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Chris Caldwell on a New French Theory of Political Correctness
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Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose, the fame of its history (for example, I could give you a rough outline off the top of my head of the history of France since Cardinal Richelieu became first minister almost 400 years ago; in contrast, I have virtually no idea what happened in Spain between the Peninsular War between France and England and the beginning of the short-lived Spanish Republic of 1931), and the tendency of theorists, French and foreigners such as Marx, to build models around its history.

With the first round of the French presidential election coming up on Sunday, here is a review in City Journal by Christopher Caldwell of a new book (in French) by French real estate theoretician Christophe Guilluy, The Twilight of the French Elite:

At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together. Though this premise has been confirmed in much of the West for half a century, the assertion will shock many Americans, conditioned to place “inequality” (bad) and “diversity” (good) at opposite poles of a Manichean moral order. …

At a practical level, considerations of economics and ethnicity are getting harder to disentangle. Guilluy has spent years in and out of buildings in northern Paris (his sisters live in public housing), and he is sensitive to the way this works in France.

The French, no fools, reserved their inner cities for what Whit Stillman’s characters call the High Urban Bourgeois. They built their worker public housing not in inner cities, but in the suburbs (which came as a revelation to Chicago’s second Mayor Daley when he started to vacation in Paris over a quarter century ago, and was inspired to beginning conspiring with Rahm Emanuel to demolish Cabrini Green and other urban housing projects).

But in recent decades, immigrants and their descendants, heavily Muslim, have been squeezing the indigenes out of the suburban housing projects.

A public-housing development is a community, yes, and one can wish that it be more diverse. But it is also an economic resource that, more and more, is getting fought over tribally. An ethnic Frenchman moving into a heavily North African housing project finds himself threatening a piece of property that members of “the community” think of as theirs. Guilluy speaks of a “battle of the eyes” fought in the lobbies of apartment buildings across France every day, in which one person or the other—the ethnic Frenchman or the immigrant’s son—will drop his gaze to the floor first.

Since provincial France is perhaps the best rural real estate in the world, getting squeezed out of big cities doesn’t sound so bad for indigenous working class. But as we’ve all found out over the last quarter of a century, in the Age of the Information Superhighway, you paradoxically need to work in a huge city to be somebody. Living in Nowheresville, even in Nowheresville, France is an invitation to get stepped on by urban elites.

Guilluy has tried to clarify French politics with an original theory of political correctness. The dominance of metropolitan elites has made it hard even to describe the most important conflicts in France, except in terms that conform to their way of viewing the world. In the last decade of the twentieth century, Western statesmen sang the praises of the free market. In our own time, they defend the “open society”—a wider concept that embraces not just the free market but also the welcoming and promotion of people of different races, religions, and sexualities. The result, in terms of policy, is a number of what Guilluy calls “top-down social movements.” …

French elites have convinced themselves that their social supremacy rests not on their economic might but on their common decency. Doing so allows them to “present the losers of globalization as embittered people who have problems with diversity,” says Guilluy. It’s not our privilege that the French deplorables resent, the elites claim; it’s the color of some of our employees’ skin. French elites have a thesaurus full of colorful vocabulary for those who resist the open society: repli (“reaction”), crispation identitaire (“ethnic tension”), and populisme (an accusation equivalent to fascism, which somehow does not require an equivalent level of proof). One need not say anything racist or hateful to be denounced as a member of “white, xenophobic France,” or even as a “fascist.” To express mere discontent with the political system is dangerous enough. It is to faire le jeu de (“play the game of”) the National Front. …

In France, political correctness is more than a ridiculous set of opinions; it’s also—and primarily—a tool of government coercion. Not only does it tilt any political discussion in favor of one set of arguments; it also gives the ruling class a doubt-expelling myth that provides a constant boost to morale and esprit de corps, much as class systems did in the days before democracy.

What’s the 21st Century equivalent of Bertie Wooster praising Jeeves’ “feudal spirit”? Bertie Celebrates Diversity?

People tend to snicker when the question of political correctness is raised: its practitioners because no one wants to be thought politically correct; and its targets because no one wants to admit to being coerced. But it determines the current polarity in French politics. Where you stand depends largely on whether you believe that antiracism is a sincere response to a genuine upsurge of public hatred or an opportunistic posture for elites seeking to justify their rule.

I believe the Wall Street Journal has an opening in its columnist list since former Jerusalem Post editor Bret Stephens moved over to the New York Times to bring an apparently uniquely diverse perspective not adequately conveyed by Roger Cohen, David Brooks, and/or Tom Friedman. Caldwell would be an ideal addition to the WSJ roster.

 
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  1. eah says:

    Read More
    • Agree: reiner Tor, Nico
    • Replies: @eah
    Yeah OK why not -- the advice/decisions of the average 4 y/o would do just as well.

    https://twitter.com/AmenaShaladi/status/855168900178341888

    , @Ex-banker
    Just checked out Macron's wikipedia page. He's married to his high school drama teacher, whom he started dating at 18 (met at 15)? The French really are different.
    , @Fredrik
    The others are no better and that includes Le Pen.
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  2. donut says:

    The Muzzie trash are still at it . The religion of peace , Allahu Akbar . Insert hate speech here .

    http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2017/04/20/Paris-shooting-kills-police-officer-wounds-2-Islamic-State-claims-credit/8501492717177/?utm_source=fp&utm_campaign=ls&utm_medium=1

    Hate speech bad Muzzie murder OK .

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    • Replies: @El Dato
    Nothing to get out of bed over.

    It's Europe and and I don't think people care all that much.

    Sure, politicians make noises. As if they could do something.

    The US/NATO/Saudi induced infernos of doom are basically a truck drive away. Gotta live with it. It's like living in Chernobyl Zone and you can't move.
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  3. 22pp22 says:

    Last year I went back to Paris for the first time in ages to visit friends. I know how much I have aged because of the look of shock I saw on their faces.

    You can no longer cut yourself off from cultural enrichment in France. The centre of the city now has the same demographics as the banlieues. The metro is filthy and everything is overpriced.

    Provincial France offfers margnally better value for money. Italy is far better although some of the smaller towns are showing the tell-tale signs of enrichment. Mostly, though, they seems to be sending their enrichers north.

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.

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    • Replies: @fitzGetty
    ... a new mosque in Pisa ... a minaret in Padua ...
    , @Yak-15
    I was also recently in France and had dinner in provincial Avignon at a family friend's house. The apartments that surround her house and a few others have been recently colonized by Islam. All the neighboring houses have sold for a loss (to Muslims) and they are the last French family remaining.

    Though she claimed to feel safe and had not experienced burglary (yet), she said that the housing prices halved and that they were selling and moving to the coast. She said that nobody wants to live in their neighborhood because no one wants to send their kids to school with the new diversity. She also spoke endlessly about how, as a public nurse, 80 pct of her patients are Muslims. Her and her husband were angry at the situation.

    Nonetheless, her and her husband hate La Pen and are not voting for her. Why? Because she is threatening to pull out of the Euro which threatens their pension payments. If France loses the euro the value of the new currency will be significantly less than the Euro. All old pensioners would see a huge reduction in their payments. So, many elderly will not vote La Pen for that reason. I predict she loses because of her euro stance.
    , @Clyde

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.
     
    Hispanic slang for a gay man is maricon. A derogatory term says ye internet's urban dictionary.
    , @Mr. Anon

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.
     
    I believe that Macron's wife was his school teacher; she's got something like fifteen years on him. Marrying your school teacher is weird; Newt Gingrich did it (and he's kind of weird), but in Macron's case, the age difference is even greater.

    BTW, doesn't "Macron" sound like the name of some minor historical figure in ancient Rome? Well, in a way, I suppose he is.

    , @Detective Club
    After the dust settles in May and Macron beats Le Pen (65%-35%) en ballotage, the French will be faced with an insoluble problem (Third-World immigration) that simply will not go away. A problem that cannot be solved by a socialist Rothschild banker (Macron) who spends all his free time in gay bars in order to escape the clutches of his elderly mother - - - I mean wife.

    Like in any other Western nation, the majority of its citizens fully subscribe to the madness that the way to solve the immigration problem is to let in more Third-Worlders, and if you foolishly try to deport them you will have wholesale riots that will certainly spill over into White areas. Best let "Them" be. Appeasement is the only sensible way to postpone the Day of Reckoning.

    The riots are surely coming but these riots will strictly be on the immigrants' terms. In France, they only burn cars these days. But these immigrants are only a short step away from burning "The Butters" in the streets (Whites = les beurres : French Arab slang for Whites).

    When Macron's favorite gay bar gets firebombed down to the ground, perhaps then and only then will he act.
    , @Nico

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.
     
    As I've said before on these pages, I definitely wanted to believe hearsay that Macron was a closet homo and his MILF of a wife a beard, but I was forced to conclude that this was almost certainly an urban legend. The silver bullet came when my younger brother put out an offer of 2000€ to anyone who could prove Macron was gay. Our other brother took him up on it, and managed to make connections allowing him to infiltrate the Parisian gay underworld of Marais pubs and "Zipper" sex-exchange smartphone apps, and nobody could turn up anything.

    There's also the fact of his marriage, not really what you would expect of someone trying to put up a front. Your standard cynical asshole politician, gay or straight, would choose either a tactical marriage to a very well-brought-up heiress, hence Jacques Chirac's union with Bernadette Chodron de Courcel, or a discreet "hidden treasure" five to ten years younger to be seen and not heard from, such as Jim McGreevy's working-class Portuguese Ironbound bombshell Dina Matos. By contrast, the Macron marriage was pushed through over considerable objection. Emmanuel's mother actually marched in to confront Brigitte Trogneux, 24 years her son's senior and his high school French teacher and the divorced mother of three daughters including one her boy-toy's age, and forbade et from seeing Emmanuel again until his 18th birthday. (She was kind; I would have called the police first.) Brigitte broke down in tears and said she didn't know if she could force herself to honor that request. Mrs. Macron tried to reason with her: she'd had her life and if Emmanuel stayed with her he'd never have issue. Eventually the Macrons were reconciled/resigned to the union and by all accounts Emmanuel and Brigitte Macron are in fact very much in love.

    That's not to say the union is not creepy or bizarre. It definitely is, and our ancestors would rightfully have looked upon a man who could have any woman he chose (as Macron certainly could have) and decided to foresake reproduction for "true love" as what we now call "cucky."

    I have no doubt Macron's avowed and open enthusiasm for the ongoing Grand Remplacement of actual French people with inbred Muslims and savage Africans is deeply linked to the "cuck" psychosis. However, I have also learned the hard way not to bother arguing with the Macronistes: the man's partisans are as you might expect pretty conventional P.C. yuppies brainwashed into believing there can be a perennial accommodation for such a thing as "moderate Islam" that is profoundly and unremarkably "French." (Not coincidently many of them have one or another stake in the liberal international order. So do I, unfortunately, but I prefer to keep France Catholic and livable. My bank account isn't meant to buy property in the dar-al-Islam.)

    , @Art Deco
    Mrs. Macron is 24 years his senior. She has children his age. Supposedly, they started seeing each other around 1994 and his parents arranged for him to complete high school elsewhere to keep them separated. She married him 10 years ago. They haven't any children. He is bizarre, but since this mess started when he was 17, it's doubtful that homosexuality is his specific problem.

    Jackie Battley Gingrich was 8 years her husband's senior. She took up with Gingrich after his first year in college and married him when she was 27. She'd not been previously married. All of the children both have derived from that marriage. Gingrich's subsequent wives are 8 and 23 years his junior.
    , @Anonymous
    When I was in high school I wanted to marry Farrah Fawcett, who was within two months of my mother's age.

    Fortunately for him, the skinny Welsh lad who cougared up with the Rubber City Ruminant settled for an album and a few months of worry-free bouncy bouncy.
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  4. dr kill says:

    I can’t tell if you are serious or not. Teh WSJ is fully converged. CJ is still worth having.

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    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    I doubt WSJ would be interested. They're firmly open borders. Caldwell has not been an open borders enthusiast.

    But you're right, he'd be good.
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  5. Randal says:

    Judging by the extracts you’ve quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.

    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.

    I don’t expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

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    • Agree: dfordoom, Desiderius
    • Disagree: syonredux
    • Replies: @fnn
    Famous piece in which George MacDonald Fraser says that PC was imported into Britain from the US in the 1990s:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-506219/The-testament-Flashmans-creator-How-Britain-destroyed-itself.html
    , @dearieme
    My own rule of thumb is that only bad American habits spread elsewhere. In modern times, of course, that means virtually all new American habits.
    , @Pericles
    I would agree with you.
    , @slumber_j
    I don't see why anyone should take offense at your comment. Where else would Europeans have gotten these notions? Argentina?

    European elites made a classic category mistake: the US is a country, and our country is a country, therefore whatever seems to work there will work here!

    Of course, whether it was actually working in the US is a whole 'nother question...
    , @Seamus Padraig
    Hard to say, Randal. When exactly did it start up in Britain? In the US, it didn't really get going until the 60s, and it's final triumph did not occur until sometime in the 90s. True: it was probably in the works even before the public became aware of it. But where did it really originate? It seems to me to have originated with the Frankfurt School Marxists of the 50s, pretty much all of whom were Mitteleuropa Jews. But in retrospect, I'm sure their warped agenda dovetailed quite nicely with the globalizationist ambitions of the Rockefellers, Rothschilds, et al.
    , @Altai
    All the schools of sociology and humanities now take their cues from America post WWII. American does not rule the west by it's massive arsenal, (That's how it rules MENA) for no European fears it's use on them. It rules the west from it's sociology departments.

    I was amazed that Trump defunded the arts since it was so little money. I think he should have removed any federal money to the humanities, diverted it to STEM. It's hardly an alt-right thing to want either, everybody to the right of centre and lots of people on the left of centre on social issues is undermined by the runaway post-modern ideology which infects the humanities in the US. Trumps internet presence was ultimately the result of the overreach of this ideology. But just like when it overreached in one go in the 90s and freaked out the 'normies', it still came back and was never forced to retreat, just knocking away at a lower tempo.

    , @Claude
    "I don’t expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV."

    Yes, PC is ultimately an American invention. And remember, it started out as a joke. Not many people laughing about it now though. Hopefully our future Edward Gibbon makes note of that.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    I believe that the reining theory is that French developed the virus which destroy themselves at a fairly swift rate; the Anglos contracted French ideals but evolved it into a less virulent but more lasting strain which has since developed to grow throughout the world.

    The United States has basically become a laboratory to gradually refine and develop the disease until it can be fine-tuned to infect almost any host.
    , @The Alarmist
    The first chinks in British armour came after WW2 ... after so many commonwealth natives had given their lives for Britain, it was kind of hard to say they could not come in, and as they gained critical mass it became harder still to continue even concealed racism and it even became necessary to bend over backwards to keep the burgeoning immigant populations happy. Same deal with America, which in my view didn't contaminate the UK and Europe with the banality of PC, rather the political and social elite saw it as a tool to keep a constructive tension between the native non-elite and the burgeoning settler populations so that their own turf was left in relative peace.
    , @yaqub the mad scientist
    I don’t expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    I would hardly consider what you say to be unpopular here or in France. French writers have been viewing the disease of Americanitis with gall since the Marshall Plan. I'd say the majority of people here are familiar with such thought and have some measure of sympathy.
    , @syonredux

    and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.
     
    Dunno. The idols of the Left in the USA are all Continental: Foucault, Lacan, Adorno, Derrida, Althusser, etc
    , @German_reader
    I'm not sure it's all due to US influence in Britain, iirc the Labour party had something like multiculturalism in its programme even back in the early 1960s, may partly be attributable to a misguided desire for continuing the empire (instead of breaking with that once and for all and concentrating on British nationalism, like Enoch Powell eventually would have wanted to). The US influence seems very obvious in some ways though, e.g. things like "black history month" or the whole nation of immigrants nonsense applied to Britain ("Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Huguenots" etc.)...I doubt people could have come up with this without the US model.
    Here in Germany, it's totally obvious that Americanization and trans-Atlanticism has played a decisive role in spreading "antiracism" and pc - one only needs to compare the former West Germany and East Germany...the contrast is rather illuminating in some ways.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    This post may be your most replied to and popular post yet.
    , @syonredux
    John Adams on Ideology:


    Napoleon! Mutato nomine, de te fabula narratur. This book is a prophecy of your empire, before your name was heard!

    The political and literary world are much indebted for the invention of the new word Ideology.
    Our English words, Idiocy or Idiotism, express not the force or meaning of it. It is presumed its proper definition is the science of Idiocy. And a very profound, abstruse, and mysterious science it is. You must descend deeper than the divers in the Dunciad to make any discoveries, and after all you will find no bottom. It is the bathos, the theory, the art, the skill of diving and sinking in government. It was taught in the school of folly; but alas! Franklin, Turgot, Rochefoucauld, and Condorcet, under Tom Paine, were the great masters of that academy!

    It may be modestly suggested to the Emperor, to coin another word in his new mint, in conformity or analogy with Ideology, and call every constitution of government in France, from 1789 to 1799, an Ideocracy.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction
     
    Here’s Priss Factor/Anon on that (as featured by Steve).

    Scroll down for Rammstein video.
    , @Peter Akuleyev
    The pro-immigration ideology is a natural outgrowth of free market capitalism and the anti-colonial movement. The elites will always choose more docile cheaper labor when given the opportunity. Slavery is not allowed any more, and the spread of literacy and cheap fire-arms has made colonialism a headache. It is easier to import immigrants, and once you start hollowing out your economy immigrants from poor and desperate countries perversely become even more attractive to the elites. As Caldwell kind of notes, paying €10 EUR /hr to a fellow white person to clean your house who has lost their good €40 EUR/hr factory job makes you feel like shit. Paying that amount to a semi-literate African makes you feel munificent. From Caldwell's description it sounds like Guilluy has done a good job of dispassionately outliving how economics drive immigration whether people consciously want it or not.
    , @MBlanc46
    I doubt that any American who can think straight would deny that we bear a significant share of the blame. That said, our leftists have been pointing to Europe as a model for as long as I can remember.
    , @Veritatis
    While we Mexicans often blame the U.S. government for some of our economic woes (macroeconomic policies, unwise privatizations, etc), we don't say anything about the devastating effect of the U.S. mass media and social networks, particularly on the young. But it is largely true that the US is a cultural bulldozer, with its huge media output and its influential universities. It is also true that any type of consumption, including ideas, is a personal choice that entails personal responsibility.

    (So, the US gets the migrants, Mexico gets the corrosive ideas. Which is the lesser of the two evils?)
    , @sb
    Spot on .
    This is something Americans will rarely admit .Even Americans who don't like the way their country has gone can't bring themselves to say anything other than for all her problems America is still the best of all lands

    I have heard Americans go on and on for the last 50 years about how dreadfully racist and dreadfully white bread vanilla boring not to mention backwards and primitive my country Australia is .Some of them were even gentile .

    Of course we have enough fools of our own who take this commentary to heart .
    It can be pretty hard to ignore the biggest kid on the block
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  6. fitzGetty says:

    … plucky little France is so dim that it even forbids the collection of key racial demographic data … thus, no one knows what’s really going on … hence researchers are compelled to seek data indirectly – via sickle cell rates and the numbers of those crippled by cousin marriage DNA (and cared for by the state) or worse … **nothing to learn from France, lads .

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  7. fitzGetty says:
    @22pp22
    Last year I went back to Paris for the first time in ages to visit friends. I know how much I have aged because of the look of shock I saw on their faces.

    You can no longer cut yourself off from cultural enrichment in France. The centre of the city now has the same demographics as the banlieues. The metro is filthy and everything is overpriced.

    Provincial France offfers margnally better value for money. Italy is far better although some of the smaller towns are showing the tell-tale signs of enrichment. Mostly, though, they seems to be sending their enrichers north.

    P.S. I don't know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don't marry women old enough to be their mothers.

    … a new mosque in Pisa … a minaret in Padua …

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  8. fnn says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    Famous piece in which George MacDonald Fraser says that PC was imported into Britain from the US in the 1990s:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-506219/The-testament-Flashmans-creator-How-Britain-destroyed-itself.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @El Dato
    Thanks.

    In the UK, references to the Daily Mail are ritually accompanied by expressions of disgust and disavoval. It may be trashy but it brings up the true belly of the beast, surprisingly doesn't read the memos on who is the official international baddie and allows one to look at beautiful people in the sidebar.
    , @PV van der Byl
    Wow, what delusional thinking! And so disappointing coming from George MacDonald Fraser, whose Flashman and other ("Quartered straight out of here") books I loved.

    He thinks the change in the UK began in the nineties? He must have been in some sort of coma for several decades.

    It was in 1968 that Enoch Powell was stripped of his shadow cabinet position by future Tory PM Edward Heath for giving a (prescient) speech about the problems immigration would cause Britain. And increasingly draconian "Race Relations" Acts were passed between 1965 and the eighties.

    All Fraser seems to have noticed is a progression in PC by reviewers of his books during the nineties.
    , @jx37
    This is from the 80s I believe. Note how liberal Morley Safer mocks them. Now we have a word for the level of lunacy pictured here - we call it conservatism.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COt65HZCJaA
    , @Randal
    Posted a link to it here myself a few weeks ago. It is a very good piece imo.
    , @Cagey Beast
    The currently reigning globalism and multiculturalism of the West was cooked-up in British and US academia. It was released first on the Anglosphere and then exported to the rest of the West in stages, starting in the early 1970s. The Brits, Australians and Canadians involved in the formulation globalism and multiculturalism were overwhelmingly emigré Jews or people from the quirky Dissenter, "free thinker" and petty bourgeois segment of Anglo society. Unfortunately that crowd ended up with more money and power than they knew what to do with, after the Second Industrial Revolution and two world wars. That's how our West came to be dominated by anti-western cranks and oddballs with billions of dollars and whole government agencies to play with. They invited in and subsidized any cultural saboteur they could get their hands on, whether it was the Frankfurt School, Freud, HG Wells or Derrida.
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  9. eah says:
    @eah
    https://twitter.com/AlfredAlbion/status/855338156354412544

    Yeah OK why not — the advice/decisions of the average 4 y/o would do just as well.

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  10. Glad to see the Whit Stilman reference to the movie “Metropolitan”. The correct term is “Urban Haute Bourgoisie”, or more amusingly abbreviated to “Uhb”.

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  11. El Dato says:
    @donut
    The Muzzie trash are still at it . The religion of peace , Allahu Akbar . Insert hate speech here .

    http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2017/04/20/Paris-shooting-kills-police-officer-wounds-2-Islamic-State-claims-credit/8501492717177/?utm_source=fp&utm_campaign=ls&utm_medium=1


    Hate speech bad Muzzie murder OK .

    Nothing to get out of bed over.

    It’s Europe and and I don’t think people care all that much.

    Sure, politicians make noises. As if they could do something.

    The US/NATO/Saudi induced infernos of doom are basically a truck drive away. Gotta live with it. It’s like living in Chernobyl Zone and you can’t move.

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  12. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    It’s hard for me to think of a group of people who let themselves get wiped out as anything but fools. But then, that is true of virtually every White country on earth!

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  13. eah says:

    OT

    One of the better troll/parody accounts on twitter.com has broken character — at least temporarily.

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  14. El Dato says:
    @fnn
    Famous piece in which George MacDonald Fraser says that PC was imported into Britain from the US in the 1990s:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-506219/The-testament-Flashmans-creator-How-Britain-destroyed-itself.html

    Thanks.

    In the UK, references to the Daily Mail are ritually accompanied by expressions of disgust and disavoval. It may be trashy but it brings up the true belly of the beast, surprisingly doesn’t read the memos on who is the official international baddie and allows one to look at beautiful people in the sidebar.

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    • Replies: @jim jones
    I cannot understand the hate towards the DM. It is obviously aimed at women as all the stories are about celebrity gossip, diets or breast cancer.
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  15. eah says:

    OT

    A radical new scam if the family is short on cash but long on expendable children:

    Minnesota Somali legislator thinks Islamic terrorists can collect on their life insurance policies

    In the UK they already have Asian/muslim ‘crash for cash’ gangs:

    Gang who risked motorists lives in £5.6million ‘crash for cash’ scam facing jail

    Real immigrant entrepreneurs.

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  16. dearieme says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    My own rule of thumb is that only bad American habits spread elsewhere. In modern times, of course, that means virtually all new American habits.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    And US tv and movies have much to do with it.
    , @Randal
    Most likely perhaps because good American habits are either tailored to American circumstances or peoples, or are habits of hard work and discipline (as are the good habits of other peoples), and so less superficially appealing to the masses than the degenerate indiscipline, sentimentality and sensationalism that is most easily spread by film, TV and music.
    , @Old fogey
    Your "rule of thumb" is perfectly correct.
    , @syonredux
    I have a similar notion regarding Franco-German academic fads. Only the slop (Deconstructionism, Lacanianism, etc) seems to get exported.....
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  17. Yak-15 says:
    @22pp22
    Last year I went back to Paris for the first time in ages to visit friends. I know how much I have aged because of the look of shock I saw on their faces.

    You can no longer cut yourself off from cultural enrichment in France. The centre of the city now has the same demographics as the banlieues. The metro is filthy and everything is overpriced.

    Provincial France offfers margnally better value for money. Italy is far better although some of the smaller towns are showing the tell-tale signs of enrichment. Mostly, though, they seems to be sending their enrichers north.

    P.S. I don't know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don't marry women old enough to be their mothers.

    I was also recently in France and had dinner in provincial Avignon at a family friend’s house. The apartments that surround her house and a few others have been recently colonized by Islam. All the neighboring houses have sold for a loss (to Muslims) and they are the last French family remaining.

    Though she claimed to feel safe and had not experienced burglary (yet), she said that the housing prices halved and that they were selling and moving to the coast. She said that nobody wants to live in their neighborhood because no one wants to send their kids to school with the new diversity. She also spoke endlessly about how, as a public nurse, 80 pct of her patients are Muslims. Her and her husband were angry at the situation.

    Nonetheless, her and her husband hate La Pen and are not voting for her. Why? Because she is threatening to pull out of the Euro which threatens their pension payments. If France loses the euro the value of the new currency will be significantly less than the Euro. All old pensioners would see a huge reduction in their payments. So, many elderly will not vote La Pen for that reason. I predict she loses because of her euro stance.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    Yep, pulling France out of the EU is a big vote loser.
    , @Peripatetic commenter
    So, it's very much a case of a generational conflict.

    The young will soon be incented to get rid of the old.
    , @Art Deco
    All old pensioners would see a huge reduction in their payments.

    They only see that if there is a large devaluation and their household consumption bundle is heavily dependent on imports.
    , @ben tillman

    Though she claimed to feel safe and had not experienced burglary (yet), she said that the housing prices halved and that they were selling and moving to the coast. She said that nobody wants to live in their neighborhood because no one wants to send their kids to school with the new diversity. She also spoke endlessly about how, as a public nurse, 80 pct of her patients are Muslims. Her and her husband were angry at the situation.

    Nonetheless, her and her husband hate La Pen and are not voting for her. Why? Because she is threatening to pull out of the Euro which threatens their pension payments. If France loses the euro the value of the new currency will be significantly less than the Euro. All old pensioners would see a huge reduction in their payments. So, many elderly will not vote La Pen for that reason. I predict she loses because of her euro stance.
     
    Idiots. Hostile rulers will repeal their pensions when they have the political strength to do so.
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  18. Christopher Caldwell is good. Everything he writes is worth reading.

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  19. Pericles says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    I would agree with you.

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  20. Clyde says:

    I believe the Wall Street Journal has an opening in its columnist list since former Jerusalem Post editor Bret Stephens moved over to the New York Times to bring an apparently unique perspective not adequately conveyed by Roger Cohen, David Brooks, and/or Tom Friedman. Caldwell would be an ideal addition to the WSJ roster.

    __hahhahha__ So, so true! I like it.

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  21. slumber_j says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    I don’t see why anyone should take offense at your comment. Where else would Europeans have gotten these notions? Argentina?

    European elites made a classic category mistake: the US is a country, and our country is a country, therefore whatever seems to work there will work here!

    Of course, whether it was actually working in the US is a whole ‘nother question…

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    • Replies: @Abe

    I don’t see why anyone should take offense at your comment. Where else would Europeans have gotten these notions? Argentina?
     
    Younglings like yourself (no offense) have an awfully compressed understanding of the 20th Century (mine of the 19th is hardly better ;-) and so overlook key details in the effort to have a more economical grasp of it all. It was Swede Gunnar Myrdal's AMERICAN DILEMMA that jumpstarted the whole post-WWII civil rights movement in America, and decades before Whiskey was bewailing Obama's star turn in the humid dreams of so many upper-middle class white lady journolists, Martin Luther King was appearing in saintly vision to the most white-girl-problem sort of Swedish white girls in such touchstone Eurocinema "art" flicks as I AM CURIOUS (YELLOW).

    In other words, it's been an entirely dialectical process (as that thinker from a not #1, nor even #2 or #3 intellectually illustrious culture Hegel would say): Europeans (for either ideological socialist or cynical nationalist reasons) shaming Americans over their treatment of blacks and Native Americans (heck, even HITLER! slammed FDR on account of the Red Man), which lead to civil rights, which lead to political correctness, which lead to multiculturalism that in the 90's wafted back across the Atlantic to infect Europe.

    I still recall all the heated disputes I had on USENET with Europeans during the early days of the Internet, when yelling back-and-forth like an a$$hole at someone was novel and trendy so long as it was done at intercontinental distance- "America is disgusting and it treats le Blaques so h'orribly!" "Yeah, you stupid frog? Well just wait till you have to deal with a bunch of them yourself. We'll see how you like diversity then!" Blowback is a bitch.

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  22. Anon 2 says:

    The American Conservative (April 20, 2017) has one of the
    best articles on France I’ve seen in months: “The Battle for
    France” by Scott McConnell.

    My Parisian friend, a young woman of about 30, tells me that
    she now keeps a mental map of which arrondissements are still
    relatively safe. And only 5 years ago the Paris tourist office
    would boast that the least safe areas of Paris are safer than
    the safest parts of NYC, showing how quickly civilization can descend
    into chaos.

    I first sensed that something ominous was brewing in Paris in
    June 2014. The African salesgirls were more sullen than
    usual, and avoided eye contact, and Africans were markedly
    more visible even in the Latin Quarter. On the Right Bank near
    the beautiful Stravinsky Fountain (famous for its kinetic
    sculptures), you often couldn’t eat in peace at café terraces
    - due to young African men, with apparently too much time on
    their hands, involved in a loud soccer match nearby.
    You also don’t want to be anywhere near the Les Halles area
    Saturday nights when Muslim gangs arrive from the surrounding
    banlieues looking for a good time. Hotel bookings are way down,
    which is not going to help France’s 10% unemployment rate.
    I’ve been visiting Paris (and France in general) since 1979, and I miss
    the old Paris of my youth, which is apparently not coming back,
    although the food and wine, and the architecture are still as great as
    ever

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I have always wanted to go to France. But, then again, maybe not.
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  23. Clyde says:
    @22pp22
    Last year I went back to Paris for the first time in ages to visit friends. I know how much I have aged because of the look of shock I saw on their faces.

    You can no longer cut yourself off from cultural enrichment in France. The centre of the city now has the same demographics as the banlieues. The metro is filthy and everything is overpriced.

    Provincial France offfers margnally better value for money. Italy is far better although some of the smaller towns are showing the tell-tale signs of enrichment. Mostly, though, they seems to be sending their enrichers north.

    P.S. I don't know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don't marry women old enough to be their mothers.

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.

    Hispanic slang for a gay man is maricon. A derogatory term says ye internet’s urban dictionary.

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  24. Anon 2 says:

    One more item: if I’m praising Paris, I mustn’t forget
    the ethereal, indeed mystical, quality of light that reaches
    all the way from the Mediterranean (and is also found
    in Italy), and was so richly explored by the Impressionists.
    France is/was God’s chosen country

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  25. CAL says:

    Europe killed more than millions of its own people and destroyed more than its economic power in two world wars. It destroyed what its elites believed. The elites in Europe had discarded Christianity in the 19th century and put their faith in scientific rationalism and Darwinism. Europe’s power around the world highlighted the superiority of those beliefs. By the end of WWII, those beliefs were shattered.

    Now, they had to grasp for something in a world where they had ceased to be dominant. They couldn’t return to Christianity. They had spent the past 200 years dismissing it as myth that had held Europe down. But, they needed to perform penance for their sins. Obviously if they had lost they had sinned or their gods were false or both. So now, it’s everyone is the same. No culture is better or worse than any other. To notice is to return to the sins of old. To not notice though and to repeat the mantras of the new religion is to achieve relevance again.

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  26. @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    Hard to say, Randal. When exactly did it start up in Britain? In the US, it didn’t really get going until the 60s, and it’s final triumph did not occur until sometime in the 90s. True: it was probably in the works even before the public became aware of it. But where did it really originate? It seems to me to have originated with the Frankfurt School Marxists of the 50s, pretty much all of whom were Mitteleuropa Jews. But in retrospect, I’m sure their warped agenda dovetailed quite nicely with the globalizationist ambitions of the Rockefellers, Rothschilds, et al.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    The Frankfurt School contained a good number of gentiles, too. Though Jews were a dominant presence, I'd wager without them no school would've been started at all. Still, it's a distortion to say the Frankfurt School was all Jewish.
    , @Jimi
    By 1968 PC culture had come into the UK sufficiently enough to ostracize Enoch Powell for his Rivers of Blood speech.
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  27. “Though this premise has been confirmed in much of the West for half a century, the assertion will shock many Americans, conditioned to place ‘inequality’ (bad) and ‘diversity’ (good) at opposite poles of a Manichean moral order.”

    It wouldn’t shock an American who’s been paying attention. I first began to notice this correlation about 25 years ago. It seemed odd at first, because it flew in the face of Marxist theory … but so much the worse for Marxist theory!

    In France, political correctness is more than a ridiculous set of opinions; it’s also—and primarily—a tool of government coercion.

    That’s what it is everywhere. At best, as in the US, it’s a new kind of ‘bourgeois morality’; at worst, as in the old USSR, it’s the law–no ifs, ands or buts.

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    • Replies: @utu

    “Though this premise has been confirmed in much of the West for half a century, the assertion will shock many Americans, conditioned to place ‘inequality’ (bad) and ‘diversity’ (good) at opposite poles of a Manichean moral order.”
     

    I first began to notice this correlation about 25 years ago.
     
    Isn't 'diversity' a part of divide and rule strategy that is played on purpose. The 'inequality' is not the unwanted side effect but it is the actual goal. The left was subcontracted to carry out this stratagem of social engineering by pushing 'diversity'. When you think of it the left does not have any other functions since they abandoned the project of economic equality and when they stopped their pretense that they were against wars. Keeping fires under the racial and gender kettle is their only job.

    America is a pilot project for this social engineering. The elites recognized pretty early the benefits of having a significant Black minority they inherited from slavery. The slavery was the gift that kept on giving. Why not perform a similar operation in Sweden where the native got too upity and created society with the least of inequality which was possible because of their social cohesion and solidarity achievable in monotonic society only. After the defeat of communism Sweden as a showroom model of egalitarian capitalism was not needed anymore.
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  28. Cache

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  29. At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.

    I’m getting very imoatient with this kind of analysis – it is the same old opression opressor-meme over and over again.
    Basically it’s the traditional Marxist worldview, that is still caught within the boundaries of opression and oppressor.

    The social state is and modern industrial society, which France represents, is more than this so. That’s the systematic point, whre Sarrazin, Bruckner and finkielkraut as well as Houellebecq and – if you please – Michael Moore, too – kick in: What are the specifiv dynamicy of the welfare state – and how are they to be supported, because they are (socially/ and or economically) productive – and where are they becoming dysfunctional – as in the many cases, whree there is just middle-class corruption taking place, for example in those cases, where french railroad-personal have managed to fix contracts with the state, that are – looking at the labour-market in gemreal, simply unfair. Late Foucault swiched to Hayek, beacuase he finally did realise, that these tendencies indeed subvert society and are simply parasitic group egoisms.

    Same with immigration – it’s not good to look upon immigration with the old communist (and new globalist!!) mindset, that everybody fits in into french society equally well. Not to forget Paul Collier – he point sthis fact out as well (as do Bruckner, Finkielkraut and Sarrazin).

    Those are the really interesting lines of (societal9 combat – compared to these hights of analytical standards, Guilly and Caldwell don’t accomplish much – hardly anything at all. It’s phenomenology part xxxx….and the way they identify diversity as a problem is simply a fight over certain buildings. if only the world would be that simple – – no, it would not be better off at all, it would be a pretty hopeless and utterly backward and boring place.

    Plus – the shockwaves that run trough France – with islamist terror-attacks happening or almost happening now the third week in a row – during election time, mind you, is slowly but steadily BECOMING REALLY SCARY.

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    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    I hope you are stone drunk. I think that I would write what you wrote if I were stone drunk. But then I am already really SCARED!
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  30. kihowi says:

    I learned everything I needed to know about the French intellectual climate when that philosopher Levi wrote a thousand page tome about the nature of America after having spent three week holiday there.

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  31. “…I believe the Wall Street Journal has an opening in its columnist list since former Jerusalem Post editor Bret Stephens moved over to the New York Times to bring an apparently unique perspective not adequately conveyed by Roger Cohen, David Brooks, and/or Tom Friedman…”

    Why so surprised, Steve?

    The Apocalypse always needs a Fourth Horseman.

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  32. at Steve Sailer – please remove my uncorrected comment from 12:33 –

    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.

    I’m getting very impatient with this kind of analysis – it is the same old opression/opressor-meme over and over again.
    Basically it’s the traditional Marxist worldview, that is still caught within the boundaries of opression /oppressor.

    The social state and modern industrial society, which France represents, is more than this oppression/opressor-scheme allows to say.

    That’s the systematic point, where Sarrazin, Bruckner and Finkielkraut as well as Houellebecq and kick in: What are the specific dynamics of the welfare state – and how are they to be supported, because they are (socially/ and or economically) productive – and where are they becoming dysfunctional – as in the many cases, where there is corruption taking place, for example in those cases, where French railroad-employees have managed to fix contracts with the state, that are – looking at the labour-market in genral, simply unfair. Late Foucault swiched to Hayek, because he too did finally realize, that these tendencies indeed subvert society and are simply parasitic group egoisms.

    Same with immigration – it’s not good to look upon immigration with the old communist (and new globalist!!) mindset, that everybody fits in into French society equally well. Not to forget London social scientist Paul Collier – he points this fact out as well – as do Bruckner, Finkielkraut and Sarrazin.

    Those are the really interesting lines of (societal) combat – compared to these hights of analytical standards, Guilly and Caldwell don’t accomplish much – hardly anything at all. It’s phenomenology part xxxx….and the way they identify diversity as a problem is simply a fight over certain buildings. If only the world would be that simple – – no, it would not be better off at all, it would be a pretty hopeless and utterly backward and boring place, if it really were that simple. Campbell and Guilly are underachievers.

    Plus – the shockwaves that run trough France – with islamist terror-attacks happening or almost happening now the third week in a row – during election time, mind you, is slowly but steadily BECOMING REALLY SCARY.

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  33. The 1066 Battle of Hastings is the answer to the mass immigration and globalization attacks that have been launched against the White Ancestral Core of the European Christian nation-states. The corrupt and evil ruling classes are as weak and crumbly as a rotting cinder block. Just as the Saxons were dislodged as the rulers of England, so shall the globalizers be removed from power in the European Christian nation-states.

    The evil ruling classes of France, the United States, England, Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and other European Christian nation-states will not relinquish their power and place without a fight. There will be civil wars and secessionary wars in every part of the world that has European Christian nation-states.

    The only larger strategic consideration will be the disposition of nuclear weapons. As the wars advance, there will have to be some type of agreement about the command and control of the nuclear weapons. I am sure some accommodations along this line can be accomplished between the Patriot victors and the losing Globalizer faction.

    France must not be allowed to sink under the nation-wrecking waves of mass immigration and multiculturalism. France must be fought for by French Patriots. The evil, money-grubbing scum in France who push open borders mass immigration and multiculturalism must be crushed.

    Marine Le Pen was born to save France from the evil Globalizers currently attacking that great nation. Marine Le Pen will Make France Proud Again.

    VIVE LA FRANCE

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    • Agree: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Who shall be the new William the Conqueror? Richard Spencer?
    , @Random Dude on the Internet
    I actually think that the globalist ruling class is a house of cards. It can all collapse rapidly from there because they don't have any real support from the public except wild packs of antifa and minorities. Just make them feel mildly uncomfortable about their futures and they'll start running for the exit. This is why they have invested all this time, money, and energy against Trump: while Trump won't order these guys to hang from lampposts, he's not 100% in the tank for them, which means their demise is literally around the corner in their mind. Sad!
    , @BB753
    I don't have much faith in Marine le Pen, but it's all we've got. Same with Trump. France used to be a home of sorts for me and I pray for the day I can go back with pride. It's really depressing to see everything you value and cherish trampled upon and spit on on a daily basis. That's how I've felt for the past three decades.
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  34. WGG says:

    “Open Society” is a term that was, I believe, coined by George Soros. If not coined by him, he certainly popularized it and named his NGO after it.

    NGO’s are the new mafia and should be dismantled and prosecuted accordingly.

    Read More
    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    It's from Karl Popper.

    If you compare Soros's writings to Popper's, you'll see that Soros is a standard deviation or two short of getting Popper's argument.
    , @CJ
    The Open Society and Its Enemies, by Karl Popper

    A book highly worth reading whether you're a globalist or not.
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  35. Tiny Duck says:

    How does it feel? Knowing that white men are going to pay for their crimes against humanity? Demographics is destiny.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Duke
    I think if it's a matter as simplistic as race and gender, I put my money on the white guys. They've been holding back becuase of the PC successes of leftist fascist. As PC BS power wanes, thier supporters are in for a shit storm of pain.
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  36. Altai says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    All the schools of sociology and humanities now take their cues from America post WWII. American does not rule the west by it’s massive arsenal, (That’s how it rules MENA) for no European fears it’s use on them. It rules the west from it’s sociology departments.

    I was amazed that Trump defunded the arts since it was so little money. I think he should have removed any federal money to the humanities, diverted it to STEM. It’s hardly an alt-right thing to want either, everybody to the right of centre and lots of people on the left of centre on social issues is undermined by the runaway post-modern ideology which infects the humanities in the US. Trumps internet presence was ultimately the result of the overreach of this ideology. But just like when it overreached in one go in the 90s and freaked out the ‘normies’, it still came back and was never forced to retreat, just knocking away at a lower tempo.

    Read More
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  37. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The French, no fools, reserved their inner cities for what Whit Stillman’s characters call the High Urban Bourgeois — You mean Urban Haute Bourgeois, or “UHB”.

    Read More
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  38. @fnn
    Famous piece in which George MacDonald Fraser says that PC was imported into Britain from the US in the 1990s:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-506219/The-testament-Flashmans-creator-How-Britain-destroyed-itself.html

    Wow, what delusional thinking! And so disappointing coming from George MacDonald Fraser, whose Flashman and other (“Quartered straight out of here”) books I loved.

    He thinks the change in the UK began in the nineties? He must have been in some sort of coma for several decades.

    It was in 1968 that Enoch Powell was stripped of his shadow cabinet position by future Tory PM Edward Heath for giving a (prescient) speech about the problems immigration would cause Britain. And increasingly draconian “Race Relations” Acts were passed between 1965 and the eighties.

    All Fraser seems to have noticed is a progression in PC by reviewers of his books during the nineties.

    Read More
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  39. George says:

    The Guardian to the rescue:

    ‘The real misery is in the countryside’: support for Le Pen surges in rural France

    Rift between ailing rural areas and far away big cities is where the Front National leader looks set to make her biggest voter gains

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/21/counryside-marine-le-pen-forgotten-france-presidential-election-2017

    Seems all those immigrants backstopping Paris real estate prices, require government services (to keep them from going Jihadi and rioting) that once were sent out to rural areas (to prevent peasant revolts).

    “The French, no fools, reserved their inner cities for what Whit Stillman’s characters call the High Urban Bourgeois.”

    French had government central planning of everything roughly from the time Italians showed up and required them to learn latin to get a job with a government pension. The US only had government planning from the New Deal on. New York City and State a bit earlier in the 20s, read about it in The Power Broker.

    Due to immigration North Eastern cities and Chicago were mostly unhealthy slums for most of their history. From the little Zola I have read, Paris was less the city of light than it is now. In 1848 Napoleon III becomes Emporer of France and converts Paris into the administrative center of the shabby but number 2 world Empire. Much the same way Bush II converts Washinton DC into the administrative center of the shabby but number 1 world Empire. How did DC rise from the ashes, it used to be dump, worse than Detroit. Empire+taxpayer cash = Imperial treasure city.

    BTW, Chicago and all domestic finances are collapsing like the did after the failed Vietnam adventure, with the difference that back then state finances were actually fairly good. This time when Chicago goes down, Illinois goes down. Most Federal pensions are by design unreserved, although Uncle raises a lot of cash it might not be possible for Uncle to bail out Federal, state, local, and even Afghani pensions simultaneously.

    Living outside Paris is not like living outside Chicago. The public transportation works in France, the high speed rail and even the just fast commuter trans mean you are not isolated. Sort of like the US when rail roads were a new idea.

    American wood frame houses are baffling to foreigners. Always the cheapest construction on even the most expensive plots. Needless to say the French chopped down their old growth forests years ago so masonry buildings are required masonry.

    WWII was not fought in the US, much of recent living patterns were set based on the situation in 1946.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill

    “The French, no fools, reserved their inner cities for what Whit Stillman’s characters call the High Urban Bourgeois.”

    French had government central planning of everything roughly from the time Italians showed up and required them to learn latin to get a job with a government pension. The US only had government planning from the New Deal on. New York City and State a bit earlier in the 20s, read about it in The Power Broker.

    Due to immigration North Eastern cities and Chicago were mostly unhealthy slums for most of their history.
     
    No, no, no. The stupid propaganda you repeat in the last quoted sentence was generated pre-war. It was the language of US central planners ("Urban Renewal" flavor) from roughly the turn of the 20th C to the 1970s. Suburbanization was a planned, intentional population movement. Furthermore, it wasn't foolish. The elite got what they wanted out of it. It was evil, obviously, but not foolish.
    , @MBlanc46
    Living ouside Chicago is not isolating. Our public transit perhaps isn't as extensive, but it's adequate, especially for the older suburbs. I've nothing against frame construction, but it's far from the only type. My suburb, for example, mandates all-brick construction. Perhaps you should actually visit a place before you write about it.
    , @black sea
    I've never before heard the argument that George W. Bush converted Washington D.C. from "a dump, worse than Detroit," to the gleaming imperial capital it is today. I'd want to see some evidence for that.

    "American wood frame houses are baffling to foreigners. Always the cheapest construction on even the most expensive plots."

     

    I guess this is baffling only because most foreigners come from countries that have already exhausted their forest resources. The wood frame, or ballon frame, contruction method is an entirely rational option, particularly in residential construction. In America, brick houses are still built using wood framing. The brick just provides the exterior wall; it isn't structural. We use wood framing because it is advantageous, not just "cheap."
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  40. Mr. Anon says:
    @22pp22
    Last year I went back to Paris for the first time in ages to visit friends. I know how much I have aged because of the look of shock I saw on their faces.

    You can no longer cut yourself off from cultural enrichment in France. The centre of the city now has the same demographics as the banlieues. The metro is filthy and everything is overpriced.

    Provincial France offfers margnally better value for money. Italy is far better although some of the smaller towns are showing the tell-tale signs of enrichment. Mostly, though, they seems to be sending their enrichers north.

    P.S. I don't know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don't marry women old enough to be their mothers.

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.

    I believe that Macron’s wife was his school teacher; she’s got something like fifteen years on him. Marrying your school teacher is weird; Newt Gingrich did it (and he’s kind of weird), but in Macron’s case, the age difference is even greater.

    BTW, doesn’t “Macron” sound like the name of some minor historical figure in ancient Rome? Well, in a way, I suppose he is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    Macron is actually 24 years y0unger than his wife. They met when he was a 15 year-old high school student.

    So, yes, Macron must be quite weird.
    , @Malcolm X-Lax
    According to Wikipedia she's 24 years older than him!
    , @Desiderius
    There's also Dr. Johnson.
    , @SeñorAnon
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brigitte_Macron:

    Emmanuel Macron and Brigitte Trogneux met at the Jesuit high school in Amiens (France), where she was a French teacher[3] and in charge of the theater class he attended.[4] The romance was not typical, as she is his senior by 24 years and 8 months, and Macron has described it as "a love often clandestine, often hidden, misunderstood by many before imposing itself".[5] After a long relationship, they married in 2007.[6] She has three children from a previous mariage.
     
    , @Tom-in-VA
    Quintus Naevius Cordus Sutorius Macro (21 BC – 38 AD) was a prefect of the Praetorian Guard, from 31 until 38, serving under the Roman Emperors Tiberius and Caligula. Upon falling out of favor, he committed suicide.

    From Wikipedia. John Rhys-Davies played him in the TV series "I, Claudius."
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  41. Claude says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    “I don’t expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.”

    Yes, PC is ultimately an American invention. And remember, it started out as a joke. Not many people laughing about it now though. Hopefully our future Edward Gibbon makes note of that.

    Read More
    • Agree: Clyde
    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    I don't recall political correctness being a joke until the right and sensible mainstream started fighting back against it well into the 1990s. In the mid-to-late 80s, I was a college (and pre-college) lefty and we used the term "politically correct/incorrect" without irony.
    , @Almost Missouri
    I don't know if it was a joke exactly, but I first heard the term "politically correct" in the early-mid-1980's at Stanford where the locals used it as a pejorative to refer to the faux-sensitive lefties. My impression was that it more described a social category with political pretensions rather than the other way around.

    I believe this must have been very near the ur-source of the term.

    I didn't hang with the lefties there, so I can't comment on how they used it.

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  42. @22pp22
    Last year I went back to Paris for the first time in ages to visit friends. I know how much I have aged because of the look of shock I saw on their faces.

    You can no longer cut yourself off from cultural enrichment in France. The centre of the city now has the same demographics as the banlieues. The metro is filthy and everything is overpriced.

    Provincial France offfers margnally better value for money. Italy is far better although some of the smaller towns are showing the tell-tale signs of enrichment. Mostly, though, they seems to be sending their enrichers north.

    P.S. I don't know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don't marry women old enough to be their mothers.

    After the dust settles in May and Macron beats Le Pen (65%-35%) en ballotage, the French will be faced with an insoluble problem (Third-World immigration) that simply will not go away. A problem that cannot be solved by a socialist Rothschild banker (Macron) who spends all his free time in gay bars in order to escape the clutches of his elderly mother – – – I mean wife.

    Like in any other Western nation, the majority of its citizens fully subscribe to the madness that the way to solve the immigration problem is to let in more Third-Worlders, and if you foolishly try to deport them you will have wholesale riots that will certainly spill over into White areas. Best let “Them” be. Appeasement is the only sensible way to postpone the Day of Reckoning.

    The riots are surely coming but these riots will strictly be on the immigrants’ terms. In France, they only burn cars these days. But these immigrants are only a short step away from burning “The Butters” in the streets (Whites = les beurres : French Arab slang for Whites).

    When Macron’s favorite gay bar gets firebombed down to the ground, perhaps then and only then will he act.

    Read More
    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I always thought that 'beure' was French back-slang for Arab.
    , @Clyde
    Germany, Sweden, France are just so full of shit when they claim they will engage in mass`deportations of failed asylum seekers. I saw a Swedish gov't drone (male) claiming they would be deporting 60,000 failed asylum seekers. Angela Merkel said similar things. Of course this will never happen because there will be Muslim/Black African riots and the police will be forced to retreat under a hail of rocks and Molotov cocktails. These rioters will have nothing to loose while European police have families they want to come home to in a non-crippled condition...or dead.

    You noted it first! The power of the Muslim+ Black immigrant riots will force every Europen nations police forces to retreat. The migrants are younger and have nothing to lose plus Muslim group think loves riots and lynch mobs.
    They show the unity of the Ummah against the non-muslims.

    , @ben tillman

    Like in any other Western nation, the majority of its citizens fully subscribe to the madness that the way to solve the immigration problem is to let in more Third-Worlders, and if you foolishly try to deport them you will have wholesale riots that will certainly spill over into White areas.
     
    I don't think anyone in this Western nation believes that, let alone a majority of citizens.
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  43. black sea says:

    “Caldwell would be an ideal addition to the WSJ roster.”

    The reasons why Caldwell would be an ideal addtion to the WSJ are the very same reasons why he won’t be considered. He thinks too clearly, and writes too honestly about what he sees.

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  44. Abe says: • Website

    Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose, the fame of its history

    Respectfully disagree (and you don’t know how hard it was for me to suppress the snarky “Um, no” opening I wanted to use this morning).

    I know I’m being provincial, but the only truly cornerstone French intellectual heavyweight I can think of at the moment is Descartes. Sartre and Camus? Give me a break. Like Hemingway in the U.S., these two giants of 20th Century Western arts & letters never really made it out of the 1900′s (just waiting, BTW, for some enterprising Millennial bright thing to make his reputation by tearing down Hemingway’s for his white privilege and gender influidity).

    Let’s put it this way- what language did Marx, Freud, and Einstein write in? And since, yeah, Einstein technically wrote in the universal language of numbers, let’s take him away and substitute Hitler. Isn’t Hitler (in all seriousness) a more influential thinker than any that’s come out of France over the last 100 years just for the mere fact that in every single Western country the left secretly and not so secretly thinks the right is going to be running whole chapters out of his playbook the moment it lets its guard down?

    And less controversially there is also Kant, Heidegger (without which French postmodernism would literally be inconceivable), Wittgenstein, Popper, Hayek. Who’s the #1 most intellectually influential country again?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    You've forgotten (Blaise) Pascal. In France it used to be said that one is either a Cartesian or a Pascalian. No more. Substitute Mohammedanism for both.
    , @PiltdownMan
    Huh?

    Teilhard de Chardin, Raymond Aron, Montaigne, Bergson, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire to come up with a few, totally off-the-cuff.

    Steve made no assertions about "cornerstone intellectuals" by which I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff.

    But Steve mentioned "lucidity of prose and fame of history" as well as the tendency to produce theories of history as criteria, indicating a far broader assessment that he was making.
    , @Desiderius

    I know I’m being provincial
     
    Yes, temporally provincial.
    , @reiner Tor
    The Frankfurt School also started in German...
    , @Sammler
    I am certain that Voltaire's mockery of Leibniz (in Candide) has been more influential than any of Leibniz's own philosophy.
    , @Anon
    Marx, Freud, and Einstein were Jewish, not German as such, and except for Einstein (who if he can be counted for Germany can also be counted for Switzerland) might have been better ignored.

    With respect to the other Germans and Frenchmen, I'd say it's very likely that any given great German thinker spoke French, but that the reverse is not true.

    The French cultural position is probably what it is because for centuries French has been learned as a second language (or third, if we include Latin) by cultured Europeans.
    , @Almost Missouri
    I agree with you that Germany intellectually dominated the 18th and 19th centuries (until they were physically wiped out by everyone else in a fit of mass jealousy in the 20th century), but if you stretch your gaze back to the 16th and 17th centuries, it evens things up quite a bit for France.
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  45. Svigor says:

    The upshot of all this is a hard break in which le deplorables embrace “racism” and make it a virtue. The only question is how popular it becomes, and how quickly.

    Read More
    • Agree: Amasius
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  46. Whiskey says: • Website

    HBD people always pull back from the full HBD implications. The desire for “diversity” is HBD driven. It is not “Jews” or Gramscian Marxists or the Frankfurt School or the 68 generation. It is the full working of White people DNA full stop, that created Diversity. It is easy to see why. Kevin Williamson HATES HATES HATES his country cousins because he is mortified that his fellow minor aristocrats might mistake him for one of them.

    We have a landless aristocracy based not on feudal land-holdings (inevitably threatened by large amounts of Muslims, or Blacks/Africans, or Mexicans deciding that land belongs to THEM) but various managerial positions and middle-men rent extractor cronyist stuff like lobbying, etc.

    There was nothing to be imported from America, that tendency was already there — add better treatment and freedom for women where in every nice little girl there is a nasty pr0n star and antifa “Moldylocks” waiting to get out, and you have a perfect storm. I read the Caldwell piece last night, it was perfect, and shows how organically just a few lucky managers made it to the top and now have a vast non-White servant class and can continue the important thing — making war against their distant cousins who are not cool. Aided by the main vector of Cuckservatism — loving Dads and Husbands coddling their wives and daughters.

    The interest of a landless, managerial aristocracy is as inimical and hostile to ordinary White people as the interest of single White women is to that of White men. Moldylocks is no more your friend than Michael Bloomberg. [Or Jerry Seinfeld, car collector, is your enemy. Think Jerry is keen on more car-b-ques?]

    Read More
    • Agree: Fredrik
    • Replies: @Random Dude on the Internet
    People will inevitably being developing a hierarchal process even if there's no monarchy around. Instead of money, power, and influence, it's about virtue signaling and cultural markers that distinguish the haves from the have nots. A Starbucks barista with a Masters Degree making $9 an hour feels more in tune with the "elite" than the electrician making $35 an hour with a high school education. The electrician will likely have a better standard of living than the barista (who will live in an apartment with roommates well into her late 20s and 30s) but that doesn't mean the barista won't be looking down on the electrician. You could blame things like the media for being responsible but it's human nature. The barista will never be with the in crowd that she desperately wants to be a part of but her aspirations ensure that she will vote reliably Democrat for the foreseeable future because its The Right Thing To Do.
    , @Bill
    Yeah, white people were always destined to be PC. It just didn't manifest for the first 5000 years. On accident.
    , @mobi

    The desire for “diversity” is HBD driven. It is not “Jews” or Gramscian Marxists or the Frankfurt School or the 68 generation. It is the full working of White people DNA full stop,
     
    False dichotomy
    , @george strong
    Kevin Williamson is a gay mulatto who hates normal white people like Trump, because he can never be a normal white person.
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  47. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Abe

    Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose, the fame of its history
     
    Respectfully disagree (and you don't know how hard it was for me to suppress the snarky "Um, no" opening I wanted to use this morning).

    I know I'm being provincial, but the only truly cornerstone French intellectual heavyweight I can think of at the moment is Descartes. Sartre and Camus? Give me a break. Like Hemingway in the U.S., these two giants of 20th Century Western arts & letters never really made it out of the 1900's (just waiting, BTW, for some enterprising Millennial bright thing to make his reputation by tearing down Hemingway's for his white privilege and gender influidity).

    Let's put it this way- what language did Marx, Freud, and Einstein write in? And since, yeah, Einstein technically wrote in the universal language of numbers, let's take him away and substitute Hitler. Isn't Hitler (in all seriousness) a more influential thinker than any that's come out of France over the last 100 years just for the mere fact that in every single Western country the left secretly and not so secretly thinks the right is going to be running whole chapters out of his playbook the moment it lets its guard down?

    And less controversially there is also Kant, Heidegger (without which French postmodernism would literally be inconceivable), Wittgenstein, Popper, Hayek. Who's the #1 most intellectually influential country again?

    You’ve forgotten (Blaise) Pascal. In France it used to be said that one is either a Cartesian or a Pascalian. No more. Substitute Mohammedanism for both.

    Read More
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  48. eah says:

    For many, political correctness is not as bad as others seem to think.

    Read More
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  49. Svigor says:

    I don’t expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    It won’t gain you many (((friends))), anyway. Seems a perfectly valid question to me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Abe

    Seems a perfectly valid question to me.
     
    Which is why I wasn't as heartbroken as maybe I should have been after Bannon's demotion. He's a very remarkable man and I wish him continued success, but at least based on his talk at the Vatican, which according to my quick reading of it seemed just so much sub-Gingrich sort of YEAH, DEMOCRACY! YEAH, CAPITALISM! YEAH, AMERICA! blowhardism, it does not appear he has absorbed the more mature sort of conservatism which the alt-right is just finally starting to introduce to America 100 years after the fact.

    I think many of us here are former-libertardians who at some point realized that American, highly ideological, laissez-faire conservatism is viable only up until the point when all the empty land runs out and you can no longer move away from your problems.
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  50. @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    I believe that the reining theory is that French developed the virus which destroy themselves at a fairly swift rate; the Anglos contracted French ideals but evolved it into a less virulent but more lasting strain which has since developed to grow throughout the world.

    The United States has basically become a laboratory to gradually refine and develop the disease until it can be fine-tuned to infect almost any host.

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  51. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The edifice of European culture in general began collapsing when Princip whacked Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo in August of 1914. What we are now seeing in France, as well as in Germany and elsewhere, is the debris.

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  52. inertial says:

    I didn’t know that “real estate theoretician” was a thing in France. Are there any of them in America? We definitely need some. Can iSteve qualify?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    Steve certainly could qualify as a golf real estate theoretician. I always enjoy his pieces on golf course architecture despite the fact I refuse to play the game. Having seen the game, I have concluded it is mechanically impossible to play without taking hundred of strokes per round and the only people who can play it are only doing so because they don't realize it is impossible.
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  53. peterike says:

    Well in the past, the French have known precisely how to deal with a culturally incompatible class (Huguenots) or with a parasitic leadership class. Here’s hoping they go at it a third time. Only this time they have to deal with both problems at once.

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  54. Here is Caldwell on opioids in the USA: https://www.firstthings.com/article/2017/04/american-carnage

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  55. Luke Lea says:

    I have a feeling this essay is more important than the book it is reviewing.

    I sent it to all my friends and relatives who can’t understand where I am coming from. Caldwell and Steyn, along with Sailer, are the three voices best able to articulate what’s going on and where we are headed. That is the essential first step in a change in direction.

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    • Agree: Abe
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  56. Abe says: • Website
    @slumber_j
    I don't see why anyone should take offense at your comment. Where else would Europeans have gotten these notions? Argentina?

    European elites made a classic category mistake: the US is a country, and our country is a country, therefore whatever seems to work there will work here!

    Of course, whether it was actually working in the US is a whole 'nother question...

    I don’t see why anyone should take offense at your comment. Where else would Europeans have gotten these notions? Argentina?

    Younglings like yourself (no offense) have an awfully compressed understanding of the 20th Century (mine of the 19th is hardly better ;-) and so overlook key details in the effort to have a more economical grasp of it all. It was Swede Gunnar Myrdal’s AMERICAN DILEMMA that jumpstarted the whole post-WWII civil rights movement in America, and decades before Whiskey was bewailing Obama’s star turn in the humid dreams of so many upper-middle class white lady journolists, Martin Luther King was appearing in saintly vision to the most white-girl-problem sort of Swedish white girls in such touchstone Eurocinema “art” flicks as I AM CURIOUS (YELLOW).

    In other words, it’s been an entirely dialectical process (as that thinker from a not #1, nor even #2 or #3 intellectually illustrious culture Hegel would say): Europeans (for either ideological socialist or cynical nationalist reasons) shaming Americans over their treatment of blacks and Native Americans (heck, even HITLER! slammed FDR on account of the Red Man), which lead to civil rights, which lead to political correctness, which lead to multiculturalism that in the 90′s wafted back across the Atlantic to infect Europe.

    I still recall all the heated disputes I had on USENET with Europeans during the early days of the Internet, when yelling back-and-forth like an a$$hole at someone was novel and trendy so long as it was done at intercontinental distance- “America is disgusting and it treats le Blaques so h’orribly!” “Yeah, you stupid frog? Well just wait till you have to deal with a bunch of them yourself. We’ll see how you like diversity then!” Blowback is a bitch.

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Younglings like yourself (no offense) have an awfully compressed understanding of the 20th Century (mine of the 19th is hardly better ;-) and so overlook key details in the effort to have a more economical grasp of it all. It was Swede Gunnar Myrdal’s AMERICAN DILEMMA that jumpstarted the whole post-WWII civil rights movement in America . . . .
     
    Myrdal wrote the book in collaboration with Richard Sterner and Arnold Rose. And Myrdal's perspective (of innate equality of the races) depended entirely on the obscurantism of Franz Boas and his followers.
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  57. Luke Lea says:

    Since provincial France is perhaps the best rural real estate in the world, getting squeezed out of big cities doesn’t sound so bad for indigenous working class.

    I wonder if the French might be more receptive than Americans to my Notes Towards a New Way of Life in America:

    “In this 21st century capitalist utopia, Luke Lea explores a world of New Country Towns in which the people work part-time outside the home and in their free time help build their own houses, cultivate gardens, cook and care for their children and grandchildren, and pursue hobbies and other outside interests. They live on small family homesteads grouped around neighborhood greens and get around town in modified golf-carts. Work and leisure integrated into the fabric of their everyday lives to the point that they don’t feel much need to retire, and they die at home in their beds as a rule, surrounded by loved ones.

    For those who would like to move to this world he provides a map with some directions for how to get there from here.”

    I’m still looking for a publisher. Here’s a link to a poorly edited copy of the whole MS:

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1A6TGpBTQlufDe1fSozy9VkH03Q9FJDHmzLyG1C2RFw4/edit?usp=sharing

    Wish I could write better but the ideas are all there. They could, in fact someday will, change the course of history.

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    • Replies: @David Davenport
    “In this 21st century capitalist utopia, Luke Lea explores a world of New Country Towns in which the people work part-time outside the home and in their free time help build their own houses, cultivate gardens, cook and care for their children and grandchildren, and pursue hobbies and other outside interests. They live on small family homesteads grouped around neighborhood greens and get around town in modified golf-carts...

    Luke Leaky, what's your policy on 2nd Amendment rights in your 21st c. Utopia?
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  58. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Detective Club
    After the dust settles in May and Macron beats Le Pen (65%-35%) en ballotage, the French will be faced with an insoluble problem (Third-World immigration) that simply will not go away. A problem that cannot be solved by a socialist Rothschild banker (Macron) who spends all his free time in gay bars in order to escape the clutches of his elderly mother - - - I mean wife.

    Like in any other Western nation, the majority of its citizens fully subscribe to the madness that the way to solve the immigration problem is to let in more Third-Worlders, and if you foolishly try to deport them you will have wholesale riots that will certainly spill over into White areas. Best let "Them" be. Appeasement is the only sensible way to postpone the Day of Reckoning.

    The riots are surely coming but these riots will strictly be on the immigrants' terms. In France, they only burn cars these days. But these immigrants are only a short step away from burning "The Butters" in the streets (Whites = les beurres : French Arab slang for Whites).

    When Macron's favorite gay bar gets firebombed down to the ground, perhaps then and only then will he act.

    I always thought that ‘beure’ was French back-slang for Arab.

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    • Replies: @Detective Club
    Maybe the Third-World immigrants have turned the word back into the faces of the White French, nowadays, and rubbed their proverbial noses with a new meaning of "FU" slang.

    "Beurre" also has a double meaning. Not only is butter white but butter is soft as well - - - and the French, particularly French politicians in power, are nothing if not soft when dealing with immigrant violence against Whites. Being White in France is, by the haughty Lefty definition of the terms of political discussion, to be racist. "Beurre" fits the White predicament in French politics and life to a T!
    , @Horzabky
    And rightly so. Un beur (not beurre, which means butter) is an Arab born, or at least grown up, in France.
    , @Cagey Beast
    Yeah, I think "beur" comes from the verlan slang for "arabe". Verlan slang words are formed by reversing the syllables to form a kind of codeword, like Cockney slang. The name for it is itself an inversion of the French words for "the wrong war round", "à l'envers". "Verlan" is obviously also a reference to the poet Verlaine.

    Female beurs are called beurettes. There's an old video at YouTube of a cute beurette policewoman keeping her cool while receiving an endless stream of swearwords thrown at her by a youth-ette as they ride in a paddy wagon. It's under "Gamine de cité insulte une flic de cité ".

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  59. The title is rather misleading. It is not a ” New French Theory of Political Correctness”, more the French Political Elite utilising a political technique that has been around for a considerable time now.
    The best book in English on the subject still seems to be Political Correctness and the Theoretical Struggle by Frank Ellis ( Maxim Institute, Auckland, 2004 ).
    Dr Ellis traces Political Correctness to its origins in Bolshevik Russia and onwards. He regards it as Neo-Marxism. The traditional Marxist wants to control the means of production – the economy – whereas the Neo-Marxist wants to control the means of expression – (principally) the dictionary.

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  60. Alfa158 says:
    @inertial
    I didn't know that "real estate theoretician" was a thing in France. Are there any of them in America? We definitely need some. Can iSteve qualify?

    Steve certainly could qualify as a golf real estate theoretician. I always enjoy his pieces on golf course architecture despite the fact I refuse to play the game. Having seen the game, I have concluded it is mechanically impossible to play without taking hundred of strokes per round and the only people who can play it are only doing so because they don’t realize it is impossible.

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  61. Fred5 says:

    I’m in Paris right now. I wouldn’t say it’s filthy but there is more graffiti in places it shouldn’t be and more available real estate than a year ago. I picked up a copy of “Living in Paris” put out by the city government, page 5 is an eye opener of PC gone wild. “Paris’ history is made up of successive waves of immigration.” First time I ever heard of Ceasar’s legionaires being immigrants. They put in bold letters “The Paris region alone is home to 40% of foreigners in France.” They still wonder why tourism is down. The foreigners without the money come first with the virtue signalers.

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    • Replies: @Altai

    First time I ever heard of Ceasar’s legionaires being immigrants.
     
    Killed a third of the population, enslaved another third, destroyed almost the entire indigenous culture and introduced the genes for aquiline noses. They were ahead of their time!
    , @Fredrik
    Don't know how you travelled from the airport but if you take the train it's hard not to see the state of the suburbs on the way to Gare du Nord. That's where the Africans and Muslims live. No wonder the direct trains(that save around 5 minutes) are recommended. Around Gare du Nord it feels like one is in Cameroon. The only non-Africans are the police or so it feels.
    , @Formerly CARealist
    The graffiti is all over Europe. Depressing. Also the cigarette butts. Gross.

    And Paris seemed pretty African to us when we were there in 2016. Still, I really liked what I saw and would go back to see more.
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  62. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    My take on it is that the French establishment is in a state of massive denial – and massive hopelessness and helplessness.

    The know full well that the present set up is a disaster, a catastrophe waiting to happen which will only get worse as time goes by. They also know full well that there is absolutely no possibility of a peaceful settlement or indeed any type of settlement.

    So, collectively their coping strategy is that of the ostrich, sticking their heads in the sand in a vain attempt to ignore the problem.
    Reality for the French is just too damned awful to contemplate, so basically what we are seeing is a neurotic psychosis on a national scale.

    Of course, The Economist magazine and the EU want to impose precisely the same living nightmare on central Europe.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Shades of central Europe and Poland in particular regarding the 'Jewish Question' prior to 1939.
    Everyone knew that the status quo could not hold, although few envisioned the terrible way in which the 'insoluble impossible' situation unravelled.
    , @mobi

    My take on it is that the French establishment is in a state of massive denial – and massive hopelessness and helplessness.

    The know full well that the present set up is a disaster, a catastrophe waiting to happen which will only get worse as time goes by. They also know full well that there is absolutely no possibility of a peaceful settlement or indeed any type of settlement.
     
    It's far from too late for a settlement:

    'French army high command already has a codename for contingency plans to ethnically cleanse muslims from France'

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3781978/French-army-secret-plan-ethnically-cleanse-Muslims-country-help-Israeli-military-claims-political-commentator.html
    , @mobi

    The know full well that the present set up is a disaster, a catastrophe waiting to happen which will only get worse as time goes by. They also know full well that there is absolutely no possibility of a peaceful settlement or indeed any type of settlement.
     
    'Majority of France's police force backs Le Pen':

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4428772/Most-French-police-officers-say-voting-Le-Pen.html

    (Imagine being a fly on the wall of the officer's barracks).

    It's coming. Once again, France will lead the way.

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  63. @Abe

    Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose, the fame of its history
     
    Respectfully disagree (and you don't know how hard it was for me to suppress the snarky "Um, no" opening I wanted to use this morning).

    I know I'm being provincial, but the only truly cornerstone French intellectual heavyweight I can think of at the moment is Descartes. Sartre and Camus? Give me a break. Like Hemingway in the U.S., these two giants of 20th Century Western arts & letters never really made it out of the 1900's (just waiting, BTW, for some enterprising Millennial bright thing to make his reputation by tearing down Hemingway's for his white privilege and gender influidity).

    Let's put it this way- what language did Marx, Freud, and Einstein write in? And since, yeah, Einstein technically wrote in the universal language of numbers, let's take him away and substitute Hitler. Isn't Hitler (in all seriousness) a more influential thinker than any that's come out of France over the last 100 years just for the mere fact that in every single Western country the left secretly and not so secretly thinks the right is going to be running whole chapters out of his playbook the moment it lets its guard down?

    And less controversially there is also Kant, Heidegger (without which French postmodernism would literally be inconceivable), Wittgenstein, Popper, Hayek. Who's the #1 most intellectually influential country again?

    Huh?

    Teilhard de Chardin, Raymond Aron, Montaigne, Bergson, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire to come up with a few, totally off-the-cuff.

    Steve made no assertions about “cornerstone intellectuals” by which I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff.

    But Steve mentioned “lucidity of prose and fame of history” as well as the tendency to produce theories of history as criteria, indicating a far broader assessment that he was making.

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    • Replies: @Abe

    Teilhard de Chardin, Raymond Aron, Montaigne, Bergson, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire to come up with a few, totally off-the-cuff.
     
    Right. And also Foucault. I realized even as I wrote my original comment that I was being peremptory and a bit immoderate, but I think my basic assertion still holds- for the past 100-150 years, behind almost every French intellectual of note, there's a German who's done the intellectual heavy-lifting which made it all possible. Heck, Freudianism is still the biggest thing going in mental health in France from what I've read.

    Steve made no assertions about “cornerstone intellectuals” by which I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff. But Steve mentioned “lucidity of prose and fame of history”
     
    Right, and I remember up until sometime in the '90's when even in high-brow American intellectual circles it was either 1789 or 1848 all the time (cf. Paul Berman, who someone brought up the other day in another thread). But things change, and now it's always either 1933 or 1939. Germans bring the big ideas (and now our historical touchpoints); French bring the coffee and black turtlenecks.
    , @Desiderius

    I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff.
     
    No, he's just stricken with the Modernist disease.
    , @Malcolm X-Lax
    Only jews can be "cornerstone intellectuals" apparently. Perhaps "Abe" is none other than jewish supremacist Jeffrey Goldberg!
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  64. Clyde says:
    @Detective Club
    After the dust settles in May and Macron beats Le Pen (65%-35%) en ballotage, the French will be faced with an insoluble problem (Third-World immigration) that simply will not go away. A problem that cannot be solved by a socialist Rothschild banker (Macron) who spends all his free time in gay bars in order to escape the clutches of his elderly mother - - - I mean wife.

    Like in any other Western nation, the majority of its citizens fully subscribe to the madness that the way to solve the immigration problem is to let in more Third-Worlders, and if you foolishly try to deport them you will have wholesale riots that will certainly spill over into White areas. Best let "Them" be. Appeasement is the only sensible way to postpone the Day of Reckoning.

    The riots are surely coming but these riots will strictly be on the immigrants' terms. In France, they only burn cars these days. But these immigrants are only a short step away from burning "The Butters" in the streets (Whites = les beurres : French Arab slang for Whites).

    When Macron's favorite gay bar gets firebombed down to the ground, perhaps then and only then will he act.

    Germany, Sweden, France are just so full of shit when they claim they will engage in mass`deportations of failed asylum seekers. I saw a Swedish gov’t drone (male) claiming they would be deporting 60,000 failed asylum seekers. Angela Merkel said similar things. Of course this will never happen because there will be Muslim/Black African riots and the police will be forced to retreat under a hail of rocks and Molotov cocktails. These rioters will have nothing to loose while European police have families they want to come home to in a non-crippled condition…or dead.

    You noted it first! The power of the Muslim+ Black immigrant riots will force every Europen nations police forces to retreat. The migrants are younger and have nothing to lose plus Muslim group think loves riots and lynch mobs.
    They show the unity of the Ummah against the non-muslims.

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    • Replies: @Ripple Earthdevil
    "These rioters will have nothing to 'loose'..."

    Seriously?
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  65. @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    The first chinks in British armour came after WW2 … after so many commonwealth natives had given their lives for Britain, it was kind of hard to say they could not come in, and as they gained critical mass it became harder still to continue even concealed racism and it even became necessary to bend over backwards to keep the burgeoning immigant populations happy. Same deal with America, which in my view didn’t contaminate the UK and Europe with the banality of PC, rather the political and social elite saw it as a tool to keep a constructive tension between the native non-elite and the burgeoning settler populations so that their own turf was left in relative peace.

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    • Replies: @Yak-15
    To an extent yes. The real moral dilemma came when they gave the colonies independence. Then all the half breeds who were loyal and died for British glory in the many past wars and administered their colonizes, like my grandparents, were chased out of country and forced into limbo.
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  66. jim jones says:
    @El Dato
    Thanks.

    In the UK, references to the Daily Mail are ritually accompanied by expressions of disgust and disavoval. It may be trashy but it brings up the true belly of the beast, surprisingly doesn't read the memos on who is the official international baddie and allows one to look at beautiful people in the sidebar.

    I cannot understand the hate towards the DM. It is obviously aimed at women as all the stories are about celebrity gossip, diets or breast cancer.

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  67. @Anonymous
    I always thought that 'beure' was French back-slang for Arab.

    Maybe the Third-World immigrants have turned the word back into the faces of the White French, nowadays, and rubbed their proverbial noses with a new meaning of “FU” slang.

    “Beurre” also has a double meaning. Not only is butter white but butter is soft as well – – – and the French, particularly French politicians in power, are nothing if not soft when dealing with immigrant violence against Whites. Being White in France is, by the haughty Lefty definition of the terms of political discussion, to be racist. “Beurre” fits the White predicament in French politics and life to a T!

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  68. I have virtually no idea what happened in Spain between the Peninsular War between France and England and the beginning of the short-lived Spanish Republic of 1931

    I think there was something about an ear, plus that really gross inbred king.

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    • Replies: @anon
    Wrong century. You should be thinking of the loss of the colonies, the (related) dominion of the Masonic liberales backed by the British and French, the Carlist Wars, the First Republic, anarchist violence, the Moroccan war, and the dictatorship of Primo de Rivera.
    , @German_reader
    What you're referring to (War of Jenkin's ear? The last Habsburg king of Spain) was well before the Peninsular war.
    19th century Spain was basically Liberals fighting periodically against reactionaries like the Carlists. And in the end (1898) being humiliated by the US.
    , @Alden
    Jenkins ear was about 100 years before the Penninsula War. While I'm in the comment section, I had no idea Camus is considered an intellectual He wrote popular fiction. I think that Gunnar Myrdahl did not write American Dilemma. If you interrogate the subtext and deconstruct it as the useful idiots say, one can only conclude that the book was carefully organized to push for school
    integration aka destruction.

    Remember, the ADL and American Jewish Committee both funded and litigated school integration aka destruction decades before thier great triumph Brown vs Topeka 1956.

    The ADL/AJC wrote that book and Myrdahl just claimed authorship And of course he was a proud communist.
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  69. @dearieme
    My own rule of thumb is that only bad American habits spread elsewhere. In modern times, of course, that means virtually all new American habits.

    And US tv and movies have much to do with it.

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  70. Abe says: • Website
    @PiltdownMan
    Huh?

    Teilhard de Chardin, Raymond Aron, Montaigne, Bergson, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire to come up with a few, totally off-the-cuff.

    Steve made no assertions about "cornerstone intellectuals" by which I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff.

    But Steve mentioned "lucidity of prose and fame of history" as well as the tendency to produce theories of history as criteria, indicating a far broader assessment that he was making.

    Teilhard de Chardin, Raymond Aron, Montaigne, Bergson, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire to come up with a few, totally off-the-cuff.

    Right. And also Foucault. I realized even as I wrote my original comment that I was being peremptory and a bit immoderate, but I think my basic assertion still holds- for the past 100-150 years, behind almost every French intellectual of note, there’s a German who’s done the intellectual heavy-lifting which made it all possible. Heck, Freudianism is still the biggest thing going in mental health in France from what I’ve read.

    Steve made no assertions about “cornerstone intellectuals” by which I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff. But Steve mentioned “lucidity of prose and fame of history”

    Right, and I remember up until sometime in the ’90′s when even in high-brow American intellectual circles it was either 1789 or 1848 all the time (cf. Paul Berman, who someone brought up the other day in another thread). But things change, and now it’s always either 1933 or 1939. Germans bring the big ideas (and now our historical touchpoints); French bring the coffee and black turtlenecks.

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    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Yes, the Germans have done much of the heavy lifting, but so much of it was wrong and destructive. Nietzsche and Heidegger, to name two, have a lot to answer for.
    , @PiltdownMan

    Right, and I remember up until sometime in the ’90′s when even in high-brow American intellectual circles it was either 1789 or 1848 all the time (cf. Paul Berman, who someone brought up the other day in another thread). But things change, and now it’s always either 1933 or 1939. Germans bring the big ideas (and now our historical touchpoints); French bring the coffee and black turtlenecks.
     
    Well, that's down to these "high-brow American intellectual circles" and not the French.

    As for black turtlenecks, French intellectuals also bring along babes in black turtlenecks to the scene, so that's a distinct plus relative to the Boche crowd.
    , @Anon 2
    Marx and Freud have been discredited as
    basically B.S. artists since they claimed to know
    (how the societies work and how the mind works)
    what was unknowable then and is still unknowable
    today. And there are still questions regarding Einstein's
    priority in the development of the Special Theory of
    Relativity (see, for example, the recent book by Roger
    Schlafly entitled " How Einstein Ruined Physics")
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  71. @WGG
    "Open Society" is a term that was, I believe, coined by George Soros. If not coined by him, he certainly popularized it and named his NGO after it.

    NGO's are the new mafia and should be dismantled and prosecuted accordingly.

    It’s from Karl Popper.

    If you compare Soros’s writings to Popper’s, you’ll see that Soros is a standard deviation or two short of getting Popper’s argument.

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  72. @PiltdownMan
    Huh?

    Teilhard de Chardin, Raymond Aron, Montaigne, Bergson, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire to come up with a few, totally off-the-cuff.

    Steve made no assertions about "cornerstone intellectuals" by which I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff.

    But Steve mentioned "lucidity of prose and fame of history" as well as the tendency to produce theories of history as criteria, indicating a far broader assessment that he was making.

    I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff.

    No, he’s just stricken with the Modernist disease.

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  73. Ex-banker says:
    @eah
    https://twitter.com/AlfredAlbion/status/855338156354412544

    Just checked out Macron’s wikipedia page. He’s married to his high school drama teacher, whom he started dating at 18 (met at 15)? The French really are different.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    No, Macron is different.
    , @mobi

    Just checked out Macron’s wikipedia page. He’s married to his high school drama teacher, whom he started dating at 18 (met at 15)? The French really are different.
     
    Yet, look where he is now.

    And she's an acting teacher.

    And it's France, so he's hardly confined to her, and she's probably ok with that.

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  74. @Charles Pewitt
    The 1066 Battle of Hastings is the answer to the mass immigration and globalization attacks that have been launched against the White Ancestral Core of the European Christian nation-states. The corrupt and evil ruling classes are as weak and crumbly as a rotting cinder block. Just as the Saxons were dislodged as the rulers of England, so shall the globalizers be removed from power in the European Christian nation-states.

    The evil ruling classes of France, the United States, England, Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and other European Christian nation-states will not relinquish their power and place without a fight. There will be civil wars and secessionary wars in every part of the world that has European Christian nation-states.

    The only larger strategic consideration will be the disposition of nuclear weapons. As the wars advance, there will have to be some type of agreement about the command and control of the nuclear weapons. I am sure some accommodations along this line can be accomplished between the Patriot victors and the losing Globalizer faction.

    France must not be allowed to sink under the nation-wrecking waves of mass immigration and multiculturalism. France must be fought for by French Patriots. The evil, money-grubbing scum in France who push open borders mass immigration and multiculturalism must be crushed.

    Marine Le Pen was born to save France from the evil Globalizers currently attacking that great nation. Marine Le Pen will Make France Proud Again.

    VIVE LA FRANCE

    Who shall be the new William the Conqueror? Richard Spencer?

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    William Windsor is pretty popular.
    , @Charles Pewitt
    Richard Spencer saw his chance for mass media glory and he grabbed it. William the Conqueror saw his chance to grab the throne in England and he took it. Richard Spencer has the guts to stand up and fight for the European Christian ancestral core of the United States. Spencer deserves much credit for that.

    Jim Spencer, the baseball player, would have made a better William the Conqueror II than Richard Spencer. Unfortunately, Jim Spencer died in 2002. I don't think Richard Spencer has 599 runs batted in like Jim had. I might be wrong.

    The Spencer surname seems to have come from a French word for dispensing -- despense. The despenser was the man in charge of provisioning. The Spencers in England came over with William the Conqueror in 1066.
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  75. DFCtomm says:

    A thought just occurred to me reading this article. Will the elite’s insistence that this is a moral issue, and that they are resisting racism, will that attitude create the opposite thought in their opposition? I know that I myself have been much more unlikely to listen to any accusation of racism, even if it were true. I’ve shrugged it off as none of my business, or even as an example of ‘no enemies to the right’. Are they shaping their own opposition and creating their own boogeymen?

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  76. @Abe

    Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose, the fame of its history
     
    Respectfully disagree (and you don't know how hard it was for me to suppress the snarky "Um, no" opening I wanted to use this morning).

    I know I'm being provincial, but the only truly cornerstone French intellectual heavyweight I can think of at the moment is Descartes. Sartre and Camus? Give me a break. Like Hemingway in the U.S., these two giants of 20th Century Western arts & letters never really made it out of the 1900's (just waiting, BTW, for some enterprising Millennial bright thing to make his reputation by tearing down Hemingway's for his white privilege and gender influidity).

    Let's put it this way- what language did Marx, Freud, and Einstein write in? And since, yeah, Einstein technically wrote in the universal language of numbers, let's take him away and substitute Hitler. Isn't Hitler (in all seriousness) a more influential thinker than any that's come out of France over the last 100 years just for the mere fact that in every single Western country the left secretly and not so secretly thinks the right is going to be running whole chapters out of his playbook the moment it lets its guard down?

    And less controversially there is also Kant, Heidegger (without which French postmodernism would literally be inconceivable), Wittgenstein, Popper, Hayek. Who's the #1 most intellectually influential country again?

    I know I’m being provincial

    Yes, temporally provincial.

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    • Replies: @Abe

    Yes, temporally provincial.
     
    Yes, but times change. The American cultural/intellectual milieu which nourished strong Francophile leanings has died over the last 25 years, replaced by a moronified one of twerking Founder Fathers, retconned "Islam has always been part of America" fake history, and general interpersonal coarseness & crudity. Who many Ivy League undergraduates now know who Diderot was as supposed Ta Genius Coates? How many would be PROUD if you pointed out their ignorance of the stale pale French male? My point is that French cultural stature relies to an inordinate extent on the affective memory of a vanishing white America, a white America which is busy sandblasting its own history and traditions (Andrew Jackson, Confederate emblems, Woodrow Wilson) into dust. Who cares who Montesquieu was if you think Jefferson and Madison were nothing but two rich, privileged slaveowners.?

    Snowflakes can't do (for now) without the technical apparatus which German culture provided- whether it be Marxism or the hermeneutical theories necessary to "interrogate" sh!t. But I think it safe to say that the hordes who flock to GET OUT, DJANGO UNCHAINED, or FAST & FURIOUS 17 have little use for the Uncle Hulot films or JULES & JIM.

    PS: Taylor Swift, the by-far closest thing in our celebrity culture to the elegant French ingenue, is routinely the target of sexual harassment and rape fantasies by the woke part of America.
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  77. @Daniel Chieh
    Who shall be the new William the Conqueror? Richard Spencer?

    William Windsor is pretty popular.

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  78. backup says:

    In France, political correctness is more than a ridiculous set of opinions; it’s also—and primarily—a tool of government coercion.

    Those who don’t believe that this is actually very much the case need to google the strange case of Soupe Identiaire. It is forbidden to hand out soup with porc in Strassbourg.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloc_identitaire

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    It is forbidden to hand out soup with porc in Strassbourg.
     
    This would cause an alsacian revolution. But thanks God, it's a scam (btw. the wikipdia article has no source).

    There was a problem with porc-soup, though, but a tiny one: It was indeed forbidden by the city-counsil, to hand out such a soup for free in front of the (architectually very impressive) new railroad-station of Straßburg - because, so the city argued: This act discriminated - - Jews and Muslims.
    And yes: The Alsace jews seemed to play a big role in the whole process. A much bigger one than the muslims, who didn't care much.

    That the jews protested, was a somewhat formal thing as well: Because hardly any Jew in Alsace needs a soup for free, really.

    All in all: Big waves in very tiny pool.
    , @Alden
    I remember that. Jewish rabbis were right there with the Imans denouncing pork and turnip soup.

    And a couple years ago when the national school system finally, finally decided to enforce a 1905 school dress code against religious dress (hijab and shrouds) the Rabbis led the confrontations against the school system. The Nazis are coming, the Nazis are coming said chicken little.

    The chant was: cross necklaces bad
    hijabs good

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  79. Abe says: • Website
    @Svigor

    I don’t expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.
     
    It won't gain you many (((friends))), anyway. Seems a perfectly valid question to me.

    Seems a perfectly valid question to me.

    Which is why I wasn’t as heartbroken as maybe I should have been after Bannon’s demotion. He’s a very remarkable man and I wish him continued success, but at least based on his talk at the Vatican, which according to my quick reading of it seemed just so much sub-Gingrich sort of YEAH, DEMOCRACY! YEAH, CAPITALISM! YEAH, AMERICA! blowhardism, it does not appear he has absorbed the more mature sort of conservatism which the alt-right is just finally starting to introduce to America 100 years after the fact.

    I think many of us here are former-libertardians who at some point realized that American, highly ideological, laissez-faire conservatism is viable only up until the point when all the empty land runs out and you can no longer move away from your problems.

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    • Agree: Bill
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    mature sort of conservatism which the alt-right is just finally starting to introduce to America 100 years after the fact.

    Where can one read this kind of conservatism, who are the sources?

    , @Bleuteaux
    I think it would certainly be interesting to hear how people's opinions have evolved to the point of being here. For me, the seeds of change started in college, but only really accelerated when working in corporate America.
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  80. Moshe says:

    WOW!

    This reads like a satirical sendup of a stalinst show trial…

    You Must Read This

    http://m.huffingtonpost.co.za/2017/04/19/revealed-here-is-shelley-garland-and-why-he-did-it_a_22046533/

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Aargh! He shouldn't have apologized. Now he'll just be the South African Tom MacMaster--if he isn't hounded out of employment and life altogether, when he could have been the South African Godfrey Elfwick or even Alan Sokal.
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  81. @Mr. Anon

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.
     
    I believe that Macron's wife was his school teacher; she's got something like fifteen years on him. Marrying your school teacher is weird; Newt Gingrich did it (and he's kind of weird), but in Macron's case, the age difference is even greater.

    BTW, doesn't "Macron" sound like the name of some minor historical figure in ancient Rome? Well, in a way, I suppose he is.

    Macron is actually 24 years y0unger than his wife. They met when he was a 15 year-old high school student.

    So, yes, Macron must be quite weird.

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  82. @Mr. Anon

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.
     
    I believe that Macron's wife was his school teacher; she's got something like fifteen years on him. Marrying your school teacher is weird; Newt Gingrich did it (and he's kind of weird), but in Macron's case, the age difference is even greater.

    BTW, doesn't "Macron" sound like the name of some minor historical figure in ancient Rome? Well, in a way, I suppose he is.

    According to Wikipedia she’s 24 years older than him!

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  83. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    My take on it is that the French establishment is in a state of massive denial - and massive hopelessness and helplessness.

    The know full well that the present set up is a disaster, a catastrophe waiting to happen which will only get worse as time goes by. They also know full well that there is absolutely no possibility of a peaceful settlement or indeed any type of settlement.

    So, collectively their coping strategy is that of the ostrich, sticking their heads in the sand in a vain attempt to ignore the problem.
    Reality for the French is just too damned awful to contemplate, so basically what we are seeing is a neurotic psychosis on a national scale.


    Of course, The Economist magazine and the EU want to impose precisely the same living nightmare on central Europe.

    Shades of central Europe and Poland in particular regarding the ‘Jewish Question’ prior to 1939.
    Everyone knew that the status quo could not hold, although few envisioned the terrible way in which the ‘insoluble impossible’ situation unravelled.

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  84. JohnnyD says:

    To be fair, Thomas Friedman and Roger Cohen will sometimes criticize Israel and its lobby, which is interesting to read. On the other hand, Friedman and Cohen are on the same page with Brett Stephens and David Brooks when it comes to American politics (i.e. more immigration and globalization).

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  85. I’m impressed with the work I’ve seen/read of this Caldwell guy recently. Thanks Steve for posting this article.

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  86. Altai says:
    @Fred5
    I'm in Paris right now. I wouldn't say it's filthy but there is more graffiti in places it shouldn't be and more available real estate than a year ago. I picked up a copy of "Living in Paris" put out by the city government, page 5 is an eye opener of PC gone wild. "Paris' history is made up of successive waves of immigration." First time I ever heard of Ceasar's legionaires being immigrants. They put in bold letters "The Paris region alone is home to 40% of foreigners in France." They still wonder why tourism is down. The foreigners without the money come first with the virtue signalers.

    First time I ever heard of Ceasar’s legionaires being immigrants.

    Killed a third of the population, enslaved another third, destroyed almost the entire indigenous culture and introduced the genes for aquiline noses. They were ahead of their time!

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    • Agree: Old fogey
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  87. jx37 says:
    @fnn
    Famous piece in which George MacDonald Fraser says that PC was imported into Britain from the US in the 1990s:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-506219/The-testament-Flashmans-creator-How-Britain-destroyed-itself.html

    This is from the 80s I believe. Note how liberal Morley Safer mocks them. Now we have a word for the level of lunacy pictured here – we call it conservatism.

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    • Replies: @Old fogey
    Thank you very much for the link.

    The Europeans not only committed suicide through outright violent wars in the 20th century, but also by even considering these issues on these terms.

    Especially telling to me was the simple issue of school lunch. One woman, proudly calling herself "African" while taking advantage of the British laws and their social and economic riches, demands that the local council provide African food for her child at school. And the Council representative did not even suggest in reply that if she wanted plantains on her child's plate, she should pack them up in the morning and send them along with her child. . .
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  88. CJ says:
    @WGG
    "Open Society" is a term that was, I believe, coined by George Soros. If not coined by him, he certainly popularized it and named his NGO after it.

    NGO's are the new mafia and should be dismantled and prosecuted accordingly.

    The Open Society and Its Enemies, by Karl Popper

    A book highly worth reading whether you’re a globalist or not.

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  89. @PiltdownMan
    Huh?

    Teilhard de Chardin, Raymond Aron, Montaigne, Bergson, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire to come up with a few, totally off-the-cuff.

    Steve made no assertions about "cornerstone intellectuals" by which I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff.

    But Steve mentioned "lucidity of prose and fame of history" as well as the tendency to produce theories of history as criteria, indicating a far broader assessment that he was making.

    Only jews can be “cornerstone intellectuals” apparently. Perhaps “Abe” is none other than jewish supremacist Jeffrey Goldberg!

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  90. @Claude
    "I don’t expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV."

    Yes, PC is ultimately an American invention. And remember, it started out as a joke. Not many people laughing about it now though. Hopefully our future Edward Gibbon makes note of that.

    I don’t recall political correctness being a joke until the right and sensible mainstream started fighting back against it well into the 1990s. In the mid-to-late 80s, I was a college (and pre-college) lefty and we used the term “politically correct/incorrect” without irony.

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  91. @Charles Pewitt
    The 1066 Battle of Hastings is the answer to the mass immigration and globalization attacks that have been launched against the White Ancestral Core of the European Christian nation-states. The corrupt and evil ruling classes are as weak and crumbly as a rotting cinder block. Just as the Saxons were dislodged as the rulers of England, so shall the globalizers be removed from power in the European Christian nation-states.

    The evil ruling classes of France, the United States, England, Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and other European Christian nation-states will not relinquish their power and place without a fight. There will be civil wars and secessionary wars in every part of the world that has European Christian nation-states.

    The only larger strategic consideration will be the disposition of nuclear weapons. As the wars advance, there will have to be some type of agreement about the command and control of the nuclear weapons. I am sure some accommodations along this line can be accomplished between the Patriot victors and the losing Globalizer faction.

    France must not be allowed to sink under the nation-wrecking waves of mass immigration and multiculturalism. France must be fought for by French Patriots. The evil, money-grubbing scum in France who push open borders mass immigration and multiculturalism must be crushed.

    Marine Le Pen was born to save France from the evil Globalizers currently attacking that great nation. Marine Le Pen will Make France Proud Again.

    VIVE LA FRANCE

    I actually think that the globalist ruling class is a house of cards. It can all collapse rapidly from there because they don’t have any real support from the public except wild packs of antifa and minorities. Just make them feel mildly uncomfortable about their futures and they’ll start running for the exit. This is why they have invested all this time, money, and energy against Trump: while Trump won’t order these guys to hang from lampposts, he’s not 100% in the tank for them, which means their demise is literally around the corner in their mind. Sad!

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    • Replies: @Rod1963
    True, but the globalist ruling class does have it's enforcers from judges, politicians, police, the MSM along with the professional and managerial class to keep us "dirt" people in line. And it's worked quite well up until now.

    They can easily squash the lone reformer or gunman and keep the wrong people from organizing with a SWAT team or judicial dictate.

    However once enough holes appears in their collective BS as it is now, they lose influence among the masses. Worse they no longer have large standing armies or large police presence like the Soviet Union had to keep the proles in line if things go pear shaped. Like they did in late 2007 early 2008. Had they not kept the banks from exploding we'd already have had our revolution/rebellion.

    And that will happen again and they don't have any more silver bullets and band aids to fix the next bubble collapse.

    When it does happen, there will be settling of accounts as the elites and their minions will not cede power or even want to hold a dialog with us. It will end with lots of bloodshed.
    , @Thea
    It seems the outrage of the elites is orchestrated to make us think he is contrary to their desires. Trump's policy isn't.
    , @Sunbeam
    "I actually think that the globalist ruling class is a house of cards. It can all collapse rapidly from there because they don’t have any real support from the public except wild packs of antifa and minorities. Just make them feel mildly uncomfortable about their futures and they’ll start running for the exit. "

    That's my take on it too. Could be wrong.

    As an aside, I think someone on this thread mentioned Peter Turchin. His work looks interesting and has the ring of truthiness.

    But thinking back I heard similar things from older people who didn't do mathematical analysis and write books. I discounted them at the time as cranky old nuts. An older me realizes they were right about lots (all this HBD stuff as well actually).

    Regarding Turchin, I really do think we have overproduced "elites." And when people who got fancy educations and got their tickets punched to get lucrative, high status jobs find there is no way that is going to happen...

    Well that's trouble. And you really don't need to do any math to see those frustrated animal spirits are going to find some kind of outlet.
    , @Bill

    I actually think that the globalist ruling class is a house of cards.
     
    Maybe in fifty years.

    If the elite order Officer Jones to go beat some "racist" heads in, does Officer Jones obey? Not only does he obey, but he's thrilled by the righteousness of his task. So, no, there's no fragility yet. And that degenerate POS at Second City Cop whining about his gibsmedats is proof.

    Do middle class white Americans have any taste for Officer Jones's blood? Do they regard him as a traitor? Are you with me in viewing SCC as a degenerate POS? Again, the question is barely worth asking. Not only would Joe Sixpack not object to Officer Jones beating in some racist heads, he would gladly join in if asked.

    So, no, the global elite is strong, powerful, and lacking in challengers.
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  92. Dahlia says:

    Incredibly perceptive, just great writing all around.

    I almost hate to have to drop this here, but Comrade Stump of “Can’t Stump the Trump” has come out with a new series…

    It’s the first time I’ve seen this, personally, but I guess we can now add *Joseph Stalin* to the #TrumpTrain roster. Joseph Stalin. And I laughed. I can’t believe where this is going…

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  93. @Whiskey
    HBD people always pull back from the full HBD implications. The desire for "diversity" is HBD driven. It is not "Jews" or Gramscian Marxists or the Frankfurt School or the 68 generation. It is the full working of White people DNA full stop, that created Diversity. It is easy to see why. Kevin Williamson HATES HATES HATES his country cousins because he is mortified that his fellow minor aristocrats might mistake him for one of them.

    We have a landless aristocracy based not on feudal land-holdings (inevitably threatened by large amounts of Muslims, or Blacks/Africans, or Mexicans deciding that land belongs to THEM) but various managerial positions and middle-men rent extractor cronyist stuff like lobbying, etc.

    There was nothing to be imported from America, that tendency was already there -- add better treatment and freedom for women where in every nice little girl there is a nasty pr0n star and antifa "Moldylocks" waiting to get out, and you have a perfect storm. I read the Caldwell piece last night, it was perfect, and shows how organically just a few lucky managers made it to the top and now have a vast non-White servant class and can continue the important thing -- making war against their distant cousins who are not cool. Aided by the main vector of Cuckservatism -- loving Dads and Husbands coddling their wives and daughters.

    The interest of a landless, managerial aristocracy is as inimical and hostile to ordinary White people as the interest of single White women is to that of White men. Moldylocks is no more your friend than Michael Bloomberg. [Or Jerry Seinfeld, car collector, is your enemy. Think Jerry is keen on more car-b-ques?]

    People will inevitably being developing a hierarchal process even if there’s no monarchy around. Instead of money, power, and influence, it’s about virtue signaling and cultural markers that distinguish the haves from the have nots. A Starbucks barista with a Masters Degree making $9 an hour feels more in tune with the “elite” than the electrician making $35 an hour with a high school education. The electrician will likely have a better standard of living than the barista (who will live in an apartment with roommates well into her late 20s and 30s) but that doesn’t mean the barista won’t be looking down on the electrician. You could blame things like the media for being responsible but it’s human nature. The barista will never be with the in crowd that she desperately wants to be a part of but her aspirations ensure that she will vote reliably Democrat for the foreseeable future because its The Right Thing To Do.

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    • Replies: @Whiskey
    Agree completely save property ownership makes one very Leary of bad neighbors.

    Money and ownership.
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  94. “French elites have convinced themselves that their social supremacy rests not on their economic might but on their common decency. Doing so allows them to ‘present the losers of globalization as embittered people who have problems with diversity,’”

    This reminds me of the Calvinism of the 17th century Dutch ruling classes, who argued that their wealth and social status were signs of the fact that they enjoyed God’s favor. The modern elites of the West are the equivalent of the Elect of past centuries. The formal self-justification for their privilege has changed, but the underlying psychology remains the same.

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  95. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @Seamus Padraig
    Hard to say, Randal. When exactly did it start up in Britain? In the US, it didn't really get going until the 60s, and it's final triumph did not occur until sometime in the 90s. True: it was probably in the works even before the public became aware of it. But where did it really originate? It seems to me to have originated with the Frankfurt School Marxists of the 50s, pretty much all of whom were Mitteleuropa Jews. But in retrospect, I'm sure their warped agenda dovetailed quite nicely with the globalizationist ambitions of the Rockefellers, Rothschilds, et al.

    The Frankfurt School contained a good number of gentiles, too. Though Jews were a dominant presence, I’d wager without them no school would’ve been started at all. Still, it’s a distortion to say the Frankfurt School was all Jewish.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Okay, I checked the "notable theorists" on Wiki, and the two without Jewish ancestry were both latecomers. The original Frankfurt School therefore probably started as an exclusively Jewish affair.
    , @mobi

    Still, it’s a distortion to say the Frankfurt School was all Jewish.
     
    Our collective epitaph will read:

    'They died of fairness'
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  96. Jimi says:
    @Seamus Padraig
    Hard to say, Randal. When exactly did it start up in Britain? In the US, it didn't really get going until the 60s, and it's final triumph did not occur until sometime in the 90s. True: it was probably in the works even before the public became aware of it. But where did it really originate? It seems to me to have originated with the Frankfurt School Marxists of the 50s, pretty much all of whom were Mitteleuropa Jews. But in retrospect, I'm sure their warped agenda dovetailed quite nicely with the globalizationist ambitions of the Rockefellers, Rothschilds, et al.

    By 1968 PC culture had come into the UK sufficiently enough to ostracize Enoch Powell for his Rivers of Blood speech.

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  97. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @reiner Tor
    The Frankfurt School contained a good number of gentiles, too. Though Jews were a dominant presence, I'd wager without them no school would've been started at all. Still, it's a distortion to say the Frankfurt School was all Jewish.

    Okay, I checked the “notable theorists” on Wiki, and the two without Jewish ancestry were both latecomers. The original Frankfurt School therefore probably started as an exclusively Jewish affair.

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    • Replies: @peterike

    The original Frankfurt School therefore probably started as an exclusively Jewish affair.
     
    Motivation, dear boy, motivation.
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  98. @Abe

    Seems a perfectly valid question to me.
     
    Which is why I wasn't as heartbroken as maybe I should have been after Bannon's demotion. He's a very remarkable man and I wish him continued success, but at least based on his talk at the Vatican, which according to my quick reading of it seemed just so much sub-Gingrich sort of YEAH, DEMOCRACY! YEAH, CAPITALISM! YEAH, AMERICA! blowhardism, it does not appear he has absorbed the more mature sort of conservatism which the alt-right is just finally starting to introduce to America 100 years after the fact.

    I think many of us here are former-libertardians who at some point realized that American, highly ideological, laissez-faire conservatism is viable only up until the point when all the empty land runs out and you can no longer move away from your problems.

    mature sort of conservatism which the alt-right is just finally starting to introduce to America 100 years after the fact.

    Where can one read this kind of conservatism, who are the sources?

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    • Replies: @Abe

    Where can one read this kind of conservatism, who are the sources?
     
    Lawrence Auster recommended Eric Voegelin, though maybe too mystical for some. Honestly to get the other ones you'd almost have to get a hyper-libertardian/GOPe book and then use it as a negative bibliography- basically read everyone that is slammed in it. I think Hayek's ROAD TO SERFDOM would be useful in this regard, at least when he's discussing German nationalists he dislikes. Pre-war French conservative Catholics would also probably be useful.
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  99. Meanwhile: Understanding the Asian American Achievement Paradox without mention of IQ

    http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/features/aap-aap0000069.pdf

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    • LOL: res
    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter

    Observing the patterns of educational attainment among the children of [Chinese] immigrants (the 1.5 and second generation), we con-tend that culture matters, but not in the way that it is popularly employed and understood.
     
    Heh. Selection matters, and culture is downstream of selection.
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  100. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    European imperialism was colonization from the top.

    Third World demographic imperialism is colonization from bottom. The newcomers arrive as bottom-feeders but their sheer demographic power takes over town after own.
    But Third World demographic imperialism is enabled by colonization from the top as well. France is no longer an autonomous nation. It is part of EU, which is part of globalist empire, of which US is the most powerful force. And that means French minds have been ideo-colonized by ‘progressive’ ideas. This saps the French of will, pride, and conviction to defend what is theirs. Today’s French elites are really collaborators, not unlike the French of Vichy era. They are not real national leaders.
    Also, there is the power of pop culture, especially Negro. Europeans, envious of American success in sports, got blacks of their own from Africa. And European women are into rap music and jungle fever and night club whore culture. So, we have Afro-colonization of white wombs as well.

    It could be that the Open Borders policy is a subconsciously roundabout way for European elites to justify and redeem their past history of imperialism and colonization of the Third World. After all, imperialism forced open borders all over the world. The French took over parts of Africa and recruited Africans to fight in Vietnam and etc. Brits allowed Asian-Indians to do business in Uganda and etc.

    But the rise of nationalism and anti-imperialist struggles in the Third World ended all this. Third World peoples told whites to pack up and go back home. Whites were repatriated back to Europe. And the Narrative has been ‘whites are guilty for past imperialism that violated the lands and/or borders of other peoples.’

    But if white nations open up to the Third World and allow themselves to be colonized by people-of-color and then uphold it as a shining ideal, then it means past imperialism wasn’t so bad since it opened borders all over the world and mixed everyone up.

    So, if the White World promote open borders as a good thing, it means past imperialism that opened borders in non-white world wasn’t such a bad thing.

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  101. Hockamaw says:

    French elites have convinced themselves that their social supremacy rests not on their economic might but on their common decency. Doing so allows them to “present the losers of globalization as embittered people who have problems with diversity,” says Guilluy.

    Un aperçu exceptionnel.

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  102. @Mr. Anon

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.
     
    I believe that Macron's wife was his school teacher; she's got something like fifteen years on him. Marrying your school teacher is weird; Newt Gingrich did it (and he's kind of weird), but in Macron's case, the age difference is even greater.

    BTW, doesn't "Macron" sound like the name of some minor historical figure in ancient Rome? Well, in a way, I suppose he is.

    There’s also Dr. Johnson.

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  103. ATBOTL says:

    I remember Christopher Caldwell being an immigration enthusiast, anti-nationalist neocon type back in the late 90′s when he was writing for the New York Press.

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  104. Matra says:

    I remember watching the below episode of 60 Minutes back in the 80s. I think it was around 1987. Notice how even Morley Safer sounds like a right winger.

    Anyway, it would seem London was more into extreme PC before the US. (For foreigners watching this 60 Minutes is typical of establishment American liberalism).

    The Loony Left

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour challenger in the General Election, came from this mileu.
    , @Abe
    Like I say elsewhere, times have changed. I am basically off Facebook because I can't stand the whining and hypocrisy of old school friends who don't even have the excuse of having been born snowflake now claiming they are unbearably triggered by the sort of stuff they would have brushed off or even laughed along with back when we were teenagers.

    Along those lines consider the following essay, so iSteve-ish I'd swear it was written by our wonderful host himself if I didn't know any better. Except this appeared (17 years ago, to be sure) in freakin' Salon. Under the name of freakin' Salon's editor:


    It’s no secret that blacks dominate much of the world of sports. In track, the purest test of athletic ability, runners of African descent hold every single men’s world record at every standard distance, from the 100 meters (where no non-black athlete has held the world record since 1960) to the marathon. In pro football, the positions that require the greatest combination of speed, power and explosiveness — wide receiver, cornerback and running back — are almost entirely played by blacks...

    Black athletic domination is so accepted today that it’s easy to forget how astonishing it is. But what is even more astonishing is that everyone — with the exception of the athletes themselves — is afraid to talk in public about it. Even acknowledging that blacks are superior athletes veers uncomfortably close to a question still too traumatic for America’s delicate racial sensibilities: Why are they?
    ...
    There are good reasons to wantto believe that black athletic domination has no physiological basis. Science has a long and disreputable history of making false extrapolations from inconclusive hard data — extrapolations that often merely parrot the prejudices of the age...

    But setting a world record in the 100 meters is a more quantifiable achievement than ripping through a Rachmaninoff concerto or blowing a trumpet solo on “So What.” And as both black athletic domination and our knowledge of genetics, physical anthropology and physiology have grown, it has become increasingly hard to assert that environmental factors alone can explain black superiority in sports.
     

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  105. The French elite must be really pissed off at the perpetrator(s) of the Champs Elysees attack.

    Don’t they realize what they are doing?

    They are encouraging the people of provincial France to fall for the canard that there’s some connection between Islam and terrorism — and right before the election!

    If these terrorists had any clue as to how easily these ignorant and stupid provincials would leap to such an absurd conclusion, they would never do what they did.

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    • Replies: @Horzabky
    Actually, there is a connection between Islam and terrorism. All the islamist terrorists are muslims. They were either born in it, or converted into it.
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  106. Whiskey says: • Website
    @Random Dude on the Internet
    People will inevitably being developing a hierarchal process even if there's no monarchy around. Instead of money, power, and influence, it's about virtue signaling and cultural markers that distinguish the haves from the have nots. A Starbucks barista with a Masters Degree making $9 an hour feels more in tune with the "elite" than the electrician making $35 an hour with a high school education. The electrician will likely have a better standard of living than the barista (who will live in an apartment with roommates well into her late 20s and 30s) but that doesn't mean the barista won't be looking down on the electrician. You could blame things like the media for being responsible but it's human nature. The barista will never be with the in crowd that she desperately wants to be a part of but her aspirations ensure that she will vote reliably Democrat for the foreseeable future because its The Right Thing To Do.

    Agree completely save property ownership makes one very Leary of bad neighbors.

    Money and ownership.

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  107. Horzabky says:
    @Anonymous
    I always thought that 'beure' was French back-slang for Arab.

    And rightly so. Un beur (not beurre, which means butter) is an Arab born, or at least grown up, in France.

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  108. Horzabky says:
    @candid_observer
    The French elite must be really pissed off at the perpetrator(s) of the Champs Elysees attack.

    Don't they realize what they are doing?

    They are encouraging the people of provincial France to fall for the canard that there's some connection between Islam and terrorism -- and right before the election!

    If these terrorists had any clue as to how easily these ignorant and stupid provincials would leap to such an absurd conclusion, they would never do what they did.

    Actually, there is a connection between Islam and terrorism. All the islamist terrorists are muslims. They were either born in it, or converted into it.

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  109. @Mr. Anon

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.
     
    I believe that Macron's wife was his school teacher; she's got something like fifteen years on him. Marrying your school teacher is weird; Newt Gingrich did it (and he's kind of weird), but in Macron's case, the age difference is even greater.

    BTW, doesn't "Macron" sound like the name of some minor historical figure in ancient Rome? Well, in a way, I suppose he is.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brigitte_Macron:

    Emmanuel Macron and Brigitte Trogneux met at the Jesuit high school in Amiens (France), where she was a French teacher[3] and in charge of the theater class he attended.[4] The romance was not typical, as she is his senior by 24 years and 8 months, and Macron has described it as “a love often clandestine, often hidden, misunderstood by many before imposing itself”.[5] After a long relationship, they married in 2007.[6] She has three children from a previous mariage.

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  110. Seamus says:

    I have virtually no idea what happened in Spain between the Peninsular War between France and England and the beginning of the short-lived Spanish Republic of 1931

    Surely you recall that they fought a war with the United States in 1898, and as a consequence lost Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines.

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    • Replies: @Daniel H
    >>>Surely you recall that they fought a war with the United States in 1898, and as a consequence lost Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines.

    Yes, the war that the Spanish won. They lost Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Phillipines, and passed them on to the USA.
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  111. @Anon 2
    The American Conservative (April 20, 2017) has one of the
    best articles on France I've seen in months: "The Battle for
    France" by Scott McConnell.

    My Parisian friend, a young woman of about 30, tells me that
    she now keeps a mental map of which arrondissements are still
    relatively safe. And only 5 years ago the Paris tourist office
    would boast that the least safe areas of Paris are safer than
    the safest parts of NYC, showing how quickly civilization can descend
    into chaos.

    I first sensed that something ominous was brewing in Paris in
    June 2014. The African salesgirls were more sullen than
    usual, and avoided eye contact, and Africans were markedly
    more visible even in the Latin Quarter. On the Right Bank near
    the beautiful Stravinsky Fountain (famous for its kinetic
    sculptures), you often couldn't eat in peace at café terraces
    - due to young African men, with apparently too much time on
    their hands, involved in a loud soccer match nearby.
    You also don't want to be anywhere near the Les Halles area
    Saturday nights when Muslim gangs arrive from the surrounding
    banlieues looking for a good time. Hotel bookings are way down,
    which is not going to help France's 10% unemployment rate.
    I've been visiting Paris (and France in general) since 1979, and I miss
    the old Paris of my youth, which is apparently not coming back,
    although the food and wine, and the architecture are still as great as
    ever

    I have always wanted to go to France. But, then again, maybe not.

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  112. Fredrik says:
    @eah
    https://twitter.com/AlfredAlbion/status/855338156354412544

    The others are no better and that includes Le Pen.

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  113. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @Abe

    Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose, the fame of its history
     
    Respectfully disagree (and you don't know how hard it was for me to suppress the snarky "Um, no" opening I wanted to use this morning).

    I know I'm being provincial, but the only truly cornerstone French intellectual heavyweight I can think of at the moment is Descartes. Sartre and Camus? Give me a break. Like Hemingway in the U.S., these two giants of 20th Century Western arts & letters never really made it out of the 1900's (just waiting, BTW, for some enterprising Millennial bright thing to make his reputation by tearing down Hemingway's for his white privilege and gender influidity).

    Let's put it this way- what language did Marx, Freud, and Einstein write in? And since, yeah, Einstein technically wrote in the universal language of numbers, let's take him away and substitute Hitler. Isn't Hitler (in all seriousness) a more influential thinker than any that's come out of France over the last 100 years just for the mere fact that in every single Western country the left secretly and not so secretly thinks the right is going to be running whole chapters out of his playbook the moment it lets its guard down?

    And less controversially there is also Kant, Heidegger (without which French postmodernism would literally be inconceivable), Wittgenstein, Popper, Hayek. Who's the #1 most intellectually influential country again?

    The Frankfurt School also started in German…

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    But this is still somehow silly.
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  114. Randal says:
    @fnn
    Famous piece in which George MacDonald Fraser says that PC was imported into Britain from the US in the 1990s:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-506219/The-testament-Flashmans-creator-How-Britain-destroyed-itself.html

    Posted a link to it here myself a few weeks ago. It is a very good piece imo.

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  115. @backup

    In France, political correctness is more than a ridiculous set of opinions; it’s also—and primarily—a tool of government coercion.
     
    Those who don't believe that this is actually very much the case need to google the strange case of Soupe Identiaire. It is forbidden to hand out soup with porc in Strassbourg.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloc_identitaire

    It is forbidden to hand out soup with porc in Strassbourg.

    This would cause an alsacian revolution. But thanks God, it’s a scam (btw. the wikipdia article has no source).

    There was a problem with porc-soup, though, but a tiny one: It was indeed forbidden by the city-counsil, to hand out such a soup for free in front of the (architectually very impressive) new railroad-station of Straßburg – because, so the city argued: This act discriminated – – Jews and Muslims.
    And yes: The Alsace jews seemed to play a big role in the whole process. A much bigger one than the muslims, who didn’t care much.

    That the jews protested, was a somewhat formal thing as well: Because hardly any Jew in Alsace needs a soup for free, really.

    All in all: Big waves in very tiny pool.

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    • Replies: @backup
    Thanks for the context. It still is strange that it was prohibited, but this certainly diminishes the impact of the story. Also goes to show that Wikipedia is a fine and relatively trustworthy - although not perfect - site until hotly debated items are at stake. And that goes for all sides.
    , @backup
    Thanks for the context. It still is strange that it was prohibited, but this certianly diminishes the impact of the story. Also goes to show that Wikipedia is a fine and relatively trustworthy - although not perfect - site until hotly debated items are at stake. And that goes for all sides.
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  116. Rod1963 says:
    @Random Dude on the Internet
    I actually think that the globalist ruling class is a house of cards. It can all collapse rapidly from there because they don't have any real support from the public except wild packs of antifa and minorities. Just make them feel mildly uncomfortable about their futures and they'll start running for the exit. This is why they have invested all this time, money, and energy against Trump: while Trump won't order these guys to hang from lampposts, he's not 100% in the tank for them, which means their demise is literally around the corner in their mind. Sad!

    True, but the globalist ruling class does have it’s enforcers from judges, politicians, police, the MSM along with the professional and managerial class to keep us “dirt” people in line. And it’s worked quite well up until now.

    They can easily squash the lone reformer or gunman and keep the wrong people from organizing with a SWAT team or judicial dictate.

    However once enough holes appears in their collective BS as it is now, they lose influence among the masses. Worse they no longer have large standing armies or large police presence like the Soviet Union had to keep the proles in line if things go pear shaped. Like they did in late 2007 early 2008. Had they not kept the banks from exploding we’d already have had our revolution/rebellion.

    And that will happen again and they don’t have any more silver bullets and band aids to fix the next bubble collapse.

    When it does happen, there will be settling of accounts as the elites and their minions will not cede power or even want to hold a dialog with us. It will end with lots of bloodshed.

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  117. @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    I don’t expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    I would hardly consider what you say to be unpopular here or in France. French writers have been viewing the disease of Americanitis with gall since the Marshall Plan. I’d say the majority of people here are familiar with such thought and have some measure of sympathy.

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    • Replies: @Ivy
    Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber wrote a book about 50 years ago titled The American Challenge on various aspects of the threats posed to France in the post-war period. Some threats were cultural, like Hollywood movies, some were economic, like all the foreign direct investment in France and elsewhere to expand markets and rebuild the industrial base. There were many love-hate elements all around as the overpowering American cultural influence swamped lower budget, lower reach local efforts, for example. France lost its way, as did Germany, England and so many other countries.

    When De Gaulle tossed out NATO in the mid-1960s, some was reflective of those sentiments. He did retain the base golf courses, so there is another iStevey aspect to the story.
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  118. Fredrik says:
    @Fred5
    I'm in Paris right now. I wouldn't say it's filthy but there is more graffiti in places it shouldn't be and more available real estate than a year ago. I picked up a copy of "Living in Paris" put out by the city government, page 5 is an eye opener of PC gone wild. "Paris' history is made up of successive waves of immigration." First time I ever heard of Ceasar's legionaires being immigrants. They put in bold letters "The Paris region alone is home to 40% of foreigners in France." They still wonder why tourism is down. The foreigners without the money come first with the virtue signalers.

    Don’t know how you travelled from the airport but if you take the train it’s hard not to see the state of the suburbs on the way to Gare du Nord. That’s where the Africans and Muslims live. No wonder the direct trains(that save around 5 minutes) are recommended. Around Gare du Nord it feels like one is in Cameroon. The only non-Africans are the police or so it feels.

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    • Replies: @Ivy
    Count yourself lucky if your train trip avoids the car-to-car musical shakedown practiced by amplified accordion-wielding Gypsies or similar entrepreneurs, and watch your wallet. I always wanted to work accordion-wielding into a comment, now my bucket list is shorter.
    , @Fred5
    Saw that too on the train in. Diversity is some kind of wonderful
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  119. reiner Tor says: • Website
    @reiner Tor
    The Frankfurt School also started in German...

    But this is still somehow silly.

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    • Replies: @mobi

    The Frankfurt School also started in German…

     


    But this is still somehow silly.
     
    If I were born in a stable, would that make me a horse?
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  120. @Daniel Chieh
    Who shall be the new William the Conqueror? Richard Spencer?

    Richard Spencer saw his chance for mass media glory and he grabbed it. William the Conqueror saw his chance to grab the throne in England and he took it. Richard Spencer has the guts to stand up and fight for the European Christian ancestral core of the United States. Spencer deserves much credit for that.

    Jim Spencer, the baseball player, would have made a better William the Conqueror II than Richard Spencer. Unfortunately, Jim Spencer died in 2002. I don’t think Richard Spencer has 599 runs batted in like Jim had. I might be wrong.

    The Spencer surname seems to have come from a French word for dispensing — despense. The despenser was the man in charge of provisioning. The Spencers in England came over with William the Conqueror in 1066.

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  121. Randal says:
    @dearieme
    My own rule of thumb is that only bad American habits spread elsewhere. In modern times, of course, that means virtually all new American habits.

    Most likely perhaps because good American habits are either tailored to American circumstances or peoples, or are habits of hard work and discipline (as are the good habits of other peoples), and so less superficially appealing to the masses than the degenerate indiscipline, sentimentality and sensationalism that is most easily spread by film, TV and music.

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Americans who back French leftist presidential candidate Jean-Luc Mélencon

    Pamela Anderson, Denny Glover, Mark Ruffalo , Oliver Stone, Noam Chomsky and Nancy Fraser.

    Mélanchan is an admirer of Hugo Chavez and Astrid Kirchner.
    I'm glad, I don't have to make sense of all this.
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  122. Ivy says:

    America has Magic Dirt.
    France has Le goût du terroir.
    Think of nuance driven by locality, the way the landforms impart taste and depth to a fine red wine from one of the many famous vineyards around Burgundy or Bordeaux. Now decree that such distinctions are obviously elitist and anti-immigrant and blah blah blah. Another French joy destined for the ash heap of globalism.

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  123. Ivy says:
    @yaqub the mad scientist
    I don’t expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    I would hardly consider what you say to be unpopular here or in France. French writers have been viewing the disease of Americanitis with gall since the Marshall Plan. I'd say the majority of people here are familiar with such thought and have some measure of sympathy.

    Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber wrote a book about 50 years ago titled The American Challenge on various aspects of the threats posed to France in the post-war period. Some threats were cultural, like Hollywood movies, some were economic, like all the foreign direct investment in France and elsewhere to expand markets and rebuild the industrial base. There were many love-hate elements all around as the overpowering American cultural influence swamped lower budget, lower reach local efforts, for example. France lost its way, as did Germany, England and so many other countries.

    When De Gaulle tossed out NATO in the mid-1960s, some was reflective of those sentiments. He did retain the base golf courses, so there is another iStevey aspect to the story.

    Read More
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  124. Ivy says:
    @Fredrik
    Don't know how you travelled from the airport but if you take the train it's hard not to see the state of the suburbs on the way to Gare du Nord. That's where the Africans and Muslims live. No wonder the direct trains(that save around 5 minutes) are recommended. Around Gare du Nord it feels like one is in Cameroon. The only non-Africans are the police or so it feels.

    Count yourself lucky if your train trip avoids the car-to-car musical shakedown practiced by amplified accordion-wielding Gypsies or similar entrepreneurs, and watch your wallet. I always wanted to work accordion-wielding into a comment, now my bucket list is shorter.

    Read More
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  125. Sean says:

    Bruno Latour Top Gun French intellectual is alleged by Graham Harmam to have got fed up arguing .

    So Latour says: ‘We need Schmitt here. We need to defeat these sceptics; they’re the enemy. Maybe we can’t persuade them to change sides on the basis of evidence. We’re sick of dealing with these people, it’s time to beat them’. He doesn’t say with violence, but he does say roughly: ‘Defeat them, they’re the enemy’. Like Schmidt, he’s not saying that they are morally evil. He’s just saying that they are endangering all of us, and so they just have to be defeated. We must declare war, in the Schmittian sense.

    Latour has a new piece out on Trump and climate change denial

    http://harpers.org/archive/2017/05/the-new-climate/

    We Europeans cannot allow ourselves to dream. Even as we are becoming aware of many different threats, we will need to take into our continent millions of people — people who, thanks to the combined impact of war, the failure of globalization, and climate change, will be thrown (like us, against us, or with us) into the search for a land where they and their children can live. We are going to have to live together with people who have not hitherto shared our traditions, our way of life, or our ideals, who are close to us and foreign to us — terribly close and terribly foreign.

    Instead of contrasting the two movements — forward toward globalization and back toward the old national terrain — Trump acts as if they can be fused. This fusion is of course possible only if the very existence of a conflict between modernization on the one hand and material realities on the other is denied. [...].

    For the first time, a whole political movement is no longer claiming that it can seriously confront geopolitical realities and is instead placing itself outside any constraint, offshore, as it were. If they had to realize the huge contradiction, they’d have to start coming down to earth. In this sense, Trumpism defines (albeit negatively, by taking up the opposite position) the first ecological government.

    The challenge to be met is tailor-made for Europe, since it is Europe that invented the strange story of globalization and then became one of its victims. History will belong to those who can be the first to come to earth, to land on an earth that can be inhabited — unless the others, the dreamers of old-style realpolitik, have finally made that earth vanish for good.

    I doesn’t sound as it the intelligentsia are picking up uncertainty from the elite. Twilight of the French Elite? Twilight of the inarticulate white non-elite more like.

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  126. Old fogey says:
    @dearieme
    My own rule of thumb is that only bad American habits spread elsewhere. In modern times, of course, that means virtually all new American habits.

    Your “rule of thumb” is perfectly correct.

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  127. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Matra
    I remember watching the below episode of 60 Minutes back in the 80s. I think it was around 1987. Notice how even Morley Safer sounds like a right winger.

    Anyway, it would seem London was more into extreme PC before the US. (For foreigners watching this 60 Minutes is typical of establishment American liberalism).

    The Loony Left

    Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour challenger in the General Election, came from this mileu.

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  128. Thea says:
    @Random Dude on the Internet
    I actually think that the globalist ruling class is a house of cards. It can all collapse rapidly from there because they don't have any real support from the public except wild packs of antifa and minorities. Just make them feel mildly uncomfortable about their futures and they'll start running for the exit. This is why they have invested all this time, money, and energy against Trump: while Trump won't order these guys to hang from lampposts, he's not 100% in the tank for them, which means their demise is literally around the corner in their mind. Sad!

    It seems the outrage of the elites is orchestrated to make us think he is contrary to their desires. Trump’s policy isn’t.

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  129. Cagey Beast says: • Website
    @Anonymous
    I always thought that 'beure' was French back-slang for Arab.

    Yeah, I think “beur” comes from the verlan slang for “arabe”. Verlan slang words are formed by reversing the syllables to form a kind of codeword, like Cockney slang. The name for it is itself an inversion of the French words for “the wrong war round”, “à l’envers”. “Verlan” is obviously also a reference to the poet Verlaine.

    Female beurs are called beurettes. There’s an old video at YouTube of a cute beurette policewoman keeping her cool while receiving an endless stream of swearwords thrown at her by a youth-ette as they ride in a paddy wagon. It’s under “Gamine de cité insulte une flic de cité “.

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  130. Abe says: • Website
    @Desiderius

    I know I’m being provincial
     
    Yes, temporally provincial.

    Yes, temporally provincial.

    Yes, but times change. The American cultural/intellectual milieu which nourished strong Francophile leanings has died over the last 25 years, replaced by a moronified one of twerking Founder Fathers, retconned “Islam has always been part of America” fake history, and general interpersonal coarseness & crudity. Who many Ivy League undergraduates now know who Diderot was as supposed Ta Genius Coates? How many would be PROUD if you pointed out their ignorance of the stale pale French male? My point is that French cultural stature relies to an inordinate extent on the affective memory of a vanishing white America, a white America which is busy sandblasting its own history and traditions (Andrew Jackson, Confederate emblems, Woodrow Wilson) into dust. Who cares who Montesquieu was if you think Jefferson and Madison were nothing but two rich, privileged slaveowners.?

    Snowflakes can’t do (for now) without the technical apparatus which German culture provided- whether it be Marxism or the hermeneutical theories necessary to “interrogate” sh!t. But I think it safe to say that the hordes who flock to GET OUT, DJANGO UNCHAINED, or FAST & FURIOUS 17 have little use for the Uncle Hulot films or JULES & JIM.

    PS: Taylor Swift, the by-far closest thing in our celebrity culture to the elegant French ingenue, is routinely the target of sexual harassment and rape fantasies by the woke part of America.

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    • Agree: PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Your modernists have fared no better.

    The difference is that when they get around to digging, and they will, the roots they discover will have a distinctly French sensibility to go with their Scottish good sense.
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  131. Sammler says: • Website
    @Abe

    Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose, the fame of its history
     
    Respectfully disagree (and you don't know how hard it was for me to suppress the snarky "Um, no" opening I wanted to use this morning).

    I know I'm being provincial, but the only truly cornerstone French intellectual heavyweight I can think of at the moment is Descartes. Sartre and Camus? Give me a break. Like Hemingway in the U.S., these two giants of 20th Century Western arts & letters never really made it out of the 1900's (just waiting, BTW, for some enterprising Millennial bright thing to make his reputation by tearing down Hemingway's for his white privilege and gender influidity).

    Let's put it this way- what language did Marx, Freud, and Einstein write in? And since, yeah, Einstein technically wrote in the universal language of numbers, let's take him away and substitute Hitler. Isn't Hitler (in all seriousness) a more influential thinker than any that's come out of France over the last 100 years just for the mere fact that in every single Western country the left secretly and not so secretly thinks the right is going to be running whole chapters out of his playbook the moment it lets its guard down?

    And less controversially there is also Kant, Heidegger (without which French postmodernism would literally be inconceivable), Wittgenstein, Popper, Hayek. Who's the #1 most intellectually influential country again?

    I am certain that Voltaire’s mockery of Leibniz (in Candide) has been more influential than any of Leibniz’s own philosophy.

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    • LOL: Patrick Harris
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    I am certain that Voltaire’s mockery of Leibniz (in Candide) has been more influential than any of Leibniz’s own philosophy.
     
    Only to the uniformed, the superficial, the Marxist whores and the true believers in philosophers both unsystematic and inconsistent.
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  132. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Ex-banker
    Just checked out Macron's wikipedia page. He's married to his high school drama teacher, whom he started dating at 18 (met at 15)? The French really are different.

    No, Macron is different.

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    • Agree: Cagey Beast
    • Replies: @Ex-banker
    Sure, he's different. But I can't believe American voters would elect somebody in such a marriage.
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  133. Sunbeam says:
    @Random Dude on the Internet
    I actually think that the globalist ruling class is a house of cards. It can all collapse rapidly from there because they don't have any real support from the public except wild packs of antifa and minorities. Just make them feel mildly uncomfortable about their futures and they'll start running for the exit. This is why they have invested all this time, money, and energy against Trump: while Trump won't order these guys to hang from lampposts, he's not 100% in the tank for them, which means their demise is literally around the corner in their mind. Sad!

    “I actually think that the globalist ruling class is a house of cards. It can all collapse rapidly from there because they don’t have any real support from the public except wild packs of antifa and minorities. Just make them feel mildly uncomfortable about their futures and they’ll start running for the exit. ”

    That’s my take on it too. Could be wrong.

    As an aside, I think someone on this thread mentioned Peter Turchin. His work looks interesting and has the ring of truthiness.

    But thinking back I heard similar things from older people who didn’t do mathematical analysis and write books. I discounted them at the time as cranky old nuts. An older me realizes they were right about lots (all this HBD stuff as well actually).

    Regarding Turchin, I really do think we have overproduced “elites.” And when people who got fancy educations and got their tickets punched to get lucrative, high status jobs find there is no way that is going to happen…

    Well that’s trouble. And you really don’t need to do any math to see those frustrated animal spirits are going to find some kind of outlet.

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  134. Abe says: • Website
    @Matra
    I remember watching the below episode of 60 Minutes back in the 80s. I think it was around 1987. Notice how even Morley Safer sounds like a right winger.

    Anyway, it would seem London was more into extreme PC before the US. (For foreigners watching this 60 Minutes is typical of establishment American liberalism).

    The Loony Left

    Like I say elsewhere, times have changed. I am basically off Facebook because I can’t stand the whining and hypocrisy of old school friends who don’t even have the excuse of having been born snowflake now claiming they are unbearably triggered by the sort of stuff they would have brushed off or even laughed along with back when we were teenagers.

    Along those lines consider the following essay, so iSteve-ish I’d swear it was written by our wonderful host himself if I didn’t know any better. Except this appeared (17 years ago, to be sure) in freakin’ Salon. Under the name of freakin’ Salon’s editor:

    It’s no secret that blacks dominate much of the world of sports. In track, the purest test of athletic ability, runners of African descent hold every single men’s world record at every standard distance, from the 100 meters (where no non-black athlete has held the world record since 1960) to the marathon. In pro football, the positions that require the greatest combination of speed, power and explosiveness — wide receiver, cornerback and running back — are almost entirely played by blacks…

    Black athletic domination is so accepted today that it’s easy to forget how astonishing it is. But what is even more astonishing is that everyone — with the exception of the athletes themselves — is afraid to talk in public about it. Even acknowledging that blacks are superior athletes veers uncomfortably close to a question still too traumatic for America’s delicate racial sensibilities: Why are they?

    There are good reasons to wantto believe that black athletic domination has no physiological basis. Science has a long and disreputable history of making false extrapolations from inconclusive hard data — extrapolations that often merely parrot the prejudices of the age…

    But setting a world record in the 100 meters is a more quantifiable achievement than ripping through a Rachmaninoff concerto or blowing a trumpet solo on “So What.” And as both black athletic domination and our knowledge of genetics, physical anthropology and physiology have grown, it has become increasingly hard to assert that environmental factors alone can explain black superiority in sports.

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    • Replies: @Abe
    URL here for those interested (unz.com software did not let me add this post-hoc in my 4 minute edit window for some reason):

    http://www.salon.com/2000/01/28/taboo/
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  135. Abe says: • Website
    @Abe
    Like I say elsewhere, times have changed. I am basically off Facebook because I can't stand the whining and hypocrisy of old school friends who don't even have the excuse of having been born snowflake now claiming they are unbearably triggered by the sort of stuff they would have brushed off or even laughed along with back when we were teenagers.

    Along those lines consider the following essay, so iSteve-ish I'd swear it was written by our wonderful host himself if I didn't know any better. Except this appeared (17 years ago, to be sure) in freakin' Salon. Under the name of freakin' Salon's editor:


    It’s no secret that blacks dominate much of the world of sports. In track, the purest test of athletic ability, runners of African descent hold every single men’s world record at every standard distance, from the 100 meters (where no non-black athlete has held the world record since 1960) to the marathon. In pro football, the positions that require the greatest combination of speed, power and explosiveness — wide receiver, cornerback and running back — are almost entirely played by blacks...

    Black athletic domination is so accepted today that it’s easy to forget how astonishing it is. But what is even more astonishing is that everyone — with the exception of the athletes themselves — is afraid to talk in public about it. Even acknowledging that blacks are superior athletes veers uncomfortably close to a question still too traumatic for America’s delicate racial sensibilities: Why are they?
    ...
    There are good reasons to wantto believe that black athletic domination has no physiological basis. Science has a long and disreputable history of making false extrapolations from inconclusive hard data — extrapolations that often merely parrot the prejudices of the age...

    But setting a world record in the 100 meters is a more quantifiable achievement than ripping through a Rachmaninoff concerto or blowing a trumpet solo on “So What.” And as both black athletic domination and our knowledge of genetics, physical anthropology and physiology have grown, it has become increasingly hard to assert that environmental factors alone can explain black superiority in sports.
     

    URL here for those interested (unz.com software did not let me add this post-hoc in my 4 minute edit window for some reason):

    http://www.salon.com/2000/01/28/taboo/

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  136. peterike says:
    @reiner Tor
    Okay, I checked the "notable theorists" on Wiki, and the two without Jewish ancestry were both latecomers. The original Frankfurt School therefore probably started as an exclusively Jewish affair.

    The original Frankfurt School therefore probably started as an exclusively Jewish affair.

    Motivation, dear boy, motivation.

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  137. Old fogey says:
    @jx37
    This is from the 80s I believe. Note how liberal Morley Safer mocks them. Now we have a word for the level of lunacy pictured here - we call it conservatism.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COt65HZCJaA

    Thank you very much for the link.

    The Europeans not only committed suicide through outright violent wars in the 20th century, but also by even considering these issues on these terms.

    Especially telling to me was the simple issue of school lunch. One woman, proudly calling herself “African” while taking advantage of the British laws and their social and economic riches, demands that the local council provide African food for her child at school. And the Council representative did not even suggest in reply that if she wanted plantains on her child’s plate, she should pack them up in the morning and send them along with her child. . .

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  138. peterike says:

    Well the European elites will never do a thing about immivasion, no matter how bad it gets. No, not even if mass slaughters happen every single day. Still, they will do nothing. Rotherham showed us that, definitively.

    At the same time, the majority of the populace seem determined to vote precisely for these leaders who will do nothing. Hence, nothing will get done.

    The only answer for European nations would be military coups, followed by mass jailings and executions of the elite class and mass expulsions of the foreigners. But my guess is that the Euro militaries are stuffed top to bottom with women and cucks in leadership roles, and hence they won’t act either.

    The only other solution would be a true white nationalist President of America and white nationalist leader of Russia joining together to effectively take over the Western European nation states and do what needs to be done. And that’s not very likely.

    No, the ball is rolling downhill ever faster, and nothing is going to stop it.

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  139. Abe says: • Website
    @Opinionator
    mature sort of conservatism which the alt-right is just finally starting to introduce to America 100 years after the fact.

    Where can one read this kind of conservatism, who are the sources?

    Where can one read this kind of conservatism, who are the sources?

    Lawrence Auster recommended Eric Voegelin, though maybe too mystical for some. Honestly to get the other ones you’d almost have to get a hyper-libertardian/GOPe book and then use it as a negative bibliography- basically read everyone that is slammed in it. I think Hayek’s ROAD TO SERFDOM would be useful in this regard, at least when he’s discussing German nationalists he dislikes. Pre-war French conservative Catholics would also probably be useful.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Thanks. I take it you do not like Hayek or The Road to Serfdom?
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  140. @Randal
    Most likely perhaps because good American habits are either tailored to American circumstances or peoples, or are habits of hard work and discipline (as are the good habits of other peoples), and so less superficially appealing to the masses than the degenerate indiscipline, sentimentality and sensationalism that is most easily spread by film, TV and music.

    Americans who back French leftist presidential candidate Jean-Luc Mélencon

    Pamela Anderson, Denny Glover, Mark Ruffalo , Oliver Stone, Noam Chomsky and Nancy Fraser.

    Mélanchan is an admirer of Hugo Chavez and Astrid Kirchner.
    I’m glad, I don’t have to make sense of all this.

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  141. Cagey Beast says: • Website
    @fnn
    Famous piece in which George MacDonald Fraser says that PC was imported into Britain from the US in the 1990s:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-506219/The-testament-Flashmans-creator-How-Britain-destroyed-itself.html

    The currently reigning globalism and multiculturalism of the West was cooked-up in British and US academia. It was released first on the Anglosphere and then exported to the rest of the West in stages, starting in the early 1970s. The Brits, Australians and Canadians involved in the formulation globalism and multiculturalism were overwhelmingly emigré Jews or people from the quirky Dissenter, “free thinker” and petty bourgeois segment of Anglo society. Unfortunately that crowd ended up with more money and power than they knew what to do with, after the Second Industrial Revolution and two world wars. That’s how our West came to be dominated by anti-western cranks and oddballs with billions of dollars and whole government agencies to play with. They invited in and subsidized any cultural saboteur they could get their hands on, whether it was the Frankfurt School, Freud, HG Wells or Derrida.

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  142. syonredux says:

    Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose,

    Of course, in the hands of Lacan, Foucault, and Derrida, French is about as lucid as mud……

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    It's the Americans who choose to adore them, not the French. For the French, they're considered something that was a hit overseas but nowhere near as big a deal back home . They're even categorized at the French-language Wikipedia page as " la French Theory": https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Theory

    Saying they represent French thought would be like saying some sickly sweet dessert wine represents all French wine, simply because it sells really well in the US but is just one of many in its home country.

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  143. Partly OT but related to this and other topics of the blog.

    An incisive and humorous analysis of the role of Threats (untouchable modes of reasoning) as a way of pre-empting logical analysis in science. It applies at least as well to undiscussable social and political thought, where the word Threat assumes its usual meaning.

    1. INTRODUCTION: THREATS VS. ASSUMPTIONS

    Science is about generalization, and generalization
    requires that conclusions obtained in the laboratory be
    transported and applied elsewhere, in an environment
    that differs in many aspects from that of the laboratory.

    [The] standard literature on this topic consists primarily
    of “threats,”
    namely, explanations of what may go
    wrong when we try to transport results from one study
    to another while ignoring their differences. Rarely do
    we find an analysis of “licensing assumptions,” namely,
    formal conditions under which the transport of results
    across differing environments or populations is
    licensed from first principles.

    The reasons for this asymmetry are several.

    First, threats are safer to cite than assumptions. He who
    cites “threats” appears prudent, cautious and thoughtful,
    whereas he who seeks licensing assumptions risks
    suspicions of attempting to endorse those assumptions.

    Second, assumptions are self-destructive in their
    honesty. The more explicit the assumption, the more
    criticism it invites, for it tends to trigger a richer space
    of alternative scenarios in which the assumption may
    fail. [People] prefer therefore to declare threats in
    public and make assumptions in private
    .

    Third, whereas threats can be communicated in plain
    English, supported by anecdotal pointers to familiar
    experiences, assumptions require a formal language
    within which the notion “environment” (or “population”)
    is given precise characterization, and differences
    among environments can be encoded and analyzed.

    http://ftp.cs.ucla.edu/pub/stat_ser/r400-reprint.pdf

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  144. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Abe

    Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose, the fame of its history
     
    Respectfully disagree (and you don't know how hard it was for me to suppress the snarky "Um, no" opening I wanted to use this morning).

    I know I'm being provincial, but the only truly cornerstone French intellectual heavyweight I can think of at the moment is Descartes. Sartre and Camus? Give me a break. Like Hemingway in the U.S., these two giants of 20th Century Western arts & letters never really made it out of the 1900's (just waiting, BTW, for some enterprising Millennial bright thing to make his reputation by tearing down Hemingway's for his white privilege and gender influidity).

    Let's put it this way- what language did Marx, Freud, and Einstein write in? And since, yeah, Einstein technically wrote in the universal language of numbers, let's take him away and substitute Hitler. Isn't Hitler (in all seriousness) a more influential thinker than any that's come out of France over the last 100 years just for the mere fact that in every single Western country the left secretly and not so secretly thinks the right is going to be running whole chapters out of his playbook the moment it lets its guard down?

    And less controversially there is also Kant, Heidegger (without which French postmodernism would literally be inconceivable), Wittgenstein, Popper, Hayek. Who's the #1 most intellectually influential country again?

    Marx, Freud, and Einstein were Jewish, not German as such, and except for Einstein (who if he can be counted for Germany can also be counted for Switzerland) might have been better ignored.

    With respect to the other Germans and Frenchmen, I’d say it’s very likely that any given great German thinker spoke French, but that the reverse is not true.

    The French cultural position is probably what it is because for centuries French has been learned as a second language (or third, if we include Latin) by cultured Europeans.

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Marx was brought up as Lutheran, not as Jew. His father had converted - and he took it quite seriously.
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  145. syonredux says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    Dunno. The idols of the Left in the USA are all Continental: Foucault, Lacan, Adorno, Derrida, Althusser, etc

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  146. Svigor says:

    The Frankfurt School contained a good number of gentiles, too. Though Jews were a dominant presence, I’d wager without them no school would’ve been started at all. Still, it’s a distortion to say the Frankfurt School was all Jewish.

    Doesn’t matter; if the School was more than 1/3 Jewish, Whiskey knows they dindunuffin. He’s gone so full retard that now he’s saying leftists and globalist oligarchs dindunuffin, too. Philo-Semitism is a disease…

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    • Replies: @Bleuteaux
    He may downplay the effect of (((tribalism))), but when it comes to the attitudes and purposes of our white, gentile oligarchy, he's quite accurate. Anyone who spends time today in the business world understands this.

    Whatever their faults, it isn't a bunch of Jews dumping the entire native IT department for wage slaves from the subcontinent, or replacing white men in management positions with compliant, politically-favorable beneficiaries.
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  147. Cagey Beast says: • Website
    @syonredux

    Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose,
     
    Of course, in the hands of Lacan, Foucault, and Derrida, French is about as lucid as mud......

    It’s the Americans who choose to adore them, not the French. For the French, they’re considered something that was a hit overseas but nowhere near as big a deal back home . They’re even categorized at the French-language Wikipedia page as “ la French Theory“: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Theory

    Saying they represent French thought would be like saying some sickly sweet dessert wine represents all French wine, simply because it sells really well in the US but is just one of many in its home country.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    It’s the Americans who choose to adore them, not the French. For the French, they’re considered something that was a hit overseas but nowhere near as big a deal back home . They’re even categorized at the French-language Wikipedia page as “ la French Theory“: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Theory

    Saying they represent French thought would be like saying some sickly sweet dessert wine represents all French wine, simply because it sells really well in the US but is just one of many in its home country.
     

    Well, as I said elsewhere on the thread, it might be that the French only export the slop: Sartre, Derrida, Lacan, etc
    , @Bill
    "They love me in Germany" -- David Hasselhoff
    , @syonredux
    Since I hate waiting

    It’s the Americans who choose to adore them, not the French. For the French, they’re considered something that was a hit overseas but nowhere near as big a deal back home . They’re even categorized at the French-language Wikipedia page as “ la French Theory“: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Theory

    Saying they represent French thought would be like saying some sickly sweet dessert wine represents all French wine, simply because it sells really well in the US but is just one of many in its home country.

     

    Well, as I said elsewhere on the thread, it might be that the French only export the slop: Sartre, Derrida, Lacan, etc
    , @syonredux
    Of course, I've long wondered if Deconstructionism wasn't some kind of elaborate con played by the French on les Anglo-Saxons......
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  148. syonredux says:
    @dearieme
    My own rule of thumb is that only bad American habits spread elsewhere. In modern times, of course, that means virtually all new American habits.

    I have a similar notion regarding Franco-German academic fads. Only the slop (Deconstructionism, Lacanianism, etc) seems to get exported…..

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    In the case of France, most of the best people don't speak English, so that helps prevent them from being well known in the Anglosphere. Alain Delon never took off in Hollywood for that reason. I was reminded of him because he apparently just came out in favour of Fillion, even though he and Jean-Marie Le Pen have been close friends for decades. I heard about this at Alain Soral's site. He's another Frenchmen who doesn't speak English and who's far from opaque in his language and ideas. Ditto the whole Le Pen family: father, daughter and niece/granddaughter.

    For those of you in the francosexual community, Soral's going to be covering the election results on Sunday evening as a live stream.
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  149. Bill says:
    @Random Dude on the Internet
    I actually think that the globalist ruling class is a house of cards. It can all collapse rapidly from there because they don't have any real support from the public except wild packs of antifa and minorities. Just make them feel mildly uncomfortable about their futures and they'll start running for the exit. This is why they have invested all this time, money, and energy against Trump: while Trump won't order these guys to hang from lampposts, he's not 100% in the tank for them, which means their demise is literally around the corner in their mind. Sad!

    I actually think that the globalist ruling class is a house of cards.

    Maybe in fifty years.

    If the elite order Officer Jones to go beat some “racist” heads in, does Officer Jones obey? Not only does he obey, but he’s thrilled by the righteousness of his task. So, no, there’s no fragility yet. And that degenerate POS at Second City Cop whining about his gibsmedats is proof.

    Do middle class white Americans have any taste for Officer Jones’s blood? Do they regard him as a traitor? Are you with me in viewing SCC as a degenerate POS? Again, the question is barely worth asking. Not only would Joe Sixpack not object to Officer Jones beating in some racist heads, he would gladly join in if asked.

    So, no, the global elite is strong, powerful, and lacking in challengers.

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  150. @Anon
    Marx, Freud, and Einstein were Jewish, not German as such, and except for Einstein (who if he can be counted for Germany can also be counted for Switzerland) might have been better ignored.

    With respect to the other Germans and Frenchmen, I'd say it's very likely that any given great German thinker spoke French, but that the reverse is not true.

    The French cultural position is probably what it is because for centuries French has been learned as a second language (or third, if we include Latin) by cultured Europeans.

    Marx was brought up as Lutheran, not as Jew. His father had converted – and he took it quite seriously.

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Yes there's nothing of the aleinu prayer and the concept of tikkun olam in Marx. He's was just a straight-shootin' Lutheran fellow like Otto von Bismarck or Reinhold Niebuhr.
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  151. Bill says:
    @George
    The Guardian to the rescue:

    'The real misery is in the countryside': support for Le Pen surges in rural France

    Rift between ailing rural areas and far away big cities is where the Front National leader looks set to make her biggest voter gains

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/21/counryside-marine-le-pen-forgotten-france-presidential-election-2017

    Seems all those immigrants backstopping Paris real estate prices, require government services (to keep them from going Jihadi and rioting) that once were sent out to rural areas (to prevent peasant revolts).

    "The French, no fools, reserved their inner cities for what Whit Stillman’s characters call the High Urban Bourgeois."

    French had government central planning of everything roughly from the time Italians showed up and required them to learn latin to get a job with a government pension. The US only had government planning from the New Deal on. New York City and State a bit earlier in the 20s, read about it in The Power Broker.

    Due to immigration North Eastern cities and Chicago were mostly unhealthy slums for most of their history. From the little Zola I have read, Paris was less the city of light than it is now. In 1848 Napoleon III becomes Emporer of France and converts Paris into the administrative center of the shabby but number 2 world Empire. Much the same way Bush II converts Washinton DC into the administrative center of the shabby but number 1 world Empire. How did DC rise from the ashes, it used to be dump, worse than Detroit. Empire+taxpayer cash = Imperial treasure city.

    BTW, Chicago and all domestic finances are collapsing like the did after the failed Vietnam adventure, with the difference that back then state finances were actually fairly good. This time when Chicago goes down, Illinois goes down. Most Federal pensions are by design unreserved, although Uncle raises a lot of cash it might not be possible for Uncle to bail out Federal, state, local, and even Afghani pensions simultaneously.

    Living outside Paris is not like living outside Chicago. The public transportation works in France, the high speed rail and even the just fast commuter trans mean you are not isolated. Sort of like the US when rail roads were a new idea.

    American wood frame houses are baffling to foreigners. Always the cheapest construction on even the most expensive plots. Needless to say the French chopped down their old growth forests years ago so masonry buildings are required masonry.

    WWII was not fought in the US, much of recent living patterns were set based on the situation in 1946.

    “The French, no fools, reserved their inner cities for what Whit Stillman’s characters call the High Urban Bourgeois.”

    French had government central planning of everything roughly from the time Italians showed up and required them to learn latin to get a job with a government pension. The US only had government planning from the New Deal on. New York City and State a bit earlier in the 20s, read about it in The Power Broker.

    Due to immigration North Eastern cities and Chicago were mostly unhealthy slums for most of their history.

    No, no, no. The stupid propaganda you repeat in the last quoted sentence was generated pre-war. It was the language of US central planners (“Urban Renewal” flavor) from roughly the turn of the 20th C to the 1970s. Suburbanization was a planned, intentional population movement. Furthermore, it wasn’t foolish. The elite got what they wanted out of it. It was evil, obviously, but not foolish.

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  152. Cagey Beast says: • Website
    @syonredux
    I have a similar notion regarding Franco-German academic fads. Only the slop (Deconstructionism, Lacanianism, etc) seems to get exported.....

    In the case of France, most of the best people don’t speak English, so that helps prevent them from being well known in the Anglosphere. Alain Delon never took off in Hollywood for that reason. I was reminded of him because he apparently just came out in favour of Fillion, even though he and Jean-Marie Le Pen have been close friends for decades. I heard about this at Alain Soral’s site. He’s another Frenchmen who doesn’t speak English and who’s far from opaque in his language and ideas. Ditto the whole Le Pen family: father, daughter and niece/granddaughter.

    For those of you in the francosexual community, Soral’s going to be covering the election results on Sunday evening as a live stream.

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    • Replies: @syonredux
    I'm trying to think..... From Rousseau on, have the French exported anything worthwhile in terms of cultural fads?
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  153. @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    I’m not sure it’s all due to US influence in Britain, iirc the Labour party had something like multiculturalism in its programme even back in the early 1960s, may partly be attributable to a misguided desire for continuing the empire (instead of breaking with that once and for all and concentrating on British nationalism, like Enoch Powell eventually would have wanted to). The US influence seems very obvious in some ways though, e.g. things like “black history month” or the whole nation of immigrants nonsense applied to Britain (“Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Huguenots” etc.)…I doubt people could have come up with this without the US model.
    Here in Germany, it’s totally obvious that Americanization and trans-Atlanticism has played a decisive role in spreading “antiracism” and pc – one only needs to compare the former West Germany and East Germany…the contrast is rather illuminating in some ways.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    ” or the whole nation of immigrants nonsense applied to Britain (“Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Huguenots” etc.)…I doubt people could have come up with this without the US model.
     
    Actually, Defoe did it first back in 1701 with his "The True-Born Englishman," which was meant to quell objections to the Dutch-born William III:

    Thus from a mixture of all kinds began,
    That het'rogeneous thing, an Englishman:
    In eager rapes, and furious lust begot
    Betwixt a painted Britain and a Scot.
    Whose gend'ring off-spring quickly learn'd to bow,
    And yoke their heifers to the Roman plough:
    From whence a mongrel half-bred race there came,
    With neither name, nor nation, speech nor fame.
    In whose hot veins new mixtures quickly ran,
    Infus'd betwixt a Saxon and a Dane
    While their rank daughters, to their parents just,
    Receiv'd all nations with promiscuous lust.
    This nauseous brood directly did contain
    The well-extracted blood of Englishmen.
     
    , @syonredux
    Also useful to note the French influence. The works of the Francophone author Frantz Fanon played a key role in shaping such things as "Post-Colonial Studies": Les Damnés de la Terre, Peau noire, masques blancs, L'An V de la Révolution Algérienne, etc....And his stuff received Sartre's imprimatur.....
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  154. backup says:
    @Dieter Kief

    It is forbidden to hand out soup with porc in Strassbourg.
     
    This would cause an alsacian revolution. But thanks God, it's a scam (btw. the wikipdia article has no source).

    There was a problem with porc-soup, though, but a tiny one: It was indeed forbidden by the city-counsil, to hand out such a soup for free in front of the (architectually very impressive) new railroad-station of Straßburg - because, so the city argued: This act discriminated - - Jews and Muslims.
    And yes: The Alsace jews seemed to play a big role in the whole process. A much bigger one than the muslims, who didn't care much.

    That the jews protested, was a somewhat formal thing as well: Because hardly any Jew in Alsace needs a soup for free, really.

    All in all: Big waves in very tiny pool.

    Thanks for the context. It still is strange that it was prohibited, but this certainly diminishes the impact of the story. Also goes to show that Wikipedia is a fine and relatively trustworthy – although not perfect – site until hotly debated items are at stake. And that goes for all sides.

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  155. @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    This post may be your most replied to and popular post yet.

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  156. backup says:
    @Dieter Kief

    It is forbidden to hand out soup with porc in Strassbourg.
     
    This would cause an alsacian revolution. But thanks God, it's a scam (btw. the wikipdia article has no source).

    There was a problem with porc-soup, though, but a tiny one: It was indeed forbidden by the city-counsil, to hand out such a soup for free in front of the (architectually very impressive) new railroad-station of Straßburg - because, so the city argued: This act discriminated - - Jews and Muslims.
    And yes: The Alsace jews seemed to play a big role in the whole process. A much bigger one than the muslims, who didn't care much.

    That the jews protested, was a somewhat formal thing as well: Because hardly any Jew in Alsace needs a soup for free, really.

    All in all: Big waves in very tiny pool.

    Thanks for the context. It still is strange that it was prohibited, but this certianly diminishes the impact of the story. Also goes to show that Wikipedia is a fine and relatively trustworthy – although not perfect – site until hotly debated items are at stake. And that goes for all sides.

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  157. Cagey Beast says: • Website
    @Dieter Kief
    Marx was brought up as Lutheran, not as Jew. His father had converted - and he took it quite seriously.

    Yes there’s nothing of the aleinu prayer and the concept of tikkun olam in Marx. He’s was just a straight-shootin’ Lutheran fellow like Otto von Bismarck or Reinhold Niebuhr.

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  158. @dr kill
    I can't tell if you are serious or not. Teh WSJ is fully converged. CJ is still worth having.

    I doubt WSJ would be interested. They’re firmly open borders. Caldwell has not been an open borders enthusiast.

    But you’re right, he’d be good.

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  159. Cagey Beast says: • Website

    Marion Maréchal-Le Pen posted a video of her speech at a monster rally in Marseilles yesterday. You can find it at YouTube under “Discours de Marion Maréchal-Le Pen à Marseille”. Even if you don’t speak French you can see the size of the crowd as she walks on stage. As an added bonus, you also get to see her walk on stage.

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    I just watched Marion Maréchal-Le Pen's speech. She describes the people going to Jean-Luc Mélenchon's rallies as "full-time militants, weed smokers and bobos in dreadlocks".

    As for Alain Soral's latest video, he predicts the first round will break down as:

    1st: Le Pen
    2nd: Fillon
    3rd: Mélenchon
    4th: Macron
    , @The Man From K Street

    As an added bonus, you also get to see her walk on stage.
     
    Sacre bleu, that woman is hotter than molten steel.
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  160. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Desiderius

    I have virtually no idea what happened in Spain between the Peninsular War between France and England and the beginning of the short-lived Spanish Republic of 1931
     
    I think there was something about an ear, plus that really gross inbred king.

    Wrong century. You should be thinking of the loss of the colonies, the (related) dominion of the Masonic liberales backed by the British and French, the Carlist Wars, the First Republic, anarchist violence, the Moroccan war, and the dictatorship of Primo de Rivera.

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  161. @Yak-15
    I was also recently in France and had dinner in provincial Avignon at a family friend's house. The apartments that surround her house and a few others have been recently colonized by Islam. All the neighboring houses have sold for a loss (to Muslims) and they are the last French family remaining.

    Though she claimed to feel safe and had not experienced burglary (yet), she said that the housing prices halved and that they were selling and moving to the coast. She said that nobody wants to live in their neighborhood because no one wants to send their kids to school with the new diversity. She also spoke endlessly about how, as a public nurse, 80 pct of her patients are Muslims. Her and her husband were angry at the situation.

    Nonetheless, her and her husband hate La Pen and are not voting for her. Why? Because she is threatening to pull out of the Euro which threatens their pension payments. If France loses the euro the value of the new currency will be significantly less than the Euro. All old pensioners would see a huge reduction in their payments. So, many elderly will not vote La Pen for that reason. I predict she loses because of her euro stance.

    Yep, pulling France out of the EU is a big vote loser.

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    • Replies: @mobi

    Yep, pulling France out of the EU is a big vote loser.
     
    French support for the EU (as of August 2016, it was 38% for, 61% against) lower than in Britain:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/08/24/french-support-for-the-eu-project-is-crumbling-on-the-left-and-r/


    (only Greece is lower)
    , @Dieter Kief

    Pulling France out of the EU is a big vote-loser
     
    As far as the euros stability and the net worth of savings are concerned: All EU economies, which are out of the Euro, are doing better in this hindsight, than do those in the Euro, as a rule of thumb: Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, Norway are financially better off than the mutually subsidizing economies such as Spain, Greece, Germany, Netherlands etc.

    German banks just started with negative inteest-rates, as aconsequence of the European Bank's flooding the market with new money - they print 60 Billion Euros monthly -and that's not all it does in order to reach the goal of the "quantitive easing" (= read: Deficit spending).

    But I agree - it's most likely too much of change, that Le Pen offers. And she made a curious decision: She declared, that she does n o t want to decide it herself, but leave it to a seperate, Nation-wide vote. Watching it from neighboring Germany, my feeling is, that this is inflicts a tad too much confusion for the average voter.

    Fillon is better equipped, because he directly adresses what's wrong with the Euro and argues for changing the financial politics of the EU (no easy task too, since Italy, Greece, Spain and Potugal side to keep subsidies high...).

    And Fillon, too, speaks out clearly against immigration.

    Little problem though: He admitted, that he is corrupt, after long debates ... and then just said: Well, I'm sorry, but my behavior was clearly not corrupt by the standards of the time, when it took place. His own party yawned...
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  162. syonredux says:
    @Cagey Beast
    It's the Americans who choose to adore them, not the French. For the French, they're considered something that was a hit overseas but nowhere near as big a deal back home . They're even categorized at the French-language Wikipedia page as " la French Theory": https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Theory

    Saying they represent French thought would be like saying some sickly sweet dessert wine represents all French wine, simply because it sells really well in the US but is just one of many in its home country.

    It’s the Americans who choose to adore them, not the French. For the French, they’re considered something that was a hit overseas but nowhere near as big a deal back home . They’re even categorized at the French-language Wikipedia page as “ la French Theory“: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Theory

    Saying they represent French thought would be like saying some sickly sweet dessert wine represents all French wine, simply because it sells really well in the US but is just one of many in its home country.

    Well, as I said elsewhere on the thread, it might be that the French only export the slop: Sartre, Derrida, Lacan, etc

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  163. @Desiderius

    I have virtually no idea what happened in Spain between the Peninsular War between France and England and the beginning of the short-lived Spanish Republic of 1931
     
    I think there was something about an ear, plus that really gross inbred king.

    What you’re referring to (War of Jenkin’s ear? The last Habsburg king of Spain) was well before the Peninsular war.
    19th century Spain was basically Liberals fighting periodically against reactionaries like the Carlists. And in the end (1898) being humiliated by the US.

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  164. syonredux says:
    @German_reader
    I'm not sure it's all due to US influence in Britain, iirc the Labour party had something like multiculturalism in its programme even back in the early 1960s, may partly be attributable to a misguided desire for continuing the empire (instead of breaking with that once and for all and concentrating on British nationalism, like Enoch Powell eventually would have wanted to). The US influence seems very obvious in some ways though, e.g. things like "black history month" or the whole nation of immigrants nonsense applied to Britain ("Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Huguenots" etc.)...I doubt people could have come up with this without the US model.
    Here in Germany, it's totally obvious that Americanization and trans-Atlanticism has played a decisive role in spreading "antiracism" and pc - one only needs to compare the former West Germany and East Germany...the contrast is rather illuminating in some ways.

    ” or the whole nation of immigrants nonsense applied to Britain (“Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Huguenots” etc.)…I doubt people could have come up with this without the US model.

    Actually, Defoe did it first back in 1701 with his “The True-Born Englishman,” which was meant to quell objections to the Dutch-born William III:

    Thus from a mixture of all kinds began,
    That het’rogeneous thing, an Englishman:
    In eager rapes, and furious lust begot
    Betwixt a painted Britain and a Scot.
    Whose gend’ring off-spring quickly learn’d to bow,
    And yoke their heifers to the Roman plough:
    From whence a mongrel half-bred race there came,
    With neither name, nor nation, speech nor fame.
    In whose hot veins new mixtures quickly ran,
    Infus’d betwixt a Saxon and a Dane
    While their rank daughters, to their parents just,
    Receiv’d all nations with promiscuous lust.
    This nauseous brood directly did contain
    The well-extracted blood of Englishmen.

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    • Replies: @German_reader
    I know, but I really doubt that was the dominant interpretation before the later decades of the 20th century.
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  165. Bill says:
    @Cagey Beast
    It's the Americans who choose to adore them, not the French. For the French, they're considered something that was a hit overseas but nowhere near as big a deal back home . They're even categorized at the French-language Wikipedia page as " la French Theory": https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Theory

    Saying they represent French thought would be like saying some sickly sweet dessert wine represents all French wine, simply because it sells really well in the US but is just one of many in its home country.

    “They love me in Germany” — David Hasselhoff

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  166. syonredux says:
    @Cagey Beast
    It's the Americans who choose to adore them, not the French. For the French, they're considered something that was a hit overseas but nowhere near as big a deal back home . They're even categorized at the French-language Wikipedia page as " la French Theory": https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Theory

    Saying they represent French thought would be like saying some sickly sweet dessert wine represents all French wine, simply because it sells really well in the US but is just one of many in its home country.

    Since I hate waiting

    It’s the Americans who choose to adore them, not the French. For the French, they’re considered something that was a hit overseas but nowhere near as big a deal back home . They’re even categorized at the French-language Wikipedia page as “ la French Theory“: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Theory

    Saying they represent French thought would be like saying some sickly sweet dessert wine represents all French wine, simply because it sells really well in the US but is just one of many in its home country.

    Well, as I said elsewhere on the thread, it might be that the French only export the slop: Sartre, Derrida, Lacan, etc

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  167. syonredux says:
    @Cagey Beast
    It's the Americans who choose to adore them, not the French. For the French, they're considered something that was a hit overseas but nowhere near as big a deal back home . They're even categorized at the French-language Wikipedia page as " la French Theory": https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Theory

    Saying they represent French thought would be like saying some sickly sweet dessert wine represents all French wine, simply because it sells really well in the US but is just one of many in its home country.

    Of course, I’ve long wondered if Deconstructionism wasn’t some kind of elaborate con played by the French on les Anglo-Saxons……

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    I think the powers-that-be in the US make a point of inviting in such intellectual saboteurs and acting as their patrons. The Rockefeller Foundation, and their ilk, financed a kind of permanent revolution done on the instalment plan. Their soul mates over in England were the Fabians:
    http://www.lse.ac.uk/alumni/LSEConnect/LSEMagazine/pdf/summer2006/FabianWindow.pdf

    The motto at the top of the window comes from this poem:

    Ah love! Could you and I with him conspire
    To grasp this sorry scheme of things entire,
    Would we not shatter it to bits - and then
    Remould it nearer to the heart's desire!

    - Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám
     
    Smashing the world to pieces and remoulding it again; a wolf in sheep's clothing. Nothing to see here.
    , @Dieter Kief
    Deconstructivism was a serious thing in France, because it opposed the native French authoritarianism of the kind represented by mind-crushing super-bores and dumbheads like communist leader Marchais.

    At a certain point, even the CIA grabbed this and therefor looked for ways to support deconstructivism, which they seem to really have done.

    And then, a dynamic started working, that could have been forseen - but hardly was, really: The anti-authoritarianism of deconstructivism (no method, no rules, no teacher) blended perfectly with the dumber hippie-stuff and the youth-revolt of the Sixties and made for some kind of over-orchestration of the oedipal side, that's always (=necessarily) involved in colledge-education.

    Erich Fromm, now comes to my mind: He clearly understood this and made the point numerously, that it's foolish to abandon authority alltogether. He even made explicitly the case for the positive side of authority: Competence, factual knowledge, reliability, truth. But to no big effect, as it seems.

    If somebody asked me, I'd go on with the fact, that Academia is a huge waiting room for bright minds nowadays, and that the inmates kinda sense the rough air, that waits for them outside - and rather regress, intellectually (PC, LBGT-differentiations...Self-mirorring to the n-th degree) - than to confront the terrible outside.

    One fact, that supports such tendencies is, that quite a few of the rich kids in the best American schools especially, never have to go outside, so to speak, simply because they either manage to stay and teach and/ or because they are overwhelmingly rich. And the parents kinda support this by helicoptering their - here and there even single (=superprecious) kid...

    Plus (and this will be the end, I promise) - kids - for lots of a-religious parents nowadays - are the only way to transcendence - and that's a strong longing, which leads to a super-cozyness in the kid-parent-relationship - - and that is after all the basic model for all of us, if we interact with the world: Now, if I look at this super-coziness between helicopter-parents and kids, I again have no hard time to figure out how all this super-snsible SJWs and LGBT-fighters and so forth - come into being - and stay alive - - -forever, kinda...(= forever cozy, warm and self-centered, kinda otherwordly (=Hogwartian - Stve Sailer pointed this out yesterday) and - - - young... - that's all far out, it really is, isn't it...

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  168. Daniel H says:
    @Seamus
    I have virtually no idea what happened in Spain between the Peninsular War between France and England and the beginning of the short-lived Spanish Republic of 1931

    Surely you recall that they fought a war with the United States in 1898, and as a consequence lost Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines.

    >>>Surely you recall that they fought a war with the United States in 1898, and as a consequence lost Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines.

    Yes, the war that the Spanish won. They lost Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Phillipines, and passed them on to the USA.

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  169. @syonredux

    ” or the whole nation of immigrants nonsense applied to Britain (“Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Huguenots” etc.)…I doubt people could have come up with this without the US model.
     
    Actually, Defoe did it first back in 1701 with his "The True-Born Englishman," which was meant to quell objections to the Dutch-born William III:

    Thus from a mixture of all kinds began,
    That het'rogeneous thing, an Englishman:
    In eager rapes, and furious lust begot
    Betwixt a painted Britain and a Scot.
    Whose gend'ring off-spring quickly learn'd to bow,
    And yoke their heifers to the Roman plough:
    From whence a mongrel half-bred race there came,
    With neither name, nor nation, speech nor fame.
    In whose hot veins new mixtures quickly ran,
    Infus'd betwixt a Saxon and a Dane
    While their rank daughters, to their parents just,
    Receiv'd all nations with promiscuous lust.
    This nauseous brood directly did contain
    The well-extracted blood of Englishmen.
     

    I know, but I really doubt that was the dominant interpretation before the later decades of the 20th century.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    I know, but I really doubt that was the dominant interpretation before the later decades of the 20th century.
     
    Sure. Just noting that the idea has cropped up before ( when it was useful to those in power)
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  170. @Fred5
    I'm in Paris right now. I wouldn't say it's filthy but there is more graffiti in places it shouldn't be and more available real estate than a year ago. I picked up a copy of "Living in Paris" put out by the city government, page 5 is an eye opener of PC gone wild. "Paris' history is made up of successive waves of immigration." First time I ever heard of Ceasar's legionaires being immigrants. They put in bold letters "The Paris region alone is home to 40% of foreigners in France." They still wonder why tourism is down. The foreigners without the money come first with the virtue signalers.

    The graffiti is all over Europe. Depressing. Also the cigarette butts. Gross.

    And Paris seemed pretty African to us when we were there in 2016. Still, I really liked what I saw and would go back to see more.

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  171. Bill says:
    @Whiskey
    HBD people always pull back from the full HBD implications. The desire for "diversity" is HBD driven. It is not "Jews" or Gramscian Marxists or the Frankfurt School or the 68 generation. It is the full working of White people DNA full stop, that created Diversity. It is easy to see why. Kevin Williamson HATES HATES HATES his country cousins because he is mortified that his fellow minor aristocrats might mistake him for one of them.

    We have a landless aristocracy based not on feudal land-holdings (inevitably threatened by large amounts of Muslims, or Blacks/Africans, or Mexicans deciding that land belongs to THEM) but various managerial positions and middle-men rent extractor cronyist stuff like lobbying, etc.

    There was nothing to be imported from America, that tendency was already there -- add better treatment and freedom for women where in every nice little girl there is a nasty pr0n star and antifa "Moldylocks" waiting to get out, and you have a perfect storm. I read the Caldwell piece last night, it was perfect, and shows how organically just a few lucky managers made it to the top and now have a vast non-White servant class and can continue the important thing -- making war against their distant cousins who are not cool. Aided by the main vector of Cuckservatism -- loving Dads and Husbands coddling their wives and daughters.

    The interest of a landless, managerial aristocracy is as inimical and hostile to ordinary White people as the interest of single White women is to that of White men. Moldylocks is no more your friend than Michael Bloomberg. [Or Jerry Seinfeld, car collector, is your enemy. Think Jerry is keen on more car-b-ques?]

    Yeah, white people were always destined to be PC. It just didn’t manifest for the first 5000 years. On accident.

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  172. Bleuteaux says:
    @Abe

    Seems a perfectly valid question to me.
     
    Which is why I wasn't as heartbroken as maybe I should have been after Bannon's demotion. He's a very remarkable man and I wish him continued success, but at least based on his talk at the Vatican, which according to my quick reading of it seemed just so much sub-Gingrich sort of YEAH, DEMOCRACY! YEAH, CAPITALISM! YEAH, AMERICA! blowhardism, it does not appear he has absorbed the more mature sort of conservatism which the alt-right is just finally starting to introduce to America 100 years after the fact.

    I think many of us here are former-libertardians who at some point realized that American, highly ideological, laissez-faire conservatism is viable only up until the point when all the empty land runs out and you can no longer move away from your problems.

    I think it would certainly be interesting to hear how people’s opinions have evolved to the point of being here. For me, the seeds of change started in college, but only really accelerated when working in corporate America.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    For me, the seeds of change started in college, but only really accelerated when working in corporate America.
     
    Now that the two are one, it is no wonder that the change happens more quickly.
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  173. Alden says:
    @Desiderius

    I have virtually no idea what happened in Spain between the Peninsular War between France and England and the beginning of the short-lived Spanish Republic of 1931
     
    I think there was something about an ear, plus that really gross inbred king.

    Jenkins ear was about 100 years before the Penninsula War. While I’m in the comment section, I had no idea Camus is considered an intellectual He wrote popular fiction. I think that Gunnar Myrdahl did not write American Dilemma. If you interrogate the subtext and deconstruct it as the useful idiots say, one can only conclude that the book was carefully organized to push for school
    integration aka destruction.

    Remember, the ADL and American Jewish Committee both funded and litigated school integration aka destruction decades before thier great triumph Brown vs Topeka 1956.

    The ADL/AJC wrote that book and Myrdahl just claimed authorship And of course he was a proud communist.

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  174. syonredux says:
    @Cagey Beast
    In the case of France, most of the best people don't speak English, so that helps prevent them from being well known in the Anglosphere. Alain Delon never took off in Hollywood for that reason. I was reminded of him because he apparently just came out in favour of Fillion, even though he and Jean-Marie Le Pen have been close friends for decades. I heard about this at Alain Soral's site. He's another Frenchmen who doesn't speak English and who's far from opaque in his language and ideas. Ditto the whole Le Pen family: father, daughter and niece/granddaughter.

    For those of you in the francosexual community, Soral's going to be covering the election results on Sunday evening as a live stream.

    I’m trying to think….. From Rousseau on, have the French exported anything worthwhile in terms of cultural fads?

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    I don't know, maybe you enjoyed the pastel coloured sweatshirts back in the '80s?
    , @Dieter Kief
    Swiss would not be that happy to hear what you say about Geneva born Jean Jacques Rousseau. Especially Swiss billionaire and right-winger (t h e tirelessly, ferociously even, anti-open-borders campaigner) Christoph Blocher, who just recently made a significant donation to secure the Swiss roots of Rousseau.
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  175. syonredux says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    John Adams on Ideology:

    Napoleon! Mutato nomine, de te fabula narratur. This book is a prophecy of your empire, before your name was heard!

    The political and literary world are much indebted for the invention of the new word Ideology.
    Our English words, Idiocy or Idiotism, express not the force or meaning of it. It is presumed its proper definition is the science of Idiocy. And a very profound, abstruse, and mysterious science it is. You must descend deeper than the divers in the Dunciad to make any discoveries, and after all you will find no bottom. It is the bathos, the theory, the art, the skill of diving and sinking in government. It was taught in the school of folly; but alas! Franklin, Turgot, Rochefoucauld, and Condorcet, under Tom Paine, were the great masters of that academy!

    It may be modestly suggested to the Emperor, to coin another word in his new mint, in conformity or analogy with Ideology, and call every constitution of government in France, from 1789 to 1799, an Ideocracy.

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  176. Cagey Beast says: • Website
    @syonredux
    Of course, I've long wondered if Deconstructionism wasn't some kind of elaborate con played by the French on les Anglo-Saxons......

    I think the powers-that-be in the US make a point of inviting in such intellectual saboteurs and acting as their patrons. The Rockefeller Foundation, and their ilk, financed a kind of permanent revolution done on the instalment plan. Their soul mates over in England were the Fabians:

    http://www.lse.ac.uk/alumni/LSEConnect/LSEMagazine/pdf/summer2006/FabianWindow.pdf

    The motto at the top of the window comes from this poem:

    Ah love! Could you and I with him conspire
    To grasp this sorry scheme of things entire,
    Would we not shatter it to bits – and then
    Remould it nearer to the heart’s desire!

    - Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám

    Smashing the world to pieces and remoulding it again; a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Nothing to see here.

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  177. Political correctness has no flies, on paranormal activity!

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  178. syonredux says:
    @German_reader
    I'm not sure it's all due to US influence in Britain, iirc the Labour party had something like multiculturalism in its programme even back in the early 1960s, may partly be attributable to a misguided desire for continuing the empire (instead of breaking with that once and for all and concentrating on British nationalism, like Enoch Powell eventually would have wanted to). The US influence seems very obvious in some ways though, e.g. things like "black history month" or the whole nation of immigrants nonsense applied to Britain ("Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Huguenots" etc.)...I doubt people could have come up with this without the US model.
    Here in Germany, it's totally obvious that Americanization and trans-Atlanticism has played a decisive role in spreading "antiracism" and pc - one only needs to compare the former West Germany and East Germany...the contrast is rather illuminating in some ways.

    Also useful to note the French influence. The works of the Francophone author Frantz Fanon played a key role in shaping such things as “Post-Colonial Studies”: Les Damnés de la Terre, Peau noire, masques blancs, L’An V de la Révolution Algérienne, etc….And his stuff received Sartre’s imprimatur…..

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  179. Cagey Beast says: • Website
    @syonredux
    I'm trying to think..... From Rousseau on, have the French exported anything worthwhile in terms of cultural fads?

    I don’t know, maybe you enjoyed the pastel coloured sweatshirts back in the ’80s?

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  180. @Abe

    Yes, temporally provincial.
     
    Yes, but times change. The American cultural/intellectual milieu which nourished strong Francophile leanings has died over the last 25 years, replaced by a moronified one of twerking Founder Fathers, retconned "Islam has always been part of America" fake history, and general interpersonal coarseness & crudity. Who many Ivy League undergraduates now know who Diderot was as supposed Ta Genius Coates? How many would be PROUD if you pointed out their ignorance of the stale pale French male? My point is that French cultural stature relies to an inordinate extent on the affective memory of a vanishing white America, a white America which is busy sandblasting its own history and traditions (Andrew Jackson, Confederate emblems, Woodrow Wilson) into dust. Who cares who Montesquieu was if you think Jefferson and Madison were nothing but two rich, privileged slaveowners.?

    Snowflakes can't do (for now) without the technical apparatus which German culture provided- whether it be Marxism or the hermeneutical theories necessary to "interrogate" sh!t. But I think it safe to say that the hordes who flock to GET OUT, DJANGO UNCHAINED, or FAST & FURIOUS 17 have little use for the Uncle Hulot films or JULES & JIM.

    PS: Taylor Swift, the by-far closest thing in our celebrity culture to the elegant French ingenue, is routinely the target of sexual harassment and rape fantasies by the woke part of America.

    Your modernists have fared no better.

    The difference is that when they get around to digging, and they will, the roots they discover will have a distinctly French sensibility to go with their Scottish good sense.

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  181. Fred5 says:
    @Fredrik
    Don't know how you travelled from the airport but if you take the train it's hard not to see the state of the suburbs on the way to Gare du Nord. That's where the Africans and Muslims live. No wonder the direct trains(that save around 5 minutes) are recommended. Around Gare du Nord it feels like one is in Cameroon. The only non-Africans are the police or so it feels.

    Saw that too on the train in. Diversity is some kind of wonderful

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  182. @Bleuteaux
    I think it would certainly be interesting to hear how people's opinions have evolved to the point of being here. For me, the seeds of change started in college, but only really accelerated when working in corporate America.

    For me, the seeds of change started in college, but only really accelerated when working in corporate America.

    Now that the two are one, it is no wonder that the change happens more quickly.

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  183. Alden says:
    @backup

    In France, political correctness is more than a ridiculous set of opinions; it’s also—and primarily—a tool of government coercion.
     
    Those who don't believe that this is actually very much the case need to google the strange case of Soupe Identiaire. It is forbidden to hand out soup with porc in Strassbourg.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloc_identitaire

    I remember that. Jewish rabbis were right there with the Imans denouncing pork and turnip soup.

    And a couple years ago when the national school system finally, finally decided to enforce a 1905 school dress code against religious dress (hijab and shrouds) the Rabbis led the confrontations against the school system. The Nazis are coming, the Nazis are coming said chicken little.

    The chant was: cross necklaces bad
    hijabs good

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  184. backup says:

    In January 2016, the national statistical institute Insée announced that life expectancy had fallen for both sexes in France for the first time since World War II, and it’s the native French working class that is likely driving the decline.

    This is VERY related to stuff we read about here.

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  185. Tom-in-VA says:
    @Mr. Anon

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.
     
    I believe that Macron's wife was his school teacher; she's got something like fifteen years on him. Marrying your school teacher is weird; Newt Gingrich did it (and he's kind of weird), but in Macron's case, the age difference is even greater.

    BTW, doesn't "Macron" sound like the name of some minor historical figure in ancient Rome? Well, in a way, I suppose he is.

    Quintus Naevius Cordus Sutorius Macro (21 BC – 38 AD) was a prefect of the Praetorian Guard, from 31 until 38, serving under the Roman Emperors Tiberius and Caligula. Upon falling out of favor, he committed suicide.

    From Wikipedia. John Rhys-Davies played him in the TV series “I, Claudius.”

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  186. @Yak-15
    I was also recently in France and had dinner in provincial Avignon at a family friend's house. The apartments that surround her house and a few others have been recently colonized by Islam. All the neighboring houses have sold for a loss (to Muslims) and they are the last French family remaining.

    Though she claimed to feel safe and had not experienced burglary (yet), she said that the housing prices halved and that they were selling and moving to the coast. She said that nobody wants to live in their neighborhood because no one wants to send their kids to school with the new diversity. She also spoke endlessly about how, as a public nurse, 80 pct of her patients are Muslims. Her and her husband were angry at the situation.

    Nonetheless, her and her husband hate La Pen and are not voting for her. Why? Because she is threatening to pull out of the Euro which threatens their pension payments. If France loses the euro the value of the new currency will be significantly less than the Euro. All old pensioners would see a huge reduction in their payments. So, many elderly will not vote La Pen for that reason. I predict she loses because of her euro stance.

    So, it’s very much a case of a generational conflict.

    The young will soon be incented to get rid of the old.

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    The young will soon be incented to get rid of the old.
     
    The pension crisis is going to be ugly when it finally hits full force. Especially if the demographics of the payers are dramatically different from that of the payees.

    My bet is for around 2030 after the last of the baby boomers has retired. What does everyone else think?
    , @Yak-15
    Perhaps, but the old vote and their are 3x more of them than the young. Guess who wins?
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  187. Cagey Beast says: • Website
    @Cagey Beast
    Marion Maréchal-Le Pen posted a video of her speech at a monster rally in Marseilles yesterday. You can find it at YouTube under "Discours de Marion Maréchal-Le Pen à Marseille". Even if you don't speak French you can see the size of the crowd as she walks on stage. As an added bonus, you also get to see her walk on stage.

    I just watched Marion Maréchal-Le Pen’s speech. She describes the people going to Jean-Luc Mélenchon’s rallies as “full-time militants, weed smokers and bobos in dreadlocks”.

    As for Alain Soral’s latest video, he predicts the first round will break down as:

    1st: Le Pen
    2nd: Fillon
    3rd: Mélenchon
    4th: Macron

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  188. utu says:
    @Seamus Padraig

    "Though this premise has been confirmed in much of the West for half a century, the assertion will shock many Americans, conditioned to place 'inequality' (bad) and 'diversity' (good) at opposite poles of a Manichean moral order."
     
    It wouldn't shock an American who's been paying attention. I first began to notice this correlation about 25 years ago. It seemed odd at first, because it flew in the face of Marxist theory ... but so much the worse for Marxist theory!

    In France, political correctness is more than a ridiculous set of opinions; it’s also—and primarily—a tool of government coercion.
     
    That's what it is everywhere. At best, as in the US, it's a new kind of 'bourgeois morality'; at worst, as in the old USSR, it's the law--no ifs, ands or buts.

    “Though this premise has been confirmed in much of the West for half a century, the assertion will shock many Americans, conditioned to place ‘inequality’ (bad) and ‘diversity’ (good) at opposite poles of a Manichean moral order.”

    I first began to notice this correlation about 25 years ago.

    Isn’t ‘diversity’ a part of divide and rule strategy that is played on purpose. The ‘inequality’ is not the unwanted side effect but it is the actual goal. The left was subcontracted to carry out this stratagem of social engineering by pushing ‘diversity’. When you think of it the left does not have any other functions since they abandoned the project of economic equality and when they stopped their pretense that they were against wars. Keeping fires under the racial and gender kettle is their only job.

    America is a pilot project for this social engineering. The elites recognized pretty early the benefits of having a significant Black minority they inherited from slavery. The slavery was the gift that kept on giving. Why not perform a similar operation in Sweden where the native got too upity and created society with the least of inequality which was possible because of their social cohesion and solidarity achievable in monotonic society only. After the defeat of communism Sweden as a showroom model of egalitarian capitalism was not needed anymore.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    When you think of it the left does not have any other functions since they abandoned the project of economic equality and when they stopped their pretense that they were against wars. Keeping fires under the racial and gender kettle is their only job.
     
    The "left" has been turned into a weapon to be used to destroy the working class. The left has been happy to go along since they never liked the working class anyway. The advantage is that they can now openly hate the working class.

    The deep loathing that socialists feel for working class people explains most of the history of the left. Indeed it explains most of post-WW2 history.
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  189. Caldwell is an excellent writer who, along with Andrew Ferguson, came through the American Spectator-Weekly Standard pipeline.

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    Perhaps I misunderstand your point, but Ferguson never wrote for the American Spectator.
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  190. Bleuteaux says:
    @Svigor

    The Frankfurt School contained a good number of gentiles, too. Though Jews were a dominant presence, I’d wager without them no school would’ve been started at all. Still, it’s a distortion to say the Frankfurt School was all Jewish.
     
    Doesn't matter; if the School was more than 1/3 Jewish, Whiskey knows they dindunuffin. He's gone so full retard that now he's saying leftists and globalist oligarchs dindunuffin, too. Philo-Semitism is a disease...

    He may downplay the effect of (((tribalism))), but when it comes to the attitudes and purposes of our white, gentile oligarchy, he’s quite accurate. Anyone who spends time today in the business world understands this.

    Whatever their faults, it isn’t a bunch of Jews dumping the entire native IT department for wage slaves from the subcontinent, or replacing white men in management positions with compliant, politically-favorable beneficiaries.

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    • Replies: @Robert Hume
    But it was largely Jewish corporate raiders such as Michael Milken and Trump's Carl Icahn, who started all of this in the '80s by using hostile takeovers to vote out managers who, instead of maximizing returns to stockholders, by, for example, outsourcing to China, gave good wages to their workers and contributed to local charities and infrastructure. That is, they cared for their own "deplorables".

    You can read all about it in "The Predator's Ball", and "Barbarians at the Gate".
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  191. mobi says:
    @Whiskey
    HBD people always pull back from the full HBD implications. The desire for "diversity" is HBD driven. It is not "Jews" or Gramscian Marxists or the Frankfurt School or the 68 generation. It is the full working of White people DNA full stop, that created Diversity. It is easy to see why. Kevin Williamson HATES HATES HATES his country cousins because he is mortified that his fellow minor aristocrats might mistake him for one of them.

    We have a landless aristocracy based not on feudal land-holdings (inevitably threatened by large amounts of Muslims, or Blacks/Africans, or Mexicans deciding that land belongs to THEM) but various managerial positions and middle-men rent extractor cronyist stuff like lobbying, etc.

    There was nothing to be imported from America, that tendency was already there -- add better treatment and freedom for women where in every nice little girl there is a nasty pr0n star and antifa "Moldylocks" waiting to get out, and you have a perfect storm. I read the Caldwell piece last night, it was perfect, and shows how organically just a few lucky managers made it to the top and now have a vast non-White servant class and can continue the important thing -- making war against their distant cousins who are not cool. Aided by the main vector of Cuckservatism -- loving Dads and Husbands coddling their wives and daughters.

    The interest of a landless, managerial aristocracy is as inimical and hostile to ordinary White people as the interest of single White women is to that of White men. Moldylocks is no more your friend than Michael Bloomberg. [Or Jerry Seinfeld, car collector, is your enemy. Think Jerry is keen on more car-b-ques?]

    The desire for “diversity” is HBD driven. It is not “Jews” or Gramscian Marxists or the Frankfurt School or the 68 generation. It is the full working of White people DNA full stop,

    False dichotomy

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  192. @syonredux
    Of course, I've long wondered if Deconstructionism wasn't some kind of elaborate con played by the French on les Anglo-Saxons......

    Deconstructivism was a serious thing in France, because it opposed the native French authoritarianism of the kind represented by mind-crushing super-bores and dumbheads like communist leader Marchais.

    At a certain point, even the CIA grabbed this and therefor looked for ways to support deconstructivism, which they seem to really have done.

    And then, a dynamic started working, that could have been forseen – but hardly was, really: The anti-authoritarianism of deconstructivism (no method, no rules, no teacher) blended perfectly with the dumber hippie-stuff and the youth-revolt of the Sixties and made for some kind of over-orchestration of the oedipal side, that’s always (=necessarily) involved in colledge-education.

    Erich Fromm, now comes to my mind: He clearly understood this and made the point numerously, that it’s foolish to abandon authority alltogether. He even made explicitly the case for the positive side of authority: Competence, factual knowledge, reliability, truth. But to no big effect, as it seems.

    If somebody asked me, I’d go on with the fact, that Academia is a huge waiting room for bright minds nowadays, and that the inmates kinda sense the rough air, that waits for them outside – and rather regress, intellectually (PC, LBGT-differentiations…Self-mirorring to the n-th degree) – than to confront the terrible outside.

    One fact, that supports such tendencies is, that quite a few of the rich kids in the best American schools especially, never have to go outside, so to speak, simply because they either manage to stay and teach and/ or because they are overwhelmingly rich. And the parents kinda support this by helicoptering their – here and there even single (=superprecious) kid…

    Plus (and this will be the end, I promise) – kids – for lots of a-religious parents nowadays – are the only way to transcendence – and that’s a strong longing, which leads to a super-cozyness in the kid-parent-relationship – – and that is after all the basic model for all of us, if we interact with the world: Now, if I look at this super-coziness between helicopter-parents and kids, I again have no hard time to figure out how all this super-snsible SJWs and LGBT-fighters and so forth – come into being – and stay alive – – -forever, kinda…(= forever cozy, warm and self-centered, kinda otherwordly (=Hogwartian – Stve Sailer pointed this out yesterday) and – – – young… – that’s all far out, it really is, isn’t it…

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    And then, a dynamic started working, that could have been forseen – but hardly was, really: The anti-authoritarianism of deconstructivism (no method, no rules, no teacher) blended perfectly with the dumber hippie-stuff and the youth-revolt of the Sixties and made for some kind of over-orchestration of the oedipal side, that’s always (=necessarily) involved in colledge-education.
     
    Interestingly, the most authoritarian profs that I had in grad school were devotees of Derrida.....
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  193. mobi says:
    @Anonymous
    My take on it is that the French establishment is in a state of massive denial - and massive hopelessness and helplessness.

    The know full well that the present set up is a disaster, a catastrophe waiting to happen which will only get worse as time goes by. They also know full well that there is absolutely no possibility of a peaceful settlement or indeed any type of settlement.

    So, collectively their coping strategy is that of the ostrich, sticking their heads in the sand in a vain attempt to ignore the problem.
    Reality for the French is just too damned awful to contemplate, so basically what we are seeing is a neurotic psychosis on a national scale.


    Of course, The Economist magazine and the EU want to impose precisely the same living nightmare on central Europe.

    My take on it is that the French establishment is in a state of massive denial – and massive hopelessness and helplessness.

    The know full well that the present set up is a disaster, a catastrophe waiting to happen which will only get worse as time goes by. They also know full well that there is absolutely no possibility of a peaceful settlement or indeed any type of settlement.

    It’s far from too late for a settlement:

    ‘French army high command already has a codename for contingency plans to ethnically cleanse muslims from France’

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3781978/French-army-secret-plan-ethnically-cleanse-Muslims-country-help-Israeli-military-claims-political-commentator.html

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  194. mobi says:
    @Anonymous
    My take on it is that the French establishment is in a state of massive denial - and massive hopelessness and helplessness.

    The know full well that the present set up is a disaster, a catastrophe waiting to happen which will only get worse as time goes by. They also know full well that there is absolutely no possibility of a peaceful settlement or indeed any type of settlement.

    So, collectively their coping strategy is that of the ostrich, sticking their heads in the sand in a vain attempt to ignore the problem.
    Reality for the French is just too damned awful to contemplate, so basically what we are seeing is a neurotic psychosis on a national scale.


    Of course, The Economist magazine and the EU want to impose precisely the same living nightmare on central Europe.

    The know full well that the present set up is a disaster, a catastrophe waiting to happen which will only get worse as time goes by. They also know full well that there is absolutely no possibility of a peaceful settlement or indeed any type of settlement.

    ‘Majority of France’s police force backs Le Pen’:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4428772/Most-French-police-officers-say-voting-Le-Pen.html

    (Imagine being a fly on the wall of the officer’s barracks).

    It’s coming. Once again, France will lead the way.

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  195. @syonredux
    I'm trying to think..... From Rousseau on, have the French exported anything worthwhile in terms of cultural fads?

    Swiss would not be that happy to hear what you say about Geneva born Jean Jacques Rousseau. Especially Swiss billionaire and right-winger (t h e tirelessly, ferociously even, anti-open-borders campaigner) Christoph Blocher, who just recently made a significant donation to secure the Swiss roots of Rousseau.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Swiss would not be that happy to hear what you say about Geneva born Jean Jacques Rousseau. Especially Swiss billionaire and right-winger (t h e tirelessly, ferociously even, anti-open-borders campaigner) Christoph Blocher, who just recently made a significant donation to secure the Swiss roots of Rousseau.
     
    Culturally French. Part of la Francophonie .
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  196. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    I believe the Wall Street Journal has an opening in its columnist list since former Jerusalem Post editor Bret Stephens moved over to the New York Times to bring an apparently uniquely diverse perspective not adequately conveyed by Roger Cohen, David Brooks, and/or Tom Friedman. Caldwell would be an ideal addition to the WSJ roster.

    Caldwell was a columnist for the FT for a while. He’d be a great hire for anyone.

    Re the NY Times hiring Bret Stephens:

    I saw a video on YouTube last night of an A-10 pilot who landed his plane despite a surface-to-air missile taking a chunk out of one of his wings. The video mentioned that the A-10 has triple-redundancies. If the primary hydraulic system gets knocked out, there’s a back-up, and if that goes out, there’s a cable-and-pulley system. Maybe the NY Times op/ed page is built similarly (except for Douthat, whose views are expendable).

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  197. mobi says:
    @Ex-banker
    Just checked out Macron's wikipedia page. He's married to his high school drama teacher, whom he started dating at 18 (met at 15)? The French really are different.

    Just checked out Macron’s wikipedia page. He’s married to his high school drama teacher, whom he started dating at 18 (met at 15)? The French really are different.

    Yet, look where he is now.

    And she’s an acting teacher.

    And it’s France, so he’s hardly confined to her, and she’s probably ok with that.

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    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    And it’s France, so he’s hardly confined to her, and she’s probably ok with that.
     
    Put that way it kind of makes sense. Young horny males are good matches for women whose sexual desire is peaking and have the experience and patience to "coach" young men. By the time he gets bored with her, as men invariably do, she is menopausal and doesn't care that much if he is looking for younger women to sleep with.
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  198. @Peripatetic commenter
    Meanwhile: Understanding the Asian American Achievement Paradox without mention of IQ

    http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/features/aap-aap0000069.pdf

    Observing the patterns of educational attainment among the children of [Chinese] immigrants (the 1.5 and second generation), we con-tend that culture matters, but not in the way that it is popularly employed and understood.

    Heh. Selection matters, and culture is downstream of selection.

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    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    And, in a world first they introduce the new concept of Stereotype promise!
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  199. mobi says:
    @reiner Tor
    The Frankfurt School contained a good number of gentiles, too. Though Jews were a dominant presence, I'd wager without them no school would've been started at all. Still, it's a distortion to say the Frankfurt School was all Jewish.

    Still, it’s a distortion to say the Frankfurt School was all Jewish.

    Our collective epitaph will read:

    ‘They died of fairness’

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    • Agree: ben tillman
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  200. mobi says:
    @reiner Tor
    But this is still somehow silly.

    The Frankfurt School also started in German…

    But this is still somehow silly.

    If I were born in a stable, would that make me a horse?

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  201. @Peripatetic commenter

    Observing the patterns of educational attainment among the children of [Chinese] immigrants (the 1.5 and second generation), we con-tend that culture matters, but not in the way that it is popularly employed and understood.
     
    Heh. Selection matters, and culture is downstream of selection.

    And, in a world first they introduce the new concept of Stereotype promise!

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  202. mobi says:
    @Frau Katze
    Yep, pulling France out of the EU is a big vote loser.

    Yep, pulling France out of the EU is a big vote loser.

    French support for the EU (as of August 2016, it was 38% for, 61% against) lower than in Britain:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/08/24/french-support-for-the-eu-project-is-crumbling-on-the-left-and-r/

    (only Greece is lower)

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  203. @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction

    Here’s Priss Factor/Anon on that (as featured by Steve).

    Scroll down for Rammstein video.

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  204. res says:
    @Peripatetic commenter
    So, it's very much a case of a generational conflict.

    The young will soon be incented to get rid of the old.

    The young will soon be incented to get rid of the old.

    The pension crisis is going to be ugly when it finally hits full force. Especially if the demographics of the payers are dramatically different from that of the payees.

    My bet is for around 2030 after the last of the baby boomers has retired. What does everyone else think?

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    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    One more nail in the coffin.

    Vox Day is on record as saying that the Empire comes apart in 2033, so you are not far off.
    , @PV van der Byl
    2030 sounds plausible. But, how did you arrive at that date? Is it just 65 years after 1965, commonly thought of as the end of the Baby boom?
    , @Peripatetic commenter
    What a dystopian future where politicians exhort the young to kill the blood-sucking oldsters who are a millstone around their necks.
    , @Almost Missouri
    I think the Baby Boomers' retirement is the force that is already making the pension crisis ugly.

    The growing wedge of non-native entitlement-claimers will ensure that the generational resentment gets compounded by ethnic resentment.
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  205. @Clyde
    Germany, Sweden, France are just so full of shit when they claim they will engage in mass`deportations of failed asylum seekers. I saw a Swedish gov't drone (male) claiming they would be deporting 60,000 failed asylum seekers. Angela Merkel said similar things. Of course this will never happen because there will be Muslim/Black African riots and the police will be forced to retreat under a hail of rocks and Molotov cocktails. These rioters will have nothing to loose while European police have families they want to come home to in a non-crippled condition...or dead.

    You noted it first! The power of the Muslim+ Black immigrant riots will force every Europen nations police forces to retreat. The migrants are younger and have nothing to lose plus Muslim group think loves riots and lynch mobs.
    They show the unity of the Ummah against the non-muslims.

    “These rioters will have nothing to ‘loose’…”

    Seriously?

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  206. @Frau Katze
    Yep, pulling France out of the EU is a big vote loser.

    Pulling France out of the EU is a big vote-loser

    As far as the euros stability and the net worth of savings are concerned: All EU economies, which are out of the Euro, are doing better in this hindsight, than do those in the Euro, as a rule of thumb: Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, Norway are financially better off than the mutually subsidizing economies such as Spain, Greece, Germany, Netherlands etc.

    German banks just started with negative inteest-rates, as aconsequence of the European Bank’s flooding the market with new money – they print 60 Billion Euros monthly -and that’s not all it does in order to reach the goal of the “quantitive easing” (= read: Deficit spending).

    But I agree – it’s most likely too much of change, that Le Pen offers. And she made a curious decision: She declared, that she does n o t want to decide it herself, but leave it to a seperate, Nation-wide vote. Watching it from neighboring Germany, my feeling is, that this is inflicts a tad too much confusion for the average voter.

    Fillon is better equipped, because he directly adresses what’s wrong with the Euro and argues for changing the financial politics of the EU (no easy task too, since Italy, Greece, Spain and Potugal side to keep subsidies high…).

    And Fillon, too, speaks out clearly against immigration.

    Little problem though: He admitted, that he is corrupt, after long debates … and then just said: Well, I’m sorry, but my behavior was clearly not corrupt by the standards of the time, when it took place. His own party yawned…

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri

    "she made a curious decision: She declared, that she does n o t want to decide it herself, but leave it to a separate, Nation-wide vote."
     
    It's not that curious. She probably realized that (for whatever reasons) French voters are ambivalent about it, so she must be ambivalent too.

    She is a professional politician, after all.
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  207. mobi says:

    Montreal’s being invaded by Frenchmen (actual Frenchmen, I’m guessing):

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/paris-on-the-saint-laurent/article34426552/

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  208. @Cagey Beast
    Marion Maréchal-Le Pen posted a video of her speech at a monster rally in Marseilles yesterday. You can find it at YouTube under "Discours de Marion Maréchal-Le Pen à Marseille". Even if you don't speak French you can see the size of the crowd as she walks on stage. As an added bonus, you also get to see her walk on stage.

    As an added bonus, you also get to see her walk on stage.

    Sacre bleu, that woman is hotter than molten steel.

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    And she's remarkably good at argumentation and thinking on her feet for someone her age. Her aunt Marine is a happy political warrior too. They're like Trump in their combativeness but are really more like Rep. Trey Gowdy in their technique.
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  209. MBlanc46 says:

    Daley I built public housing for blacks in already black areas on the South and West sides. There would have been hell to pay if he’d tried to build it on the white fringes of the city, or, heaven forfend, in the white suburbs. When a black family tried to move into Cicero, they were burned out. By the nineties, when Junior was in office, there were already so many court-ordered blacks in the suburbs that it was hardly noticed when he demolished a lot of projects and shipped the residents to the fringes with Section 8 vouchers in hand.

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  210. At 17th of August, there will appear “The Seventh Languge Function” – a really funny novel by Laurent Binet, which centers around Barthes and Derrida, Foucault and Lacan and – a grim detective, who has hired a young academic of the sign-reading and interpreting kind (fun – and suprising – this part of lingusitics and language-philosophy is tightly interwoven with what detectives usally do, so the whole thing makes really sense).

    I’m half way through with it and really enjoyed it so far!

    (It’s a good alternative for all those “effeminated little reading-women” (Julio Cortazar in his playful novel “Hopscotch”), who find the really tough philosophical discourse a little bit – – intimidating (all those abstractions, this hordes of words, really, that sometimes make no sense on the first attempt – all this traditional stuff nobody can decipher nowdays anyways – or what should it be good for to know, how Mysticism and language-scepticism originated in neo-platonism and were a consequence of sorts of the old testament’s “aleph” – “aleph” being an indicator, that right from the start of our tradition, there was a bodily part reflected in the use of words – and – in the long run – led to distinctions that made it plausible to go with Jaspers back to the Axial-Age of world-civilization (The Greeks, classical Chinese Philosophy, the Monotheisms roundabout year 500 BC) – – and proceed from there on, considering the fight between nominalism and realism (two very much misleading terms, unless you really kneel into understanding them) and go on to mysticism as a means to bring differentiations forward, that later on enabled not only Descartes (because, before the mystics, nobody really made much of the word “I”, whithout which Descartes would have rested unreleased, as far as his problems are concerned – he would not have been able to understand them, even).

    Now – this all, by lots of other traces, is deeply routed in Neo-Platonism and one single outlier in the course of world-thought: Augustinus. Others, that could turn out to be of such a rare spezies might be Meister Eckhart and – I hesitate a bit, though: Paracelsus (not all of his writings are edited as of now (about 500 years after he wrote them) – but they soon will be. He is known to have formulated one basic law of medicine and toxicology at once, that stands firm through the centuries until today: The dose makes the poison.

    (For the jew-counters on this blog: Not that much to be seen yet, until now – and this is already the beginning of our time: Roughly the 16th century).

    The beat goes on with Montaigne, Gryphius, Newton, Smith, Chamfort, Goethe, Hume and Kant.

    Then the going gets very subjective – necessarily. For me it’s roughly this way: Hegel, Schopenhauer, Dostojewski, Freud, Tschechow, Durkheim, Weber, Twain, Gödel, Wittgenstein, Fromm, Gadamer, Habermas, Mann, Wolfe, Enzensberger, O’Rourke, Franzen.

    (I didn’t intend to go into all this, but now that I have… I might just try to calm me down by writing and thinking a little bit, because the situation in France with all this terorism going on during election time seems to really frighten me (I don’t live that far away from France, too and, now that I think about it: I plan to visit it next month, which – usally – is quite a joyful thought).

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  211. BB753 says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    The 1066 Battle of Hastings is the answer to the mass immigration and globalization attacks that have been launched against the White Ancestral Core of the European Christian nation-states. The corrupt and evil ruling classes are as weak and crumbly as a rotting cinder block. Just as the Saxons were dislodged as the rulers of England, so shall the globalizers be removed from power in the European Christian nation-states.

    The evil ruling classes of France, the United States, England, Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and other European Christian nation-states will not relinquish their power and place without a fight. There will be civil wars and secessionary wars in every part of the world that has European Christian nation-states.

    The only larger strategic consideration will be the disposition of nuclear weapons. As the wars advance, there will have to be some type of agreement about the command and control of the nuclear weapons. I am sure some accommodations along this line can be accomplished between the Patriot victors and the losing Globalizer faction.

    France must not be allowed to sink under the nation-wrecking waves of mass immigration and multiculturalism. France must be fought for by French Patriots. The evil, money-grubbing scum in France who push open borders mass immigration and multiculturalism must be crushed.

    Marine Le Pen was born to save France from the evil Globalizers currently attacking that great nation. Marine Le Pen will Make France Proud Again.

    VIVE LA FRANCE

    I don’t have much faith in Marine le Pen, but it’s all we’ve got. Same with Trump. France used to be a home of sorts for me and I pray for the day I can go back with pride. It’s really depressing to see everything you value and cherish trampled upon and spit on on a daily basis. That’s how I’ve felt for the past three decades.

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  212. @res

    The young will soon be incented to get rid of the old.
     
    The pension crisis is going to be ugly when it finally hits full force. Especially if the demographics of the payers are dramatically different from that of the payees.

    My bet is for around 2030 after the last of the baby boomers has retired. What does everyone else think?

    One more nail in the coffin.

    Vox Day is on record as saying that the Empire comes apart in 2033, so you are not far off.

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    I recall in the mid-1990s doing a calculation on the appropriate debt-to-equity ratio in a pension fund [No wait! Come back! It gets better!] and reasoning that the leading edge of the Boomer demographic bump must begin drawing down their pensions in 2010. I expected that others would anticipate the same thing, so the event would be preceded by a bow-wave of front-selling as others tried to leave equities for the bond market ahead of the inevitable Boomer liquidation. The net of this was that I reasoned in order not to get hosed, you had to get out of equities by ... oh, 2008 or so.

    It is hard not to regard all the equity market inflation since then as cynical bubble-blowing.

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  213. @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    The pro-immigration ideology is a natural outgrowth of free market capitalism and the anti-colonial movement. The elites will always choose more docile cheaper labor when given the opportunity. Slavery is not allowed any more, and the spread of literacy and cheap fire-arms has made colonialism a headache. It is easier to import immigrants, and once you start hollowing out your economy immigrants from poor and desperate countries perversely become even more attractive to the elites. As Caldwell kind of notes, paying €10 EUR /hr to a fellow white person to clean your house who has lost their good €40 EUR/hr factory job makes you feel like shit. Paying that amount to a semi-literate African makes you feel munificent. From Caldwell’s description it sounds like Guilluy has done a good job of dispassionately outliving how economics drive immigration whether people consciously want it or not.

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    • Replies: @Bleuteaux
    Something I wish someone would research, as nutty as it sounds, is whether our current economic system is actually cheaper for producers than slavery would have been. I'm sure slaves required food, shelter and medical care. In part time nation USA, how many people can't even get that from their employers?
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  214. Ex-banker says:
    @Anon
    No, Macron is different.

    Sure, he’s different. But I can’t believe American voters would elect somebody in such a marriage.

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  215. @mobi

    Just checked out Macron’s wikipedia page. He’s married to his high school drama teacher, whom he started dating at 18 (met at 15)? The French really are different.
     
    Yet, look where he is now.

    And she's an acting teacher.

    And it's France, so he's hardly confined to her, and she's probably ok with that.

    And it’s France, so he’s hardly confined to her, and she’s probably ok with that.

    Put that way it kind of makes sense. Young horny males are good matches for women whose sexual desire is peaking and have the experience and patience to “coach” young men. By the time he gets bored with her, as men invariably do, she is menopausal and doesn’t care that much if he is looking for younger women to sleep with.

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  216. @res

    The young will soon be incented to get rid of the old.
     
    The pension crisis is going to be ugly when it finally hits full force. Especially if the demographics of the payers are dramatically different from that of the payees.

    My bet is for around 2030 after the last of the baby boomers has retired. What does everyone else think?

    2030 sounds plausible. But, how did you arrive at that date? Is it just 65 years after 1965, commonly thought of as the end of the Baby boom?

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    • Replies: @res
    Pretty much. I'm more used to thinking of 1964 as the end of the baby boom, but 2030 is a round number and I would expect some time delay.
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  217. EriK says:
    @Percy Gryce
    Caldwell is an excellent writer who, along with Andrew Ferguson, came through the American Spectator-Weekly Standard pipeline.

    Perhaps I misunderstand your point, but Ferguson never wrote for the American Spectator.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Ferguson wrote for the WSJ in the 1980s. Another guy well worth reading.
    , @Percy Gryce
    Maybe not with the regularity I was thinking, but his own website bio says he did:

    http://www.andrewfergusonbooks.com/?page_id=18
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  218. This one by Andrew Marr about PC in the BBC in 1999 might become an evergreen on this blog -

    - “And the final answer, frankly, is the vigorous use of state power to coerce and repress. It may be my Presbyterian background, but I firmly believe that repression can be a great, civilising instrument for good. Stamp hard on certain ‘natural’ beliefs for long enough and you can almost kill them off. The police are first in line to be burdened further, but a new Race Relations Act will impose the will of the state on millions of other lives too.

    Poor? Stupid? Racist? Then don’t listen to a pampered white liberal like me.”

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    It may be my Presbyterian background, but I firmly believe that repression can be a great, civilising instrument for good. Stamp hard on certain ‘natural’ beliefs for long enough and you can almost kill them off.
     
    No, that's a (somewhat sick, twisted) version of Methodist Arminianism. Presbyterians believe that God alone is the great, civilizing instrument. If your faith and focus is on God and His commandments, it may well crowd out those natural beliefs - in fact many of us are counting on it - but they can't be directly killed off as they're part of our inherent, fallen, human nature.

    It's akin to trying to eliminate the IQ gap.
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  219. @res

    The young will soon be incented to get rid of the old.
     
    The pension crisis is going to be ugly when it finally hits full force. Especially if the demographics of the payers are dramatically different from that of the payees.

    My bet is for around 2030 after the last of the baby boomers has retired. What does everyone else think?

    What a dystopian future where politicians exhort the young to kill the blood-sucking oldsters who are a millstone around their necks.

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  220. MBlanc46 says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    I doubt that any American who can think straight would deny that we bear a significant share of the blame. That said, our leftists have been pointing to Europe as a model for as long as I can remember.

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    • Agree: syonredux
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  221. MBlanc46 says:
    @George
    The Guardian to the rescue:

    'The real misery is in the countryside': support for Le Pen surges in rural France

    Rift between ailing rural areas and far away big cities is where the Front National leader looks set to make her biggest voter gains

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/21/counryside-marine-le-pen-forgotten-france-presidential-election-2017

    Seems all those immigrants backstopping Paris real estate prices, require government services (to keep them from going Jihadi and rioting) that once were sent out to rural areas (to prevent peasant revolts).

    "The French, no fools, reserved their inner cities for what Whit Stillman’s characters call the High Urban Bourgeois."

    French had government central planning of everything roughly from the time Italians showed up and required them to learn latin to get a job with a government pension. The US only had government planning from the New Deal on. New York City and State a bit earlier in the 20s, read about it in The Power Broker.

    Due to immigration North Eastern cities and Chicago were mostly unhealthy slums for most of their history. From the little Zola I have read, Paris was less the city of light than it is now. In 1848 Napoleon III becomes Emporer of France and converts Paris into the administrative center of the shabby but number 2 world Empire. Much the same way Bush II converts Washinton DC into the administrative center of the shabby but number 1 world Empire. How did DC rise from the ashes, it used to be dump, worse than Detroit. Empire+taxpayer cash = Imperial treasure city.

    BTW, Chicago and all domestic finances are collapsing like the did after the failed Vietnam adventure, with the difference that back then state finances were actually fairly good. This time when Chicago goes down, Illinois goes down. Most Federal pensions are by design unreserved, although Uncle raises a lot of cash it might not be possible for Uncle to bail out Federal, state, local, and even Afghani pensions simultaneously.

    Living outside Paris is not like living outside Chicago. The public transportation works in France, the high speed rail and even the just fast commuter trans mean you are not isolated. Sort of like the US when rail roads were a new idea.

    American wood frame houses are baffling to foreigners. Always the cheapest construction on even the most expensive plots. Needless to say the French chopped down their old growth forests years ago so masonry buildings are required masonry.

    WWII was not fought in the US, much of recent living patterns were set based on the situation in 1946.

    Living ouside Chicago is not isolating. Our public transit perhaps isn’t as extensive, but it’s adequate, especially for the older suburbs. I’ve nothing against frame construction, but it’s far from the only type. My suburb, for example, mandates all-brick construction. Perhaps you should actually visit a place before you write about it.

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  222. Cagey Beast says: • Website
    @The Man From K Street

    As an added bonus, you also get to see her walk on stage.
     
    Sacre bleu, that woman is hotter than molten steel.

    And she’s remarkably good at argumentation and thinking on her feet for someone her age. Her aunt Marine is a happy political warrior too. They’re like Trump in their combativeness but are really more like Rep. Trey Gowdy in their technique.

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  223. MBlanc46 says:
    @Abe

    Teilhard de Chardin, Raymond Aron, Montaigne, Bergson, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire to come up with a few, totally off-the-cuff.
     
    Right. And also Foucault. I realized even as I wrote my original comment that I was being peremptory and a bit immoderate, but I think my basic assertion still holds- for the past 100-150 years, behind almost every French intellectual of note, there's a German who's done the intellectual heavy-lifting which made it all possible. Heck, Freudianism is still the biggest thing going in mental health in France from what I've read.

    Steve made no assertions about “cornerstone intellectuals” by which I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff. But Steve mentioned “lucidity of prose and fame of history”
     
    Right, and I remember up until sometime in the '90's when even in high-brow American intellectual circles it was either 1789 or 1848 all the time (cf. Paul Berman, who someone brought up the other day in another thread). But things change, and now it's always either 1933 or 1939. Germans bring the big ideas (and now our historical touchpoints); French bring the coffee and black turtlenecks.

    Yes, the Germans have done much of the heavy lifting, but so much of it was wrong and destructive. Nietzsche and Heidegger, to name two, have a lot to answer for.

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    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    Perhaps we can dig them up and crucify them!
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  224. Bleuteaux says:
    @Peter Akuleyev
    The pro-immigration ideology is a natural outgrowth of free market capitalism and the anti-colonial movement. The elites will always choose more docile cheaper labor when given the opportunity. Slavery is not allowed any more, and the spread of literacy and cheap fire-arms has made colonialism a headache. It is easier to import immigrants, and once you start hollowing out your economy immigrants from poor and desperate countries perversely become even more attractive to the elites. As Caldwell kind of notes, paying €10 EUR /hr to a fellow white person to clean your house who has lost their good €40 EUR/hr factory job makes you feel like shit. Paying that amount to a semi-literate African makes you feel munificent. From Caldwell's description it sounds like Guilluy has done a good job of dispassionately outliving how economics drive immigration whether people consciously want it or not.

    Something I wish someone would research, as nutty as it sounds, is whether our current economic system is actually cheaper for producers than slavery would have been. I’m sure slaves required food, shelter and medical care. In part time nation USA, how many people can’t even get that from their employers?

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri

    "I wish someone would research, as nutty as it sounds, is whether our current economic system is actually cheaper for producers than slavery would have been."
     
    It's not nutty at all, and there has already been a lot of economic research on it. I believe the consensus is that slavery is not cheaper than pittance wages. Indeed, I seem to recall a certain body of work that said even in the antebellum South, a proletariat would have been cheaper than the slave class, but the social norms of plantation society were already too baked in at that point.

    Certainly if you consider the enormous future costs that slavery imposed on the country, anything would have been cheaper than that!

    Another data point is that even in the antebellum South, when they needed a whole lotta real cheap labor for a large engineering project e.g., New Orleans canals, they didn't use slaves; they used Irish famine refugees: no housing, medical or full board food costs; just pay 'em just enough for bread or booze to keep 'em going until the next ship arrives!

    Substitute modern empty calories for "bread" and opioids for "booze" and it seems plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

    Oh well, laissez les bons temps rouler!

    , @Dieter Kief
    Marx and Engels showed in the Communist Manfesto, that capitalsim is about rationality and effectiveness - and that it sweeps away the oldways, wherever it succeeds. Marx said, that this was a good thing - you could go on from there, that this was, how slavery was overcome in the hole wide world. And if you look around, it has been overcome - for sure not only because it was more effctive, but in saying it was more rational, you also claim, that it was more just (etc.) - but that's not only Marx anymore, that's Max Weber and G. H. Mead and Talcott Parsons etc. (Durkheim!) too.
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  225. @Dieter Kief

    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I'm getting very imoatient with this kind of analysis - it is the same old opression opressor-meme over and over again.
    Basically it's the traditional Marxist worldview, that is still caught within the boundaries of opression and oppressor.

    The social state is and modern industrial society, which France represents, is more than this so. That's the systematic point, whre Sarrazin, Bruckner and finkielkraut as well as Houellebecq and - if you please - Michael Moore, too - kick in: What are the specifiv dynamicy of the welfare state - and how are they to be supported, because they are (socially/ and or economically) productive - and where are they becoming dysfunctional - as in the many cases, whree there is just middle-class corruption taking place, for example in those cases, where french railroad-personal have managed to fix contracts with the state, that are - looking at the labour-market in gemreal, simply unfair. Late Foucault swiched to Hayek, beacuase he finally did realise, that these tendencies indeed subvert society and are simply parasitic group egoisms.

    Same with immigration - it's not good to look upon immigration with the old communist (and new globalist!!) mindset, that everybody fits in into french society equally well. Not to forget Paul Collier - he point sthis fact out as well (as do Bruckner, Finkielkraut and Sarrazin).

    Those are the really interesting lines of (societal9 combat - compared to these hights of analytical standards, Guilly and Caldwell don't accomplish much - hardly anything at all. It's phenomenology part xxxx....and the way they identify diversity as a problem is simply a fight over certain buildings. if only the world would be that simple - - no, it would not be better off at all, it would be a pretty hopeless and utterly backward and boring place.

    Plus - the shockwaves that run trough France - with islamist terror-attacks happening or almost happening now the third week in a row - during election time, mind you, is slowly but steadily BECOMING REALLY SCARY.

    I hope you are stone drunk. I think that I would write what you wrote if I were stone drunk. But then I am already really SCARED!

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Sorry - that's the uncorrected version of the text I published 23 minutes later. I was tired. I fell asleep right after I hit the Publish Comment button. Could well be, that you don't like the corrected version either, but for this one I'm not sorry. Even though I was still quite tired, when I published the corrected version of this comment.
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  226. Veritatis says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    While we Mexicans often blame the U.S. government for some of our economic woes (macroeconomic policies, unwise privatizations, etc), we don’t say anything about the devastating effect of the U.S. mass media and social networks, particularly on the young. But it is largely true that the US is a cultural bulldozer, with its huge media output and its influential universities. It is also true that any type of consumption, including ideas, is a personal choice that entails personal responsibility.

    (So, the US gets the migrants, Mexico gets the corrosive ideas. Which is the lesser of the two evils?)

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    • Replies: @syonredux
    Judging by people like José Vasconcelos, Mexico is quite capable of producing idiocy on its own....
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson

    So, the US gets the migrants, Mexico gets the corrosive ideas. Which is the lesser of the two evils?
     
    The corrosive ideas. But why do you think that the US isn't suffering from them? And BTW, if my choices are having an arm hacked off, or both an arm and a leg remorselessly hewn, why would you think I'd accept the former?

    All Americans need to unite to oppose either foreigners or peddlers of pernicious perversion hacking off our limbs!
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  227. syonredux says:
    @Dieter Kief
    Deconstructivism was a serious thing in France, because it opposed the native French authoritarianism of the kind represented by mind-crushing super-bores and dumbheads like communist leader Marchais.

    At a certain point, even the CIA grabbed this and therefor looked for ways to support deconstructivism, which they seem to really have done.

    And then, a dynamic started working, that could have been forseen - but hardly was, really: The anti-authoritarianism of deconstructivism (no method, no rules, no teacher) blended perfectly with the dumber hippie-stuff and the youth-revolt of the Sixties and made for some kind of over-orchestration of the oedipal side, that's always (=necessarily) involved in colledge-education.

    Erich Fromm, now comes to my mind: He clearly understood this and made the point numerously, that it's foolish to abandon authority alltogether. He even made explicitly the case for the positive side of authority: Competence, factual knowledge, reliability, truth. But to no big effect, as it seems.

    If somebody asked me, I'd go on with the fact, that Academia is a huge waiting room for bright minds nowadays, and that the inmates kinda sense the rough air, that waits for them outside - and rather regress, intellectually (PC, LBGT-differentiations...Self-mirorring to the n-th degree) - than to confront the terrible outside.

    One fact, that supports such tendencies is, that quite a few of the rich kids in the best American schools especially, never have to go outside, so to speak, simply because they either manage to stay and teach and/ or because they are overwhelmingly rich. And the parents kinda support this by helicoptering their - here and there even single (=superprecious) kid...

    Plus (and this will be the end, I promise) - kids - for lots of a-religious parents nowadays - are the only way to transcendence - and that's a strong longing, which leads to a super-cozyness in the kid-parent-relationship - - and that is after all the basic model for all of us, if we interact with the world: Now, if I look at this super-coziness between helicopter-parents and kids, I again have no hard time to figure out how all this super-snsible SJWs and LGBT-fighters and so forth - come into being - and stay alive - - -forever, kinda...(= forever cozy, warm and self-centered, kinda otherwordly (=Hogwartian - Stve Sailer pointed this out yesterday) and - - - young... - that's all far out, it really is, isn't it...

    And then, a dynamic started working, that could have been forseen – but hardly was, really: The anti-authoritarianism of deconstructivism (no method, no rules, no teacher) blended perfectly with the dumber hippie-stuff and the youth-revolt of the Sixties and made for some kind of over-orchestration of the oedipal side, that’s always (=necessarily) involved in colledge-education.

    Interestingly, the most authoritarian profs that I had in grad school were devotees of Derrida…..

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    That's what happened on a pretty big scale: The super-autoritarian types switched over fom Maoism, Trotskyism, Third-Worldism (...), RAF- and Brigade-Rosse-Terrorism to Deconstructivism. I'm not ironic now, when I state, that this was a great acomplishment of Derrida and the like. And it did indeed help to sweep paleo-Communism off the agenda in Germany, where I had a first-row seat (and did activey take part in those fights from a usally loathed social democratic position) and in Italy and in France (thanks god the french got rid of their communists - France had the most frightening communists I've come across in the Western world).

    Habermas dedicated his in this field ground-breaking and to this day unsurpassed "Philosophical Discourse of Modernity" "to Rebecca" for bringing him "in close contact with Deconstructivism and Postmodernism", which he dismantled completely, so to speak. - A parent (Habermas), that took his offspring (Rebecca) serious, - - whom I came across quite often, because we studied (and I sometimes taught) at the same university (Konstanz).
    At Konstanz university, I was the first ever to openly critizise Postmodernism and Deconstructivism in a university course I gave in 86 - to the great embaressment of almost all of my peers. The one guy who took part in this course and was reluctant and really open to my critical arguments was a psychologist, who later became a really populuar German comedian, Georg Schramm, who often critizised the German left via role-prose: He then spoke as information-officer Sanftleben of the German military, which, for the reasons I stated above, indeed made sense

    (My comment No. 204 above might be of interest for you, too).

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  228. @Abe

    Ideologically, France remains the second or third most important country in the world after the U.S. and perhaps Britain because of, among other reasons, the lucidity of French prose, the fame of its history
     
    Respectfully disagree (and you don't know how hard it was for me to suppress the snarky "Um, no" opening I wanted to use this morning).

    I know I'm being provincial, but the only truly cornerstone French intellectual heavyweight I can think of at the moment is Descartes. Sartre and Camus? Give me a break. Like Hemingway in the U.S., these two giants of 20th Century Western arts & letters never really made it out of the 1900's (just waiting, BTW, for some enterprising Millennial bright thing to make his reputation by tearing down Hemingway's for his white privilege and gender influidity).

    Let's put it this way- what language did Marx, Freud, and Einstein write in? And since, yeah, Einstein technically wrote in the universal language of numbers, let's take him away and substitute Hitler. Isn't Hitler (in all seriousness) a more influential thinker than any that's come out of France over the last 100 years just for the mere fact that in every single Western country the left secretly and not so secretly thinks the right is going to be running whole chapters out of his playbook the moment it lets its guard down?

    And less controversially there is also Kant, Heidegger (without which French postmodernism would literally be inconceivable), Wittgenstein, Popper, Hayek. Who's the #1 most intellectually influential country again?

    I agree with you that Germany intellectually dominated the 18th and 19th centuries (until they were physically wiped out by everyone else in a fit of mass jealousy in the 20th century), but if you stretch your gaze back to the 16th and 17th centuries, it evens things up quite a bit for France.

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  229. syonredux says:
    @Dieter Kief
    Swiss would not be that happy to hear what you say about Geneva born Jean Jacques Rousseau. Especially Swiss billionaire and right-winger (t h e tirelessly, ferociously even, anti-open-borders campaigner) Christoph Blocher, who just recently made a significant donation to secure the Swiss roots of Rousseau.

    Swiss would not be that happy to hear what you say about Geneva born Jean Jacques Rousseau. Especially Swiss billionaire and right-winger (t h e tirelessly, ferociously even, anti-open-borders campaigner) Christoph Blocher, who just recently made a significant donation to secure the Swiss roots of Rousseau.

    Culturally French. Part of la Francophonie .

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  230. @Claude
    "I don’t expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV."

    Yes, PC is ultimately an American invention. And remember, it started out as a joke. Not many people laughing about it now though. Hopefully our future Edward Gibbon makes note of that.

    I don’t know if it was a joke exactly, but I first heard the term “politically correct” in the early-mid-1980′s at Stanford where the locals used it as a pejorative to refer to the faux-sensitive lefties. My impression was that it more described a social category with political pretensions rather than the other way around.

    I believe this must have been very near the ur-source of the term.

    I didn’t hang with the lefties there, so I can’t comment on how they used it.

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    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    I don’t know if it was a joke exactly, but I first heard the term “politically correct” in the early-mid-1980′s at Stanford where the locals used it as a pejorative to refer to the faux-sensitive lefties. My impression was that it more described a social category with political pretensions rather than the other way around.
     
    Interesting. I first heard it in the summer of 1985, used in a group of Eng. Lit. post-doctoral students from an Ivy. Somebody said something, and someone else said "but it it politically correct to say so?"

    A detailed, technical discussion followed about the usefulness of what had been expressed in terms of political strategy, couched in post-modernist analysis of rhetoric and power.

    The term seemed to have none of the emotive overtones it does now and was rather dry and literal.
    , @Anon
    Apparently the term is much older, though it was probably not commonly used here until about the time you mention.
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  231. @MBlanc46
    Yes, the Germans have done much of the heavy lifting, but so much of it was wrong and destructive. Nietzsche and Heidegger, to name two, have a lot to answer for.

    Perhaps we can dig them up and crucify them!

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  232. syonredux says:
    @German_reader
    I know, but I really doubt that was the dominant interpretation before the later decades of the 20th century.

    I know, but I really doubt that was the dominant interpretation before the later decades of the 20th century.

    Sure. Just noting that the idea has cropped up before ( when it was useful to those in power)

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  233. @Sammler
    I am certain that Voltaire's mockery of Leibniz (in Candide) has been more influential than any of Leibniz's own philosophy.

    I am certain that Voltaire’s mockery of Leibniz (in Candide) has been more influential than any of Leibniz’s own philosophy.

    Only to the uniformed, the superficial, the Marxist whores and the true believers in philosophers both unsystematic and inconsistent.

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  234. syonredux says:
    @Veritatis
    While we Mexicans often blame the U.S. government for some of our economic woes (macroeconomic policies, unwise privatizations, etc), we don't say anything about the devastating effect of the U.S. mass media and social networks, particularly on the young. But it is largely true that the US is a cultural bulldozer, with its huge media output and its influential universities. It is also true that any type of consumption, including ideas, is a personal choice that entails personal responsibility.

    (So, the US gets the migrants, Mexico gets the corrosive ideas. Which is the lesser of the two evils?)

    Judging by people like José Vasconcelos, Mexico is quite capable of producing idiocy on its own….

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    • Replies: @Veritatis
    Being idiotic, like being unkind, is one of those widely distributed human traits.
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  235. @Abe

    Teilhard de Chardin, Raymond Aron, Montaigne, Bergson, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire to come up with a few, totally off-the-cuff.
     
    Right. And also Foucault. I realized even as I wrote my original comment that I was being peremptory and a bit immoderate, but I think my basic assertion still holds- for the past 100-150 years, behind almost every French intellectual of note, there's a German who's done the intellectual heavy-lifting which made it all possible. Heck, Freudianism is still the biggest thing going in mental health in France from what I've read.

    Steve made no assertions about “cornerstone intellectuals” by which I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff. But Steve mentioned “lucidity of prose and fame of history”
     
    Right, and I remember up until sometime in the '90's when even in high-brow American intellectual circles it was either 1789 or 1848 all the time (cf. Paul Berman, who someone brought up the other day in another thread). But things change, and now it's always either 1933 or 1939. Germans bring the big ideas (and now our historical touchpoints); French bring the coffee and black turtlenecks.

    Right, and I remember up until sometime in the ’90′s when even in high-brow American intellectual circles it was either 1789 or 1848 all the time (cf. Paul Berman, who someone brought up the other day in another thread). But things change, and now it’s always either 1933 or 1939. Germans bring the big ideas (and now our historical touchpoints); French bring the coffee and black turtlenecks.

    Well, that’s down to these “high-brow American intellectual circles” and not the French.

    As for black turtlenecks, French intellectuals also bring along babes in black turtlenecks to the scene, so that’s a distinct plus relative to the Boche crowd.

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  236. @Almost Missouri
    I don't know if it was a joke exactly, but I first heard the term "politically correct" in the early-mid-1980's at Stanford where the locals used it as a pejorative to refer to the faux-sensitive lefties. My impression was that it more described a social category with political pretensions rather than the other way around.

    I believe this must have been very near the ur-source of the term.

    I didn't hang with the lefties there, so I can't comment on how they used it.

    I don’t know if it was a joke exactly, but I first heard the term “politically correct” in the early-mid-1980′s at Stanford where the locals used it as a pejorative to refer to the faux-sensitive lefties. My impression was that it more described a social category with political pretensions rather than the other way around.

    Interesting. I first heard it in the summer of 1985, used in a group of Eng. Lit. post-doctoral students from an Ivy. Somebody said something, and someone else said “but it it politically correct to say so?”

    A detailed, technical discussion followed about the usefulness of what had been expressed in terms of political strategy, couched in post-modernist analysis of rhetoric and power.

    The term seemed to have none of the emotive overtones it does now and was rather dry and literal.

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Now that I'm thinking about it, I can say more specifically that I heard it first in March 1985, but with the people I heard it from, it seemed to have a well established currency, so it must have been at least a year older than that there.
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  237. Vinay says:

    “an apparently uniquely diverse perspective not adequately conveyed by Roger Cohen, David Brooks, and/or Tom Friedman. ”

    Jews on opposite sides of the political divide seem as contemptuous of each other as whites on opposite sides of the political divide. Given this, I just don’t understand your apparent belief that Jews are somehow interchangeable. They don’t even seem to share support for Israel in common, given the Jewish support for BDS.

    If you think whites have earned their disproportionate prominence in the world, why do you insist on denying the same sense of entitlement for Jewish people? Surely they’ve paid their dues, right?

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    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @mobi
    "If you think whites have earned their disproportionate prominence in the world, why do you insist on denying the same sense of entitlement for Jewish people? Surely they’ve paid their dues, right?"


    Try this thought experiment:

    'Every parasite has earned its success, every bit as much as every host has (true). Therefore, what right does the host have to oppose their parasitism?'

    Correct, or not correct?

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  238. @Bleuteaux
    Something I wish someone would research, as nutty as it sounds, is whether our current economic system is actually cheaper for producers than slavery would have been. I'm sure slaves required food, shelter and medical care. In part time nation USA, how many people can't even get that from their employers?

    “I wish someone would research, as nutty as it sounds, is whether our current economic system is actually cheaper for producers than slavery would have been.”

    It’s not nutty at all, and there has already been a lot of economic research on it. I believe the consensus is that slavery is not cheaper than pittance wages. Indeed, I seem to recall a certain body of work that said even in the antebellum South, a proletariat would have been cheaper than the slave class, but the social norms of plantation society were already too baked in at that point.

    Certainly if you consider the enormous future costs that slavery imposed on the country, anything would have been cheaper than that!

    Another data point is that even in the antebellum South, when they needed a whole lotta real cheap labor for a large engineering project e.g., New Orleans canals, they didn’t use slaves; they used Irish famine refugees: no housing, medical or full board food costs; just pay ‘em just enough for bread or booze to keep ‘em going until the next ship arrives!

    Substitute modern empty calories for “bread” and opioids for “booze” and it seems plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.

    Oh well, laissez les bons temps rouler!

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    • Replies: @David Davenport
    “I wish someone would research, as nutty as it sounds, is whether our current economic system is actually cheaper for producers than slavery would have been.”

    Sociology for the South: Or the Failure of Free Society (Classic Reprint) first published in 1854.

    Amazon's About the Author:

    George Fitzhugh, lawyer, planter, newspaperman, sociologist, was born in Virginia in 1806. He married in 1829, had nine children, and lived until the Civil War in his wife's home in Port Royal, Virginia. During this period he practiced law, was employed briefly in the Attorney General's office, wrote for various periodicals and newspapers, and published two books, Sociology for the South, or the Failure of Free Society (1854) and Cannibals All! (1857). After a foray into abolitionist territory in 1856, including a debate in New Haven with Wendell Phillips, he returned to the South more convinced than ever of his position, and up to the War he remained hopeful of converting the North. Fitzhugh died in Texas in 1881.

    George Fitzhugh may have coined the word "sociology." G.F. was active when Karl Marx was writing for New York newspapers. G.F. was probably familiar with Marxism in it's Old Testament version, if you'll pardon the expression.

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  239. @PiltdownMan

    I don’t know if it was a joke exactly, but I first heard the term “politically correct” in the early-mid-1980′s at Stanford where the locals used it as a pejorative to refer to the faux-sensitive lefties. My impression was that it more described a social category with political pretensions rather than the other way around.
     
    Interesting. I first heard it in the summer of 1985, used in a group of Eng. Lit. post-doctoral students from an Ivy. Somebody said something, and someone else said "but it it politically correct to say so?"

    A detailed, technical discussion followed about the usefulness of what had been expressed in terms of political strategy, couched in post-modernist analysis of rhetoric and power.

    The term seemed to have none of the emotive overtones it does now and was rather dry and literal.

    Now that I’m thinking about it, I can say more specifically that I heard it first in March 1985, but with the people I heard it from, it seemed to have a well established currency, so it must have been at least a year older than that there.

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  240. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Almost Missouri
    I don't know if it was a joke exactly, but I first heard the term "politically correct" in the early-mid-1980's at Stanford where the locals used it as a pejorative to refer to the faux-sensitive lefties. My impression was that it more described a social category with political pretensions rather than the other way around.

    I believe this must have been very near the ur-source of the term.

    I didn't hang with the lefties there, so I can't comment on how they used it.

    Apparently the term is much older, though it was probably not commonly used here until about the time you mention.

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Well, ...

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=politically+correct&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cpolitically%20correct%3B%2Cc0

    ... whatever currency "politically correct" had before the 1980s, it seems hardly anyone noticed.
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  241. @Peripatetic commenter
    One more nail in the coffin.

    Vox Day is on record as saying that the Empire comes apart in 2033, so you are not far off.

    I recall in the mid-1990s doing a calculation on the appropriate debt-to-equity ratio in a pension fund [No wait! Come back! It gets better!] and reasoning that the leading edge of the Boomer demographic bump must begin drawing down their pensions in 2010. I expected that others would anticipate the same thing, so the event would be preceded by a bow-wave of front-selling as others tried to leave equities for the bond market ahead of the inevitable Boomer liquidation. The net of this was that I reasoned in order not to get hosed, you had to get out of equities by … oh, 2008 or so.

    It is hard not to regard all the equity market inflation since then as cynical bubble-blowing.

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  242. @Luke Lea

    Since provincial France is perhaps the best rural real estate in the world, getting squeezed out of big cities doesn’t sound so bad for indigenous working class.
     
    I wonder if the French might be more receptive than Americans to my Notes Towards a New Way of Life in America:

    "In this 21st century capitalist utopia, Luke Lea explores a world of New Country Towns in which the people work part-time outside the home and in their free time help build their own houses, cultivate gardens, cook and care for their children and grandchildren, and pursue hobbies and other outside interests. They live on small family homesteads grouped around neighborhood greens and get around town in modified golf-carts. Work and leisure integrated into the fabric of their everyday lives to the point that they don’t feel much need to retire, and they die at home in their beds as a rule, surrounded by loved ones.

    For those who would like to move to this world he provides a map with some directions for how to get there from here."

    I'm still looking for a publisher. Here's a link to a poorly edited copy of the whole MS:

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1A6TGpBTQlufDe1fSozy9VkH03Q9FJDHmzLyG1C2RFw4/edit?usp=sharing

    Wish I could write better but the ideas are all there. They could, in fact someday will, change the course of history.

    “In this 21st century capitalist utopia, Luke Lea explores a world of New Country Towns in which the people work part-time outside the home and in their free time help build their own houses, cultivate gardens, cook and care for their children and grandchildren, and pursue hobbies and other outside interests. They live on small family homesteads grouped around neighborhood greens and get around town in modified golf-carts…

    Luke Leaky, what’s your policy on 2nd Amendment rights in your 21st c. Utopia?

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    • Replies: @Luke Lea

    Luke Leaky, what’s your policy on 2nd Amendment rights in your 21st c. Utopia?
     
    I support them. Explicitly, chapter 4.
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  243. @Anon
    Apparently the term is much older, though it was probably not commonly used here until about the time you mention.
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  244. @Veritatis
    While we Mexicans often blame the U.S. government for some of our economic woes (macroeconomic policies, unwise privatizations, etc), we don't say anything about the devastating effect of the U.S. mass media and social networks, particularly on the young. But it is largely true that the US is a cultural bulldozer, with its huge media output and its influential universities. It is also true that any type of consumption, including ideas, is a personal choice that entails personal responsibility.

    (So, the US gets the migrants, Mexico gets the corrosive ideas. Which is the lesser of the two evils?)

    So, the US gets the migrants, Mexico gets the corrosive ideas. Which is the lesser of the two evils?

    The corrosive ideas. But why do you think that the US isn’t suffering from them? And BTW, if my choices are having an arm hacked off, or both an arm and a leg remorselessly hewn, why would you think I’d accept the former?

    All Americans need to unite to oppose either foreigners or peddlers of pernicious perversion hacking off our limbs!

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  245. @Almost Missouri

    "I wish someone would research, as nutty as it sounds, is whether our current economic system is actually cheaper for producers than slavery would have been."
     
    It's not nutty at all, and there has already been a lot of economic research on it. I believe the consensus is that slavery is not cheaper than pittance wages. Indeed, I seem to recall a certain body of work that said even in the antebellum South, a proletariat would have been cheaper than the slave class, but the social norms of plantation society were already too baked in at that point.

    Certainly if you consider the enormous future costs that slavery imposed on the country, anything would have been cheaper than that!

    Another data point is that even in the antebellum South, when they needed a whole lotta real cheap labor for a large engineering project e.g., New Orleans canals, they didn't use slaves; they used Irish famine refugees: no housing, medical or full board food costs; just pay 'em just enough for bread or booze to keep 'em going until the next ship arrives!

    Substitute modern empty calories for "bread" and opioids for "booze" and it seems plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

    Oh well, laissez les bons temps rouler!

    “I wish someone would research, as nutty as it sounds, is whether our current economic system is actually cheaper for producers than slavery would have been.”

    Sociology for the South: Or the Failure of Free Society (Classic Reprint) first published in 1854.

    Amazon’s About the Author:

    George Fitzhugh, lawyer, planter, newspaperman, sociologist, was born in Virginia in 1806. He married in 1829, had nine children, and lived until the Civil War in his wife’s home in Port Royal, Virginia. During this period he practiced law, was employed briefly in the Attorney General’s office, wrote for various periodicals and newspapers, and published two books, Sociology for the South, or the Failure of Free Society (1854) and Cannibals All! (1857). After a foray into abolitionist territory in 1856, including a debate in New Haven with Wendell Phillips, he returned to the South more convinced than ever of his position, and up to the War he remained hopeful of converting the North. Fitzhugh died in Texas in 1881.

    George Fitzhugh may have coined the word “sociology.” G.F. was active when Karl Marx was writing for New York newspapers. G.F. was probably familiar with Marxism in it’s Old Testament version, if you’ll pardon the expression.

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  246. @Dieter Kief

    Pulling France out of the EU is a big vote-loser
     
    As far as the euros stability and the net worth of savings are concerned: All EU economies, which are out of the Euro, are doing better in this hindsight, than do those in the Euro, as a rule of thumb: Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, Norway are financially better off than the mutually subsidizing economies such as Spain, Greece, Germany, Netherlands etc.

    German banks just started with negative inteest-rates, as aconsequence of the European Bank's flooding the market with new money - they print 60 Billion Euros monthly -and that's not all it does in order to reach the goal of the "quantitive easing" (= read: Deficit spending).

    But I agree - it's most likely too much of change, that Le Pen offers. And she made a curious decision: She declared, that she does n o t want to decide it herself, but leave it to a seperate, Nation-wide vote. Watching it from neighboring Germany, my feeling is, that this is inflicts a tad too much confusion for the average voter.

    Fillon is better equipped, because he directly adresses what's wrong with the Euro and argues for changing the financial politics of the EU (no easy task too, since Italy, Greece, Spain and Potugal side to keep subsidies high...).

    And Fillon, too, speaks out clearly against immigration.

    Little problem though: He admitted, that he is corrupt, after long debates ... and then just said: Well, I'm sorry, but my behavior was clearly not corrupt by the standards of the time, when it took place. His own party yawned...

    “she made a curious decision: She declared, that she does n o t want to decide it herself, but leave it to a separate, Nation-wide vote.”

    It’s not that curious. She probably realized that (for whatever reasons) French voters are ambivalent about it, so she must be ambivalent too.

    She is a professional politician, after all.

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    • Replies: @Fredrik
    Yes, but even though the French IMO are a strange bunch it's still probably too much to hear her speak about anything that isn't immigration.

    IMO, if Fillon is as sincere as it gets when speaking about immigration and other politics he's a better choice than Le Pen even though he's corrupt(and goes less far than Le Pen). At least he recognizes that there's a lot else failing in France now. Le Pen seems to want to double down on those things.
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  247. black sea says:
    @George
    The Guardian to the rescue:

    'The real misery is in the countryside': support for Le Pen surges in rural France

    Rift between ailing rural areas and far away big cities is where the Front National leader looks set to make her biggest voter gains

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/21/counryside-marine-le-pen-forgotten-france-presidential-election-2017

    Seems all those immigrants backstopping Paris real estate prices, require government services (to keep them from going Jihadi and rioting) that once were sent out to rural areas (to prevent peasant revolts).

    "The French, no fools, reserved their inner cities for what Whit Stillman’s characters call the High Urban Bourgeois."

    French had government central planning of everything roughly from the time Italians showed up and required them to learn latin to get a job with a government pension. The US only had government planning from the New Deal on. New York City and State a bit earlier in the 20s, read about it in The Power Broker.

    Due to immigration North Eastern cities and Chicago were mostly unhealthy slums for most of their history. From the little Zola I have read, Paris was less the city of light than it is now. In 1848 Napoleon III becomes Emporer of France and converts Paris into the administrative center of the shabby but number 2 world Empire. Much the same way Bush II converts Washinton DC into the administrative center of the shabby but number 1 world Empire. How did DC rise from the ashes, it used to be dump, worse than Detroit. Empire+taxpayer cash = Imperial treasure city.

    BTW, Chicago and all domestic finances are collapsing like the did after the failed Vietnam adventure, with the difference that back then state finances were actually fairly good. This time when Chicago goes down, Illinois goes down. Most Federal pensions are by design unreserved, although Uncle raises a lot of cash it might not be possible for Uncle to bail out Federal, state, local, and even Afghani pensions simultaneously.

    Living outside Paris is not like living outside Chicago. The public transportation works in France, the high speed rail and even the just fast commuter trans mean you are not isolated. Sort of like the US when rail roads were a new idea.

    American wood frame houses are baffling to foreigners. Always the cheapest construction on even the most expensive plots. Needless to say the French chopped down their old growth forests years ago so masonry buildings are required masonry.

    WWII was not fought in the US, much of recent living patterns were set based on the situation in 1946.

    I’ve never before heard the argument that George W. Bush converted Washington D.C. from “a dump, worse than Detroit,” to the gleaming imperial capital it is today. I’d want to see some evidence for that.

    “American wood frame houses are baffling to foreigners. Always the cheapest construction on even the most expensive plots.”

    I guess this is baffling only because most foreigners come from countries that have already exhausted their forest resources. The wood frame, or ballon frame, contruction method is an entirely rational option, particularly in residential construction. In America, brick houses are still built using wood framing. The brick just provides the exterior wall; it isn’t structural. We use wood framing because it is advantageous, not just “cheap.”

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    • Replies: @george strong
    Having lived overseas, stone/cement houses crack due to the temp changes of the seasons. Wood frame is best.
    , @Steve Sailer
    I think the balloon frame house was invented in Chicago shortly after it's founding about 175 years ago. Americans had lots of wood and lots of nails, but not much time for laboriously assembling houses, because they were moving West and needed a roof over their heads before winter.
    , @BB753
    Brick houses use steel frames and beams, which are superior to wooden frames. I expect you'll agree.
    , @Jack D
    We have a harsher climate than most of Europe - hotter summer, colder winters, so insulation is very important. Brick and stone look very sturdy (at least until there is an earthquake) but have very little insulating value. The hollow walls of a wood frame structure are easy to stuff with insulation.

    Europeans tend to build for the long term. American houses are more like cars - something with a finite life. My MIL lives in a ranch house that was built in the '50s. Even though it has not rotted away despite its cheap wood frame construction (as long as you keep the termites away and keep a good roof on it, it will last indefinitely) and is well maintained, when she goes it is a tear down - it's functionally obsolete.

    Technically speaking, modern American houses are no longer "balloon frame" but rather "platform frame". When balloon framing began, it was still possible to get long 2x4s the full height of a 2 story house (e.g. 16 or 20 feet) so they would build the outside walls in 1 piece and then "hang" the floors on ledger boards on the inside of the walls . But we no longer have timber of that quality. In addition, having uninterrupted cavities in the wall created a "chimney effect" in fires so they would spread rapidly from 1 floor to the next so it wasn't really a good idea.

    In platform framing you built a platform (floor deck) for the 1st floor, then the outside walls are built on top of the deck , then you cover them with another floor deck and then you build the next story's walls on top of that deck, etc.
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  248. @res

    The young will soon be incented to get rid of the old.
     
    The pension crisis is going to be ugly when it finally hits full force. Especially if the demographics of the payers are dramatically different from that of the payees.

    My bet is for around 2030 after the last of the baby boomers has retired. What does everyone else think?

    I think the Baby Boomers’ retirement is the force that is already making the pension crisis ugly.

    The growing wedge of non-native entitlement-claimers will ensure that the generational resentment gets compounded by ethnic resentment.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    I think the Baby Boomers’ retirement is the force that is already making the pension crisis ugly.

    The largest birth cohort recorded in that era was that of 1957, which numbered 4.3 million. As we speak, the 1957 cohort has a life expectancy of about 22 years. The Census Bureau estimates the population over 65 will increase from 15% to 22% of the total by 2040. Currently, disbursements to the elderly amount to about 3% of gross domestic product (with disbursements to the disabled and survivors about 1.5% of gdp). Increasing disbursements to the elderly from 3% to 4.5% of gdp, or raising the retirement age by 5 years, or doing some combination, need not cause a social crisis. Private pension plans may be defined contribution plans (the norm), actuarially sound defined-benefit plans, or actuarially unsound defined benefit plans. If they're the last sort, there's a standing set of procedures for the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation to implement cram-downs.
    , @res

    I think the Baby Boomers’ retirement is the force that is already making the pension crisis ugly.
     
    Agreed. AFAICT it only gets worse from here until 2030 ("ugly" is relative). The first of the baby boomers turned 65 in 2011. We are closer to the beginning of the crisis than the end.

    The growing wedge of non-native entitlement-claimers will ensure that the generational resentment gets compounded by ethnic resentment.
     
    Also agreed, but unsure whether the ethnic resentment will be greater for the mismatch between the majority of workers paying for non-native claimants or the minority of workers paying "their share" for all of the white baby boomers. The generational resentment will be even worse when those workers stop to think about the retirement ages and benefits for the boomers relative to what they are likely to receive.
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  249. Dan Hayes says:

    Steve,

    Caldwell is too good a man to be associated with the Weekly Standard!

    Maybe the political indepence and integrity of his late father-in-law Bob Novak rubbed off on him?

    Some years back in the Sunday New York Times he wrote a very impressive essay on the spiritual collapse of modern Ireland and the void that was left behind. Very perceptive!

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  250. Yak-15 says:
    @Peripatetic commenter
    So, it's very much a case of a generational conflict.

    The young will soon be incented to get rid of the old.

    Perhaps, but the old vote and their are 3x more of them than the young. Guess who wins?

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    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    When cities have huge pension liabilities that they cannot service I think they will find it easy to rationalize eliminating a few of those people. They could tell younger cops that they will get better pensions if they bump off some of those blood suckers.

    After all, look at what TPTB in Berkeley seem to have rationalized.
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  251. @Whiskey
    HBD people always pull back from the full HBD implications. The desire for "diversity" is HBD driven. It is not "Jews" or Gramscian Marxists or the Frankfurt School or the 68 generation. It is the full working of White people DNA full stop, that created Diversity. It is easy to see why. Kevin Williamson HATES HATES HATES his country cousins because he is mortified that his fellow minor aristocrats might mistake him for one of them.

    We have a landless aristocracy based not on feudal land-holdings (inevitably threatened by large amounts of Muslims, or Blacks/Africans, or Mexicans deciding that land belongs to THEM) but various managerial positions and middle-men rent extractor cronyist stuff like lobbying, etc.

    There was nothing to be imported from America, that tendency was already there -- add better treatment and freedom for women where in every nice little girl there is a nasty pr0n star and antifa "Moldylocks" waiting to get out, and you have a perfect storm. I read the Caldwell piece last night, it was perfect, and shows how organically just a few lucky managers made it to the top and now have a vast non-White servant class and can continue the important thing -- making war against their distant cousins who are not cool. Aided by the main vector of Cuckservatism -- loving Dads and Husbands coddling their wives and daughters.

    The interest of a landless, managerial aristocracy is as inimical and hostile to ordinary White people as the interest of single White women is to that of White men. Moldylocks is no more your friend than Michael Bloomberg. [Or Jerry Seinfeld, car collector, is your enemy. Think Jerry is keen on more car-b-ques?]

    Kevin Williamson is a gay mulatto who hates normal white people like Trump, because he can never be a normal white person.

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  252. @black sea
    I've never before heard the argument that George W. Bush converted Washington D.C. from "a dump, worse than Detroit," to the gleaming imperial capital it is today. I'd want to see some evidence for that.

    "American wood frame houses are baffling to foreigners. Always the cheapest construction on even the most expensive plots."

     

    I guess this is baffling only because most foreigners come from countries that have already exhausted their forest resources. The wood frame, or ballon frame, contruction method is an entirely rational option, particularly in residential construction. In America, brick houses are still built using wood framing. The brick just provides the exterior wall; it isn't structural. We use wood framing because it is advantageous, not just "cheap."

    Having lived overseas, stone/cement houses crack due to the temp changes of the seasons. Wood frame is best.

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  253. Yak-15 says:
    @The Alarmist
    The first chinks in British armour came after WW2 ... after so many commonwealth natives had given their lives for Britain, it was kind of hard to say they could not come in, and as they gained critical mass it became harder still to continue even concealed racism and it even became necessary to bend over backwards to keep the burgeoning immigant populations happy. Same deal with America, which in my view didn't contaminate the UK and Europe with the banality of PC, rather the political and social elite saw it as a tool to keep a constructive tension between the native non-elite and the burgeoning settler populations so that their own turf was left in relative peace.

    To an extent yes. The real moral dilemma came when they gave the colonies independence. Then all the half breeds who were loyal and died for British glory in the many past wars and administered their colonizes, like my grandparents, were chased out of country and forced into limbo.

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  254. Fredrik says:
    @Almost Missouri

    "she made a curious decision: She declared, that she does n o t want to decide it herself, but leave it to a separate, Nation-wide vote."
     
    It's not that curious. She probably realized that (for whatever reasons) French voters are ambivalent about it, so she must be ambivalent too.

    She is a professional politician, after all.

    Yes, but even though the French IMO are a strange bunch it’s still probably too much to hear her speak about anything that isn’t immigration.

    IMO, if Fillon is as sincere as it gets when speaking about immigration and other politics he’s a better choice than Le Pen even though he’s corrupt(and goes less far than Le Pen). At least he recognizes that there’s a lot else failing in France now. Le Pen seems to want to double down on those things.

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  255. @black sea
    I've never before heard the argument that George W. Bush converted Washington D.C. from "a dump, worse than Detroit," to the gleaming imperial capital it is today. I'd want to see some evidence for that.

    "American wood frame houses are baffling to foreigners. Always the cheapest construction on even the most expensive plots."

     

    I guess this is baffling only because most foreigners come from countries that have already exhausted their forest resources. The wood frame, or ballon frame, contruction method is an entirely rational option, particularly in residential construction. In America, brick houses are still built using wood framing. The brick just provides the exterior wall; it isn't structural. We use wood framing because it is advantageous, not just "cheap."

    I think the balloon frame house was invented in Chicago shortly after it’s founding about 175 years ago. Americans had lots of wood and lots of nails, but not much time for laboriously assembling houses, because they were moving West and needed a roof over their heads before winter.

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    England had a tradition of wood (timber) framed houses but they were big heavy timbers and it required skilled craftsmen to piece them together like furniture with mortises and tenons, etc. In Colonial America, carpenter was one of the most skilled, highest paying guilds.

    Automated saw mills and wire nail factories made sawed dimensional lumber (2x4, etc.) and nails cheap. In Colonial times, each nail had to be hammered out individually by a blacksmith and it took several minutes to make 1 nail so you can imagine how expensive they were. And you didn't need years of apprenticeship to be able to nail together a bunch of 2x4s.
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  256. dfordoom says: • Website
    @utu

    “Though this premise has been confirmed in much of the West for half a century, the assertion will shock many Americans, conditioned to place ‘inequality’ (bad) and ‘diversity’ (good) at opposite poles of a Manichean moral order.”
     

    I first began to notice this correlation about 25 years ago.
     
    Isn't 'diversity' a part of divide and rule strategy that is played on purpose. The 'inequality' is not the unwanted side effect but it is the actual goal. The left was subcontracted to carry out this stratagem of social engineering by pushing 'diversity'. When you think of it the left does not have any other functions since they abandoned the project of economic equality and when they stopped their pretense that they were against wars. Keeping fires under the racial and gender kettle is their only job.

    America is a pilot project for this social engineering. The elites recognized pretty early the benefits of having a significant Black minority they inherited from slavery. The slavery was the gift that kept on giving. Why not perform a similar operation in Sweden where the native got too upity and created society with the least of inequality which was possible because of their social cohesion and solidarity achievable in monotonic society only. After the defeat of communism Sweden as a showroom model of egalitarian capitalism was not needed anymore.

    When you think of it the left does not have any other functions since they abandoned the project of economic equality and when they stopped their pretense that they were against wars. Keeping fires under the racial and gender kettle is their only job.

    The “left” has been turned into a weapon to be used to destroy the working class. The left has been happy to go along since they never liked the working class anyway. The advantage is that they can now openly hate the working class.

    The deep loathing that socialists feel for working class people explains most of the history of the left. Indeed it explains most of post-WW2 history.

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  257. @Bleuteaux
    Something I wish someone would research, as nutty as it sounds, is whether our current economic system is actually cheaper for producers than slavery would have been. I'm sure slaves required food, shelter and medical care. In part time nation USA, how many people can't even get that from their employers?

    Marx and Engels showed in the Communist Manfesto, that capitalsim is about rationality and effectiveness – and that it sweeps away the oldways, wherever it succeeds. Marx said, that this was a good thing – you could go on from there, that this was, how slavery was overcome in the hole wide world. And if you look around, it has been overcome – for sure not only because it was more effctive, but in saying it was more rational, you also claim, that it was more just (etc.) – but that’s not only Marx anymore, that’s Max Weber and G. H. Mead and Talcott Parsons etc. (Durkheim!) too.

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  258. Anon 2 says:
    @Abe

    Teilhard de Chardin, Raymond Aron, Montaigne, Bergson, Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire to come up with a few, totally off-the-cuff.
     
    Right. And also Foucault. I realized even as I wrote my original comment that I was being peremptory and a bit immoderate, but I think my basic assertion still holds- for the past 100-150 years, behind almost every French intellectual of note, there's a German who's done the intellectual heavy-lifting which made it all possible. Heck, Freudianism is still the biggest thing going in mental health in France from what I've read.

    Steve made no assertions about “cornerstone intellectuals” by which I suppose you mean philosophers working on foundational stuff. But Steve mentioned “lucidity of prose and fame of history”
     
    Right, and I remember up until sometime in the '90's when even in high-brow American intellectual circles it was either 1789 or 1848 all the time (cf. Paul Berman, who someone brought up the other day in another thread). But things change, and now it's always either 1933 or 1939. Germans bring the big ideas (and now our historical touchpoints); French bring the coffee and black turtlenecks.

    Marx and Freud have been discredited as
    basically B.S. artists since they claimed to know
    (how the societies work and how the mind works)
    what was unknowable then and is still unknowable
    today. And there are still questions regarding Einstein’s
    priority in the development of the Special Theory of
    Relativity (see, for example, the recent book by Roger
    Schlafly entitled ” How Einstein Ruined Physics”)

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  259. sb says:
    @Randal
    Judging by the extracts you've quoted, at any rate, France appears to have much the same social pathology as does my own country.


    At the opening of his new book, Guilluy describes twenty-first-century France as “an ‘American’ society like any other, unequal and multicultural.” It’s a controversial premise—that inequality and racial diversity are linked as part of the same (American-type) system and that they progress or decline together.
     
    I don't expect to gain any popularity here by suggesting it, but there is a legitimate question to be asked about the extent which the problems of multiculturalism and the pro-immigration society, as well as the obsessive antiracist ideology and the cult of white guilt, have been imported into Britain and Europe post-WW2 from US society, along with all the routine cultural pollution of US music, films and TV.

    For certain there were also indigenous British and European contributions to these societal pathologies (post-imperial guilt, etc), but the reality is that since the end of the drawn out suicide of the European powers in WW1 & WW2 the US has been economically and politically utterly dominant, and that means most of the cultural traffic has been in one direction.

    Spot on .
    This is something Americans will rarely admit .Even Americans who don’t like the way their country has gone can’t bring themselves to say anything other than for all her problems America is still the best of all lands

    I have heard Americans go on and on for the last 50 years about how dreadfully racist and dreadfully white bread vanilla boring not to mention backwards and primitive my country Australia is .Some of them were even gentile .

    Of course we have enough fools of our own who take this commentary to heart .
    It can be pretty hard to ignore the biggest kid on the block

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  260. @syonredux

    And then, a dynamic started working, that could have been forseen – but hardly was, really: The anti-authoritarianism of deconstructivism (no method, no rules, no teacher) blended perfectly with the dumber hippie-stuff and the youth-revolt of the Sixties and made for some kind of over-orchestration of the oedipal side, that’s always (=necessarily) involved in colledge-education.
     
    Interestingly, the most authoritarian profs that I had in grad school were devotees of Derrida.....

    That’s what happened on a pretty big scale: The super-autoritarian types switched over fom Maoism, Trotskyism, Third-Worldism (…), RAF- and Brigade-Rosse-Terrorism to Deconstructivism. I’m not ironic now, when I state, that this was a great acomplishment of Derrida and the like. And it did indeed help to sweep paleo-Communism off the agenda in Germany, where I had a first-row seat (and did activey take part in those fights from a usally loathed social democratic position) and in Italy and in France (thanks god the french got rid of their communists – France had the most frightening communists I’ve come across in the Western world).

    Habermas dedicated his in this field ground-breaking and to this day unsurpassed “Philosophical Discourse of Modernity” “to Rebecca” for bringing him “in close contact with Deconstructivism and Postmodernism”, which he dismantled completely, so to speak. – A parent (Habermas), that took his offspring (Rebecca) serious, – – whom I came across quite often, because we studied (and I sometimes taught) at the same university (Konstanz).
    At Konstanz university, I was the first ever to openly critizise Postmodernism and Deconstructivism in a university course I gave in 86 – to the great embaressment of almost all of my peers. The one guy who took part in this course and was reluctant and really open to my critical arguments was a psychologist, who later became a really populuar German comedian, Georg Schramm, who often critizised the German left via role-prose: He then spoke as information-officer Sanftleben of the German military, which, for the reasons I stated above, indeed made sense

    (My comment No. 204 above might be of interest for you, too).

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  261. @Moshe
    WOW!

    This reads like a satirical sendup of a stalinst show trial...

    You Must Read This

    http://m.huffingtonpost.co.za/2017/04/19/revealed-here-is-shelley-garland-and-why-he-did-it_a_22046533/

    Aargh! He shouldn’t have apologized. Now he’ll just be the South African Tom MacMaster–if he isn’t hounded out of employment and life altogether, when he could have been the South African Godfrey Elfwick or even Alan Sokal.

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  262. Nico says:
    @22pp22
    Last year I went back to Paris for the first time in ages to visit friends. I know how much I have aged because of the look of shock I saw on their faces.

    You can no longer cut yourself off from cultural enrichment in France. The centre of the city now has the same demographics as the banlieues. The metro is filthy and everything is overpriced.

    Provincial France offfers margnally better value for money. Italy is far better although some of the smaller towns are showing the tell-tale signs of enrichment. Mostly, though, they seems to be sending their enrichers north.

    P.S. I don't know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don't marry women old enough to be their mothers.

    P.S. I don’t know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don’t marry women old enough to be their mothers.

    As I’ve said before on these pages, I definitely wanted to believe hearsay that Macron was a closet homo and his MILF of a wife a beard, but I was forced to conclude that this was almost certainly an urban legend. The silver bullet came when my younger brother put out an offer of 2000€ to anyone who could prove Macron was gay. Our other brother took him up on it, and managed to make connections allowing him to infiltrate the Parisian gay underworld of Marais pubs and “Zipper” sex-exchange smartphone apps, and nobody could turn up anything.

    There’s also the fact of his marriage, not really what you would expect of someone trying to put up a front. Your standard cynical asshole politician, gay or straight, would choose either a tactical marriage to a very well-brought-up heiress, hence Jacques Chirac’s union with Bernadette Chodron de Courcel, or a discreet “hidden treasure” five to ten years younger to be seen and not heard from, such as Jim McGreevy’s working-class Portuguese Ironbound bombshell Dina Matos. By contrast, the Macron marriage was pushed through over considerable objection. Emmanuel’s mother actually marched in to confront Brigitte Trogneux, 24 years her son’s senior and his high school French teacher and the divorced mother of three daughters including one her boy-toy’s age, and forbade et from seeing Emmanuel again until his 18th birthday. (She was kind; I would have called the police first.) Brigitte broke down in tears and said she didn’t know if she could force herself to honor that request. Mrs. Macron tried to reason with her: she’d had her life and if Emmanuel stayed with her he’d never have issue. Eventually the Macrons were reconciled/resigned to the union and by all accounts Emmanuel and Brigitte Macron are in fact very much in love.

    That’s not to say the union is not creepy or bizarre. It definitely is, and our ancestors would rightfully have looked upon a man who could have any woman he chose (as Macron certainly could have) and decided to foresake reproduction for “true love” as what we now call “cucky.”

    I have no doubt Macron’s avowed and open enthusiasm for the ongoing Grand Remplacement of actual French people with inbred Muslims and savage Africans is deeply linked to the “cuck” psychosis. However, I have also learned the hard way not to bother arguing with the Macronistes: the man’s partisans are as you might expect pretty conventional P.C. yuppies brainwashed into believing there can be a perennial accommodation for such a thing as “moderate Islam” that is profoundly and unremarkably “French.” (Not coincidently many of them have one or another stake in the liberal international order. So do I, unfortunately, but I prefer to keep France Catholic and livable. My bank account isn’t meant to buy property in the dar-al-Islam.)

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    • Replies: @Anon

    my younger brother put out an offer of 2000€ to anyone who could prove Macron was gay. Our other brother took him up on it, and managed to make connections allowing him to infiltrate the Parisian gay underworld of Marais pubs and “Zipper” sex-exchange smartphone apps, and nobody could turn up anything.
     
    Has there ever been a soap opera based on your life?
    , @Flip
    And how stupid was King Edward VIII to give up his throne for that hideous woman?
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  263. @EriK
    Perhaps I misunderstand your point, but Ferguson never wrote for the American Spectator.

    Ferguson wrote for the WSJ in the 1980s. Another guy well worth reading.

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    I'm a fan but didn't understand the point.
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  264. BB753 says:
    @black sea
    I've never before heard the argument that George W. Bush converted Washington D.C. from "a dump, worse than Detroit," to the gleaming imperial capital it is today. I'd want to see some evidence for that.

    "American wood frame houses are baffling to foreigners. Always the cheapest construction on even the most expensive plots."

     

    I guess this is baffling only because most foreigners come from countries that have already exhausted their forest resources. The wood frame, or ballon frame, contruction method is an entirely rational option, particularly in residential construction. In America, brick houses are still built using wood framing. The brick just provides the exterior wall; it isn't structural. We use wood framing because it is advantageous, not just "cheap."

    Brick houses use steel frames and beams, which are superior to wooden frames. I expect you’ll agree.

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    • Replies: @black sea
    For those with an ongoing interest in the topic:

    http://www.kompareit.com/homeandgarden/construction-compare-steel-vs-wood-house-framing.html


    Apparently, wood-framing offers advantages and disadvantages, as does steel-framing. Since I don't work in the construction industry, I'll leave the final judgement to the people financing and constructing the houses.
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  265. mobi says:
    @Vinay
    "an apparently uniquely diverse perspective not adequately conveyed by Roger Cohen, David Brooks, and/or Tom Friedman. "

    Jews on opposite sides of the political divide seem as contemptuous of each other as whites on opposite sides of the political divide. Given this, I just don't understand your apparent belief that Jews are somehow interchangeable. They don't even seem to share support for Israel in common, given the Jewish support for BDS.

    If you think whites have earned their disproportionate prominence in the world, why do you insist on denying the same sense of entitlement for Jewish people? Surely they've paid their dues, right?

    “If you think whites have earned their disproportionate prominence in the world, why do you insist on denying the same sense of entitlement for Jewish people? Surely they’ve paid their dues, right?”

    Try this thought experiment:

    ‘Every parasite has earned its success, every bit as much as every host has (true). Therefore, what right does the host have to oppose their parasitism?’

    Correct, or not correct?

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  266. @Yak-15
    Perhaps, but the old vote and their are 3x more of them than the young. Guess who wins?

    When cities have huge pension liabilities that they cannot service I think they will find it easy to rationalize eliminating a few of those people. They could tell younger cops that they will get better pensions if they bump off some of those blood suckers.

    After all, look at what TPTB in Berkeley seem to have rationalized.

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    I see muni bankruptcy and renegotiation before elimination of the elderly.

    What is TPTB?
    , @Yak-15
    The biggest problem is the ethnic age divide. As a Muslim, why vote to pay for old white pensioners instead of the Ummah?
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  267. Jack D says:
    @black sea
    I've never before heard the argument that George W. Bush converted Washington D.C. from "a dump, worse than Detroit," to the gleaming imperial capital it is today. I'd want to see some evidence for that.

    "American wood frame houses are baffling to foreigners. Always the cheapest construction on even the most expensive plots."

     

    I guess this is baffling only because most foreigners come from countries that have already exhausted their forest resources. The wood frame, or ballon frame, contruction method is an entirely rational option, particularly in residential construction. In America, brick houses are still built using wood framing. The brick just provides the exterior wall; it isn't structural. We use wood framing because it is advantageous, not just "cheap."

    We have a harsher climate than most of Europe – hotter summer, colder winters, so insulation is very important. Brick and stone look very sturdy (at least until there is an earthquake) but have very little insulating value. The hollow walls of a wood frame structure are easy to stuff with insulation.

    Europeans tend to build for the long term. American houses are more like cars – something with a finite life. My MIL lives in a ranch house that was built in the ’50s. Even though it has not rotted away despite its cheap wood frame construction (as long as you keep the termites away and keep a good roof on it, it will last indefinitely) and is well maintained, when she goes it is a tear down – it’s functionally obsolete.

    Technically speaking, modern American houses are no longer “balloon frame” but rather “platform frame”. When balloon framing began, it was still possible to get long 2x4s the full height of a 2 story house (e.g. 16 or 20 feet) so they would build the outside walls in 1 piece and then “hang” the floors on ledger boards on the inside of the walls . But we no longer have timber of that quality. In addition, having uninterrupted cavities in the wall created a “chimney effect” in fires so they would spread rapidly from 1 floor to the next so it wasn’t really a good idea.

    In platform framing you built a platform (floor deck) for the 1st floor, then the outside walls are built on top of the deck , then you cover them with another floor deck and then you build the next story’s walls on top of that deck, etc.

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  268. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I think the balloon frame house was invented in Chicago shortly after it's founding about 175 years ago. Americans had lots of wood and lots of nails, but not much time for laboriously assembling houses, because they were moving West and needed a roof over their heads before winter.

    England had a tradition of wood (timber) framed houses but they were big heavy timbers and it required skilled craftsmen to piece them together like furniture with mortises and tenons, etc. In Colonial America, carpenter was one of the most skilled, highest paying guilds.

    Automated saw mills and wire nail factories made sawed dimensional lumber (2×4, etc.) and nails cheap. In Colonial times, each nail had to be hammered out individually by a blacksmith and it took several minutes to make 1 nail so you can imagine how expensive they were. And you didn’t need years of apprenticeship to be able to nail together a bunch of 2x4s.

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  269. Art Deco says:
    @Yak-15
    I was also recently in France and had dinner in provincial Avignon at a family friend's house. The apartments that surround her house and a few others have been recently colonized by Islam. All the neighboring houses have sold for a loss (to Muslims) and they are the last French family remaining.

    Though she claimed to feel safe and had not experienced burglary (yet), she said that the housing prices halved and that they were selling and moving to the coast. She said that nobody wants to live in their neighborhood because no one wants to send their kids to school with the new diversity. She also spoke endlessly about how, as a public nurse, 80 pct of her patients are Muslims. Her and her husband were angry at the situation.

    Nonetheless, her and her husband hate La Pen and are not voting for her. Why? Because she is threatening to pull out of the Euro which threatens their pension payments. If France loses the euro the value of the new currency will be significantly less than the Euro. All old pensioners would see a huge reduction in their payments. So, many elderly will not vote La Pen for that reason. I predict she loses because of her euro stance.

    All old pensioners would see a huge reduction in their payments.

    They only see that if there is a large devaluation and their household consumption bundle is heavily dependent on imports.

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    • Replies: @Yak-15
    If a noveau Franc is floated it will likely trade at a discount to the global reserve currencies including the euro. But I recognize scenarios where it moves either way relative to the Euro.

    Maybe the euro becomes a defacto d-Mark and it goes up in value, maybe the weight of the peripheral countries drags the value of the euro down.

    Additionally, I believe a large part of the goods baskets in France consist of imports. At least, imports from other EU countries. Regardless, the perception I was given was that many pensioners in France feel they would stand to lose a lot if the Franc was resurrected.
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  270. Art Deco says:
    @22pp22
    Last year I went back to Paris for the first time in ages to visit friends. I know how much I have aged because of the look of shock I saw on their faces.

    You can no longer cut yourself off from cultural enrichment in France. The centre of the city now has the same demographics as the banlieues. The metro is filthy and everything is overpriced.

    Provincial France offfers margnally better value for money. Italy is far better although some of the smaller towns are showing the tell-tale signs of enrichment. Mostly, though, they seems to be sending their enrichers north.

    P.S. I don't know what shade of LGBTXYZFU, Macron is, but normal guys don't marry women old enough to be their mothers.

    Mrs. Macron is 24 years his senior. She has children his age. Supposedly, they started seeing each other around 1994 and his parents arranged for him to complete high school elsewhere to keep them separated. She married him 10 years ago. They haven’t any children. He is bizarre, but since this mess started when he was 17, it’s doubtful that homosexuality is his specific problem.

    Jackie Battley Gingrich was 8 years her husband’s senior. She took up with Gingrich after his first year in college and married him when she was 27. She’d not been previously married. All of the children both have derived from that marriage. Gingrich’s subsequent wives are 8 and 23 years his junior.

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  271. @Dieter Kief
    This one by Andrew Marr about PC in the BBC in 1999 might become an evergreen on this blog -

    - "And the final answer, frankly, is the vigorous use of state power to coerce and repress. It may be my Presbyterian background, but I firmly believe that repression can be a great, civilising instrument for good. Stamp hard on certain ‘natural’ beliefs for long enough and you can almost kill them off. The police are first in line to be burdened further, but a new Race Relations Act will impose the will of the state on millions of other lives too.

    Poor? Stupid? Racist? Then don’t listen to a pampered white liberal like me."

    It may be my Presbyterian background, but I firmly believe that repression can be a great, civilising instrument for good. Stamp hard on certain ‘natural’ beliefs for long enough and you can almost kill them off.

    No, that’s a (somewhat sick, twisted) version of Methodist Arminianism. Presbyterians believe that God alone is the great, civilizing instrument. If your faith and focus is on God and His commandments, it may well crowd out those natural beliefs – in fact many of us are counting on it – but they can’t be directly killed off as they’re part of our inherent, fallen, human nature.

    It’s akin to trying to eliminate the IQ gap.

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Freedom implies sin - and possible failure.

    Andrew Marr could also be read as a kind of superficial seculariser.
    It was Adorno, who pointed out again and again, that secularization is not to be taken lightly at all.

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  272. Anon 2 says:

    Some of the French (in France) I’m in contact with are
    convinced that ISIS wants Le Pen to win in order to facilitate
    recruitment, since Le Pen will be tough on Muslims, and
    therefore they expect more terrorist attacks in the coming
    days. The goal is to radicalize the French public. Sounds
    like a liberal argument to prevent people from giving
    Le Pen their vote

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  273. res says:
    @PV van der Byl
    2030 sounds plausible. But, how did you arrive at that date? Is it just 65 years after 1965, commonly thought of as the end of the Baby boom?

    Pretty much. I’m more used to thinking of 1964 as the end of the baby boom, but 2030 is a round number and I would expect some time delay.

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  274. Art Deco says:
    @Almost Missouri
    I think the Baby Boomers' retirement is the force that is already making the pension crisis ugly.

    The growing wedge of non-native entitlement-claimers will ensure that the generational resentment gets compounded by ethnic resentment.

    I think the Baby Boomers’ retirement is the force that is already making the pension crisis ugly.

    The largest birth cohort recorded in that era was that of 1957, which numbered 4.3 million. As we speak, the 1957 cohort has a life expectancy of about 22 years. The Census Bureau estimates the population over 65 will increase from 15% to 22% of the total by 2040. Currently, disbursements to the elderly amount to about 3% of gross domestic product (with disbursements to the disabled and survivors about 1.5% of gdp). Increasing disbursements to the elderly from 3% to 4.5% of gdp, or raising the retirement age by 5 years, or doing some combination, need not cause a social crisis. Private pension plans may be defined contribution plans (the norm), actuarially sound defined-benefit plans, or actuarially unsound defined benefit plans. If they’re the last sort, there’s a standing set of procedures for the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation to implement cram-downs.

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri

    "The Census Bureau estimates the population over 65 will increase from 15% to 22% of the total by 2040. Currently, disbursements to the elderly amount to about 3% of gross domestic product (with disbursements to the disabled and survivors about 1.5% of gdp)."
     
    Or put another way, Federal pension disbursements, which already exceed Federal revenues, have to jump up by another half, while the taxpaying portion of the population shrinks by 8%. Anybody see a problem with that?

    "Private pension plans may be defined contribution plans (the norm), actuarially sound defined-benefit plans, or actuarially unsound defined benefit plans. If they’re the last sort, there’s a standing set of procedures for the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation to implement cram-downs."
     
    Note that about 80% of defined benefit pensions are the "last sort" (unsound). The total amount of unsoundness is unknown but probably in the trillion dollar range. The PBGC is technically insolvent so that means, as you say, a trillion dollar cram down.

    What does a trillion dollar cram down look like? Well, if the average pensioner is screwed out of $100,000, that means 10,000,000 more disgruntled pensioners. Those people vote. They will vote to dispossess the shrinking portion of current workers in order to recover some of what they feel (not wrongly) they are owed. Even the dumbest politician can do that electoral math. At the very least, the Coalition of Resentment has its most potent new member ever.

    And this doesn't even consider the generally parlous state of public finances, the effect of immigration--and chain migration ("family reunification") in particular--in boosting the entitlement-harvesting portion of the population, without helping the entitlement-payers, or the increasing portion of the population taking other sorts of entitlements: disability, food stamps, WIC, etc.

    At some point, the ability of the makers to support the takers ends. We are taking giant steps toward that place. The pension crisis is one of those giant steps.
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  275. res says:
    @Almost Missouri
    I think the Baby Boomers' retirement is the force that is already making the pension crisis ugly.

    The growing wedge of non-native entitlement-claimers will ensure that the generational resentment gets compounded by ethnic resentment.

    I think the Baby Boomers’ retirement is the force that is already making the pension crisis ugly.

    Agreed. AFAICT it only gets worse from here until 2030 (“ugly” is relative). The first of the baby boomers turned 65 in 2011. We are closer to the beginning of the crisis than the end.

    The growing wedge of non-native entitlement-claimers will ensure that the generational resentment gets compounded by ethnic resentment.

    Also agreed, but unsure whether the ethnic resentment will be greater for the mismatch between the majority of workers paying for non-native claimants or the minority of workers paying “their share” for all of the white baby boomers. The generational resentment will be even worse when those workers stop to think about the retirement ages and benefits for the boomers relative to what they are likely to receive.

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  276. Duke says:
    @Tiny Duck
    How does it feel? Knowing that white men are going to pay for their crimes against humanity? Demographics is destiny.

    I think if it’s a matter as simplistic as race and gender, I put my money on the white guys. They’ve been holding back becuase of the PC successes of leftist fascist. As PC BS power wanes, thier supporters are in for a shit storm of pain.

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  277. Art Deco says:

    Agreed. AFAICT it only gets worse from here until 2030 (“ugly” is relative). The first of the baby boomers turned 65 in 2011. We are closer to the beginning of the crisis than the end.

    The nadir of the Depression era birth trough was in 1936. Birth cohorts increased in size somehat jaggedly and unevenly from 1936 to 1945, then fairly rapidly from 1945 to 1952, then at a modest pace from 1952 to 1957, then declined for 19 years. The bulk of the increase occurred between 1939 and 1952. The mean retirement age is 63, All of the boom cohorts will have reached retirement age by 2020. The median age at death is about 79, so those born during the era of larger and larger birth cohorts is beginning to shuffle off.

    The dimensions of the demographic boom are overstated, as are their effects.

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    • Replies: @res
    The decline from 1957 to 1964 was fairly gradual. Let's make this more concrete: https://www.infoplease.com/us/births/live-births-and-birth-rates-year
    Because of the greater population in 1964 the number of live births was greater then than in 1952 even though the birth rate was 16% lower.

    I think that data makes a strong case for the boom ending in 1964 (as commonly stated) in which case all the boom cohorts will have reached 65 in 2029.


    The dimensions of the demographic boom are overstated, as are their effects.
     
    This sounds like a conversation better held in 20 years. If you can make your statement concrete enough to bet on I suspect you would find some takers here.
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  278. @Detective Club
    After the dust settles in May and Macron beats Le Pen (65%-35%) en ballotage, the French will be faced with an insoluble problem (Third-World immigration) that simply will not go away. A problem that cannot be solved by a socialist Rothschild banker (Macron) who spends all his free time in gay bars in order to escape the clutches of his elderly mother - - - I mean wife.

    Like in any other Western nation, the majority of its citizens fully subscribe to the madness that the way to solve the immigration problem is to let in more Third-Worlders, and if you foolishly try to deport them you will have wholesale riots that will certainly spill over into White areas. Best let "Them" be. Appeasement is the only sensible way to postpone the Day of Reckoning.

    The riots are surely coming but these riots will strictly be on the immigrants' terms. In France, they only burn cars these days. But these immigrants are only a short step away from burning "The Butters" in the streets (Whites = les beurres : French Arab slang for Whites).

    When Macron's favorite gay bar gets firebombed down to the ground, perhaps then and only then will he act.

    Like in any other Western nation, the majority of its citizens fully subscribe to the madness that the way to solve the immigration problem is to let in more Third-Worlders, and if you foolishly try to deport them you will have wholesale riots that will certainly spill over into White areas.

    I don’t think anyone in this Western nation believes that, let alone a majority of citizens.

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  279. @Yak-15
    I was also recently in France and had dinner in provincial Avignon at a family friend's house. The apartments that surround her house and a few others have been recently colonized by Islam. All the neighboring houses have sold for a loss (to Muslims) and they are the last French family remaining.

    Though she claimed to feel safe and had not experienced burglary (yet), she said that the housing prices halved and that they were selling and moving to the coast. She said that nobody wants to live in their neighborhood because no one wants to send their kids to school with the new diversity. She also spoke endlessly about how, as a public nurse, 80 pct of her patients are Muslims. Her and her husband were angry at the situation.

    Nonetheless, her and her husband hate La Pen and are not voting for her. Why? Because she is threatening to pull out of the Euro which threatens their pension payments. If France loses the euro the value of the new currency will be significantly less than the Euro. All old pensioners would see a huge reduction in their payments. So, many elderly will not vote La Pen for that reason. I predict she loses because of her euro stance.

    Though she claimed to feel safe and had not experienced burglary (yet), she said that the housing prices halved and that they were selling and moving to the coast. She said that nobody wants to live in their neighborhood because no one wants to send their kids to school with the new diversity. She also spoke endlessly about how, as a public nurse, 80 pct of her patients are Muslims. Her and her husband were angry at the situation.

    Nonetheless, her and her husband hate La Pen and are not voting for her. Why? Because she is threatening to pull out of the Euro which threatens their pension payments. If France loses the euro the value of the new currency will be significantly less than the Euro. All old pensioners would see a huge reduction in their payments. So, many elderly will not vote La Pen for that reason. I predict she loses because of her euro stance.

    Idiots. Hostile rulers will repeal their pensions when they have the political strength to do so.

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    • Replies: @Yak-15
    That is almost certainly true. Why would muslim voters choose to pay for the expensive pensions of old whites instead of handouts for other Muslims?
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  280. @Bleuteaux
    He may downplay the effect of (((tribalism))), but when it comes to the attitudes and purposes of our white, gentile oligarchy, he's quite accurate. Anyone who spends time today in the business world understands this.

    Whatever their faults, it isn't a bunch of Jews dumping the entire native IT department for wage slaves from the subcontinent, or replacing white men in management positions with compliant, politically-favorable beneficiaries.

    But it was largely Jewish corporate raiders such as Michael Milken and Trump’s Carl Icahn, who started all of this in the ’80s by using hostile takeovers to vote out managers who, instead of maximizing returns to stockholders, by, for example, outsourcing to China, gave good wages to their workers and contributed to local charities and infrastructure. That is, they cared for their own “deplorables”.

    You can read all about it in “The Predator’s Ball”, and “Barbarians at the Gate”.

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    • Replies: @Bleuteaux
    I agree 100%. But the day-to-day assholes in Corporate America spread throughout the country are not all or even majority Jewish.

    I'll have to check out those books. I do think it is a major under covered story how Wall Street (in that case, mostly Jews) have turned every single company in the country into essentially a subsidiary of itself, to the point where corporate bullshit like "shareholder value add" are everyday phrases.