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In the 1960s under Democratic Governor Pat Brown, government agencies in California oversaw huge amounts of infrastructure constructed, such as freeways, aqueducts, and college campuses to ready the state for the huge population of the future. Since then, however, not so much … This was made semi-explicit under Pat’s son Jerry Brown’s first term of governor in his slogan: “Era of Limits.”

Since then, construction in California has been a slow process. This is less due to “bureaucracy” — the French state, for example, is pretty good at getting things like High Speed Rail built — as due to California’s emphasis on individual rights and multiple levels of government.

Most of all, the secret why “progressive” California makes so little progress is because most Californians think, not unreasonably, that California was better when they first remember it than it is today, so their first reaction to hearing anybody proposing Hope and Change in California is to hire a lawyer to throw a wrench in the works.

 
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  1. anon[338] • Disclaimer says:

    Hey, they did give us legal weed. Look how well that industry is doing…

  2. With more than twice as many people as back in the 1960s, California not only has less sparsely populated land to build new roads on, but the populated land costs many times as much inflation-adjusted money to buy the right-of-way for roads.

    Additionally, AA hires don’t necessarily get the job done. Yet they keep “working” for California.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  3. Anon[393] • Disclaimer says:

    most Californians think, not unreasonably, that California was better when they first remember it than it is today

    You mean, when it was white, with fewer Mexicans and Central Americans, with less crime and trash?

    When nutcases were living in funny farms, injected with head-on-a-post by kindly doctors, and not living on the streets?

    When the aerospace industry was booming with lots of smaller, unmerged companies, making physical products, for the Defense Department to use to defeat the Ruskies and pinkos, and employing lots of engineers who immigrated from exotic places like the Southern U.S., where they had attended Georgia Tech, which was unwoke?

    I wanna go back to when the world was free
    When all my friends were just like me
    Southern California, 1963

    • Replies: @Neoconned
  4. JimB says:

    Californians think, not unreasonably, that California was better when they first remember it than it is today.

    Most Americans over the age of 35 think America was better when they first remember it than it is today. But progressive politicians think that when you find yourself in a shit hole, you should pipe in more sewage.

    • Agree: TomSchmidt
    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Art Deco
  5. Random bot [AKA "Random botnot"] says:

    I saw the future in California several years ago. We drove on a nice uncrowded private expressway. Our car had a monitoring gizmo that billed us automatically. It was kind of expensive. I looked at the public freeway; it was bumper locked. This was east of L.A.

    The rich will pay and live like 1950 – Excellent! Everyone else is gridlocked in a virtual tar pit.

    Money talks – and it is unbiased.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  6. And why is he so popular?
    New York Times
    Richard Reeves
    Aug. 24, 1975

    Although he is not particularly likable young man, he has touched the imagination of Californians by choosing to sleep on a mattress on the floor of a bare $250‐a‐month apartment in Sacramento rather than in a $1.3million mansion, by trading in a bulletproof Cadillac limousine for a Plymouth Satellite and by roaming around the state government asking hostile and irreverent questions like this one he posed to the University of California’s Board of Regents “Why is it better to have a smaller number of students in each class?”

    Jerry Brown’s claim to fame is he got everybody to buy a copy of Small is Beautiful.

    Amazon says it is a number one bestseller but I couldn’t finish it and I didn’t keep it long. Also Jerry Brown was dating Linda Ronstadt when she was smoking hot.

  7. Random bot [AKA "Random botnot"] says:

    How about a grid of giant pyramids to draw solar and lunar power? They use them in Egypt to power greater Cairo.

    Investment opportunities are available with Trans Cal Power. We call it Rainbow Energy. You’ll call it delightful.

  8. California’s success as the best big state comes from the fact that it is the least Black big state in the country.

    If it gets any less expensive, by building more roads and houses, then it will attract more working class African Americans, and the resulting decrease in social capital by crime will make it less expensive, and a feedback cycle will result.

    So California keeps the infrastructure the same, and doubles the population with mass immigration, the result is to make the State expensive, which is bad for working class Americans, but keeps the Africans out, which is good for the Californians.

    Essentially, California is the most reactionary, far right state when it comes to local politics, especially when it comes to zoning, but it is the most liberal at the state level for economic policies(with a pretend facsimile for racial liberalism).

    Occasionally, a area will forget this, and will have a crime spree that causes much grief and anguish, like San Franciso and their approach toward crime, but for cities like LA and San Jose who follow this playbook, the result is a very high standard of living.

    I have found that economic leftism(not too far left tho) for the economy and social conservatism for everything else makes a pretty good combination.

  9. @anon

    OT

    Unexpectedly, the white liberals in Evanston IL got Steve’s memo about giving blacks the local marijuana concessions as a form of reparations. Oddly, they didn’t get the memo of their fellow liberals in next door Chicago about using the proceeds to get the blacks out of town.

    https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/472450-chicago-suburb-to-use-recreational-marijuana-sales-tax-to-fund

  10. jtgw says:

    France’s unemployment rate is 8.4%. California’s is 4.0% and the US is 3.6%. France’s transportation boondoggles clearly don’t compensate for the strangling effect of its over-sized public sector.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  11. @Morton's toes

    I did read _Small is Beautiful_ . I found it insightful, logical, and deeply moving. But then, I was about fifteen years old at the time.

    • LOL: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Desiderius
  12. The only people in CA who matter are the 500,000 tech nerds in the bay area.

    Why?

    Because socialism isn’t free, and beggars can’t be choosers.

    The reason infrastructure stopped isn’t because boomers remembered the past, its because young computer people didn’t want any. Because “reasons.” Because “theories.” Because “fuck you.”

    Its astonishing that someone like you, steve, who lives there (right?) doesn’t realize the feudal nature of that state, and the utter political, economic, and social irrelevance of 98%+ of the population.

    I mean, as if what a bunch of boomers (or mexicans, or blacks, or salvadorans) thought or wanted or voted mattered, compared to the will of those paying the taxes in SF.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @bomag
  13. If only they hadn’t hired immigration lawyers.

  14. @International Jew

    Likewise.

    Jerry and his buds didn’t exactly stick to the plan.

    • Replies: @M_Young
  15. Mr. Anon says:
    @Random bot

    The rich will pay and live like 1950 – Excellent! Everyone else is gridlocked in a virtual tar pit.

    Brazilifornia

  16. Anonymous[406] • Disclaimer says:

    The Anglo-Saxon Common Law system is built on the notion of ‘precedence’, that is previous judgements relating to similar cases more or less govern the law in future cases.
    These things have a rolling, accumulative nature. Once the public has ‘learned the trick’ of circumventing proposed infrastructure development by citing all manner of previous cases and judgements, then the body of ‘blocking’ case law only accumulates and widens in scope, and what’s more, an ever increasing number of plaintiffs become aware of the law and how they might use it to their advantage and likely win.

    • Agree: Daniel H
    • Replies: @Daniel H
  17. Speaking of infrastructure, and golf infrastructure– which is never OT here– Saint Andrew’s shoulder blade arrived at his namesake burgh in Fife. Andrew was made patron of Scotland after a saltire-in-the-sky appeared before a military victory.

    (Can you even discuss this at Free Republic? They used to ban you for contrails talk.)

    At any rate, Happy St Andrew’s, everybody!

    https://www.standrews.com/Play/Links-webcam

  18. RAZ says:

    Not excusing Jerry, but had to have been a whole lot more fun to have been governor when dad Pat was governor and CA was growing (in a good way) than when son Jerry was governor (particularly second time around).

    Pat got to BUILD great stuff. The greatest public university system in the world. A great highway system, water systems. By now isn’t much of the state budget earmarked for welfare, pensions, health care, etc?

    Course Jerry had to start building his ridiculously expensive high speed rail that Newsom had to shut down.

  19. @jtgw

    So you actually believe the US government promulgated employment figures? You know, the ones that if you work just a few hours a week, you are counted as employed? And if you are what they call a discouraged worker after you have given up trying to find work, sometimes work commensurate with your skills and experience, or sometimes pretty much any work, they don’t count you, deliberately neglecting to report on that silly old thing called the labor participation rate? Okee doke. It’s called lying with statistics, rather like that bullshit cost of living index where major costs are just unaccountably overlooked when they are cooking the books.

    I give points to the French bureaucrats for honesty, our government statisticians not so much.

    • Replies: @Jtgw
    , @Bill Jones
  20. Michelle says:

    I grew up in a truly diverse city in California. Whites, Blacks, Greeks, Portuguese,
    Jews, Chinese, Japanese, Gypsies (who stole like crazy, stereotypically), and back then, a few Indians and Mexicans. The Jews went to Hebrew school after public school and the Greeks went to Greek school, ha, ha!! Everyone spoke English. Also, all adults smoked indoors and all of thus were the better for it.

    • LOL: jim jones
  21. As an LA resident, I would unreservedly support a very particular and passenger-limited state-wide (and even international) rail project.

    A heavily secure and ICE-staffed prison rail system that transports aggressively located and collected illegal aliens all over the state 30 to 50 miles (f*** your metric system!) into Mexico and then ejects the invasive species back to the sh**hole from whence it came.

  22. @jtgw

    France’s official unemployment n°s are probably off by quite a bit on the optimistic side.

    However: you seriously believe in those 4 % you cite?

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  23. Can Californians use legal wrenches to push out some of their underclass?

  24. newrouter says:

    Pat Brown had an investment in the future named Jerry Brown. Jerry Brown has no investment in the future.

    • Agree: Laurence Whelk
  25. Alfa158 says:

    Apparently these “limits” that Brown was referring to didn’t include limits on population.

  26. M_Young says:
    @Desiderius

    Nope…Jerry definitely wanted to emulate Daddy in his later terms.

  27. @Morton's toes

    Also Jerry Brown was dating Linda Ronstadt when she was smoking hot.

    Bah. Gov. Bob Kerrey’s flame had it all over Linda. And he had one leg, and lived in Lincoln, Nebraska at the time.

    https://purpleclover.littlethings.com/entertainment/7737-debra-winger/item/bob-kerrey/

    One libertarian magazine quipped that speculation that Linda would be Jerry’s first lady was out-of-date. Considering his monastic background, she probably already was.

    • LOL: iffen
    • Replies: @Ganderson
  28. Prosa123 says:

    While France helped, even as poor a country as Morocco was able to build high speed rail.

  29. Len says:

    OT – Racial transgenderism

  30. @Almost Missouri

    Even more OT: AM, a note for you, especially since we’ve got a St Andrew’s theme already going on this thread. Thanks again for your past insights on St Andrew’s University. Daughter C did include it in her UCAS app, and she got an offer from them this week. She’s also had an offer from Durham, and has an interview next week at Oxford, so it’s down to those three.

  31. You assholes love endless suburbs. God, are you assholes.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @El Dato
    , @Ganderson
  32. anon[252] • Disclaimer says:

    This was made semi-explicit under Pat’s son Jerry Brown’s first term of governor in his slogan: “Era of Limits.”

    Too bad Jerry didn’t decide to apply that “era of limits” to Mexicans crossing the border.

  33. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Morton's toes

    I never thought Linda was smoking hot-a great singer yes, smoking hot no. I thought Emmy was hotter in fact. She had remarkable T&A before her second kid, but you had to look carefully because she was a modest dresser.

  34. Daniel H says:
    @Anonymous

    Right now I am spending a lot of time in San Fransico – never having been there prior to 2 weeks ago – and I have been struck by how shabbily quaint – though still attractive – many San Francisco neighborhoods are. One that comes to mind is outer Richmond. If outer Richmond were in New York city every commercial establishment on Geary Blvd would have been renovted to the latest hip designs coming out of the world over and of course marginally used space such as the several greasy spoons along the blvd. wouldn’t exist at all. Over the past week I have been thinking that the reason things have stayed so quaint in San Francisco is because it must cost so much in terms of wading through, regulation, lawyering the regulation, delay and the capital that this all consumes just to get any construction/building/renovation done beyond renovating one’s kitchen to make it worth the effort. Well, it’s their city and one cannot gainsay that San Francisco has been pretty damn successful over the past 60 years or so, so more power to them. Too bad the rest of us don’t think like San Franciscans.

    • Agree: M_Young
    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Alden
  35. @Anonymous

    Many years ago, hiking in Topanga Canyon, I saw an ethereally beautiful 50-something lady with waist-length gray hair. “Who is that?” I wondered. After a few seconds, I realized: “Emmy Lou Harris.”

    Famous beauties really are beautiful.

    Long ago, my wife was touching up her makeup in the mirror of the ladies room in Barney’s department store in Manhattan. She looks next to her and says to her, “Holy cow, who is that?” It was Brooke Shields.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Known Fact
  36. Also, the Relative Quality Of Infrastructure problem. “Something needs to be done about that bridge I cross going to work. It’ll fall down anyday now!” The news announces the bridge will be worked on, with a 4 month period of 1 lane only. “Why is the DOT wasting money on that bridge? It isn’t that bad!”

  37. Kronos says:
    @JimB

    Keep in mind, many great parts of California protected itself from black incursion. After most rich liberals realized Blacks were going to be like Bill Clinton’s genital warts (an expensive, chronic, and lifelong problem) they used poor desperate Hispanics as human meat shields. There was an active choice by California liberal whites to utilize Hispanics/Latins to replace Blacks in LA, San Fran, and other nice spots. But Blacks are like energy, you can’t destroy them, only transfer the problem another “physical state” (or county.) The good places are fighting amongst each other in a high stakes game of musical chairs. Who’s gonna take care of them? No Southern (and especially Northern California county) wants to take “diversity assets” more toxic than Lehman Brothers 2008 Balance Sheet. Those that point the game out automatically lose and receive the Blacks by default. So Hispanic “inoculation” is a decent way to hedge bets.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @JimB
    , @Known Fact
  38. @Anonymous

    If you were a teenage boy and saw this and your eyes didn’t bug out your tv picture must not have been very good.

    • Agree: Old Prude
  39. Anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Arthur

    Your comment got me to googling, and it turns out that there are several handy Wikipedia pages:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._metropolitan_areas_with_large_African-American_populations

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._cities_with_large_African-American_populations

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._communities_with_African-American_majority_populations_in_2000

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_African-American_neighborhoods

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_and_territories_by_African-American_population

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Belt_(U.S._region)

    The most pertinent data seems to me to be the list of metro areas with large black populations. And indeed California cities are low: Los Angeles with only 7.1 percent, San Francisco and Sacramento with 7.0 each, San Diego with 5.1. Nationwide, the only othe single digiters are Boston (7.1) and Minneapolis-Saint Paul (7.4), Pittsburgh (8.4), San Antonio (7.2), and Seattle (5.6).

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @FPD72
  40. Anon[388] • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel H

    The way San Fran is going, they’re going to have the entire city declared a National Historic Site and use that to kick out everyone who doesn’t behave.

  41. Anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    It’s more than just looks. Attractive celebrity women can have, and this sounds silly, an electricity, an aura, a charisma and charm that zaps you. I’ve had the opportunity to be around a couple of mid-level young, attractive female Japanese singers, both of whom were probably chosen by their management companies more as great beauties who can sing than great singers who look good, and wow, they give a much greater impression in person than they give in photos and on television. They definitely, by virtue of their profession, developed a poise and way of relating to people that only enhances their beauty.

    On the other hand, there is a genuinely talented singer songwriter who I’d always thought was fairly attractive. But she was cast by Shiseido for a cosmetics commercial, to appear alongside a genuine beauty. Whoa, the contrast was brutal!

    This is an example of the difference between a far, far right Bell curve outlier and someone merely on the right tip of the Bell curve. The Nobel and Fields Prize winners, the Olympic sprinters, whatever. The world champion series in figure skating is going on now, and living in a Japanese household containing women I must watch it. The difference between the top 10 and the bottom 10 of the few dozen top-of-the-top skaters is quite apparent even to a casual observer.

  42. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anonymous

    When I was a kid, California was the place where the future happens first. And it was great!

    Now, California is the place where the future happens first. And it sucks!

  43. Mr. Anon says:
    @obwandiyag

    Suburbs are clean, orderly, law-abiding, and conducive to the upbringing of children.

    A**holes like you create ghettos, which are filthy, chaotic, lawless, and conducive to the upbringing of feral criminals.

  44. @Anon

    “The difference between the top 10 and the bottom 10 of the few dozen top-of-the-top skaters is quite apparent even to a casual observer.”

    Right. It’s funny how every four years during the Winter Olympics, over the course of a few days I suddenly become an expert on how, say, the 12th best figure skater in the world is much worse than the top 3.

  45. @Anon

    The San Fernando Valley might be the only place in America with over 25,000 blacks but no black neighborhoods. As far as I can tell, the 3% of the population that is black is just dispersed fairly randomly. It’s kind of like a TV commercial where the neighbors get together to watch the Big Game and one is black. It’s pretty nice, but not much like the rest of America.

  46. Daniel H says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I lived for decades in Astoria, Queens, New York City, Archie Bunker’s putative neighborhood. Whenever the New York Times gets all riled up about diversity and multiculturalism (about every 3 months or so) they dispatch a novice to Astoria to write-up the wonders of this invite-the-world neighborhood. But, you know what? Conspicuously absent from this neighborhood are African Americans. I mean every friggin nationality from every continent has clawed a space in this ‘hood except African Americans. Now, it isn’t the Archie Bunker’s who are refusing to rent apartments to African Americans because the Archie Bunker’s have long passed from the scence. The rental stock is entirely in the hands of east/south Europeans, south/meso American, east/south Asians and every friggin nationality in between. None of these will rent apartments to African Americans. NONE. Gays and trannies have even carved out a niche but a black man hasn’t a Chinamen’s chance of renting an aprtment in this “wonderfully diverse” ‘hood. It does suck. Bottom rail stays on the bottom.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  47. Alden says:
    @allahu akbar

    Santa Clara tech isn’t the only economic power in California. I’d say agriculture including weed is the biggest FIRE almost as big. Real estate and commercial industrial construction is massive because of the high cost of housing. Movies TV music brings in more money than SV Santa Clara tech Because of the huge population rich, middle class and prosperous because of welfare and off the books jobs, retail is enormous.

    Silicon Valley gets all the publicity. But big ag construction, real estate tourism and entertainment is bigger and will always be here.

  48. Alden says:
    @Kronos

    San Fran uses Asians to replace blacks, not Hispanics. The best thing about the Hispanic Asian is that they’re the new affirmative action government hires and crowded out the surly 😡 incompetent blacks.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Realist
  49. Kronos says:
    @Steve Sailer

    So instead of “one black per block” it’s like one every three miles?

  50. Kronos says:
    @Alden

    San Fran uses Asians to replace blacks, not Hispanics.

    Fair enough.

  51. @Mr. Anon

    Suburbs are clean, orderly, law-abiding, and conducive to the upbringing of children.

    Not suburbs of Paris.

    Nor of Jo’burg.

    Nor of St Louis.

    Nor of Los Angeles.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Alden
  52. anon[710] • Disclaimer says:

    If you lived in Long Beach, California in 1953, you were plenty excited because the vacant lot across from Circle Drive-in had finally been paved over, and Beany’s was OPEN, ready to serve, and the place was hoppin’!

    Chances are you knew at least one of the employee’s, because you went to school with him, or his brother, which was a short walk away, and he’d slide you some extra fries. The fries were fried in beef tallow, which is no longer legally allowed, and are still the best tasting fries you’ve ever eaten.

    Your parents would run into people they knew, too. Oh, there’s Mrs. Lang! She was your third grade teacher. There’s Mildred! She works at the jewelry counter at Buffums! There’s Joe! The guy who fixed your dad’s brakes. He’s dressed in a suit! Must have just gotten out of Church, like us!

    Lookit all that open space for you and your friends to adventure in on your bikes till the street lights came on!

  53. @Mr. Anon

    Whatever the cultural value of suburbs (like anything, they can be better or worse) they are expensive. They require huge investments in infrastructure such as roads, water, sewage, public transport etc.
    Where I live there is a clear move towards medium, even high density “suburbs”.

  54. @Steve Sailer

    The San Fernando Valley might be the only place in America with over 25,000 blacks but no black neighborhoods.

    St Paul has almost exactly 25,000 native blacks and nine or ten thousand Africans, but no real black neighborhoods anymore. The old Rondo Avenue which was the black Main Street sixty years ago was ripped out to make room for a freeway.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rondo_Neighborhood

    Blacks still live in the area, but nearby Frogtown was swamped with refugees and immigrants from nearly every Asian country east of the Irawaddy. Whites are present as well. It really is diverse.

    Minneapolis is much the same, except a more typical black urban zone has developed in the North sectorin recent decades. Others moved out, and were replaced by welfare-reform refugees from other Midwestern states. However, South Minneapolis makes up nearly half the city, and whites and all manner of minorities are scattered throughout. Except for the bungalow, lakeshore, and other tony areas, which are still heavily white.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    , @JRB
  55. Anon[319] • Disclaimer says:

    Sometimes, I still wonder what would have been if I had relocated from the east coast to take that job offer with the City of LA back in 1987.

  56. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Congrats to Miss LRC. It’s nice to hear when someone has no bad options.

  57. El Dato says:
    @obwandiyag

    They should definitely not be “endless” but …

    > People moving to suburbs to get away from the roaming bands of obwandiyags and/or out-of-control prices
    > obwandiyags not appreciate!

    Yeah it’s cancer. What do you propose then? Large African Pyramids in the city center?

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
  58. Realist says:
    @Alden

    San Fran uses Asians to replace blacks, not Hispanics.

    Yeah, San Francisco is a great example.

  59. @Reg Cæsar

    Can you even discuss this at Free Republic?

    lol

    They live in mortal fear that someone, somewhere may accuse them of being conspiracy theorists.

    The horror!

  60. @Reg Cæsar

    That’s why we now have … ta da! .. exurbs! Read some Paul Kersey sometime.

    In Europe it does work differently. City centers (so far?) are nice, and the diversity is out in the suburbs.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @SunBakedSuburb
  61. JimB says:
    @Kronos

    Who’s gonna take care of them?

    Certainly not the Amish. Perhaps the only way to make blacks go away is to revert to a preindustrial agrarian society requiring every member to work 12 hours a day to avoid being shunned. The only way to make Hispanics go away is to make alcohol effectively unobtainable. That might cure the homeless problem, too.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  62. Jtgw says:
    @JerseyJeffersonian

    What makes you think France’s statistics are more reliable? If America’s are underestimated it stands to reason so are France’s.

  63. @anon

    I’m trying to find James Q. Wilson’s 1969 Harper’s article about growing up in North Long Beach, where he graduated from Jordan HS in 1952.

  64. iffen says:

    Isn’t California having trouble keeping the electricity on for the simple reason that the utility regulating bodies will not allow the electric utilities to do basic ROW maintenance?

    • Replies: @Sparkon
  65. Romanian says: • Website
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Even more OT – It was the feast of St Andrew yesterday!

    • Replies: @jim jones
  66. Neoconned says:
    @anon

    The whole pt of legal pot is to tax it. If you don’t, should have just left it illegal.

    • Replies: @George Taylor
  67. @Anon

    I remember experiencing that in my twentiesI was attracted to a 9.5 woman (or so she seemed to me,) and then she was seated next to a 9.99999 with an even better BMI.

    It was disconcerting to me and my unconscious SMV calculator. I also think the 9.5 felt greatly deflated because despite having a bf she seemed to have sensed that she could not compete with the “10.”

  68. Corvinus says:

    “Most of all, the secret why “progressive” California makes so little progress is because most Californians think, not unreasonably, that California was better when they first remember it than it is today”.

    According to Who/Whom? Regardless, here is the appropriate context, Mr. Sailer. Perhaps you could have done more research and put those famed NOTICING skills to the test. Too much turkey like the rest of us?

    https://www.sacbee.com/opinion/california-forum/article219805750.html

    https://techcrunch.com/2019/02/19/why-cant-we-build-anything

    https://www.governing.com/topics/transportation-infrastructure/gov-california-transportation-roads-investment.html

  69. @Jtgw

    I don’t have hard data, but one senses that the US really games the unemployment data versus most European countries
    A US 4% number is absurd when one can survey and find that in 20% -25% of US households no one has a job in terms of how we defined it in the now remote 1980’s.
    In many European countries a man laid off two years ago remains a member of a union, and his union still advocates for his dole and other benefits

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  70. @Steve Sailer

    fwiw,

    the article is behind Harper’s paywall, as a pdf, available to anyone here with a subscription (I don’t have one.)

    There is part of a collection of essays titled On Character: Essays by James Q. Wilson online at Google Books online. The chapter Young People: The 1960s is readable and references the North Long Beach essay and repeats some his observations in the essay.

    http://tinyurl.com/vykkp9c

    https://books.google.com.sg/books?id=Qd9L2kQoxr0C&pg=PA99&lpg=PA99&dq=%22the+young+people+of+north+long+beach%22&source=bl&ots=GrO2_VFno-&sig=ACfU3U2nbxYYPthER44GI7kkEHv9GhJFCg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjz3eepyZTmAhUReysKHTt7Bk8Q6AEwA3oECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q=%22the%20young%20people%20of%20north%20long%20beach%22&f=false

  71. jim jones says:
    @Romanian

    To celebrate the feast of St Andrew:

    • Replies: @Romanian
  72. @Daniel H

    While Wikipedia agrees with you, it is unsourced. I always thought Archie lived in Corona rather than Astoria.

    a black man hasn’t a Chinamen’s chance of renting an aprtment in this “wonderfully diverse” ‘hood.

    That’s because they all live in Flushing 😉

  73. @Steve Sailer

    I have the pdf of the original. Let me know if you still need it and I will email it to you.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  74. Art Deco says:
    @JimB

    Most Americans over the age of 35 think America was better when they first remember it than it is today.

    In some respects yes, in important respects, no. The America I first remember was experiencing considerable entropy – escalating crime rates, escalating rates of welfare dependency, escalating divorce rates, escalating illegitimacy rates, ever more immodesty and vulgarity, and the degradation of religious institutions. It also had an acute problem of horrendous urban rioting. You’ve hit a plateau in regard to most of these phenomena and a partial reversal of degradation on some measures. (Property crime is no more common than it was ca. 1962, probably less so). There are some other improvements baked into everyday life that are agreeable: the air is cleaner, the coffee you drink at home and in diners is much better, cars are more durable and reliable and your dealings with car mechanics are more agreeable, you spend less time on the phone contending with busy signals, you spend less time in doctor’s waiting rooms, &c. There are acute and episodic problems which are more agreeably dealt with: a cancer diagnosis is much less likely to be a death sentence.

  75. Art Deco says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Lorain and Elyria, Ohio, where Toni Morrison grew up, are rather like that. About 17% black, but not concentrated in any part of town bar one small knot.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Steve Sailer
  76. Ganderson says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Old joke:

    Q. Why can’t Linda Ronstadt go more than 30 mph?
    A. Because she has a governor on her.

  77. Ganderson says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    General Melchett weighs in on English higher Ed:

  78. Ganderson says:
    @obwandiyag

    I don’t necessarily love the burbs. I grew up in a single family house in a neighborhood of single family houses in the city. I do get, though why people move to the outskirts, even though they may prefer a more citified existence. It begins with ‘V’ or perhaps ‘D’.

  79. KR says:
    @Morton's toes

    Yup. I read it. At age 14, though perhaps I was 13. Jr. High. Even then I thought it was hokum but so many “grown ups” were reading it — my copy was from mother — that I questioned my first response, wondering what I was missing.

    Long ago.

  80. Ganderson says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    You live there Reg, and I haven’t since 1984, but my frequent trips back (2 to 3 x per year) speak to massive changes in the urban core.
    Merriam Park, where I was raised, is much the same, but The East Side near Maryland and Arkwright, where my dad grew up and was mostly Scandinavian with a few Italians to spice up the stew (Yarusso’s still open?) is a mostly Asian ( jungle, not fancy) slum. Frogtown used to be a tidy blue collar neighborhood. Is the West Side still Mexican?

    As for Sin City- two black neighborhoods in my youth- the North Side south of 36th, or perhaps Lowry, and the area around 38th and 4th.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  81. dvorak says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Thanks again for your past insights on St Andrew’s University.

    The iSteve community is great, including our jester Tiny Duck.

    Just be sure to mark “Ignore Commenter” for Thomm.

  82. vinny says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Compton used to be one of the classiest suburbs in SoCal. Hope you find one with better luck.

  83. bomag says:
    @allahu akbar

    compared to the will of those paying the taxes in SF

    Plenty of examples where those paying the taxes have nary a say in what gets done.

  84. @Art Deco

    I don’t think I want to revert to 1950s dental care.

    • Replies: @theMann
    , @Random bot
  85. bomag says:
    @animalogic

    …they are expensive

    I’ve always liked the descriptor “monuments to conspicuous consumption.”

  86. Mr. Anon says:
    @Art Deco

    In some respects yes, in important respects, no. The America I first remember was experiencing considerable entropy – escalating crime rates, escalating rates of welfare dependency, escalating divorce rates, escalating illegitimacy rates, ever more immodesty and vulgarity, and the degradation of religious institutions. It also had an acute problem of horrendous urban rioting. You’ve hit a plateau in regard to most of these phenomena and a partial reversal of degradation on some measures.

    WTF? It was worse before when divorce rates were escalating. But now that they have reached a high stable level, it’s better? It was worse before when illegitimacy was still uncommon but increasing, but now that the rate of illegitimate births is about 40% (~30% for whites, ~75% for blacks), everything is better? It was worse when the culture was becoming more vulgar, but now that you can’t get through a single day without seeing somebody whos tatted up like a carnival attraction, and when radio advertisements and even cooking shows are full of crude sexual innuendo………..it’s better? It was worse when religious institutions were beginning to be degraded, but now that they are openly mocked, reviled, and even stifled,………….that’s better?

    And urban rioting was a problem for the cities where it happened. Elsewhere, where there were no black people, it wasn’t a problem at all. Now the problems of “urban America” can be found most everywhere.

    (Property crime is no more common than it was ca. 1962, probably less so)………………………………………………………. cars are more durable and reliable and your dealings with car mechanics are more agreeable, you spend less time on the phone contending with busy signals, you spend less time in doctor’s waiting rooms, &c.

    Sure, fewer purse snatchings. But more porch bandits. And now you can have your credit-card number, bank account number, even social security number stolen with remarkable ease and it can be sold and re-sold before you even know it. People now have to deal with all sorts of aggravating scheisse arising from the cyber economy. We spend less time listening to busy signals, but more time on hold, navigating phone-trees, dealing with “customer support” that can barely speak our language, let alone actually help us. And I would bet that total car expenses haven’t decreased since the 1970s. Cars cost alot more now in real dollars. Fewer repairs now, but major repairs cost alot more.

    Your compulsion to pontificate contrarian-wise leads you to say a lot of stupid s**t.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Anonymous
  87. theMann says:
    @jtgw

    Yes, but a first class ticket on a TGV is something else.

  88. Alden says:
    @animalogic

    Cities require the same infrastructure, plus the enormous numbers of police welfare workers school police and counselors to wrangle the herds of lowlifes.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
  89. Paul says:

    You can’t have a first-world location with a third-world population. What has happened to California is a case in point.

  90. @John Arthur

    California also has fairly generous welfare compared to states like Texas. States used to make new residents wait a certain period before they could collect welfare, but SCOTUS struck that down long ago because discrimination, or something. My late neighbor’s deadbeat niece moved from Virginia to California just for the better money.

  91. @Almost Missouri

    Thanks for the Evanston link.

    I can always use a laugh.

    I’ll check back on them in a decade, if Deus vult.

  92. @anon

    One of the things that limits the population in the Bay Area is parking. This is particularly true in the upper crust towns were home prices are sky high. By having zoning restrictions that limits density it makes around town driving and parking tolerable even if the long commutes suck. Everybody tries to avoid rush hour if possible. Most of these towns have restrictions on square footage and height keeping things flat and spread out so driving is almost a necessity, particularly if you are carrying things. When you live in the suburbs, parking at home is not an issue but when you go down to the local Starbucks / Whole Foods / CVS you can drive around in circles if it is Christmas or there is an event. Even rich people have to buy food and tooth paste. The footprint of these towns was set a long time ago so dumping in new populations in apartment buildings makes it less nice for those already living there.

  93. @John Arthur

    “I have found that economic leftism (not too far left tho) for the economy and social conservatism for everything else makes a pretty good combination.”

    Agreed. But on Unz the cranks pushing fundamentalist capitalism will never stray from their dusty ideas. They believe a mixed economy is a satanic conspiracy.

  94. Jack D says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    If you price roads at zero (“freeways”) then in a highly populated area there is basically no quantity of roads that you can provide that will fill the demand at rush hour. Highways are a staggeringly inefficient way to provide mass transit because you can only fit 200 cars on a mile of highway, which is only slightly more than the # of people who fit in 1 subway car.

    Of course, subways are impractical if they cost a billion $ per mile also. In China they build subways for $30 million/mile and even in Europe they do it for $100 million/mile. Only the US stinks this badly due to union featherbedding, poor project management, etc. A US project requires 4x the workforce of one in Europe so even if you pay the workers the same it is going to cost 4x as much even before all the other inefficiencies.

    https://www.citylab.com/transportation/2018/01/why-its-so-expensive-to-build-urban-rail-in-the-us/551408/

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  95. Sparkon says:
    @iffen

    No, I think it’s for the simple reason that California has an inefficient energy grid due to its reliance on unreliable wind and solar, if we want to talk about infrastructure, or idiocy.

    The so-called climate crisis is a globalist scam. No better evidence is needed than this morning’s “Meet the Mess” with obnoxious host Chuck Todd, who had guests John Kerry and Arnold Schwarzenegger in a segment babbling about “Word War Zero.”

    John Kerry: We are way behind on climate change

    According to Wikipedia, “Todd is a congregant in the Reform congregation of Temple Rodef Shalom in Falls Church, Virginia.

    From the Temple’s website:

    Our Capital Campaign to build A Home for the Future of Judaism has ended, and we made our goal of $16,000,000! What a ride it has been!

    Sixteen million smackers for “the Future of Judaism” from just this one Temple.

    Nice ride, if you can afford it.

    —-

    Next up:

    Tents on the Sidewalk
    (sung to the tune of the 1964 hit “Under the Boardwalk” by the Drifters)

    Oh, when the sun beats down on those panels up on the roof
    Any your bill gets so high you wish that people knew the whole truth
    Tents on the sidewalk with your family
    On a blanket with your pit bull is where you’ll be.

    Tents on the sidewalk, My girlfriend’s a fright
    Tents on the sidewalk, Keep the drugs out of sight
    Tents on the sidewalk, We’ll be staying all night
    Tents on the sidewalk, Yeah sidewalk!

    From your tent you can hear the sound of traffic going by
    With a cardboard sign you can make a few bucks if you try
    Tents on the sidewalk, where some people pee
    On a blanket with your backpack is where you’ll be.

    Somebody may want to give it a go with Infrastructure Disease to the tune of “Industrial Disease” by Dire Straits, which happens to have really great lyrics by Mark Knopfler, and I suppose that’s enough build-up to finally play a song:

    “Industrial Disease” Dire Straits, 1982

    • Replies: @Jack D
  96. @Art Deco

    I remember the gas station bathrooms of 35 years ago, and the steps down into the NYC subway. There are spots of progress.

  97. Jack D says:
    @Art Deco

    The old America was a much poorer country in many respects. Many families had only 1 car and that car was less well equipped than any car you can buy today. Not only were important safety features such as seatbelts and airbags missing but these cars had no air conditioning, only an AM radio and no power accessories – no power brakes or steering, crank windows, etc. and often a 3 speed manual transmission with very slow acceleration and poor handling and reliability. On a damp wintry day, it was less than a certain proposition whether your car would actually start or not and the lack of rustproofing meant that they would rot away in a few short years in areas where it was necessary to salt the roads in winter. Of course, this was when you could get gas for it – there were times after the ’73 energy crisis when you couldn’t even get gas (which had suddenly quadrupled in price).

    The same think was true at home – often there was no air conditioning at all. Entertainment came from a small and blurry black & white TV and a scratchy record player. Working class people could not afford air travel. Cell ph0nes and the internet did not exist so most homes had a single dial telephone. The housing built for the returning GI’s was cheaply constructed with minimal bathrooms – often only 1 tiny bathroom for the whole house. Household appliances (although often quite durable) were primitive compared to modern ones – if you wanted ice you had to fill an ice cube tray and freeze it. Microwave ovens were only owned by the rich. And so on.

  98. @Achmed E. Newman

    In California certain cities are gentrifying whilst the first ring of suburbs built in the 50s and 60s are degrading economically and shedding whites with the ability to move. The SF Bay Area and Los Angeles are exceptions. LA is its own special mess.

  99. @Steve Sailer

    Was bowling in NY one day, looked over to the next lane and it was supermodel Carol Alt, with hockey-star boyfriend Ron Greschner. It was the big-hair and leggings era and she looked just fine.

    My family was in the fashion biz, and what struck me about pro models was not just “the look” but the ability to hold that precise look for the split-second needed to get the shot.

  100. @Jack D

    Many families had only 1 car and that car was less well equipped than any car you can buy today.

    What you say is true, but lot of people today would be very happy if they could buy a “less well-equipped” car. If you took out the multiple airbags, emission controls, backup cameras, tire pressure monitor, electronic stability control, shatterproof glass, crumple zones, door beams and so on, you could sell a nice $10,000 new car at a profit. But that would be illegal.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Paco Wové
    , @Jack D
    , @Anonymous
  101. JRB says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    If you have to go multicultural as soon as possible go all the way. It’s not good to have two or three large groups in a neighbourhood, because then one or two of the new groups will have ambitions to become all powerful and will discriminate against the weaker groups. It’s much better to have 6 or 7 different groups at around 8 or 12% and about 10 / 20 groups at between 1% and 3% of the population. Nobody will then have ideas of becoming all powerful. If you have decent policing where the majority of policemen comes from the more capable groups, it can even work. If it will work forever, is however still an ungoing experiment.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @TomSchmidt
  102. I thought the reason California doesn’t get anything done regarding infrastructure is because, like NYC since the 1960s, it blows the budget on deadbeats “of color,” and thus has nothing left for infrastructure.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Alden
  103. @Kronos

    This is certainly a factor in NYC’s renaissance — African Americans are largely confined to certain relatively remote areas and do not have too much social or political power thanks to the large Hispanic, Asian and Other populations also in the stew.

    True, there are high-profile nuisances (e.g. Sharpton in his prime, and some City Council progressives now eyeing the mayoralty) — but aside from a few notorious projects NYC’s “bad” neighborhoods are a walk in the park compared to many other cities. Including some small more blackish cities right up in the Hudson Valley.

  104. Jack D says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    That sure doesn’t help but infrastructure in California also requires 4x the number of (mostly white) union labor hours as infrastructure in Europe due to union work rules and featherbedding. Instead of 1 guy working all day, 4 guys work 2 hours each day and spend the other 6 hours waiting for the guys from the other unions to set things up for them to do their job.

    And even before a shovel ever touches the ground, billions are spend on “consultants” doing “studies” of every conceivable thing which are like full employment programs for (mostly white) liberal arts grads – you have the environmental consultants (more than 1 kind), the archaeological consultant, the historical consultant, the community impact consultant, etc. And meanwhile years are going by and costs are rising. In China the same highway or railroad is already finished and done and starting to crumble while in the US they are still studying the impact on the local firefly population and waiting for the interminable lawsuits by the Sierra Club to wind their way thru the courts. If these do gooders were still in the actual employ of a foreign power it couldn’t be any worse.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Alden
  105. @Jtgw

    Well, this may be so, but at least the French didn’t transparently thumb their noses at a populace suffering from unemployment and underemployment – like here -who damn well know that these figures are bullshit, like the US government statisticians did. I am sure that the reported figures in France were at least within hailing distance of the truth, especially compared to US figures. Here in the US, those ridiculous figures are designed for the purposes of the neoliberal elites; “See, our policies are good for The People (about whom We give zero fucks), so let’s pour on the coal with more of those policies!” This is the true view of the Uniparty, and lying to our faces is par for the course.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  106. Alden says:
    @Daniel H

    Meh, it’s an Asian City now and Asians don’t pay attention to all those regulations. And most of the inspectors and enforcers are also Asians who don’t approve of the regulations either.

    Neither do the Whites, why should we?

    If the garage doors were open you’d see chicken slaughter houses and sweatshops operating in the garages. Skinny, scrawny Chinese men squatting on the floor as they behead, gut out de feather and cut up chickens right in the floor.

    You can often hear the sound of 15, 20 sewing machines coming from the houses in residence only zones.

    Between California over regulation and 4th world immigrants whose culture is do what you can get away with, the regulations can be a joke.

  107. Alden says:
    @Jack D

    Most of the workers I see working on government projects are Hispanic Indians. They work for the sub sub contractors. Some of the big construction firms are just middlemen between the client and sub sub contractors using Hispanic Indians whose women and children support the family with welfare.

    The unions aren’t White any more, mostly Hispanic and Asian.

    The rest of your post is accurate about the environmentalists and Sierra Club.

    It’s basically a fight between the construction industry and the environmental industry attorneys and activists. Non profits are one of the biggest sectors of the economy.

  108. @JimB

    There used to be an expression, “work like a (negro),” which was aimed at whites who did too much hard work. I expect that many blacks will do just fine in a pre-industrial agrarian society.

    • Replies: @JimB
  109. Alden says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    34% if the total welfare population of the country lives in California. Then there are the massive subsidies to non White immigrants and their crooked businesses.

    Add the Asian, Indian Russian Persian Armenian old people on SSI although they never put a dime into social security plus the Medicare and clogging up all the free senior Lyft, vans bus passes, free food huge percentage of immigrant kids with free breakfast and lunch as well as food stamps

    A lot of the food given away by the free food banks ends up in the convenience stores owned by 4th world immigrants. Old Chinese in San Francisco hit 5 or 6 free food banks a week and the food is resold in their convenience stores.

    It’s probably no worse than New York Illinois Mass Minnesota and other liberal states.

  110. @anon

    Chances are you knew at least one of the employees, because you went to school with him, or his brother, which was a short walk away…

    “Walk”?

  111. Neoconned says:
    @Anon

    I can’t hit the agree button but ya pretty much….the California my aunt’s and uncles moved to in the 70s and went from poor Alabama rebels to the only millionaires in our family today….

  112. Anon[710] • Disclaimer says:

    “Walk”?

    Short walk from school.

    You’re right. That was a bad sentence.

  113. @Faraday's Bobcat

    “[a] lot of people today would be very happy if they could buy a “less well-equipped” car.”

    As an acquaintance of mine said, “I don’t want a new car. I want my old car, new.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  114. Art Deco says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Your compulsion to pontificate contrarian-wise leads you to say a lot of stupid s**t

  115. Art Deco says:
    @JerseyJeffersonian

    Make numbers up if it helps you feel better. Just don’t bother the rest of us with your fantasies.

  116. @JerseyJeffersonian

    You are, of course correct. Being ancient of days, I can recall back when that nasty little shit Robert Reich as his first act as Labor Secretary in the Clinton Regime was to reduce by 20% the weighting given to “inner city”- read black, respondents. Voila! a two tenths of a point reduction in unemployment overnight,

    I’ve always liked John Williams’ Shadowstats.

    He strips out all the bullshit perpetrated to the numbers since the Carter era and the results have always seemed much more a reflection of the reality I observe than the US Govt. numbers.

    http://www.shadowstats.com/

  117. @Ganderson

    Is the West Side still Mexican?

    Yes, but the original Mexicans of a century ago are now a small minority. it’s like when the Winthrop Fleet swamped the Pilgrims.

    The non-white areas of both Twin Cities tend to be mixed, not all-this and all-that. Except for North Minneapolis, the few monoracial areas are white, and wealthy.

    Minnesota was the first state with charter schools, and is liberal with cross-district enrolment and homeschooling. That slows the white flight, because you can have educational segregation separate from residential.

  118. @JRB

    This came to mind during the Cincinnati riots. That metro area and the Twin Cities were both about 5/6 white at the time. The difference is that along the Ohio, the other sixth was almost all black. It was us-against-them.

    No Minnesota minority was over 5%, and those were internally split– native blacks and Africans, 57 varieties of Asian. That really helps with the race relations. Keeps them civil.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  119. Paul says:

    Japan looks at U.S. multicultural chaos these days and says that’s not what it wants.
    .

  120. theMann says:
    @Inquiring Mind

    Or 1950’s prostate care either.

  121. JimB says:
    @TomSchmidt

    I expect that many blacks will do just fine in a pre-industrial agrarian society.

    So long as there are white farms to raid, like in SA.

  122. Anonymous[710] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Sure, fewer purse snatchings. But more porch bandits. And now you can have your credit-card number, bank account number, even social security number stolen with remarkable ease and it can be sold and re-sold before you even know it.

    I notice a lot of the media isn’t noticing a large social sea change thanks to RING brand outside camera’s that you can get cheaply at Costco.

    When you set up the camera, RING has an App called “Neighbors” that allows you to see whatever is causing the movement to trip the camera, and record any shenanigans to upload to the “Neighbors” app, which can be viewed by everyone within a mile of your radius, as well as the local police.

    Here’s a vid of something that happened recently in my neighborhood. A delivery driver dropped off food at an apartment complex. As he was leaving, he noticed an Amazon box on another tenants doorstep, and decided to just take it for himself.

    The tenant of that property was alerted on his RING app, downloaded the video of the driver, called the driver’s company, and uploaded the video to them. The company immediately knew who the culprit was, and called their employee, informed him that he’d been videotaped, and demanded he immediately return the package, and apologize to the customer, to avoid the video being submitted to the police.

    The employee had opened the box by this time. He immediately taped it up, returned to the scene of the crime with the stolen goods, and proceeded to knock on the door of the victim, and profusely apologize for his thievery.

    One point being that some might say crime is down now, but the reason might not be due to Aristotle’s concept of “ethnos,” or a healthy sense of community. It’s more likely due to RING and the internet, which actually enables people to circle their community wagons, while still operating in a multicultural shithole.

    Conclusion: Despite or increasing level of technology to “gentle” it’s effects, multiculturalism is cultural poison. Unchecked diversity sickens a society. It breeds community distrust, because the community, disjointed by fundamental tribal interests, is no longer worthy of trust.

    Here’s the apology, thanks to RING, not “ETHNOS”:

    https://neighbors.ring.com/n/6zORo

  123. Jack D says:
    @Sparkon

    I’m not sure I really understand the relevance of Todd’s religious affiliation or the fact that they are fund raising for a new building. If he was a Presbyterian and they were raising money for a new church, how would that change anything? Or does the fact that he is (nominally) Jewish automatically taint everything that he does and says?

    • Replies: @Sparkon
  124. Alden says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The lady in the aqua T shirt is the affirmative action head of the Compton Inglewood Carson Lakewood whatever black suburb Streets and Sanitation Department

  125. Jack D says:
    @Faraday's Bobcat

    $10,000? Try $6,900, which was the price of a Nissan Tsuru (which was essentially a stripped out 1991 Nissan Sentra) in Mexico.

    https://www.autotrader.com/car-news/nissan-tsuru-sentra-time-forgot-260308

    OTOH, the Tsuru received 0 stars on its last crash test. Personally I wouldn’t be caught dead in one. You could buy a reasonable safe and well equipped car for $10,000, it just wouldn’t be brand new.

  126. Random bot [AKA "Random botnot"] says:
    @Inquiring Mind

    Truest thing ever!

  127. SafeNow says:

    I have observed, over decades, the relaxing of the performance standard in California. It is now “get it basically right.” I know where this relaxing originated, and it has been contagious across occupations and institutions. Thus, PGE, whose wires caused the fires, had gotten wire maintenance basically right. Homelessness is not addressed because, hey, nearly all streets are unaffected. The dive boat got safety basically right. And thus, this explains infrastructure. It’s almost gotten so that if one is — here comes my oft-posted trio — proficient/conscientious/fastidious, one is an outlier, and is rocking the boat for others. This is geographically contagious — how’s the “basically right” Boeing Max doing.

    • Replies: @Random bot
  128. @John Arthur

    California’s success as the best big state comes from the fact that it is the least Black big state in the country.

    Hispanics and blacks are like two subspecies trying to occupy the same ecological niche. For better or worse, in California the steady influx of Hispanics (the invasive species, if you will) has crowded out the blacks. The Hispanics may not be world beaters, but they are harder working, more law abiding, less political, and less hostile to whites. One shudders to think what California would be like if it were 40% black, instead of 40% Hispanic.

    Essentially, California is the most reactionary, far right state when it comes to local politics, especially when it comes to zoning, but it is the most liberal at the state level for economic policies(with a pretend facsimile for racial liberalism).

    I don’t know if there is such a thing as “far right” in zoning. But it’s true that California homeowners (who make up a hugely disproportionate share of actual voters) get to have their cake and eat it too when it comes to politics. They get to increase their property values by being virulently anti-development. But at the same time they get to virtue signal that they are doing this for altruist reasons like preserving the environment, promoting “sustainability,” and opposing evil capitalist real estate developers.

    • Agree: John Arthur
    • Replies: @Chris Renner
    , @Lot
    , @danand
  129. Random bot [AKA "Random botnot"] says:
    @SafeNow

    Boeing Max

    Was the software H1-B plus offshore talent? Welcome to the future.

  130. @Anonymous

    I never thought Linda was smoking hot-a great singer yes, smoking hot no.

    Linda Ronstadt was definitely more “cute” and wholesome than “smoking” sexy. (More of a Maryanne than a Ginger, so to speak). She has an interesting family background of Mexican and German descent from one of the early settler families in Arizona.

    Linda Maria Ronstadt was born in 1946 in Tucson, Arizona, the third of four children of Gilbert Ronstadt (1911–1995), a prosperous machinery merchant who ran the F. Ronstadt Co.,[26] and Ruth Mary (Copeman) Ronstadt (1914–1982), a homemaker.[27]

    Ronstadt was raised on the family’s 10-acre (4 ha) ranch with her siblings Peter (who served as Tucson’s Chief of Police for 10 years, 1981–1991), Michael J., and Gretchen (Suzy). The family was featured in Family Circle magazine in 1953.[28]

    Linda’s father came from a pioneering Arizona ranching family[29] and was of German, English, and Mexican ancestry.[30] The family’s influence on and contributions to Arizona’s history, including wagon making, commerce, pharmacies, and music, are chronicled in the library of the University of Arizona.[31] Linda Ronstadt’s great-grandfather, graduate engineer Friedrich August Ronstadt (who went by Federico Augusto Ronstadt) emigrated to the Southwest (then a part of Mexico) in the 1840s from Hanover, Germany, and married a Mexican citizen, eventually settling in Tucson.[32][33] In 1991, the City of Tucson opened its central transit terminal on March 16 and dedicated it to Linda’s grandfather, Federico José María Ronstadt, a local pioneer businessman; he was a wagon maker whose early contribution to the city’s mobility included six mule-drawn streetcars delivered in 1903–04.[34]

    Her mother Ruth Mary, of German, English, and Dutch ancestry, was raised in Flint, Michigan. She was a daughter of Lloyd Groff Copeman, a prolific inventor and holder of many patents. Copeman, with nearly 700 patents to his name, invented an early form of the toaster, many refrigerator devices, the grease gun, the first electric stove, and an early form of the microwave oven. His flexible rubber ice cube tray earned him millions of dollars in royalties.[35] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_Ronstadt#Early_life

    Musically, her early country stuff is much better IMHO than her later FM pop that everyone knows her for.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
  131. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Faraday's Bobcat

    You can buy a new pickup truck in some countries for US $10K. It will have electronic fuel injection and meet roughly 1980s-1990s safety and emissions standards, the upholstery will be spartan, fit and finish in some cases is not up to US standards. The cheapest new pickup in the US lists out at just under $30K.

    Much of the difference is the mandate for not only front but side air bags, mandatory ABS, mandatory rear view back up camera (“if it saves just one life”…), and the constantly more tight CAFE standards that require proven and debugged engine and transmission architectures to be abandoned for ten speed automatics, CVT’s (the transmission from Hell), “gasoline direct injection” systems, cylinder deactivation, and the use of lost foam light alloy castings that are dependent on resin impregnation to fight porosity as well as being unremachinable in the field.

    The major US makers all had engines, transmissions, rear ends that were thoroughly mechanically debugged: QC flaws came down to poor assembly or rampant cost cutting misapplied. When Detroit wanted-as in the case of the Town Car, the vehicle that transported the Wall Streeters that controlled Ford’s financial future-they could make a damn reliable car.

    Also, keep in mind that Ford actually put seat belts in cars voluntarily but people did not want them and sales actually suffered, so Ford took them out. Only a tiny number of people actually wanted crashworthiness and that tiny minority bought the Swedish Volvo.

    By federally mandating a more crashworthy car, and driver self-protection systems like ABS, jackass driving has greatly increased. People do stuff in a 2019 Toyota they never would have in a car that they knew they could get killed in if they did something really stupid.

    By 1965, new cars were within an order of magnitude of modern reliability. That went down, with driveability and fuel mileage, when add-on emissions systems were tacked on and new cars were not as driveable as 1965 ones until the early 1980s. A Ford with fuel injection, EDIS and an AOD transmission was a better car than a sixties car, as was a Chevy with HEI, tuned port injection and a 700R4 or 200R4. But then they went to more and more complex systems and each time reliability went down, then back up again. Under the constant pressure of tightening standards, automakers basically had a cycle like women: every few years cars would get cranky and act odd. Then they’d get better for a while.

    2019 seems to be a heavy flow year for the industry. Even Hondas and Toyotas are down in reliability from their mid to late 2000s peak, mechanics and owners say.

    • Replies: @anon
  132. Art Deco says:
    @Houston 1992

    A US 4% number is absurd when one can survey and find that in 20% -25% of US households no one has a job in terms of how we defined it in the now remote 1980’s. In many European countries a man laid off two years ago remains a member of a union, and his union still advocates for his dole and other benefits

    You had 119 million households in this country in 2017. About 21% of these households consisted of (1) a person over 65 living alone or (2) a married couple of which at least one party was over 65 or (3) an unmarried couple of which at least one party was over 65. About 18% of the population over 65 is currently employed, so roughly 17% of all households consist of elderly persons not employed. You’ve got 8.2 million disabled workers drawing benefits; some of these are single persons living alone or are in a household with one other person. That 20% of all households do not have anyone in them working is not anomalous.

    Have no clue how you got the idea the Bureau of Labor Statistics or the Census Bureau had changed the definition of the meaning ’employed’ to make it a term of art. That aside, the employment-to-population ratio bounced around 0.566 in 1948, 0.553 in 1961, 0.579 in 1973, 0.629 in 1989, 0.644 in 2000, and 0.607 in 2019. The share of the population over 16 who were also over 65 was 10.8% in 1950, 14.3% in 1961, 14.7% in 1973, 16% in 1989, 15.7% in 2000, and 17.9% in 2019. You haven’t had any secular decline in the share of the population over 16 employed and the uptake of the working aged population has fluctuated only within a narrow band.

    Part-time workers who would prefer full-time work are not very numerous. They make up about 1.8% of all employed persons.

  133. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paco Wové

    As an acquaintance of mine said, “I don’t want a new car. I want my old car, new.”

    I want my old car better than new. Same style, same layout, but the newer tech I want without the bullshit. Add electronic ignition and EFI, replace the three speed transmission with a four speed with lockup converter, put in a full floating 9 inch rear with a Torsen diff, better electrics, Imron paint, better seats. Aftermarket stereo. Or, maybe, a OM 617 swap and a five speed manual.

    I know how to do it but I lack the physical strength and flexibility and stamina to do heavy mechanical work any more. And I can not even think about paying someone actually qualified to build one for me.

  134. anon[159] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    2019 seems to be a heavy flow year for the industry. Even Hondas and Toyotas are down in reliability from their mid to late 2000s peak, mechanics and owners say.

    Are the 19’s the first year that turns off the engine whenever the vehicle is stopping, then starts the engine back up when the driver releases the brake? I drove one this year, it is disconcerting but one can get used to it. However I wonder about starter motor longevity, extra battery capacity and engine durability, not to mention the electronics.

  135. @anon

    And that’s why the generation who grew up in such fashion went on to wreck the country for everybody else. Their idyllic childhood left them with no sense of danger.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  136. Art Deco says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    People who were juveniles in 1953 weren’t responsible for the two decades long project of replacing punishment with social work. The perpetrators of that were a generation older.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  137. MBlanc46 says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Well said, Mr Anon. Perhaps we should leave it at that and cease to feed.

  138. MBlanc46 says:
    @Art Deco

    Sure, some of the stuff is considerably fancier now than the corresponding stuff was in 1958, but the country was immeasurably better then than it is now. I’d gladly give up my mobile for the party line to have 1958 America back.

  139. MBlanc46 says:
    @Jack D

    There’s a whole lot more to life than gizmos. I’ll take the ’55 Nash, lemon though it was, and I’ll sleep outside in the summer, if I can have Eisenhower’s America back, thanks very much.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  140. Pontius says:
    @anon

    How do you break something that nice? Sad.

  141. @Art Deco

    And that’s why the generation who grew up in such fashion went on to wreck the country for everybody else. Their idyllic childhood left them with no sense of danger.

    People who were juveniles in 1953 weren’t responsible for the two decades long project of replacing punishment with social work. The perpetrators of that were a generation older.

    You can’t reason with the victims of the New Math.

    Or is it Fuzzy Math? I’ve lost count.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  142. @Art Deco

    Lorain and Elyria, Ohio, where Toni Morrison grew up, are rather like that. About 17% black, but not concentrated in any part of town bar one small knot.

    I forget which, but one of those two towns vie with St Paul’s Festival of Nations for the title of America’s oldest and largest multiethnic festival. Not so long ago, the great majority of those ethnicities were European. I visited the Carpatho-Ruthenian booth at one.

    I wonder if the sheer complexity of the white population confuses the blacks– or the whites themselves.

    You want divesity? Here’s the 2019 line-up, 17-24 Euro/non-Euro:

    2019 EXHIBITS*: Afghani, Albanian, Bangladesh, Bulgarian, Cambodian, Carpatho-Rusyn, Chinese, Colombian, Croatian, Czech & Slovak, Dutch, Egyptian, Finnish, French, Greek, Guatemalan, Hmong, Hungarian, Indian, Italian, Jamaican, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Nepalese, Pakistani , Palestinian , Peruvian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Slovenian, Sri Lankan, Sudanese, Taiwanese, Tamil, Thai, Tibetan, Turkish, Ugandan, Vietnamese.

    The bazaar booths were 38-8 outre-mer:

    2019 BAZAARS*: African American, Angolan, Bolivian, Bulgarian, Burkinabe, Cambodian, Chilean, Chinese, Chippewa, Colombian, Ecuadorian, Egyptian, Filipino, Finnish, French, German, Ghanaian, Greek, Hmong, Indian, Iranian, Japanese, Kenyan, Lakota, Malagache, Mexican, Moroccan, Mozambican, Nepalese, Nigerian, Pakistani, Peruvian, Polish, Russian, Rwandan, Scottish, Seychellois, Sri Lankan, Taiwanese, Tanzanian, Thai, Tibetan, Togolese, Turkish, Venezuelan, Vietnamese.

    Food? 11-24 E/non-E. At least the “Belgian” stand is gone. It was a scoop of vanilla n a toaster waffle, with some strawberry jam.

    2019 CAFES*: African American, American Indian, Bangladeshi, Chinese, Colombian, Czech & Slovak, Danish, Dutch, Egyptian, Filipino, Finnish, French, Greek, Hungarian, Indian, Italian, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Lebanese, Mexican, Nepalese, Nigerian, Norwegian, Palestinian, Peruvian, Polish, Somali, Sudanese, Taiwanese, Thai, Tibetan, Turkish, Ukrainian, & Vietnamese.

    https://www.festivalofnations.com

  143. @Art Deco

    Ohio has some rural blacks. I once read about some basketball player who used his millions to buy a farm and horses. Why? Because he grew up on a farm with horses in rural Ohio.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @Lot
  144. anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Karl Malone got a farm in retirement.

  145. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Congratulations to Miss Calvinist; here’s wishing her all the very best in next week’s interview.

  146. @Jack D

    Before the war, perhaps. But your description is shaded to make middle-class life in America from the Fifties to the Seventies sound like the grim, grey experience it almost certainly was in second-world, middle-income Iron Curtain countries like East Germany or Poland. Far from it. The sense of limitless possibility, the sense of things improving every year, and the sense of our lives being far, far nicer and more stylish and fun than those in any other country (even Canada) was palpable.

  147. Ganderson says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Agree with the Mary Ann vs Ginger analogy. Harris and Ronstadt did a wonderful album together called Western Wall, the Tucson Sessions.

  148. @animalogic

    You hit the nail on the head as to suburbs’ inherent weakness: they’re financially unsustainable.

    A suburban house with 100 feet of street frontage costs the same to provide with water and sewer services as 5 row houses with 20 foot fronts, but doesn’t pay anywhere near enough in taxes and fees to cover it.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    , @Anon
    , @Alden
  149. @Hypnotoad666

    And thanks to Prop 13, they don’t face the downside – increased taxes on their wildly inflated home value – that someone in another state would.

  150. Brutusale says:
    @MBlanc46

    It just struck me that your responses here were to two of our (((forward thinkers))) here at iSteve, especially apt after Jack D’s comment upthread nattering about Jews and Presbyterians!

    If you youngsters actually lived in America during the 50s-60s, you’d realize that the lack of cool stuff, other than improvements in medicine, in no way detracted from the glories of living in America then.

    Jack bemoans the lack of entertainment options in the elder days. Playing ball, pond hockey, running around in the woods with our .22s plinking cans and varmints…who had time for TV? We entertained ourselves.

  151. Sparkon says:
    @Jack D

    No. I simply find Chuck Todd obnoxious, which is my opinion, but more significantly, I see little in this college drop-out’s journalism to justify his ascent to one of the top talking head positions on the boob tube.

    Money talks.

    But I do give Mr. Todd credit for hotly challenging Pres. Trump about his claims to have seen and received tweets about thousands of Muslims celebrating in New Jersey after 9/11. It’s an interesting point, but it was just another round of Rope-a-Dope.

    Certainly, Mr. Todd didn’t bring up Mr. Trump’s own assertions on 9/11 about the Twin Towers being so strong, and his opinion that the terrorists must have had bombs:

    “When I first looked at it I couldn’t believe it because there was a hole in the steel. Remember that the width of the windows in the World Trade Center, if you were ever up there, they were quite narrow, and in between was this heavy steel.

    “I said how could a plane – even a plane, even a 767 or 747 or whatever it might have been – how could it possibly go through that steel?

    “I happen to think that they had not only a plane, but they had bombs that exploded almost simultaneously.

    https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/us-news/donald-trumps-911-bomb-theory-13227061

    According to its website, Todd’s Temple Rodef Shalom raised $16 million from donations by 1,118 temple members, meaning temple members, on average, contributed $14,311 each, which is not chicken feed.

    According to Wikipedia, Falls Church, VA where the temple is located has “… the lowest level of poverty of any independent city or county in the United States.”

    Mr. Todd lives in nearby Arlington, VA “the 5th highest-income county in the U.S. by median family income,” so I assume there are few if any homeless people living in tents on the sidewalks in either of those two wealthy communities, both of which are just 10 miles or so outside Washington D.C.

    To explain Mr. Todd’s unexpected rise to the top rank of chattering celebrities, I suggest that connections matter, and money talks.

  152. @Alden

    That’s really not a scientific answer, you know.
    https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsos.160926

    “Socio-economic related properties of a city grow faster than a linear relationship with the population, in a log–log plot, the so-called superlinear scaling. Conversely, the larger a city, the more efficient it is in the use of its infrastructure, leading to a sublinear scaling on these variables. ”

    In other words, the larger and denser a city, the lower its infrastructure costs. Crime, also, can grow super-linearly with increasing city size. The increased wealth of a city generates enough to pay for police to reduce crime so there’s still an economic benefit, but the police need to be motivated enough to be out of the donut shops. That hasn’t happened in Baltimore, recently, and its starting not to happen in NYC.

  153. @Chris Renner

    Exactly. From my response to Alden:

    “Socio-economic related properties of a city grow faster than a linear relationship with the population, in a log–log plot, the so-called superlinear scaling. Conversely, the larger a city, the more efficient it is in the use of its infrastructure, leading to a sublinear scaling on these variables.”

  154. @JRB

    Mono-ethnic neighborhoods, like Irish Charlestown and The Italian North End, fared much better at resisting destruction for the benefit of the politically-connected Bostonians, like Rappaport, who took title to much of the multi-ethnic West End, a White “slum.”

    https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1963/02/01/west-end-story/

    I’d rather be a minority in a neighborhood with a majority that can fight for its interests. Be the shabbos goy in an Orthodox Neighborhood. Frankly, the increasing political power of blacks is a good thing in this light since it helps prevent wholesale clearance on black areas, as happened in Manhattanville in NYC and Black Bottom in Detroit, with the latter “slum clearance” eventually leading to the utter devastation of all Detroit.

  155. Anon[319] • Disclaimer says:
    @Chris Renner

    A suburban house with 100 feet of street frontage costs the same to provide with water and sewer services as 5 row houses with 20 foot fronts, but doesn’t pay anywhere near enough in taxes and fees to cover it.

    In my city, water and sewer services (including delivery, administration, and capital) are fully funded by users of water and sewer services, not property taxes.

    • Replies: @Chris Renner
  156. @Reg Cæsar

    The New Math was a doozy.

    Everyone has a right to be Betrand Russell.

  157. @Reg Cæsar

    Those riots were twenty years ago.

    Race relations here are pretty freaking copacetic these days. Blacks are Americans. The Johnny Come Latelys and those who invited them aren’t.

  158. @Jack D

    If you price roads at zero (“freeways”) then in a highly populated area there is basically no quantity of roads that you can provide that will fill the demand at rush hour.

    Highways are a staggeringly inefficient way to provide mass transit because you can only fit 200 cars on a mile of highway, which is only slightly more than the # of people who fit in 1 subway car.

    Jack, the first statement–“no quanity”–is false. Well unless you take “highly populated” to mean densities like NYC and you specifically bar stacking roads vertically.

    No argument that roads with cars are wildly space inefficient compared to what you can achieve with rail transit. Nor that people like the point-to-point of cars and will opt for that if they have a car, gas is cheap and the commute isn’t too painful.

    But as a mathematical point there is some level of road capacity that handles peak rush hour. Our retirement home is in such an area. At rush hour there are a bunch of cars on the roads, but traffic moves along just fine.

    Los Angeles has a density of 8000/sq mi. That’s dense, but nothing like NYC, or even your own Philly. In 1970 when the freeways were pretty much in place it was only 5600–a much more suburban density. And the region’s growth is much greater, which creates more longer regional commutes, that are consuming relatively more freeway capacity.

    If you sent home everyone who is an immigrant or child of immigrants arrived since 1970, i think the freeways would become dramatically less congested. (My kids couldn’t live there by hey … that’s life.) Of course, that isn’t the Los Angeles that would exist now. Absent immigration more California natives would have stayed on, and more non-Californian US natives would have come. One of the evils of immigration is taking away nice places from Americans that are their birthright.

    Anyway the point is there isn’t any necessity to congestion. It’s a matter of population and road capacity. I’m very much not saying that’s the way everything should be organized–i’m in favor of a mix, some places high density, with housing near jobs and with rail transit, some places low density and suburban. (Free people can work out what they want.) But there is no natural bar to open roads. They are just very hard–and ridiculously expensive–to maintain when the program is allowing millions of people to flow into the US, pushing America away from its heritage of open space to Asian style crowding.

  159. @Mr. Anon

    Like I said. You have just proved yourself to be an asshole. I will not lower myself to give you any more concrete an answer because that would be worse than throwing pearls before swine.

  160. @El Dato

    You are the classic kind of fool chump this blog makes its money on.

    You think because something IS, that’s the way it has to be. Can’t see past the tip of your own ignorant self-satisfied nose.

  161. @Jack D

    Yep, technological and productivity improvements have raised the material living standard. Especially in what you’d broadly call “IT”. The Internet alone–access to information and ability to communicate, do banking, pay bills, book flights, figure stuff out without a lot of wasted running around–is at least half of what’s better. And that underlying tech has improved other products–cars, airplanes, etc.–both directly and through better design and better industrial and service operation.

    Meanwhile social conditions … regression.

    Basically the engineers, the STEM people, have done their jobs well. While our parasitic elites, the verbalists, have spewed nonsense and created an utter disaster.

  162. @animalogic

    Oh, my god. Somebody on here who is actually informed, instead of just making crap up out of its own head and acting like its own clueless lie of a life is somehow the arbiter of all that is truth.

    You forget the investment in land. This is what I most object to. Where I live, the most fertile farmland in the US is being destroyed forever by endless McMansions and condos. Such issues are absolutely beyond the peabrains of the rest of these high-IQ-worshipping, low-IQ filth.

    • Replies: @donvonburg
  163. @John Arthur

    California’s success as the best big state…

    From what year are you posting this comment?

  164. @Reg Cæsar

    (Can you even discuss this at Free Republic? They used to ban you for contrails talk.)

    There is simply no way that Free Republic could possibly still exist. You must be lying, for some peculiar reason.

  165. anon[710] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    The same think was true at home – often there was no air conditioning at all. Entertainment came from a small and blurry black & white TV and a scratchy record player. Working class people could not afford air travel. Cell ph0nes and the internet did not exist so most homes had a single dial telephone. The housing built for the returning GI’s was cheaply constructed with minimal bathrooms – often only 1 tiny bathroom for the whole house. Household appliances (although often quite durable) were primitive compared to modern ones – if you wanted ice you had to fill an ice cube tray and freeze it. Microwave ovens were only owned by the rich. And so on.

    If my middle-class family is an indicator, you’re just all wrong, especially regarding Southern California. My parents built their home, via mortgage, in 1959, eight blocks from the beach, with an all electric kitchen that was featured in Better Homes and Gardens.

    However, the first house he bought was one of those GI specials in Lakewood, and it was well built, far from being a piece of crap, and it’s still standing and looking good today. We had an Amana microwave by 1968. Wasn’t that expensive. We used it all the time. We never had an air conditioner. We had a cabin in the local mountains, a ski boat, and my dad bought me a third hand Honda cub to tool around on as a 11 year old so he didn’t have to drive me around so much. I loved that thing.

    He achieved all this starting from nothing, doing manual labor at his own business he started, with an 8th grade education. He was about broke at 38, and died at 84 a millionaire.

    Try pulling that shit in So Cal now, friendo!

    To reiterate: Southern California in 1959… was awesome. For opportunity, and quality of life, we were hands down the best state in the Union. Anyone who implies anything contradicting that fact is out of his or her mind.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  166. @Anon

    In my city, water and sewer services (including delivery, administration, and capital) are fully funded by users of water and sewer services, not property taxes.

    That’s great if it’s true. Unfortunately, unless your city is made up entirely of traditional pre-WWII development, the water/sewer authority’s capital budget is almost certainly running a long-term deficit; there are just too many miles of pipe per user to maintain.

    Aside from that, any city – whether it’s traditional development or suburban – is going to provide services that are difficult (local streets, libraries, fire departments) or impossible (policing) to fund through user fees. And, again because of the less dense development, those services always cost more to provide in suburban development.

  167. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “ Ohio has some rural blacks.”

    They exist, but rural Ohio is one of the highest share of NonH whites in the USA. Large parts of it spanning many counties are under 1% black.

    Random example, Mercer County, population 40,000:

    “ 97.4% white, 0.4% Asian, 0.2% Pacific islander, 0.2% American Indian, 0.2% black or African American, 0.6% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.5% of the population.”

    Inside Mercer Co is a city named after a Mexican, Montezuma, Ohio. It is: “99.4% White and 0.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.2% of the population”

  168. Lot says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “ what California would be like if it were 40% black”

    Mississippi with better weather.

    “ They get to increase their property values by being virulently anti-development. But at the same time they get to virtue signal that they are doing this for altruist reasons”

    Completely true. No doubt frustrating to the landless, certain apartment developers, and Matt Yglesias. For the rest of us…

  169. California telephone poles cost more.

  170. @byrresheim

    The broadest (government) measure of unemployment (U6) is around 6.5%. U3 (the “official” unemployment) is a lie.

    John Williams calculates unemployment at 21.6%; he includes “long-term discouraged” workers which BLS no longer tracks.

    http://www.shadowstats.com/alternate_data/unemployment-charts

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  171. Art Deco says:
    @William Badwhite

    John Williams calculates unemployment at 21.6%; he includes “long-term discouraged” workers which BLS no longer tracks.

    No, John Williams makes numbers up to please himself. There are currently 158 million employed persons in this country, so his contention is that there are 43.3 million ‘unemployed”. As we speak, about 7% of the working population is over the age of 65, so let’s figure a similar share of Mr. Williams ‘unemployed’ are as well. That leaves about 40.3 million ‘unemployed’ persons of working age. There are currently about 208 million people between their 16th and 65th birthday, of whom 147 million are currently employed. So, he’s telling us that 187 million out of 208 million would be employed if we had a healthy economy. No, there has never been a time when 90% of those of working age were actually working. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has survey research available on why people make the decisions they do about their work life. Not that Williams will ever read it.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  172. Sandmich says:
    @Jack D

    Remove debt from our economy and it might depress you to see where things would stand now. We have the highest credit limit and have been abusing it with impunity.

  173. @Neoconned

    The whole pt of legal pot is to tax it. If you don’t, should have just left it illegal.

    But you shouldn’t tax it to the point your maintaining the same black market you hoped to eliminate by legalizing it. Taxes yes, but so much you create a black market, no. Cases in point.

    – The Whiskey Rebellion
    – The infamous death of Eric Garner that created such strife in Brooklyn. It was all started when NYPD officers approached Garner on suspicion of selling single cigarettes from packs without tax stamps.
    – In fact cigarette smuggling is big business in New York, there was even a Sopranos episode about it. https://www.villagevoice.com/2015/04/07/smuggled-untaxed-cigarettes-are-everywhere-in-new-york-city/

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  174. @Art Deco

    U6 is a much better estimate of “unemployment” than is U3.

    No, John Williams makes numbers up to please himself.

    Says the librarian that doesn’t provide citations for any of her blather. Williams makes a living selling his estimates and you give your pontificating away for free. To people that don’t want it. What makes you certain as to why Williams does what he does? Citation needed.

    As we speak, about 7% of the working population is over the age of 65, so let’s figure

    “lets figure”, from the same lady that whines about people making up numbers. This “why people do things” game is easy: Autistic Deco makes up numbers to please herself and to to give the appearance of being not being a grumpy cat lady.

    No, there has never been a time when 90% of those of working age were actually working.

    The librarian counters an assertion nobody made. Also, citation needed.

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics has survey research available on why people make the decisions they do about their work life.

    Do they cover why someone claiming to be male would work in a 99% female field?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  175. Alden says:
    @Chris Renner

    How about a city house with 38 ft frontage that pays $20,000 property taxes every year?

    Thinks that’s enough to support the street sidewalk, and street cleaning? . Utilities? The residents pay market value for them.

    • Replies: @Chris Renner
  176. @Alden

    How about a city house with 38 ft frontage that pays $20,000 property taxes every year?

    That’s enough to cover all of the stuff a city needs and a lot of things it doesn’t, but it’s about as representative as a middle-aged peak earner who pays $100K in income taxes every year would be to federal or state finance.

    Even in expensive Northern Virginia (where I live), the only place you’ll find such a house is Old Town Alexandria or Del Ray.

  177. Art Deco says:
    @William Badwhite

    The data can be had for free from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. If John Williams is making a living from this, he has fools for customers.

  178. Jack D says:
    @anon

    In 1970, an Amana microwave was $495 on sale, which is equivalent to around $3,250 today. I would say that’s pretty expensive. An actual equivalent microwave today costs around $139. If a microwave oven today cost $3,250 then how many people would have them in their house?

  179. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    I think I first saw a microwave oven in a house (as opposed to a jet galley or a theme park restaurant) sometime well after 1970, but by the time I was in high school, most of my friends’ families had them, though my parents were late adopters and did not buy one until after I’d left home.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  180. @Anonymous

    My parents first bought a microwave oven in 1980.

    • Replies: @black sea
  181. @obwandiyag

    Because of environmental whactivists who are liable to “discover” a snail darter, furbish lousewort, or jumping wallaby rat (and if they can’t discover it they might actually kidnap one and plant it) no sane developer will build on anything BUT plowed, disked cultivated ground.

    Crummy soil becomes fertile soil when you bring in sand, compost, hot lime, animal manure of various types, and turn it over and bring in earthworms.

    You can always burn down the McMansions and tear up the foundations and doze them over, but I’m thinking hydroponic growing will become economically viable before much of that is needed.

  182. @Jack D

    “Radarange” was the trademark of the Litton Corporation, whose core expertise was the manufacture of machinery for glassblowing and manufacturing vacuum tubes. They became a big defense avionics contractor. Tex Thornton, the founder, left a huge fortune and his widow and children endowed the Thornton School of Music at USC: his son Chuck was also famous in aviation circles as being for a long time the owner of the only T-38 Talon in civilian hands.

    They spun the microwave oven business off to Amana sometime around the late 1960s, I think. I can remember seeing Litton branded microwave ovens in various places well into the seventies.

  183. black sea says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I’m guessing late 80’s for my parents.

    A toaster oven worked just fine.

    When the quality of your life is measured in the affordability of microwave ovens, it’s time for a little agonizing reappraisal.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  184. @George Taylor

    Cigarettes are $16 a pack in NYC. They are $6 here.

  185. Romanian says: • Website
    @jim jones

    St Andre is the patron saint of Romania (the Apostle who preached the gospel here), so those Romanian bagpipers are wonderful 😉

  186. @black sea

    A toaster oven worked just fine.

    My parents were very late to switch to the microwave, believing the toaster oven was good enough.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  187. danand says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    “One shudders to think what California would be like if it were 40% black, instead of 40% Hispanic.”

    No doubt California have fewer than their fair share, but as they say, there is always hope for change.

    Choked out a Highway Patrol officer, doubt there will be charges filed.

  188. Jack D says:

    I believe the “RadarRange” trademark belonged to Raytheon, not Litton and Raytheon was the 1st to commercialize them. The early (1950s) units were even more expensive (they cost as much as a car) and required a 240V hookup and did not sell well at all. However, Litton developed the small format ovens that we used today and cut the price and sales went from 40,000 units in 1970 to 1,000,000 units in 1975.

    The magnetron was top-secret cutting edge radar technology during WWII. It was probably more important to the Allied victory than the atom bomb. And now they churn them out by the millions in Chinese factories for as little as $50 (for the whole oven – the magnetron probably only costs a couple of $).

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  189. @ScarletNumber

    My parents were very late to switch to the microwave, believing the toaster oven was good enough.

    I had a cute, but stupid, girl friend who thought microwaves debased food but who loved her toaster oven. She had other redeeming qualities, so I made no comment.

    • Replies: @Anon
  190. Anon[930] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    She was right, depending on what it is you’re trying to cook. Microwaves have pretty serious limitations and are very much not idiot-proof, as any fire department near a college is well aware.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  191. Jack D says:
    @Anon

    The big mistake is that people think of it as an oven, because it is shaped like an oven. Really it is a moist heating method like a steamer. They should have called it a microwave steamer and then people would have understood that you weren’t going to get crispy pizza or chicken out of it.

    Ideally you would have a convection oven/toaster and microwave in one box. They make combo ovens but American power outlets are limited to 1800 watts so you can’t run both functions at the same time – you have to keep switching back and forth in order not to overload the circuit and this defeats any speed advantage you would gain..

  192. Hibernian says:
    @Jack D

    It was invented by a self educated electronics genius from Maine who worked for Raytheon. It was an accidental discovery/invention. An egg he was brown bagging for lunch was cooked by the microwave radiation in the lab.

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