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  1. What’s to say? Cheetos!

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  2. The uploader has not made this video in your country.

    I’m in South Africa – that’s So Racist!

    Can’t be arsed to fire up a proxy.

    Read More
    • Agree: Harold
    • Replies: @Iain
    Same in NZ :-(
    , @jim jones
    Tunnelbear is a simple, free VPN I use for situations like that. Information wants to be free.
    , @Frau Katze
    Not available in Canada either.
    , @theo the kraut
    Opera has free proxies.

    1) install Opera
    2) install "open in Opera" add-ons for Chrome or Firefox
    3) use right-click "open in Opera" for any geo-protected website

    https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/open-with-opera/ncnicmhfhjancnjbemnfipofidciaplf?hl=en

    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/open-with-opera

    Else, Tunnelbear for Chrome:

    https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/tunnelbear-vpn/omdakjcmkglenbhjadbccaookpfjihpa/related?hl=en
  3. Pretty much sums up the lib domination of the MSM when one of its biggest showpieces can make fun of the irony of their worldview, do it with a straight face, and not for a minute think that what they advocate in real life might actually be absurd.

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    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    Well... it's nice to know that comedy can still trump ideology.
    , @Rotten
    No, this sketch covers for the MSM.

    "Murphy and Kennedy?" Do the Irish really control the advertising industry? More like ((Murphy & Kennedy)).

    If you look, you'll find either a ((advertising agency)) or a ((cooperative executive)) in nearly every case where advertising seems to promote some sort of social justice issue instead of a product.
  4. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    seems like even the media has noticed how cringe-making big business’ advertising propaganda for cheap labor has become

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  5. With the title of the sketch, I thought for sure it would be another sketch in mockery of HerrTrumpenator, since the Left has settled on “Orange Cheeto Man” as one of their go-to insults.

    I’m guessing it started off that way—an anti-Trump sketch with Baldwin doing his Trump impression as the new spokesman for Cheetos, going well over the top with each pitch, and while the other side pitched virtue-signalling, after-school-special, pro-Mexican-and-Muslim-immigrant commercials (perhaps with Trump deporting the other side at the end of the sketch).

    But sometime in development Lorne Michaels stepped in (maybe with Jim Downey’s input) and told them that 500 anti-Trump sketches was too many, and that they should change the sketch but keep the bare bones of an ad pitch at Cheetos, and even keep Baldwin.

    Then someone piped up how all the virtue-signalling commercials were actually not enjoyable and actually pretty grating and crass and they switched the focus of the sketch from celebrating corporate virtue-signalling/attacking Trump to attacking corporate virtue-signalling. (Given Baldwin’s lack of self-awareness, it probably had to be explained to him several times that his virtue-signalling was actually the butt of the joke.)

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    • Agree: dcthrowback
    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    Well, they outsmart themselves because even real commercials with their "messages" inspire me to change channels. It isn't that there aren't options. Those who sell commercials should consider that; whether this commercial is going to drive away "channel surfers" of which there are plenty.
  6. @NickG

    The uploader has not made this video in your country.
     
    I'm in South Africa - that's So Racist!

    Can't be arsed to fire up a proxy.

    Same in NZ :-(

    Read More
    • Replies: @NeonBets
    FWIW: http://instantunblock.com/ works well when you just want a simple proxy for a quick video view.
  7. @The Alarmist
    Pretty much sums up the lib domination of the MSM when one of its biggest showpieces can make fun of the irony of their worldview, do it with a straight face, and not for a minute think that what they advocate in real life might actually be absurd.

    Well… it’s nice to know that comedy can still trump ideology.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist

    Well… it’s nice to know that comedy can still trump ideology.
     
    Pun intended?
  8. The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.

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    • Replies: @anon
    We do have our own comedians. Ever heard of memes?
    , @NC
    Agree 100%. That wasn't even that funny only competent hackery. Million Dollar Extreme was on adult swim, but they were cancelled and blacklisted despite high ratings when someone noticed that they were right wing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIGjr3MuL3g
    , @Anonymous

    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.
     
    Comedy? Oh, that's what that is. Maybe I'm a tough audience but I can sit through a bunch of Comedy Central stand up routines and at most crack a smile (even when I'm trying). Why is it that I can laugh my ass off reading some posts by Steve Sailer yet can sit through whole comedy shows and only crack a smile? And that's only to appease my wife, who spent a lot on tickets for comedy shows at the nearby Wilbur Theatre. Two comedians I have found laugh-out-loud funny are Brian Regan and the late Mitch Hedberg, and funny enough, I couldn't discern their political leanings.

    Here's my sense of humor. A commercial for Berlitz language school: The German Coastguard.

    , @Danindc
    Colin Quinn and the lesser known Nick DiPaulo. Every other comedian is worthless.

    DIPaulo is not hiding anything but Quinn still wants a glimpse of mainstream films, tv etc so he mostly keeps quiet. Understandably.
    , @Simon in London
    True - it was funny though.
    , @AndrewR
    Murdoch Murdoch is really funny and well-done for a YouTube channel with a five figure subscriber count. If they had corporate backing it would be the best thing in TV history but that will norlt happen in the foreseeable future because of how non-PC it is (it's non-PC enough to make "non-PC" "conservatives" counter-signal how awful and racist it is).

    I'd link it but can't quite figure out how on my phone.

    , @Mr. Anon
    True. The occasional funny bit is hardly worth the excruciating experience of sitting through SNL. And they have become so political that, in addition to being merely unfunny, they are blatantly offensive to about half the country. Screw 'em.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    I don't know about you, but I find Ann Coulter to be pretty damn funny.
    , @Gunnar von Cowtown
    I've long suspected Anthony Jeselnik of being right-wing and a crypto-iSteve reader. His "Google Search & Destroy" bit was just Steve's "Google Gaydar" carried out to its logical point of absurdity.

    Fun fact; he used to date Amy Schumer. Both of them had shows picked up by Comedy Central at the same time. One of them became a huge movie star/media gadfly. The other was actually funny.
    , @Massimo Heitor

    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.
     
    SNL has done excellent right wing humor, even alt-right humor, that I already linked in this thread. SNL has different writers and comedians that range across the political spectrum. Famous SNL alum with outspoken right wing views include Adam Sandler, Norm MacDonald, Colin Quinn, Dennis Miller, Victoria Jackson, Jon Lovitz, David Spade.

    I love great comedy and great political comedy and great right wing political comedy wherever I can find it. Ann Coulter can be funny, Steve Sailer has his great gags here and there, mark steyn has his funny moments. Milo is a right wing entertainer with a few funny moments.

    Here's another SNL skit that mocks the left that I missed. This is from moderate leftist Robert Smigel, who is hilarious, but unfortunately, still left:
    https://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/tv-funhouse-blue-state-santa/n12657?snl=1
    , @candid_observer
    I think that, as the Trump Revolution works its way through our culture, any number of comedians will be pulled in by its defiant anti-Establishment attitude. In fact, they will probably be among the first to go -- irreverence is the real cause of any genuine comedian.

    The problem for right wing comedians to date has been that the right has been in the past so much associated with the Establishment -- either the smug rich, or the smug Christian Right. But the Trump Revolution has nothing to do with that. Milo, whatever else he may represent, is a good example of how thoroughly this new thing of ours rejects the staid mores of the old right.

    Irreverence is The Force for authentic comedians -- and I expect to see an increasing number of them falling under its power. And the more oppressive the left inclines -- and it always inclines toward further oppression -- the more comedians will pull free of its grasp.
    , @Forbes
    Well the prog-left is unearthing graveyard quantities of bones for use as comedy material if anyone notices. Whether SNL serves up any of it--beyond tokenism--is doubtful.

    Just like MTV, which stopped running music videos because its target market had outgrown them, SNL is rarely funny--because its not about comedy. It's a cultural marker for the in-crowd. You watch it because your cohort is watching it--so you can talk about it at work and with your friends. You watch it to be au courant on the guest host, the musical guest, the fake news segment, and maybe, just maybe, there's a comedy sketch segment that was funny.

    SNL's target market grew up with participation awards--they don't expect the sketch to be funny, it's the effort that counts. Like programmed monkeys, they applaud the diversity, the PC, the virtue and vanity signaling, and giving everyone on staff an opportunity to participate. If it's funny, that's a bonus.
    , @WowJustWow
    If you like your comedy extra-dry, you might like David Angelo:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jy5Bs_avaFo

    (Is there a trick to getting videos to embed in the comments?)

    , @Bill Burr
    Bill Burr - subversive, right-leaning, comedic genius. Search for "Bill Burr guns and lotion".

    You'll be glad you did!
    , @Bill Burr
    Bill Burr - subversive, right-leaning, comedic genius. Search for "Bill Burr guns and lotion".

    You'll be glad you did!
    , @anon

    If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.
     
    alt-right mostly uses comedy

    during the election alt-right twitter was far funnier than any TV comedy
  9. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    We do have our own comedians. Ever heard of memes?

    Read More
  10. @NickG

    The uploader has not made this video in your country.
     
    I'm in South Africa - that's So Racist!

    Can't be arsed to fire up a proxy.

    Tunnelbear is a simple, free VPN I use for situations like that. Information wants to be free.

    Read More
  11. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    Agree 100%. That wasn’t even that funny only competent hackery. Million Dollar Extreme was on adult swim, but they were cancelled and blacklisted despite high ratings when someone noticed that they were right wing.

    Read More
  12. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.

    Comedy? Oh, that’s what that is. Maybe I’m a tough audience but I can sit through a bunch of Comedy Central stand up routines and at most crack a smile (even when I’m trying). Why is it that I can laugh my ass off reading some posts by Steve Sailer yet can sit through whole comedy shows and only crack a smile? And that’s only to appease my wife, who spent a lot on tickets for comedy shows at the nearby Wilbur Theatre. Two comedians I have found laugh-out-loud funny are Brian Regan and the late Mitch Hedberg, and funny enough, I couldn’t discern their political leanings.

    Here’s my sense of humor. A commercial for Berlitz language school: The German Coastguard.

    Read More
    • Agree: Ron Mexico
    • Replies: @Bill B.
    I can't remember when I found SNL funny. Perhaps it never was.

    Steve pointed out a long time ago that American popular culture might owe more to Germany than the UK. That could explain quite a lot.

    Here is my sense of humor. Gerald the Gorilla.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beCYGm1vMJ0
    , @Lagertha
    Haha- German CG, priceless. What about South Park, Adventure Time, Archer, Sponge Bob, etc.?; Mel Brooks anything; Monty Python, 3 Stooges, anything. Does any TV comedy show have to have any political veneer? Most "progressives"/liberals are so hyper-sensitive these days, and, now, obsessively looking for anything they deem "insensitive." SNL became boring years ago.

    OT: the push for diversity and multiculturalism in everything, results in conformity (and who establishes those standards?), since how can a fondness for, and the celebration of uniqueness/individualism coincide?..or that favorite, coexist?..or continue to exist? OK, now I'm really confused :)

    , @George strong
    Daniel Tosh is anti-PC, makes fun of minorities and women, salutes white male achievement. Not right-wing by any means, but close enough.
    , @Stan Adams
    Here's mine. (Not for kiddies.)

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dt-ovJJB7t4
    , @Ron Mexico
    Agree with Mitch Hedberg. No politics, lots of "noticing".
  13. @PhysicistDave
    Well... it's nice to know that comedy can still trump ideology.

    Well… it’s nice to know that comedy can still trump ideology.

    Pun intended?

    Read More
  14. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    Colin Quinn and the lesser known Nick DiPaulo. Every other comedian is worthless.

    DIPaulo is not hiding anything but Quinn still wants a glimpse of mainstream films, tv etc so he mostly keeps quiet. Understandably.

    Read More
  15. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    True – it was funny though.

    Read More
  16. OT
    BLM leader says blacks’ skin converts sunlight to knowlege (also kill white people).

    Black Lives Matter Leader Says White People Are ‘Sub-Human’ and Suffer From ‘Genetic Defects’
    … In a Facebook post, [Soros Funded] Black Lives Matter Toronto co-founder Yusra Khogali went on a rant, arguing that black people are the superior race
    … “Whiteness is not humxness [sic], in fact, white skin is sub-humxn [sic],”
    … “Melanin enables black skin to capture light and hold it in its memory mode which reveals that blackness converts light into knowledge. …”
    … “White ppl are recessive genetic defects. …”
    … “Black ppl simply through their dominant genes can literally wipe out the white race if we had the power to.”

    Last year … she also caused a controversy after tweeting: “Plz Allah give me strength to not cuss/kill these men and white folks out here today. …”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Melanin enables black skin to capture light and hold it in its memory mode which reveals that blackness converts light into knowledge
     
    See. Now the Dark Enlightenment is being coopted too. Or maybe that's the Darkie Enlightenment...
    , @donut
    An African immigrant was the first American in space after all :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ham_(chimpanzee)#/media/File:Ham_the_chimp_(cropped).jpg
  17. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    Murdoch Murdoch is really funny and well-done for a YouTube channel with a five figure subscriber count. If they had corporate backing it would be the best thing in TV history but that will norlt happen in the foreseeable future because of how non-PC it is (it’s non-PC enough to make “non-PC” “conservatives” counter-signal how awful and racist it is).

    I’d link it but can’t quite figure out how on my phone.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Patrick Harris
    I guess some of it's clever... in that semi-Aspergery 4chan kind of way. We need some right-wing normie comedians.
  18. When they alluded to Chester the Cheetah being trans, I instantly guessed he would be called Chelsea the Cheetah. Instead they chose Danielle. Wtf. I guess they didn’t want to offend any fans of Our Lady Bradley “Chelsea” Manning of Leavenworth.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Danindc
    Or Clinton .....
    , @anonguy

    When they alluded to Chester the Cheetah being trans, I instantly guessed he would be called Chelsea the Cheetah. Instead they chose Danielle. Wtf.
     
    I didn't have a guess, but I instantly wondered what the new name would be, figured it would be something clever.

    Danielle seems like a nominal, random pick. There is no wit in it.
    , @pepperinmono
    That's one long term problem about not going after and destroying the Clintons:we will have to deal with Chelsea.
    JFK Jr did us all a solid on his own.
  19. @whorefinder
    With the title of the sketch, I thought for sure it would be another sketch in mockery of HerrTrumpenator, since the Left has settled on "Orange Cheeto Man" as one of their go-to insults.

    I'm guessing it started off that way---an anti-Trump sketch with Baldwin doing his Trump impression as the new spokesman for Cheetos, going well over the top with each pitch, and while the other side pitched virtue-signalling, after-school-special, pro-Mexican-and-Muslim-immigrant commercials (perhaps with Trump deporting the other side at the end of the sketch).

    But sometime in development Lorne Michaels stepped in (maybe with Jim Downey's input) and told them that 500 anti-Trump sketches was too many, and that they should change the sketch but keep the bare bones of an ad pitch at Cheetos, and even keep Baldwin.

    Then someone piped up how all the virtue-signalling commercials were actually not enjoyable and actually pretty grating and crass and they switched the focus of the sketch from celebrating corporate virtue-signalling/attacking Trump to attacking corporate virtue-signalling. (Given Baldwin's lack of self-awareness, it probably had to be explained to him several times that his virtue-signalling was actually the butt of the joke.)

    Well, they outsmart themselves because even real commercials with their “messages” inspire me to change channels. It isn’t that there aren’t options. Those who sell commercials should consider that; whether this commercial is going to drive away “channel surfers” of which there are plenty.

    Read More
  20. This was actually a decent skit that cleverly mocks contemporary social mores and social hang ups.

    I am so triggered.

    Read More
  21. @AndrewR
    Murdoch Murdoch is really funny and well-done for a YouTube channel with a five figure subscriber count. If they had corporate backing it would be the best thing in TV history but that will norlt happen in the foreseeable future because of how non-PC it is (it's non-PC enough to make "non-PC" "conservatives" counter-signal how awful and racist it is).

    I'd link it but can't quite figure out how on my phone.

    I guess some of it’s clever… in that semi-Aspergery 4chan kind of way. We need some right-wing normie comedians.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    What you call "Aspergery," I call surrealist.

    Matt Stone, Trey Parker and Seth MacFarlane. might be as close as we get to right-wing.

    All right-wingers are blacklisted by the establishment. Might as well go hard.
  22. Decent comedy and right leaning Steven Crowder (Louder with Crowder) youtube channel.

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  23. Now this is something I don’t understand very well regarding the real advertising business, but I’m sure the SNL skit above is a pretty realistic parody of it. I’ve heard many times that it’s the “name recognition” that gets people to buy. They say it doesn’t matter whether the ad has anything to do with the product or service, they just want to get that product (or service) brand name in your head.

    Someone tell me how do you think that really works? (My contention is that it doesn’t, and things sell or don’t sell, and Madison Avenue has squat-all to do with it these days.) You’ve got your Coke-cola and you’ve got your Pepsi – who has not heard of either one? Is the idea to associate this one, say Pepsi (which sucks, BTW) with this musical slut artist so people remember, “Hey, “Lady Madonna”/”Pepsi”, yeah whenever I see “Pepsi”, I think “Lady Madonna”. OK, so I’m at the store, and my mind goes “Here’s the Pepsi; “Lady Madonna likes this!” “but … it sucks, if I’m gonna drink caffeinated sugar water, I’ll take Coke-cola.” “I like Lady Madonna, but she can go buy whatever the hell she drinks, who cares?”

    What about products/services that most people have NOT heard of yet? Yeah the idea of advertising is to let people know what you’re selling. “Here are some grimy amigos climbing over a fence, cleaning up all their trash on the way across the Colorado (river) desert, finding a new home, cutting down on Carbon (for the Carbophobics out there in TV land) when they get there and enriching the living s__t out of our lives” NOW “Dog Pile II Web Services – put your work on the Thunderstorm Cloud!” How does that help me as a consumer?

    I found no problem with the old ads that would try to sell you on stuff based on WHAT IT DOES!. Yeah, there was a lot of bull involved some of the time, but at least it was informative.

    I will continue this comment later with some thoughts about that funny lizard that sells auto insurance – he’s cute.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    By advertising so much, Coke and Pepsi make it hard for a 3rd company to compete with their highly profitable duopoly.

    I tried to sell P&G on doing a test of cutting advertising in 1985 but brand managers don't want to volunteer their ad budget to be cut because that makes them look weak. Strong brand managers get their ad budgets raise, not cut.

    , @guest
    I waited years for the show Mad Men to explain the purpose of advertising to me, but it never did. The closest it came, I think, was to say that there's a pact between the audience and the pitchman: you sit there and listen to me, and in exchange you get free entertainment. They try to be informative, too, but the basis of it is that you feel good, you associate your good feelings with the product, and you remember the product.

    That was Mad Men, anyway, they accentuated happiness (in the ads, not in the characters' lives). The movie Roger Dodger took the opposite view, which is that advertisers try to make you feel bad about yourself. Then you go buy their product to feel better. I don't know.

    They probably say it's all about "brand recognition" because that's the easiest part to wrap their minds around. Like all those charities that talk about "raising awareness" (aka propagandizing). If that's all you officially dedicate yourself to, who's to come barging in, asking what you're doing with their money?

    Advertising works, I can say that for sure. I'm more apt to buy products I've heard of than ones I haven't. How it works is mysterious, however, because I don't buy every product I've ever heard of. Some I buy, some I don't. Why one and not the other? No one knows. Could be a difference in advertising, could be something advertising could never touch.

    Advertising also gives me an itch to consume things I otherwise wouldn't bother with. I know this, because over the last few years I've gone to fewer movies and paid much less attention to movie ads and entertainment news. So when I go on Netflix and scroll through new releases, I have no idea what most of them are , and no desire to watch them. But when I come across ones I have heard of before, I'm usually more apt to want to see them.

    So, again, I know it works. Just not how, nor how well.

    , @WowJustWow
    The point of a Coca-Cola commercial isn't to convince you that Coca-Cola is great, it's to convince you that other people have seen the commercial. Ever heard the phrase "Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM?" Well, no party host ever got a dirty look for loading a cooler with Coca-Cola instead of RC Cola.
    , @inertial
    Advertising works. And yes, it works on you too. I used to think that I am so clever, I am immune to advertising. Then I started noticing that ads I found especially preposterous were always for products where I was not the target audience. And the ads I enjoyed the most? Always for products I might actually buy. An interesting coincidence. And this is not all. Eventually I realized that advertising subtly influences my day to day consumer choices as well.

    You shouldn't think that you are different from everyone else. Take your Coke preference. How do you think you got it in the first place? You imprinted on Coke at an early age and liked it ever since. I bet advertising was involved, either directed at you as a kid or at your parents. The soft drink companies know that adults rarely switch their soda preferences, so they try to catch the moment early on when the choice is made. Have you noticed how Coke or Pepsi commercials almost always feature young people? This means that they are targeted at an even younger audience.

    Or take the gecko. Yes, these commercials won't influence you choice between GEICO and State Farm. But if you had to choose between GEICO and some no name insurance company you'd be biased toward GEICO. They would feel like a safer choice because you've heard about them many times.
    , @MW
    Advertising does a LOT, not just "name recognition." It sets your opinion of the product, and the ideas and emotions you associate with it.

    If Coke didn't advertise, then you would primarily associate it with diabetes, obesity, "empty calories." But they advertise constantly, to make you feel that drinking cola is normal, it is not stigmatized, and hopefully, you associate it more with happiness and fizziness and family, so your net reaction is "yeah, it's not health food but whatever." It might not work on you in particular (humans can be quirky), but it works on the population at large. They sell a lot of Coke.

    Contrast that with cigarettes in the USA, which were banned from television in the 1970s, and from most everywhere else by the 1990s. You probably primarily associate them with cancer and death. And sure enough, smoking rates are in free-fall. The industry can't effectively counter the idea that smoking is bad and stigmatized - which for a long time they did, very effectively, by linking smoking with manly cowboys and suave camels.

    We humans are really stupid. We have our moments and our specialties, but in terms of mundane day-to-day decisions, we are astoundingly easy to manipulate.

  24. @Achmed E. Newman
    Now this is something I don't understand very well regarding the real advertising business, but I'm sure the SNL skit above is a pretty realistic parody of it. I've heard many times that it's the "name recognition" that gets people to buy. They say it doesn't matter whether the ad has anything to do with the product or service, they just want to get that product (or service) brand name in your head.

    Someone tell me how do you think that really works? (My contention is that it doesn't, and things sell or don't sell, and Madison Avenue has squat-all to do with it these days.) You've got your Coke-cola and you've got your Pepsi - who has not heard of either one? Is the idea to associate this one, say Pepsi (which sucks, BTW) with this musical slut artist so people remember, "Hey, "Lady Madonna"/"Pepsi", yeah whenever I see "Pepsi", I think "Lady Madonna". OK, so I'm at the store, and my mind goes "Here's the Pepsi; "Lady Madonna likes this!" "but ... it sucks, if I'm gonna drink caffeinated sugar water, I'll take Coke-cola." "I like Lady Madonna, but she can go buy whatever the hell she drinks, who cares?"

    What about products/services that most people have NOT heard of yet? Yeah the idea of advertising is to let people know what you're selling. "Here are some grimy amigos climbing over a fence, cleaning up all their trash on the way across the Colorado (river) desert, finding a new home, cutting down on Carbon (for the Carbophobics out there in TV land) when they get there and enriching the living s__t out of our lives" NOW "Dog Pile II Web Services - put your work on the Thunderstorm Cloud!" How does that help me as a consumer?

    I found no problem with the old ads that would try to sell you on stuff based on WHAT IT DOES!. Yeah, there was a lot of bull involved some of the time, but at least it was informative.

    I will continue this comment later with some thoughts about that funny lizard that sells auto insurance - he's cute.

    By advertising so much, Coke and Pepsi make it hard for a 3rd company to compete with their highly profitable duopoly.

    I tried to sell P&G on doing a test of cutting advertising in 1985 but brand managers don’t want to volunteer their ad budget to be cut because that makes them look weak. Strong brand managers get their ad budgets raise, not cut.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Sorry for the long delay in response, Steve. I would expect that too - it'd have to be a strong manager who doesn't believe the corporate BS to try something like your proposal. However, there could easily be really nice statistics projects done (right in your wheelhouse too) that could just use sales numbers and advertising data history to determine if any of it changed sales number - for better or possibly for worse. Then, the green-eyeshade guys could come in and work out whether even the increased sales numbers were worth it vs. the ad budget.

    They do not want to do any of that - especially the big guys - they may get results that they didn't want to get and lose their Madison Avenue friends. It is not a free market in the BIG BIDNESS WORLD; that's what's really the problem.

    (Once you brought that up to Proctor & Gamble, BTW, I'm surprised they didn't yearly-evaluate you right out the back door - with 10 minutes to gather up your crap ;-}

    , @Anonymous
    Taxing ad revenues of broadcast companies, or a sales tax on advertising expenditures generally, would by my first move. But I would not be elected for that reason.
  25. SNL has much funnier mockeries of the left than this one. Here are some of the top of my head:

    President Barbie Doll:

    Asian American Doll (Sailer linked this one before):

    http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/asian-american-doll/2836284?snl=1

    Mockery of Slavery Guilt Trip in Black History Month (I heard this offended cast members):

    Mockery of Obama’s Executive Order on Immigration (Sailer linked this one too)

    A fake Mitt Romney attack ad. A little dated to 2012, but still very funny:

    http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/mitt-romney-ad-1/n27669?snl=1

    Read More
  26. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    True. The occasional funny bit is hardly worth the excruciating experience of sitting through SNL. And they have become so political that, in addition to being merely unfunny, they are blatantly offensive to about half the country. Screw ‘em.

    Read More
  27. @Patrick Harris
    I guess some of it's clever... in that semi-Aspergery 4chan kind of way. We need some right-wing normie comedians.

    What you call “Aspergery,” I call surrealist.

    Matt Stone, Trey Parker and Seth MacFarlane. might be as close as we get to right-wing.

    All right-wingers are blacklisted by the establishment. Might as well go hard.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Stone and Parker have their moments, but there is nothing remotely right-wing about MacFarlane. He is a complete left-wing poztule.
  28. @AndrewR
    When they alluded to Chester the Cheetah being trans, I instantly guessed he would be called Chelsea the Cheetah. Instead they chose Danielle. Wtf. I guess they didn't want to offend any fans of Our Lady Bradley "Chelsea" Manning of Leavenworth.

    Or Clinton …..

    Read More
  29. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    I don’t know about you, but I find Ann Coulter to be pretty damn funny.

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  30. @AndrewR
    What you call "Aspergery," I call surrealist.

    Matt Stone, Trey Parker and Seth MacFarlane. might be as close as we get to right-wing.

    All right-wingers are blacklisted by the establishment. Might as well go hard.

    Stone and Parker have their moments, but there is nothing remotely right-wing about MacFarlane. He is a complete left-wing poztule.

    Read More
    • Agree: Percy Gryce
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Family Guy is an equal opportunity mocker. They're not afraid to make fun of even Jews.
  31. OT: UConn women’s basketball team wins 100th straight game.

    Some time back, Steve Sailer pointed out that since women’s soccer doesn’t have enough players or fans to support a national league, what might work is a barnstorming team. On the college level, North Carolina used to sort of be that barnstorming team, drawing in most of the best players, and going thirteen straight seasons with one or zero losses. When the Tarheel women came to play soccer at my alma mater, it was a much bigger deal than usual to have Goliath visiting. Apparently UConn is performing a similar role in college women’s basketball.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    who says dominance is bad for a sport or league? "Top ranked UConn’s 66-55 milestone 100th-consecutive victory over No. 6 South Carolina on Monday, Feb. 13 (9 p.m. ET, ESPN2), delivered a 0.9 overnight rating, marking the highest-rated college basketball game on ESPN2 this season among men’s and women’s telecasts, and the highest-rated women’s college basketball regular-season game since 2010. "
  32. @Daniel Chieh
    I don't know about you, but I find Ann Coulter to be pretty damn funny.

    Meh; she’s indubitably abrasive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Indubitably!

    (but don't call her a jerk, dammit!)
    , @Daniel Chieh
    She's got a gift for imagery in her gab to makes her analogies stick to my mind. I think that when it comes to savaging concepts defined as antagonistic, she definitely lets loose with a hybrid of uniquely acerbic feminine cattishness and a glee at violating liberal norms and taboos.

    I'm hopeful some of the new female faces of conservatism will be able to continue that trend, but they're not quite there yet, I think. Perhaps Lauren Southern.

  33. @anon
    seems like even the media has noticed how cringe-making big business' advertising propaganda for cheap labor has become

    And for World War T.

    Read More
  34. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    I’ve long suspected Anthony Jeselnik of being right-wing and a crypto-iSteve reader. His “Google Search & Destroy” bit was just Steve’s “Google Gaydar” carried out to its logical point of absurdity.

    Fun fact; he used to date Amy Schumer. Both of them had shows picked up by Comedy Central at the same time. One of them became a huge movie star/media gadfly. The other was actually funny.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmW0mYUuyo

    Not right wing and not funny either.
    , @Sam
    Jeselnik is quite subversive. I guess he is a de-facto right winger but most likely just a cynical type who gets bored by conventional values.
    , @Je SUis Charlie Martel
    Jeselnik was ridiculously funny and went right after PC. I also think Daniel Tosh does this, he is so over the top progs think they have to laugh or they won't be in on the meta joke, but the meta joke is them and their pieties
  35. @Hippopotamusdrome
    OT
    BLM leader says blacks' skin converts sunlight to knowlege (also kill white people).


    Black Lives Matter Leader Says White People Are ‘Sub-Human’ and Suffer From ‘Genetic Defects’
    ... In a Facebook post, [Soros Funded] Black Lives Matter Toronto co-founder Yusra Khogali went on a rant, arguing that black people are the superior race
    ... “Whiteness is not humxness [sic], in fact, white skin is sub-humxn [sic],”
    ... “Melanin enables black skin to capture light and hold it in its memory mode which reveals that blackness converts light into knowledge. ..."
    ... “White ppl are recessive genetic defects. ..."
    ... “Black ppl simply through their dominant genes can literally wipe out the white race if we had the power to.”
    ...
    Last year ... she also caused a controversy after tweeting: “Plz Allah give me strength to not cuss/kill these men and white folks out here today. ...”

     

    Melanin enables black skin to capture light and hold it in its memory mode which reveals that blackness converts light into knowledge

    See. Now the Dark Enlightenment is being coopted too. Or maybe that’s the Darkie Enlightenment…

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  36. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    I've long suspected Anthony Jeselnik of being right-wing and a crypto-iSteve reader. His "Google Search & Destroy" bit was just Steve's "Google Gaydar" carried out to its logical point of absurdity.

    Fun fact; he used to date Amy Schumer. Both of them had shows picked up by Comedy Central at the same time. One of them became a huge movie star/media gadfly. The other was actually funny.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmW0mYUuyo

    Not right wing and not funny either.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown
    I hadn't seen that clip before. It's disappointing, but I'll cut him some slack since it was 2013 and he was discussing the Comedy Central Roast of Donald Trump from 2011.

    This is pretty great, though.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_I9WzZGfAg
  37. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.

    SNL has done excellent right wing humor, even alt-right humor, that I already linked in this thread. SNL has different writers and comedians that range across the political spectrum. Famous SNL alum with outspoken right wing views include Adam Sandler, Norm MacDonald, Colin Quinn, Dennis Miller, Victoria Jackson, Jon Lovitz, David Spade.

    I love great comedy and great political comedy and great right wing political comedy wherever I can find it. Ann Coulter can be funny, Steve Sailer has his great gags here and there, mark steyn has his funny moments. Milo is a right wing entertainer with a few funny moments.

    Here’s another SNL skit that mocks the left that I missed. This is from moderate leftist Robert Smigel, who is hilarious, but unfortunately, still left:

    https://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/tv-funhouse-blue-state-santa/n12657?snl=1

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    A lot of those names are a stretch. Dennis Miller was converted after 9/11; prior to that he was a conventional liberal. However much inborn rightness there was to him all along, it wasn't enough to tickle a conservative's political bone.

    Victoria Jackson probably didn't have much creative control, and she strikes me as a "born again" type, so I wouldn't assume she was that way when she was on the show.

    Adam Sandler was a puerile novelty act, and his comedy had barely any content at all, much less political content.

    David Spade went after Hollywood, and not in the jokey, insider way all E! channel-type gossip shows nowadays do. More in a direct and honest way, but not exactly in a right-wing way, either.

    Colin Quinn, I don't really know. He seems like he could be on my side. But he's also very guarded, despite the fact that he does overtly political commentary. Which is telling.

    Jon Lovitz I don't really know about. I liked his characters, but they didn't tell me anything one way or another.

    All that being said, with how many years SNL has been on the air and how many cast members they've had, plenty of them had to have been actual conservatives. But what does that amount to? There were also plenty of conservative-themed sketches, but obviously a lot less than other kinds. Again, what does that amount to?

    The biggest right-wing influence on the show, and one of the guys who was around since the beginning, was Jim Downey. In him you'll find the conservative heart of SNL, if it ever had one. The most consistently rightist element in the history of the show was his tenure with Norm MacDonald on Weekend Update.

    Proof is in the uncomprehending reaction of the audience to the majority of the jokes. Not silence or scattered titters, which are unfortunately all too common. But more like "Wha? Huh?" It wasn't that they were highbrow jokes, though they were above average-brow for the show. But people didn't know they were allowed to laugh at those sorts of things in that way. That wasn't all about politics, but definitely the network's reaction was at least partly politically motivated.

    That remains pretty much the pinnacle of the show for me, though Bill Murray is by far my favorite cast member outside the show. I never watched regularly after Norm was axed, though I was only 14 at the time. (Interest in shows like SNL probably peak shortly thereafter, anyway.)

  38. @Mr. Anon
    Stone and Parker have their moments, but there is nothing remotely right-wing about MacFarlane. He is a complete left-wing poztule.

    Family Guy is an equal opportunity mocker. They’re not afraid to make fun of even Jews.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    The only remarkable thing about Family Guy making fun of Jews is that MacFarlane isn't Jewish himself (he actually seems WASPy to me). But he's no doubt surrounded by them, and they sign off on it. Jews love making fun of Jews, and they are in fact more obsessed with doing so than any Nazi who ever lived. It just has to be done in the right way. You make fun from the inside, not the out.

    Family Guy and a host of shows like it get their laughs pushing the envelope of PC, or appearing to, without ever breaking through. They mock PC within PC-dom. South Park is a bit closer to what Family Guy pretends to be, in that I believe its creators are genuinely anti-PC (though, like all of us, they grew up within its confines and can't think entirely outside of it without going crazy). But they don't stray very far, and almost exclusively go after targets that don't matter, like Kanye West or Barbara Streisand.

    Compared even to the pitiful transgressiveness of South Park, Family Guy is totally an establishment show. They only pretend to have the wrong sort of opinions, or their opinions differ on trivial matters. They are most definitely not equal opportunity mockers. Not quite so unbalanced as other shows, like SNL, but by no means equal.

    By the way, being "transgressive" is not the only way to be funny. But that's how these people promote themselves, so that's what I'm judging them on.

    , @Mr. Anon
    I've only seen snippets of FG. I couldn't stand to actually watch it, as I find it viscerally repellent. I seriously doubt that MacFarlane seriously questions the prevailing narrative in any substantive way.
  39. @Autochthon
    Meh; she's indubitably abrasive.

    She’s got a gift for imagery in her gab to makes her analogies stick to my mind. I think that when it comes to savaging concepts defined as antagonistic, she definitely lets loose with a hybrid of uniquely acerbic feminine cattishness and a glee at violating liberal norms and taboos.

    I’m hopeful some of the new female faces of conservatism will be able to continue that trend, but they’re not quite there yet, I think. Perhaps Lauren Southern.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I agree with everything you write.

    I was just taking the piss one last time about a theme on a previous thread.

    I still maintain Steve Sailer and Mark Steyn are two of the funniest conservative persons going. Porter, of Kakistocracy fame, is also hilarious when he chooses to be; he's easily the most biting, arch writer going.

    Adam Carolla bears mention as well.

  40. I doubt they’d have run this skit if they had known that Chester the Cheeta is a first cousin of Pepe the Frog. Both have that same wild and crazy indifference to PC shibboleths.

    Read More
  41. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    I've long suspected Anthony Jeselnik of being right-wing and a crypto-iSteve reader. His "Google Search & Destroy" bit was just Steve's "Google Gaydar" carried out to its logical point of absurdity.

    Fun fact; he used to date Amy Schumer. Both of them had shows picked up by Comedy Central at the same time. One of them became a huge movie star/media gadfly. The other was actually funny.

    Jeselnik is quite subversive. I guess he is a de-facto right winger but most likely just a cynical type who gets bored by conventional values.

    Read More
  42. @Massimo Heitor
    SNL has much funnier mockeries of the left than this one. Here are some of the top of my head:

    President Barbie Doll:
    https://youtu.be/1Se8PVZdfPg

    Asian American Doll (Sailer linked this one before):
    http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/asian-american-doll/2836284?snl=1

    Mockery of Slavery Guilt Trip in Black History Month (I heard this offended cast members):
    https://youtu.be/UvJufKoTrOk

    Mockery of Obama's Executive Order on Immigration (Sailer linked this one too)
    https://youtu.be/JUDSeb2zHQ0

    A fake Mitt Romney attack ad. A little dated to 2012, but still very funny:
    http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/mitt-romney-ad-1/n27669?snl=1

    “millions of undocument immigrants”

    Read More
  43. @Daniel Chieh
    She's got a gift for imagery in her gab to makes her analogies stick to my mind. I think that when it comes to savaging concepts defined as antagonistic, she definitely lets loose with a hybrid of uniquely acerbic feminine cattishness and a glee at violating liberal norms and taboos.

    I'm hopeful some of the new female faces of conservatism will be able to continue that trend, but they're not quite there yet, I think. Perhaps Lauren Southern.

    I agree with everything you write.

    I was just taking the piss one last time about a theme on a previous thread.

    I still maintain Steve Sailer and Mark Steyn are two of the funniest conservative persons going. Porter, of Kakistocracy fame, is also hilarious when he chooses to be; he’s easily the most biting, arch writer going.

    Adam Carolla bears mention as well.

    Read More
    • Agree: ATX Hipster
    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    It's MILLER TIME! Dennis Miller is pretty good, the best of them. Overall, even if accurate, women aren't funny, they just aren't. Especially leftist-women. There's nothing funny about their agenda. "The Wives Of ISIS", a British production however, IS hilarious. Undoubtedly written by men.
  44. I lasted 35 seconds.

    –Six white people, including the eyeball-lacerating Alex Baldwin (?).

    –”We’ll start with the team from Murphy and Kennedy.” (Those Micks. They’ve been in control of the Ad Biz FOREVER, boyo.)

    –The lampooned ad is the contractor supply store from Big Lig Pennsylvania, run by the pro-Trump daughter of an enduring PA company.

    My view is that Maggie Hardy Magerko (84 founder/former CEO Joe Hardy’s daughter) was punked.

    Rob Schapiro, chief creative officer of 84 Lumber’s ad agency Brunner, echoes her reasoning for the creating this type of advertisement.

    “The intention is about opportunity,” Schapiro, who filmed the spot in Mexico, tells PEOPLE. “We view it as a patriotic story. If you think of liberty’s torch as a beacon of light from the land of opportunity, that’s how we viewed that light coming through the door. Exactly the same as a beacon of light, we are a company of opportunity and a land of opportunity.

    “It’s a very patriotic message. The flag that this young child creates, you see what that means to the mother and daughter. That’s the beacon of light we talk about.”

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/84-lumber-ceo-says-super-234938550.html

    Those are not the words of a meaning-maker who has the slightest connection to founding stock whites men in the US or Pennsylvania. Or white men in general. This is boilerplate propaganda whose first ingredient is schmaltz.

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  45. WOT:

    Malaysia official: Kim Jong Un’s brother slain at airport

    http://www.staradvertiser.com/2017/02/14/breaking-news/malaysia-official-kim-jong-uns-brother-slain-at-airport/

    “Events my boy, events.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Langley
    EMOT:

    German shepherd scores at Westminster dog show

    http://www.staradvertiser.com/2017/02/14/breaking-news/rumor-has-it-german-shepherd-scores-at-westminster-dog-show-2/

    They warned me that if Trump was elected there would be a resurgence of Nazis culture!

    http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/31183/
  46. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    I think that, as the Trump Revolution works its way through our culture, any number of comedians will be pulled in by its defiant anti-Establishment attitude. In fact, they will probably be among the first to go — irreverence is the real cause of any genuine comedian.

    The problem for right wing comedians to date has been that the right has been in the past so much associated with the Establishment — either the smug rich, or the smug Christian Right. But the Trump Revolution has nothing to do with that. Milo, whatever else he may represent, is a good example of how thoroughly this new thing of ours rejects the staid mores of the old right.

    Irreverence is The Force for authentic comedians — and I expect to see an increasing number of them falling under its power. And the more oppressive the left inclines — and it always inclines toward further oppression — the more comedians will pull free of its grasp.

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  47. @Langley
    WOT:

    Malaysia official: Kim Jong Un’s brother slain at airport

    http://www.staradvertiser.com/2017/02/14/breaking-news/malaysia-official-kim-jong-uns-brother-slain-at-airport/

    "Events my boy, events."

    EMOT:

    German shepherd scores at Westminster dog show

    http://www.staradvertiser.com/2017/02/14/breaking-news/rumor-has-it-german-shepherd-scores-at-westminster-dog-show-2/

    They warned me that if Trump was elected there would be a resurgence of Nazis culture!

    http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/31183/

    Read More
  48. @Steve Sailer
    By advertising so much, Coke and Pepsi make it hard for a 3rd company to compete with their highly profitable duopoly.

    I tried to sell P&G on doing a test of cutting advertising in 1985 but brand managers don't want to volunteer their ad budget to be cut because that makes them look weak. Strong brand managers get their ad budgets raise, not cut.

    Sorry for the long delay in response, Steve. I would expect that too – it’d have to be a strong manager who doesn’t believe the corporate BS to try something like your proposal. However, there could easily be really nice statistics projects done (right in your wheelhouse too) that could just use sales numbers and advertising data history to determine if any of it changed sales number – for better or possibly for worse. Then, the green-eyeshade guys could come in and work out whether even the increased sales numbers were worth it vs. the ad budget.

    They do not want to do any of that – especially the big guys – they may get results that they didn’t want to get and lose their Madison Avenue friends. It is not a free market in the BIG BIDNESS WORLD; that’s what’s really the problem.

    (Once you brought that up to Proctor & Gamble, BTW, I’m surprised they didn’t yearly-evaluate you right out the back door – with 10 minutes to gather up your crap ;-}

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  49. @Anonymous

    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.
     
    Comedy? Oh, that's what that is. Maybe I'm a tough audience but I can sit through a bunch of Comedy Central stand up routines and at most crack a smile (even when I'm trying). Why is it that I can laugh my ass off reading some posts by Steve Sailer yet can sit through whole comedy shows and only crack a smile? And that's only to appease my wife, who spent a lot on tickets for comedy shows at the nearby Wilbur Theatre. Two comedians I have found laugh-out-loud funny are Brian Regan and the late Mitch Hedberg, and funny enough, I couldn't discern their political leanings.

    Here's my sense of humor. A commercial for Berlitz language school: The German Coastguard.

    I can’t remember when I found SNL funny. Perhaps it never was.

    Steve pointed out a long time ago that American popular culture might owe more to Germany than the UK. That could explain quite a lot.

    Here is my sense of humor. Gerald the Gorilla.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beCYGm1vMJ0

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I'm not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.

    American fast food is pretty German (hamburgers), so why not American humor? Of course, I've never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I'm totally in the dark on the subject. I almost went to see Toni Erdmann. It's supposed to be really funny, although the trailer isn't.

  50. Cute English girl sees her old neighborhood taken over by burka wearing women and aggro blacks:

    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SgKMI1wV0ps

    Bringing this to America is the left’s #1 priority.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Christian
    In real European life, the Muslim men, even if there are only 10 to a city block, gather at the coffee shops all over Europe. A single woman dropping in for her morning coffee has to run a gauntlet of insult for being unaccompanied, for her fashion sense, for her uncovered head. You don't have to have any particular majority of Muslim immigrant men in your community, they gather. Where they gather, they're a majority and a nuisance, if not a danger. And they're a real hassle for the women that thought they had finally won their women's rights. May they remember it was a woman, Merkle, one they voted for, that did this to them. What did Merkle care? She has no children, no human legacy, Hell, Muslim men probably revive that tingle between her pegs, who knows, it's clearly the case for American feminists, too. Merkle is a strange duck. When I see those selfies she takes surrounded by Muslim men, I get the creeps. There's a vibe there.
    , @NC
    She's obviously an Irish transplant (cute and English girl are oxymoronic terms) and the same with the skinhead leader. I watched most of that, and it was so awful. It's like they sent the morning weather girl to fix Islamic terrorism. The dumb little bimbo is so rotten with multiculturalism that even when they call her a whore to her face and tell her that they believe in stoning and chopping off hands, she doesn't believe them. It conflicts with her programming about wise and good brown people and gets thrown out. It's like she's being paid to be a perpetual college freshman. In a sane world she'd be married with 6 kids and in charge of the parish food drive.
  51. @AndrewR
    When they alluded to Chester the Cheetah being trans, I instantly guessed he would be called Chelsea the Cheetah. Instead they chose Danielle. Wtf. I guess they didn't want to offend any fans of Our Lady Bradley "Chelsea" Manning of Leavenworth.

    When they alluded to Chester the Cheetah being trans, I instantly guessed he would be called Chelsea the Cheetah. Instead they chose Danielle. Wtf.

    I didn’t have a guess, but I instantly wondered what the new name would be, figured it would be something clever.

    Danielle seems like a nominal, random pick. There is no wit in it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @larry lurker

    Danielle seems like a nominal, random pick.
     
    For me, that made it funnier - "Danielle the Cheetah" is clearly a terrible name for a mascot, but the only thing the executives are worried about is the ad's political message.

    Danielle is also a little more girly/sexy than your average girl's name, which gives it an autogynephiliac feel.

    , @a Newsreader
    They do seem to have picked up on one oddity of the trans renaming ritual: when the trannie reveals his new name, it typically has no significance apparent to the observer. Why does Bradley Manning choose Chelsea? Why does Bruce Jenner choose Caitlyn? Why does Chester the Cheetah choose Danielle? Is there a method to the madness?
  52. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    I've long suspected Anthony Jeselnik of being right-wing and a crypto-iSteve reader. His "Google Search & Destroy" bit was just Steve's "Google Gaydar" carried out to its logical point of absurdity.

    Fun fact; he used to date Amy Schumer. Both of them had shows picked up by Comedy Central at the same time. One of them became a huge movie star/media gadfly. The other was actually funny.

    Jeselnik was ridiculously funny and went right after PC. I also think Daniel Tosh does this, he is so over the top progs think they have to laugh or they won’t be in on the meta joke, but the meta joke is them and their pieties

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  53. @Bill B.
    I can't remember when I found SNL funny. Perhaps it never was.

    Steve pointed out a long time ago that American popular culture might owe more to Germany than the UK. That could explain quite a lot.

    Here is my sense of humor. Gerald the Gorilla.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beCYGm1vMJ0

    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I’m not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.

    American fast food is pretty German (hamburgers), so why not American humor? Of course, I’ve never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I’m totally in the dark on the subject. I almost went to see Toni Erdmann. It’s supposed to be really funny, although the trailer isn’t.

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    • Replies: @Veracitor
    There are no German movies which are intentionally funny.

    However, I am told that the American TV show Hogan's Heroes, dubbed into German with a lot of ribaldry added in the 1990's is funny. Sample: https://youtu.be/F7cvTMEOVZY

    , @anonguy

    Of course, I’ve never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I’m totally in the dark on the subject.
     
    Me neither.

    However, I once saw The Great Escape on TV in Germany. It had been dubbed into German, fair enough, although seeing all those American soldiers speaking German was fun.

    But the German parts for the Germans, from the original, had been dubbed into English with German subtitles.

    That was pretty funny.
    , @Anonymous
    There is nothing German about a hamburger as we know it.

    In Germany, pastries are called by city names. A "Berliner" is a glazed fried dumpling. I forget what a "Hamburger" is, but it has no meat.
    , @Anon87
    You haven't seen any 70s Bavarian sex comedies I take it?
    , @Bill B.

    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I’m not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.
     
    That reminds me: I saw that recently the Atlantic's James Fallows attempted to outrank you in a Twitter exchange by pointing out that he was very well travelled and worldly.

    His retort was a reminder that no matter how diverse one's country becomes - work with Koreans, eat with Mexicans, fight with Russians, party with Africans, whatever - the cosmopolitan elite will always consider most white folk as knowledge-lite rubes.
    , @theo the kraut
    There's a lot of talented political satire over here and a reasonable amount of regular comedy gold, but it's the same as with Chinese, Finnish, or French fun stuff, the rest of the world can't understand it, give and take a Tati or de Funès. Also, truth be told, we killed a lot of our funny guys and made the rest conquer Hollywood--Billy Wilder, anyone? US humour is heavily German Jew-infused, the Brits have to rely on their own devices.

    Some of our best comedians are Austrians--here's actor Helmut Qualtinger reading "Mein Kampf": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0NZTz42Cok

    It's toe-curlingly unfunny even to German ears but the way he unmasks fellow Austrian Hitler's whiny self-pity and megalomania is magnificent.

    Hogan's Heroes has been dubbed into German with a lot of ribaldry* and dialectal funnyness added, Klinke speaks Saxonian and Schultz Bavarian, it's one of the few times that the translation/adaptation is 3x funnier than the original. Same goes for Laurel & Hardy, the silent movies got commentaries, often in rhymes, spoken by one of our preeminent poetic cabaret artists,* a real stroke of genius. Carl Bark's Duckburg stories got entirely new life by an art history PhD's translations** and Married With Children got a lovingly executed linguistic makeover, too, the German Peggy Bundy's voice is 10x more vulgar and grating, it's a whole different beast. Mostly, of course, it's garbage in, garbage out, German or not.

    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanns_Dieter_Hüsch
    ** https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erika_Fuchs

    * h/t Veracitor

    , @Peter Akuleyev
    Toni Erdmann has some funny scenes, but it is not really a comedy.

    Germany has made plenty of slapsticky movies that are supposed to be funny - "Der Wixxxer", or "Traumschiff Surprise" (a Star Trek parody, with dated gay jokes), "Fack Ju Göhte". They seem to target 12-14 year olds.

    Germany is best at slightly melancholy films and TV shows that have elements of humor in them - "Goodbye Lenin", "Stromberg" (the German version of The Office), or anything starring Christian Ulmen - but aren't straight comedies. "Toni Erdmann" fits in that genre. There is even a bizarre little German mini-series currently on Netflix called "Komm Schon!" about a failing sex therapist that is kind of funny and warped.

    Austrians for some reason are much, much funnier than Germans. Austria actually produces very strong comedies, but I suspect they don't translate easily because they rely on clever word play and snappy dialogue, not simply people embarassing themselves or having temper tantrums (the staples of German humor). Either the Austrians have preserved a lot of the Jewish humor heritage, or a lot of "Jewish" humor is actually Austrian in origin.
  54. @Anonymous

    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.
     
    Comedy? Oh, that's what that is. Maybe I'm a tough audience but I can sit through a bunch of Comedy Central stand up routines and at most crack a smile (even when I'm trying). Why is it that I can laugh my ass off reading some posts by Steve Sailer yet can sit through whole comedy shows and only crack a smile? And that's only to appease my wife, who spent a lot on tickets for comedy shows at the nearby Wilbur Theatre. Two comedians I have found laugh-out-loud funny are Brian Regan and the late Mitch Hedberg, and funny enough, I couldn't discern their political leanings.

    Here's my sense of humor. A commercial for Berlitz language school: The German Coastguard.

    Haha- German CG, priceless. What about South Park, Adventure Time, Archer, Sponge Bob, etc.?; Mel Brooks anything; Monty Python, 3 Stooges, anything. Does any TV comedy show have to have any political veneer? Most “progressives”/liberals are so hyper-sensitive these days, and, now, obsessively looking for anything they deem “insensitive.” SNL became boring years ago.

    OT: the push for diversity and multiculturalism in everything, results in conformity (and who establishes those standards?), since how can a fondness for, and the celebration of uniqueness/individualism coincide?..or that favorite, coexist?..or continue to exist? OK, now I’m really confused :)

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  55. Corporate America must be completely destroyed. All of it.

    Cheetos must be either eaten with a fork or broken up and sprinkled on other food; for if you do not, you’ll have orange fingers for hours.

    Carthage must be destroyed? That’s been done. Comcast must be destroyed.

    President Trump should publicly announce that he has decided to destroy the corporate propaganda apparatus. Tens of millions of patriotic Americans will cheer him on.

    There is something in the political and cultural atmosphere at the present moment. It seems like a dam is about to burst. The vote by the British to leave the EU and the election of President Trump is just the beginning of a great age of creative destruction.

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  56. @Hippopotamusdrome
    OT
    BLM leader says blacks' skin converts sunlight to knowlege (also kill white people).


    Black Lives Matter Leader Says White People Are ‘Sub-Human’ and Suffer From ‘Genetic Defects’
    ... In a Facebook post, [Soros Funded] Black Lives Matter Toronto co-founder Yusra Khogali went on a rant, arguing that black people are the superior race
    ... “Whiteness is not humxness [sic], in fact, white skin is sub-humxn [sic],”
    ... “Melanin enables black skin to capture light and hold it in its memory mode which reveals that blackness converts light into knowledge. ..."
    ... “White ppl are recessive genetic defects. ..."
    ... “Black ppl simply through their dominant genes can literally wipe out the white race if we had the power to.”
    ...
    Last year ... she also caused a controversy after tweeting: “Plz Allah give me strength to not cuss/kill these men and white folks out here today. ...”

     

    An African immigrant was the first American in space after all :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ham_(chimpanzee)#/media/File:Ham_the_chimp_(cropped).jpg

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  57. @Chrisnonymous
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmW0mYUuyo

    Not right wing and not funny either.

    I hadn’t seen that clip before. It’s disappointing, but I’ll cut him some slack since it was 2013 and he was discussing the Comedy Central Roast of Donald Trump from 2011.

    This is pretty great, though.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_I9WzZGfAg

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  58. I have to disagree with the general tenor of these comments (“Even they finally realize the absurdity of their ideology.”) There is a moment in the sketch where they explicitly make the point that what is crass is the use of these “important issues” to sell products. It is a very safe, vanilla, left-wing criticism of materialism/consumerism. It actually is amazing how they can produce a sketch where they explicitly mock the absurdity of this new conventional wisdom sanctimony while remaining completely oblivious to the fact that they are skewering those absurd contradictions.

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  59. @AndrewR
    Family Guy is an equal opportunity mocker. They're not afraid to make fun of even Jews.

    The only remarkable thing about Family Guy making fun of Jews is that MacFarlane isn’t Jewish himself (he actually seems WASPy to me). But he’s no doubt surrounded by them, and they sign off on it. Jews love making fun of Jews, and they are in fact more obsessed with doing so than any Nazi who ever lived. It just has to be done in the right way. You make fun from the inside, not the out.

    Family Guy and a host of shows like it get their laughs pushing the envelope of PC, or appearing to, without ever breaking through. They mock PC within PC-dom. South Park is a bit closer to what Family Guy pretends to be, in that I believe its creators are genuinely anti-PC (though, like all of us, they grew up within its confines and can’t think entirely outside of it without going crazy). But they don’t stray very far, and almost exclusively go after targets that don’t matter, like Kanye West or Barbara Streisand.

    Compared even to the pitiful transgressiveness of South Park, Family Guy is totally an establishment show. They only pretend to have the wrong sort of opinions, or their opinions differ on trivial matters. They are most definitely not equal opportunity mockers. Not quite so unbalanced as other shows, like SNL, but by no means equal.

    By the way, being “transgressive” is not the only way to be funny. But that’s how these people promote themselves, so that’s what I’m judging them on.

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  60. Steve, have you watched The Man in the High Castle? This show is 100% Mad Men + Fascism. Actually, the fascists in TMitHC are more likeable than Don Draper. I’m surprised a web search didn’t bring me more confirmation, and complaints about the show’s praising Nazism with faint damnation, though I did find one:

    http://flavorwire.com/596241/the-man-in-the-high-castle-and-the-alluring-spectacle-of-fascism

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    • Replies: @guest
    It is my belief they tried desperately to avoid the Fascinatin' Fascism trap, and in order to avoid glamorization they made them as boring as possible. Except for the fashion. You've just gotta have that. In this case, they get a two-fer: early 60s (like Mad Men) and Nazis.

    As for the rest, it's all Leave It to Beaver, Stepford Wives, euthanasia, and world domination. The Nazi America they set up is superficial at best, considering it's supposed to be serious drama, when it's not an action-y sci-fi spy thriller. But that's the point, isn't it? Those were the pre-civil rights movement, pre-"second wave" feminism, pre-New Left, pre-PC days. In other words, the Bad Old Days. So they gotta be simple, crude, and boring. That way, they can't be accused of promoting Nazism.

    Ah, but the Nazi America they depict is clean, polite, peaceful (at least internally, not counting the resistance movement,which doesn't show up that much). Men are men, and women are women. Parents care about keeping their children in line. Children actually respect their parents. Doesn't sound so bad. Whoops.

    Also, the most compelling character is Nazi Dad, "senior group leader" Smith. That's so because villains are easier to write, especially these days, when no one believes in heroes, not even in the superhero genre. (How depressing is Superman, of all people?) But it's more than that. The rest of the active characters come off as kinda crazy, or at best groping. Smith knows what he's doing. He acts within limits. He has values and motivations normal people can understand, even if they don't agree with them.

    , @Alfa158
    Man in the High Castle is worth an article all by itself. Trying to avoid spoilers:
    I don’t know if it is true that Ridley Scott harbors what are, by Showbiz dogma, subversive sympathies about race, politics and culture, but the show has some disturbing sub-texts. It is loosely based on the Phillip K. Dick novel but expands the kernel idea to far greater breadth and detail. Most of the show is the usual dramatic boilerplate but reviewing the whole show, the most striking thing is the depiction that emerges of the three parts of the US, the Pacific States under Japanese occupation, the Eastern states under the Third Reich and the lawless Neutral Zone of the Rockies.
    The Pacific States is Dystopia, it is multi-racial with the surviving Jews and Blacks, and everyone else under a brutal and oppressive Japanese occupation. Although some Japanese are written as peaceful and sympathetic, most are played as the vicious, devious brutes who would fit right in to an American film produced during WWII. The Pacific States are dirty, dingy, poor, crime riddled and underdeveloped. Everything is shabby and low tech, the few cars are left-over prewar cars or crappy little 50’s Japanese boxes loaned to the production company by the Toyota auto museum. Americans of any race including Nisei are required to bow obsequiously to any Japanese. The Yakazu are allowed to carry out drug running, extortion, murder and prostitution as long as they don’t overstep their boundaries. The show spends a non-PC amount of screen time showing the night-clubs staffed by White bar-girls for the pleasure of important Japanese. The Japanese security services are omnipresent, efficient and utterly ruthless. If you are not Japanese your life is pretty much of no value and they will murder innocent civilians at the drop of a hat. The Japanese are improbably, even written as low-tech, lagging far behind Germany.
    The US in the Third Reich does look like a Madmen vision of 50’s America with swastikas. It is what any alt-righter would describe as Whitopia. The cities are clean, modern, expansive and safe. The citizens drive German or large 50’s American cars live in good housing and dress nicely at all times.. The kids are smart, well-dressed, polite, and confident in their future. There appears to be no visible poverty or unemployment and the Working Man is respected. In one episode a character new to the Reich asks about a key for the door to their apartment and is told no-one bothers installing locking doors anymore because no one is going to come in who isn’t supposed to. There are no people who look like the Other. Some Jews are in hiding but there is no sign of Blacks, Latins or Asians. What happened to them is not stated and, frankly, no-one wants to know what happed to them. As long as you don’t make trouble and don’t have any genetic defects that will get you euthanized, things are good. Although the Security Services are brutal when they catch anyone, and their giant brutalist HQ in NYC looks imposing, story details seem to suggest that they are spread very thin and frankly really not very good at their jobs. The Reich is safe not because the Resistance, which seems to consist mostly of war veterans who are still trying to fight, is being thoroughly suppressed by vast and competent police force, but because the mass of people are pretty satisfied with how things are going for them.
  61. @Steve Sailer
    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I'm not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.

    American fast food is pretty German (hamburgers), so why not American humor? Of course, I've never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I'm totally in the dark on the subject. I almost went to see Toni Erdmann. It's supposed to be really funny, although the trailer isn't.

    There are no German movies which are intentionally funny.

    However, I am told that the American TV show Hogan’s Heroes, dubbed into German with a lot of ribaldry added in the 1990′s is funny. Sample: https://youtu.be/F7cvTMEOVZY

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  62. @Massimo Heitor

    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.
     
    SNL has done excellent right wing humor, even alt-right humor, that I already linked in this thread. SNL has different writers and comedians that range across the political spectrum. Famous SNL alum with outspoken right wing views include Adam Sandler, Norm MacDonald, Colin Quinn, Dennis Miller, Victoria Jackson, Jon Lovitz, David Spade.

    I love great comedy and great political comedy and great right wing political comedy wherever I can find it. Ann Coulter can be funny, Steve Sailer has his great gags here and there, mark steyn has his funny moments. Milo is a right wing entertainer with a few funny moments.

    Here's another SNL skit that mocks the left that I missed. This is from moderate leftist Robert Smigel, who is hilarious, but unfortunately, still left:
    https://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/tv-funhouse-blue-state-santa/n12657?snl=1

    A lot of those names are a stretch. Dennis Miller was converted after 9/11; prior to that he was a conventional liberal. However much inborn rightness there was to him all along, it wasn’t enough to tickle a conservative’s political bone.

    Victoria Jackson probably didn’t have much creative control, and she strikes me as a “born again” type, so I wouldn’t assume she was that way when she was on the show.

    Adam Sandler was a puerile novelty act, and his comedy had barely any content at all, much less political content.

    David Spade went after Hollywood, and not in the jokey, insider way all E! channel-type gossip shows nowadays do. More in a direct and honest way, but not exactly in a right-wing way, either.

    Colin Quinn, I don’t really know. He seems like he could be on my side. But he’s also very guarded, despite the fact that he does overtly political commentary. Which is telling.

    Jon Lovitz I don’t really know about. I liked his characters, but they didn’t tell me anything one way or another.

    All that being said, with how many years SNL has been on the air and how many cast members they’ve had, plenty of them had to have been actual conservatives. But what does that amount to? There were also plenty of conservative-themed sketches, but obviously a lot less than other kinds. Again, what does that amount to?

    The biggest right-wing influence on the show, and one of the guys who was around since the beginning, was Jim Downey. In him you’ll find the conservative heart of SNL, if it ever had one. The most consistently rightist element in the history of the show was his tenure with Norm MacDonald on Weekend Update.

    Proof is in the uncomprehending reaction of the audience to the majority of the jokes. Not silence or scattered titters, which are unfortunately all too common. But more like “Wha? Huh?” It wasn’t that they were highbrow jokes, though they were above average-brow for the show. But people didn’t know they were allowed to laugh at those sorts of things in that way. That wasn’t all about politics, but definitely the network’s reaction was at least partly politically motivated.

    That remains pretty much the pinnacle of the show for me, though Bill Murray is by far my favorite cast member outside the show. I never watched regularly after Norm was axed, though I was only 14 at the time. (Interest in shows like SNL probably peak shortly thereafter, anyway.)

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    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor

    Jim Downey. In him you’ll find the conservative heart of SNL, if it ever had one.
     
    Jim Downey is still there and writes much of the political humor. He is widely considered right wing, but he was a registered Democrat and a big supporter of Obama, so he can't be that far right.

    A lot of those names are a stretch.
     
    Sure. Most SNL cast members were gregarious goofballs focused on being fun and entertaining crowds. Many didn't even realize their own political views until they got a little older.

    Today, I only watch individual clips rather than full episodes. That's a technology change obviously. Some SNL clips are great, others aren't.

    This Cheetos clip is funnier on second viewing.
  63. This vid reminds me that with fat girls, no matter how otherwise pleasant-seeming, and no matter how nice their hair, I just can’t get interested.

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    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    This vid reminds me that with fat girls, no matter how otherwise pleasant-seeming, and no matter how nice their hair, I just can’t get interested.
     
    Yep. Despite feminist nonsense, it's entirely natural. They've landed a bunch of lard, where your baby is supposed to go.
  64. @Autochthon
    I agree with everything you write.

    I was just taking the piss one last time about a theme on a previous thread.

    I still maintain Steve Sailer and Mark Steyn are two of the funniest conservative persons going. Porter, of Kakistocracy fame, is also hilarious when he chooses to be; he's easily the most biting, arch writer going.

    Adam Carolla bears mention as well.

    It’s MILLER TIME! Dennis Miller is pretty good, the best of them. Overall, even if accurate, women aren’t funny, they just aren’t. Especially leftist-women. There’s nothing funny about their agenda. “The Wives Of ISIS”, a British production however, IS hilarious. Undoubtedly written by men.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I generally agree women are not usually as funny as men. British are also usually funnier than Americans. British women are almost always vastly funnier than American women. It may be only delivery, and not writing, as you suggest, but performance takes talent as well.

    Patricia Routledge, Wendy Richard, Mollie Sugden ... all were hilarious in their day. Sugden in particular could bring down the house with just the properly timed arch of an eyebrow. Nowadays, Australian Rose Byrne cracks me up. She and Statham carried Spy, much more so than McCarthy did.

    I think the earlier discussion was focused on explicitly conservative or at least libertarian humour. This digression reminds me much of the best humour (like the best literature, etc.) is apolitical; it deals with more fundamental aspects of the human condition.

  65. @Achmed E. Newman
    Now this is something I don't understand very well regarding the real advertising business, but I'm sure the SNL skit above is a pretty realistic parody of it. I've heard many times that it's the "name recognition" that gets people to buy. They say it doesn't matter whether the ad has anything to do with the product or service, they just want to get that product (or service) brand name in your head.

    Someone tell me how do you think that really works? (My contention is that it doesn't, and things sell or don't sell, and Madison Avenue has squat-all to do with it these days.) You've got your Coke-cola and you've got your Pepsi - who has not heard of either one? Is the idea to associate this one, say Pepsi (which sucks, BTW) with this musical slut artist so people remember, "Hey, "Lady Madonna"/"Pepsi", yeah whenever I see "Pepsi", I think "Lady Madonna". OK, so I'm at the store, and my mind goes "Here's the Pepsi; "Lady Madonna likes this!" "but ... it sucks, if I'm gonna drink caffeinated sugar water, I'll take Coke-cola." "I like Lady Madonna, but she can go buy whatever the hell she drinks, who cares?"

    What about products/services that most people have NOT heard of yet? Yeah the idea of advertising is to let people know what you're selling. "Here are some grimy amigos climbing over a fence, cleaning up all their trash on the way across the Colorado (river) desert, finding a new home, cutting down on Carbon (for the Carbophobics out there in TV land) when they get there and enriching the living s__t out of our lives" NOW "Dog Pile II Web Services - put your work on the Thunderstorm Cloud!" How does that help me as a consumer?

    I found no problem with the old ads that would try to sell you on stuff based on WHAT IT DOES!. Yeah, there was a lot of bull involved some of the time, but at least it was informative.

    I will continue this comment later with some thoughts about that funny lizard that sells auto insurance - he's cute.

    I waited years for the show Mad Men to explain the purpose of advertising to me, but it never did. The closest it came, I think, was to say that there’s a pact between the audience and the pitchman: you sit there and listen to me, and in exchange you get free entertainment. They try to be informative, too, but the basis of it is that you feel good, you associate your good feelings with the product, and you remember the product.

    That was Mad Men, anyway, they accentuated happiness (in the ads, not in the characters’ lives). The movie Roger Dodger took the opposite view, which is that advertisers try to make you feel bad about yourself. Then you go buy their product to feel better. I don’t know.

    They probably say it’s all about “brand recognition” because that’s the easiest part to wrap their minds around. Like all those charities that talk about “raising awareness” (aka propagandizing). If that’s all you officially dedicate yourself to, who’s to come barging in, asking what you’re doing with their money?

    Advertising works, I can say that for sure. I’m more apt to buy products I’ve heard of than ones I haven’t. How it works is mysterious, however, because I don’t buy every product I’ve ever heard of. Some I buy, some I don’t. Why one and not the other? No one knows. Could be a difference in advertising, could be something advertising could never touch.

    Advertising also gives me an itch to consume things I otherwise wouldn’t bother with. I know this, because over the last few years I’ve gone to fewer movies and paid much less attention to movie ads and entertainment news. So when I go on Netflix and scroll through new releases, I have no idea what most of them are , and no desire to watch them. But when I come across ones I have heard of before, I’m usually more apt to want to see them.

    So, again, I know it works. Just not how, nor how well.

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  66. @Lot
    Cute English girl sees her old neighborhood taken over by burka wearing women and aggro blacks:

    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SgKMI1wV0ps

    Bringing this to America is the left's #1 priority.

    In real European life, the Muslim men, even if there are only 10 to a city block, gather at the coffee shops all over Europe. A single woman dropping in for her morning coffee has to run a gauntlet of insult for being unaccompanied, for her fashion sense, for her uncovered head. You don’t have to have any particular majority of Muslim immigrant men in your community, they gather. Where they gather, they’re a majority and a nuisance, if not a danger. And they’re a real hassle for the women that thought they had finally won their women’s rights. May they remember it was a woman, Merkle, one they voted for, that did this to them. What did Merkle care? She has no children, no human legacy, Hell, Muslim men probably revive that tingle between her pegs, who knows, it’s clearly the case for American feminists, too. Merkle is a strange duck. When I see those selfies she takes surrounded by Muslim men, I get the creeps. There’s a vibe there.

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  67. Amusing piece. The forces of PC combat things like HBD, pattern recognition, and alt-right argument from science chiefly by stifling independence of thought and research. https://psmag.com/how-science-can-combat-the-alt-right-af4a0b330b23#.sowlx5y5t

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  68. @NickG

    The uploader has not made this video in your country.
     
    I'm in South Africa - that's So Racist!

    Can't be arsed to fire up a proxy.

    Not available in Canada either.

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  69. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    Well the prog-left is unearthing graveyard quantities of bones for use as comedy material if anyone notices. Whether SNL serves up any of it–beyond tokenism–is doubtful.

    Just like MTV, which stopped running music videos because its target market had outgrown them, SNL is rarely funny–because its not about comedy. It’s a cultural marker for the in-crowd. You watch it because your cohort is watching it–so you can talk about it at work and with your friends. You watch it to be au courant on the guest host, the musical guest, the fake news segment, and maybe, just maybe, there’s a comedy sketch segment that was funny.

    SNL’s target market grew up with participation awards–they don’t expect the sketch to be funny, it’s the effort that counts. Like programmed monkeys, they applaud the diversity, the PC, the virtue and vanity signaling, and giving everyone on staff an opportunity to participate. If it’s funny, that’s a bonus.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Lorne Michaels kept it focused for a long time on what 15-year-olds staying up late with their friends would like.
    , @SFG
    You know, I'm just going to say--everyone I know claims SNL used to be funnier than it is. This having happened in several time periods, I think it's the same bit as the golden age of science fiction being 13--stuff just doesn't grab you as much when you're older.
  70. @AndrewR
    When they alluded to Chester the Cheetah being trans, I instantly guessed he would be called Chelsea the Cheetah. Instead they chose Danielle. Wtf. I guess they didn't want to offend any fans of Our Lady Bradley "Chelsea" Manning of Leavenworth.

    That’s one long term problem about not going after and destroying the Clintons:we will have to deal with Chelsea.
    JFK Jr did us all a solid on his own.

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  71. @Steve Sailer
    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I'm not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.

    American fast food is pretty German (hamburgers), so why not American humor? Of course, I've never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I'm totally in the dark on the subject. I almost went to see Toni Erdmann. It's supposed to be really funny, although the trailer isn't.

    Of course, I’ve never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I’m totally in the dark on the subject.

    Me neither.

    However, I once saw The Great Escape on TV in Germany. It had been dubbed into German, fair enough, although seeing all those American soldiers speaking German was fun.

    But the German parts for the Germans, from the original, had been dubbed into English with German subtitles.

    That was pretty funny.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    There's a bit in the South Park movie where the kids do a search for porn and find Cartman's mom in a German Scheisse movie.

    I managed to find the German version of this scene, and it's an English movie, with the guy speaking in an exaggerated English accent. Doesn't seem fair.
  72. @Anonymous

    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.
     
    Comedy? Oh, that's what that is. Maybe I'm a tough audience but I can sit through a bunch of Comedy Central stand up routines and at most crack a smile (even when I'm trying). Why is it that I can laugh my ass off reading some posts by Steve Sailer yet can sit through whole comedy shows and only crack a smile? And that's only to appease my wife, who spent a lot on tickets for comedy shows at the nearby Wilbur Theatre. Two comedians I have found laugh-out-loud funny are Brian Regan and the late Mitch Hedberg, and funny enough, I couldn't discern their political leanings.

    Here's my sense of humor. A commercial for Berlitz language school: The German Coastguard.

    Daniel Tosh is anti-PC, makes fun of minorities and women, salutes white male achievement. Not right-wing by any means, but close enough.

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  73. @Achmed E. Newman
    Now this is something I don't understand very well regarding the real advertising business, but I'm sure the SNL skit above is a pretty realistic parody of it. I've heard many times that it's the "name recognition" that gets people to buy. They say it doesn't matter whether the ad has anything to do with the product or service, they just want to get that product (or service) brand name in your head.

    Someone tell me how do you think that really works? (My contention is that it doesn't, and things sell or don't sell, and Madison Avenue has squat-all to do with it these days.) You've got your Coke-cola and you've got your Pepsi - who has not heard of either one? Is the idea to associate this one, say Pepsi (which sucks, BTW) with this musical slut artist so people remember, "Hey, "Lady Madonna"/"Pepsi", yeah whenever I see "Pepsi", I think "Lady Madonna". OK, so I'm at the store, and my mind goes "Here's the Pepsi; "Lady Madonna likes this!" "but ... it sucks, if I'm gonna drink caffeinated sugar water, I'll take Coke-cola." "I like Lady Madonna, but she can go buy whatever the hell she drinks, who cares?"

    What about products/services that most people have NOT heard of yet? Yeah the idea of advertising is to let people know what you're selling. "Here are some grimy amigos climbing over a fence, cleaning up all their trash on the way across the Colorado (river) desert, finding a new home, cutting down on Carbon (for the Carbophobics out there in TV land) when they get there and enriching the living s__t out of our lives" NOW "Dog Pile II Web Services - put your work on the Thunderstorm Cloud!" How does that help me as a consumer?

    I found no problem with the old ads that would try to sell you on stuff based on WHAT IT DOES!. Yeah, there was a lot of bull involved some of the time, but at least it was informative.

    I will continue this comment later with some thoughts about that funny lizard that sells auto insurance - he's cute.

    The point of a Coca-Cola commercial isn’t to convince you that Coca-Cola is great, it’s to convince you that other people have seen the commercial. Ever heard the phrase “Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM?” Well, no party host ever got a dirty look for loading a cooler with Coca-Cola instead of RC Cola.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I think I get it To paraphrase, are you saying that the commercial was made to make you think (or know) that this is a product that everyone knows about, so it must be OK? That's a good point.
    Were it my party though, I'd get whatever tasted the best. If the guests suggested Pepsi I'd tell them to quit drinking that rot-gut. We don't have many parties, so it's not a factor ;-}
    , @Anonymous
    I bought a whole case of Moxie once for an office party. I was very unpopular.

    The problem was not that Moxie is not advertised. It was that it tastes awful unless you grew up drinking the vile stuff.

  74. @Anonymous

    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.
     
    Comedy? Oh, that's what that is. Maybe I'm a tough audience but I can sit through a bunch of Comedy Central stand up routines and at most crack a smile (even when I'm trying). Why is it that I can laugh my ass off reading some posts by Steve Sailer yet can sit through whole comedy shows and only crack a smile? And that's only to appease my wife, who spent a lot on tickets for comedy shows at the nearby Wilbur Theatre. Two comedians I have found laugh-out-loud funny are Brian Regan and the late Mitch Hedberg, and funny enough, I couldn't discern their political leanings.

    Here's my sense of humor. A commercial for Berlitz language school: The German Coastguard.

    Here’s mine. (Not for kiddies.)

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dt-ovJJB7t4

    Read More
  75. @WowJustWow
    The point of a Coca-Cola commercial isn't to convince you that Coca-Cola is great, it's to convince you that other people have seen the commercial. Ever heard the phrase "Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM?" Well, no party host ever got a dirty look for loading a cooler with Coca-Cola instead of RC Cola.

    I think I get it To paraphrase, are you saying that the commercial was made to make you think (or know) that this is a product that everyone knows about, so it must be OK? That’s a good point.
    Were it my party though, I’d get whatever tasted the best. If the guests suggested Pepsi I’d tell them to quit drinking that rot-gut. We don’t have many parties, so it’s not a factor ;-}

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  76. Off topic, cuckold omega-male friend-of-ISteve Enrique Marquez plead guilty to conspiracy, for which he faces 25 to life.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/fiend-san-bernardino-shooter-pleads-guilty-charges-article-1.2972655

    (The article says he plead guilty today and also it says he plans to plead guilty Thursday, so not clear which is right.)

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  77. @anonguy

    When they alluded to Chester the Cheetah being trans, I instantly guessed he would be called Chelsea the Cheetah. Instead they chose Danielle. Wtf.
     
    I didn't have a guess, but I instantly wondered what the new name would be, figured it would be something clever.

    Danielle seems like a nominal, random pick. There is no wit in it.

    Danielle seems like a nominal, random pick.

    For me, that made it funnier – “Danielle the Cheetah” is clearly a terrible name for a mascot, but the only thing the executives are worried about is the ad’s political message.

    Danielle is also a little more girly/sexy than your average girl’s name, which gives it an autogynephiliac feel.

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    • Replies: @guest
    If the joke is that they're bad at making up names, then the name should be more obviously terrible, like "Doris" or something. "Danielle" makes me wonder what the joke is.
  78. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    If you like your comedy extra-dry, you might like David Angelo:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jy5Bs_avaFo

    (Is there a trick to getting videos to embed in the comments?)

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  79. Oh, about the lizard. Even past my TV-watching daze (get it?) I still have seen that 6 in tall British lizard talking about auto insurance on friends’ or hotel TVs. He’s very entertaining and cute. However, it has not changed anything about my purchasing of auto insurance no matter what new hijinks that cold-blooded limey is up to. What would a lizard know about insurance, is what I wanna know.

    What’s the point?

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  80. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    OT:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/lawsuit-ensues-over-comment-by-espn-commentator-at-australian-open/#comments

    Lawsuit ensues over comment by ESPN commentator at Australian Open

    LOS ANGELES – A tennis commentator dropped by ESPN for a remark about Venus Williams during the Australian Open has sued the sports network for wrongful termination.

    Former tennis pro Doug Adler maintains he was describing Williams’ aggressive style last month as “guerrilla” tactics and not comparing her with a “gorilla.”

    He apologized for his poor word choice but was let go from ESPN mid-tournament.

    Adler filed suit Tuesday in Los Angeles Superior Court, saying he has wrongly been branded a racist and lost work because of the controversy. The suit calls for punitive financial damages, but doesn’t name an amount.

    ESPN spokesman Mike Soltys says the network has not seen the lawsuit and has no comment.

    Offended viewers called for Adler to be fired because they believed he had compared Williams, who is African-American, with a gorilla.

    Adler used an even more poor choice of words when he later said, “Wow, that silverback has a wicked serve.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    He should have been more niggardly with his choice of words.
  81. @anonguy

    When they alluded to Chester the Cheetah being trans, I instantly guessed he would be called Chelsea the Cheetah. Instead they chose Danielle. Wtf.
     
    I didn't have a guess, but I instantly wondered what the new name would be, figured it would be something clever.

    Danielle seems like a nominal, random pick. There is no wit in it.

    They do seem to have picked up on one oddity of the trans renaming ritual: when the trannie reveals his new name, it typically has no significance apparent to the observer. Why does Bradley Manning choose Chelsea? Why does Bruce Jenner choose Caitlyn? Why does Chester the Cheetah choose Danielle? Is there a method to the madness?

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  82. @larry lurker

    Danielle seems like a nominal, random pick.
     
    For me, that made it funnier - "Danielle the Cheetah" is clearly a terrible name for a mascot, but the only thing the executives are worried about is the ad's political message.

    Danielle is also a little more girly/sexy than your average girl's name, which gives it an autogynephiliac feel.

    If the joke is that they’re bad at making up names, then the name should be more obviously terrible, like “Doris” or something. “Danielle” makes me wonder what the joke is.

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  83. @Forbes
    Well the prog-left is unearthing graveyard quantities of bones for use as comedy material if anyone notices. Whether SNL serves up any of it--beyond tokenism--is doubtful.

    Just like MTV, which stopped running music videos because its target market had outgrown them, SNL is rarely funny--because its not about comedy. It's a cultural marker for the in-crowd. You watch it because your cohort is watching it--so you can talk about it at work and with your friends. You watch it to be au courant on the guest host, the musical guest, the fake news segment, and maybe, just maybe, there's a comedy sketch segment that was funny.

    SNL's target market grew up with participation awards--they don't expect the sketch to be funny, it's the effort that counts. Like programmed monkeys, they applaud the diversity, the PC, the virtue and vanity signaling, and giving everyone on staff an opportunity to participate. If it's funny, that's a bonus.

    Lorne Michaels kept it focused for a long time on what 15-year-olds staying up late with their friends would like.

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    • Replies: @Forbes
    That's plausible. I would've said college-age, not high school. It wasn't on when I was 15.
  84. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    SNL is still so bad and has been bad for a long time now. It should have been retired at least 2 decades ago, probably after Norm MacDonald left.

    Read More
    • Replies: @pepperinmono
    Quit watching SNL after Bill Murray left.
    Just not funny.
    Can't believe has survived so long.

    Not necessarily right wing, but not reflexively liberal was George Carlin.
  85. @anonguy

    Of course, I’ve never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I’m totally in the dark on the subject.
     
    Me neither.

    However, I once saw The Great Escape on TV in Germany. It had been dubbed into German, fair enough, although seeing all those American soldiers speaking German was fun.

    But the German parts for the Germans, from the original, had been dubbed into English with German subtitles.

    That was pretty funny.

    There’s a bit in the South Park movie where the kids do a search for porn and find Cartman’s mom in a German Scheisse movie.

    I managed to find the German version of this scene, and it’s an English movie, with the guy speaking in an exaggerated English accent. Doesn’t seem fair.

    Read More
  86. @Forbes
    Well the prog-left is unearthing graveyard quantities of bones for use as comedy material if anyone notices. Whether SNL serves up any of it--beyond tokenism--is doubtful.

    Just like MTV, which stopped running music videos because its target market had outgrown them, SNL is rarely funny--because its not about comedy. It's a cultural marker for the in-crowd. You watch it because your cohort is watching it--so you can talk about it at work and with your friends. You watch it to be au courant on the guest host, the musical guest, the fake news segment, and maybe, just maybe, there's a comedy sketch segment that was funny.

    SNL's target market grew up with participation awards--they don't expect the sketch to be funny, it's the effort that counts. Like programmed monkeys, they applaud the diversity, the PC, the virtue and vanity signaling, and giving everyone on staff an opportunity to participate. If it's funny, that's a bonus.

    You know, I’m just going to say–everyone I know claims SNL used to be funnier than it is. This having happened in several time periods, I think it’s the same bit as the golden age of science fiction being 13–stuff just doesn’t grab you as much when you’re older.

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    • Replies: @guest
    SNL is made for people who are old enough to stay up after midnight but too young to drive. I watched it regularly from like 12 to 14. It would be natural for me to say that was its funniest period.

    Except I also watched it in reruns, and I definitely prefer the span from '87-'94 best. (Basically the Phil Hartman era). Which is just a bit outside my natural range. People can have relatively objective opinions.
  87. @Jim Christian
    It's MILLER TIME! Dennis Miller is pretty good, the best of them. Overall, even if accurate, women aren't funny, they just aren't. Especially leftist-women. There's nothing funny about their agenda. "The Wives Of ISIS", a British production however, IS hilarious. Undoubtedly written by men.

    I generally agree women are not usually as funny as men. British are also usually funnier than Americans. British women are almost always vastly funnier than American women. It may be only delivery, and not writing, as you suggest, but performance takes talent as well.

    Patricia Routledge, Wendy Richard, Mollie Sugden … all were hilarious in their day. Sugden in particular could bring down the house with just the properly timed arch of an eyebrow. Nowadays, Australian Rose Byrne cracks me up. She and Statham carried Spy, much more so than McCarthy did.

    I think the earlier discussion was focused on explicitly conservative or at least libertarian humour. This digression reminds me much of the best humour (like the best literature, etc.) is apolitical; it deals with more fundamental aspects of the human condition.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    An addendum, if Steve will indulge it:

    It used to be for most of human history that politics could be civil; people with differing views could debate at the pub , parliament, agora, etc. and part friends; work together, attend the same church, and so on.

    Nowadays, the Malthusian death match; the refusal to understand what different countries, cultures, etc. are for; and the synergy of all these things has accelerated a toxic, perpetual conflict where all politics is dire and urgent and nasty because every question is a winner-take-all, existential threat. The other fellow won't spend a bit more of taxes for schools instead of roads: he'll drive me off my land and give it to his hostile, foreign helots.

    This, in turn, means that humour, like every other aspect of life, (advertisements, to come back to the topic of Steve's post and the "Cheetohs" skit) is increasingly politicised. I confess I deny myself goods and services I shouldn't have to think so much about because it is the only way to avoid financing people out to destroy me.

    Hell, I once spent an entire Saturday before I could find socks made in the U.S.A. and not some foreign hellhole. And even still, I cannot but fear they were made by illegal aliens who put Americans out of work. It's the same with entertainment: I don't want to care about a film-maker's politics, but when every film is blatant propaganda I cannot enjoy it, and likewise when I cannot but think how half the cast will spend the money earned from my ticket to finance my suppression. Some would say it's my fault for being such a stickler, but I disagree. Sadly, most people who otherwise share my values have no trouble financing the opposition: witness Pence's attending Hamilton and praising it even as they openly and directly insulted him, not just by virtue of the play itself as anti-white screed, but personally and individually: in the presence of his own daughter no less!

    , @Jim Christian

    This digression reminds me much of the best humour (like the best literature, etc.) is apolitical; it deals with more fundamental aspects of the human condition.
     
    Good takes. Robert Klein and Lewis Black more so than Carlin define aspects of the human condition, yet both took their acts to a political left wing fare thee well, Klein is much less profane and with the Henry Mancini Music Lab behind the curtain for a little musical respite from his "wisdom", you get a little entertainment with some class. Klein isn't a half-bad harmonica player, either. Here he is now!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMFEnbwBJGc

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jQN6y5mW08&list=RDiMFEnbwBJGc&index=4

  88. @NC
    Agree 100%. That wasn't even that funny only competent hackery. Million Dollar Extreme was on adult swim, but they were cancelled and blacklisted despite high ratings when someone noticed that they were right wing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIGjr3MuL3g

    Much funnier if they had actually made the ads!

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  89. @Autochthon
    I generally agree women are not usually as funny as men. British are also usually funnier than Americans. British women are almost always vastly funnier than American women. It may be only delivery, and not writing, as you suggest, but performance takes talent as well.

    Patricia Routledge, Wendy Richard, Mollie Sugden ... all were hilarious in their day. Sugden in particular could bring down the house with just the properly timed arch of an eyebrow. Nowadays, Australian Rose Byrne cracks me up. She and Statham carried Spy, much more so than McCarthy did.

    I think the earlier discussion was focused on explicitly conservative or at least libertarian humour. This digression reminds me much of the best humour (like the best literature, etc.) is apolitical; it deals with more fundamental aspects of the human condition.

    An addendum, if Steve will indulge it:

    It used to be for most of human history that politics could be civil; people with differing views could debate at the pub , parliament, agora, etc. and part friends; work together, attend the same church, and so on.

    Nowadays, the Malthusian death match; the refusal to understand what different countries, cultures, etc. are for; and the synergy of all these things has accelerated a toxic, perpetual conflict where all politics is dire and urgent and nasty because every question is a winner-take-all, existential threat. The other fellow won’t spend a bit more of taxes for schools instead of roads: he’ll drive me off my land and give it to his hostile, foreign helots.

    This, in turn, means that humour, like every other aspect of life, (advertisements, to come back to the topic of Steve’s post and the “Cheetohs” skit) is increasingly politicised. I confess I deny myself goods and services I shouldn’t have to think so much about because it is the only way to avoid financing people out to destroy me.

    Hell, I once spent an entire Saturday before I could find socks made in the U.S.A. and not some foreign hellhole. And even still, I cannot but fear they were made by illegal aliens who put Americans out of work. It’s the same with entertainment: I don’t want to care about a film-maker’s politics, but when every film is blatant propaganda I cannot enjoy it, and likewise when I cannot but think how half the cast will spend the money earned from my ticket to finance my suppression. Some would say it’s my fault for being such a stickler, but I disagree. Sadly, most people who otherwise share my values have no trouble financing the opposition: witness Pence’s attending Hamilton and praising it even as they openly and directly insulted him, not just by virtue of the play itself as anti-white screed, but personally and individually: in the presence of his own daughter no less!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "It used to be for most of human history that politics could be civil;...."

    Are you kidding? For most of human history, most people were not permitted to engage in politics of any kind - not really. Their involvement was limited to fighting the King's wars (whether they wanted to or not), feeding the King's men (whether they wanted to or not), and abiding by the King's laws (etc.). For "King" read any kind of worthy you wish: King, Lord, Emperor, Sultan, Pharaoh, Hetman, Shogun, Daimyo, etc.

    Politics, whenever it has been practiced, has seldom been civil. If you doubt it, ask any of Henry VIII courtiers, or the Mob of Paris, or the Greens, or the Blues, the Ghelphs, or the Ghibelines.
    , @SFG
    Pence was just being diplomatic. He knows he's going to get an earful going to a liberal play on Broadway. My guess is he was either (a) trying to reach across the aisle because he was an old-school politician and thought it would be good for the country or (b) heard about the play and curiosity overcame him.
  90. @Anonymous
    SNL is still so bad and has been bad for a long time now. It should have been retired at least 2 decades ago, probably after Norm MacDonald left.

    Quit watching SNL after Bill Murray left.
    Just not funny.
    Can’t believe has survived so long.

    Not necessarily right wing, but not reflexively liberal was George Carlin.

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  91. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    Bill Burr – subversive, right-leaning, comedic genius. Search for “Bill Burr guns and lotion”.

    You’ll be glad you did!

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    • Replies: @40 Acres and A Kardashian
    Burr's hilarious, but no white man married to a black woman is right wing.

    That's a contradiction in terms.
  92. @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    Bill Burr – subversive, right-leaning, comedic genius. Search for “Bill Burr guns and lotion”.

    You’ll be glad you did!

    Read More
  93. @Achmed E. Newman
    Now this is something I don't understand very well regarding the real advertising business, but I'm sure the SNL skit above is a pretty realistic parody of it. I've heard many times that it's the "name recognition" that gets people to buy. They say it doesn't matter whether the ad has anything to do with the product or service, they just want to get that product (or service) brand name in your head.

    Someone tell me how do you think that really works? (My contention is that it doesn't, and things sell or don't sell, and Madison Avenue has squat-all to do with it these days.) You've got your Coke-cola and you've got your Pepsi - who has not heard of either one? Is the idea to associate this one, say Pepsi (which sucks, BTW) with this musical slut artist so people remember, "Hey, "Lady Madonna"/"Pepsi", yeah whenever I see "Pepsi", I think "Lady Madonna". OK, so I'm at the store, and my mind goes "Here's the Pepsi; "Lady Madonna likes this!" "but ... it sucks, if I'm gonna drink caffeinated sugar water, I'll take Coke-cola." "I like Lady Madonna, but she can go buy whatever the hell she drinks, who cares?"

    What about products/services that most people have NOT heard of yet? Yeah the idea of advertising is to let people know what you're selling. "Here are some grimy amigos climbing over a fence, cleaning up all their trash on the way across the Colorado (river) desert, finding a new home, cutting down on Carbon (for the Carbophobics out there in TV land) when they get there and enriching the living s__t out of our lives" NOW "Dog Pile II Web Services - put your work on the Thunderstorm Cloud!" How does that help me as a consumer?

    I found no problem with the old ads that would try to sell you on stuff based on WHAT IT DOES!. Yeah, there was a lot of bull involved some of the time, but at least it was informative.

    I will continue this comment later with some thoughts about that funny lizard that sells auto insurance - he's cute.

    Advertising works. And yes, it works on you too. I used to think that I am so clever, I am immune to advertising. Then I started noticing that ads I found especially preposterous were always for products where I was not the target audience. And the ads I enjoyed the most? Always for products I might actually buy. An interesting coincidence. And this is not all. Eventually I realized that advertising subtly influences my day to day consumer choices as well.

    You shouldn’t think that you are different from everyone else. Take your Coke preference. How do you think you got it in the first place? You imprinted on Coke at an early age and liked it ever since. I bet advertising was involved, either directed at you as a kid or at your parents. The soft drink companies know that adults rarely switch their soda preferences, so they try to catch the moment early on when the choice is made. Have you noticed how Coke or Pepsi commercials almost always feature young people? This means that they are targeted at an even younger audience.

    Or take the gecko. Yes, these commercials won’t influence you choice between GEICO and State Farm. But if you had to choose between GEICO and some no name insurance company you’d be biased toward GEICO. They would feel like a safer choice because you’ve heard about them many times.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Nah, I had to drink milk 3 meals/day as a kid. I started liking Coke when I tasted it, and mostly quit when I realized the 30 g of sugar in a can was not good for my body. Advertisers are like the rest of salesmen - they're only successful if you let them be. I'm not sure if this is really true, but they say "you can't con an honest man".

    Hey funny think - I do have State Farm. Geico might get me to call for a quote, and, in fact, I'm sure I did at some point. So they did let me know they were out there. That's the part that might be useful, but for the ad budget they give that limey lizard, they could have lowered their rates enough to get me to buy a policy.

    I think a big reason I'm not susceptible too much is I wasn't allowed to watch much TV when I was young. Let me see if embedding is working, or at least here's a link to John Prine recommending you blow up your TV (and eat a lot of peaches):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BofvfVPFbiM

    I'll have to think about your first paragraph, though, inertial ....
    , @guest
    I don't exactly switch preferences, but I deliberately buy whatever pop is on sale at the grocery store, which is constantly flip-flopping between Coke, Pepsi, and the odds and ends. I prefer Coke to Pepsi (or I *think* I do), but I also prefer Mountain Dew to the non-cola cohorts of Coke. That's an unsolvable dilemma.
  94. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Steve Sailer
    By advertising so much, Coke and Pepsi make it hard for a 3rd company to compete with their highly profitable duopoly.

    I tried to sell P&G on doing a test of cutting advertising in 1985 but brand managers don't want to volunteer their ad budget to be cut because that makes them look weak. Strong brand managers get their ad budgets raise, not cut.

    Taxing ad revenues of broadcast companies, or a sales tax on advertising expenditures generally, would by my first move. But I would not be elected for that reason.

    Read More
  95. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @WowJustWow
    The point of a Coca-Cola commercial isn't to convince you that Coca-Cola is great, it's to convince you that other people have seen the commercial. Ever heard the phrase "Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM?" Well, no party host ever got a dirty look for loading a cooler with Coca-Cola instead of RC Cola.

    I bought a whole case of Moxie once for an office party. I was very unpopular.

    The problem was not that Moxie is not advertised. It was that it tastes awful unless you grew up drinking the vile stuff.

    Read More
  96. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Steve Sailer
    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I'm not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.

    American fast food is pretty German (hamburgers), so why not American humor? Of course, I've never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I'm totally in the dark on the subject. I almost went to see Toni Erdmann. It's supposed to be really funny, although the trailer isn't.

    There is nothing German about a hamburger as we know it.

    In Germany, pastries are called by city names. A “Berliner” is a glazed fried dumpling. I forget what a “Hamburger” is, but it has no meat.

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    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    A "Hamburger" is just a high-end German frikadelle (i.e. without the onions and pork Germans threw in because Germany was a poorer country).
  97. @AndrewR
    Family Guy is an equal opportunity mocker. They're not afraid to make fun of even Jews.

    I’ve only seen snippets of FG. I couldn’t stand to actually watch it, as I find it viscerally repellent. I seriously doubt that MacFarlane seriously questions the prevailing narrative in any substantive way.

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  98. @Autochthon
    An addendum, if Steve will indulge it:

    It used to be for most of human history that politics could be civil; people with differing views could debate at the pub , parliament, agora, etc. and part friends; work together, attend the same church, and so on.

    Nowadays, the Malthusian death match; the refusal to understand what different countries, cultures, etc. are for; and the synergy of all these things has accelerated a toxic, perpetual conflict where all politics is dire and urgent and nasty because every question is a winner-take-all, existential threat. The other fellow won't spend a bit more of taxes for schools instead of roads: he'll drive me off my land and give it to his hostile, foreign helots.

    This, in turn, means that humour, like every other aspect of life, (advertisements, to come back to the topic of Steve's post and the "Cheetohs" skit) is increasingly politicised. I confess I deny myself goods and services I shouldn't have to think so much about because it is the only way to avoid financing people out to destroy me.

    Hell, I once spent an entire Saturday before I could find socks made in the U.S.A. and not some foreign hellhole. And even still, I cannot but fear they were made by illegal aliens who put Americans out of work. It's the same with entertainment: I don't want to care about a film-maker's politics, but when every film is blatant propaganda I cannot enjoy it, and likewise when I cannot but think how half the cast will spend the money earned from my ticket to finance my suppression. Some would say it's my fault for being such a stickler, but I disagree. Sadly, most people who otherwise share my values have no trouble financing the opposition: witness Pence's attending Hamilton and praising it even as they openly and directly insulted him, not just by virtue of the play itself as anti-white screed, but personally and individually: in the presence of his own daughter no less!

    “It used to be for most of human history that politics could be civil;….”

    Are you kidding? For most of human history, most people were not permitted to engage in politics of any kind – not really. Their involvement was limited to fighting the King’s wars (whether they wanted to or not), feeding the King’s men (whether they wanted to or not), and abiding by the King’s laws (etc.). For “King” read any kind of worthy you wish: King, Lord, Emperor, Sultan, Pharaoh, Hetman, Shogun, Daimyo, etc.

    Politics, whenever it has been practiced, has seldom been civil. If you doubt it, ask any of Henry VIII courtiers, or the Mob of Paris, or the Greens, or the Blues, the Ghelphs, or the Ghibelines.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I suspect we are defining the term differently, since I completely agree with the points I believe you are making. Perhaps I ought to have written "civic life" rather than "politics."
  99. @Autochthon
    An addendum, if Steve will indulge it:

    It used to be for most of human history that politics could be civil; people with differing views could debate at the pub , parliament, agora, etc. and part friends; work together, attend the same church, and so on.

    Nowadays, the Malthusian death match; the refusal to understand what different countries, cultures, etc. are for; and the synergy of all these things has accelerated a toxic, perpetual conflict where all politics is dire and urgent and nasty because every question is a winner-take-all, existential threat. The other fellow won't spend a bit more of taxes for schools instead of roads: he'll drive me off my land and give it to his hostile, foreign helots.

    This, in turn, means that humour, like every other aspect of life, (advertisements, to come back to the topic of Steve's post and the "Cheetohs" skit) is increasingly politicised. I confess I deny myself goods and services I shouldn't have to think so much about because it is the only way to avoid financing people out to destroy me.

    Hell, I once spent an entire Saturday before I could find socks made in the U.S.A. and not some foreign hellhole. And even still, I cannot but fear they were made by illegal aliens who put Americans out of work. It's the same with entertainment: I don't want to care about a film-maker's politics, but when every film is blatant propaganda I cannot enjoy it, and likewise when I cannot but think how half the cast will spend the money earned from my ticket to finance my suppression. Some would say it's my fault for being such a stickler, but I disagree. Sadly, most people who otherwise share my values have no trouble financing the opposition: witness Pence's attending Hamilton and praising it even as they openly and directly insulted him, not just by virtue of the play itself as anti-white screed, but personally and individually: in the presence of his own daughter no less!

    Pence was just being diplomatic. He knows he’s going to get an earful going to a liberal play on Broadway. My guess is he was either (a) trying to reach across the aisle because he was an old-school politician and thought it would be good for the country or (b) heard about the play and curiosity overcame him.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    To be singled out by the entire cast at the curtain call and lectured in front of the audience? I really doubt he was expecting that.
  100. I work with a large number of foreigners, so there is really no shared culture (management of course likes it this way). In many ways this is a bad thing, but one positive is that I never have to talk about pop culture or sports. Which is good, because it has totally freed me from having to maintain the least bit of interest in either of those things.

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  101. @Mr. Anon
    "It used to be for most of human history that politics could be civil;...."

    Are you kidding? For most of human history, most people were not permitted to engage in politics of any kind - not really. Their involvement was limited to fighting the King's wars (whether they wanted to or not), feeding the King's men (whether they wanted to or not), and abiding by the King's laws (etc.). For "King" read any kind of worthy you wish: King, Lord, Emperor, Sultan, Pharaoh, Hetman, Shogun, Daimyo, etc.

    Politics, whenever it has been practiced, has seldom been civil. If you doubt it, ask any of Henry VIII courtiers, or the Mob of Paris, or the Greens, or the Blues, the Ghelphs, or the Ghibelines.

    I suspect we are defining the term differently, since I completely agree with the points I believe you are making. Perhaps I ought to have written “civic life” rather than “politics.”

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  102. @SFG
    Pence was just being diplomatic. He knows he's going to get an earful going to a liberal play on Broadway. My guess is he was either (a) trying to reach across the aisle because he was an old-school politician and thought it would be good for the country or (b) heard about the play and curiosity overcame him.

    To be singled out by the entire cast at the curtain call and lectured in front of the audience? I really doubt he was expecting that.

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    • Replies: @SFG
    I wonder. The guy's an experienced political operator. As VP he would need a lot of security arrangements, which means he'd have to call ahead...and someone would squeal.

    I tend to think he knew what he was walking into...but I could certainly be wrong.
  103. Is Alec baldwin a really annoying dick or what?

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    • Replies: @Anon87
    Annoying liberal with anger issues, sure. But he does have a sense of humor.
  104. @Bill Burr
    Bill Burr - subversive, right-leaning, comedic genius. Search for "Bill Burr guns and lotion".

    You'll be glad you did!

    Burr’s hilarious, but no white man married to a black woman is right wing.

    That’s a contradiction in terms.

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    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    I would not at all be surprised to discover that white men who marry (and stay married to) black women are more likely to vote Republican. Normal Republican voters (as opposed to the alt right and HBD fans) tend to be more likely to see black people as individuals and less likely to see them as "representatives of their race", whereas a lot of liberals can't seem to ever get past that.
  105. @inertial
    Advertising works. And yes, it works on you too. I used to think that I am so clever, I am immune to advertising. Then I started noticing that ads I found especially preposterous were always for products where I was not the target audience. And the ads I enjoyed the most? Always for products I might actually buy. An interesting coincidence. And this is not all. Eventually I realized that advertising subtly influences my day to day consumer choices as well.

    You shouldn't think that you are different from everyone else. Take your Coke preference. How do you think you got it in the first place? You imprinted on Coke at an early age and liked it ever since. I bet advertising was involved, either directed at you as a kid or at your parents. The soft drink companies know that adults rarely switch their soda preferences, so they try to catch the moment early on when the choice is made. Have you noticed how Coke or Pepsi commercials almost always feature young people? This means that they are targeted at an even younger audience.

    Or take the gecko. Yes, these commercials won't influence you choice between GEICO and State Farm. But if you had to choose between GEICO and some no name insurance company you'd be biased toward GEICO. They would feel like a safer choice because you've heard about them many times.

    Nah, I had to drink milk 3 meals/day as a kid. I started liking Coke when I tasted it, and mostly quit when I realized the 30 g of sugar in a can was not good for my body. Advertisers are like the rest of salesmen – they’re only successful if you let them be. I’m not sure if this is really true, but they say “you can’t con an honest man”.

    Hey funny think – I do have State Farm. Geico might get me to call for a quote, and, in fact, I’m sure I did at some point. So they did let me know they were out there. That’s the part that might be useful, but for the ad budget they give that limey lizard, they could have lowered their rates enough to get me to buy a policy.

    I think a big reason I’m not susceptible too much is I wasn’t allowed to watch much TV when I was young. Let me see if embedding is working, or at least here’s a link to John Prine recommending you blow up your TV (and eat a lot of peaches):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BofvfVPFbiM

    I’ll have to think about your first paragraph, though, inertial ….

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  106. @Steve Sailer
    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I'm not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.

    American fast food is pretty German (hamburgers), so why not American humor? Of course, I've never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I'm totally in the dark on the subject. I almost went to see Toni Erdmann. It's supposed to be really funny, although the trailer isn't.

    You haven’t seen any 70s Bavarian sex comedies I take it?

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  107. @Opinionator
    To be singled out by the entire cast at the curtain call and lectured in front of the audience? I really doubt he was expecting that.

    I wonder. The guy’s an experienced political operator. As VP he would need a lot of security arrangements, which means he’d have to call ahead…and someone would squeal.

    I tend to think he knew what he was walking into…but I could certainly be wrong.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    It may have been a brilliant move/a tactic, inadvertently, to show on a national TV, just how far "progressives" will go...to hurt, humiliate, impugn, threaten anyone associated with Trump. It was truly a spectacle to see the US VP, forced to face actors/NYC elites, who relished this moment of attempted public humiliation, couched in terms of "we just want a conversation." Attempted, because it exposed the utter phoniness/the deep-seated hatred embedded in the people subjecting Pence to this (well, all of us), Pence was stoic like a rock...and magnanimous later, with his reaction.

    This whole movement, right now (SNL included), this all-out sinister obsession to "take-down," Trump, his family, his staff (Flynn & Conway!...Conway over clothes! - everyone forgot about all the designers Michele endorsed...and 5 Guys burgers the Obamas' loved and endorsed), anyone associated with the new administration, is creepy. And, like always, will backfire. Several turncoat Republicans, the Neocons, should be aware that they will be discarded and made irrelevant very soon - this is my ominous prediction. And, for Pete's sake, get rid of the past administration's remaining people! Get rid of all last year's staff members - 'cause loose lips still sink ships, or start wars.

    People who were formerly on the fence about Trump, are now rallying against the deplorable behavior of the "New Deplorables!" Since when are certain Republicans and basically, all Democrats and their "progressive" angry mobs, so enamored with the CIA/FBI and govt spying on citizen's phones? I suppose I should just act like Pence now, and stare back since the machinations of the left are failing, and they look oh so stupid and hypocritical. Haha, just occurred to me: none of you guys are worried; this too will pass? Stock market high, so all is good?
  108. SNL has never been very funny. Even during the “good years”, there’d be a handful of really great sketches per season. If you chuckled a couple times during an episode, that was as good as it gets.

    The linked sketch was awful and was purely a business decision. Lorne Michaels for sure is a leftist but he’s also a businessman and figured that nonstop anti-Trump sketches would result in a ratings crash as there are still a lot of conservatives in that evil flyover country who still tune in. So he has to throw a couple bones here and there. It was sad to see cuckservatives bark and clap like seals in approval for this weak sketch. Seems like anytime the media makes a slight overture to the right, these people will start acting like everything is forgiven.

    Stop watching this crap. The 99.9% of the time where it is blaringly anti-Trump and belittles white guys in flyover country is how they really feel about you. The one rare occasion where they hold back a punch is not good enough.

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    • Agree: Forbes, sayless
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Stop watching this crap. The 99.9% of the time where it is blaringly anti-Trump and belittles white guys in flyover country is how they really feel about you. The one rare occasion where they hold back a punch is not good enough.
     
    Quite right. They hate us. We should return the favor.
  109. @Tony
    Is Alec baldwin a really annoying dick or what?

    Annoying liberal with anger issues, sure. But he does have a sense of humor.

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  110. @NickG

    The uploader has not made this video in your country.
     
    I'm in South Africa - that's So Racist!

    Can't be arsed to fire up a proxy.

    Opera has free proxies.

    1) install Opera
    2) install “open in Opera” add-ons for Chrome or Firefox
    3) use right-click “open in Opera” for any geo-protected website

    https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/open-with-opera/ncnicmhfhjancnjbemnfipofidciaplf?hl=en

    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/open-with-opera

    Else, Tunnelbear for Chrome:

    https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/tunnelbear-vpn/omdakjcmkglenbhjadbccaookpfjihpa/related?hl=en

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  111. @Random Dude on the Internet
    SNL has never been very funny. Even during the "good years", there'd be a handful of really great sketches per season. If you chuckled a couple times during an episode, that was as good as it gets.

    The linked sketch was awful and was purely a business decision. Lorne Michaels for sure is a leftist but he's also a businessman and figured that nonstop anti-Trump sketches would result in a ratings crash as there are still a lot of conservatives in that evil flyover country who still tune in. So he has to throw a couple bones here and there. It was sad to see cuckservatives bark and clap like seals in approval for this weak sketch. Seems like anytime the media makes a slight overture to the right, these people will start acting like everything is forgiven.

    Stop watching this crap. The 99.9% of the time where it is blaringly anti-Trump and belittles white guys in flyover country is how they really feel about you. The one rare occasion where they hold back a punch is not good enough.

    Stop watching this crap. The 99.9% of the time where it is blaringly anti-Trump and belittles white guys in flyover country is how they really feel about you. The one rare occasion where they hold back a punch is not good enough.

    Quite right. They hate us. We should return the favor.

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  112. @Svigor
    Steve, have you watched The Man in the High Castle? This show is 100% Mad Men + Fascism. Actually, the fascists in TMitHC are more likeable than Don Draper. I'm surprised a web search didn't bring me more confirmation, and complaints about the show's praising Nazism with faint damnation, though I did find one:

    http://flavorwire.com/596241/the-man-in-the-high-castle-and-the-alluring-spectacle-of-fascism

    It is my belief they tried desperately to avoid the Fascinatin’ Fascism trap, and in order to avoid glamorization they made them as boring as possible. Except for the fashion. You’ve just gotta have that. In this case, they get a two-fer: early 60s (like Mad Men) and Nazis.

    As for the rest, it’s all Leave It to Beaver, Stepford Wives, euthanasia, and world domination. The Nazi America they set up is superficial at best, considering it’s supposed to be serious drama, when it’s not an action-y sci-fi spy thriller. But that’s the point, isn’t it? Those were the pre-civil rights movement, pre-”second wave” feminism, pre-New Left, pre-PC days. In other words, the Bad Old Days. So they gotta be simple, crude, and boring. That way, they can’t be accused of promoting Nazism.

    Ah, but the Nazi America they depict is clean, polite, peaceful (at least internally, not counting the resistance movement,which doesn’t show up that much). Men are men, and women are women. Parents care about keeping their children in line. Children actually respect their parents. Doesn’t sound so bad. Whoops.

    Also, the most compelling character is Nazi Dad, “senior group leader” Smith. That’s so because villains are easier to write, especially these days, when no one believes in heroes, not even in the superhero genre. (How depressing is Superman, of all people?) But it’s more than that. The rest of the active characters come off as kinda crazy, or at best groping. Smith knows what he’s doing. He acts within limits. He has values and motivations normal people can understand, even if they don’t agree with them.

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  113. @Steve Sailer
    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I'm not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.

    American fast food is pretty German (hamburgers), so why not American humor? Of course, I've never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I'm totally in the dark on the subject. I almost went to see Toni Erdmann. It's supposed to be really funny, although the trailer isn't.

    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I’m not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.

    That reminds me: I saw that recently the Atlantic’s James Fallows attempted to outrank you in a Twitter exchange by pointing out that he was very well travelled and worldly.

    His retort was a reminder that no matter how diverse one’s country becomes – work with Koreans, eat with Mexicans, fight with Russians, party with Africans, whatever – the cosmopolitan elite will always consider most white folk as knowledge-lite rubes.

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  114. @SFG
    You know, I'm just going to say--everyone I know claims SNL used to be funnier than it is. This having happened in several time periods, I think it's the same bit as the golden age of science fiction being 13--stuff just doesn't grab you as much when you're older.

    SNL is made for people who are old enough to stay up after midnight but too young to drive. I watched it regularly from like 12 to 14. It would be natural for me to say that was its funniest period.

    Except I also watched it in reruns, and I definitely prefer the span from ’87-’94 best. (Basically the Phil Hartman era). Which is just a bit outside my natural range. People can have relatively objective opinions.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    (Basically the Phil Hartman era)

    That's my view, too. I was about 28-35 and really liked that era.

    , @Danindc
    You liked it best because it was the best. You have good comedic instincts.
  115. @inertial
    Advertising works. And yes, it works on you too. I used to think that I am so clever, I am immune to advertising. Then I started noticing that ads I found especially preposterous were always for products where I was not the target audience. And the ads I enjoyed the most? Always for products I might actually buy. An interesting coincidence. And this is not all. Eventually I realized that advertising subtly influences my day to day consumer choices as well.

    You shouldn't think that you are different from everyone else. Take your Coke preference. How do you think you got it in the first place? You imprinted on Coke at an early age and liked it ever since. I bet advertising was involved, either directed at you as a kid or at your parents. The soft drink companies know that adults rarely switch their soda preferences, so they try to catch the moment early on when the choice is made. Have you noticed how Coke or Pepsi commercials almost always feature young people? This means that they are targeted at an even younger audience.

    Or take the gecko. Yes, these commercials won't influence you choice between GEICO and State Farm. But if you had to choose between GEICO and some no name insurance company you'd be biased toward GEICO. They would feel like a safer choice because you've heard about them many times.

    I don’t exactly switch preferences, but I deliberately buy whatever pop is on sale at the grocery store, which is constantly flip-flopping between Coke, Pepsi, and the odds and ends. I prefer Coke to Pepsi (or I *think* I do), but I also prefer Mountain Dew to the non-cola cohorts of Coke. That’s an unsolvable dilemma.

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  116. @Steve Sailer
    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I'm not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.

    American fast food is pretty German (hamburgers), so why not American humor? Of course, I've never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I'm totally in the dark on the subject. I almost went to see Toni Erdmann. It's supposed to be really funny, although the trailer isn't.

    There’s a lot of talented political satire over here and a reasonable amount of regular comedy gold, but it’s the same as with Chinese, Finnish, or French fun stuff, the rest of the world can’t understand it, give and take a Tati or de Funès. Also, truth be told, we killed a lot of our funny guys and made the rest conquer Hollywood–Billy Wilder, anyone? US humour is heavily German Jew-infused, the Brits have to rely on their own devices.

    Some of our best comedians are Austrians–here’s actor Helmut Qualtinger reading “Mein Kampf”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0NZTz42Cok

    It’s toe-curlingly unfunny even to German ears but the way he unmasks fellow Austrian Hitler’s whiny self-pity and megalomania is magnificent.

    Hogan’s Heroes has been dubbed into German with a lot of ribaldry* and dialectal funnyness added, Klinke speaks Saxonian and Schultz Bavarian, it’s one of the few times that the translation/adaptation is 3x funnier than the original. Same goes for Laurel & Hardy, the silent movies got commentaries, often in rhymes, spoken by one of our preeminent poetic cabaret artists,* a real stroke of genius. Carl Bark’s Duckburg stories got entirely new life by an art history PhD’s translations** and Married With Children got a lovingly executed linguistic makeover, too, the German Peggy Bundy’s voice is 10x more vulgar and grating, it’s a whole different beast. Mostly, of course, it’s garbage in, garbage out, German or not.

    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanns_Dieter_Hüsch
    ** https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erika_Fuchs

    * h/t Veracitor

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    • Replies: @res
    Thanks for the German insights. But, this is truly frightening:

    Married With Children got a lovingly executed linguistic makeover, too, the German Peggy Bundy’s voice is 10x more vulgar and grating, it’s a whole different beast.
     
  117. @guest
    SNL is made for people who are old enough to stay up after midnight but too young to drive. I watched it regularly from like 12 to 14. It would be natural for me to say that was its funniest period.

    Except I also watched it in reruns, and I definitely prefer the span from '87-'94 best. (Basically the Phil Hartman era). Which is just a bit outside my natural range. People can have relatively objective opinions.

    (Basically the Phil Hartman era)

    That’s my view, too. I was about 28-35 and really liked that era.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Phil Hartman was also in some of the best Simpson's episodes.

    But Alec Baldwin is an incredibly talented comedic actor. The writing must just be much worse today.

  118. @Steve Sailer
    (Basically the Phil Hartman era)

    That's my view, too. I was about 28-35 and really liked that era.

    Phil Hartman was also in some of the best Simpson’s episodes.

    But Alec Baldwin is an incredibly talented comedic actor. The writing must just be much worse today.

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    • Replies: @guest
    Troy McClure: Hi, I'm Troy McClure. You may remember me from such self-help videos as "Smoke Yourself Thin" and "Get Confident, Stupid!"

    Lionel Hutz: I rest my case
    Judge: You rest your case?
    Hutz: What? Oh, no, I thought that was just a figure of speech. Case closed.

  119. You can’t make this Cheetos schtick up. A blatant send up of the libprogs sticking a fork in their own propaganda.
    Then watched the McCarthy transgender take on Spicer. It was lame but funny.
    Then Baldwin defending the immigration eo. Lies, but some original stuff.

    Meanwhile Alex Jones’s raspy rants aside, the new guy in the InfoWars video points out that “SNL Admits They Are Losing Fight Against Trump.”

    IOW, the official NYTimes FakeNewsAlert Review article is:
    ‘S.N.L.’ Targets Trump Again, With a Hint of Exhaustion

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  120. @Dave Pinsen
    Phil Hartman was also in some of the best Simpson's episodes.

    But Alec Baldwin is an incredibly talented comedic actor. The writing must just be much worse today.

    Troy McClure: Hi, I’m Troy McClure. You may remember me from such self-help videos as “Smoke Yourself Thin” and “Get Confident, Stupid!”

    Lionel Hutz: I rest my case
    Judge: You rest your case?
    Hutz: What? Oh, no, I thought that was just a figure of speech. Case closed.

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  121. @Lot
    Cute English girl sees her old neighborhood taken over by burka wearing women and aggro blacks:

    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SgKMI1wV0ps

    Bringing this to America is the left's #1 priority.

    She’s obviously an Irish transplant (cute and English girl are oxymoronic terms) and the same with the skinhead leader. I watched most of that, and it was so awful. It’s like they sent the morning weather girl to fix Islamic terrorism. The dumb little bimbo is so rotten with multiculturalism that even when they call her a whore to her face and tell her that they believe in stoning and chopping off hands, she doesn’t believe them. It conflicts with her programming about wise and good brown people and gets thrown out. It’s like she’s being paid to be a perpetual college freshman. In a sane world she’d be married with 6 kids and in charge of the parish food drive.

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  122. @guest
    SNL is made for people who are old enough to stay up after midnight but too young to drive. I watched it regularly from like 12 to 14. It would be natural for me to say that was its funniest period.

    Except I also watched it in reruns, and I definitely prefer the span from '87-'94 best. (Basically the Phil Hartman era). Which is just a bit outside my natural range. People can have relatively objective opinions.

    You liked it best because it was the best. You have good comedic instincts.

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  123. @guest
    A lot of those names are a stretch. Dennis Miller was converted after 9/11; prior to that he was a conventional liberal. However much inborn rightness there was to him all along, it wasn't enough to tickle a conservative's political bone.

    Victoria Jackson probably didn't have much creative control, and she strikes me as a "born again" type, so I wouldn't assume she was that way when she was on the show.

    Adam Sandler was a puerile novelty act, and his comedy had barely any content at all, much less political content.

    David Spade went after Hollywood, and not in the jokey, insider way all E! channel-type gossip shows nowadays do. More in a direct and honest way, but not exactly in a right-wing way, either.

    Colin Quinn, I don't really know. He seems like he could be on my side. But he's also very guarded, despite the fact that he does overtly political commentary. Which is telling.

    Jon Lovitz I don't really know about. I liked his characters, but they didn't tell me anything one way or another.

    All that being said, with how many years SNL has been on the air and how many cast members they've had, plenty of them had to have been actual conservatives. But what does that amount to? There were also plenty of conservative-themed sketches, but obviously a lot less than other kinds. Again, what does that amount to?

    The biggest right-wing influence on the show, and one of the guys who was around since the beginning, was Jim Downey. In him you'll find the conservative heart of SNL, if it ever had one. The most consistently rightist element in the history of the show was his tenure with Norm MacDonald on Weekend Update.

    Proof is in the uncomprehending reaction of the audience to the majority of the jokes. Not silence or scattered titters, which are unfortunately all too common. But more like "Wha? Huh?" It wasn't that they were highbrow jokes, though they were above average-brow for the show. But people didn't know they were allowed to laugh at those sorts of things in that way. That wasn't all about politics, but definitely the network's reaction was at least partly politically motivated.

    That remains pretty much the pinnacle of the show for me, though Bill Murray is by far my favorite cast member outside the show. I never watched regularly after Norm was axed, though I was only 14 at the time. (Interest in shows like SNL probably peak shortly thereafter, anyway.)

    Jim Downey. In him you’ll find the conservative heart of SNL, if it ever had one.

    Jim Downey is still there and writes much of the political humor. He is widely considered right wing, but he was a registered Democrat and a big supporter of Obama, so he can’t be that far right.

    A lot of those names are a stretch.

    Sure. Most SNL cast members were gregarious goofballs focused on being fun and entertaining crowds. Many didn’t even realize their own political views until they got a little older.

    Today, I only watch individual clips rather than full episodes. That’s a technology change obviously. Some SNL clips are great, others aren’t.

    This Cheetos clip is funnier on second viewing.

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  124. @marty
    This vid reminds me that with fat girls, no matter how otherwise pleasant-seeming, and no matter how nice their hair, I just can't get interested.

    This vid reminds me that with fat girls, no matter how otherwise pleasant-seeming, and no matter how nice their hair, I just can’t get interested.

    Yep. Despite feminist nonsense, it’s entirely natural. They’ve landed a bunch of lard, where your baby is supposed to go.

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  125. Most of these comments are clueless. The problem isn’t SNL writers, but the above respondents who put ideology before comedy.

    In the case of the SNL sketch, the intent of the writers is about as obvious as a jackhammer: “It sounds like you’re just using that issue to sell Cheetos.” This goes back to the origins of the term political correctness before it was seized by reactionaries. It was originally used by people on the left to mock those who said the right things without actually believing them — “yes, that’s politically correct.” Over twenty years ago Thomas Frank was writing essays about how advertisers “commodify dissent.”

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    The term "politically correct" goes back to the 1930s, and was used by communists - unironically - to describe correct throught (i.e. the thoughts the party thought you should have and that therefore every communist thought they should have). I heard it used by left-wingers in much the same way in the 1980s, albeit somewhat ironically.
    , @guest
    What do you mean, "before it was seized by reactionaries?" That's the exact same sense in which reactionaries use the phrase, only they think of themselves as outsiders looking in. But they still have to live in PC society. Which is like living inside of leftism being a leftist dissenter, or just being a conscientious leftist in a time of strict leftist conformity.
  126. @Anonymous
    There is nothing German about a hamburger as we know it.

    In Germany, pastries are called by city names. A "Berliner" is a glazed fried dumpling. I forget what a "Hamburger" is, but it has no meat.

    A “Hamburger” is just a high-end German frikadelle (i.e. without the onions and pork Germans threw in because Germany was a poorer country).

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  127. @Steve Sailer
    A well-traveled British reader suggested that to me. I'm not worldly enough to have much of an opinion.

    American fast food is pretty German (hamburgers), so why not American humor? Of course, I've never seen a German movie that was intentionally funny, so I'm totally in the dark on the subject. I almost went to see Toni Erdmann. It's supposed to be really funny, although the trailer isn't.

    Toni Erdmann has some funny scenes, but it is not really a comedy.

    Germany has made plenty of slapsticky movies that are supposed to be funny – “Der Wixxxer”, or “Traumschiff Surprise” (a Star Trek parody, with dated gay jokes), “Fack Ju Göhte”. They seem to target 12-14 year olds.

    Germany is best at slightly melancholy films and TV shows that have elements of humor in them – “Goodbye Lenin”, “Stromberg” (the German version of The Office), or anything starring Christian Ulmen – but aren’t straight comedies. “Toni Erdmann” fits in that genre. There is even a bizarre little German mini-series currently on Netflix called “Komm Schon!” about a failing sex therapist that is kind of funny and warped.

    Austrians for some reason are much, much funnier than Germans. Austria actually produces very strong comedies, but I suspect they don’t translate easily because they rely on clever word play and snappy dialogue, not simply people embarassing themselves or having temper tantrums (the staples of German humor). Either the Austrians have preserved a lot of the Jewish humor heritage, or a lot of “Jewish” humor is actually Austrian in origin.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    No discussion of german humor would be complete without this (in)famous occupational safety video:

    Forklift Driver Klaus
  128. @40 Acres and A Kardashian
    Burr's hilarious, but no white man married to a black woman is right wing.

    That's a contradiction in terms.

    I would not at all be surprised to discover that white men who marry (and stay married to) black women are more likely to vote Republican. Normal Republican voters (as opposed to the alt right and HBD fans) tend to be more likely to see black people as individuals and less likely to see them as “representatives of their race”, whereas a lot of liberals can’t seem to ever get past that.

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  129. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @bjdubbs
    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it's own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I'd like to hear about it.

    If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.

    alt-right mostly uses comedy

    during the election alt-right twitter was far funnier than any TV comedy

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  130. @donut
    An African immigrant was the first American in space after all :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ham_(chimpanzee)#/media/File:Ham_the_chimp_(cropped).jpg

    That reminds me of a good joke.

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  131. @Steve Sailer
    Lorne Michaels kept it focused for a long time on what 15-year-olds staying up late with their friends would like.

    That’s plausible. I would’ve said college-age, not high school. It wasn’t on when I was 15.

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  132. @Achmed E. Newman
    Now this is something I don't understand very well regarding the real advertising business, but I'm sure the SNL skit above is a pretty realistic parody of it. I've heard many times that it's the "name recognition" that gets people to buy. They say it doesn't matter whether the ad has anything to do with the product or service, they just want to get that product (or service) brand name in your head.

    Someone tell me how do you think that really works? (My contention is that it doesn't, and things sell or don't sell, and Madison Avenue has squat-all to do with it these days.) You've got your Coke-cola and you've got your Pepsi - who has not heard of either one? Is the idea to associate this one, say Pepsi (which sucks, BTW) with this musical slut artist so people remember, "Hey, "Lady Madonna"/"Pepsi", yeah whenever I see "Pepsi", I think "Lady Madonna". OK, so I'm at the store, and my mind goes "Here's the Pepsi; "Lady Madonna likes this!" "but ... it sucks, if I'm gonna drink caffeinated sugar water, I'll take Coke-cola." "I like Lady Madonna, but she can go buy whatever the hell she drinks, who cares?"

    What about products/services that most people have NOT heard of yet? Yeah the idea of advertising is to let people know what you're selling. "Here are some grimy amigos climbing over a fence, cleaning up all their trash on the way across the Colorado (river) desert, finding a new home, cutting down on Carbon (for the Carbophobics out there in TV land) when they get there and enriching the living s__t out of our lives" NOW "Dog Pile II Web Services - put your work on the Thunderstorm Cloud!" How does that help me as a consumer?

    I found no problem with the old ads that would try to sell you on stuff based on WHAT IT DOES!. Yeah, there was a lot of bull involved some of the time, but at least it was informative.

    I will continue this comment later with some thoughts about that funny lizard that sells auto insurance - he's cute.

    Advertising does a LOT, not just “name recognition.” It sets your opinion of the product, and the ideas and emotions you associate with it.

    If Coke didn’t advertise, then you would primarily associate it with diabetes, obesity, “empty calories.” But they advertise constantly, to make you feel that drinking cola is normal, it is not stigmatized, and hopefully, you associate it more with happiness and fizziness and family, so your net reaction is “yeah, it’s not health food but whatever.” It might not work on you in particular (humans can be quirky), but it works on the population at large. They sell a lot of Coke.

    Contrast that with cigarettes in the USA, which were banned from television in the 1970s, and from most everywhere else by the 1990s. You probably primarily associate them with cancer and death. And sure enough, smoking rates are in free-fall. The industry can’t effectively counter the idea that smoking is bad and stigmatized – which for a long time they did, very effectively, by linking smoking with manly cowboys and suave camels.

    We humans are really stupid. We have our moments and our specialties, but in terms of mundane day-to-day decisions, we are astoundingly easy to manipulate.

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    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @guest
    With cigarettes it wasn't just an absence of advertising. There was an enormous amount of advertising (aka propaganda) in the other direction. After the tobacco lawsuits here in MN they made them pay for this mind-numbingly boring "target market" campaign, for instance. But it was more than that. Anti-tobacco propaganda was ubiquitous. I learned very few things in public school, among them: reading, writing, arithmetic, racism is bad, and smoking is bad.

    Also, I'd like to point out, back when it first caught on like a match on fire, tobacco use was not spread by modern advertising. Call it one of those Madness of Crowds things, but Sir Walter Raleigh, or whoever, didn't get hooked by Joe Camel.
  133. @Vince
    Most of these comments are clueless. The problem isn't SNL writers, but the above respondents who put ideology before comedy.

    In the case of the SNL sketch, the intent of the writers is about as obvious as a jackhammer: "It sounds like you're just using that issue to sell Cheetos." This goes back to the origins of the term political correctness before it was seized by reactionaries. It was originally used by people on the left to mock those who said the right things without actually believing them -- "yes, that's politically correct." Over twenty years ago Thomas Frank was writing essays about how advertisers "commodify dissent."

    The term “politically correct” goes back to the 1930s, and was used by communists – unironically – to describe correct throught (i.e. the thoughts the party thought you should have and that therefore every communist thought they should have). I heard it used by left-wingers in much the same way in the 1980s, albeit somewhat ironically.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "I heard it used by left-wingers in much the same way in the 1980s, albeit somewhat ironically."

    My first recollection of the term "politically correct" was exactly that: Joe Strummer of the Clash wryly talking about how you'd think our fellow leftists would be happy with The Clash, but still we're not quite politically correct enough for them.

  134. @Peter Akuleyev
    Toni Erdmann has some funny scenes, but it is not really a comedy.

    Germany has made plenty of slapsticky movies that are supposed to be funny - "Der Wixxxer", or "Traumschiff Surprise" (a Star Trek parody, with dated gay jokes), "Fack Ju Göhte". They seem to target 12-14 year olds.

    Germany is best at slightly melancholy films and TV shows that have elements of humor in them - "Goodbye Lenin", "Stromberg" (the German version of The Office), or anything starring Christian Ulmen - but aren't straight comedies. "Toni Erdmann" fits in that genre. There is even a bizarre little German mini-series currently on Netflix called "Komm Schon!" about a failing sex therapist that is kind of funny and warped.

    Austrians for some reason are much, much funnier than Germans. Austria actually produces very strong comedies, but I suspect they don't translate easily because they rely on clever word play and snappy dialogue, not simply people embarassing themselves or having temper tantrums (the staples of German humor). Either the Austrians have preserved a lot of the Jewish humor heritage, or a lot of "Jewish" humor is actually Austrian in origin.

    No discussion of german humor would be complete without this (in)famous occupational safety video:

    Forklift Driver Klaus

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  135. @Autochthon
    I generally agree women are not usually as funny as men. British are also usually funnier than Americans. British women are almost always vastly funnier than American women. It may be only delivery, and not writing, as you suggest, but performance takes talent as well.

    Patricia Routledge, Wendy Richard, Mollie Sugden ... all were hilarious in their day. Sugden in particular could bring down the house with just the properly timed arch of an eyebrow. Nowadays, Australian Rose Byrne cracks me up. She and Statham carried Spy, much more so than McCarthy did.

    I think the earlier discussion was focused on explicitly conservative or at least libertarian humour. This digression reminds me much of the best humour (like the best literature, etc.) is apolitical; it deals with more fundamental aspects of the human condition.

    This digression reminds me much of the best humour (like the best literature, etc.) is apolitical; it deals with more fundamental aspects of the human condition.

    Good takes. Robert Klein and Lewis Black more so than Carlin define aspects of the human condition, yet both took their acts to a political left wing fare thee well, Klein is much less profane and with the Henry Mancini Music Lab behind the curtain for a little musical respite from his “wisdom”, you get a little entertainment with some class. Klein isn’t a half-bad harmonica player, either. Here he is now!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMFEnbwBJGc

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jQN6y5mW08&list=RDiMFEnbwBJGc&index=4

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  136. @The Alarmist
    Pretty much sums up the lib domination of the MSM when one of its biggest showpieces can make fun of the irony of their worldview, do it with a straight face, and not for a minute think that what they advocate in real life might actually be absurd.

    No, this sketch covers for the MSM.

    “Murphy and Kennedy?” Do the Irish really control the advertising industry? More like ((Murphy & Kennedy)).

    If you look, you’ll find either a ((advertising agency)) or a ((cooperative executive)) in nearly every case where advertising seems to promote some sort of social justice issue instead of a product.

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  137. @Svigor
    Steve, have you watched The Man in the High Castle? This show is 100% Mad Men + Fascism. Actually, the fascists in TMitHC are more likeable than Don Draper. I'm surprised a web search didn't bring me more confirmation, and complaints about the show's praising Nazism with faint damnation, though I did find one:

    http://flavorwire.com/596241/the-man-in-the-high-castle-and-the-alluring-spectacle-of-fascism

    Man in the High Castle is worth an article all by itself. Trying to avoid spoilers:
    I don’t know if it is true that Ridley Scott harbors what are, by Showbiz dogma, subversive sympathies about race, politics and culture, but the show has some disturbing sub-texts. It is loosely based on the Phillip K. Dick novel but expands the kernel idea to far greater breadth and detail. Most of the show is the usual dramatic boilerplate but reviewing the whole show, the most striking thing is the depiction that emerges of the three parts of the US, the Pacific States under Japanese occupation, the Eastern states under the Third Reich and the lawless Neutral Zone of the Rockies.
    The Pacific States is Dystopia, it is multi-racial with the surviving Jews and Blacks, and everyone else under a brutal and oppressive Japanese occupation. Although some Japanese are written as peaceful and sympathetic, most are played as the vicious, devious brutes who would fit right in to an American film produced during WWII. The Pacific States are dirty, dingy, poor, crime riddled and underdeveloped. Everything is shabby and low tech, the few cars are left-over prewar cars or crappy little 50’s Japanese boxes loaned to the production company by the Toyota auto museum. Americans of any race including Nisei are required to bow obsequiously to any Japanese. The Yakazu are allowed to carry out drug running, extortion, murder and prostitution as long as they don’t overstep their boundaries. The show spends a non-PC amount of screen time showing the night-clubs staffed by White bar-girls for the pleasure of important Japanese. The Japanese security services are omnipresent, efficient and utterly ruthless. If you are not Japanese your life is pretty much of no value and they will murder innocent civilians at the drop of a hat. The Japanese are improbably, even written as low-tech, lagging far behind Germany.
    The US in the Third Reich does look like a Madmen vision of 50’s America with swastikas. It is what any alt-righter would describe as Whitopia. The cities are clean, modern, expansive and safe. The citizens drive German or large 50’s American cars live in good housing and dress nicely at all times.. The kids are smart, well-dressed, polite, and confident in their future. There appears to be no visible poverty or unemployment and the Working Man is respected. In one episode a character new to the Reich asks about a key for the door to their apartment and is told no-one bothers installing locking doors anymore because no one is going to come in who isn’t supposed to. There are no people who look like the Other. Some Jews are in hiding but there is no sign of Blacks, Latins or Asians. What happened to them is not stated and, frankly, no-one wants to know what happed to them. As long as you don’t make trouble and don’t have any genetic defects that will get you euthanized, things are good. Although the Security Services are brutal when they catch anyone, and their giant brutalist HQ in NYC looks imposing, story details seem to suggest that they are spread very thin and frankly really not very good at their jobs. The Reich is safe not because the Resistance, which seems to consist mostly of war veterans who are still trying to fight, is being thoroughly suppressed by vast and competent police force, but because the mass of people are pretty satisfied with how things are going for them.

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  138. @Anonymous

    The right gets so excited over any tiny bone the left throws in its direction. Ultimately the only way is for the right to have it’s own comedians and its own outlets. If there is a right wing comedy channel on Youtube or something, I’d like to hear about it.
     
    Comedy? Oh, that's what that is. Maybe I'm a tough audience but I can sit through a bunch of Comedy Central stand up routines and at most crack a smile (even when I'm trying). Why is it that I can laugh my ass off reading some posts by Steve Sailer yet can sit through whole comedy shows and only crack a smile? And that's only to appease my wife, who spent a lot on tickets for comedy shows at the nearby Wilbur Theatre. Two comedians I have found laugh-out-loud funny are Brian Regan and the late Mitch Hedberg, and funny enough, I couldn't discern their political leanings.

    Here's my sense of humor. A commercial for Berlitz language school: The German Coastguard.

    Agree with Mitch Hedberg. No politics, lots of “noticing”.

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  139. @John Mansfield
    OT: UConn women's basketball team wins 100th straight game.

    Some time back, Steve Sailer pointed out that since women's soccer doesn't have enough players or fans to support a national league, what might work is a barnstorming team. On the college level, North Carolina used to sort of be that barnstorming team, drawing in most of the best players, and going thirteen straight seasons with one or zero losses. When the Tarheel women came to play soccer at my alma mater, it was a much bigger deal than usual to have Goliath visiting. Apparently UConn is performing a similar role in college women's basketball.

    who says dominance is bad for a sport or league? “Top ranked UConn’s 66-55 milestone 100th-consecutive victory over No. 6 South Carolina on Monday, Feb. 13 (9 p.m. ET, ESPN2), delivered a 0.9 overnight rating, marking the highest-rated college basketball game on ESPN2 this season among men’s and women’s telecasts, and the highest-rated women’s college basketball regular-season game since 2010. “

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Women's professional team sports shouldn't have a league, they should have just the national team, which barnstorms against a team of foreign all-stars with a name like Team Putin.

    Individual sports like tennis and golf are in effect barnstorming with all the stars come to town once a year. The US women's national team that you remember from the Olympics could generate a healthy turnout once a year in a few dozen cities. A good crowd would turn out once a year in, say, Tulsa or Spokane to root on Team USA against the foreigners.

    Any more than that, boredom sets in.

  140. @SFG
    I wonder. The guy's an experienced political operator. As VP he would need a lot of security arrangements, which means he'd have to call ahead...and someone would squeal.

    I tend to think he knew what he was walking into...but I could certainly be wrong.

    It may have been a brilliant move/a tactic, inadvertently, to show on a national TV, just how far “progressives” will go…to hurt, humiliate, impugn, threaten anyone associated with Trump. It was truly a spectacle to see the US VP, forced to face actors/NYC elites, who relished this moment of attempted public humiliation, couched in terms of “we just want a conversation.” Attempted, because it exposed the utter phoniness/the deep-seated hatred embedded in the people subjecting Pence to this (well, all of us), Pence was stoic like a rock…and magnanimous later, with his reaction.

    This whole movement, right now (SNL included), this all-out sinister obsession to “take-down,” Trump, his family, his staff (Flynn & Conway!…Conway over clothes! – everyone forgot about all the designers Michele endorsed…and 5 Guys burgers the Obamas’ loved and endorsed), anyone associated with the new administration, is creepy. And, like always, will backfire. Several turncoat Republicans, the Neocons, should be aware that they will be discarded and made irrelevant very soon – this is my ominous prediction. And, for Pete’s sake, get rid of the past administration’s remaining people! Get rid of all last year’s staff members – ’cause loose lips still sink ships, or start wars.

    People who were formerly on the fence about Trump, are now rallying against the deplorable behavior of the “New Deplorables!” Since when are certain Republicans and basically, all Democrats and their “progressive” angry mobs, so enamored with the CIA/FBI and govt spying on citizen’s phones? I suppose I should just act like Pence now, and stare back since the machinations of the left are failing, and they look oh so stupid and hypocritical. Haha, just occurred to me: none of you guys are worried; this too will pass? Stock market high, so all is good?

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  141. @Anonymous
    OT:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/lawsuit-ensues-over-comment-by-espn-commentator-at-australian-open/#comments

    Lawsuit ensues over comment by ESPN commentator at Australian Open

    LOS ANGELES - A tennis commentator dropped by ESPN for a remark about Venus Williams during the Australian Open has sued the sports network for wrongful termination.

    Former tennis pro Doug Adler maintains he was describing Williams’ aggressive style last month as “guerrilla” tactics and not comparing her with a “gorilla.”

    He apologized for his poor word choice but was let go from ESPN mid-tournament.

    Adler filed suit Tuesday in Los Angeles Superior Court, saying he has wrongly been branded a racist and lost work because of the controversy. The suit calls for punitive financial damages, but doesn’t name an amount.

    ESPN spokesman Mike Soltys says the network has not seen the lawsuit and has no comment.

    Offended viewers called for Adler to be fired because they believed he had compared Williams, who is African-American, with a gorilla.
     

    Adler used an even more poor choice of words when he later said, "Wow, that silverback has a wicked serve."

    He should have been more niggardly with his choice of words.

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  142. @theo the kraut
    There's a lot of talented political satire over here and a reasonable amount of regular comedy gold, but it's the same as with Chinese, Finnish, or French fun stuff, the rest of the world can't understand it, give and take a Tati or de Funès. Also, truth be told, we killed a lot of our funny guys and made the rest conquer Hollywood--Billy Wilder, anyone? US humour is heavily German Jew-infused, the Brits have to rely on their own devices.

    Some of our best comedians are Austrians--here's actor Helmut Qualtinger reading "Mein Kampf": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0NZTz42Cok

    It's toe-curlingly unfunny even to German ears but the way he unmasks fellow Austrian Hitler's whiny self-pity and megalomania is magnificent.

    Hogan's Heroes has been dubbed into German with a lot of ribaldry* and dialectal funnyness added, Klinke speaks Saxonian and Schultz Bavarian, it's one of the few times that the translation/adaptation is 3x funnier than the original. Same goes for Laurel & Hardy, the silent movies got commentaries, often in rhymes, spoken by one of our preeminent poetic cabaret artists,* a real stroke of genius. Carl Bark's Duckburg stories got entirely new life by an art history PhD's translations** and Married With Children got a lovingly executed linguistic makeover, too, the German Peggy Bundy's voice is 10x more vulgar and grating, it's a whole different beast. Mostly, of course, it's garbage in, garbage out, German or not.

    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanns_Dieter_Hüsch
    ** https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erika_Fuchs

    * h/t Veracitor

    Thanks for the German insights. But, this is truly frightening:

    Married With Children got a lovingly executed linguistic makeover, too, the German Peggy Bundy’s voice is 10x more vulgar and grating, it’s a whole different beast.

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  143. @Ron Mexico
    who says dominance is bad for a sport or league? "Top ranked UConn’s 66-55 milestone 100th-consecutive victory over No. 6 South Carolina on Monday, Feb. 13 (9 p.m. ET, ESPN2), delivered a 0.9 overnight rating, marking the highest-rated college basketball game on ESPN2 this season among men’s and women’s telecasts, and the highest-rated women’s college basketball regular-season game since 2010. "

    Women’s professional team sports shouldn’t have a league, they should have just the national team, which barnstorms against a team of foreign all-stars with a name like Team Putin.

    Individual sports like tennis and golf are in effect barnstorming with all the stars come to town once a year. The US women’s national team that you remember from the Olympics could generate a healthy turnout once a year in a few dozen cities. A good crowd would turn out once a year in, say, Tulsa or Spokane to root on Team USA against the foreigners.

    Any more than that, boredom sets in.

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    • Replies: @Ron Mexico
    Wholly agree. The WNBA is a nice tax-write off for the NBA and its owners, and wins them Pokemon Diversity points, but is a league that most people do not watch, either in person or on teevee. I can hear Joe Piscopo's Frank Sinatra describing Ebony Mag, "When I think of Ebony, I think of a magazine most people do not read..." describing any women's pro league.
  144. @Mr. Anon
    The term "politically correct" goes back to the 1930s, and was used by communists - unironically - to describe correct throught (i.e. the thoughts the party thought you should have and that therefore every communist thought they should have). I heard it used by left-wingers in much the same way in the 1980s, albeit somewhat ironically.

    “I heard it used by left-wingers in much the same way in the 1980s, albeit somewhat ironically.”

    My first recollection of the term “politically correct” was exactly that: Joe Strummer of the Clash wryly talking about how you’d think our fellow leftists would be happy with The Clash, but still we’re not quite politically correct enough for them.

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    • Replies: @Curle
    I'm sure it wasn't the first time I heard the term but the first time I heard it and got agitated was in an episode of 30 Something. It was while I was in grad school and the very occasional TV episode was one of my small pleasures. I recall the actor talked about something not being politically correct. I was astounded that such an obnoxious concept was being normalized via the medium of TV and I ceased watching the show. I think I turned to Who's the Boss as my replacement TV pleasure.
    , @The True and Original David
    I first heard the term "politically correct" at NYU in 1987. A teacher unironically used it to describe some foreign film, I think one of Louie Malle's (not sure). This teacher also commented separately that something-or-other was like what "hanging out with my male friends at their Marxist meetings" was like.
  145. @Steve Sailer
    Women's professional team sports shouldn't have a league, they should have just the national team, which barnstorms against a team of foreign all-stars with a name like Team Putin.

    Individual sports like tennis and golf are in effect barnstorming with all the stars come to town once a year. The US women's national team that you remember from the Olympics could generate a healthy turnout once a year in a few dozen cities. A good crowd would turn out once a year in, say, Tulsa or Spokane to root on Team USA against the foreigners.

    Any more than that, boredom sets in.

    Wholly agree. The WNBA is a nice tax-write off for the NBA and its owners, and wins them Pokemon Diversity points, but is a league that most people do not watch, either in person or on teevee. I can hear Joe Piscopo’s Frank Sinatra describing Ebony Mag, “When I think of Ebony, I think of a magazine most people do not read…” describing any women’s pro league.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But Americans can get excited for one week per year or per couple of years about a women's Team USA.
  146. @Ron Mexico
    Wholly agree. The WNBA is a nice tax-write off for the NBA and its owners, and wins them Pokemon Diversity points, but is a league that most people do not watch, either in person or on teevee. I can hear Joe Piscopo's Frank Sinatra describing Ebony Mag, "When I think of Ebony, I think of a magazine most people do not read..." describing any women's pro league.

    But Americans can get excited for one week per year or per couple of years about a women’s Team USA.

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  147. @Vince
    Most of these comments are clueless. The problem isn't SNL writers, but the above respondents who put ideology before comedy.

    In the case of the SNL sketch, the intent of the writers is about as obvious as a jackhammer: "It sounds like you're just using that issue to sell Cheetos." This goes back to the origins of the term political correctness before it was seized by reactionaries. It was originally used by people on the left to mock those who said the right things without actually believing them -- "yes, that's politically correct." Over twenty years ago Thomas Frank was writing essays about how advertisers "commodify dissent."

    What do you mean, “before it was seized by reactionaries?” That’s the exact same sense in which reactionaries use the phrase, only they think of themselves as outsiders looking in. But they still have to live in PC society. Which is like living inside of leftism being a leftist dissenter, or just being a conscientious leftist in a time of strict leftist conformity.

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  148. @MW
    Advertising does a LOT, not just "name recognition." It sets your opinion of the product, and the ideas and emotions you associate with it.

    If Coke didn't advertise, then you would primarily associate it with diabetes, obesity, "empty calories." But they advertise constantly, to make you feel that drinking cola is normal, it is not stigmatized, and hopefully, you associate it more with happiness and fizziness and family, so your net reaction is "yeah, it's not health food but whatever." It might not work on you in particular (humans can be quirky), but it works on the population at large. They sell a lot of Coke.

    Contrast that with cigarettes in the USA, which were banned from television in the 1970s, and from most everywhere else by the 1990s. You probably primarily associate them with cancer and death. And sure enough, smoking rates are in free-fall. The industry can't effectively counter the idea that smoking is bad and stigmatized - which for a long time they did, very effectively, by linking smoking with manly cowboys and suave camels.

    We humans are really stupid. We have our moments and our specialties, but in terms of mundane day-to-day decisions, we are astoundingly easy to manipulate.

    With cigarettes it wasn’t just an absence of advertising. There was an enormous amount of advertising (aka propaganda) in the other direction. After the tobacco lawsuits here in MN they made them pay for this mind-numbingly boring “target market” campaign, for instance. But it was more than that. Anti-tobacco propaganda was ubiquitous. I learned very few things in public school, among them: reading, writing, arithmetic, racism is bad, and smoking is bad.

    Also, I’d like to point out, back when it first caught on like a match on fire, tobacco use was not spread by modern advertising. Call it one of those Madness of Crowds things, but Sir Walter Raleigh, or whoever, didn’t get hooked by Joe Camel.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But cigarettes were spread to women in the 1920s in part by a lot of advertising aimed at getting women to smoke.
  149. @guest
    With cigarettes it wasn't just an absence of advertising. There was an enormous amount of advertising (aka propaganda) in the other direction. After the tobacco lawsuits here in MN they made them pay for this mind-numbingly boring "target market" campaign, for instance. But it was more than that. Anti-tobacco propaganda was ubiquitous. I learned very few things in public school, among them: reading, writing, arithmetic, racism is bad, and smoking is bad.

    Also, I'd like to point out, back when it first caught on like a match on fire, tobacco use was not spread by modern advertising. Call it one of those Madness of Crowds things, but Sir Walter Raleigh, or whoever, didn't get hooked by Joe Camel.

    But cigarettes were spread to women in the 1920s in part by a lot of advertising aimed at getting women to smoke.

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    • Replies: @guest
    Good, old Eddie Bernays, yes. He wrote a book called "Propaganda," rather than limiting himself to "Advertising." When the Powers That Be decided we shouldn't smoke anymore, they took advantage of Bernays' tricks as fully as had Big Tobacco.
    , @Curle
    I wonder what signaled a gal was easy before cigarettes and tattoos? Locker room wisdom used to be that "if she smokes she p*kes." Then along came tramp stamps. Maybe it was drinking.
  150. @Steve Sailer
    But cigarettes were spread to women in the 1920s in part by a lot of advertising aimed at getting women to smoke.

    Good, old Eddie Bernays, yes. He wrote a book called “Propaganda,” rather than limiting himself to “Advertising.” When the Powers That Be decided we shouldn’t smoke anymore, they took advantage of Bernays’ tricks as fully as had Big Tobacco.

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  151. @Steve Sailer
    "I heard it used by left-wingers in much the same way in the 1980s, albeit somewhat ironically."

    My first recollection of the term "politically correct" was exactly that: Joe Strummer of the Clash wryly talking about how you'd think our fellow leftists would be happy with The Clash, but still we're not quite politically correct enough for them.

    I’m sure it wasn’t the first time I heard the term but the first time I heard it and got agitated was in an episode of 30 Something. It was while I was in grad school and the very occasional TV episode was one of my small pleasures. I recall the actor talked about something not being politically correct. I was astounded that such an obnoxious concept was being normalized via the medium of TV and I ceased watching the show. I think I turned to Who’s the Boss as my replacement TV pleasure.

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  152. @Steve Sailer
    But cigarettes were spread to women in the 1920s in part by a lot of advertising aimed at getting women to smoke.

    I wonder what signaled a gal was easy before cigarettes and tattoos? Locker room wisdom used to be that “if she smokes she p*kes.” Then along came tramp stamps. Maybe it was drinking.

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  153. @Steve Sailer
    "I heard it used by left-wingers in much the same way in the 1980s, albeit somewhat ironically."

    My first recollection of the term "politically correct" was exactly that: Joe Strummer of the Clash wryly talking about how you'd think our fellow leftists would be happy with The Clash, but still we're not quite politically correct enough for them.

    I first heard the term “politically correct” at NYU in 1987. A teacher unironically used it to describe some foreign film, I think one of Louie Malle’s (not sure). This teacher also commented separately that something-or-other was like what “hanging out with my male friends at their Marxist meetings” was like.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I can vaguely recall hearing Joe Strummer use "politically correct" around 1982 to refer to leftist critics of The Clash. Joe, in contrast, felt that leftists ought to be pretty damn happy with The Clash and stop kvetching about the best rock and rolls band they'd ever have on their side.
    '
  154. @The True and Original David
    I first heard the term "politically correct" at NYU in 1987. A teacher unironically used it to describe some foreign film, I think one of Louie Malle's (not sure). This teacher also commented separately that something-or-other was like what "hanging out with my male friends at their Marxist meetings" was like.

    I can vaguely recall hearing Joe Strummer use “politically correct” around 1982 to refer to leftist critics of The Clash. Joe, in contrast, felt that leftists ought to be pretty damn happy with The Clash and stop kvetching about the best rock and rolls band they’d ever have on their side.

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  155. “Politically correct” as a pejorative Cultural Reference debuted for most people probably with President George H.W. Bush’s 1990/91 reference to its bad effect on college campuses. I seem to remember that this was during his presidential campaign.

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