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Can You Hack Your Own Fight-Or-Flight Responses? Can Science Replicate Your Hacks?
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Commenter Spotted Toad says about Harvard B School prof Amy Cuddy’s popular Power Posing paper that’s a focal point of the social sciences’ Replication Crisis:

The original paper claimed that these poses caused a change in testosterone of over a third of a standard deviation and a change in cortisol of almost half a standard deviation.

Maybe this is an obvious point, but if this were true, it would represent a huge failure of the neuroendocrine system and homeostasis, to be manipulated and tricked so easily.

Indeed. On the other hand, I don’t think it’s impossible to hack your own fight-or-flight systems in, say, the direction of fight rather than flight.

What’s the Eminem rap song that football teams used to play in the locker room before games to psych themselves up? “Lose Yourself?” It’s about Eminem getting himself fired up for an important rap battle, but it applies well in lots of situations.

I wouldn’t be surprised if playing that song in a high school football team’s locker room before a big game in c. 2005 had measurable effects on the players’ biochemisty.

Here’s a video about Vince Young’s 2005 U. of Texas Longhorns team that beat Reggie Bush and Matt Leinart’s USC Trojan dynasty for the national championship set to “Lose Yourself.”

But … a few comments on why Power Posing is unlikely to replicate well EVEN if it ever worked in the first place.

- While Amy Cuddy is a good motivational speaker, Eminem is an extremely good rapper and this was his best song for the purpose of getting fired up. There are a zillion Aspiring Rappers in America, but Eminem was the single best one for awhile.

- There’s nothing keeping the other team from playing that song in their locker room too.

- After a few years, however, no doubt this song seemed corny and old-fashioned to high school football players. (But perhaps at some point in the future it will seem like a timeless classic and come back in popularity, for awhile.)

- One reason motivational techniques wear out is because they become associated with failure in the minds of their users. Say a team plays this song before it’s first game of the 2003 season and wins. And then they do it again and win again. And then a third time! With the aid of their Magic Song, they are unbeatable!

But then they lose 4 games in a row. So maybe for the 8th game of the season they try a different song because now this old song just reminds them of the dashing of their hopes for a good season.

Here’s another famous sports motivational song:

This story suggests that successful motivational techniques can be extremely idiosyncratic, both involving individuals and times/places. For example, the 1979 Pittsburgh Pirates won the World Series using as their theme song the not very masculine disco song by the girl group Sister Sledge:

We are family
I got all my sisters with me

Presumably, veteran first baseman Willie Stargell’s motivation in choosing a song extolling sororal unity was that his team didn’t need to get more fired up, they needed to relax, lighten up, and not get on each other’s nerves during the long season.

Previously, “We Are Family” had been popular primarily at sororities and gay pride marches.

But 38-year-old giant slugger Willie Stargell picked it out as his team’s theme song that summer, and if Pops Stargell liked it, well, you could too without worrying about it raising doubts about your masculinity.

The 1979 Pirates were a particularly black team and Stargell was exploiting, perhaps unconsciously, a common African American trope of the time of embracing things that made white guys uncomfortable about their masculinity, such as disco dancing (1979 was the year of DJ Steve Dahl’s very white Disco Demolition Night at a White Sox game), on the grounds that they were so masculine that the usual white rules of acting masculine didn’t apply to them.

But picking out a song beloved by sorority sisters and drag queens as your ballclub’s motivational theme song may not work if you aren’t Willie Stargell in 1979.

So, while it very well is possible that you can hack your own or your team’s fight or flight system, you can’t expect it to replicate scientifically as well as, say, the laws of astrophysics.

 
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  1. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    A lot of military training is devoted to short circuiting the fight or flight response altogether so that soldiers follow their commanding officers in the heat of battle.

    What about this motivational song for the Russian paratroopers:

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    • Replies: @Taco

    A lot of military training is devoted to short circuiting the fight or flight response altogether so that soldiers follow their commanding officers in the heat of battle.
     
    Kind of.

    Military training is designed to normalize stressful situations so you can go through them without being overwhelmed by adrenaline. Not really short circuiting the fight or flight response per se, just raising the threshold at which it is triggered.
    , @Ben Gunn
    Russina torpers, it looks like a gay dance routine. Here is something bite down hard on, old schoool: Garry Owen

    https://youtu.be/JcDJ9ygaswg

    , @Lurker
    Someone who had done British military parachute training told me that the training was directed not to so much toward making you unafraid of jumping out of a plane but more that the idea of not jumping out wouldn't even occur to you.
    , @flyingtiger
    Not as good as "Blood on the Risers."
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  2. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    There was the Mets’ song and music video from the World Series winning ’86 Mets:

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  3. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    There are lots of examples of attempts to do this: power lifters with certain rituals as they approach the bar, martial artists before attempting to break boards or whatever. I don’t know if anyone has quantified how well various rituals work.

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  4. Hubbub says:

    But perhaps at some point in the future it will seem like a timeless classic and come back in popularity, for awhile.

    LOL – Good one, Steve, good one.

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  5. I will never get rap.

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    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    The Beastie Boys were fun.
    , @JW
    It grew on me when working a job, in my early twenties, that played hip-hop.
    , @Tiny Duck
    Probably because you are a lame-o
    , @2Mintzin1
    Rap is a bunch of rhythm tracks (sometimes very good ones) with a guy or gal chanting or shouting in the foreground in syncopated fashion. Melody is generally sampled, which tells you that melody creation is beyond the talents of the performer. Emotional range is from racist rage to self-pity, sometimes in the same composition (I hesitate to call it a song).

    I miss great black pop music. Seems to be a thing of the past.
    , @reiner Tor
    This song (and a few other rap songs) grew on me at the time, so I can understand why people listen to it occasionally. But yes, in general I never got how people could listen to rap music all day long. Especially white people, when the performers are black. I’m not saying I cannot listen to music where the performers are not white, but with rap, the music is quite simple, so that the importance of the extra-musical qualities (like the lyrics, the general masculinity, etc.) is very high, and so it’s extra difficult to listen to when the performers are of a different race rhyming about how they hate the listener’s race or something.
    , @TB
    This one is good, about John A. Thorburn, the rappers father who fought in the Vietnam war and was exposed to Agent Orange:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGZsGX3B_BY
    , @benjaminl
    At the very least, some rappers can achieve technical feats of speed and/or difficulty, much as can heavy-metal guitarists. As a teenage boy, I was very impressed by that aspect of it.

    Eminem's "Rap God" recently was cited by Guinness for "most words in a song":

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/sep/08/eminem-rap-god-new-world-record-most-words-in-a-song

    The stretch from 4:25 to 4:42 "features 97 words in 15 seconds, for an average of 6.5 words per second."

    https://youtu.be/XbGs_qK2PQA?t=4m23s

    Of course, much like the four-minute mile, once it's been done, plenty of people can do it again. YouTube is full of successful imitations, like this girl: https://youtu.be/kxEjXuZ2Mpo?t=4m25s
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  6. Danindc says:

    Orioles were up 3-1 in the World Series against that Pirate team. They even had 3 of the best starting pitchers in the planet ready to start the final 3 games
    (Flanagan,Palmer, McGregor). Could not get it done. Hate that song.

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  7. We Are Family was the song, and Stargell’s Stars were the fashion accessory:

    Willie awarded them like gold stars in elementary school, when teammates did something good:

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    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    God, baseball was fun in the 1970s. Probably just because I was a kid at the time, but looking back on it, it just seems like a more enjoyable time.

    I certainly could be wrong, but I feel cheated having come of age in the early 1990s. I hit my 20s just as the prudes took over . . . and they're just getting stronger.

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  8. After a few years, however, no doubt this song seemed corny and old-fashioned to high school football players. (But perhaps at some point in the future it will seem like a timeless classic and come back in popularity, for awhile.)

    I suspect that there’s definitely generational issues around such ploys. At some point, anything that the previous kids were doing – say four or five years before – looks lame to upcoming kids.

    What matters is not the particular move/song/etc., but whether the tactic works. A song can pump people up. The fact that the song needs to change every year or two doesn’t negate the fact that a song can pump people up.

    Some techniques just work, even if you need to rotate how it done. Guys are attracted to young, pretty women but you still need to change the model every once in awhile.

    Perhaps the real skill is not so much recognizing what long-standing techniques work, but when to change out the presentation and in what way.

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  9. @Buzz Mohawk
    We Are Family was the song, and Stargell's Stars were the fashion accessory:

    http://www.blogcdn.com/massively.joystiq.com/media/2013/05/kent-tekulve.jpg

    Willie awarded them like gold stars in elementary school, when teammates did something good:

    http://www.blogcdn.com/massively.joystiq.com/media/2013/05/stargells-stars.jpg

    God, baseball was fun in the 1970s. Probably just because I was a kid at the time, but looking back on it, it just seems like a more enjoyable time.

    I certainly could be wrong, but I feel cheated having come of age in the early 1990s. I hit my 20s just as the prudes took over . . . and they’re just getting stronger.

    Read More
    • Replies: @EriK
    (Sn)Omar Moreno stole 77 bags in 1979 for the Pirates, the year before he stole 96. That sounds like fun.
    , @Thea
    Being a child in the 70s was strange. It was a real unfriendly culture for children as adults had become perpetual adolescents and the world was their playground. On the bright side we were left to our devices to explore in ways that aren't common from the mid-80s onward.

    More pregnancies ended in abortion than going to term in that decade.
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  10. BB753 says:

    This is the ultimate motivational song:

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Not really, because it's usually played after a team wins. Steve's talking about songs to pump the team up before the game.
    , @Pericles
    Shouldn't it be this one before the game?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tJYN-eG1zk

    Both are rather generic, not to mention cliché by now, but you have to admire how Queen apparently could dash off a couple of songs that would get played at sports games for decades.

    This one is to be played in certain MMA floor situations:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f4Mc-NYPHaQ

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  11. @candid_observer
    I will never get rap.

    The Beastie Boys were fun.

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  12. Alice says:

    Of course rituals hack your fight or flight response, because the idea is to stop your conscious control of the situation in favor of automatic processes. So you’re creating new automatic processes. But you ain’t gonna do it once or twice and have a dramatic effects.

    None of these are tiny hacks with no prior practice producing outsized gains. It’s years of this practice. That’s what judo does, and wresting does, and SEAL training does, and SWAT training, and professional level sports training.

    The idea is to create a set of rituals that act as *replacement* automatic responses in a situation where milliseconds count.

    And yes, mood music is part of this ritual. Getting yourself pumped up is a trained effect. Whether it’s Beastie Boys’ Ill Communication or Metallica’s Enter Sandman, it’s whatever you’ve done to ingrain your entrance into a state of “flow”.

    The female “poses”, though, are far more about how others react to the woman than how tbe woman acts–because that’s the issue for most women. They are wired to want to make men feel a certain way about them (and women feel a different way), and they’ll respond differently to men responding to them differently.

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  13. Mystic says:

    Madonna light, the hyper speeding
    Caressed the newborn with a tear
    Of misty windfields, crystal plains
    And all the magic of daybreak

    The virgin dream, a haunting taste of
    Celtic love joys, warm at court
    Withered rivers, painted streams
    Cut deep the sweet vagina

    Ah, yes the lords, the monied merchants
    The feudalistic jester slave
    Walk deep between these walls of stone
    In a fading sky pulsation

    Descended veil of resurrection
    Agrocola’s granite tomb
    The blood of Pict in all its fury
    Died by a thousand eyes

    And deadly is the stage which stagnates
    Calm before a raging storm
    The hands and nails frozen black
    By twilight stripped of sinew

    Sinew splintered splendor crackled
    Swirling forest castle ride
    Funneled through magenta hallways
    Hell was but the froth

    Toth the isis child new as mother’s milk
    Had come the magic
    Pipes of spice and firefly
    Diamonds of lightning

    Lightning diamond festival of dragon fire
    Cricket strings
    Leaf percussion, looking glass
    Far beneath the overground man

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  14. Langley says:

    What is described above does not a represent a huge failure of the neuroendocrine system and homeostasis. It is a feature – not a bug.

    Yes you can change behavior.

    Overt behavior (standing up strieght) is controlled through operant conditioning.
    Glandular behavior (release of hormones associated with emotions) is controlled through classical conditioning.

    Through operant conditioning you can train a feminist or soldier to stand up strieght by positive and/or negative reinforcement (increase praise or stop yelling when they behave the way you want). These overt postures/gestures may effect the glandular/emotional system according to the facial feedback hypothesis.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facial_feedback_hypothesis

    OR

    You can attempt to change the reactions of the glandular/emotional system directly a through classical conditioning technique called systematic desensitization. You can reduce the anxiety response in phobic people by gradually exposing them to the feared stimulus while getting them to engage in pleasurable /relaxing activity.
    I believe this is the actual basis of most things called psychotherapy.
    It is like Pavlov ringing the bell again and again without putting any food in the dog’s mouth. The salivation stops.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systematic_desensitization

    With my patients I preferred a quicker approach.

    Why do these new motivational techniques wear out?
    It may be due to the body’s attempt to maintain homeostasis as described in Solomon’s opponent-process theory.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opponent-process_theory

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  15. anon says: • Disclaimer

    It’s already well established that a placebo effect can be powerful. Or powerful enough that drug studies are required to control for it.

    There is also a minor industry of motivational activities, which include speeches as well as group activities, etc.

    If Social Psychology had strong and empirically supported theories, it would be reasonable to expect spinoffs. Applied Social Psychology? There is certainly the demand.

    The top professional golfers now have a team of subject matter experts (swing coaches and short game coaches) and motivational experts. Any top 30 golfer can fly Netjets.

    And if anything was even plausibly as powerful as the ‘Power Pose’ an academic ‘Human Subject Committee’ would. veto it. They can’t even try to replicate the Milgram experiment. Because it would damage an individual when they discover they are a latent Nazi.

    All this time tested stuff sort of works. But like opposing armies praying for victory, it can’t work for everyone.

    The real problem with Social Psychology is that people are mainly interested in counter intuitive results. Like a study to determine if ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ are indeed magic words. Not that it could be easily done or that effectiveness is context dependent. But people would be underwhelmed with any outcome from such an experiment.

    So armed with computers, data was churned by researchers with an inadequate background in statistics. Don’t underestimate the availability of cheap, powerful computing. Calculating any of this stuff by hand is labor intensive. And in the days of mainframes, access to computing frequently came with a trained intermediary. And was expensive.

    So, yea. Agree.

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    • Replies: @guest
    Speaking of swing experts, can anything every cure the Yips? Or is it one of the mysteries of the universe?
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  16. JW says:
    @candid_observer
    I will never get rap.

    It grew on me when working a job, in my early twenties, that played hip-hop.

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  17. keuril says:

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    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    LOL, I was thinking of this while I was reading Steve's post. Deserves to be a double feature with this
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  18. Twinkie says:

    I don’t think it’s impossible to hack your own fight-or-flight systems in, say, the direction of fight.

    It’s not impossible. But, if you are naturally inclined to flight, it will take a lot of training and re-conditioning to “hack” it. In other words, it will take a lot of hard work. People don’t want to hear that – they want to hear that it can be done quickly with some power-posing or some Black Belt magazine trickery (or “Pay me $2,000 and I will teach you how to be invincible in 3 hours!” type ads).

    As an example, most human beings will flinch and close their eyes when punches start flying around their faces. This is bad – you will not be able to see the punches and avoid or parry them, let alone counter, if you close your eyes. You can break this natural habit by having the trainee lean on a wall (so he can’t retreat), and slowly punch his head with open palms. Rinse and repeat over next several days and weeks with increasing intensity and speed. Obviously, some will take to it better and faster than others, but most will see significant improvement.

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  19. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @BB753
    This is the ultimate motivational song:


    https://youtu.be/04854XqcfCY

    Not really, because it’s usually played after a team wins. Steve’s talking about songs to pump the team up before the game.

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    • Replies: @MC
    Right. The real Queen pump-up song is We Will Rock You.
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  20. Tiny Duck says:
    @candid_observer
    I will never get rap.

    Probably because you are a lame-o

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    One of your best! Let it rip.
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  21. Can You Hack Your Own Fight-Or-Flight Responses?

    In some cases, with the right equipment.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie
    Even though the "criminal" with a knife doesn't know what he is doing (he is not holding that knife properly and has a poor posture for fighting), the man drawing his 1911, whether he gets a shot off or not, is about to get knifed.
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  22. prosa123 says: • Website

    Ireland has an anthem used in most international sports competitions, Ireland’s Call, that is much more stirring than the rather jaunty official national anthem, A Soldier’s Song. Teams adopted Ireland’s Call because it’s a neutral anthem that is appropriate for teams with players from both the Republic of Ireland and from Northern Ireland. Yet it has the side benefit of being a motivational get out and win song.

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    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    prosa123:

    While Ireland's Call may be stirring in its own right but A Soldier's Song is absolutely much more stirring!

    Because of its strong and stirring political message I do agree with you that it may be inappropriate from a Northern Ireland standpoint.
    , @flyingtiger
    I bet Thin Lizzy would have done a great version of this song.
    , @Anonym
    I think it's hard to top this as a stirring anthem. Everyone from Sinatra to Roy Orbison to Elvis has had a go at it but I don't think you can top Gerry and the Pacemakers for this song.

    https://youtu.be/OV5_LQArLa0

    I first found it by researching the football chant in the background of Fearless. Which in itself is what you might listen to when you are about to do something they say couldn't be done.

    https://youtu.be/TeyHPAdxuy0
    , @daniel le mouche
    The dumbest song I've ever heard.
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  23. EriK says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country
    God, baseball was fun in the 1970s. Probably just because I was a kid at the time, but looking back on it, it just seems like a more enjoyable time.

    I certainly could be wrong, but I feel cheated having come of age in the early 1990s. I hit my 20s just as the prudes took over . . . and they're just getting stronger.

    (Sn)Omar Moreno stole 77 bags in 1979 for the Pirates, the year before he stole 96. That sounds like fun.

    Read More
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  24. George says:

    “Hack Your Own Fight-Or-Flight Responses”

    Try boxing training

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  25. 2Mintzin1 says:
    @candid_observer
    I will never get rap.

    Rap is a bunch of rhythm tracks (sometimes very good ones) with a guy or gal chanting or shouting in the foreground in syncopated fashion. Melody is generally sampled, which tells you that melody creation is beyond the talents of the performer. Emotional range is from racist rage to self-pity, sometimes in the same composition (I hesitate to call it a song).

    I miss great black pop music. Seems to be a thing of the past.

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  26. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The issue with power posing or any kind of body language tricks is that it provokes a response from other people. It doesn’t happen in a vacuum. How one responds to other people’s responses to one’s body language is just as important.

    There was that famous bit from the Gore Bush debate in 2000 where Gore tried a kind of power pose approach to intimidate Bush. Bush responded with a dismissive nod that evoked a laugh from the audience at Gore’s stiff and wooden attempt at an intimidating power pose. Gore gets clearly flustered by this and responds with a nervous smile and by asking Bush, “What about the Dingle Norwood bill?”, which completely deflates the confident, intimidating power look he was going for.

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  27. Taco says:
    @Anonymous
    A lot of military training is devoted to short circuiting the fight or flight response altogether so that soldiers follow their commanding officers in the heat of battle.

    What about this motivational song for the Russian paratroopers:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlQ6KqTlyfk

    A lot of military training is devoted to short circuiting the fight or flight response altogether so that soldiers follow their commanding officers in the heat of battle.

    Kind of.

    Military training is designed to normalize stressful situations so you can go through them without being overwhelmed by adrenaline. Not really short circuiting the fight or flight response per se, just raising the threshold at which it is triggered.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    I'd say it's about fifty-fifty. I was specifically taught to use breathing techniques to keep a handle on adrenaline levels, but it was also emphasized that the adrenaline serves a purpose - it put every essential system in my body on high alert so I'd be more focused, more aware, and better able to react - and this was something to be used, not avoided.

    There were a few times, like night jumps with high winds, when I was definitely feeling a lot of adrenaline and was glad I knew how to channel my fight-or-flight response productively.
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  28. Oh I don’t know – In the Air Tonight and Eye of the Tiger were still being played in pre-game locker rooms 10 years and longer after their debut.

    Maybe the reason the Marshall Mathers song seemed corny only a few years later was due to the possibility of its listeners having shorter attention spans.

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  29. Ive been in more than a handful of fights and I can recall in some cases being far more afraid of administrative/legal consequences than of the other guy.

    Seems like a major hack of the fight or flight response. I know from talking with other guys that they have felt the same thing. Who would have done this hack against White men (((that was a rhetorical question)))?

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  30. Ben Gunn says:
    @Anonymous
    A lot of military training is devoted to short circuiting the fight or flight response altogether so that soldiers follow their commanding officers in the heat of battle.

    What about this motivational song for the Russian paratroopers:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlQ6KqTlyfk

    Russina torpers, it looks like a gay dance routine. Here is something bite down hard on, old schoool: Garry Owen

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    • Agree: Dan Hayes
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  31. Lurker says:
    @Anonymous
    A lot of military training is devoted to short circuiting the fight or flight response altogether so that soldiers follow their commanding officers in the heat of battle.

    What about this motivational song for the Russian paratroopers:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlQ6KqTlyfk

    Someone who had done British military parachute training told me that the training was directed not to so much toward making you unafraid of jumping out of a plane but more that the idea of not jumping out wouldn’t even occur to you.

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  32. The ultimate motivator music I saw was when I worked a high school football game with a 80 percent black team against a majority white one. The former sent a cd up to the announcer to play for their entrance song. It wasn’t conventional gangsta rap, it was gang rap- the kind of almost homemade stuff where the whole lyric sheet is straight gang code- in this case, Vice Lords. As that cranked up, the team came out and started doing a kind of shameless 70′s boogiedown version of the standard warmup. It was designed to psych out the much larger, higher ranked team, and it succeeded- the other team looked freaked out. Saw a smirk on the white good ole boy coach’s face. He knew they were going to win that night.

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  33. @keuril
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wre9bkg9Mxw

    LOL, I was thinking of this while I was reading Steve’s post. Deserves to be a double feature with this

    Read More
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  34. Dan Hayes says:
    @prosa123
    Ireland has an anthem used in most international sports competitions, Ireland's Call, that is much more stirring than the rather jaunty official national anthem, A Soldier's Song. Teams adopted Ireland's Call because it's a neutral anthem that is appropriate for teams with players from both the Republic of Ireland and from Northern Ireland. Yet it has the side benefit of being a motivational get out and win song.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAtMzIacbMQ

    prosa123:

    While Ireland’s Call may be stirring in its own right but A Soldier’s Song is absolutely much more stirring!

    Because of its strong and stirring political message I do agree with you that it may be inappropriate from a Northern Ireland standpoint.

    Read More
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  35. gregor says:

    Yeah, I would wager that very few of the Wonder Women offering the heartfelt testimonials about how the power pose has changed their life will still be doing it five years from now. If SNL did a skit making fun of power posing, that would probably end it right there. These things rely on novelty. Then there are also a lot of rituals and superstitions that rely on the opposite impulse: familiarity. These have a much longer shelf life. But they seem to be more about comfort and easing nerves rather than getting fired up.

    One of the more amusing quotes Cuddy gave for that article was her response to the failed replication. She noted that the replication only had subjects hold their poses for two minutes and she suggested that six minutes would maybe be better. Six minutes seems like an excruciatingly long time to hold one of those poses. I can’t imagine anyone doing that, actually.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    "Six minutes seen s like an excruciatingly long time to hold one of those poses. I can't imagine anyone doing that, actually."

    I used to live in St. Cloud, MN, and there was a gentleman who regularly dressed up in a Superman costume. He was seen to stand on street corners with his chest puffed out, fists on hips. Every time I saw him he was already posed, so I assume he did it for long stretches.

    At first I assumed he was committed to a prank, Andy Kaufman-style. But as time passed I switched my assessment to mental derangement. Everyone I ever gossiped with about him agreed.

    Holding his Superman pose put his position in the social hierarchy roughly between serial-killing drifter and ne'er-do-well who owes money around town.

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  36. @candid_observer
    I will never get rap.

    This song (and a few other rap songs) grew on me at the time, so I can understand why people listen to it occasionally. But yes, in general I never got how people could listen to rap music all day long. Especially white people, when the performers are black. I’m not saying I cannot listen to music where the performers are not white, but with rap, the music is quite simple, so that the importance of the extra-musical qualities (like the lyrics, the general masculinity, etc.) is very high, and so it’s extra difficult to listen to when the performers are of a different race rhyming about how they hate the listener’s race or something.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Danindc
    Could never listen to rap for the reasons you mention. I always was searching for a term to describe why....then it came w election of Trump....the word is "cucked"
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  37. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Tiny Duck
    Probably because you are a lame-o

    One of your best! Let it rip.

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  38. @Taco

    A lot of military training is devoted to short circuiting the fight or flight response altogether so that soldiers follow their commanding officers in the heat of battle.
     
    Kind of.

    Military training is designed to normalize stressful situations so you can go through them without being overwhelmed by adrenaline. Not really short circuiting the fight or flight response per se, just raising the threshold at which it is triggered.

    I’d say it’s about fifty-fifty. I was specifically taught to use breathing techniques to keep a handle on adrenaline levels, but it was also emphasized that the adrenaline serves a purpose – it put every essential system in my body on high alert so I’d be more focused, more aware, and better able to react – and this was something to be used, not avoided.

    There were a few times, like night jumps with high winds, when I was definitely feeling a lot of adrenaline and was glad I knew how to channel my fight-or-flight response productively.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    but it was also emphasized that the adrenaline serves a purpose – it put every essential system in my body on high alert so I’d be more focused, more aware, and better able to react – and this was something to be used, not avoided.
     
    The problem with that theory is that the adrenaline rush can't be used specifically and selectively. It's a dumb, automatic, animal reaction to a threat that is only useful for untrained people to the extent that it enhances that fight drive and gives a quick burst of wild, shaky energy-output (through the major muscle groups). It makes a person fight like an animal in panic.

    To a fighter (whether armed or unarmed) who has to deal with complexity, it creates a whole host of problems - you get tunnel vision (which retards situational awareness), lose fine motor skills (which is why untrained people start jerking/slamming triggers wildly and miss every shot even within 25 feet), experience a dramatic increase in oxygen consumption (gas quickly and lose the ability to sustain combat against multiple threats), get stiff (can't move smoothly and suffer more substantial damage against impacts and falls), and, on top of that, have that unpleasant stomach pain.

    Proper, slow, methodical breathing (inhale through nose, exhale through mouth) will negate all these disadvantages. It will increase focus/situational awareness, improve fine motor skills, restrain energy consumption, allow for smooth movements, improve the ability to take impacts and falls, and even give you a bit of a "high"/euphoria/calm confidence.

    And that is why that slow, full, purposeful breathing is taught to magicians locked in a box under water, martial artists, people who engage in gun fights for a living, etc.
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  39. Danindc says:
    @reiner Tor
    This song (and a few other rap songs) grew on me at the time, so I can understand why people listen to it occasionally. But yes, in general I never got how people could listen to rap music all day long. Especially white people, when the performers are black. I’m not saying I cannot listen to music where the performers are not white, but with rap, the music is quite simple, so that the importance of the extra-musical qualities (like the lyrics, the general masculinity, etc.) is very high, and so it’s extra difficult to listen to when the performers are of a different race rhyming about how they hate the listener’s race or something.

    Could never listen to rap for the reasons you mention. I always was searching for a term to describe why….then it came w election of Trump….the word is “cucked”

    Read More
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  40. One of the major advantages trained fighters have (boxers, grapplers, et al) against untrained fighters is that they generally don’t have the adrenaline rush in the first few seconds of the fight…that leads to the adrenaline dump 30 seconds later where your arms turn to lead.

    Sometimes you hear the term “30 seconds of fury” to describe how guys will go beserk and then just stand there as they get torn apart by someone because they can’t fight back.

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  41. newrouter says:

    >But picking out a song beloved by sorority sisters and drag queens as your ballclub’s motivational theme song may not work if you aren’t Willie Stargell in 1979.<

    or Pittsburgh 1979. A whole way of life was being ripped away. 6 years later all the mills are closed. Total devastation of a civic culture. "We are family" worked because we were at least that time were, white working class, united in a collective concern.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    One of my favorite baseball memories is Game 7 of that Series, because I watched it in a bar with a group of co-workers from that part of Pennsylvania. They were from solidly middle-working class families and had come to my state for jobs. That night is really the only reason I know much about Stargell's Stars and the whole Family thing.

    Very sad what happened to industry there. Inexcusable. Part of the destruction of America by its own leaders. One of the reasons we here have legitimate complaints.

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  42. Horseball says:

    The New Zealand haka looks gay to me:

    Read More
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  43. @Anonymous
    A lot of military training is devoted to short circuiting the fight or flight response altogether so that soldiers follow their commanding officers in the heat of battle.

    What about this motivational song for the Russian paratroopers:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlQ6KqTlyfk

    Not as good as “Blood on the Risers.”

    Read More
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  44. @prosa123
    Ireland has an anthem used in most international sports competitions, Ireland's Call, that is much more stirring than the rather jaunty official national anthem, A Soldier's Song. Teams adopted Ireland's Call because it's a neutral anthem that is appropriate for teams with players from both the Republic of Ireland and from Northern Ireland. Yet it has the side benefit of being a motivational get out and win song.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAtMzIacbMQ

    I bet Thin Lizzy would have done a great version of this song.

    Read More
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  45. Twinkie says:
    @ATX Hipster
    I'd say it's about fifty-fifty. I was specifically taught to use breathing techniques to keep a handle on adrenaline levels, but it was also emphasized that the adrenaline serves a purpose - it put every essential system in my body on high alert so I'd be more focused, more aware, and better able to react - and this was something to be used, not avoided.

    There were a few times, like night jumps with high winds, when I was definitely feeling a lot of adrenaline and was glad I knew how to channel my fight-or-flight response productively.

    but it was also emphasized that the adrenaline serves a purpose – it put every essential system in my body on high alert so I’d be more focused, more aware, and better able to react – and this was something to be used, not avoided.

    The problem with that theory is that the adrenaline rush can’t be used specifically and selectively. It’s a dumb, automatic, animal reaction to a threat that is only useful for untrained people to the extent that it enhances that fight drive and gives a quick burst of wild, shaky energy-output (through the major muscle groups). It makes a person fight like an animal in panic.

    To a fighter (whether armed or unarmed) who has to deal with complexity, it creates a whole host of problems – you get tunnel vision (which retards situational awareness), lose fine motor skills (which is why untrained people start jerking/slamming triggers wildly and miss every shot even within 25 feet), experience a dramatic increase in oxygen consumption (gas quickly and lose the ability to sustain combat against multiple threats), get stiff (can’t move smoothly and suffer more substantial damage against impacts and falls), and, on top of that, have that unpleasant stomach pain.

    Proper, slow, methodical breathing (inhale through nose, exhale through mouth) will negate all these disadvantages. It will increase focus/situational awareness, improve fine motor skills, restrain energy consumption, allow for smooth movements, improve the ability to take impacts and falls, and even give you a bit of a “high”/euphoria/calm confidence.

    And that is why that slow, full, purposeful breathing is taught to magicians locked in a box under water, martial artists, people who engage in gun fights for a living, etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ATX Hipster
    Sure. As others have said above, adrenaline management is the kind of thing that takes practice, and it has to be controlled to be useful.
    , @anonguy

    And that is why that slow, full, purposeful breathing is taught to magicians locked in a box under water, martial artists, people who engage in gun fights for a living, etc.
     
    Breathing/control of nerves/shaking is about 90% of the game for marksmanship.
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  46. Twinkie says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Can You Hack Your Own Fight-Or-Flight Responses?
     
    In some cases, with the right equipment.

    http://preppercentral.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/self-defense-with-gun.jpg

    Even though the “criminal” with a knife doesn’t know what he is doing (he is not holding that knife properly and has a poor posture for fighting), the man drawing his 1911, whether he gets a shot off or not, is about to get knifed.

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  47. NickG says:

    I don’t think it’s impossible to hack your own fight-or-flight systems in, say, the direction of fight rather than flight.

    Indeed, it most certainly isn’t. This brings to mind much military training, which, amongst much else, has been developed to play with our existing, deeply tribal, hard-wired pre-dispositions. And of course there is the New Zealand rugby team, the All Blacks’ Haka. This was the start of the 2011 world cup final, New Zealand won 8-7.

    On this whole theme of hacking your system, and a tiny nation of 4.5 million folks being consistently the best rugby nation in the World, it’s well worth taking the time to watch the full 2017 documentary Beneath the Black: A journey through New Zealand rugby.

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  48. Stogumber says:

    “Power posing” is plausible because it connects with two traditional ideas.
    First, the idea that emotions don’t cause mimics and gestures, but mimics and gestures cause emotions.
    Secondly, the well known American recommendation “Fake it until you make it”.

    As for the masculinity tropes – in Germany we have a frequent phenomenon that it is the most burly men with manual jobs who tend to join the well known amateur dancing groups “men disguising as women” (Maennerballett). As young people of the higher classes affect a proletarian accent (because they can afford to do so).

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  49. guest says:

    What is this mania for calling everything a “hack.” I use computers all the time, but have never hacked anything in my life.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles

    What is this mania for calling everything a “hack.”

     

    Breaking and exploiting the system to collect shekels is the signature move of our era.
    , @anonymous
    What if you could curate your hacks? That would be awesome!
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Hack has two meanings:
    1) the original meaning was a noun used to describe a bad piece of code - something that was done poorly, had possible bad side effects, relied on a magic value that might change, etc. I did one today, but since it's my own code, it does not matter.
    2) the second meaning is to use hack as a verb - the Russians hacked/broke into US voting machines.
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  50. guest says:
    @anon
    It's already well established that a placebo effect can be powerful. Or powerful enough that drug studies are required to control for it.

    There is also a minor industry of motivational activities, which include speeches as well as group activities, etc.

    If Social Psychology had strong and empirically supported theories, it would be reasonable to expect spinoffs. Applied Social Psychology? There is certainly the demand.

    The top professional golfers now have a team of subject matter experts (swing coaches and short game coaches) and motivational experts. Any top 30 golfer can fly Netjets.

    And if anything was even plausibly as powerful as the 'Power Pose' an academic 'Human Subject Committee' would. veto it. They can't even try to replicate the Milgram experiment. Because it would damage an individual when they discover they are a latent Nazi.

    All this time tested stuff sort of works. But like opposing armies praying for victory, it can't work for everyone.

    The real problem with Social Psychology is that people are mainly interested in counter intuitive results. Like a study to determine if 'please' and 'thank you' are indeed magic words. Not that it could be easily done or that effectiveness is context dependent. But people would be underwhelmed with any outcome from such an experiment.

    So armed with computers, data was churned by researchers with an inadequate background in statistics. Don't underestimate the availability of cheap, powerful computing. Calculating any of this stuff by hand is labor intensive. And in the days of mainframes, access to computing frequently came with a trained intermediary. And was expensive.

    So, yea. Agree.

    Speaking of swing experts, can anything every cure the Yips? Or is it one of the mysteries of the universe?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Cure the yips? I would say no. There was some evidence presented years ago that it is physically based. Golfers get bad nerves as they age.

    There are all sorts of work arounds and players use them at progressively younger ages. Jordan Spieth is the best putter in the game outside 10 feet but average on short puts. He has a routine which he uses on occasion in competition on short puts of looking at the hole and not the ball.

    Also golfers seem to be moving away from the classic grip and have all sorts of crosshand grips. Some this is facilitated by the speed of the greens, which require very little energy to be imparted to the ball. The 'belly putter' was anchored and was finally banned by the PGA.

    Seems to me that everything is more of a work around rather than a cure. But I'm not an expert.
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  51. guest says:
    @gregor
    Yeah, I would wager that very few of the Wonder Women offering the heartfelt testimonials about how the power pose has changed their life will still be doing it five years from now. If SNL did a skit making fun of power posing, that would probably end it right there. These things rely on novelty. Then there are also a lot of rituals and superstitions that rely on the opposite impulse: familiarity. These have a much longer shelf life. But they seem to be more about comfort and easing nerves rather than getting fired up.

    One of the more amusing quotes Cuddy gave for that article was her response to the failed replication. She noted that the replication only had subjects hold their poses for two minutes and she suggested that six minutes would maybe be better. Six minutes seems like an excruciatingly long time to hold one of those poses. I can't imagine anyone doing that, actually.

    “Six minutes seen s like an excruciatingly long time to hold one of those poses. I can’t imagine anyone doing that, actually.”

    I used to live in St. Cloud, MN, and there was a gentleman who regularly dressed up in a Superman costume. He was seen to stand on street corners with his chest puffed out, fists on hips. Every time I saw him he was already posed, so I assume he did it for long stretches.

    At first I assumed he was committed to a prank, Andy Kaufman-style. But as time passed I switched my assessment to mental derangement. Everyone I ever gossiped with about him agreed.

    Holding his Superman pose put his position in the social hierarchy roughly between serial-killing drifter and ne’er-do-well who owes money around town.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    Tell him all the St. Cloud Somalis are working for Lex Luthor.
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  52. @Twinkie

    but it was also emphasized that the adrenaline serves a purpose – it put every essential system in my body on high alert so I’d be more focused, more aware, and better able to react – and this was something to be used, not avoided.
     
    The problem with that theory is that the adrenaline rush can't be used specifically and selectively. It's a dumb, automatic, animal reaction to a threat that is only useful for untrained people to the extent that it enhances that fight drive and gives a quick burst of wild, shaky energy-output (through the major muscle groups). It makes a person fight like an animal in panic.

    To a fighter (whether armed or unarmed) who has to deal with complexity, it creates a whole host of problems - you get tunnel vision (which retards situational awareness), lose fine motor skills (which is why untrained people start jerking/slamming triggers wildly and miss every shot even within 25 feet), experience a dramatic increase in oxygen consumption (gas quickly and lose the ability to sustain combat against multiple threats), get stiff (can't move smoothly and suffer more substantial damage against impacts and falls), and, on top of that, have that unpleasant stomach pain.

    Proper, slow, methodical breathing (inhale through nose, exhale through mouth) will negate all these disadvantages. It will increase focus/situational awareness, improve fine motor skills, restrain energy consumption, allow for smooth movements, improve the ability to take impacts and falls, and even give you a bit of a "high"/euphoria/calm confidence.

    And that is why that slow, full, purposeful breathing is taught to magicians locked in a box under water, martial artists, people who engage in gun fights for a living, etc.

    Sure. As others have said above, adrenaline management is the kind of thing that takes practice, and it has to be controlled to be useful.

    Read More
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  53. @newrouter
    >But picking out a song beloved by sorority sisters and drag queens as your ballclub’s motivational theme song may not work if you aren’t Willie Stargell in 1979.<

    or Pittsburgh 1979. A whole way of life was being ripped away. 6 years later all the mills are closed. Total devastation of a civic culture. "We are family" worked because we were at least that time were, white working class, united in a collective concern.

    One of my favorite baseball memories is Game 7 of that Series, because I watched it in a bar with a group of co-workers from that part of Pennsylvania. They were from solidly middle-working class families and had come to my state for jobs. That night is really the only reason I know much about Stargell’s Stars and the whole Family thing.

    Very sad what happened to industry there. Inexcusable. Part of the destruction of America by its own leaders. One of the reasons we here have legitimate complaints.

    Read More
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  54. MC says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Not really, because it's usually played after a team wins. Steve's talking about songs to pump the team up before the game.

    Right. The real Queen pump-up song is We Will Rock You.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    That works. But I always thought "Gimme The Prize" was a better Queen pump-up song:

    https://youtu.be/GT1k3-fErCM?t=37s
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  55. TB says:
    @candid_observer
    I will never get rap.

    This one is good, about John A. Thorburn, the rappers father who fought in the Vietnam war and was exposed to Agent Orange:

    Read More
    • Replies: @daniel le mouche
    Another stupid rap song. Pretending he's a soldier in Vietnam--but RAPPIN. His father, a soldier, was exposed to Agent Orange? What about the countless innocents in Vietnam? It's fair enough, we all want to describe what we know--unfortunately, what we know is completely barren culturally. Most rap is posing. And what of all the white or Asian or European kids doing it, just because they think it makes them look cool? And what's the point of it? Isn't it supposed to be spontaneous ranting? Isn't it supposed to be the epitome of 'real'? But behold its reality.
    It's a new low, like everything since the advent of television. What fun does the future have in store?
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  56. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @MC
    Right. The real Queen pump-up song is We Will Rock You.

    That works. But I always thought “Gimme The Prize” was a better Queen pump-up song:

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  57. anon says: • Disclaimer

    The original paper claimed that these poses caused a change in testosterone of over a third of a standard deviation and a change in cortisol of almost half a standard deviation.

    Maybe this is an obvious point, but if this were true, it would represent a huge failure of the neuroendocrine system and homeostasis, to be manipulated and tricked so easily.

    Perhaps the getting “tricked” can be viewed as a failure on the part of the body, but any insinuation that these hormonal changes don’t actually occur doesn’t necessarily hold.

    Evangelicals routinely “trick” themselves into states of ecstasy. Opiate for the masses isn’t hyperbole. Does pornography and accompanying orgasm not have an effect on hormone profiles?

    I think the resolution, in regard to a purported failure of homeostasis, is that the hormone surges are transitory in nature.

    Read More
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  58. Pericles says:
    @BB753
    This is the ultimate motivational song:


    https://youtu.be/04854XqcfCY

    Shouldn’t it be this one before the game?

    Both are rather generic, not to mention cliché by now, but you have to admire how Queen apparently could dash off a couple of songs that would get played at sports games for decades.

    This one is to be played in certain MMA floor situations:

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  59. Pericles says:
    @guest
    What is this mania for calling everything a "hack." I use computers all the time, but have never hacked anything in my life.

    What is this mania for calling everything a “hack.”

    Breaking and exploiting the system to collect shekels is the signature move of our era.

    Read More
    • Agree: res
    • Replies: @res
    True, but it goes beyond that. Consider "hacking your diet." Even if it's not for collecting shekels the key seems to be making little or no effort to achieve results.
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  60. JimB says:

    Classical musicians and public speakers have been modulating their fight-or-flight response for decades by popping propanalol pills, which lower your blood pressure, reduce cortisol levels, and steady your heart rate. Instead of pumping you up, they calm you down without flooding your brain with opioids and impairing your intellect. If the goal is to outwit rather than intimidate your opponent, propanalol is a nice little pharmaceutical hack.

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  61. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @guest
    What is this mania for calling everything a "hack." I use computers all the time, but have never hacked anything in my life.

    What if you could curate your hacks? That would be awesome!

    Read More
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  62. Anonym says:
    @prosa123
    Ireland has an anthem used in most international sports competitions, Ireland's Call, that is much more stirring than the rather jaunty official national anthem, A Soldier's Song. Teams adopted Ireland's Call because it's a neutral anthem that is appropriate for teams with players from both the Republic of Ireland and from Northern Ireland. Yet it has the side benefit of being a motivational get out and win song.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAtMzIacbMQ

    I think it’s hard to top this as a stirring anthem. Everyone from Sinatra to Roy Orbison to Elvis has had a go at it but I don’t think you can top Gerry and the Pacemakers for this song.

    I first found it by researching the football chant in the background of Fearless. Which in itself is what you might listen to when you are about to do something they say couldn’t be done.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jim jones
    Famously used as the backing for this video:

    https://vimeo.com/41406911
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  63. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @guest
    Speaking of swing experts, can anything every cure the Yips? Or is it one of the mysteries of the universe?

    Cure the yips? I would say no. There was some evidence presented years ago that it is physically based. Golfers get bad nerves as they age.

    There are all sorts of work arounds and players use them at progressively younger ages. Jordan Spieth is the best putter in the game outside 10 feet but average on short puts. He has a routine which he uses on occasion in competition on short puts of looking at the hole and not the ball.

    Also golfers seem to be moving away from the classic grip and have all sorts of crosshand grips. Some this is facilitated by the speed of the greens, which require very little energy to be imparted to the ball. The ‘belly putter’ was anchored and was finally banned by the PGA.

    Seems to me that everything is more of a work around rather than a cure. But I’m not an expert.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I watched some videos of 1970s Masters and Augusta National's greens back then were comically slow. Nicklaus or Palmer would give 20 footers a sharp rap. The ball would rocket up to the hole and then just die all of a sudden. I didn't see any of the crazy modern stuff like how on Saturday on 16 you have to aim for a giant U-turn.

    I think Augusta National switched from Bermuda grass to bent grass greens around 1981.

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  64. @anon
    Cure the yips? I would say no. There was some evidence presented years ago that it is physically based. Golfers get bad nerves as they age.

    There are all sorts of work arounds and players use them at progressively younger ages. Jordan Spieth is the best putter in the game outside 10 feet but average on short puts. He has a routine which he uses on occasion in competition on short puts of looking at the hole and not the ball.

    Also golfers seem to be moving away from the classic grip and have all sorts of crosshand grips. Some this is facilitated by the speed of the greens, which require very little energy to be imparted to the ball. The 'belly putter' was anchored and was finally banned by the PGA.

    Seems to me that everything is more of a work around rather than a cure. But I'm not an expert.

    I watched some videos of 1970s Masters and Augusta National’s greens back then were comically slow. Nicklaus or Palmer would give 20 footers a sharp rap. The ball would rocket up to the hole and then just die all of a sudden. I didn’t see any of the crazy modern stuff like how on Saturday on 16 you have to aim for a giant U-turn.

    I think Augusta National switched from Bermuda grass to bent grass greens around 1981.

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  65. FozzieT says:

    Other classic pump-up songs that haven’t gone out of style:

    Ramones Blitzkrieg Bop (Used in selling expensive exercise bikes to upscale white chicks)

    Dropkick Murphy’s (Used by Notre Dame and basically everyone in Boston)

    Metallica Enter Sandman

    AC/DC Thunderstruck

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  66. Thea says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country
    God, baseball was fun in the 1970s. Probably just because I was a kid at the time, but looking back on it, it just seems like a more enjoyable time.

    I certainly could be wrong, but I feel cheated having come of age in the early 1990s. I hit my 20s just as the prudes took over . . . and they're just getting stronger.

    Being a child in the 70s was strange. It was a real unfriendly culture for children as adults had become perpetual adolescents and the world was their playground. On the bright side we were left to our devices to explore in ways that aren’t common from the mid-80s onward.

    More pregnancies ended in abortion than going to term in that decade.

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  67. jim jones says:
    @Anonym
    I think it's hard to top this as a stirring anthem. Everyone from Sinatra to Roy Orbison to Elvis has had a go at it but I don't think you can top Gerry and the Pacemakers for this song.

    https://youtu.be/OV5_LQArLa0

    I first found it by researching the football chant in the background of Fearless. Which in itself is what you might listen to when you are about to do something they say couldn't be done.

    https://youtu.be/TeyHPAdxuy0

    Famously used as the backing for this video:

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  68. Read More
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  69. anonguy says:

    A lot of performers eat bananas for stage fright.

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    Thats racist.
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  70. anonguy says:
    @Twinkie

    but it was also emphasized that the adrenaline serves a purpose – it put every essential system in my body on high alert so I’d be more focused, more aware, and better able to react – and this was something to be used, not avoided.
     
    The problem with that theory is that the adrenaline rush can't be used specifically and selectively. It's a dumb, automatic, animal reaction to a threat that is only useful for untrained people to the extent that it enhances that fight drive and gives a quick burst of wild, shaky energy-output (through the major muscle groups). It makes a person fight like an animal in panic.

    To a fighter (whether armed or unarmed) who has to deal with complexity, it creates a whole host of problems - you get tunnel vision (which retards situational awareness), lose fine motor skills (which is why untrained people start jerking/slamming triggers wildly and miss every shot even within 25 feet), experience a dramatic increase in oxygen consumption (gas quickly and lose the ability to sustain combat against multiple threats), get stiff (can't move smoothly and suffer more substantial damage against impacts and falls), and, on top of that, have that unpleasant stomach pain.

    Proper, slow, methodical breathing (inhale through nose, exhale through mouth) will negate all these disadvantages. It will increase focus/situational awareness, improve fine motor skills, restrain energy consumption, allow for smooth movements, improve the ability to take impacts and falls, and even give you a bit of a "high"/euphoria/calm confidence.

    And that is why that slow, full, purposeful breathing is taught to magicians locked in a box under water, martial artists, people who engage in gun fights for a living, etc.

    And that is why that slow, full, purposeful breathing is taught to magicians locked in a box under water, martial artists, people who engage in gun fights for a living, etc.

    Breathing/control of nerves/shaking is about 90% of the game for marksmanship.

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  71. res says:
    @Pericles

    What is this mania for calling everything a “hack.”

     

    Breaking and exploiting the system to collect shekels is the signature move of our era.

    True, but it goes beyond that. Consider “hacking your diet.” Even if it’s not for collecting shekels the key seems to be making little or no effort to achieve results.

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  72. Thank you for mentioning Eminem. I know little of rap, but that’s a good song. My favorite of his,–I think he’s part of it–is as follows.

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  73. benjaminl says:
    @candid_observer
    I will never get rap.

    At the very least, some rappers can achieve technical feats of speed and/or difficulty, much as can heavy-metal guitarists. As a teenage boy, I was very impressed by that aspect of it.

    Eminem’s “Rap God” recently was cited by Guinness for “most words in a song”:

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/sep/08/eminem-rap-god-new-world-record-most-words-in-a-song

    The stretch from 4:25 to 4:42 “features 97 words in 15 seconds, for an average of 6.5 words per second.”

    Of course, much like the four-minute mile, once it’s been done, plenty of people can do it again. YouTube is full of successful imitations, like this girl:

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    At the very least, some rappers can achieve technical feats of speed and/or difficulty, much as can heavy-metal guitarists. As a teenage boy, I was very impressed by that aspect of it.

    While Eminem has definitely done some catchy, musical stuff this in particular is not overly so. Contrast with Megadeth. (As a young man I don’t think Dave grokked the Crusades.)

    https://youtu.be/9d4ui9q7eDM
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  74. @prosa123
    Ireland has an anthem used in most international sports competitions, Ireland's Call, that is much more stirring than the rather jaunty official national anthem, A Soldier's Song. Teams adopted Ireland's Call because it's a neutral anthem that is appropriate for teams with players from both the Republic of Ireland and from Northern Ireland. Yet it has the side benefit of being a motivational get out and win song.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAtMzIacbMQ

    The dumbest song I’ve ever heard.

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  75. @TB
    This one is good, about John A. Thorburn, the rappers father who fought in the Vietnam war and was exposed to Agent Orange:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGZsGX3B_BY

    Another stupid rap song. Pretending he’s a soldier in Vietnam–but RAPPIN. His father, a soldier, was exposed to Agent Orange? What about the countless innocents in Vietnam? It’s fair enough, we all want to describe what we know–unfortunately, what we know is completely barren culturally. Most rap is posing. And what of all the white or Asian or European kids doing it, just because they think it makes them look cool? And what’s the point of it? Isn’t it supposed to be spontaneous ranting? Isn’t it supposed to be the epitome of ‘real’? But behold its reality.
    It’s a new low, like everything since the advent of television. What fun does the future have in store?

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  76. MarcB. says:

    You can improve upon them, but they are still limited by one’s inborn neural wiring and intestinal fortitude.

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  77. Always enjoy watching feminists and cuckservative argue over the existence and explanation for the gender gap.
    The answer has always been known. The gender gap is entirely explained by the fact that women are not equal to men and never will be.
    We have torn our society into fragments and spent ourselves into oblivion trying to make women equal to men so that we can say there is no gender gap. A process that cannot be sustained for much longer. There is no social model, and not enough resources in the world to make women equal to men.

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    • Replies: @unpc downunder
    The point of highlighting gender gaps in the media is to get more women into male dominated professions and encourage them to move further up the career ladder. This is why right-leaning media editors allow left-liberal reporters to push so many stories about the gender pay gap. The business elites knows income equality will never happen, but if they can get some more women into STEM fields and some butch women into trades they will be happy. And business elites don't care about family formation, they just care about securing enough workers 5-10 years into the future.
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  78. Anonym says:
    @benjaminl
    At the very least, some rappers can achieve technical feats of speed and/or difficulty, much as can heavy-metal guitarists. As a teenage boy, I was very impressed by that aspect of it.

    Eminem's "Rap God" recently was cited by Guinness for "most words in a song":

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/sep/08/eminem-rap-god-new-world-record-most-words-in-a-song

    The stretch from 4:25 to 4:42 "features 97 words in 15 seconds, for an average of 6.5 words per second."

    https://youtu.be/XbGs_qK2PQA?t=4m23s

    Of course, much like the four-minute mile, once it's been done, plenty of people can do it again. YouTube is full of successful imitations, like this girl: https://youtu.be/kxEjXuZ2Mpo?t=4m25s

    At the very least, some rappers can achieve technical feats of speed and/or difficulty, much as can heavy-metal guitarists. As a teenage boy, I was very impressed by that aspect of it.

    While Eminem has definitely done some catchy, musical stuff this in particular is not overly so. Contrast with Megadeth. (As a young man I don’t think Dave grokked the Crusades.)

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  79. Extremely good rapper? Like extremely fine piece of defecation?

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  80. @eyesfrontmen
    Always enjoy watching feminists and cuckservative argue over the existence and explanation for the gender gap.
    The answer has always been known. The gender gap is entirely explained by the fact that women are not equal to men and never will be.
    We have torn our society into fragments and spent ourselves into oblivion trying to make women equal to men so that we can say there is no gender gap. A process that cannot be sustained for much longer. There is no social model, and not enough resources in the world to make women equal to men.

    The point of highlighting gender gaps in the media is to get more women into male dominated professions and encourage them to move further up the career ladder. This is why right-leaning media editors allow left-liberal reporters to push so many stories about the gender pay gap. The business elites knows income equality will never happen, but if they can get some more women into STEM fields and some butch women into trades they will be happy. And business elites don’t care about family formation, they just care about securing enough workers 5-10 years into the future.

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  81. TB says:

    It says in the beginning that 4 million were exposed to it, and this is one of the stories. Also in the end it says it’s dedicated to all the people affected by the horrors of war. I think it is a well written verse.

    Thorburn’s father, Staff Sgt. John A. Thorburn, was a Vietnam veteran affected by Agent Orange. Thorburn’s family was significantly affected by the potent chemical. His brother Maxx was born handicapped and blind, eventually dying at the age of 10. Thorburn’s sister, Dee Ann, was born without the ability to walk or speak. She died in 2007 at the age of 26. John A. Thorburn died 7 January 2010 from cancer.

    Totally agree most of it is thrash. The funny thing is that originally it wasn’t just a black thing. Created in the burning South Bronx of the 70s by jamaicans, puertoricans, italians, jews etc. Interestingly it seems like the Culture war has also affected the Puertoricans so they no longer can say the forbidden word like they have been for the last 50 years.

    In California I guess the Mexican big band narco corridors will replace rap: Here is a hit with English subtext, at least they sing.:

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  82. The Pirates caps were also original looking and gave the team instant Standout Appeal . Some may think they looked goofy but Willie Stargell pulled it off . Probably because he looked like a cool cat who could win money playing pool .

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  83. @guest
    "Six minutes seen s like an excruciatingly long time to hold one of those poses. I can't imagine anyone doing that, actually."

    I used to live in St. Cloud, MN, and there was a gentleman who regularly dressed up in a Superman costume. He was seen to stand on street corners with his chest puffed out, fists on hips. Every time I saw him he was already posed, so I assume he did it for long stretches.

    At first I assumed he was committed to a prank, Andy Kaufman-style. But as time passed I switched my assessment to mental derangement. Everyone I ever gossiped with about him agreed.

    Holding his Superman pose put his position in the social hierarchy roughly between serial-killing drifter and ne'er-do-well who owes money around town.

    Tell him all the St. Cloud Somalis are working for Lex Luthor.

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  84. @guest
    What is this mania for calling everything a "hack." I use computers all the time, but have never hacked anything in my life.

    Hack has two meanings:
    1) the original meaning was a noun used to describe a bad piece of code – something that was done poorly, had possible bad side effects, relied on a magic value that might change, etc. I did one today, but since it’s my own code, it does not matter.
    2) the second meaning is to use hack as a verb – the Russians hacked/broke into US voting machines.

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  85. @anonguy
    A lot of performers eat bananas for stage fright.

    Thats racist.

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