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Brookings: One Troublesome Fact Not to Know on World Population Day
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From the Brookings Institution:

10 useful facts to know on World Population Day

Amanda Waldron Wednesday, July 11, 2018
BROOKINGS NOW …

1. The global population is rising fast now, but is expected to peak by 2070 …

2. A majority of the world’s population could soon be middle- or upper-class …

3. China’s population is expected to age rapidly between now and 2050

4. Rapid depopulation threatens Russia’s economy

5. Egypt’s population boom could pose regional or even global dangers

6. Urban populations are declining in developed economies

7. 2016 population growth in the U.S. was the lowest in 80 years

8. Young minorities are driving much of the population growth in the United States, especially in cities

9. America’s aging population is straining the federal budget

10. If every woman in the world received a secondary education, the population could be 3 billion less by 2050

And here’s One Fact Not to Know: Africa. In this article on world population, the text string “Africa” never appears.

The “global dangers” posed by “Egypt’s population boom” are singled out, but the vast African population boom goes unmentioned.

 
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  1. Q says:

    8. Young minorities are driving much of the population growth in the United States, especially in cities

    Unfortunately, all minority groups are out-birthing whites in the US, except for the Asians, who are the only group with even lower birth rate than non-hispanic whites:

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/226292/us-fertility-rates-by-race-and-ethnicity/

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  2. anonymous[139] • Disclaimer says:

    the self-parody is reaching levels previously thought unimaginable.

  3. 2. A majority of the world’s population could soon be middle- or upper-class …

    Hmm.. how can a ‘majority be upper? or even middle? it sounds like our Globalist overlords really mean we’ll all be plebes.

    • Replies: @Excal
    , @fish
  4. To Hell with Africa. The terms “overpopulation,” “famine,” “finite resources,” etc. never occur.

    I caught part of some documentary about electricity, petroleum, farming, and similar matters vis-á-vis human effects on the planet. This part pointed out that essentially all arable land is now in use for agriculture, that something like every two and a half acres of currently produces enough food each year to feed one person, and that by about 2050 the population will be such that every two and a half acres of land will have to produce enough food annually to feed five persons. The narrator’s very next sentence was something like “Therefore we must find ways to produce even more food.” The piece continued with no mention whatsoever of the idea that the population could be made to stop growing (nevermind to decline back to some sane number).

    These people refuse to accept the idea that finite resources cannot sustain infinite consumption. They literally deny mathematics and physics able to be understood by a five-year-old.

    Oh, sure, a bit better fertiliser here, some genetically modified soy there; the production can indeed doubtless yet be increased. Stipulated and undeniable. But there is a limit. The planet’s surface is not getting any larger. Pick a year. Pick a population. 3000 A D.? Ten billion? 3050 A.D.? One trillion? No one may know the number just now. But there is a number. The powers that be and the vast majority of the schlubs, too, don’t believe that.

    They will be disabused harshly.

  5. Oh, this list is just precious in its naivete!

    I do give them a little credit for singling out Egypt as a complete demographic disaster.

    el-Sisi has done an amazing job in his tenure as President. I hope he continues on for many years in extremely robust health!

    • Replies: @anonymous
  6. Excal says:
    @I, commenter

    Those classes are not distinguished merely by their relative numbers. Each has inherent distinguishing characteristics.

    Actually, that is one of the most interesting “facts” in the list. As Don Colacho pointed out, a primary aim of socialists has always been to make everyone as middle-class as themselves — in fact, bourgeois.

  7. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon

    Gerard O’Neill showed that 1970s level technology could support more than 10 trillion people in orbital space colonies. The current infatuation with Mars, a gravity well with limited surface area, is kind of stupid given what O’Neill showed.

    • LOL: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    , @Mr. Anon
  8. 6. Urban populations are declining in developed economies

    This has been going on since Roman times. Cities have always sucked in migrants from the fecund countryside, just to keep going.

  9. 4. Rapid depopulation threatens Russia’s economy

    Russia’s “rapid depopulation” is an old American meme that just won’t die. Anatoly Karlin, who is a blogger at this site, debunked it more than once. But this idea has become part of “conventional wisdom” on Russia, and informs US foreign policy. Vice-president Biden cited it as the reason why Russia’s interests in the Ukraine should be ignored.

    http://www.unz.com/akarlin/myths-russia-demography/

    http://www.unz.com/akarlin/russias-demographic-crisis-ended/

    https://www.unz.com/akarlin/normalization-of-russias-demographics/

    • Replies: @Anon
  10. “If every woman in the world received a secondary education, the population could be 3 billion less by 2050”

    IF you want to know why schools suck so bad now, here’s your answer: they’re being used as glorified gas chambers.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Neuday
  11. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Autochthon

    Yeah, I like that it peaks in 2070 for no special reason. “Arable land used” is misleading because a lot of it is wasted or mismanaged. If Africa used modern agriculture there would be no famines.

  12. Anon[276] • Disclaimer says:

    In all fairness, this was not a “Brookings Institute White Paper.” It was a short blog post written by the 20-something web designer. She probably Googled “population facts” and Steve’s graph didn’t come up. Why might that be? Because you’d sort of have to already know how it to search for it, “world’s most important graph.”

    Steve has many talents, but SEO is not one of them. Think of it from the search engine’s point of view. If you want your stuff to come up in response to a search query, you need to put the words that the average person searching for content like yours would enter in the search box in the text, preferably in the title. Google cannot read your mind. The title is doubly important, since it usually is the thing that shows in the search results list, so if it is something unfathomable like “Ya Gotta Read This One,” ain’t nobody gonna click on it.

    This is empiracally testable with A-B testing, something that Ron should be able to implement.

    It’s hard to get writers to understand basic SEO, search engines, and impatient internet readers, so in a previous job I added a field to the post database so that there was both a title and a subtitle, and we enforced absolute literal clarity in titles, and let the writers go all snarky or cryptic in the subtitles, and displayed both on the page (we put the subtitle before the title, but in smaller type).

    You don’t want to keyword stuff, since Google will penalize you, but you do need to have the words that literally and boringly describe the post in the text and in the title. This is stupidly obviously and most people are embarassed when you point it out to them.

    If Steve wants his population stuff to be evergreen, high ranking reference material, he should create and curate and maintain a page with that information on it, and it should eventually rise in Google’s ranking, attracting the attention of lazy web writers. Think titles like “Surprising Population Fact: U.N. Says Africa to Grow to 4 Billion by Century’s End.”

  13. 10. If every woman in the world received a secondary education, the population could be 3 billion less by 2050

    If every woman in the world undertook to get a PhD in Womens Studies, world population could go to essentially zero by 2100.

    • Replies: @Gracebear
  14. @J.Ross

    Okay. So how many people can live on Earth with optimum efficiency in agriculture, use of lands, etc.? I’ll give you a hint: the answer is not ∞.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Neuday
  15. @J.Ross

    “Arable land used” is misleading because a lot of it is wasted or mismanaged. If Africa used modern agriculture there would be no famines.

    Yes, this is something I’d not quite grasped until recently. A friend of mine is working full-time in Tanzania trying to set up better ways for local farmers to get their cash crops to market. He’s remarked with some amazement at the vast quantities of fertile land that are left fallow there. If this is the case in other African countries, then there is an enormous capacity for greater productivity. Africa is really, really big.

  16. J.Ross says: • Website
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    There was a really good piece here or at vdare several months ago going into more detail. They’re still using slash and burn, they don’t work when they don’t really have to, there’s weak attention to detail and maintenance.

  17. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Autochthon

    True. But we are coming up to a question of why major resources should be allowed to be totally wasted in an age of constant environmental lip service.

  18. istevefan says:

    9. America’s aging population is straining the federal budget

    Is that true? I am not an expert on government assistance, but isn’t the biggest cost of the elderly social security? If so isn’t that something that those people have contributed to throughout their working lives? That money is supposedly theirs and the government is just holding it. How is that a strain?

    • Replies: @eah
    , @Pericles
    , @Colin Wright
  19. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    This is stupidly obviously and most people are embarassed when you point it out to them.

    Right, hoss. And you’ve never heard of search results manipulation either.

  20. I just had to look and see what reason they gave for focusing on Egypt. I suspected there might be an Israeli angle, and indeed Martin Indyk is “executive vice president” of Brookings, whatever that means.

    But Wikipedia says the biggest donor to Brookings is Qatar, and Qatar is still facing off against the quartet of Egypt, Saudi Arabia, UAE, and Bahrain. Could *that* have something to do with it?

    Finally, the Brookings article “Egypt’s population: boom then bust?” does point out that Egypt is “the largest Arab and Mediterranean country”. I find this interesting from the perspective of who will control the Mediterranean in the future.

    In fact, the secretary-general of Sarkozy’s “Union for the Mediterranean” is a senior Egyptian diplomat, Nasser Kamel. I never heard Egypt mentioned in relation to Europe’s immigration problem, I thought Libya and Turkey were the key countries; but maybe Egypt has a significance that had escaped me.

    • Replies: @Nigerian Nationalist
  21. @Desiderius

    LOL

    It does feel like that sometimes. It’s usually just hot air.

  22. @Anon

    Hey, thanks for the SEO hints, # 276. I really wanted to learn that for my blog, and my title has partial differential notation, so I doubt that helps much!

    Our host has another problem with his computer skills, or maybe it’s just a defective version of windows. His ctrl-F function – it seems to be broken. Everytime he does a search for something very relevant, such as “immigr…” in an article about the environment or politics, or, here for instance, “Africa” in an article about population changes, it DOES NOT WORK!

    Steve, did you send one of those MS error reports that goes straight to Bill Gate’s hot secretary? I’ve had good luck with those – they are one feature that at least doesn’t consistently crash the machine.

  23. eah says:
    @istevefan

    That money is supposedly theirs…

    Oh man are you ever naïve/uninformed.

    SS is just a tax, nothing more — courts have ruled that you have no inherent right to any level of benefit, or any benefits at all, no matter how much you contributed tax you paid — Congress can change the law at any time about this.

    • Replies: @eah
  24. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

  25. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    And here’s One Fact Not to Know: Africa. In this article on world population, the text string “Africa” never appears.

    I guess it is the Dark Continent once again. But this time, we are supposed to PRETEND that we don’t know. Journalistic black hole. Disappears everything, even light.

    • Replies: @kissinger
  26. Anon[338] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon

    If you can remember the name of the documentary, let us know.

  27. Anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    How deep is that fertile topsoil tho?

  28. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The guy was a doofus who destroyed a perfectly good airplane and killed himself. Let’s not glamorize a doofus.

    My sympathy for this mickey mouse airline and its insurors is tempered by the fact that if the airline had paid a decent wage they might not have had to hire doofuses. TWA and Pan Am maintenance never pulled this nonsense, and they had plenty of opportunity. If they wanted to do a barrel roll, they could, like, take flying lessons….or get someone to take them up in an aerobatic airplane…not kill themselves and wreck an airplane.

  29. Cortes says:
    @eah

    But on the other hand, we’re going to be strapping on our jet packs (or simply Jaunting) to head for infinite leisure possibilities while machines do the work…

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
  30. @Anonymous

    That’s an undeniably mature and sober assessment, Anonymous (if a little heavy on the actuarial OCD). Now forget all that, hook up some decent speakers / headphones and crank some tunes. (#21)

  31. BenKenobi says:
    @Anonymous

    Your bait is bad and you should feel bad.

  32. @J.Ross

    My friend says the biggest barriers to effective land use are structural.

    That is, there’s little to no clear individual ownership of land; it belongs to ‘the village’ or local collective. Who farms which plots of land varies from year to year at the whim of the local bigwigs, so there’s not much incentive to improve land or try to farm more than your allotment.

    My friend is pretty lefty, but he’s starting to rant more and more directly about the Afro-Marxist/warm-and-cuddly-communitarian setup in Tanzania, and the debilitating effects this has all the way down from the national government to individuals and their choices.

    • Replies: @PaulS
  33. Steve–fish, barrel.

    Nothing can come from the establishment anymore that is not narrative compliant. And now they’ve recruited from the endless supply of eagerly conforming–and otherwise useless except for their biological function–girls with BAs to very earnestly churn out narrative compliant pablum, with nary an interesting thought flittering into their little brains.

    You could be posting all day, all night and not keep up with the flow. Heck you could hire the Derb’s old assistants Mandy, Candy and Brandy to post for you and still not keep up.

    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  34. @J.Ross

    Maybe the Chinese will rationalize African agriculture after the African countries default on infrastructure loans and have give up land in exchange. The Chinese could use and feed African laborers and implement a one-child policy.

  35. @Cortes

    And maybe 3D printing synthetic food too?

  36. Anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:
    @eah

    A point – deliberately IMHO – left out of these simplistic diagrams and arguments is that children are dependent on working age adults too. Not only the direct cost to their parents, but the taxpayer cost of paying for their education – which, strangely enough, as it happens, is more or less directly equivalent to state retirement pensions in every advanced society in question.
    Therefore, in purely fiscal terms the effect of declining birthrates is neutral. That said, personal, general and corporate taxation must rise somewhat to fund health/social security.

    Considering that households are spared the expense of big families, this shouldn’t be a hard sell to the electorate.
    Also consider that 1% growth in per capita productivity – by 20th century advanced economy terms, an absurdly low figure – would double national income in 70 years, thus obviating and problems.

    The only thing that can – and *WILL* f*ck things up is Economist style massive uncontrolled third world immigration.

    [MORE]

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @eah
  37. Pericles says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Why not instead let Africans live in the ecological balance that they have had for tens of thousands of years? Tell your bleeding heart friend to go back home instead. If it works, don’t fix it.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  38. Pericles says:
    @istevefan

    It’s not like your social security is a savings account.

    Oddly enough, trying to make it more like a savings account seems to destabilize the economy. Savings cool down the economy, but not saving means society will get poorly funded retirees. Sweden has been wobbling on this question now for a decade or so.

    In the 1990s, after a crisis, we actually introduced a sustainable system for pensions, but since it reduced payouts when the funds dipped low … well, let’s just say the first time this could even theoretically have happened, a decade or so after introduction, the public outcry was too much for the politicians and it was quietly forgotten.

    It was stupid (but irresistible) to introduce ponzi ‘gibs retirement’ in the first place. Democracy at its finest.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  39. @J.Ross

    Peter Cook: “Arable land–that is, land what is capable of being tilled by Arabs.”

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  40. kissinger says:
    @Anon

    Blacks are sacred objects. They cannot be criticized or pointed out for the fear of being accused of blasphemy, I mean racism.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  41. @Mitchell Porter

    Egypt and EThiopia, both fast growing. One Nile.._

    I wonder, do Malthusians and Jew obsessives overlap?

  42. anonymous[101] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    It isn’t naivete.

  43. fish says:
    @I, commenter

    What’s your problem….they keep raising the chocolate ration!

  44. m___ says:

    The list as a whole.

    The brain of the ape must define what you throw against it. Done.

  45. “2050” Is Coming Sooner Than We Thought

    “2050” is arriving much sooner than expected. In many ways, it’s already here. Non-Hispanic Whites are already a minority among citizens 10-years-old and younger. Analysis suggests that Whites will become a minority in the United States population by 2031—almost 15 years before the census estimate—and a minority of U.S. voters by 2044, foretelling major political changes in the immediate future.

    https://nationalpolicy.institute/2018/08/17/2050-is-coming-sooner-than-we-thought/

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
  46. Flemur says:

    China’s population is expected to age rapidly between now and 2050

    Did they invent some sort of time travel?

    If so, using it to age rapidly sounds…wrong.

  47. Jeremy Grantham of investment management firm GMO writes about Africa in his latest missive “The Race of Our Lives Revisited” (pages 17-18):

    https://www.gmo.com/docs/default-source/research-and-commentary/strategies/asset-allocation/the-race-of-our-lives-revisited.pdf?sfvrsn=4

    Exhibit 20 shows the real problem with population. In a word, Africa, where such persistent policies are sadly lacking. In most of Africa fertility rates are declining, but not rapidly, nor are they forecast to decline rapidly. Indeed, in several countries rapid population growth seems to be encouraged either overtly or by inference – the obvious lack of governmental interest in reducing it.

    “The problem, as you can see clearly, is Africa. Nigeria, the biggest country in Africa by population, is a perfect case. When I was born, there were 28 million Nigerians. Today, there are about 190 million: the precise number is not known. The midrange forecast for 2100 is 780 million! In recent surveys Nigerians say that seven children is the desired family size, so they are disappointed by their actual six. Only 15% use contraception and 54% consider it immoral. In a recent poll, 74% of Nigerians said they would love to emigrate if they could, and 38% said they actually plan to try to emigrate in the next 5 years, mostly to the US or Europe. 38% of 780 million – that’s 300 million who would love to go to the US and Europe, particularly the UK, which today can feed just half of its current 66 million people – the rest of its food is imported. (The only worse country is Japan, which feeds one-third. Everyone says how economically ludicrous it is for Japan to accept a declining population, but come serious, global food troubles, and they will come, the only way for Japan to even approach internal food sufficiency is to have a much smaller population.) Nigeria is just an example; the rest of Africa is forecast to nearly quadruple its population, or try to, to 3.7 billion people by 2100. When the UN makes these forecasts, we tend to assume they are on top of agricultural issues, but based on their conclusions I strongly doubt it. Another major problem is the sensitivity of the population issue. Not nearly enough time and thought and money is spent on population growth because it’s so politically sensitive.”

  48. @Q

    Only Hispanics, really. Asian women, white women and black women are all so close to each other it hardly makes a huge difference. 2.0, 1.8, 1.7, 1.6.

  49. Big Bill says:
    @J.Ross

    A few years ago I checked the stats on “arable” land use. The UN said that only ~27% of arable land was used in Africa and ~92% of arable land was used in China.

    There’s lots of farmland for Africa, always has been, but they will have to kill and eat the the remaining wild animals.

  50. @Charles Pewitt

    I’ll believe it when I see it. 50-60 percent of Hispanics are functionally white, especially in the South. When Puerto Ricans, Cubans, lighter Mexicans and South Americans move here they usually marry non-Hispanic whites and assimilate into white communities. They are a little racially mixed but they present as white enough and are Western. Yeah, maybe it means a lot of white people will end up looking something like Chileans or Argentines 100 years from now with 10-15 percent Amerindian ancestry but there are worse outcomes- Europe faces a bigger threat.

    Now perhaps things play out differently in other regions where the white population has less confidence in itself.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  51. @Anonymous

    Mars may be small, but it’s already got water and an atmosphere (after a fashion).  And it’s empty.  Being cold and in the dark half the time might make it harder to colonize than the empty reaches above, or it might not.

  52. @Anonymous

    I suspect that this was a stunt by news-cycle manipulators associated with Q.  There’s just no way that someone without flight training is going to be able to do aerobatics like barrel rolls in an airliner (rated for something like 2.3 G max) without pulling the wings off.  This is the sort of thing that CAN be done by a hacked flight director (autopilot), though.  If so, there was no one on board the aircraft past the required manual steps like engine start.  Radio transmissions are easily generated from recordings.

    Making the aircraft a Q400 was a dog whistle of deafening volume.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @Anonymous
  53. Neuday says:
    @Desiderius

    Perhaps not gas chambers, but mass pseudo-hysterectomy theaters; by the time a women gets out of college, her uterus goes unwanted and unused.

  54. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anonymous

    O’Neill showed no such thing. He may have claimed such a thing. Space colonization boosters are notorious for spinning fanciful futures on the flimsiest of bases.

  55. Neuday says:
    @Autochthon

    Perhaps 6 billion could live quite well, 12 billion rather uncomfortably, and 15 billion in misery, all excepting those who run finance, media, and directors of the required police state, who will live rather well, regardless.

  56. “but the vast African population boom goes unmentioned”

    Maybe they don’t want to frighten us. I will bet that many people don’t know this. I’ll do my own survey soon and see what I come up with.

  57. @The Last Real Calvinist

    The White man has gone into Africa and upset the Balance of Nature. There will be a terrible price payed for this.
    The White man must immediately stop interfering in Africa. Don’t send medicine, food etc and after a few generations the African population will drop to itz natural level at about a hundred million or so.
    This is the sustainable level for Sub-Saharan Africa.
    Advise your friend to leave ASAP. Find a nice woman and have a few children. This is the best thing he can do for the world.

  58. @Pericles

    Oddly enough, trying to make it more like a savings account seems to destabilize the economy. Savings cool down the economy, but not saving means society will get poorly funded retirees.

    Yeah, it’s the transition that’s tough.

    The “savings account”–which would actually be more properly an “investment account”–would work fine. Young people are building it up–surpressing their consumption, but increasing savings available for investment. But old people are tearing their portfolio down–decreasing their investments, selling them to the young savers, but increasing consumption. Works great and is highly resilient and stable.

    It’s simply that a transition from the current pay-go–where we just tax off a big slice of working people’s consumption and give it to the seniors–is a difficult, treacherous maneuver.

  59. @Autochthon

    Q: Assume that a population doubles each time period. Assume people who understand the statistical nature of genetics calculate that in 10 full periods’ time the environment will reach maximum carrying capacity at which point it would be poised on the brink of catastrophic collapse. At what point will the danger of overpopulation register in the consciousness of the “powers that be and the vast majority of schlubs”?

    A: Never. Or not likely to.

    Since the population doubles in one time period, at the end of the ninth period there is still 50% capacity, which to a person who assumes that growth is linear, seems to offer plenty of time and room for more growth. end of 8th period = 75% capacity, 7th = 87.5% capacity and so on.

    “See? No cause for alarm, plenty of room for more. You chicken littles are always running around shrieking that the sky is falling.”

  60. Can anybody pronounce the names of the Texas players involved in that recent historic triple play?

  61. @The Last Real Calvinist

    ‘…If this is the case in other African countries, then there is an enormous capacity for greater productivity. Africa is really, really big.’

    Yes, but it would need to be intelligently farmed. Did I just put my finger on the problem?

  62. @istevefan

    ‘…That money is supposedly theirs and the government is just holding it. How is that a strain?’

    Hopefully, you’re being sarcastic.

  63. Gracebear says:
    @International Jew

    Wonderful advice for Steve. Hope he reads it and acts on it. Too many irrelevant, unclear titles on his wonderful posts.

  64. Gracebear says:
    @Anon

    I agree strongly with this post. Headlines are important, and Steve’s are too often clever but unclear. I hate to see other readers fail to follow Steve’s excellent posts because of confusing headlines.
    (My remarks earlier got posted wrongly to the wrong commentaror—my error.)

  65. Eleventh Commandment: Thou shalt not notice.

  66. Education and readily-available food stop population growth. Everybody with any sense knows this.

  67. “A majority of the world’s population could soon be middle- or upper-class”
    most of the world will be poor third worlders. desperate to get to the middle class countries.

    “Urban populations are declining in developed economies”
    it’s the reverse. urbanization is the trend. countrysides depopulate in first world nations and cities keep getting bigger, pending on them running out of room. it’s even happening in china. not a first world nation.

    “Young minorities are driving much of the population growth in the United States, especially in cities”
    how does she rectify point 6 and point 8? the european population is about to start declining, almost all the growth is from the vibrant, and when the vibrant move to first world nations, they move to…the cities

    “America’s aging population is straining the federal budget”
    weren’t a gagillion young vibrants supposed to offset that? what happened?

  68. @The Last Real Calvinist

    If this is the case in other African countries, then there is an enormous capacity for greater productivity. Africa is really, really big.

    I can tell you that this is indeed the case in the Maghreb region.

    It’s depressing to see such natural bounty go to waste.

  69. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Crew Cut Man

    Nice. Now I have to learn who Peter Cook is.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  70. PaulS says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    It’s not just Tanzania. In South Africa the Zulu king has a personal fiefdom just under the size of Belgium. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingonyama_Trust

    When the ANC recently proposed reforming land ownership to grant individual property rights to villagers he was not impressed and threatened to secede from South Africa.

    This also led to an unlikely pairing with an Afrikaner delegation to his birthday over the issue of land expropriation. Since if the government goes after Boer land, the Zulus might be next.

  71. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Felix Keverich

    Fewer people higher wages, bigger and nicer homes, less traffic more free street parking no more standing on crowded subways, What’s not to like?

    In medieval and renaissance times France was the wealthiest country in Western Europe. Only 25 million people.

    America was at it’s peak when we had 150 to 200 million.

    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
  72. anonymous[127] • Disclaimer says:
    @S. Anonyia

    The white majority of today will be replaced in 80 years with the whitish majority. America will have a majority people based on Anglo values. The upper class doesn’t have hangups about marrying browner so no barriers to completely thorough mixing.

  73. Mr. Anon says:
    @Mr. Rational

    There’s just no way that someone without flight training is going to be able to do aerobatics like barrel rolls in an airliner (rated for something like 2.3 G max) without pulling the wings off.

    A 1 G barrel roll puts no more stress on the airframe than it experiences just sitting on the ground. A reasonably smart guy who has practiced with flight simulation software could probably pull it off.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  74. Anonymous[177] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Rational

    2.5 g at rated max gross weight. That airplane was empty. Watch the film of Tex Johnson barrel rolling the Dash 80. You could have walked down the aisle and if you didn’t look out the window you would never known you were inverted.

  75. eah says:
    @Anonymous

    simplistic diagrams

    I don’t see anything “simplistic” about it since the situation is actually rather simple:

    Social Security now running a deficit; insolvency set at 2034

    Forget about “insolvency”; I have no idea what that means, fiscally — but SS outlays are funded by 1) payroll taxes (employee and employer), and 2) interest on UST debt held in the “trust fund” — ie SS is a strictly taxpayer funded program that depends on cash flow, and this cash flow is nearly 100% funded by US taxpayers — year for year there are fewer and fewer taxpayers compared to SS recipients; outlays are rising far, far faster than “income” (from taxes and “trust fund” interest) — that is a rather simple fact, wouldn’t you say?

    People like you who try to make it seem complicated are dishonest — there is simply no way to resolve the future cash flow problem of SS other than 1) raise taxes significantly, and/or 2) reduce benefit outlays, and/or 3) print money (call that ‘entitlement easing’).

    Any other suggestion is sophistry.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  76. @J.Ross

    If you want to really see Negro land management/agricultural practices, go take a Google Earth look-see at the land border of Haiti-Dominican Republic.

    Dominicans owe a great debt of gratitude to Rafael Trujillo.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  77. @Anon

    I was about 12 years old when we crossed the 200 million Rubicon, so I remember fairly well. The roads were smooth and uncongested, you could piss off your back porch in town and set off big firecrackers with impunity and you had to watch Beatles and James Bond movies or look real hard to find someone who couldn’t speak something that reasonably approached standard North American English.

  78. @Mr. Anon

    A 1 G barrel roll

    You might as well posit a fish-scaled unicorn with talon feet.  There is no such thing; you need to pull considerably more than 1 G at the pull-up or you will stall out before getting over the top of the roll.  You generally get close to 0 G over the top.

    I have flown barrel and aileron rolls.  I know whereof I speak.  They take practice.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Mr. Anon
  79. Anonymous[177] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Rational

    Yes, but you can do one with no negative G and well within a 2.5 G limit.

    What doofus Sky King actually wound up doing is another matter. Perhaps they will release flight recorder data.

  80. Mr. Anon says:
    @Mr. Rational

    I have flown barrel and aileron rolls. I know whereof I speak. They take practice.

    I don’t doubt that they do. But what were you implying? That the whole thing was faked? A “false-flag”? Is that what was being claimed by “Mr. Rational”?

  81. Mr. Anon says:
    @J.Ross

    Nice. Now I have to learn who Peter Cook is.

    He was one of the funniest men who ever lived.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kyos-M48B8U

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  82. Anon[104] • Disclaimer says:

    “The white majority of today will be replaced in 80 years with the whitish majority. America will have a majority people based on Anglo values. The upper class doesn’t have hangups about marrying browner so no barriers to completely thorough mixing.”

    That’s not correct at all. Assuming the US is still around in 80 years (doubtful), we know the following will occur:

    1. America will be predominantly non-white; Mestizo don’t count.

    2. The upperclass will be mostly white or at least light-skinned. We’ve seen this repeatedly in racially stratified societies in Central and South America. Further, the miscegenation rate among the upperclass does not suggest that we’ll have a brown elite any time soon. Most rich whites breed with other whites – sometimes Asians – but rarely blacks or Hispanics.

    3. American society will not be based on Anglo values. According to many recent polls, non-whites are increasingly disapproving of concepts such as property rights, meritocracy, capitalism, fair play, and freedom of speech; the more of them exist in the population, the fewer freedoms we’ll have. We are already seeing some of that with the left’s assault on comedy, religious freedom, and their instance on politically correct thought being promoted in movies, comics, television, and games; hell, Elizabeth Warren just suggested we start nationalizing corporations. Hm, where have we seen that before?

    *Cough, Venezuela.

    In 80 years time, the US is likely to resemble something like SA, a country that continually demeans the white minority and restricts certain types of speech as “hate speech” while tolerating the same kinds of hate speech from coalition members. It will be a very tense place to say the least. More likely than not, it will be a free for all marked by continual societal unrest and economic boom/bust cycles set off by racial redistributionist policies a la SA’s racist land grab from whites.

    Dark times ahead.

  83. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Mr. Anon

    Yes, very glad to hear about him:

    In 1961, Cook opened The Establishment, a club at 18 Greek Street in Soho in central London, presenting fellow comedians in a nightclub setting, including American Lenny Bruce. Cook said it was a satirical venue modelled on “those wonderful Berlin cabarets … which did so much to stop the rise of Hitler and prevent the outbreak of the Second World War”;[14] as a members-only venue it was outside the censorship restrictions.

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