    Respect!

    Interestingly, philosophy is also under fire for its diversity problems, so one can assume that philosophers’ Diversity Statements will face particular scrutiny. But one needn’t approve of all of the conduct ever exhibited by philosophers to wonder how easy it will be to get trained logicians to swallow the party line without question. They tried that on Socrates, and he chose to swallow poison instead.

     

    LOL.

    Somehow the movie Ridicule comes to mind.
  98. @Sam Haysom
    What does this even mean? I’d venture im to your right on social issues. But the whole mean girl clucking at ugly people thing turns people off. I’d love to see some evidence that it doesn’t.

    A) not much room there

    B) being afraid of women turns them off

  99. @Anonymous

    In reality, he suggested that a Republican Party with a more populist economic message might win the missing whites and more minority votes as well.
     
    .

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about "white tribalism." Don't let them. It's a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.

    Indeed. The cracks are showing. Poor polling, as done by CNN, shows black male Trump vote share at 13%.

    https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Politics/2016/1205/Among-black-men-a-spark-of-support-for-Donald-Trump

    I have seen analyses elsewhere that show black male voting for Trump at 20%. I suspect that this percentage will rise if the nationalist economic platform improves things for the working classes, white and black.

  100. @Steve in Greensboro
    Steve Sailer is one of the few indispensable cultural analysts.

    The only other analyst that I'm aware of that published work hinting at this electoral strategy (or something like it) was Angelo Codevilla in his "America's Ruling Class" an essay in The American Spectator back in July 2010. Codevilla wasn't making an explicitly racial argument, but rather that a majority of Americans in 2010 were not represented by either party, both of which governed in the interests of the Ruling Class. It happens that then (and I think still now) this unrepresented majority is predominantly white.

    I think the reason such matters weren't publicly discussed is that there was no money in expressing them. Even today, such discussions are greeted with shrieks of "witch, burn the witch!" I am sure the NYT comments section (if such a thing exists) is a hotbed of triggered SJW ravings in response to Douthat's essay.

    Codevilla expanded that essay into a 147-page pamphlet in:

    • Agree: Dieter Kief
  101. The article is right in that the secret to Trump’s success is focussing on the white vote, and getting enough of it to win whatever the remaining 30% of the electorate do.

    …and I think that white people can do this, and in the present situation, should do it.

    The sad bit about it all is that it leads to the kind of political paralysis that marked Northern Ireland for so long. Instead of Protestant versus Catholic, you get White versus non-white, and all other political considerations become subordinate to that.

    Take Trump. I think a lot of his policies are literally catastrophic, but what choice do I have? Support the Democratic candidate? I’ll take bad policy over suicide, thank you. We no longer have the luxury of debating among ourselves — that way lies Hillary Clinton. We have to rally around the ‘white’ candidate — and stick to him, no matter how big an idiot he is.

    And that’s where we’re headed. That or worse. Once everything is defined in terms of race, how do we reverse course? About the only other observation that seems germane at the moment is that it’s the minorities and the Left that started this. The ‘white power structure’ (such as it was) in this country was perfectly willing to share; there wasn’t much effective resistance.

    One would think that would have been enough. For most ordinary non-whites, it probably would have been. But no. The only way the ethno-warriors could keep their jobs was to keep demanding more, and so they did, and so here we all are.

    So it’s all somebody else’s fault. That, however, is cold comfort. It remains our problem.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    And that’s where we’re headed. That or worse. Once everything is defined in terms of race, how do we reverse course?
     
    Secession/partition into ethnostates?
  102. @PiltdownMan

    When did new stories become editorials? This is now common but when did it start in the modern era? I know back in the old days newspapers were party outlets but in the modern era they used to pretend to be non-partisan except on the editorial page.
     
    It's hard to say. Opinion pages (as opposed to the editorial and letters page) dates back to 1970, when the New York Times introduced an opinion page opposite the editorial. Opinion columns and opinion articles were simply unknown, in newspapers through the post War years, until that point in time.

    Slanted reportage, or reportage as opinion probably dates back to the Clinton era, when newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots. I'm pretty sure it would have happened earlier, in the Reagan era, but for the fact that older generation publishers such as the current Sulzberger's grandad, Punch Sulzberger, or Katherine Graham would simply not tolerated it. It pretty much became the norm during the Bush and Obama years.

    newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots

    Aren’t the black-clad anarchists who rioted against globalism during the Seattle WTO meeting the same types who now riot in support of globalism?

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Antifa types are for globalism on the ground (ie. multiculturalism) but against it at the international level. Centrist globalists take the most extreme position. They are for both international and local globalism. Conservative Inc. globalists are for international globalism but increasingly drag their feet on globalism at the national level. Of course their resistance to multiculturalism and mass immigration is half-assed, apologetic and deliberately impotent, so they should just be counted along with the centrists. They're judas-goat globalists in charge of bringing the White majority population along with the plan.
    , @Colin Wright
    'Aren’t the black-clad anarchists who rioted against globalism during the Seattle WTO meeting the same types who now riot in support of globalism?'

    Orwell observed something similar eighty years ago; the same people who had supported Communism in the twenties advocated fascism in the thirties.

    It's not about specific policies; it's about adopting a set of views that allow you to be violent.

    These people are hypocritical, morally empty swine. They just want an excuse to smash someone's face in.
    , @mr. wild
    Bingo. The 20th anniversary of the WTO protests will be an excellent opportunity to review the shift in leftism.
    , @Carol
    Yes. And at the time I wondered why they would oppose a system that would share America's wealth with the rest of the world. Because we monopolized so much of it.
  103. @snorlax

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.
     
    I'd half agree but the "Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf - Adolf Hitler" is probably turning more people off at the moment.

    Ron needs to add a link to “Das Kapital” next to “Mein Kampf”. Let’s see what they can make of that. Throw in a link to “Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl and her Daddy” just to get their hamster wheel really spinning.

  104. Several things killed Mitt Romney; but personally, what I saw was the devastating effect of that ‘49%’ crack.

    My wife is Hispanic, and an Evangelical, and although we personally weren’t poor, we certainly weren’t rich. More to the point, though, my wife continues to identify with the sort of Hispanics that patronize Evangelical churches — usually poor and economically marginalized, but desperately hard-working. It is not unusual for the men to hold two full time jobs while the woman holds one and tries to tend to the kids.

    So anyway, we’re at a wine-tasting place, and the server starts praising Romney. I kind of bite my tongue — I’m enjoying being mildly buzzed, and I don’t actually want a furious political argument. My wife is won over, and she comes out sure she’s going to vote for Romney. I continue to bite my tongue.

    The very next day Romney comes out with that ‘49%’ remark. It was priceless.

  105. @Bill P
    These elite republican pundits need to spend more time with proles. They seem to think that being supplicating will increase the share of the minority vote.

    This is exactly backward. Republicans who are unapologetic, tough and practical - while also fair - will get more respect from all but the elite minorities. For example, cracking down on illegal immigration will be more popular with Hispanic voters than open borders. Why people can't understand that a Texan roofer named Jorge might not be happy about a couple million Central Americans suddenly showing up just confounds me. And as for black voters, you aren't going to outdemocrat the democrats, so appeal to the types who have their lives together and dislike the BLM punks. They need a reason to vote Republican, and if you just imitate the democrats with racial platitudes there is no reason.

    Pandering will get Republicans nowhere. It will have diminishing returns for democrats as well. Now that minorities have more of their own candidates to choose from, why vote for some supplicating white sad sack?

    The way forward for Republicans is to be unapologetic Americans. That includes being unapologetic about race, culture, religion, etc. You don't gain admirers by grovelling. Especially not among your typical working class minorities.

    Now the elite minorities are another story. They have assimilated to white elite norms of contempt for non-elite white Americans. Most of them are fully onboard with the new Morgenthau Plan for non-progressive white America. It's a shame but it is what it is, and there's probably not much that can be done about it besides clamping down on immigration from Asia and letting the Sarah Jeong's of this world have it with both barrels.

    And speaking of her, that fine lady is now Ross Douthat' s esteemed colleague. Mr. Douthat, always ready to condemn any hint of something inoffensive and normal such as white solidarity, hasn't made a peep about Jeong's racial trash-talking. Her employment at the Times is only going to make him look more like a hypocrite than he already does. I mean, you could make excuses for Charles Blow, but not an ungrateful little snake like her. So every time he gets on his high horse about racism, people are going to know he works for a paper that endorses racial hatred of whites.

    That can't be a very comfortable position to be in for Ross.

    Why people can’t understand that a Texan roofer named Jorge might not be happy about a couple million Central Americans suddenly showing up just confounds me.

    The latinx “Talented Tenth” elite managed to retcon Cesar Chavez into an anti-white open borders activist, so most latinx don’t have any ideological leaders around whom to coalesce.

    The potential to snatch latinx who favor border enforcement is still there, but has not been tapped. Audacious Epigone, for example, recently posted polling data showing that latinx are divided on open borders.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    An awful lot of the guys in the Border Patrol guys are Latinos.
  106. @Sam Haysom
    This is why the Overton window matters and not just in ideology but also temperament. compared to a guy like Richard Spencer Steve seems like a bank manager.

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.

    Concern troll is concerned.

  107. @WowJustWow
    Pro tip for those who must struggle to survive in the rhetorical minefields of academia, government, and journalism: When a progressive proposal is necessarily predicated on a progressively unpalatable assumption, simply state the conclusion, and leave the assumption unspoken, even if there's so little inferential distance between the assumption and the conclusion that they can be stated in almost exactly the same words.

    That's the essence of "the fine boundary between 'I try to be sensitive to differences in learning style and their implications for diversity' and 'I understand that poor and minority students may learn differently to others.'": https://quillette.com/2018/06/25/shibboleths-that-exclude-in-the-name-of-inclusion/

    Could you give us more examples?

  108. @Sam Haysom
    What does this even mean? I’d venture im to your right on social issues. But the whole mean girl clucking at ugly people thing turns people off. I’d love to see some evidence that it doesn’t.

    To be perfectly honest (and I know I’m going to get junked for saying this here), I think talking about race and ethnicity at all is generally a nonstarter. And this is not because “normies” are too thoroughly indoctrinated in multiculturalism to absorb the discussion, but because it really is far too Procrustean a bed into which to fit the vital issues of the day. The kind of people who frequent places like Unz may have difficulty remembering that ethnological studies just aren’t a priority for most people. Once you start throwing in a lot of HBD terms, genetics, IQ, and evolution, you’ve effectively glazed the eyes of 90% of the audience, and you’re left preaching to a very odd choir. The average person doesn’t really want to have a conversation about race at all. He wants to forget about it; he wants this whole silly subject to leave him the heck alone. He doesn’t want to have to have an opinion about it, not one he is obliged to confess in public anyway, and especially not one that he has to carefully tailor in order to avoid suspicion of thought-crime.

    This should suggest what ought to be a proper populist strategy: Dismantle those legal and social structures which lead to the emergence of a racial grievance industry. President Trump could take a huge step in this direction simply by announcing that Affirmative Action and federal hiring quotas will no longer be enforced. The Left will raise an unprecedented outcry over this and will probably sue and demonstrate like never before, but it’s hard to argue with the substance of the decision. Since the opposite of preferential treatment is “meritocracy,” the inherent fairness of the proposal will win over that portion of the public who really matters. Let everyone who takes the opposite side be forced to buy in to the explicit proposition that certain ethnics are entitled to special treatment at public expense. They will never succeed at getting that ratified into law, nor will it ever be accepted by the general population. Once individuals and private institutions know that they are free to associate with whom they please, the grievance industry will dry up for lack of profit.

    The only two things even making this an issue are the Warren Court laws and the welfare state. The liquidating of these two pernicious influences is a difficult but politically attainable goal. The effort should be focused there.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    Dismantle those legal and social structures which lead to the emergence of a racial grievance industry.
     
    I like it. If Trump could realize it, the field of play would be reoriented, and dramatically so.
    , @Anonymous

    sue and demonstrate like never before
     
    No, they'll have to style and profile like never before because to be the man, Rick Steamboat!, you have to BEAT THE MAN!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrXTVFx8DXs
  109. @WowJustWow
    Pro tip for those who must struggle to survive in the rhetorical minefields of academia, government, and journalism: When a progressive proposal is necessarily predicated on a progressively unpalatable assumption, simply state the conclusion, and leave the assumption unspoken, even if there's so little inferential distance between the assumption and the conclusion that they can be stated in almost exactly the same words.

    That's the essence of "the fine boundary between 'I try to be sensitive to differences in learning style and their implications for diversity' and 'I understand that poor and minority students may learn differently to others.'": https://quillette.com/2018/06/25/shibboleths-that-exclude-in-the-name-of-inclusion/

    That link was just a polite and highly volubile way of saying to the PC brigade that they are unsufferable assholes.

    Respect!

    Interestingly, philosophy is also under fire for its diversity problems, so one can assume that philosophers’ Diversity Statements will face particular scrutiny. But one needn’t approve of all of the conduct ever exhibited by philosophers to wonder how easy it will be to get trained logicians to swallow the party line without question. They tried that on Socrates, and he chose to swallow poison instead.

    LOL.

    Somehow the movie Ridicule comes to mind.

  110. @Alec Leamas

    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the “jobs > handouts” norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.
     
    Perhaps, but the left has a plan for that too. A large part of the motivation for things such as the "Affordable Care Act" is to create an economic climate in which staying out of the government subsidized benefits pool is more and more difficult, acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.

    A large part of the motivation for things such as the “Affordable Care Act” is to create an economic climate in which staying out of the government subsidized benefits pool is more and more difficult, acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.

    That, and to ensure the people depend on the government for basic life needs, and will continue to vote for higher taxes and bigger government even when they perceive the government to be otherwise hostile.

  111. @Harry Baldwin
    newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots

    Aren't the black-clad anarchists who rioted against globalism during the Seattle WTO meeting the same types who now riot in support of globalism?

    Antifa types are for globalism on the ground (ie. multiculturalism) but against it at the international level. Centrist globalists take the most extreme position. They are for both international and local globalism. Conservative Inc. globalists are for international globalism but increasingly drag their feet on globalism at the national level. Of course their resistance to multiculturalism and mass immigration is half-assed, apologetic and deliberately impotent, so they should just be counted along with the centrists. They’re judas-goat globalists in charge of bringing the White majority population along with the plan.

  112. @Alec Leamas

    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the “jobs > handouts” norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.
     
    Perhaps, but the left has a plan for that too. A large part of the motivation for things such as the "Affordable Care Act" is to create an economic climate in which staying out of the government subsidized benefits pool is more and more difficult, acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.

    acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.

    From what I’ve observed, the under-40 cohort has dispensed with shame–and are far from being acculturated as proud and independent. They are glued to social media making them fad and trend followers of the most banal sort. They’re buying the propaganda pumped out on Facebook, et al., which is why there’s so much alarm expressed about fake news or “fake news,” and the need to shut down/censor alternative voices that challenge the propaganda, challenge The Narrative, or merely present alternative perspectives (even if dark conspiracy theories).

    Just ask yourself, how is Kim Kardashian a “thing”–a celebrity, a socialite, a TV personality, except for a complete lack of shame?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Just ask yourself, how is Kim Kardashian a “thing”–a celebrity, a socialite, a TV personality, except for a complete lack of shame?

    How were Bill and Hillary Clinton a "thing"--a president, a senator, foundation heads--except for a complete lack of shame?
  113. In his most infamous and widely condemned blog post, written during the unrest following Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Sailer wrote that African Americans “possess poorer native judgment than members of better-educated groups. Thus, they need stricter moral guidance from society.”

    Seems like the Ferguson effect would also vindicate whatever criticism Steve’s Katrina post generated as well.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    It would if it was a thing, but it's not. If you read the NYTimes, there's BLM and then there's this huge increase in crime in the cities in which BLM was most active and it's a total mystery why that happened. A puzzlement. Our greatest minds and top social scientists have no idea. Maybe years from now it will be understood, but for now, it's completely inexplicable - maybe a new drug epidemic? Who knows? The connection to BLM is never, never openly acknowledged.

    This is how the leftist media works in general - certain tenuous or non-existent connections, such as Trump's connection to the Charlottesville Nazis and the Russians, are just as accepted fact despite the total lack of evidence and other connections, which are as plain as day, are never, ever mentioned or even baldly denied. Every failing ideology has a whistling past the graveyard quality to it - just before the final collapse you have to double down on the ideology to prove that you have no doubt in your heart and to buck up the others. So the cries of "Segregation Forever" are not loudest in Alabama 1883 but in Alabama 1963.

  114. @Anonymous
    How can people with graduate degrees--from good schools even--not have voted for Hillary? I mean, how? And congrats on the little link.

    The biggest Trump supporter I know has degrees from Harvard, Princeton, and Caltech.

    • Replies: @MG
    I think Nick Szabo (almost certainly Satoshi Nakamoto) is also not averse to Trump. He certainly disdains progressives.
    , @Anon
    What is your friend's reasoning? Equally interesting, have you seen his advocacy in action? What arguments or rhetoric does he employ?
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The biggest Trump supporter I know has degrees from Harvard, Princeton, and Caltech.

     

    Probably because he's actually worth something.
  115. The Sailer Strategy is irrelevant to national elections, but the Sailer coalition of the fringes is very much in play. The Sailer Strategy would require that whites nationally start thinking and voting like whites do in the Southeast. I don’t see that happening for at least a generation.

    Trump got the two million or so missing white votes Romney repelled, of course, but in the end, Clinton won the popular vote by nearly 3 million votes. The republican vote is tapped out at about 62-64 million, but the democratic vote can get up to at least 65 or 66 million. Those are the raw numbers. Nothing can change that. 2012 and 2016 show that clearly. The demographic die is set.

    If the republicans cannot get beyond 62-64 million, which I believe is the case, then their only hope is that the democrats put forward another pasty, old, white. Clinton lost because she could not get out the black vote in Obama-like numbers in Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Pennsylvania–and we’re talking in the 10s of thousands, not 100s of thousands. In 2020, another pasty, white democrat will be even less able to. Can the democrats put up another Obama like figure, or is he a once in a century-type aberration?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    If the republicans cannot get beyond 62-64 million, which I believe is the case, then their only hope is that the democrats put forward another pasty, old, white.

    I think the Democrats will do worse if they put up Kamala Harris or Cory Booker. As Zach Galifianakis asked Barack Obama, "How does it feel to be the last black president?"
    , @Jack Hanson
    Hillary's "popular vote surplus" was nearly 100% LA and Chicago. Meaningless, the electoral equivalent of running in pawns for queens while your opponent wins with a bishop knight Checkmate.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The Sailer Strategy would require that whites nationally start thinking and voting like whites do in the Southeast
     
    Whites think like "whites", rather than normal white people do, because their ancestors recklessly joined the cult of diversity four hundred years ago, and left whites in at least three of their states a minority for over a century.

    Plus, their bloc voting wasn't to protect themselves against blacks, but to protect themselves, and get back at, the hated Yankee.
    , @ben tillman

    If the republicans cannot get beyond 62-64 million, which I believe is the case, then their only hope is that the democrats put forward another pasty, old, white.
     
    If the Democrats don't do that, then surely that will push the GOP's vote total past 64 million.
  116. @Harry Baldwin
    newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots

    Aren't the black-clad anarchists who rioted against globalism during the Seattle WTO meeting the same types who now riot in support of globalism?

    ‘Aren’t the black-clad anarchists who rioted against globalism during the Seattle WTO meeting the same types who now riot in support of globalism?’

    Orwell observed something similar eighty years ago; the same people who had supported Communism in the twenties advocated fascism in the thirties.

    It’s not about specific policies; it’s about adopting a set of views that allow you to be violent.

    These people are hypocritical, morally empty swine. They just want an excuse to smash someone’s face in.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    People who smashed windows in the 1990s to fight globalism and smashed windows in the 2010s to promote globalism really just like smashing windows. They would have been happier if they'd been born into English soccer hooligan families, but instead they got born into the Volvo-driving liberal suburbs, so they have to pretend they have an ideology to just doing what comes naturally to them.
  117. Today’s NYT magazine features 2 articles regarding GOPe. First, Paul Ryan gets to cast himself as The Left’s new favorite Republican as a bulwark against Trumpism. This is the same collection of MSM who had no problem portraying Ryan as a heartless goon dumping Grandma off a cliff by merely mentioning any changes to federal medical plans. What’s not mentioned is how Trump assumed after McConnell and Ryan had spent years claiming to replace Obamacare, in Trump’s first month he found their plans to replace it where empty nonsense.So Mr. Policy Wonk Speaker, on his leading issue, did not have a workable plan on President Trump’s desk at the outset. Good luck loving your new boy,lefties. The Joe Scarborough track awaits.

    Also,article how grunts in the Middle East wars have long figured out they’re fighting for each other and to get home in one piece. And not much else.

    Hope Trump reads both. The GOPe need to be hunted like rats. And the wars have to be ended.The Middle East; they’re animals anyway, let them lose their souls, not our problem.

  118. NPR is still trying to figure out who voted for Trump.

    Why Is It Still OK To ‘Trash’ Poor White People?
    https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2018/08/01/605084163/why-its-still-ok-to-trash-poor-white-people

  119. @ben tillman
    The biggest Trump supporter I know has degrees from Harvard, Princeton, and Caltech.

    I think Nick Szabo (almost certainly Satoshi Nakamoto) is also not averse to Trump. He certainly disdains progressives.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    The best evidence points to the late Hal Finney, although Szabo is the next-best candidate to be Nakamato after him.
  120. @Ed

    In his most infamous and widely condemned blog post, written during the unrest following Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Sailer wrote that African Americans “possess poorer native judgment than members of better-educated groups. Thus, they need stricter moral guidance from society.”
     
    Seems like the Ferguson effect would also vindicate whatever criticism Steve’s Katrina post generated as well.

    It would if it was a thing, but it’s not. If you read the NYTimes, there’s BLM and then there’s this huge increase in crime in the cities in which BLM was most active and it’s a total mystery why that happened. A puzzlement. Our greatest minds and top social scientists have no idea. Maybe years from now it will be understood, but for now, it’s completely inexplicable – maybe a new drug epidemic? Who knows? The connection to BLM is never, never openly acknowledged.

    This is how the leftist media works in general – certain tenuous or non-existent connections, such as Trump’s connection to the Charlottesville Nazis and the Russians, are just as accepted fact despite the total lack of evidence and other connections, which are as plain as day, are never, ever mentioned or even baldly denied. Every failing ideology has a whistling past the graveyard quality to it – just before the final collapse you have to double down on the ideology to prove that you have no doubt in your heart and to buck up the others. So the cries of “Segregation Forever” are not loudest in Alabama 1883 but in Alabama 1963.

    • Replies: @James Forrestal
    Even the Guardian grudgingly admitted the validity of the Ferguson Effect (once):

    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/may/13/ferguson-effect-real-researcher-richard-rosenfield-second-thoughts?CMP=share_btn_tw

    But the NYT? No way. Part of this may be that media outlets usually have slightly more freedom to cover racial issues in other countries than their own -- just look at Daily Mail coverage of black crime in the US, or any conservative US publication's coverage of crime by non-white invaders in Europe.
  121. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    But rank-and-file doesn’t matter. What matters is thinktank-and-finance. It doesn’t matter what grassroots Dems think. Democratic politicos depend on big money from Jewish elites who remain staunchly Palestinian. Notice Ocasio shut up about Palestinians the minute she won the primary.

    In Democrats, lots of rank-and-file Dems are anti-Israel but all Democratic politicians and bureaucrats are Israel, Israel, and Israel.

    If US were a democracy, it would matter. But US is an oligarchy.

  122. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    “Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate.”

    That sentence would make a lot more sense if it started with “Clinton” rather than Trump.

  123. @MG
    I think Nick Szabo (almost certainly Satoshi Nakamoto) is also not averse to Trump. He certainly disdains progressives.

    The best evidence points to the late Hal Finney, although Szabo is the next-best candidate to be Nakamato after him.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Nah. Almost certainly Nick Szabo, albeit in collaboration with someone to code.
    , @MG
    Evidence is stronger that it is Szabo. See, for instance -

    https://towardsdatascience.com/stylometric-analysis-satoshi-nakamoto-294926cdf995
  124. Ross Dou-that, not this. Seriously, what conservatives are looking for helpful advice and info from the NYT?

    • Replies: @wrd9
    I kind of like Ross Dou-THOT (That [Conservative] Hoe Over There).
  125. 100 Sarah Jeongs will only have a marginal impact on in-grouping whites. The people who want to dismiss her can do so easily because there is no punishment or price to pay although it might come back later to haunt the left. What it is really going to take is some Horst Wessel (bad example possibly) type hideous real unmistakable black (or brown) on white hate crime that will force a litmus test on other WHITES to acknowledge anti-white hate. Right now they are allowed to hide.

    The left is so used to being the only one’s to pull this shit. It is also why they are patrolling the internet and social media so heavily. It is not because they are concerned with decency or that they are not obsessed with hate crimes; they seem to live for white on black issues. Once black on white hate becomes a meme there will be no stopping it and the left will sorely rue ever using it in the first place.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    What it is really going to take is some Horst Wessel (bad example possibly) type hideous real unmistakable black (or brown) on white hate crime that will force a litmus test on other WHITES to acknowledge anti-white hate.

    I guess the MSM just won't cover it. The New York Times has never mentioned Frederick Demond Scott of Kansas City, after all. He's the black Dylann Roof.
  126. Off topic but this nytimes article talking about how terrible they think nerds are and how great they think athlete are is fascinating and might be of interest:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/11/opinion/sunday/nerds-lebron-james-elon-musk.html

  127. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate.

    I agree that Trump was not a very good candidate. However I believe his campaign proved to be very well organized. He had a small team doing polling and data mining that paid off big in targeting their efforts.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump’s voters?

    No, but he would lose a lot of his current donors, and he probably wouldn’t be willing to do that. Running on the Trump platform that is – the platform that Trump ran on – not the one he has been governing on, that is.

    I think he wouldn’t, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I think that is true for Kobach. Pence, on the other hand, is a lousy candidate. He’s too milquetoast. That overt christian conservative vibe is a strike to a lot of people (I know it is to me). He seems like the kind of guy who will cuck, and he probably will. Trump has proved that conservative christians will vote for a candidate who isn’t one, provided he does not seek to alienate them and makes an honest effort to represent their interests.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Pence was a based talk radio host Tea Party guy. While not my favorite either, but I would worry less about him getting tricked into some amnesty for wall-funding deal than with Trump's.
  128. @Sam Haysom
    Eh except for the fact that as the stigma around things like disability have deceased white disability fraud has exploded.

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.

    Yeah, of the people I personally know who are what I would consider disability frauds, about half are white.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Long Island seems like a center of disability fraud.
  129. So the spineless Ross Douthat can’t bring himself to mention “Sailer strategy”. Even when it is known as such by well-informed liberals, centrists and conservatives alike. Pathetic coward!

  130. @snorlax
    The best evidence points to the late Hal Finney, although Szabo is the next-best candidate to be Nakamato after him.

    Nah. Almost certainly Nick Szabo, albeit in collaboration with someone to code.

  131. @snorlax
    The best evidence points to the late Hal Finney, although Szabo is the next-best candidate to be Nakamato after him.

    Evidence is stronger that it is Szabo. See, for instance –

    https://towardsdatascience.com/stylometric-analysis-satoshi-nakamoto-294926cdf995

    • Replies: @snorlax
    This comment was meant as a reply to you.
  132. @Harry Baldwin
    newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots

    Aren't the black-clad anarchists who rioted against globalism during the Seattle WTO meeting the same types who now riot in support of globalism?

    Bingo. The 20th anniversary of the WTO protests will be an excellent opportunity to review the shift in leftism.

  133. The “Trump Electoral Strategy” isn’t particularly new. Nixon (with help from Buchanan) utilized it in 1972. Reagan used similar strategy. Buchanan was on to something, but the GOP abandoned citizens in favor of the world’s people, just like the Democrats have done for the last four score and twenty-plus years.

    Had Buchanan’s insurgency in 1992 or 1996 been successful, iSteve’s analysis would not have been necessary. Heck, iSteve would probably be known better as an ex-Cabinet member now.

    I also found the sanctimonious disgust from the NYmag hacks quite humorous :

    Perhaps the Sailerist idea most closely echoed by the Trump movement is “citizenism,” which he describes as the philosophy that a nation should give overwhelming preference to the interests of its current citizens over foreigners, in the same way as a corporation prioritizes the interests of its current shareholders over everyone else.

    God forbid.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The shareholder analogy I brought up many years ago drove Bryan Caplan insane with rage because he knew I was right: it is a violation of fiduciary trust for management to sell new shares to new shareholders too cheap because management's job is to maximize shareholder wealth for current shareholders, not future shareholders.

    The analogy to citizenship is obvious.

    , @Sam Haysom
    Honestly that passage should never have made it into the article if it was meant to be a hit piece. That’s Steve’s killshot.
  134. Ok so you basically admit whites and conservatives are racist

    Good to know

  135. Completely OT

    I’d love to read an iSteve review of Three Identical Strangers, the new documentary about triplets separated at birth which is really about a Jewish adoption agency that was a front for private twins-reared-apart studies from the 1960s through the 1980s. I’m surprised I haven’t seen anyone mention it around here yet (though I have been off the grid quite a bit lately, so maybe someone did).

    It’s very good until the last ten minutes.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    http://takimag.com/article/the_disco_triplets_steve_sailer#axzz5NrmnnWv2
  136. @Sam Haysom
    Eh except for the fact that as the stigma around things like disability have deceased white disability fraud has exploded.

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.

    I think most people want to work, they just want “cool” jobs.

    Taste tester, professional athlete, coach, cinematic action hero, tv personality, social media celebrity, rapper, bikini contest judge, personal assistant to Kanye West, gigolo, sports blogger, race car driver, fashion model, space fleet captain, etc. That sort of thing.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I think how you’re treated by your bosses and how you get along with your coworkers are more important to job satisfaction. Also, whether you’re in an environment that fits with your personality. I think a lot of men and women are miserable in feminized office environments. I’m not sure what sort of job, if any, would make most women happy, but a lot of men really enjoy jobs like coal mining: the camaraderie, the danger, the masculine nature of the work, etc.
  137. There seems to be a coordinated effort on the part of the establishment the past couple of weeks to really drive home the new explicitly anti-white line and to vilify and isolate those middle of road conservatives who are not alt-right or nationalists but who are objecting to anti-white speech and population replacement.

    Did anyone read Goldberg’s latest at NRO? He’s really edging right up to rejecting the right to free speech. In the article, he shows sympathy for the silencing of alt-right voices and repeatedly scoffs at and mocks free speech arguments. The cucked right’s strategy to signal against outright anti-white hate and censorship while simultaneously keeping their sheep out of the jaws of the alt-right can’t go on much longer. At some point, there is going to be a split.

    I think you can divide up the right into four groups now. The alt-right/nationalists, nationalist leaning conservatives like Tucker and Ingraham, the cuck leaning types like Peterson and Shapiro who signal against PC but support population replacement and the openly anti-white shills like Kristol, Williamson and Goldberg who don’t even make a pretense of caring about free speech. These four groups are all sharing the same spaces to some extent.

    How long can that last? How is this going to crack up?

    • Replies: @Anonym
    I think you can divide up the right into four groups now. The alt-right/nationalists, nationalist leaning conservatives like Tucker and Ingraham, the cuck leaning types like Peterson and Shapiro who signal against PC but support population replacement and the openly anti-white shills like Kristol, Williamson and Goldberg who don’t even make a pretense of caring about free speech. These four groups are all sharing the same spaces to some extent.

    I am not sure of the level of support for each, but no one will pull the R lever for the last group, not even that group themselves (who will vote D).
  138. Circulating for Years on the Margins of Conservatism

    Circulating in a body with atherosclerosis. Or more likely peripheral arterial disease.

    • LOL: JohnnyWalker123
  139. I think this is relatively on topic. Someone said that the Sailer Strategy was not rocket science. Well, Steve said it first and best, while all in the media were kowtowing to the numbskull Rove.

    I read the current first headline at Breitbart, the backbone of modern Republican thought. It came before Trump was a thing, and it is to the right of Trump.

    https://www.breitbart.com/video/2018/08/12/pelosi-trumps-whole-thing-is-make-america-white-again/#disqus_thread

    I read it looking to find a “You say that like it’s a bad thing!” type quote, for reassurance. But it goes beyond that. And I find Steve’s influence again, although it takes it an extra, excellent step:

    “and our posterity” in the Constitution means this 1965 law is UN-CONSTITUTIONAL.

    And this follows on from it:

    Exactly. The 1965 bill was an act of TREASON against America. Only White countries are being forcibly diversified.

    This is a war on Whites. The media tells us only white people are racist. So “we must eliminate racism” means eliminating Whites.

    Nailed it. The “War on Whites’, that’s what it is. We are fighting back. The first step is to have our intelligentsia realize what’s going on. This is being accomplished in spades. Breitbart is the new mainstream right. They may shut our outlets down but it’s a losing battle. Another will pop up, and once redpilled, no one goes back.

  140. @Alec Leamas

    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the “jobs > handouts” norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.
     
    Perhaps, but the left has a plan for that too. A large part of the motivation for things such as the "Affordable Care Act" is to create an economic climate in which staying out of the government subsidized benefits pool is more and more difficult, acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.

    Just pitch it to them that they “earned it”, like all those taxpayer-subsidized hip replacements.

  141. @snorlax
    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the "jobs > handouts" norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.

    Among prime-age (age 25-54) individuals, 87% of Non-Hispanic White males are employed. For Black males, the employment rate is 76%. Asian and Hispanic men are nearly identical to Whites in their respective employment rates.

    Non-Hispanic Women (72%) and Black Women (73%) have a similar employment rates.

    • Replies: @prusmc
    I believe it was Pat Buchanan who noted: when the economy is bad the economy is the most important issue, when the economy is good other concerns are the most important issue.
  142. @Sam Haysom
    Eh except for the fact that as the stigma around things like disability have deceased white disability fraud has exploded.

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.

    “life time entry level jobs and handouts.”

    Work is a very broad category. Many maybe most entry level jobs are physically demanding work. After 30 it becomes harder and harder.

  143. @Jack D
    It would if it was a thing, but it's not. If you read the NYTimes, there's BLM and then there's this huge increase in crime in the cities in which BLM was most active and it's a total mystery why that happened. A puzzlement. Our greatest minds and top social scientists have no idea. Maybe years from now it will be understood, but for now, it's completely inexplicable - maybe a new drug epidemic? Who knows? The connection to BLM is never, never openly acknowledged.

    This is how the leftist media works in general - certain tenuous or non-existent connections, such as Trump's connection to the Charlottesville Nazis and the Russians, are just as accepted fact despite the total lack of evidence and other connections, which are as plain as day, are never, ever mentioned or even baldly denied. Every failing ideology has a whistling past the graveyard quality to it - just before the final collapse you have to double down on the ideology to prove that you have no doubt in your heart and to buck up the others. So the cries of "Segregation Forever" are not loudest in Alabama 1883 but in Alabama 1963.

    Even the Guardian grudgingly admitted the validity of the Ferguson Effect (once):

    http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/may/13/ferguson-effect-real-researcher-richard-rosenfield-second-thoughts?CMP=share_btn_tw

    But the NYT? No way. Part of this may be that media outlets usually have slightly more freedom to cover racial issues in other countries than their own — just look at Daily Mail coverage of black crime in the US, or any conservative US publication’s coverage of crime by non-white invaders in Europe.

  144. That’s more or less pseudoscience, especially comparing between personal correspondence and academic writing.

    I find the evidence for Finney compelling.

    1. He was neighbors with the man identified by Newsweek actually named Satoshi Nakamoto. Too much of a coincidence.

    2. Nakamoto’s retirement from Bitcoin development and sharply curtailed online presence in 2010 corresponded to Finney’s retirement from software development and sharply curtailed online presence at the same time due to his confinement in a wheelchair. The complete lack of communication from Nakamoto since 2014 corresponds to Finney’s total incapacitation and death. Nakamoto has not spent any of his bitcoins, now (and for some years) worth many billions, since 2009.

    3. Finney was the first persona to respond enthusiastically to Nakamoto’s initial Bitcoin post to the crypto mailing list. Finney was the recipient of the first Bitcoin transaction, from Nakamoto. AFAICT, Finney is the only person known to have received Bitcoin from Nakamoto. Finney was the first persona to be publicly involved in Bitcoin development other than Nakamoto.

    4. In 2011, Szabo wrote (emphasis mine):

    Myself, Wei Dai, and Hal Finney were the only people I know of who liked the idea [of cryptocurrency] (or in Dai’s case his related idea) enough to pursue it to any significant extent until Nakamoto (assuming Nakamoto is not really Finney or Dai). Only Finney and Nakamoto were motivated enough to actually implement such a scheme.

    An odd statement considering Finney didn’t implement such a scheme, under his own name.

    There is good evidence for Szabo as well of course; we can say for certain that both Finney and Szabo were at a minimum very early collaborators with Nakamoto.

  145. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    I keep wondering what impact having Mein Kampf as a dead-center, yellow-highlight Featured Book has on this site. My gut tells me the cons probably outweigh the pros.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    What is the point? Is that where Ron is at now, or is it free speech purism?
  146. OT:

    Monsieur Zack Beauchamp went down to the Unite The Right rally and found someone naive enough to dox himself. This is journalistic malpractice on the part of Monsieur Beauchamp but a life-long teacher’s pet just has to tattle-tale.

    https://twitter.com/zackbeauchamp/status/1028741505052291073

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Oh, this explains why the normal rules can be thrown out the windows: these people areb't fellow citizens, they are an existential threat! Call your opponents Nazis and the rules can go out the window.


    https://twitter.com/zackbeauchamp/status/1028669911386734592
    , @Anonym
    Looks like one of our fellow whites, without the quotes. Rock on pro-white Jew, if that's what you are.
    , @anonymous
    I think Zack got pranked.
  147. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    Agree Douthat is wrong there. The South serves as the model. Mississippi is 37% black, yet Republicans carry it easily. Nationally, the GOP share of the white vote has jumped to 60/40 in the last couple of elections, and it will go higher. That shift is happening much quicker than Dems can possibly bring in and naturalize foreign voters. It was a delayed reaction, but whites have now noticed what’s going on before Democrats could bring in enough reinforcements.

    I disagree entirely about Trump. He is a polarizing figure to be sure, but I think he was uniquely suited to win on a realignment platform (i.e., dissent from new-liberal globalism or whatever you want to call it). What establishment Republican would have run on a Trump platform without backing down? It is to laugh. Who else could have withstood the fierce media onslaught without wilting? Who else could have won without the donor money? I just don’t see any of the McCains or Romneys doing it and I sure as hell don’t see those guys staying in the pocket and landing counter punches like Trump did so admirably. By that I refer to the way Trump was able excite and provoke the media and use their attacks against them. Trump seemed to feed on it and it ended up serving as evidence of his populist bonafides. Same thing with the issue of “decorum.” A polite or inoffensive version of Trump would have gotten buried.

    Now that Trump has set the course, many will follow the ways of MAGA. Because MAGA will have built up momentum, these others will not need the unique savvy of Trump.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Trump was also willing to repudiate McCain and the Bushes, which I believe was an absolute necessity for the Republican Party. Sad that sometimes savvy Limbaugh and Hannity don't get this. They'll still praise the Bushes.
    , @Anon
    There's no one else out there. There isn't even hardly anyone else on Trump's team besides Trump.
  148. @ben tillman
    The biggest Trump supporter I know has degrees from Harvard, Princeton, and Caltech.

    What is your friend’s reasoning? Equally interesting, have you seen his advocacy in action? What arguments or rhetoric does he employ?

  149. @Dave Pinsen
    Trump wasn’t a good candidate? Come on. He was the best candidate. That’s why he’s POTUS.

    I think Bernie or Biden or Warren would have beat him. They just needed Hillary’s support plus 85,000 more midwest votes. And part of that 85,000 could have come from Jill Stein’s anti Hillary far left support.

    The Dem nomination process was totally broken as it allowed Hillary to rack up superdelegate endorsements early and muscle Biden and Warren away from even running.

    On the same topic, Jeb Bush raised $105 million before even formally entering the race using basically the same tactic. Did anyone who advised the corps to set their cash on fire this way get fired?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    A generic Democrat might have beaten Trump - generic candidates often beat named opposition. This is because generic candidates have only strengths while real humans have strengths and weaknesses.

    Biden and Warren are both real humans with real weaknesses (which Trump would have exploited). It's a miracle that Biden hasn't been Me-Tooed. Warren is a phony Indian.

    Trump steam rollered not only Hillary (admittedly a flawed candidate) but a dozen Republican primary opponents, included Yeb who had hundreds of million to spend and yet Trump effortlessly tore him to shreds. (Hillary too outspent Trump by a large margin despite the HUNDREDS of $ that Trump received from Russia and yet he won. )

    Trump resonated with the zeitgeist like no one else - no other candidate could have shrugged off Pussygate the way Trump did. No other candidate could have withheld his tax returns. Trump was like a judo master - he could take the force of his opponent's blows and turn them against them.
    , @Jack Hanson
    Lot hitting Whiskey levels of anti-prophet here.
  150. @Cagey Beast
    OT:

    Monsieur Zack Beauchamp went down to the Unite The Right rally and found someone naive enough to dox himself. This is journalistic malpractice on the part of Monsieur Beauchamp but a life-long teacher's pet just has to tattle-tale.


    https://twitter.com/zackbeauchamp/status/1028741505052291073

    Oh, this explains why the normal rules can be thrown out the windows: these people areb’t fellow citizens, they are an existential threat! Call your opponents Nazis and the rules can go out the window.

    https://twitter.com/zackbeauchamp/status/1028669911386734592

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Ann Coulter retweeted:

    https://twitter.com/phl43/status/1029104125701701632
  151. @Harry Baldwin
    newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots

    Aren't the black-clad anarchists who rioted against globalism during the Seattle WTO meeting the same types who now riot in support of globalism?

    Yes. And at the time I wondered why they would oppose a system that would share America’s wealth with the rest of the world. Because we monopolized so much of it.

  152. @JohnnyWalker123
    Among prime-age (age 25-54) individuals, 87% of Non-Hispanic White males are employed. For Black males, the employment rate is 76%. Asian and Hispanic men are nearly identical to Whites in their respective employment rates.

    Non-Hispanic Women (72%) and Black Women (73%) have a similar employment rates.

    I believe it was Pat Buchanan who noted: when the economy is bad the economy is the most important issue, when the economy is good other concerns are the most important issue.

  153. Broke: Haven Monahan

    Woke: Karen (or should I say Becky?) Monahan

  154. https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/12/politics/terry-mcauliffe-charlottesville-trump-cnntv/index.html

    I legitimately understand why Pinochet’s men resorted to torturing communists. The utter shamelessness of the left is perhaps their most salient and perennial attribute.

  155. @snorlax
    Yes, there is the Coming Apart / Bowling Alone / White Death trend — the collapse of white lower-middle class norms and the corresponding rise of underclass norms (including preferring handouts to jobs) among whites. But the way whites are nevertheless atypical is that many or a majority of us continue to hold to the "jobs > handouts" norm, and that we ever had that norm in the first place.

    Reminds me of a convo I had with some relatives who lost their jobs in W’s Depression and had to take minimum wage work.

    Them: complaining about situation

    Me: Why don’t you sign up for EBT? You easily qualify, two adults three kids on 30,000 a year.

    Them: No we’d never sign up for welfare

    Me: why not you paid taxes for years, it is just getting some back

    Them: Never, we’re not *****

    By the way one of them registered to vote for Trump, first time he voted in his life. His wife went Obama, Obama, Trump. I might have too, I forgot who I voted for in 2012.

  156. Orban kills Gender Studies as a college major!

    http://hungarianfreepress.com/2018/08/10/gender-studies-programs-to-be-banned-in-hungary/

    Meanwhile the increasingly embarrassing Betsy DeVos is getting ready to kill the single best thing Obama did, which was cut off “colleges” whose graduates failed to repay their loans or get jobs from further federal loans.

    With Big Ed, the approach should be the same as with immigration. Since nothing good will ever pass Congress, do everything possible to shut it down from the Exec Branch. We need a Sec of Ed whose first goal every morning is how to cut of federal money flowing to the bloated America-hating higher education complex. By far the biggest flow is federal student loans.

    Does Stephen Miller need to step in here too?

  157. @Lot
    I think Bernie or Biden or Warren would have beat him. They just needed Hillary's support plus 85,000 more midwest votes. And part of that 85,000 could have come from Jill Stein's anti Hillary far left support.

    The Dem nomination process was totally broken as it allowed Hillary to rack up superdelegate endorsements early and muscle Biden and Warren away from even running.

    On the same topic, Jeb Bush raised $105 million before even formally entering the race using basically the same tactic. Did anyone who advised the corps to set their cash on fire this way get fired?

    A generic Democrat might have beaten Trump – generic candidates often beat named opposition. This is because generic candidates have only strengths while real humans have strengths and weaknesses.

    Biden and Warren are both real humans with real weaknesses (which Trump would have exploited). It’s a miracle that Biden hasn’t been Me-Tooed. Warren is a phony Indian.

    Trump steam rollered not only Hillary (admittedly a flawed candidate) but a dozen Republican primary opponents, included Yeb who had hundreds of million to spend and yet Trump effortlessly tore him to shreds. (Hillary too outspent Trump by a large margin despite the HUNDREDS of $ that Trump received from Russia and yet he won. )

    Trump resonated with the zeitgeist like no one else – no other candidate could have shrugged off Pussygate the way Trump did. No other candidate could have withheld his tax returns. Trump was like a judo master – he could take the force of his opponent’s blows and turn them against them.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    If I'm recalling the survey research correctly, the polled support of Messrs. Bush, Walker, and Huckabee largely evaporated during Trump's first 3 months as a candidate. He didn't have to tear them apart. They simply faded away. Trump ended up fighting Ted Cruz, the one candidate the Capitol Hill nexus arguably finds more alienating than Trump (with the nomenklatura vote seeking refuge first in Rubio and then in Kasich).

    In previous Republican contests, you had this large bloc of voters (1/3 of the total?) whose preferred candidate was The-Guy-Whose-Turn-It-Is. The thing is, The-Guy-Whose-Turn-It-Is is never the guy who holds fixed and astringent views on any topic (that's 'divisive'), so Rick Santorum was not considered. Santorum's utter failure was curious inasmuch as in addition to having been the runner-up in 2012, he's something of an immigration hawk and not an enthusiast of Paul Ryan's unpalatable libertarian nostrums (e.g replacing Medicare with vouchers). Someone who thinks Trump was a bad candidate has to answer why Huckabee and Santorum could not marshal and motivate their natural constituency and Trump could.
  158. @Anonymous

    The numbers offer a cautionary tale for both emerging-Democratic-majority inevitabilists and for a left whose increasing vehemence about the wickedness of “whiteness” probably encourages the white tribalism that Trump rallied and exploited.
     
    Does Douthat vote Democrat or otherwise lean left? He certainly writes as though that's where his sympathies lie.

    Douthat was the founder of The American Scene, a once engaging group blog which has been all but defunct for a number of years, as well as a columnist for The Atlantic. His personal social circle was made up of liberal writers from the sort of social milieux in which he was schooled (though not in which he grew up). For many years, he seemed to almost apologize for what he was advocating as he was advocating it. He improved for a time, but has at times seemed to recede to old mental habits.

    Someone did a study of who reporters, critics, and editors at The New York Times were following on Twitter. Answer: people very much like themselves, which is one source of the circle-jerk quality of American journalism. Only 10% followed Ross Douthat, who offers the paper’s sole display of starboard discussion. He is, indeed, a decorative curio there.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Douthat’s partner at the American Scene, Reihan Salam - the anti-Sarah Jeong - might have been a better choice for the Times, but only White Men are allowed to express heterodox thoughts in Progland.
  159. @Dave Pinsen
    Ross has credited Steve by name before, but something has changed recently with Ross, where he’s trying to distance himself from both Steve and Trump, even though he’s largely on the same page as both of them.

    Douthat mentioned Steve by name (albeit as part of a long list of names) as recently as April 25 of this year: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/25/opinion/california-democrats-trump-republicans.html

  160. @Alec Leamas

    Does Douthat vote Democrat or otherwise lean left? He certainly writes as though that’s where his sympathies lie.
     
    Douthat exists on the margins of elite polite society as a sort of curiosity with his TradCath views - it's expected that whether he sincerely believes it or not he has to say when called upon that downscale whites are icky and problematic.

    Who in his right mind could write this with a straight face? I mean, someone who has been paying attention?:

    His mix of economic populism and deliberate racial polarization was supposed to be demographically foredoomed — but instead it won him precisely those regions Trende’s analysis had highlighted, and the presidency as well.
     
    In this view, "racial polarization" must mean not enthusiastically offering one's self and progeny on the altar of the cult of multicultural diversity.

    I thought Obama promoted “deliberate racial polarization,” but no one at the New York Times seemed to notice..

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    I thought Obama promoted “deliberate racial polarization,” but no one at the New York Times seemed to notice..
     
    Racial polarization has been implicit and then fairly explicit Democratic electoral strategy for several decades now. The Judis and Teixeira book was big in the beltway media when it came out. It's Sailer's Coalition of the Fringes put in favorable terms.

    Douthat must know this, and yet he feels that he can't address the thing straight-on.
  161. @Jack D
    A generic Democrat might have beaten Trump - generic candidates often beat named opposition. This is because generic candidates have only strengths while real humans have strengths and weaknesses.

    Biden and Warren are both real humans with real weaknesses (which Trump would have exploited). It's a miracle that Biden hasn't been Me-Tooed. Warren is a phony Indian.

    Trump steam rollered not only Hillary (admittedly a flawed candidate) but a dozen Republican primary opponents, included Yeb who had hundreds of million to spend and yet Trump effortlessly tore him to shreds. (Hillary too outspent Trump by a large margin despite the HUNDREDS of $ that Trump received from Russia and yet he won. )

    Trump resonated with the zeitgeist like no one else - no other candidate could have shrugged off Pussygate the way Trump did. No other candidate could have withheld his tax returns. Trump was like a judo master - he could take the force of his opponent's blows and turn them against them.

    If I’m recalling the survey research correctly, the polled support of Messrs. Bush, Walker, and Huckabee largely evaporated during Trump’s first 3 months as a candidate. He didn’t have to tear them apart. They simply faded away. Trump ended up fighting Ted Cruz, the one candidate the Capitol Hill nexus arguably finds more alienating than Trump (with the nomenklatura vote seeking refuge first in Rubio and then in Kasich).

    In previous Republican contests, you had this large bloc of voters (1/3 of the total?) whose preferred candidate was The-Guy-Whose-Turn-It-Is. The thing is, The-Guy-Whose-Turn-It-Is is never the guy who holds fixed and astringent views on any topic (that’s ‘divisive’), so Rick Santorum was not considered. Santorum’s utter failure was curious inasmuch as in addition to having been the runner-up in 2012, he’s something of an immigration hawk and not an enthusiast of Paul Ryan’s unpalatable libertarian nostrums (e.g replacing Medicare with vouchers). Someone who thinks Trump was a bad candidate has to answer why Huckabee and Santorum could not marshal and motivate their natural constituency and Trump could.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    They’re dorks.
    , @Jack D
    If the Republican Party was a Catholic party then Santorum would have been perfect but it isn't. Also explain to me how someone who couldn't win re-election to his own Senate seat was going to win the White House? Also Santorum backed idiotic crap like "Intelligent Design". Trump played along with the social conservatives to get their votes but everyone understands that Trump is no Holy Roller in his personal life (far from it) and this is just a cynical ploy to get votes. Santorum appears to really believe that shit which make him a rube. Don't get me wrong - I happen to like Santorum as a person (and because of his economic positions) despite all this, but he was/is never going to be POTUS.
  162. OT:
    Pelosi: Trump’s Whole Thing Is ‘Make America White Again’

    https://www.breitbart.com/video/2018/08/12/pelosi-trumps-whole-thing-is-make-america-white-again/

    Nancy’s own family:

    • Replies: @Antlitz Grollheim
    The cream is a nice touch.
  163. @JohnnyWalker123

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.

     

    I think most people want to work, they just want "cool" jobs.

    Taste tester, professional athlete, coach, cinematic action hero, tv personality, social media celebrity, rapper, bikini contest judge, personal assistant to Kanye West, gigolo, sports blogger, race car driver, fashion model, space fleet captain, etc. That sort of thing.

    I think how you’re treated by your bosses and how you get along with your coworkers are more important to job satisfaction. Also, whether you’re in an environment that fits with your personality. I think a lot of men and women are miserable in feminized office environments. I’m not sure what sort of job, if any, would make most women happy, but a lot of men really enjoy jobs like coal mining: the camaraderie, the danger, the masculine nature of the work, etc.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  164. The Unite the Right II has concluded in DC with less than 30 participants and over a thousand counter-demonstrators.

    Alt-Rite can officially be pronounced dead as a doornail.

    Still waiting for Steve’s analysis of the Alt-Right.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    They’re dorks.
    , @Sam Haysom
    It simply evaporated into its surroundings in perfect Moaist fashion. The biggest danger to an elite challenging movement is agent provacateurs stay out of the meat space (I hate this term my apoligies) and you can’t get set up. It helps that the worst aspects of the alt right happen to be the guys that like to lead demonstrations.
    , @Jack D
    Right, the great threat to the Republic that all good people of conscience must struggle against consisted of 2 dozen people. The New York Times is still looking for their fugitive leader, Emmanuel Goldwhite so that he can be given a proper show trial.
    , @27 year old
    No you moron

    WN talking points are on Fox News every night now
  165. @Art Deco
    If I'm recalling the survey research correctly, the polled support of Messrs. Bush, Walker, and Huckabee largely evaporated during Trump's first 3 months as a candidate. He didn't have to tear them apart. They simply faded away. Trump ended up fighting Ted Cruz, the one candidate the Capitol Hill nexus arguably finds more alienating than Trump (with the nomenklatura vote seeking refuge first in Rubio and then in Kasich).

    In previous Republican contests, you had this large bloc of voters (1/3 of the total?) whose preferred candidate was The-Guy-Whose-Turn-It-Is. The thing is, The-Guy-Whose-Turn-It-Is is never the guy who holds fixed and astringent views on any topic (that's 'divisive'), so Rick Santorum was not considered. Santorum's utter failure was curious inasmuch as in addition to having been the runner-up in 2012, he's something of an immigration hawk and not an enthusiast of Paul Ryan's unpalatable libertarian nostrums (e.g replacing Medicare with vouchers). Someone who thinks Trump was a bad candidate has to answer why Huckabee and Santorum could not marshal and motivate their natural constituency and Trump could.

    They’re dorks.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    And holy rollers. That doesn't resonate anymore.
  166. >He Who Must Not Be Named

    Speaking of, did you coin this phrase (in an alternative order):

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/08/09/male-pale-stale-university-professors-given-reverse-mentors/

    Googling, it seems the reporter’s work has made appearances on this blog multiple times…

    • Replies: @anon
    Upon further googling, looks like the phrase has been around (and I wasn't getting the reference). For instance, was used in speaking of NASA in the early 90s.

    https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/185731/what-is-the-origin-of-pale-male-and-stale

    , @Steve Sailer
    I think I probably picked up "stale, pale male" from somewhere else. I'm not sure if that one ever existed in the wild or was created by a pale, stale satirist.
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    Origins of the phrasing aside, that is one hell of a story. Imagine being a senior STEM academic, and having to place your career into the power of a 'junior female colleague from an ethnic minority', who will be judging your commitment to 'diversity'.

    The whole scheme sounds overtly, aggressively Orwellian:

    Prof John Rowe, who is overseeing the project at Birmingham University, said he hoped the scheme will allow eminent professors to confront their own biases and leave them “feeling quite uncomfortable”.

     

    , @donut
    A few years ago there was a family of hawks nesting over the door of some upper east side apt. building in NYC . The male was called "Pale Male" by the local bird watchers as they had been observing him for some time .
    Probably one of earliest social media mobs went after the guy because he intended to remove nest for blah blah reason . His daughter was harassed in school , the whole familiar tale . I'm not sure if he was actually Hitler but might as well have been .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pale_Male

    The Wiki article just mentions the board but I recall the mob singled out a specific individual .
  167. @Seth Largo
    Completely OT

    I'd love to read an iSteve review of Three Identical Strangers, the new documentary about triplets separated at birth which is really about a Jewish adoption agency that was a front for private twins-reared-apart studies from the 1960s through the 1980s. I'm surprised I haven't seen anyone mention it around here yet (though I have been off the grid quite a bit lately, so maybe someone did).

    It's very good until the last ten minutes.
  168. @Sam Haysom
    Eh except for the fact that as the stigma around things like disability have deceased white disability fraud has exploded.

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.

    I think there are about 10 million people collecting Social Security Disability. It does appear that the understanding of what constitutes a ‘disability’ has grown increasingly relaxed on the part of applicants and officials alike, which is disturbing but something different than ‘fraud’. The median age at which an initial award is granted is 49 and the median duration of benefits is about 8 years. The application process requires a ruling by an administrative law judge and takes about two years. Most people who apply get turned down. I cannot see that it’s analogous to AFDC or general relief payments. There’s another 4 million working-aged people collecting SSI. About 40% of them are mentally retarded or schizophrenic; fewer than 10% have muskuloskelital problems. You’ve got 14 million working-aged people collecting benefits while you have over 150 million people working. If half of these are people who would have been turned down in 1970, that amounts to 7 million people against 150 million working. I don’t think that sustains your thesis.

    • Replies: @prusmc
    There is a web site which gives the track record of every disability appeals judge. A case goes on appeal after it has been initially turned down by the system. The average is about 45 percent of appeals are approved in the claimants favor. There is an administration social security judge in Puerto Rico who grants over 98 percent of the claims.
  169. @Art Deco
    Douthat was the founder of The American Scene, a once engaging group blog which has been all but defunct for a number of years, as well as a columnist for The Atlantic. His personal social circle was made up of liberal writers from the sort of social milieux in which he was schooled (though not in which he grew up). For many years, he seemed to almost apologize for what he was advocating as he was advocating it. He improved for a time, but has at times seemed to recede to old mental habits.

    Someone did a study of who reporters, critics, and editors at The New York Times were following on Twitter. Answer: people very much like themselves, which is one source of the circle-jerk quality of American journalism. Only 10% followed Ross Douthat, who offers the paper's sole display of starboard discussion. He is, indeed, a decorative curio there.

    Douthat’s partner at the American Scene, Reihan Salam – the anti-Sarah Jeong – might have been a better choice for the Times, but only White Men are allowed to express heterodox thoughts in Progland.

  170. @Finspapa
    The “Trump Electoral Strategy” isn’t particularly new. Nixon (with help from Buchanan) utilized it in 1972. Reagan used similar strategy. Buchanan was on to something, but the GOP abandoned citizens in favor of the world’s people, just like the Democrats have done for the last four score and twenty-plus years.

    Had Buchanan’s insurgency in 1992 or 1996 been successful, iSteve’s analysis would not have been necessary. Heck, iSteve would probably be known better as an ex-Cabinet member now.

    I also found the sanctimonious disgust from the NYmag hacks quite humorous :

    Perhaps the Sailerist idea most closely echoed by the Trump movement is “citizenism,” which he describes as the philosophy that a nation should give overwhelming preference to the interests of its current citizens over foreigners, in the same way as a corporation prioritizes the interests of its current shareholders over everyone else.
     
    God forbid.

    The shareholder analogy I brought up many years ago drove Bryan Caplan insane with rage because he knew I was right: it is a violation of fiduciary trust for management to sell new shares to new shareholders too cheap because management’s job is to maximize shareholder wealth for current shareholders, not future shareholders.

    The analogy to citizenship is obvious.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Do you have at your fingertips text of Caplan's reaction? Was it a back and forth?

    By the way, did you pick up the parallel in Bannon's recent NYMag interview where he talks about maximizing citizenship value?
  171. @anon
    >He Who Must Not Be Named

    Speaking of, did you coin this phrase (in an alternative order):

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/08/09/male-pale-stale-university-professors-given-reverse-mentors/

    Googling, it seems the reporter's work has made appearances on this blog multiple times...

    Upon further googling, looks like the phrase has been around (and I wasn’t getting the reference). For instance, was used in speaking of NASA in the early 90s.

    https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/185731/what-is-the-origin-of-pale-male-and-stale

  172. @Finspapa
    The “Trump Electoral Strategy” isn’t particularly new. Nixon (with help from Buchanan) utilized it in 1972. Reagan used similar strategy. Buchanan was on to something, but the GOP abandoned citizens in favor of the world’s people, just like the Democrats have done for the last four score and twenty-plus years.

    Had Buchanan’s insurgency in 1992 or 1996 been successful, iSteve’s analysis would not have been necessary. Heck, iSteve would probably be known better as an ex-Cabinet member now.

    I also found the sanctimonious disgust from the NYmag hacks quite humorous :

    Perhaps the Sailerist idea most closely echoed by the Trump movement is “citizenism,” which he describes as the philosophy that a nation should give overwhelming preference to the interests of its current citizens over foreigners, in the same way as a corporation prioritizes the interests of its current shareholders over everyone else.
     
    God forbid.

    Honestly that passage should never have made it into the article if it was meant to be a hit piece. That’s Steve’s killshot.

  173. @MG
    Evidence is stronger that it is Szabo. See, for instance -

    https://towardsdatascience.com/stylometric-analysis-satoshi-nakamoto-294926cdf995

    This comment was meant as a reply to you.

  174. @midtown
    Yeah, of the people I personally know who are what I would consider disability frauds, about half are white.

    Long Island seems like a center of disability fraud.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Long Island seems like a center of disability fraud.

     

    It's the home of Blue Shÿster Cult.
  175. @anon
    >He Who Must Not Be Named

    Speaking of, did you coin this phrase (in an alternative order):

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/08/09/male-pale-stale-university-professors-given-reverse-mentors/

    Googling, it seems the reporter's work has made appearances on this blog multiple times...

    I think I probably picked up “stale, pale male” from somewhere else. I’m not sure if that one ever existed in the wild or was created by a pale, stale satirist.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Are you an Olde Frothingslosh drinker?

    Olde Frothingslosh Pale Stale Ale

    A visitor (Bill Graham) informed me of a memorable hoax that I missed: Ye Olde Frothingsloth Pale Stale Ale. Frothingslosh is a unique beer that's so light that the beer actually floats on top of the foam. It all started out as a running joke on Rege Cordic's Pittsburgh radio show in the 1950s. He made up all kinds of joke ads for this fictitious beer and invented slogans such as "A whale of an ale for the pale stale male" and "Hi dittom dottom, the foam is on the bottom." But the Olde Frothingsloth concept became so popular, that eventually it caught the attention of the Pittsburgh Brewing Co. who started selling small runs of Olde Frothingsloth for special occasions such as Christmas and holidays. Of course, the beer being sold was really just Iron City Beer repackaged with Olde Frothingslosh labels, but the labels themselves were so outrageous that they instantly became prized among beer can collectors. The most popular cans were those that featured Miss Olde Frothingslosh, Fatima Yechburgh (pictured below), the supposed winner of the Frothingslosh Beauty Contest. Fatima was described as a resident of a small town near Pittsburgh. When not studying arc welding, she enjoyed soap carving, arm wrestling, sky diving, and ballet. I believe that the Pittsburgh Brewing Co. still occasionally produces small runs of Olde Frothingslosh. I'd love to try some.
     

    —From the Musée d’Hoaxeaux (http://hoaxes.org/weblog/comments/olde_frothingslosh_pale_stale_ale).

    Rege Cordic was the DJ who replaced Bob Crane on 50,000 watt KNX-AM in 1966-67.

  176. @Currahee
    The Unite the Right II has concluded in DC with less than 30 participants and over a thousand counter-demonstrators.

    Alt-Rite can officially be pronounced dead as a doornail.

    Still waiting for Steve's analysis of the Alt-Right.

    They’re dorks.

  177. @Currahee
    The Unite the Right II has concluded in DC with less than 30 participants and over a thousand counter-demonstrators.

    Alt-Rite can officially be pronounced dead as a doornail.

    Still waiting for Steve's analysis of the Alt-Right.

    It simply evaporated into its surroundings in perfect Moaist fashion. The biggest danger to an elite challenging movement is agent provacateurs stay out of the meat space (I hate this term my apoligies) and you can’t get set up. It helps that the worst aspects of the alt right happen to be the guys that like to lead demonstrations.

  178. @PiltdownMan

    When did new stories become editorials? This is now common but when did it start in the modern era? I know back in the old days newspapers were party outlets but in the modern era they used to pretend to be non-partisan except on the editorial page.
     
    It's hard to say. Opinion pages (as opposed to the editorial and letters page) dates back to 1970, when the New York Times introduced an opinion page opposite the editorial. Opinion columns and opinion articles were simply unknown, in newspapers through the post War years, until that point in time.

    Slanted reportage, or reportage as opinion probably dates back to the Clinton era, when newspapers started taking a very strong pro-globalist position in their coverage of the Seattle riots. I'm pretty sure it would have happened earlier, in the Reagan era, but for the fact that older generation publishers such as the current Sulzberger's grandad, Punch Sulzberger, or Katherine Graham would simply not tolerated it. It pretty much became the norm during the Bush and Obama years.

    Opinion columns and opinion articles were simply unknown, in newspapers through the post War years, until [1970].

    No, that can’t be right. Columnists like Walter Lippmann on one end of the spectrum and Westbrook Pegler on the other had been around since at least the 1930s. Drew Pearson was another. I remember James J Kilpatrick and Nicholas von Hoffman in the Post back in the … late ’60s, I think? There was lots of opinion journalism in the big-city papers, nationally syndicated and local, before 1970. Wasn’t it always a thing?

    What you might be thinking of is the existence of a dedicated op-ed page with regular columnists and guests. I seem to recall the Kilpatrick, von Hoffman and Jack Anderson (successor to Pearson) columns being sort of scattered through the Post prior to the op-ed innovation.

    One big difference between then and now: Everybody read these guys, even those on the other side. They more or less had to, since the newspaper was the main source of news – much more important in places like NY and DC than TV network news. You saw the columns whether you wanted to or not, and so you read them.

    Now, people only see the words of those they agree with, along with a few tame “opponents”.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Newspapers had always run columnists and editorials and letters to the editor. I think the NYT started its Op-Ed page around 1969 opposite the Editorial page. They printed on it a lot of outside contributions (paying something like $150 -- I doubt if the fee has changed in a half century). I don't know if that was an innovation or not, but it was at least an innovation to put them in one place on a regular basis.

    In general, the 1970s were pretty pro-free speech.

    I got started as a pundit in 1990 writing up op-eds and sending them to semi-random newspapers on an assembly line basis. Seeing them in print, they looked just as good as the professionals' columns, so that built my confidence. I assumed at the time, however, that I would quickly run out of good ideas for things to write about.

    , @PiltdownMan

    What you might be thinking of is the existence of a dedicated op-ed page with regular columnists and guests.
     
    I was. My apologies for being imprecise—people like Walter Lippman were writing opinions in newspapers long before 1970, of course.
  179. @kimchilover
    I keep wondering what impact having Mein Kampf as a dead-center, yellow-highlight Featured Book has on this site. My gut tells me the cons probably outweigh the pros.

    What is the point? Is that where Ron is at now, or is it free speech purism?

  180. @Colin Wright
    'Aren’t the black-clad anarchists who rioted against globalism during the Seattle WTO meeting the same types who now riot in support of globalism?'

    Orwell observed something similar eighty years ago; the same people who had supported Communism in the twenties advocated fascism in the thirties.

    It's not about specific policies; it's about adopting a set of views that allow you to be violent.

    These people are hypocritical, morally empty swine. They just want an excuse to smash someone's face in.

    People who smashed windows in the 1990s to fight globalism and smashed windows in the 2010s to promote globalism really just like smashing windows. They would have been happier if they’d been born into English soccer hooligan families, but instead they got born into the Volvo-driving liberal suburbs, so they have to pretend they have an ideology to just doing what comes naturally to them.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    'People who smashed windows in the 1990s...'

    I completely agree. These are essentially testosterone-filled young males. If they were in Highland New Guinea, they'd go off and fling spears at members of the next tribe working in a yam field on the trobal frontier. Since they come from white liberal suburbia, they amp up leftist ideology until it provides them with the necessary rationalization for violence.

    I suspect that as a rule, they probably suffer from self-esteem issues related to their failing to get good grades and get into an elite college. Adopting the ideologies they do offers them an alternative means of self-appraisal, in which a willingness to smash windows and hit those safely weaker than oneself makes one a success.

    These people are vermin. Give me an honest black looter any day. At least then there's no pretense.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    People who smashed windows in the 1990s to fight globalism and smashed windows in the 2010s to promote globalism really just like smashing windows.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDbUEydkuR8
    , @Anonymous

    People who smashed windows in the 1990s to fight globalism and smashed windows in the 2010s to promote globalism
     
    Great line!
    , @Highlander
    This is just a function of the increasing inequality in the distribution of wealth which is reaching levels rivaling or exceeding those of the Gilded Age. These protesters are simply the scions of the formerly larger middle classes who get that they are on permanent barista career paths and don't like it one bit. The more savvy among them will gravitate towards what their smarter working class brethren do and form small service businesses be it coffee shop owner or residential plumbing contractor or at least get a federal government job and aspire to rise to the elevated level of GS-14 after 30 years of drudge work.

    The world has a rapidly decreasing need for professionals with IQs much under 130.
  181. @Tyrion 2

    The globalists (and Douthat is one of them) and foreign invaders are trying mightily to make this nationalist uprising about “white tribalism.” Don’t let them. It’s a marginalize, divide-and-conquer strategy.
     
    Yes, I understand that inevitably those of a white nationalist inclination will support a generally nationalist agenda but so should citizens of all colours.

    If anything, black Americans are most hurt by the globalist trend of sacrificing citizenship value to boost other asset prices, because they have the least of the latter and so are most reliant on the former.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.

    ‘Yes, I understand that inevitably those of a white nationalist inclination will support a generally nationalist agenda but so should citizens of all colours.

    If anything, black Americans are most hurt by the globalist trend of sacrificing citizenship value to boost other asset prices, because they have the least of the latter and so are most reliant on the former.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.’

    This kinda depends. I suspect the introduction of the Great Society welfare programs and government sinecures via affirmative action may have seduced the black population.

    Your position implicitly assumes blacks want to work, earn a decent living, acquire the rewards of thrift, upward mobility, etc. If that were so, indeed they above all others should object to immigration.

    But what if it isn’t so? What if blacks — depending on their station in life — either want that AFDC or want that government clerk position? What if they aren’t interested in fixing cars, or becoming a carpenter, or opening that Quickee-Mart, or whatever?

    Then all of a sudden the balance shifts. Immigration may not be actually be to their benefit, but priority one is making sure the gravy train keeps running.

    That means vote Democrat.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Government jobs are typically restricted to US citizens, so black women with the right educational levels don't have to compete too much with Hispanic women.
    , @ben tillman

    But what if it isn’t so? What if blacks — depending on their station in life — either want that AFDC or want that government clerk position? What if they aren’t interested in fixing cars, or becoming a carpenter, or opening that Quickee-Mart, or whatever?

    Then all of a sudden the balance shifts. Immigration may not be actually be to their benefit, but priority one is making sure the gravy train keeps running.
     
    Immigration diverts the wagon train in other directions and lessens its cargo.
  182. @Lot
    Ross is wrong when he claims that Sailer Strategy can't create a majority:

    ---Those losses point to the likely limits on racial polarization as a Republican strategy. Turning out disaffected whites is more politically effective than most people imagined after 2012, but white voters are ultimately too divided to make a “white strategy” work as a foundation for a real governing majority.---

    It is true Trump lost the GOP many Romney voters, especially educated women, lost the popular vote, and carried the electoral college by winning PA, MI, and WI by very thin margins.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate. He also had the good luck of running against a nepotism/affirmative action candidate that was extraordinarily unpopular and united the GOP in a way Obama and Bill Clinton did not.

    Other politicians can take Trump's coalition and expand it just by being more personally appealing than him.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump's voters? I think he wouldn't, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.

    I seem to remember Ross linking right to iSteve several times before. But these days the kooks and "Featured Book: Mien Kampf Adolf Hitler" lined up to the right of the blog prevent that from happening.

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate.

    I was, and still am, convinced he really wanted to lose. Every time the polls showed he was maybe narrowing the gap, he’d say or do something to blow it. He won because he ran out of time; he just didn’t have enough time, between Comey’s reopening of the Hillary investigation, and November 8, to think of a brand-new way to blow his lead.

    And, as with so many things, Ann Coulter’s got it right: we all voted for Trump despite his many faults, because we cared so much about the National Question. The “mandate” for that (if there’s such a thing) was thus far stronger than any “mandate” for national single-payer health care emanating from the election of Barack Obama. Obama won for the opposite reason: millions of people voted for him primarily because they liked him (or what he told them he was), and only secondarily because they wanted the policies on his platform. (They could have gotten those policies if they’d made Hillary their nominee.)

    • Replies: @Anon
    Very interesting second paragraph.

    And, as with so many things, Ann Coulter’s got it right: we all voted for Trump despite his many faults, because we cared so much about the National Question.
     
    Do you have a particular Coulter essay in mind?
  183. @Big Bill

    Why people can’t understand that a Texan roofer named Jorge might not be happy about a couple million Central Americans suddenly showing up just confounds me.
     
    The latinx "Talented Tenth" elite managed to retcon Cesar Chavez into an anti-white open borders activist, so most latinx don't have any ideological leaders around whom to coalesce.

    The potential to snatch latinx who favor border enforcement is still there, but has not been tapped. Audacious Epigone, for example, recently posted polling data showing that latinx are divided on open borders.

    An awful lot of the guys in the Border Patrol guys are Latinos.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    One of them quit and wrote a book about it.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/967290623991611392?s=21
  184. @Steve Sailer
    People who smashed windows in the 1990s to fight globalism and smashed windows in the 2010s to promote globalism really just like smashing windows. They would have been happier if they'd been born into English soccer hooligan families, but instead they got born into the Volvo-driving liberal suburbs, so they have to pretend they have an ideology to just doing what comes naturally to them.

    ‘People who smashed windows in the 1990s…’

    I completely agree. These are essentially testosterone-filled young males. If they were in Highland New Guinea, they’d go off and fling spears at members of the next tribe working in a yam field on the trobal frontier. Since they come from white liberal suburbia, they amp up leftist ideology until it provides them with the necessary rationalization for violence.

    I suspect that as a rule, they probably suffer from self-esteem issues related to their failing to get good grades and get into an elite college. Adopting the ideologies they do offers them an alternative means of self-appraisal, in which a willingness to smash windows and hit those safely weaker than oneself makes one a success.

    These people are vermin. Give me an honest black looter any day. At least then there’s no pretense.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    They suffer from about as many self-esteem issues as Muhammad Ali. Seriously, where does this idea come from? Why is it so persistent? They’re spoiled, snobby rich kids. They’ve got self esteem coming out their ears.
  185. @ATBOTL
    There seems to be a coordinated effort on the part of the establishment the past couple of weeks to really drive home the new explicitly anti-white line and to vilify and isolate those middle of road conservatives who are not alt-right or nationalists but who are objecting to anti-white speech and population replacement.

    Did anyone read Goldberg's latest at NRO? He's really edging right up to rejecting the right to free speech. In the article, he shows sympathy for the silencing of alt-right voices and repeatedly scoffs at and mocks free speech arguments. The cucked right's strategy to signal against outright anti-white hate and censorship while simultaneously keeping their sheep out of the jaws of the alt-right can't go on much longer. At some point, there is going to be a split.

    I think you can divide up the right into four groups now. The alt-right/nationalists, nationalist leaning conservatives like Tucker and Ingraham, the cuck leaning types like Peterson and Shapiro who signal against PC but support population replacement and the openly anti-white shills like Kristol, Williamson and Goldberg who don't even make a pretense of caring about free speech. These four groups are all sharing the same spaces to some extent.

    How long can that last? How is this going to crack up?

    I think you can divide up the right into four groups now. The alt-right/nationalists, nationalist leaning conservatives like Tucker and Ingraham, the cuck leaning types like Peterson and Shapiro who signal against PC but support population replacement and the openly anti-white shills like Kristol, Williamson and Goldberg who don’t even make a pretense of caring about free speech. These four groups are all sharing the same spaces to some extent.

    I am not sure of the level of support for each, but no one will pull the R lever for the last group, not even that group themselves (who will vote D).

  186. @Cagey Beast
    OT:

    Monsieur Zack Beauchamp went down to the Unite The Right rally and found someone naive enough to dox himself. This is journalistic malpractice on the part of Monsieur Beauchamp but a life-long teacher's pet just has to tattle-tale.


    https://twitter.com/zackbeauchamp/status/1028741505052291073

    Looks like one of our fellow whites, without the quotes. Rock on pro-white Jew, if that’s what you are.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    Probably Italian. Often confused with Jews and vice versa. (It looks like Ashkenazim are 50-60% Italian, genetically).
    , @Lot
    His name is very Jewish and he lives in a very Jewish suburb. Given his age and lack of signs of orthodoxy, he is probably a mix of Jewish with most likely Italian or Irish.
  187. @anon
    >He Who Must Not Be Named

    Speaking of, did you coin this phrase (in an alternative order):

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/08/09/male-pale-stale-university-professors-given-reverse-mentors/

    Googling, it seems the reporter's work has made appearances on this blog multiple times...

    Origins of the phrasing aside, that is one hell of a story. Imagine being a senior STEM academic, and having to place your career into the power of a ‘junior female colleague from an ethnic minority’, who will be judging your commitment to ‘diversity’.

    The whole scheme sounds overtly, aggressively Orwellian:

    Prof John Rowe, who is overseeing the project at Birmingham University, said he hoped the scheme will allow eminent professors to confront their own biases and leave them “feeling quite uncomfortable”.

  188. @ben tillman
    The biggest Trump supporter I know has degrees from Harvard, Princeton, and Caltech.

    The biggest Trump supporter I know has degrees from Harvard, Princeton, and Caltech.

    Probably because he’s actually worth something.

  189. @snorlax

    Far be it for me to give advice to a guy like Steve but I do wish he’d lay of the first law of female journalism and Becky with the good hair analysis for awhile though. Outside the alternative right that stuff does turn people off.
     
    I'd half agree but the "Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf - Adolf Hitler" is probably turning more people off at the moment.

    ‘I’d half agree but the “Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf – Adolf Hitler” is probably turning more people off at the moment.’

    That’s a point, but it raises an interesting question.

    Is it better to allow the Mainstream narrative to lead you to censor yourself, or is it better to express exactly what you think — or in this case, post — what interests you?

    Both have their pitfalls. Trying to placate the mainstream of course leads to the sort of conventional ‘conservatism’ we have today. What is it? It seems to consist mostly of bashing Trump and serving Israel.

    On the other hand, it’s also easy to marginalize yourself. I won’t even bother to spark the usual responses, but I can think of at least one category of poster here I simply skip as soon as I realize what’s up. If a tree falls in forest, and everyone’s plugged their ears, is there a sound?

    For myself, at least in theory I try to distinguish between groups that I would eventually like to have as allies and those I fully and frankly intend to push off the bridge as soon as it’s feasible. For example, I will try to avoid being rude to women — but I see no need to be nice to Zionists.

    • LOL: IHTG
    • Replies: @IHTG
    Imagine thinking that by supporting Trump you're not serving Israel. Get out of your echo chambers alt-righters!
  190. @Colin Wright
    'Yes, I understand that inevitably those of a white nationalist inclination will support a generally nationalist agenda but so should citizens of all colours.

    If anything, black Americans are most hurt by the globalist trend of sacrificing citizenship value to boost other asset prices, because they have the least of the latter and so are most reliant on the former.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.'

    This kinda depends. I suspect the introduction of the Great Society welfare programs and government sinecures via affirmative action may have seduced the black population.

    Your position implicitly assumes blacks want to work, earn a decent living, acquire the rewards of thrift, upward mobility, etc. If that were so, indeed they above all others should object to immigration.

    But what if it isn't so? What if blacks -- depending on their station in life -- either want that AFDC or want that government clerk position? What if they aren't interested in fixing cars, or becoming a carpenter, or opening that Quickee-Mart, or whatever?

    Then all of a sudden the balance shifts. Immigration may not be actually be to their benefit, but priority one is making sure the gravy train keeps running.

    That means vote Democrat.

    Government jobs are typically restricted to US citizens, so black women with the right educational levels don’t have to compete too much with Hispanic women.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    'Government jobs are typically restricted to US citizens, so black women with the right educational levels don’t have to compete too much with Hispanic women.'

    That's more or less my point. If blacks aren't even interested in private sector employment (except for being IBM's necessary Vice-President-in-charge-of-being-black), then immigrants cease to be much of a threat.

    Blacks running small businesses, being self-employed artisans, etc are becoming exceedingly rare. I've dealt with a few, and they were just fine, but they're more of a historical curiosity than anything else.

    More typical is the experience I had driving around West Oakland looking for something (I forget what) once. It was lunch time, and it was a light industrial area, so all the workers were out lining up at the roach coaches. In spite of the fact that Oakland is a heavily black city, everyone was Asian or Hispanic -- until I got to one building.

    Ah, blacks working too! I confess it: my inner liberal rejoiced.

    Then I noticed the sign: 'Oakland School District Textbook Depository.' Government 'job.'
  191. @Anonymous

    even though he’s largely on the same page as both of them.
     
    What evidence have you seen of that?

    Ross co-wrote a book about how the GOP could and should attract the (white, implicitly) working class. He also echoed Steve’s “coalition of the fringes” observation after the 2012 election. There’s more evidence, but those are two examples that come immediately to mind.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Thanks
  192. @SteveO

    Opinion columns and opinion articles were simply unknown, in newspapers through the post War years, until [1970].
     
    No, that can't be right. Columnists like Walter Lippmann on one end of the spectrum and Westbrook Pegler on the other had been around since at least the 1930s. Drew Pearson was another. I remember James J Kilpatrick and Nicholas von Hoffman in the Post back in the ... late '60s, I think? There was lots of opinion journalism in the big-city papers, nationally syndicated and local, before 1970. Wasn't it always a thing?

    What you might be thinking of is the existence of a dedicated op-ed page with regular columnists and guests. I seem to recall the Kilpatrick, von Hoffman and Jack Anderson (successor to Pearson) columns being sort of scattered through the Post prior to the op-ed innovation.

    One big difference between then and now: Everybody read these guys, even those on the other side. They more or less had to, since the newspaper was the main source of news - much more important in places like NY and DC than TV network news. You saw the columns whether you wanted to or not, and so you read them.

    Now, people only see the words of those they agree with, along with a few tame "opponents".

    Newspapers had always run columnists and editorials and letters to the editor. I think the NYT started its Op-Ed page around 1969 opposite the Editorial page. They printed on it a lot of outside contributions (paying something like $150 — I doubt if the fee has changed in a half century). I don’t know if that was an innovation or not, but it was at least an innovation to put them in one place on a regular basis.

    In general, the 1970s were pretty pro-free speech.

    I got started as a pundit in 1990 writing up op-eds and sending them to semi-random newspapers on an assembly line basis. Seeing them in print, they looked just as good as the professionals’ columns, so that built my confidence. I assumed at the time, however, that I would quickly run out of good ideas for things to write about.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Not sure if I have ever seen a SS on-spec op-ed before. The Rice student paper review of Right Stuff was quite good.

    What's the best one you can link to? What papers printed you first and most often?
  193. @Steve Sailer
    Long Island seems like a center of disability fraud.

    Long Island seems like a center of disability fraud.

    It’s the home of Blue Shÿster Cult.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    Eric Bloom … greatest stun guitar -ist of all time?
  194. @Dave Pinsen
    Trump wasn’t a good candidate? Come on. He was the best candidate. That’s why he’s POTUS.

    Agree.

  195. @Steve Sailer
    People who smashed windows in the 1990s to fight globalism and smashed windows in the 2010s to promote globalism really just like smashing windows. They would have been happier if they'd been born into English soccer hooligan families, but instead they got born into the Volvo-driving liberal suburbs, so they have to pretend they have an ideology to just doing what comes naturally to them.

    People who smashed windows in the 1990s to fight globalism and smashed windows in the 2010s to promote globalism really just like smashing windows.

  196. anonymous[494] • Disclaimer says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    I think I probably picked up "stale, pale male" from somewhere else. I'm not sure if that one ever existed in the wild or was created by a pale, stale satirist.

    Are you an Olde Frothingslosh drinker?

    Olde Frothingslosh Pale Stale Ale

    A visitor (Bill Graham) informed me of a memorable hoax that I missed: Ye Olde Frothingsloth Pale Stale Ale. Frothingslosh is a unique beer that’s so light that the beer actually floats on top of the foam. It all started out as a running joke on Rege Cordic‘s Pittsburgh radio show in the 1950s. He made up all kinds of joke ads for this fictitious beer and invented slogans such as “A whale of an ale for the pale stale male” and “Hi dittom dottom, the foam is on the bottom.” But the Olde Frothingsloth concept became so popular, that eventually it caught the attention of the Pittsburgh Brewing Co. who started selling small runs of Olde Frothingsloth for special occasions such as Christmas and holidays. Of course, the beer being sold was really just Iron City Beer repackaged with Olde Frothingslosh labels, but the labels themselves were so outrageous that they instantly became prized among beer can collectors. The most popular cans were those that featured Miss Olde Frothingslosh, Fatima Yechburgh (pictured below), the supposed winner of the Frothingslosh Beauty Contest. Fatima was described as a resident of a small town near Pittsburgh. When not studying arc welding, she enjoyed soap carving, arm wrestling, sky diving, and ballet. I believe that the Pittsburgh Brewing Co. still occasionally produces small runs of Olde Frothingslosh. I’d love to try some.

    —From the Musée d’Hoaxeaux (http://hoaxes.org/weblog/comments/olde_frothingslosh_pale_stale_ale).

    Rege Cordic was the DJ who replaced Bob Crane on 50,000 watt KNX-AM in 1966-67.

    • Replies: @anon
    Olde Frothingshlosh X-mas advert sung to the tune of “O Tannenbaum”:

    "Olde Frothingslosh, Olde Frothingslosh,
    the pale stale ale for the pale stale male.
    Brewed with water from an old dish pail,
    Old Frothingslosh, Olde Frothingslosh,
    Oh my gosh, it's Frothingslosh"
  197. @SnakeEyes
    Kind of gutless of him to not link to you directly.

    Kind of gutless of him to not link to you directly.

    It is a dilemma. I want Sailer to be as widely read as possible – especially the Taki articles. OTOH I don’t want a herd of libtards harassing Steve when he wants to go out for breakfast. Douthat cites Sailer and it is practically a doxing.

    • Replies: @Highlander

    I don’t want a herd of libtards harassing Steve when he wants to go out for breakfast.
     
    The Valley is on the whole a pretty anonymous place even if he eats at joints on Ventura Blvd.
  198. @snorlax
    I make a hobby of reading old newspapers and magazines — slanted reporting has been the norm from the very beginning.

    I have the same hobby, and I concur.

    Have you ever heard of this site? I spend a lot of time browsing through old papers:
    http://www.newspapers.com

    If you’re not willing to spring for a subscription, Google has a decent little archive. The scan quality ranges from decent to awful:
    http://news.google.com/newspapers

  199. @S. Anonyia
    I hope by Trumpy platform you are including not only the populism/nationalism but also the more pragmatic foreign policy he ran on- calling out George Bush for not keeping the U.S safe on 9/11, criticizing intervention in the Middle East, wanting to make deals with “adversaries” etc.

    Because no neocon will ever win the Presidency again. A non-isolationist Republican will never win no matter how nutty the Dems get- voters will stay home. Foreign policy is a big part of how Trump got places like Michigan and nearly got Minnesota. That’s how he got a lot of former Bernie supporters to switch over (which the media doesn’t talk about much). Trump won because he was outrageous, because he called out the powerful and slammed their ridiculousness and waste on national tv, often in a hilarious way. That was appealing to a lot of people and I really can’t imagine a Cotton or Romney style candidate doing that.

    Foreign policy is a big part of how Trump got places like Michigan and nearly got Minnesota

    Ronald Reagan ran three percentage points ahead of Hillary while losing the state. In 2016, unfortunately, the anti-Clinton vote split Minnesota.

  200. @Steve Sailer
    Government jobs are typically restricted to US citizens, so black women with the right educational levels don't have to compete too much with Hispanic women.

    ‘Government jobs are typically restricted to US citizens, so black women with the right educational levels don’t have to compete too much with Hispanic women.’

    That’s more or less my point. If blacks aren’t even interested in private sector employment (except for being IBM’s necessary Vice-President-in-charge-of-being-black), then immigrants cease to be much of a threat.

    Blacks running small businesses, being self-employed artisans, etc are becoming exceedingly rare. I’ve dealt with a few, and they were just fine, but they’re more of a historical curiosity than anything else.

    More typical is the experience I had driving around West Oakland looking for something (I forget what) once. It was lunch time, and it was a light industrial area, so all the workers were out lining up at the roach coaches. In spite of the fact that Oakland is a heavily black city, everyone was Asian or Hispanic — until I got to one building.

    Ah, blacks working too! I confess it: my inner liberal rejoiced.

    Then I noticed the sign: ‘Oakland School District Textbook Depository.’ Government ‘job.’

  201. @Intelligent Dasein
    To be perfectly honest (and I know I'm going to get junked for saying this here), I think talking about race and ethnicity at all is generally a nonstarter. And this is not because "normies" are too thoroughly indoctrinated in multiculturalism to absorb the discussion, but because it really is far too Procrustean a bed into which to fit the vital issues of the day. The kind of people who frequent places like Unz may have difficulty remembering that ethnological studies just aren't a priority for most people. Once you start throwing in a lot of HBD terms, genetics, IQ, and evolution, you've effectively glazed the eyes of 90% of the audience, and you're left preaching to a very odd choir. The average person doesn't really want to have a conversation about race at all. He wants to forget about it; he wants this whole silly subject to leave him the heck alone. He doesn't want to have to have an opinion about it, not one he is obliged to confess in public anyway, and especially not one that he has to carefully tailor in order to avoid suspicion of thought-crime.

    This should suggest what ought to be a proper populist strategy: Dismantle those legal and social structures which lead to the emergence of a racial grievance industry. President Trump could take a huge step in this direction simply by announcing that Affirmative Action and federal hiring quotas will no longer be enforced. The Left will raise an unprecedented outcry over this and will probably sue and demonstrate like never before, but it's hard to argue with the substance of the decision. Since the opposite of preferential treatment is "meritocracy," the inherent fairness of the proposal will win over that portion of the public who really matters. Let everyone who takes the opposite side be forced to buy in to the explicit proposition that certain ethnics are entitled to special treatment at public expense. They will never succeed at getting that ratified into law, nor will it ever be accepted by the general population. Once individuals and private institutions know that they are free to associate with whom they please, the grievance industry will dry up for lack of profit.

    The only two things even making this an issue are the Warren Court laws and the welfare state. The liquidating of these two pernicious influences is a difficult but politically attainable goal. The effort should be focused there.

    Dismantle those legal and social structures which lead to the emergence of a racial grievance industry.

    I like it. If Trump could realize it, the field of play would be reoriented, and dramatically so.

  202. @Anonymous

    SS publicly identified the Franklin on the ground. Trump was the only one who picked it up!
     
    Why was Trump the only one to pick it up?

    And despite proven success, why is he still the only one close to espousing nationalist views two years later?

    There’s a $100 bill on the sidewalk, lying there for any politician to pick up.

    Standing nearby is a political donor offering him $1,000 not to pick it up.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Lot
    You think Paul Manafort every delivered suitcases of cash to a member of Congress? Or perhaps wired them cash from his foreign accounts the way he paid his tailor?

    He supposedly received in total about $60 million from one of the sides in Ukraine, but had cash flow problems. Was he spending millions on personal consumption? A million dollars in suits?

    He purchased a lot of NY and DC real estate. That has been consistently going up in value since 2010. Even if he overpaid and wasted money on renovations, those markets have doubled, he still made a lot.

    In the W years, Chakah Fattah, Bob Ney, William Jefferson, And Duke Cunningham all were convicted of bribery. So this isn't outlandish.
  203. @Cagey Beast
    OT:

    Monsieur Zack Beauchamp went down to the Unite The Right rally and found someone naive enough to dox himself. This is journalistic malpractice on the part of Monsieur Beauchamp but a life-long teacher's pet just has to tattle-tale.


    https://twitter.com/zackbeauchamp/status/1028741505052291073

    I think Zack got pranked.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Yeah the guy looks quite Jewish. He may be pulling a prank or he may genuinely trying out this White supremacy he's heard so much about. All the alt-right celebrities were advising people to steer clear of this so who knows what motivated this guy?
  204. @Forbes

    acculturating proud and independent whites to dispense with their ethos of shame.
     
    From what I've observed, the under-40 cohort has dispensed with shame--and are far from being acculturated as proud and independent. They are glued to social media making them fad and trend followers of the most banal sort. They're buying the propaganda pumped out on Facebook, et al., which is why there's so much alarm expressed about fake news or "fake news," and the need to shut down/censor alternative voices that challenge the propaganda, challenge The Narrative, or merely present alternative perspectives (even if dark conspiracy theories).

    Just ask yourself, how is Kim Kardashian a "thing"--a celebrity, a socialite, a TV personality, except for a complete lack of shame?

    Just ask yourself, how is Kim Kardashian a “thing”–a celebrity, a socialite, a TV personality, except for a complete lack of shame?

    How were Bill and Hillary Clinton a “thing”–a president, a senator, foundation heads–except for a complete lack of shame?

  205. @ManWick
    The Sailer Strategy is irrelevant to national elections, but the Sailer coalition of the fringes is very much in play. The Sailer Strategy would require that whites nationally start thinking and voting like whites do in the Southeast. I don't see that happening for at least a generation.

    Trump got the two million or so missing white votes Romney repelled, of course, but in the end, Clinton won the popular vote by nearly 3 million votes. The republican vote is tapped out at about 62-64 million, but the democratic vote can get up to at least 65 or 66 million. Those are the raw numbers. Nothing can change that. 2012 and 2016 show that clearly. The demographic die is set.

    If the republicans cannot get beyond 62-64 million, which I believe is the case, then their only hope is that the democrats put forward another pasty, old, white. Clinton lost because she could not get out the black vote in Obama-like numbers in Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Pennsylvania--and we're talking in the 10s of thousands, not 100s of thousands. In 2020, another pasty, white democrat will be even less able to. Can the democrats put up another Obama like figure, or is he a once in a century-type aberration?

    If the republicans cannot get beyond 62-64 million, which I believe is the case, then their only hope is that the democrats put forward another pasty, old, white.

    I think the Democrats will do worse if they put up Kamala Harris or Cory Booker. As Zach Galifianakis asked Barack Obama, “How does it feel to be the last black president?”

  206. @Prof. Woland
    100 Sarah Jeongs will only have a marginal impact on in-grouping whites. The people who want to dismiss her can do so easily because there is no punishment or price to pay although it might come back later to haunt the left. What it is really going to take is some Horst Wessel (bad example possibly) type hideous real unmistakable black (or brown) on white hate crime that will force a litmus test on other WHITES to acknowledge anti-white hate. Right now they are allowed to hide.

    The left is so used to being the only one's to pull this shit. It is also why they are patrolling the internet and social media so heavily. It is not because they are concerned with decency or that they are not obsessed with hate crimes; they seem to live for white on black issues. Once black on white hate becomes a meme there will be no stopping it and the left will sorely rue ever using it in the first place.

    What it is really going to take is some Horst Wessel (bad example possibly) type hideous real unmistakable black (or brown) on white hate crime that will force a litmus test on other WHITES to acknowledge anti-white hate.

    I guess the MSM just won’t cover it. The New York Times has never mentioned Frederick Demond Scott of Kansas City, after all. He’s the black Dylann Roof.

  207. @gregor
    Agree Douthat is wrong there. The South serves as the model. Mississippi is 37% black, yet Republicans carry it easily. Nationally, the GOP share of the white vote has jumped to 60/40 in the last couple of elections, and it will go higher. That shift is happening much quicker than Dems can possibly bring in and naturalize foreign voters. It was a delayed reaction, but whites have now noticed what’s going on before Democrats could bring in enough reinforcements.

    I disagree entirely about Trump. He is a polarizing figure to be sure, but I think he was uniquely suited to win on a realignment platform (i.e., dissent from new-liberal globalism or whatever you want to call it). What establishment Republican would have run on a Trump platform without backing down? It is to laugh. Who else could have withstood the fierce media onslaught without wilting? Who else could have won without the donor money? I just don’t see any of the McCains or Romneys doing it and I sure as hell don’t see those guys staying in the pocket and landing counter punches like Trump did so admirably. By that I refer to the way Trump was able excite and provoke the media and use their attacks against them. Trump seemed to feed on it and it ended up serving as evidence of his populist bonafides. Same thing with the issue of “decorum.” A polite or inoffensive version of Trump would have gotten buried.

    Now that Trump has set the course, many will follow the ways of MAGA. Because MAGA will have built up momentum, these others will not need the unique savvy of Trump.

    Trump was also willing to repudiate McCain and the Bushes, which I believe was an absolute necessity for the Republican Party. Sad that sometimes savvy Limbaugh and Hannity don’t get this. They’ll still praise the Bushes.

    • Agree: gregor
    • Replies: @Lot
    "Trump was also willing to repudiate McCain and the Bushes"

    It was absolutely his finest hour.

    Something to think about:

    2004: Dem establishment crushes anti-war Dean, then loses

    2006: huge Dem gains in Congress running against Iraq

    2008: more Dem gains in Congress, anti-war Obama beats pro-war Hillary then pro-war McCain

    2010: Obama follows the advice of Hillary and Kerry, slow walks ending Iraq, Dems are crushed because of their low turnout

    2012: War finally ending, Obama beats pro-war Romney

    2016: anti-war Trump beats pro-war Bush III, then pro-war Hillary. Obscure Vermont socialist nearly beats pro-war Hillary.
  208. @Reg Cæsar

    Long Island seems like a center of disability fraud.

     

    It's the home of Blue Shÿster Cult.

    Eric Bloom … greatest stun guitar -ist of all time?

  209. @S. Anonyia
    I hope by Trumpy platform you are including not only the populism/nationalism but also the more pragmatic foreign policy he ran on- calling out George Bush for not keeping the U.S safe on 9/11, criticizing intervention in the Middle East, wanting to make deals with “adversaries” etc.

    Because no neocon will ever win the Presidency again. A non-isolationist Republican will never win no matter how nutty the Dems get- voters will stay home. Foreign policy is a big part of how Trump got places like Michigan and nearly got Minnesota. That’s how he got a lot of former Bernie supporters to switch over (which the media doesn’t talk about much). Trump won because he was outrageous, because he called out the powerful and slammed their ridiculousness and waste on national tv, often in a hilarious way. That was appealing to a lot of people and I really can’t imagine a Cotton or Romney style candidate doing that.

    Good comment.

    Trump’s foreign policy has been generally great.

    Regarding the neo-con issue, that term has evolved several times and I think it has now lost its usefulness, except as a historical term.

    What was a fairly coherent very pro-W group 10-20 years ago has split into many different groups

    1. centrist Democrats (Max Boot)
    2. anti-Trumpers who are otherwise conventional Republicans (McCain, Frum, George Will, the Bushes)
    3. anti-Trump to neutral Trump (the Kochs, Bill Kristol, much of National Review)
    4. MAGA (Pipes, Bolton, Gingrich, Giuliani, Pompeo, Cotton)

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Regarding the neo-con issue, that term has evolved several times and I think it has now lost its usefulness, except as a historical term
     
    All too true. Remember when it first appeared? It applied to domestic social and economic issues, on which the neocons were mostly arguing for common sense. Charles Murray was one of them.

    Whatever happened to that kind of domestic neo? Are they preserved in aspic at the Manhattan Institute, Mackinac Center, and Center of the American Experiment?

    Or in amber, like fossils?
  210. @Steve Sailer
    Newspapers had always run columnists and editorials and letters to the editor. I think the NYT started its Op-Ed page around 1969 opposite the Editorial page. They printed on it a lot of outside contributions (paying something like $150 -- I doubt if the fee has changed in a half century). I don't know if that was an innovation or not, but it was at least an innovation to put them in one place on a regular basis.

    In general, the 1970s were pretty pro-free speech.

    I got started as a pundit in 1990 writing up op-eds and sending them to semi-random newspapers on an assembly line basis. Seeing them in print, they looked just as good as the professionals' columns, so that built my confidence. I assumed at the time, however, that I would quickly run out of good ideas for things to write about.

    Not sure if I have ever seen a SS on-spec op-ed before. The Rice student paper review of Right Stuff was quite good.

    What’s the best one you can link to? What papers printed you first and most often?

  211. @anonymous
    I think Zack got pranked.

    Yeah the guy looks quite Jewish. He may be pulling a prank or he may genuinely trying out this White supremacy he’s heard so much about. All the alt-right celebrities were advising people to steer clear of this so who knows what motivated this guy?

  212. @Harry Baldwin
    Trump was also willing to repudiate McCain and the Bushes, which I believe was an absolute necessity for the Republican Party. Sad that sometimes savvy Limbaugh and Hannity don't get this. They'll still praise the Bushes.

    “Trump was also willing to repudiate McCain and the Bushes”

    It was absolutely his finest hour.

    Something to think about:

    2004: Dem establishment crushes anti-war Dean, then loses

    2006: huge Dem gains in Congress running against Iraq

    2008: more Dem gains in Congress, anti-war Obama beats pro-war Hillary then pro-war McCain

    2010: Obama follows the advice of Hillary and Kerry, slow walks ending Iraq, Dems are crushed because of their low turnout

    2012: War finally ending, Obama beats pro-war Romney

    2016: anti-war Trump beats pro-war Bush III, then pro-war Hillary. Obscure Vermont socialist nearly beats pro-war Hillary.

  213. @Art Deco
    If I'm recalling the survey research correctly, the polled support of Messrs. Bush, Walker, and Huckabee largely evaporated during Trump's first 3 months as a candidate. He didn't have to tear them apart. They simply faded away. Trump ended up fighting Ted Cruz, the one candidate the Capitol Hill nexus arguably finds more alienating than Trump (with the nomenklatura vote seeking refuge first in Rubio and then in Kasich).

    In previous Republican contests, you had this large bloc of voters (1/3 of the total?) whose preferred candidate was The-Guy-Whose-Turn-It-Is. The thing is, The-Guy-Whose-Turn-It-Is is never the guy who holds fixed and astringent views on any topic (that's 'divisive'), so Rick Santorum was not considered. Santorum's utter failure was curious inasmuch as in addition to having been the runner-up in 2012, he's something of an immigration hawk and not an enthusiast of Paul Ryan's unpalatable libertarian nostrums (e.g replacing Medicare with vouchers). Someone who thinks Trump was a bad candidate has to answer why Huckabee and Santorum could not marshal and motivate their natural constituency and Trump could.

    If the Republican Party was a Catholic party then Santorum would have been perfect but it isn’t. Also explain to me how someone who couldn’t win re-election to his own Senate seat was going to win the White House? Also Santorum backed idiotic crap like “Intelligent Design”. Trump played along with the social conservatives to get their votes but everyone understands that Trump is no Holy Roller in his personal life (far from it) and this is just a cynical ploy to get votes. Santorum appears to really believe that shit which make him a rube. Don’t get me wrong – I happen to like Santorum as a person (and because of his economic positions) despite all this, but he was/is never going to be POTUS.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    How Rick Santorum Helped Donald Trump Win the White House
    By Bill Powell On 11/15/16 at 9:00 AM

    https://www.newsweek.com/2016/11/25/donald-trump-presidential-campaign-521145.html
  214. @Currahee
    The Unite the Right II has concluded in DC with less than 30 participants and over a thousand counter-demonstrators.

    Alt-Rite can officially be pronounced dead as a doornail.

    Still waiting for Steve's analysis of the Alt-Right.

    Right, the great threat to the Republic that all good people of conscience must struggle against consisted of 2 dozen people. The New York Times is still looking for their fugitive leader, Emmanuel Goldwhite so that he can be given a proper show trial.

  215. @IHTG
    Are you trying to imply that Sean Trende stole your idea, Steve?

    My idea I put forward on 11/28/2000 was so obvious that the real question is why it took 12 years for anybody else to come up with it?

    • Replies: @al-Gharaniq
    I think you're being a bit too humble there and aren't giving yourself as much credit as you should. I mean, the alternative is that it wasn't quite so obvious back in 2000, but by 2012 (after 2 presidential electoral defeats) some analysts finally started to notice the pattern. To notice that early on is quite an accomplishment.

    Did Sean Trende ever contact you or read your posts on the subject (that you know of, at least), or did he independently re-discover the missing white voter issue?

    All this kind of reminds me of the Newton-Leibniz calculus controversy, actually.
    , @gregor
    I vaguely remember Sam Francis talking about it way back when. So you had at least one convert.

    https://www.unz.com/sfrancis/so-who-really-needs-the-hispanic-vote-anyway/

    https://www.unz.com/sfrancis/gop-cant-win-great-hispandering-competition/

    And I can't remember who exactly but I remember someone make the related point that sucking up to blacks doesn't work and how Bush tried and did no better than Goldwater.

    No one else put it forward because most of them favor Invade the World, Invite the World. They don't want to win if it means they have to sacrifice those cherished principles.
    , @JackOH
    "My idea . . . was so obvious . . .".

    "The obvious differs from the secret and hidden in that the obvious is much more difficult to see." Rough paraphrase from a novel by Trevanian, author of The Eiger Sanction and other popular, literate novels.

    Back when I was doing some local controversialist writing, I sort of wondered if I'd be better off being ignored, trashed, or plagiarized by big-ticket slobs. The idea of actually being given credit for having moved public opinion seemed too distant a possibility.
  216. @Harry Baldwin
    There's a $100 bill on the sidewalk, lying there for any politician to pick up.

    Standing nearby is a political donor offering him $1,000 not to pick it up.

    You think Paul Manafort every delivered suitcases of cash to a member of Congress? Or perhaps wired them cash from his foreign accounts the way he paid his tailor?

    He supposedly received in total about $60 million from one of the sides in Ukraine, but had cash flow problems. Was he spending millions on personal consumption? A million dollars in suits?

    He purchased a lot of NY and DC real estate. That has been consistently going up in value since 2010. Even if he overpaid and wasted money on renovations, those markets have doubled, he still made a lot.

    In the W years, Chakah Fattah, Bob Ney, William Jefferson, And Duke Cunningham all were convicted of bribery. So this isn’t outlandish.

  217. @Anonym
    Looks like one of our fellow whites, without the quotes. Rock on pro-white Jew, if that's what you are.

    Probably Italian. Often confused with Jews and vice versa. (It looks like Ashkenazim are 50-60% Italian, genetically).

  218. @njguy73

    I hesitate to call these websites cowardly, but Steve IS on the SPLC shit list for calling Obama a “wigger.” For Steve’s sake, it’s better that the SPLC cloaking device remain operational. His ideas percolate up to the journalists, researchers, and politicians who matter, yet at the same time he avoids Antifa kicking in his new garage door when Don Lemon doxes him.
     
    I'd be on the SPLC shit list if they knew I own a copy of "Truly Tasteless Jokes."

    I’d be on the SPLC shit list if they knew I own a copy of “Truly Tasteless Jokes.”

    Is Regnery the publisher and Ann Coulter the editor?

  219. @SteveO

    Opinion columns and opinion articles were simply unknown, in newspapers through the post War years, until [1970].
     
    No, that can't be right. Columnists like Walter Lippmann on one end of the spectrum and Westbrook Pegler on the other had been around since at least the 1930s. Drew Pearson was another. I remember James J Kilpatrick and Nicholas von Hoffman in the Post back in the ... late '60s, I think? There was lots of opinion journalism in the big-city papers, nationally syndicated and local, before 1970. Wasn't it always a thing?

    What you might be thinking of is the existence of a dedicated op-ed page with regular columnists and guests. I seem to recall the Kilpatrick, von Hoffman and Jack Anderson (successor to Pearson) columns being sort of scattered through the Post prior to the op-ed innovation.

    One big difference between then and now: Everybody read these guys, even those on the other side. They more or less had to, since the newspaper was the main source of news - much more important in places like NY and DC than TV network news. You saw the columns whether you wanted to or not, and so you read them.

    Now, people only see the words of those they agree with, along with a few tame "opponents".

    What you might be thinking of is the existence of a dedicated op-ed page with regular columnists and guests.

    I was. My apologies for being imprecise—people like Walter Lippman were writing opinions in newspapers long before 1970, of course.

  220. @Lot
    Good comment.

    Trump's foreign policy has been generally great.

    Regarding the neo-con issue, that term has evolved several times and I think it has now lost its usefulness, except as a historical term.

    What was a fairly coherent very pro-W group 10-20 years ago has split into many different groups

    1. centrist Democrats (Max Boot)
    2. anti-Trumpers who are otherwise conventional Republicans (McCain, Frum, George Will, the Bushes)
    3. anti-Trump to neutral Trump (the Kochs, Bill Kristol, much of National Review)
    4. MAGA (Pipes, Bolton, Gingrich, Giuliani, Pompeo, Cotton)

    Regarding the neo-con issue, that term has evolved several times and I think it has now lost its usefulness, except as a historical term

    All too true. Remember when it first appeared? It applied to domestic social and economic issues, on which the neocons were mostly arguing for common sense. Charles Murray was one of them.

    Whatever happened to that kind of domestic neo? Are they preserved in aspic at the Manhattan Institute, Mackinac Center, and Center of the American Experiment?

    Or in amber, like fossils?

    • Replies: @Lot
    Mmmm, aspic. I could go for some duck liver pate on rye crackers crackers and gouda. I like the cheaper and meatier ones more than the now-illegal foie gras.
  221. @Cagey Beast
    OT:
    Pelosi: Trump’s Whole Thing Is ‘Make America White Again’

    https://www.breitbart.com/video/2018/08/12/pelosi-trumps-whole-thing-is-make-america-white-again/

    Nancy's own family:
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/B_XFop7UIAAsmwW.jpg

    The cream is a nice touch.

  222. @NickG

    As my favourite Jewish academic and Labour Lord likes to say, it isn’t that the English hate the Labour party, it is that the English think the Labour party hates them.

    Obviously, the truth is that the English are racist for noticing…
     
    Alas still lots of them - at least the blue collar natives - don't notice and continue to vote Labour out of habit, legacy tribal loyalty and so on.

    The UK Labour hasn't represented the interests of working class or blue collar Britons, at least outside of the ever expanding trough that is the public sector, for decades.

    Alas still lots of them – at least the blue collar natives – don’t notice and continue to vote Labour out of habit, legacy tribal loyalty and so on.

    The UK Labour hasn’t represented the interests of working class or blue collar Britons, at least outside of the ever expanding trough that is the public sector, for decades.

    To be fair working class and blue collar Britons know that the Tories hate them more than Labour does. So voting to keep out the Tory scum does make some sense.

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    The Tories don't hate them anymore, except for the occasional freakshow like Matthew Parris. The Tories are often oblivious instead. Your data is old.
  223. @Mr. Anon

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate.
     
    I agree that Trump was not a very good candidate. However I believe his campaign proved to be very well organized. He had a small team doing polling and data mining that paid off big in targeting their efforts.

    Would Tom Cotton, for instance, running on a Trumpy platform, lose many of Trump’s voters?
     
    No, but he would lose a lot of his current donors, and he probably wouldn't be willing to do that. Running on the Trump platform that is - the platform that Trump ran on - not the one he has been governing on, that is.

    I think he wouldn’t, but would also take back many of the educated McCain/Romney voters who defected or stayed home in 2016. The same for Mike Pence or Kris Kobach.
     
    I think that is true for Kobach. Pence, on the other hand, is a lousy candidate. He's too milquetoast. That overt christian conservative vibe is a strike to a lot of people (I know it is to me). He seems like the kind of guy who will cuck, and he probably will. Trump has proved that conservative christians will vote for a candidate who isn't one, provided he does not seek to alienate them and makes an honest effort to represent their interests.

    Pence was a based talk radio host Tea Party guy. While not my favorite either, but I would worry less about him getting tricked into some amnesty for wall-funding deal than with Trump’s.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Pence was a based talk radio host Tea Party guy.
     
    I don't doubt that he is, fundamentally, a good man. But he is also, fundamentally, a cuck. The fact that he took his family to see "Hamilton" says a lot about his judgement. He comes across as weak and ineffectual - too nice and too trusting - kind of like Bush the Younger, if Bush the Younger hadn't been a total d*ck. Pence should go back to being a talk-radio host, and leave somebody else to be Trump's heir-apparent. He is not the man that 21st-century America needs.
  224. Lmao at all these people in here kissing Steve’s ring at his “prediction”.

    Steve was eeyore for most of the campaign season. Lets not kid ourselves.

  225. @Reg Cæsar

    Regarding the neo-con issue, that term has evolved several times and I think it has now lost its usefulness, except as a historical term
     
    All too true. Remember when it first appeared? It applied to domestic social and economic issues, on which the neocons were mostly arguing for common sense. Charles Murray was one of them.

    Whatever happened to that kind of domestic neo? Are they preserved in aspic at the Manhattan Institute, Mackinac Center, and Center of the American Experiment?

    Or in amber, like fossils?

    Mmmm, aspic. I could go for some duck liver pate on rye crackers crackers and gouda. I like the cheaper and meatier ones more than the now-illegal foie gras.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Mmmm, aspic. I could go for some duck liver pate on rye crackers crackers and gouda.

     

    Is that kosher? I wonder if Jane and Michael Stern keep it at home, considering how often they break it on the road.

    Would a Juicy Lucy with fake non-dairy cheese between veggie burgers be kosher? I don't eat meat on Fridays, and veggie burgers seem to break the spirit, if not the letter, of the rule.

    If Americans can call a gyro "yee-ro", why can't they call Gouda "how-da", which actually sounds American? "Goo-da" is a misapplication of French orthography. (Don't get me started on "Helsinki"...) Someday I'll visit both Gouda and Edam, and throw in Cheddar as well.

    I like the cheaper and meatier ones more than the now-illegal foie gras.

     

    An article in Cigar Aficionado rated the Nicaraguans reviewed above the Cubans. Is that common now? Is the attraction to Cubans more that of forbidden fruit, or nostalgia? Westerners say that the possibly fatal fugu isn't really all that great a dish, either.
  226. @anon
    >He Who Must Not Be Named

    Speaking of, did you coin this phrase (in an alternative order):

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/08/09/male-pale-stale-university-professors-given-reverse-mentors/

    Googling, it seems the reporter's work has made appearances on this blog multiple times...

    A few years ago there was a family of hawks nesting over the door of some upper east side apt. building in NYC . The male was called “Pale Male” by the local bird watchers as they had been observing him for some time .
    Probably one of earliest social media mobs went after the guy because he intended to remove nest for blah blah reason . His daughter was harassed in school , the whole familiar tale . I’m not sure if he was actually Hitler but might as well have been .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pale_Male

    The Wiki article just mentions the board but I recall the mob singled out a specific individual .

  227. @Colin Wright
    'People who smashed windows in the 1990s...'

    I completely agree. These are essentially testosterone-filled young males. If they were in Highland New Guinea, they'd go off and fling spears at members of the next tribe working in a yam field on the trobal frontier. Since they come from white liberal suburbia, they amp up leftist ideology until it provides them with the necessary rationalization for violence.

    I suspect that as a rule, they probably suffer from self-esteem issues related to their failing to get good grades and get into an elite college. Adopting the ideologies they do offers them an alternative means of self-appraisal, in which a willingness to smash windows and hit those safely weaker than oneself makes one a success.

    These people are vermin. Give me an honest black looter any day. At least then there's no pretense.

    They suffer from about as many self-esteem issues as Muhammad Ali. Seriously, where does this idea come from? Why is it so persistent? They’re spoiled, snobby rich kids. They’ve got self esteem coming out their ears.

  228. @Thulean Friend
    Not always. Sailer has catalogued the 'Flight from White' for a number of years now. Many Whites will simply attack other Whites in order to fit in with the zeitgeist or simply make up tall tales of their own ethnic background (Elizabeth Warren's supposed 'native ancestry' fits this).

    But there will be a core who do not shy away from the fight. And it is this core upon the future hinges.

    …or simply make up tall tales of their own ethnic background (Elizabeth Warren’s supposed ‘native ancestry’ fits this).

    Churchill’s own Iroquois ancestry was better established, albeit never proven. Not that these people would claim him.

    That’s Winston. Ward is another story.

    • Replies: @Anon

    Churchill’s own Iroquois ancestry was better established, albeit never proven.
     
    Do you have a reference?
  229. @AndrewR
    Trump won mainly because of his platform and Hillary's well-earned unpopularity.

    A charming, less arrogant, more thoughtful, more knowledgeable candidate with Trump's broad platform and establishment-rocking agenda would have beaten Hillary in probably at least 40 states.

    You and Lot are forgetting that winning the primary is part of the process. No one other than Trump could have both won the nomination of one of the two major parties and won the general election in 2016.

  230. @Steve Sailer
    My idea I put forward on 11/28/2000 was so obvious that the real question is why it took 12 years for anybody else to come up with it?

    I think you’re being a bit too humble there and aren’t giving yourself as much credit as you should. I mean, the alternative is that it wasn’t quite so obvious back in 2000, but by 2012 (after 2 presidential electoral defeats) some analysts finally started to notice the pattern. To notice that early on is quite an accomplishment.

    Did Sean Trende ever contact you or read your posts on the subject (that you know of, at least), or did he independently re-discover the missing white voter issue?

    All this kind of reminds me of the Newton-Leibniz calculus controversy, actually.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    If you did a Google search on various words inevitable in the topic you'd eventually find my writings.
  231. @al-Gharaniq
    I think you're being a bit too humble there and aren't giving yourself as much credit as you should. I mean, the alternative is that it wasn't quite so obvious back in 2000, but by 2012 (after 2 presidential electoral defeats) some analysts finally started to notice the pattern. To notice that early on is quite an accomplishment.

    Did Sean Trende ever contact you or read your posts on the subject (that you know of, at least), or did he independently re-discover the missing white voter issue?

    All this kind of reminds me of the Newton-Leibniz calculus controversy, actually.

    If you did a Google search on various words inevitable in the topic you’d eventually find my writings.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Why were you seemingly slow to warm up to Trump?
  232. @Jack D
    If the Republican Party was a Catholic party then Santorum would have been perfect but it isn't. Also explain to me how someone who couldn't win re-election to his own Senate seat was going to win the White House? Also Santorum backed idiotic crap like "Intelligent Design". Trump played along with the social conservatives to get their votes but everyone understands that Trump is no Holy Roller in his personal life (far from it) and this is just a cynical ploy to get votes. Santorum appears to really believe that shit which make him a rube. Don't get me wrong - I happen to like Santorum as a person (and because of his economic positions) despite all this, but he was/is never going to be POTUS.

    How Rick Santorum Helped Donald Trump Win the White House
    By Bill Powell On 11/15/16 at 9:00 AM

    https://www.newsweek.com/2016/11/25/donald-trump-presidential-campaign-521145.html

  233. @Steve Sailer
    An awful lot of the guys in the Border Patrol guys are Latinos.

    One of them quit and wrote a book about it.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    "Third generation Mexican American joins the border patrol, empathizes with illegal migrants from Mexico"

    fake book from fake media
  234. @Intelligent Dasein
    To be perfectly honest (and I know I'm going to get junked for saying this here), I think talking about race and ethnicity at all is generally a nonstarter. And this is not because "normies" are too thoroughly indoctrinated in multiculturalism to absorb the discussion, but because it really is far too Procrustean a bed into which to fit the vital issues of the day. The kind of people who frequent places like Unz may have difficulty remembering that ethnological studies just aren't a priority for most people. Once you start throwing in a lot of HBD terms, genetics, IQ, and evolution, you've effectively glazed the eyes of 90% of the audience, and you're left preaching to a very odd choir. The average person doesn't really want to have a conversation about race at all. He wants to forget about it; he wants this whole silly subject to leave him the heck alone. He doesn't want to have to have an opinion about it, not one he is obliged to confess in public anyway, and especially not one that he has to carefully tailor in order to avoid suspicion of thought-crime.

    This should suggest what ought to be a proper populist strategy: Dismantle those legal and social structures which lead to the emergence of a racial grievance industry. President Trump could take a huge step in this direction simply by announcing that Affirmative Action and federal hiring quotas will no longer be enforced. The Left will raise an unprecedented outcry over this and will probably sue and demonstrate like never before, but it's hard to argue with the substance of the decision. Since the opposite of preferential treatment is "meritocracy," the inherent fairness of the proposal will win over that portion of the public who really matters. Let everyone who takes the opposite side be forced to buy in to the explicit proposition that certain ethnics are entitled to special treatment at public expense. They will never succeed at getting that ratified into law, nor will it ever be accepted by the general population. Once individuals and private institutions know that they are free to associate with whom they please, the grievance industry will dry up for lack of profit.

    The only two things even making this an issue are the Warren Court laws and the welfare state. The liquidating of these two pernicious influences is a difficult but politically attainable goal. The effort should be focused there.

    sue and demonstrate like never before

    No, they’ll have to style and profile like never before because to be the man, Rick Steamboat!, you have to BEAT THE MAN!

  235. @Dave Pinsen
    One of them quit and wrote a book about it.

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/967290623991611392?s=21

    “Third generation Mexican American joins the border patrol, empathizes with illegal migrants from Mexico”

    fake book from fake media

  236. @Anonym
    Looks like one of our fellow whites, without the quotes. Rock on pro-white Jew, if that's what you are.

    His name is very Jewish and he lives in a very Jewish suburb. Given his age and lack of signs of orthodoxy, he is probably a mix of Jewish with most likely Italian or Irish.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    In my experience the children of Jew-Irish mixed marriages tend to look Irish.
  237. @TTSSYF
    I miss Lawrence Auster. Sailer's commentary was always a nice complement to Auster's...what I didn't get from one, I got from the other.

    I miss Lawrence Auster. Sailer’s commentary was always a nice complement to Auster’s…what I didn’t get from one, I got from the other.

    Agreed. I liked Lawrence Auster’s site too; he was a good man. I also miss Mangan’s site.

    • Replies: @snorlax

    I also miss Mangan’s site.
     
    He didn't die, I don't think.
    , @Desiderius
    Poor Moldbug never could win Auster over.
  238. @Lot
    Pence was a based talk radio host Tea Party guy. While not my favorite either, but I would worry less about him getting tricked into some amnesty for wall-funding deal than with Trump's.

    Pence was a based talk radio host Tea Party guy.

    I don’t doubt that he is, fundamentally, a good man. But he is also, fundamentally, a cuck. The fact that he took his family to see “Hamilton” says a lot about his judgement. He comes across as weak and ineffectual – too nice and too trusting – kind of like Bush the Younger, if Bush the Younger hadn’t been a total d*ck. Pence should go back to being a talk-radio host, and leave somebody else to be Trump’s heir-apparent. He is not the man that 21st-century America needs.

  239. @Anonymous
    How can people with graduate degrees--from good schools even--not have voted for Hillary? I mean, how? And congrats on the little link.

    there are legions of people who voted for Trump. My relatives and my lovely Dad, taught at Stanford, MIT, Harvard, Princeton, Yale…would have all, voted for Trump (blacks & whites in the 60’s) because they voted against: Nazis, Bolsheviks and Totalitarians of any ethnicity and race. Everyone (from Greatest Generation, including Europe) sent their youngest men to the front, to kill people – no one really, expected survivors/VFW survivors, fucking, yah (speaking for my Grandpa). Shit, my time is up!

  240. @Dave Pinsen
    Ross has credited Steve by name before, but something has changed recently with Ross, where he’s trying to distance himself from both Steve and Trump, even though he’s largely on the same page as both of them.

    He’s stuck with bills to pay. Being middle-aged sucks. You can no longer believe you can do anything.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Well, granny, you may be old but you can still post pointless comments on unz.com all day, so you've got that going for you.
    , @Carbon blob
    Indeed, to be famous but not quite have FU money is a sad state of affairs.
    , @Lagertha
    haha - yet you post- get off my land.
  241. @Lot
    His name is very Jewish and he lives in a very Jewish suburb. Given his age and lack of signs of orthodoxy, he is probably a mix of Jewish with most likely Italian or Irish.

    In my experience the children of Jew-Irish mixed marriages tend to look Irish.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Only when they're young.
  242. @Mr. Anon

    I miss Lawrence Auster. Sailer’s commentary was always a nice complement to Auster’s…what I didn’t get from one, I got from the other.
     
    Agreed. I liked Lawrence Auster's site too; he was a good man. I also miss Mangan's site.

    I also miss Mangan’s site.

    He didn’t die, I don’t think.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    No, he just gave it up for other things.
  243. @Desiderius
    They’re dorks.

    And holy rollers. That doesn’t resonate anymore.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    That depends. Billy Graham resonates more than Joel Osteen. Progs want you to think it doesn’t.
  244. @Tim Howells
    Congrats on the well deserved recognition, albeit in a grudging, backhand kind of way. These corporate media guys are rightly terrified to even lift the lid enough to take a peek at the significance of the 2016 election. They partially understand it though, in their own way, and hence the no-holds-barred assault on the alternative media prior to the midterms. Fingers crossed.

    It’s all good. Steve is not one of those people who loses their soul and all…ok…yah…cool…
    yah…ok…yeah, ok, get it, cool, no…. (8th Grade)

  245. @Steve Sailer
    My idea I put forward on 11/28/2000 was so obvious that the real question is why it took 12 years for anybody else to come up with it?

    I vaguely remember Sam Francis talking about it way back when. So you had at least one convert.

    https://www.unz.com/sfrancis/so-who-really-needs-the-hispanic-vote-anyway/

    https://www.unz.com/sfrancis/gop-cant-win-great-hispandering-competition/

    And I can’t remember who exactly but I remember someone make the related point that sucking up to blacks doesn’t work and how Bush tried and did no better than Goldwater.

    No one else put it forward because most of them favor Invade the World, Invite the World. They don’t want to win if it means they have to sacrifice those cherished principles.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Sucking up to Blacks doesn’t work because Blacks hate suck ups. Trump is still working for their votes, and should.
  246. @Anon
    Hey, my comment on the Times article got awarded a Times Pick!

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/11/opinion/sunday/the-white-strategy.html?comments#permid=28198729

    I deliberately angled for that by wording the comment to make it appear as though I was concerned about the future of the Democratic Party, but in fact my goal was to try to pound into the stupid heads of the Republicans the fact that, as I put it in the comment, "Any strategy that can get a train-wreck like Donald Trump elected president is truly powerful!"

    If you have a Times account please feel free to head over there and upvote my comment.

    Hey, Anon 337. *I’m* Anonymous 337. Ask anyone here and they will tell you this: “I served with Anonymous 337. I knew Anonymous 337. Anonymous 337 was a friend of mine. Senator, you’re no Anonymous 337!”

    • Replies: @res
    OK, Spartacus. I moonlight as Anon 337, is that good enough? ; )
  247. @S. Anonyia
    And holy rollers. That doesn't resonate anymore.

    That depends. Billy Graham resonates more than Joel Osteen. Progs want you to think it doesn’t.

  248. @gregor
    I vaguely remember Sam Francis talking about it way back when. So you had at least one convert.

    https://www.unz.com/sfrancis/so-who-really-needs-the-hispanic-vote-anyway/

    https://www.unz.com/sfrancis/gop-cant-win-great-hispandering-competition/

    And I can't remember who exactly but I remember someone make the related point that sucking up to blacks doesn't work and how Bush tried and did no better than Goldwater.

    No one else put it forward because most of them favor Invade the World, Invite the World. They don't want to win if it means they have to sacrifice those cherished principles.

    Sucking up to Blacks doesn’t work because Blacks hate suck ups. Trump is still working for their votes, and should.

  249. @PiltdownMan

    I’d half agree but the “Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf – Adolf Hitler” is probably turning more people off at the moment.
     
    Yeah, I've been wondering if Ron's thrown caution to the winds—leave that gold-bordered Mein Kampf as a headline item under the masthead for a while and it is sure to attract attention from the usual suspects—Morris Dees' SPLC and Foxman and Greenblatt's ADL.

    Ron, for all his many virtues, has a blind spot a mile wide.

  250. @Mr. Anon

    I miss Lawrence Auster. Sailer’s commentary was always a nice complement to Auster’s…what I didn’t get from one, I got from the other.
     
    Agreed. I liked Lawrence Auster's site too; he was a good man. I also miss Mangan's site.

    Poor Moldbug never could win Auster over.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Poor Moldbug never could win Auster over.

     

    Moldbug is a confirmed "Oxfordian", and Auster himself at least leant toward "anti-Stratfordianism."

    So they were close on one point, as trivial, nutty, and obsessive as it is.
  251. @snorlax
    In my experience the children of Jew-Irish mixed marriages tend to look Irish.

    Only when they’re young.

  252. @gregor
    Agree Douthat is wrong there. The South serves as the model. Mississippi is 37% black, yet Republicans carry it easily. Nationally, the GOP share of the white vote has jumped to 60/40 in the last couple of elections, and it will go higher. That shift is happening much quicker than Dems can possibly bring in and naturalize foreign voters. It was a delayed reaction, but whites have now noticed what’s going on before Democrats could bring in enough reinforcements.

    I disagree entirely about Trump. He is a polarizing figure to be sure, but I think he was uniquely suited to win on a realignment platform (i.e., dissent from new-liberal globalism or whatever you want to call it). What establishment Republican would have run on a Trump platform without backing down? It is to laugh. Who else could have withstood the fierce media onslaught without wilting? Who else could have won without the donor money? I just don’t see any of the McCains or Romneys doing it and I sure as hell don’t see those guys staying in the pocket and landing counter punches like Trump did so admirably. By that I refer to the way Trump was able excite and provoke the media and use their attacks against them. Trump seemed to feed on it and it ended up serving as evidence of his populist bonafides. Same thing with the issue of “decorum.” A polite or inoffensive version of Trump would have gotten buried.

    Now that Trump has set the course, many will follow the ways of MAGA. Because MAGA will have built up momentum, these others will not need the unique savvy of Trump.

    There’s no one else out there. There isn’t even hardly anyone else on Trump’s team besides Trump.

  253. @Steve Sailer
    The shareholder analogy I brought up many years ago drove Bryan Caplan insane with rage because he knew I was right: it is a violation of fiduciary trust for management to sell new shares to new shareholders too cheap because management's job is to maximize shareholder wealth for current shareholders, not future shareholders.

    The analogy to citizenship is obvious.

    Do you have at your fingertips text of Caplan’s reaction? Was it a back and forth?

    By the way, did you pick up the parallel in Bannon’s recent NYMag interview where he talks about maximizing citizenship value?

  254. @Steve Sailer
    People who smashed windows in the 1990s to fight globalism and smashed windows in the 2010s to promote globalism really just like smashing windows. They would have been happier if they'd been born into English soccer hooligan families, but instead they got born into the Volvo-driving liberal suburbs, so they have to pretend they have an ideology to just doing what comes naturally to them.

    People who smashed windows in the 1990s to fight globalism and smashed windows in the 2010s to promote globalism

    Great line!

  255. @International Jew

    Trump, however, ran a disorganized campaign and was, notwithstanding some unique strengths, not a very good candidate.
     
    I was, and still am, convinced he really wanted to lose. Every time the polls showed he was maybe narrowing the gap, he'd say or do something to blow it. He won because he ran out of time; he just didn't have enough time, between Comey's reopening of the Hillary investigation, and November 8, to think of a brand-new way to blow his lead.

    And, as with so many things, Ann Coulter's got it right: we all voted for Trump despite his many faults, because we cared so much about the National Question. The "mandate" for that (if there's such a thing) was thus far stronger than any "mandate" for national single-payer health care emanating from the election of Barack Obama. Obama won for the opposite reason: millions of people voted for him primarily because they liked him (or what he told them he was), and only secondarily because they wanted the policies on his platform. (They could have gotten those policies if they'd made Hillary their nominee.)

    Very interesting second paragraph.

    And, as with so many things, Ann Coulter’s got it right: we all voted for Trump despite his many faults, because we cared so much about the National Question.

    Do you have a particular Coulter essay in mind?

    • Replies: @International Jew
    I think I heard her say that in an interview. I'm sure you could find evidence of her articulating the same idea in print too. Or if you can't, maybe I should just take credit for it!
  256. @Dave Pinsen
    Ross co-wrote a book about how the GOP could and should attract the (white, implicitly) working class. He also echoed Steve's "coalition of the fringes" observation after the 2012 election. There's more evidence, but those are two examples that come immediately to mind.

    Thanks

  257. @ManWick
    The Sailer Strategy is irrelevant to national elections, but the Sailer coalition of the fringes is very much in play. The Sailer Strategy would require that whites nationally start thinking and voting like whites do in the Southeast. I don't see that happening for at least a generation.

    Trump got the two million or so missing white votes Romney repelled, of course, but in the end, Clinton won the popular vote by nearly 3 million votes. The republican vote is tapped out at about 62-64 million, but the democratic vote can get up to at least 65 or 66 million. Those are the raw numbers. Nothing can change that. 2012 and 2016 show that clearly. The demographic die is set.

    If the republicans cannot get beyond 62-64 million, which I believe is the case, then their only hope is that the democrats put forward another pasty, old, white. Clinton lost because she could not get out the black vote in Obama-like numbers in Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Pennsylvania--and we're talking in the 10s of thousands, not 100s of thousands. In 2020, another pasty, white democrat will be even less able to. Can the democrats put up another Obama like figure, or is he a once in a century-type aberration?

    Hillary’s “popular vote surplus” was nearly 100% LA and Chicago. Meaningless, the electoral equivalent of running in pawns for queens while your opponent wins with a bishop knight Checkmate.

  258. @Lot
    I think Bernie or Biden or Warren would have beat him. They just needed Hillary's support plus 85,000 more midwest votes. And part of that 85,000 could have come from Jill Stein's anti Hillary far left support.

    The Dem nomination process was totally broken as it allowed Hillary to rack up superdelegate endorsements early and muscle Biden and Warren away from even running.

    On the same topic, Jeb Bush raised $105 million before even formally entering the race using basically the same tactic. Did anyone who advised the corps to set their cash on fire this way get fired?

    Lot hitting Whiskey levels of anti-prophet here.

    • Replies: @Lot
    I posted specific bets I made before the 2016 election, all winners. I forgot who, but someone else here said they made the same bets after seeing my posts and thanked me.
  259. @Reg Cæsar

    ...or simply make up tall tales of their own ethnic background (Elizabeth Warren’s supposed ‘native ancestry’ fits this).
     
    Churchill's own Iroquois ancestry was better established, albeit never proven. Not that these people would claim him.

    That's Winston. Ward is another story.

    Churchill’s own Iroquois ancestry was better established, albeit never proven.

    Do you have a reference?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Do you have a reference?

     

    How about Winston (II) himself?

    https://winstonchurchill.org/resources/genealogy/churchill-s-american-heritage/

    https://winstonchurchill.org/resources/genealogy/he-had-iroquois-ancestors/
  260. @Steve Sailer
    If you did a Google search on various words inevitable in the topic you'd eventually find my writings.

    Why were you seemingly slow to warm up to Trump?

  261. @anonymous
    Are you an Olde Frothingslosh drinker?

    Olde Frothingslosh Pale Stale Ale

    A visitor (Bill Graham) informed me of a memorable hoax that I missed: Ye Olde Frothingsloth Pale Stale Ale. Frothingslosh is a unique beer that's so light that the beer actually floats on top of the foam. It all started out as a running joke on Rege Cordic's Pittsburgh radio show in the 1950s. He made up all kinds of joke ads for this fictitious beer and invented slogans such as "A whale of an ale for the pale stale male" and "Hi dittom dottom, the foam is on the bottom." But the Olde Frothingsloth concept became so popular, that eventually it caught the attention of the Pittsburgh Brewing Co. who started selling small runs of Olde Frothingsloth for special occasions such as Christmas and holidays. Of course, the beer being sold was really just Iron City Beer repackaged with Olde Frothingslosh labels, but the labels themselves were so outrageous that they instantly became prized among beer can collectors. The most popular cans were those that featured Miss Olde Frothingslosh, Fatima Yechburgh (pictured below), the supposed winner of the Frothingslosh Beauty Contest. Fatima was described as a resident of a small town near Pittsburgh. When not studying arc welding, she enjoyed soap carving, arm wrestling, sky diving, and ballet. I believe that the Pittsburgh Brewing Co. still occasionally produces small runs of Olde Frothingslosh. I'd love to try some.
     

    —From the Musée d’Hoaxeaux (http://hoaxes.org/weblog/comments/olde_frothingslosh_pale_stale_ale).

    Rege Cordic was the DJ who replaced Bob Crane on 50,000 watt KNX-AM in 1966-67.

    Olde Frothingshlosh X-mas advert sung to the tune of “O Tannenbaum”:

    “Olde Frothingslosh, Olde Frothingslosh,
    the pale stale ale for the pale stale male.
    Brewed with water from an old dish pail,
    Old Frothingslosh, Olde Frothingslosh,
    Oh my gosh, it’s Frothingslosh”

  262. @Detective Club
    It should not go unmentioned that the Black vote, according to the 2016 exit polls, was down 5.5% when compared to 2012. The combined margin of victory, for Trump, of a mere 80,000 votes in 3 states : Wisconsin (Milwaukee), Michigan (Detroit), and Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) meant that Hillary's candidacy did not drive the Black turnout in those places. Hillary was a Bridge Too Far, particularly for Black males : they stayed home in 2016.

    Trump's candidacy encouraged Whites to turnout for him. In 2016, White turnout was up 2.2% over 2012 (Romney). The White die-off continues and the Immigration Act of 1965 voters increase, so perhaps Trump cannot be re-elected in 2020 - - - but does anybody in their right mind think that either Cory Booker or Kamala Harris will win in a cakewalk in 2020? It seems that Trump has a better than even chance to repeat his "Racist Appeal" in 2020, even with the declining population of remaining White voters, who will vote for him out of frightened motives of self-preservation in 2020. Hillary won California by 29% over Trump in 2016. Kamala Harris could win California by over 50% and still lose Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania bigly because of increased White voter turnout in those 3 states.

    It is hard for Whites to forget the last four years of Obama : it seemed that he was forever agitating for corrupt Whitey to be brought to heel and that evil Whitey must be brought to heel, out of "moral necessity" - - - the arc of history is long but it leads to Justice! If there ever was a racist and a liar, it was Obama. In Obama's political world, Whitey stinks like a fart in church and it's always payback time for righteous Persons of Color to descend on Whitey from a great height. Obama's favorite word in the dictionary was REVENGE.

    Don’t underestimate the strength of the young white vote in particular men. In DC this summer I’ve seen near daily bus loads of teenage white boys with MAGA hats on. Sometimes entire groups have them on. If they get to the polls they could be a force. Recall Trump basically needs to hold on to FL, PA and win one of the remaining (NC, MI, WI). I have a hard time seeing Kamala succeeding where Clinton failed.

  263. @Lagertha
    He's stuck with bills to pay. Being middle-aged sucks. You can no longer believe you can do anything.

    Well, granny, you may be old but you can still post pointless comments on unz.com all day, so you’ve got that going for you.

  264. @Logan
    Ethnogenesis is most effectively implemented by attacking random members of a group for being members of that group.

    In self-defense they begin to feel a sense of solidarity with other members of that group.

    This is so profoundly obvious I'm unclear why it even needs to be mentioned.

    It’s so obvious that one can attack many whites for being whites and said whites will grovel or help you attack other whites instead of feeling solidarity with their fellow whites. (Real fellow whites not (((fellow whites))))

  265. @Steve Sailer
    My idea I put forward on 11/28/2000 was so obvious that the real question is why it took 12 years for anybody else to come up with it?

    “My idea . . . was so obvious . . .”.

    “The obvious differs from the secret and hidden in that the obvious is much more difficult to see.” Rough paraphrase from a novel by Trevanian, author of The Eiger Sanction and other popular, literate novels.

    Back when I was doing some local controversialist writing, I sort of wondered if I’d be better off being ignored, trashed, or plagiarized by big-ticket slobs. The idea of actually being given credit for having moved public opinion seemed too distant a possibility.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    While trying to source your quote, I came across a post called "The Secret Life of the Obvious." Quite interesting. http://wisdom.tenner.org/secret-life-of-the-obvious.html
  266. @Colin Wright
    'I’d half agree but the “Featured Book [w/ gold border]: Mein Kampf – Adolf Hitler” is probably turning more people off at the moment.'

    That's a point, but it raises an interesting question.

    Is it better to allow the Mainstream narrative to lead you to censor yourself, or is it better to express exactly what you think -- or in this case, post -- what interests you?

    Both have their pitfalls. Trying to placate the mainstream of course leads to the sort of conventional 'conservatism' we have today. What is it? It seems to consist mostly of bashing Trump and serving Israel.

    On the other hand, it's also easy to marginalize yourself. I won't even bother to spark the usual responses, but I can think of at least one category of poster here I simply skip as soon as I realize what's up. If a tree falls in forest, and everyone's plugged their ears, is there a sound?

    For myself, at least in theory I try to distinguish between groups that I would eventually like to have as allies and those I fully and frankly intend to push off the bridge as soon as it's feasible. For example, I will try to avoid being rude to women -- but I see no need to be nice to Zionists.

    Imagine thinking that by supporting Trump you’re not serving Israel. Get out of your echo chambers alt-righters!

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    'Imagine thinking that by supporting Trump you’re not serving Israel. Get out of your echo chambers alt-righters!'

    The important distinction -- and it is important, though certainly not voluntary on Trump's part -- is that prior to Trump, support for Israel was a non-partisan good. It was like motherhood; politically, it was unthinkable to question it.

    That would have continued had Clinton won. However, Trump did. As a result, Israel is becoming a partisan issue. The Left does not support moving the embassy to Jerusalem. Some even murmured over Israel murdering over a hundred unarmed demonstrators.

    Perceptibly, Israel is becoming a partisan issue rather than an unquestionable shibboleth. Figures such as Bernie Sanders -- who on occasion actually manages to keep from groveling before her -- are moving into the mainstream discourse. Once that shift is completed, Israel becomes subject to critical examination, and once Israel is subject to critical examination, she's dead.

    So no, Trump isn't opposed to Israel. But he is progress. This isn't because he's a nice guy. It's because simply by virtue of who he is, he cannot enforce a non-partisan consensus on behalf of the Zionist agenda.

    My guess is that now Israel won't even get her war with Iran. She's already had to accept the restoration of the Syrian state. If Hillary had won, Syria would still be in that desired state of blood-soaked anarchy, and we'd already be fighting in Iran.

  267. @Dan Hayes
    In the political amnesia world of Douthat's New York Times Steve Sailer is the prognosticator that dares not speak its name.

    Douthat even has to insert the obligatory “In reality, he suggested that a Republican Party with a more populist economic message might win the missing whites and more minority votes as well.

    What is up with this GOPe/cuckservative obsession with “winning more minority votes”?

    Is it legitimate for someone to take office with 75%-95% of the “minority vote” in some way that it would NOT be legitimate for someone to take office with 75%-95% of the white vote?

    Because, if the current dispensation in US socio-politics goes on, nothing is more certain that there will be a White Faction, or Tendency, or even Party (probably NOT called “Republicans”) that will win all the elections in perpetuity.

  268. @WorkingClass
    Cotton and Pence. A war monger and a bible thumper. This Deplorable would never vote for either one.

    I have been saying since 2000 that the working class is up for grabs. If I had said white working class I would have been as smart as Steve. If working class African Americans were capable of understanding that they are working class they would be Socialists or Deplorables. Same goes for perverts, feminists and self hating whites.

    Self respecting whites are now a voting block. They are not wedded to the GOP but neither can the Democrats ask for their vote. The beauty of the Trump victory is that he defeated both parties. The truth is emerging. The working class is bigger than the political duopoly.

    The problem both parties have in assimilating the voting bloc that is the white working class is that they hate the Democrats because they (the WWC) are nationalists, but they also hate the Republicans because they (the WWC) are socialists.

    What they are waiting for is a party that will incorporate nationalism and socialism.

    Oh wait…

  269. @Desiderius
    Poor Moldbug never could win Auster over.

    Poor Moldbug never could win Auster over.

    Moldbug is a confirmed “Oxfordian”, and Auster himself at least leant toward “anti-Stratfordianism.”

    So they were close on one point, as trivial, nutty, and obsessive as it is.

  270. @ManWick
    The Sailer Strategy is irrelevant to national elections, but the Sailer coalition of the fringes is very much in play. The Sailer Strategy would require that whites nationally start thinking and voting like whites do in the Southeast. I don't see that happening for at least a generation.

    Trump got the two million or so missing white votes Romney repelled, of course, but in the end, Clinton won the popular vote by nearly 3 million votes. The republican vote is tapped out at about 62-64 million, but the democratic vote can get up to at least 65 or 66 million. Those are the raw numbers. Nothing can change that. 2012 and 2016 show that clearly. The demographic die is set.

    If the republicans cannot get beyond 62-64 million, which I believe is the case, then their only hope is that the democrats put forward another pasty, old, white. Clinton lost because she could not get out the black vote in Obama-like numbers in Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Pennsylvania--and we're talking in the 10s of thousands, not 100s of thousands. In 2020, another pasty, white democrat will be even less able to. Can the democrats put up another Obama like figure, or is he a once in a century-type aberration?

    The Sailer Strategy would require that whites nationally start thinking and voting like whites do in the Southeast

    Whites think like “whites”, rather than normal white people do, because their ancestors recklessly joined the cult of diversity four hundred years ago, and left whites in at least three of their states a minority for over a century.

    Plus, their bloc voting wasn’t to protect themselves against blacks, but to protect themselves, and get back at, the hated Yankee.

    • Replies: @JackOH
    Reg Caesar, you've latched on to something astounding to me. I'm assuming you're talking about the introduction by Southern Whites of Anglo stock of non-Anglo, non-European chattel slaves, and specifically, Africans.

    When I first read your comment scarcely twenty minutes ago, I was immediately struck with the thought that the "great betrayers" of Western civilization in its North American variant were Southerners who held no scruple about wishing to maintain an elite status within the colonies, and later, states. Those already enslaved Africans were just tools.

    Maybe this is already self-evident to everyone but me. But, if I'm reading you correctly, then anyone who wants to claim leadership of white nationalism with some intellectual integrity ought to take as his starting point a pretty thorough criticism of those "reckless" White Southern elites.
  271. @Anon

    Churchill’s own Iroquois ancestry was better established, albeit never proven.
     
    Do you have a reference?
  272. @Obsessive Contrarian
    "They are more worried about undersampling minority groups than undersampling whites,"

    Great. If they knew how fragile their hold on power is, they'd do something.

    Amirite?

    I fail to see what Sailer's complaint is - Douthat linked to an article that explicitly mentioned "The Sailer Strategy" - while characterizing it as "on the margins" of conservatism. This is factually correct, and exactly what Sailer bemoans!

    A comment on the Douthat article: "Here's the thing: the Democratic Party knows that if its share of the black vote ever falls below 85%, it will never win a presidential election again. "

    I really don't know that this is true - I suspect there is a grain of truth in it. I think it would depend on individual states. We don't have one General Election, we have 50 elections. The comment might be true in the states in which the black vote is a decisive swing vote.

    The black vote is never a swing vote. It’s always a binary thing, on/off, counting as a factor in Dem performance only. And the only thing meant by “black vote” is “black voters where they can count as a factor.”

    Blacks not turning out for Clinton, also actually giving Trump a bigger percentage of last 2 GOP presidents, are signs they aren’t terribly threatened by Trump.

  273. @Currahee
    The Unite the Right II has concluded in DC with less than 30 participants and over a thousand counter-demonstrators.

    Alt-Rite can officially be pronounced dead as a doornail.

    Still waiting for Steve's analysis of the Alt-Right.

    No you moron

    WN talking points are on Fox News every night now

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    WN talking points are on Fox News every night now
     
    I think the Spencerite "peaceful cleansing of blacks" White Nationalism was a dead letter from the start.

    Tucker and Ingraham are simply speaking against the further cleansing of whites - I don't think this qualifies as "White Nationalism," and regardless of whether it does I think it's counterproductive to call it "White Nationalism." It's simply the National Interest.
  274. @JackOH
    "My idea . . . was so obvious . . .".

    "The obvious differs from the secret and hidden in that the obvious is much more difficult to see." Rough paraphrase from a novel by Trevanian, author of The Eiger Sanction and other popular, literate novels.

    Back when I was doing some local controversialist writing, I sort of wondered if I'd be better off being ignored, trashed, or plagiarized by big-ticket slobs. The idea of actually being given credit for having moved public opinion seemed too distant a possibility.

    While trying to source your quote, I came across a post called “The Secret Life of the Obvious.” Quite interesting. http://wisdom.tenner.org/secret-life-of-the-obvious.html

  275. @Reg Cæsar

    The Sailer Strategy would require that whites nationally start thinking and voting like whites do in the Southeast
     
    Whites think like "whites", rather than normal white people do, because their ancestors recklessly joined the cult of diversity four hundred years ago, and left whites in at least three of their states a minority for over a century.

    Plus, their bloc voting wasn't to protect themselves against blacks, but to protect themselves, and get back at, the hated Yankee.

    Reg Caesar, you’ve latched on to something astounding to me. I’m assuming you’re talking about the introduction by Southern Whites of Anglo stock of non-Anglo, non-European chattel slaves, and specifically, Africans.

    When I first read your comment scarcely twenty minutes ago, I was immediately struck with the thought that the “great betrayers” of Western civilization in its North American variant were Southerners who held no scruple about wishing to maintain an elite status within the colonies, and later, states. Those already enslaved Africans were just tools.

    Maybe this is already self-evident to everyone but me. But, if I’m reading you correctly, then anyone who wants to claim leadership of white nationalism with some intellectual integrity ought to take as his starting point a pretty thorough criticism of those “reckless” White Southern elites.

  276. @Stan d Mute
    I was just thinking (the smoke is still thick in the air) this morning about leftards mantra that “we must make it uncomfortable for whites.” And I agree. We must.

    White men in particular tend to go to work, focus on work, come home still thinking about work and deal with domestic life, then sleep, awaken, and repeat. We slept while our entire manufacturing economy was offshored. We sleep now as our Nation is subsumed by hordes of invaders.

    We must be made much more uncomfortable. Those of us reading iSteve are canaries. We are the vigilant. We notice. That we are here is prima facie evidence. Our less observant brothers must be awoken. To that end, shouldn’t we embrace “let’s make it uncomfortable for whites?”

    It’s a hard pill to swallow for those of us who are already awake. “More uncomfortable Stan?” “Are you retarded (an open question admittedly)?” But look around you, your family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, and fellow parishioners, are they awake? What exactly will it take to awaken them? Make it happen or be willing to go down with the sleeping ship says Stan.

    We hold 100% of the hard power in America. We design, build, operate, and maintain the energy, water, food, chemical, transportation, and every other fundamentally necessary ingredient of existence including the media. NYT works only because of white men. We own and know how to use all the weapons (we invented and built them!). Yet we sleep complacently as we are mocked and hated by media and our wives and children abused in the streets. This could be stopped tomorrow by a general strike. A National White Out. Just stay home. Go John Galt for a week. In any case, we need to be made uncomfortable enough that all of us see it.

    We must be made much more uncomfortable. Those of us reading iSteve are canaries. We are the vigilant. We notice. That we are here is prima facie evidence. Our less observant brothers must be awoken. To that end, shouldn’t we embrace “let’s make it uncomfortable for whites?”

    It’s a hard pill to swallow for those of us who are already awake. “More uncomfortable Stan?” “Are you retarded (an open question admittedly)?” But look around you, your family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, and fellow parishioners, are they awake? What exactly will it take to awaken them? Make it happen or be willing to go down with the sleeping ship says Stan.

    I’ve been commenting here for 2 to 3 years give or take. And as is typical on the internet, I’ve gotten into a few pissing matches about this or that. And during the last bunch of comments I wrote it occurred to me that there’s a common thread of every one. Whenever I’m crossing swords with someone, the other guy is always high-handing away the prerogatives or the objections of American normies, and I’m having none of it.

    I’m not in a pissing match over this (at least not yet). but I we’ve got the same sort of problem here. There’s a certain logic that say this ought to work but in reality it’s way too far away to be practical. It’s especially dubious to think we can execute something like this and the normies won’t have any say in the matter. They do, and if they don’t like it, we’ve got nothing.

    Or another example is the Unite The Right rally in Charlottesville. Not the one just now, which was basically a nonevent, but last year. To be honest, on my own behalf I don’t have any strong feelings one way or the other about the “Right” demonstrators. But the reality is, if the normies can’t abide those people, we can’t either.

    That’s unfortunately a nonstarter for most of us here but we’re in a better situation that most of realize. If we can state a good case, that speaks to them, that makes sense relative to what’s visible for them, the normies will absolutely give us a fair hearing. And when we get the normies on board with us, we can win.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    The thing is, when you don't feel that you're personally threatened, you act like you have no skin in the game even though you do.

    The whites of South Africa finally are seeing things clearly. But it's far too late. They needed to have seen things clearly 25 years ago.

    After a generation of ultra-high crime rates, New Yorkers finally got the message, to an extent. After a generation of low crime, they went right back to the old ways.

    Given the 24/7 media / educational / corporate brainwashing, liberal whites are never going to get the message until they're mugged by reality, preferably literally.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    But the reality is, if the normies can’t abide those people, we can’t either
     
    Was Unite the Right, as its name would imply, a mixed bag?

    They might better have called it Reb Lives Matter. That's more specific, and other stripes of rightists who support them could simply be amici curiae walking behind, at the forbearance of the leaders.

    Gay activists eventually banned NAMBLA from their parades (quite hypocritically), and it worked wonders for them.
    , @wrd9
    Yep, a "Day Without Whites" isn't going to cut it. However, there are some policies that would wake up liberal white and minority elites and that is for Trump to go hard on desegregating schools and neighborhoods in deep blue cities and towns. Targeting the 1% areas with very low income blacks and hispanics in the form of Section 8/affordable housing would be one tactic. Forcing elite private schools to admit a high percentage of low income minorities is another. Additionally, mandating select universities limit the high income population in the class to their representation in the US population, ie the 1% get 1% of the admissions. The point is to prevent the liberal elites from insulating themselves from the consequences of their actions.
    , @JackOH
    "If we can state a good case, that speaks to them, that makes sense relative to what’s visible for them, the normies will absolutely give us a fair hearing. And when we get the normies on board with us, we can win."

    Well said, Boethiuss.
  277. @snorlax

    I also miss Mangan’s site.
     
    He didn't die, I don't think.

    No, he just gave it up for other things.

  278. @Harry Baldwin
    I thought Obama promoted "deliberate racial polarization," but no one at the New York Times seemed to notice..

    I thought Obama promoted “deliberate racial polarization,” but no one at the New York Times seemed to notice..

    Racial polarization has been implicit and then fairly explicit Democratic electoral strategy for several decades now. The Judis and Teixeira book was big in the beltway media when it came out. It’s Sailer’s Coalition of the Fringes put in favorable terms.

    Douthat must know this, and yet he feels that he can’t address the thing straight-on.

  279. Anonymous[226] • Disclaimer says:

    If Ross actually wrote your name it’d trigger a Lexis Nexis alert over at Minitrue (and he knows this). It’s like ancient Roman times of drawing “Quo vadis” or a fish in the dirt.

    The internet is a Petri dish of such obscurantist cant, e.g. “Is Lee Marvin retroactively /ourguy/,” or “I’m a fan of the stimulus policies of Airwolf Hitlyrics”

  280. @27 year old
    No you moron

    WN talking points are on Fox News every night now

    WN talking points are on Fox News every night now

    I think the Spencerite “peaceful cleansing of blacks” White Nationalism was a dead letter from the start.

    Tucker and Ingraham are simply speaking against the further cleansing of whites – I don’t think this qualifies as “White Nationalism,” and regardless of whether it does I think it’s counterproductive to call it “White Nationalism.” It’s simply the National Interest.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  281. @Boethiuss

    We must be made much more uncomfortable. Those of us reading iSteve are canaries. We are the vigilant. We notice. That we are here is prima facie evidence. Our less observant brothers must be awoken. To that end, shouldn’t we embrace “let’s make it uncomfortable for whites?”

    It’s a hard pill to swallow for those of us who are already awake. “More uncomfortable Stan?” “Are you retarded (an open question admittedly)?” But look around you, your family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, and fellow parishioners, are they awake? What exactly will it take to awaken them? Make it happen or be willing to go down with the sleeping ship says Stan.
     
    I've been commenting here for 2 to 3 years give or take. And as is typical on the internet, I've gotten into a few pissing matches about this or that. And during the last bunch of comments I wrote it occurred to me that there's a common thread of every one. Whenever I'm crossing swords with someone, the other guy is always high-handing away the prerogatives or the objections of American normies, and I'm having none of it.

    I'm not in a pissing match over this (at least not yet). but I we've got the same sort of problem here. There's a certain logic that say this ought to work but in reality it's way too far away to be practical. It's especially dubious to think we can execute something like this and the normies won't have any say in the matter. They do, and if they don't like it, we've got nothing.

    Or another example is the Unite The Right rally in Charlottesville. Not the one just now, which was basically a nonevent, but last year. To be honest, on my own behalf I don't have any strong feelings one way or the other about the "Right" demonstrators. But the reality is, if the normies can't abide those people, we can't either.

    That's unfortunately a nonstarter for most of us here but we're in a better situation that most of realize. If we can state a good case, that speaks to them, that makes sense relative to what's visible for them, the normies will absolutely give us a fair hearing. And when we get the normies on board with us, we can win.

    The thing is, when you don’t feel that you’re personally threatened, you act like you have no skin in the game even though you do.

    The whites of South Africa finally are seeing things clearly. But it’s far too late. They needed to have seen things clearly 25 years ago.

    After a generation of ultra-high crime rates, New Yorkers finally got the message, to an extent. After a generation of low crime, they went right back to the old ways.

    Given the 24/7 media / educational / corporate brainwashing, liberal whites are never going to get the message until they’re mugged by reality, preferably literally.

  282. @Lot
    Mmmm, aspic. I could go for some duck liver pate on rye crackers crackers and gouda. I like the cheaper and meatier ones more than the now-illegal foie gras.

    Mmmm, aspic. I could go for some duck liver pate on rye crackers crackers and gouda.

    Is that kosher? I wonder if Jane and Michael Stern keep it at home, considering how often they break it on the road.

    Would a Juicy Lucy with fake non-dairy cheese between veggie burgers be kosher? I don’t eat meat on Fridays, and veggie burgers seem to break the spirit, if not the letter, of the rule.

    If Americans can call a gyro “yee-ro”, why can’t they call Gouda “how-da”, which actually sounds American? “Goo-da” is a misapplication of French orthography. (Don’t get me started on “Helsinki”…) Someday I’ll visit both Gouda and Edam, and throw in Cheddar as well.

    I like the cheaper and meatier ones more than the now-illegal foie gras.

    An article in Cigar Aficionado rated the Nicaraguans reviewed above the Cubans. Is that common now? Is the attraction to Cubans more that of forbidden fruit, or nostalgia? Westerners say that the possibly fatal fugu isn’t really all that great a dish, either.

    • Replies: @snorlax

    Is that kosher?
     
    Sure, according to the clear meaning of the text; it's only the typically insane-troll-logic Talmudic rulings that say it isn't. (c.f. Supreme Court rulings)
    , @snorlax
    Supposedly the quality of Cuban cigars has gradually declined since 1959.
    , @Jack D
    I doubt the Sterns are kosher at home. In my parent's generation it wasn't unusual to find Jews who kept kosher homes but ate non-kosher food outside of the home but I think that's pretty rare today - most Jews are either Orthodox and keep kosher all of the time or else Reform or atheist and don't keep kosher at all.

    If you were going to have a kosher Juicy Lucy made with veggie burgers then you could use real cheese. If you wanted a beef Juicy Lucy then you would have to use some kind of fake non-dairy soy cheese. Vegetarian foods (veggie burgers/soy cheese) are neither meat nor dairy and so can be consumed with either type of meal. A veggie burger with veggie cheese is something that a vegan might eat but not necessarily someone who keeps kosher. Usually the rule with fake foods is that the fakeness sort of compounds so if you are able to substitute 1 fake main ingredient but leave the rest real you are more likely to come up with something that tastes like the real dish than an all fake recipe.
    , @William Badwhite
    Cuban cigars are generally not very good. What else would you expect from state-owned industry after almost 60 years? There are all sorts of things that need to be done properly from beginning (tobacco farming) to the end (rolling, boxing) that they no longer do or where they cut corners.

    Many of the cigar producing families from Cuba ended up after a stop or three in Nicaragua, the DR, even in the US (Tampa and Miami) and just picked up where they left off.
  283. @Boethiuss

    We must be made much more uncomfortable. Those of us reading iSteve are canaries. We are the vigilant. We notice. That we are here is prima facie evidence. Our less observant brothers must be awoken. To that end, shouldn’t we embrace “let’s make it uncomfortable for whites?”

    It’s a hard pill to swallow for those of us who are already awake. “More uncomfortable Stan?” “Are you retarded (an open question admittedly)?” But look around you, your family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, and fellow parishioners, are they awake? What exactly will it take to awaken them? Make it happen or be willing to go down with the sleeping ship says Stan.
     
    I've been commenting here for 2 to 3 years give or take. And as is typical on the internet, I've gotten into a few pissing matches about this or that. And during the last bunch of comments I wrote it occurred to me that there's a common thread of every one. Whenever I'm crossing swords with someone, the other guy is always high-handing away the prerogatives or the objections of American normies, and I'm having none of it.

    I'm not in a pissing match over this (at least not yet). but I we've got the same sort of problem here. There's a certain logic that say this ought to work but in reality it's way too far away to be practical. It's especially dubious to think we can execute something like this and the normies won't have any say in the matter. They do, and if they don't like it, we've got nothing.

    Or another example is the Unite The Right rally in Charlottesville. Not the one just now, which was basically a nonevent, but last year. To be honest, on my own behalf I don't have any strong feelings one way or the other about the "Right" demonstrators. But the reality is, if the normies can't abide those people, we can't either.

    That's unfortunately a nonstarter for most of us here but we're in a better situation that most of realize. If we can state a good case, that speaks to them, that makes sense relative to what's visible for them, the normies will absolutely give us a fair hearing. And when we get the normies on board with us, we can win.

    But the reality is, if the normies can’t abide those people, we can’t either

    Was Unite the Right, as its name would imply, a mixed bag?

    They might better have called it Reb Lives Matter. That’s more specific, and other stripes of rightists who support them could simply be amici curiae walking behind, at the forbearance of the leaders.

    Gay activists eventually banned NAMBLA from their parades (quite hypocritically), and it worked wonders for them.

  284. @Reg Cæsar

    Mmmm, aspic. I could go for some duck liver pate on rye crackers crackers and gouda.

     

    Is that kosher? I wonder if Jane and Michael Stern keep it at home, considering how often they break it on the road.

    Would a Juicy Lucy with fake non-dairy cheese between veggie burgers be kosher? I don't eat meat on Fridays, and veggie burgers seem to break the spirit, if not the letter, of the rule.

    If Americans can call a gyro "yee-ro", why can't they call Gouda "how-da", which actually sounds American? "Goo-da" is a misapplication of French orthography. (Don't get me started on "Helsinki"...) Someday I'll visit both Gouda and Edam, and throw in Cheddar as well.

    I like the cheaper and meatier ones more than the now-illegal foie gras.

     

    An article in Cigar Aficionado rated the Nicaraguans reviewed above the Cubans. Is that common now? Is the attraction to Cubans more that of forbidden fruit, or nostalgia? Westerners say that the possibly fatal fugu isn't really all that great a dish, either.

    Is that kosher?

    Sure, according to the clear meaning of the text; it’s only the typically insane-troll-logic Talmudic rulings that say it isn’t. (c.f. Supreme Court rulings)

  285. @Reg Cæsar

    Mmmm, aspic. I could go for some duck liver pate on rye crackers crackers and gouda.

     

    Is that kosher? I wonder if Jane and Michael Stern keep it at home, considering how often they break it on the road.

    Would a Juicy Lucy with fake non-dairy cheese between veggie burgers be kosher? I don't eat meat on Fridays, and veggie burgers seem to break the spirit, if not the letter, of the rule.

    If Americans can call a gyro "yee-ro", why can't they call Gouda "how-da", which actually sounds American? "Goo-da" is a misapplication of French orthography. (Don't get me started on "Helsinki"...) Someday I'll visit both Gouda and Edam, and throw in Cheddar as well.

    I like the cheaper and meatier ones more than the now-illegal foie gras.

     

    An article in Cigar Aficionado rated the Nicaraguans reviewed above the Cubans. Is that common now? Is the attraction to Cubans more that of forbidden fruit, or nostalgia? Westerners say that the possibly fatal fugu isn't really all that great a dish, either.

    Supposedly the quality of Cuban cigars has gradually declined since 1959.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Supposedly the quality of Cuban cigars has gradually declined since 1959.

     

    Which type did the First Fellatrix use?

    "Narcissist" or "Looney Toon" would be a catchy name for a smoke.
    , @Anonymous
    More or less, yes. After the JFK/MM era most of the real cigar talent-the blenders and the planters-decamped from Cuba and took seed with them.

    Cuban soil has some unique flavoring effects, but it is subtle, and overall skill at blending is more important.

    The embargo has been a failure, but overall, American cigar smokers aren’t missing that much.
  286. @Anon
    Hey, my comment on the Times article got awarded a Times Pick!

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/11/opinion/sunday/the-white-strategy.html?comments#permid=28198729

    I deliberately angled for that by wording the comment to make it appear as though I was concerned about the future of the Democratic Party, but in fact my goal was to try to pound into the stupid heads of the Republicans the fact that, as I put it in the comment, "Any strategy that can get a train-wreck like Donald Trump elected president is truly powerful!"

    If you have a Times account please feel free to head over there and upvote my comment.

    Your reply to Barb from Wisconsin was pretty restrained considering she blamed Comey, the Russians and gerrymandering for Trump’s win. From the little I have read of the Times comments that seems representative of their readers.

  287. There’s a lot of hope in a Red Solo Cup.

    Ross Douthat is a rancid douchebag trimmer.

  288. @IHTG
    Imagine thinking that by supporting Trump you're not serving Israel. Get out of your echo chambers alt-righters!

    ‘Imagine thinking that by supporting Trump you’re not serving Israel. Get out of your echo chambers alt-righters!’

    The important distinction — and it is important, though certainly not voluntary on Trump’s part — is that prior to Trump, support for Israel was a non-partisan good. It was like motherhood; politically, it was unthinkable to question it.

    That would have continued had Clinton won. However, Trump did. As a result, Israel is becoming a partisan issue. The Left does not support moving the embassy to Jerusalem. Some even murmured over Israel murdering over a hundred unarmed demonstrators.

    Perceptibly, Israel is becoming a partisan issue rather than an unquestionable shibboleth. Figures such as Bernie Sanders — who on occasion actually manages to keep from groveling before her — are moving into the mainstream discourse. Once that shift is completed, Israel becomes subject to critical examination, and once Israel is subject to critical examination, she’s dead.

    So no, Trump isn’t opposed to Israel. But he is progress. This isn’t because he’s a nice guy. It’s because simply by virtue of who he is, he cannot enforce a non-partisan consensus on behalf of the Zionist agenda.

    My guess is that now Israel won’t even get her war with Iran. She’s already had to accept the restoration of the Syrian state. If Hillary had won, Syria would still be in that desired state of blood-soaked anarchy, and we’d already be fighting in Iran.

  289. @Anonymous
    Hey, Anon 337. *I'm* Anonymous 337. Ask anyone here and they will tell you this: "I served with Anonymous 337. I knew Anonymous 337. Anonymous 337 was a friend of mine. Senator, you're no Anonymous 337!"

    OK, Spartacus. I moonlight as Anon 337, is that good enough? ; )

  290. @snorlax
    Supposedly the quality of Cuban cigars has gradually declined since 1959.

    Supposedly the quality of Cuban cigars has gradually declined since 1959.

    Which type did the First Fellatrix use?

    “Narcissist” or “Looney Toon” would be a catchy name for a smoke.

  291. @Art Deco
    I think there are about 10 million people collecting Social Security Disability. It does appear that the understanding of what constitutes a 'disability' has grown increasingly relaxed on the part of applicants and officials alike, which is disturbing but something different than 'fraud'. The median age at which an initial award is granted is 49 and the median duration of benefits is about 8 years. The application process requires a ruling by an administrative law judge and takes about two years. Most people who apply get turned down. I cannot see that it's analogous to AFDC or general relief payments. There's another 4 million working-aged people collecting SSI. About 40% of them are mentally retarded or schizophrenic; fewer than 10% have muskuloskelital problems. You've got 14 million working-aged people collecting benefits while you have over 150 million people working. If half of these are people who would have been turned down in 1970, that amounts to 7 million people against 150 million working. I don't think that sustains your thesis.

    There is a web site which gives the track record of every disability appeals judge. A case goes on appeal after it has been initially turned down by the system. The average is about 45 percent of appeals are approved in the claimants favor. There is an administration social security judge in Puerto Rico who grants over 98 percent of the claims.

  292. @Clyde

    Revealed preferences are that most people would rather not work if the choice is between life time entry level jobs and handouts.
     
    One guy in Washington State was so sick of three years in his dead end airport job that involved lots of heavy lifting, baggage lifting. That he stole his employer's 30 million dollar airplane for a 20 minute joy ride and crashed it. But that airplane must be worth more than the reported 30 million.

    I don’t think so. $30 million is the list price of a Dash 8 brand new (and airlines often pay less than sticker) but the one that crashed was six years old. Airplanes are like cars or any other used equipment – used is worth a lot less than new. I would guesstimate its value at maybe $10 million or so.

    Not sure why this is of any importance but it’s a strange idea that this plane was somehow more valuable than reported.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    Quite inexpensive for a 78 seater.
  293. @Reg Cæsar

    Mmmm, aspic. I could go for some duck liver pate on rye crackers crackers and gouda.

     

    Is that kosher? I wonder if Jane and Michael Stern keep it at home, considering how often they break it on the road.

    Would a Juicy Lucy with fake non-dairy cheese between veggie burgers be kosher? I don't eat meat on Fridays, and veggie burgers seem to break the spirit, if not the letter, of the rule.

    If Americans can call a gyro "yee-ro", why can't they call Gouda "how-da", which actually sounds American? "Goo-da" is a misapplication of French orthography. (Don't get me started on "Helsinki"...) Someday I'll visit both Gouda and Edam, and throw in Cheddar as well.

    I like the cheaper and meatier ones more than the now-illegal foie gras.

     

    An article in Cigar Aficionado rated the Nicaraguans reviewed above the Cubans. Is that common now? Is the attraction to Cubans more that of forbidden fruit, or nostalgia? Westerners say that the possibly fatal fugu isn't really all that great a dish, either.

    I doubt the Sterns are kosher at home. In my parent’s generation it wasn’t unusual to find Jews who kept kosher homes but ate non-kosher food outside of the home but I think that’s pretty rare today – most Jews are either Orthodox and keep kosher all of the time or else Reform or atheist and don’t keep kosher at all.

    If you were going to have a kosher Juicy Lucy made with veggie burgers then you could use real cheese. If you wanted a beef Juicy Lucy then you would have to use some kind of fake non-dairy soy cheese. Vegetarian foods (veggie burgers/soy cheese) are neither meat nor dairy and so can be consumed with either type of meal. A veggie burger with veggie cheese is something that a vegan might eat but not necessarily someone who keeps kosher. Usually the rule with fake foods is that the fakeness sort of compounds so if you are able to substitute 1 fake main ingredient but leave the rest real you are more likely to come up with something that tastes like the real dish than an all fake recipe.

  294. Given last week’s debate over (coalition of the) fringe vs margin, there’s always the possibility that he’s trolling you.

  295. Anonymous[277] • Disclaimer says:
    @snorlax
    Supposedly the quality of Cuban cigars has gradually declined since 1959.

    More or less, yes. After the JFK/MM era most of the real cigar talent-the blenders and the planters-decamped from Cuba and took seed with them.

    Cuban soil has some unique flavoring effects, but it is subtle, and overall skill at blending is more important.

    The embargo has been a failure, but overall, American cigar smokers aren’t missing that much.

    [MORE]

  296. @Colin Wright
    The article is right in that the secret to Trump's success is focussing on the white vote, and getting enough of it to win whatever the remaining 30% of the electorate do.

    ...and I think that white people can do this, and in the present situation, should do it.

    The sad bit about it all is that it leads to the kind of political paralysis that marked Northern Ireland for so long. Instead of Protestant versus Catholic, you get White versus non-white, and all other political considerations become subordinate to that.

    Take Trump. I think a lot of his policies are literally catastrophic, but what choice do I have? Support the Democratic candidate? I'll take bad policy over suicide, thank you. We no longer have the luxury of debating among ourselves -- that way lies Hillary Clinton. We have to rally around the 'white' candidate -- and stick to him, no matter how big an idiot he is.

    And that's where we're headed. That or worse. Once everything is defined in terms of race, how do we reverse course? About the only other observation that seems germane at the moment is that it's the minorities and the Left that started this. The 'white power structure' (such as it was) in this country was perfectly willing to share; there wasn't much effective resistance.

    One would think that would have been enough. For most ordinary non-whites, it probably would have been. But no. The only way the ethno-warriors could keep their jobs was to keep demanding more, and so they did, and so here we all are.

    So it's all somebody else's fault. That, however, is cold comfort. It remains our problem.

    And that’s where we’re headed. That or worse. Once everything is defined in terms of race, how do we reverse course?

    Secession/partition into ethnostates?

  297. @Lagertha
    He's stuck with bills to pay. Being middle-aged sucks. You can no longer believe you can do anything.

    Indeed, to be famous but not quite have FU money is a sad state of affairs.

  298. @ManWick
    The Sailer Strategy is irrelevant to national elections, but the Sailer coalition of the fringes is very much in play. The Sailer Strategy would require that whites nationally start thinking and voting like whites do in the Southeast. I don't see that happening for at least a generation.

    Trump got the two million or so missing white votes Romney repelled, of course, but in the end, Clinton won the popular vote by nearly 3 million votes. The republican vote is tapped out at about 62-64 million, but the democratic vote can get up to at least 65 or 66 million. Those are the raw numbers. Nothing can change that. 2012 and 2016 show that clearly. The demographic die is set.

    If the republicans cannot get beyond 62-64 million, which I believe is the case, then their only hope is that the democrats put forward another pasty, old, white. Clinton lost because she could not get out the black vote in Obama-like numbers in Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Pennsylvania--and we're talking in the 10s of thousands, not 100s of thousands. In 2020, another pasty, white democrat will be even less able to. Can the democrats put up another Obama like figure, or is he a once in a century-type aberration?

    If the republicans cannot get beyond 62-64 million, which I believe is the case, then their only hope is that the democrats put forward another pasty, old, white.

    If the Democrats don’t do that, then surely that will push the GOP’s vote total past 64 million.

  299. @JimB
    Ross Dou-that, not this. Seriously, what conservatives are looking for helpful advice and info from the NYT?

    I kind of like Ross Dou-THOT (That [Conservative] Hoe Over There).

  300. @Colin Wright
    'Yes, I understand that inevitably those of a white nationalist inclination will support a generally nationalist agenda but so should citizens of all colours.

    If anything, black Americans are most hurt by the globalist trend of sacrificing citizenship value to boost other asset prices, because they have the least of the latter and so are most reliant on the former.

    Getting a bit of fun by hating on whitey is a poor sop for higher wages and lower living costs.'

    This kinda depends. I suspect the introduction of the Great Society welfare programs and government sinecures via affirmative action may have seduced the black population.

    Your position implicitly assumes blacks want to work, earn a decent living, acquire the rewards of thrift, upward mobility, etc. If that were so, indeed they above all others should object to immigration.

    But what if it isn't so? What if blacks -- depending on their station in life -- either want that AFDC or want that government clerk position? What if they aren't interested in fixing cars, or becoming a carpenter, or opening that Quickee-Mart, or whatever?

    Then all of a sudden the balance shifts. Immigration may not be actually be to their benefit, but priority one is making sure the gravy train keeps running.

    That means vote Democrat.

    But what if it isn’t so? What if blacks — depending on their station in life — either want that AFDC or want that government clerk position? What if they aren’t interested in fixing cars, or becoming a carpenter, or opening that Quickee-Mart, or whatever?

    Then all of a sudden the balance shifts. Immigration may not be actually be to their benefit, but priority one is making sure the gravy train keeps running.

    Immigration diverts the wagon train in other directions and lessens its cargo.

  301. @OldDog
    Party switchers, not race was the key to 2016 election.
    I disagree with the "white voter" analysis simply because it is not based on fact just opinion. There are no statistics kept anywhere on the race of a voter.
    If one seeks a reason for Trumps win one should look at the 2016 primary election vote totals for those states which allow voters to choose a candidate in either party. Simply compare vote totals in those states for Democrats and Republicans in 2016 to the primary vote totals by party in 2012 and 2008. You will find the vote totals for the R primary voters to be significantly highe