The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Brilliant
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From The Telegraph:

Don’t call students ‘genius’ because word is associated with men, Cambridge lecturers told

Camilla Turner, education editor
12 JUNE 2017 • 7:21PM

Cambridge University examiners are told to avoid using words like “flair”, “brilliance” and “genius” when assessing students’ work because they are associated with men, an academic has revealed.

Lucy Delap, a lecturer in British history at Cambridge University, said that History tutors are discouraged from using these terms because they “carry assumptions of gender inequality”.

“Some of those words, in particular genius, have a very long intellectual history where it has long been associated with qualities culturally assumed to be male”, she said. “Some women are fine with that, but others might find it hard to see themselves in those categories”.

I don’t know if vocabulary choices have changed over the years, but when I was last in England in 1994 on a business trip, every single thing I did was called “brilliant” by my forbearing hosts. The very polite English lady who was my host at Nielsen in Oxford asked if I had any trouble getting there from Heathrow Airport.

“Well, it took me awhile to find the Hertz counter, but I stopped a bunch of people and asked and I finally found one I could understand because he had a full set of teeth.”

“Oh, brilliant!”

“And then, when I got the car, I almost got into two or three head-on collisions before I noticed something: you guys drive on the wrong side of the road!”

“Oh, brilliant, brilliant.”

“And the speedometer was broken. No way was I going 200 miles per hour.”

“Oh, brilliant, brilliant, brilliant.”

“And then I wanted to get a bag of potato chips from a vending machine, but all they had were crisps. So, I stuck a bunch of those funny Susan B. Anthony dollar coins in the slot, but the bag got stuck. So, I gave the machine a hard shove and I got not only the crisps, which, by the way, are a lot like potato chips, plus a free packet of biscuits, whatever those are.”

“Oh, brilliant, brilliant, brilliant, brilliant.”

 
Hide 179 CommentsLeave a Comment
179 Comments to "Brilliant"
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. unit472 says:

    I thought ‘genius’ and ‘brilliant’ were terms mostly applied to black mediocrities these days.

    Read More
    • Agree: NickG
    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Indeed, and here's your poster child:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gScuUkPewE
    , @cucksworth
    Ta-Nehisi Coates is a true genius. Those NFL wife beaters are brilliant.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/brilliant/#comment-1908964
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. MBlanc46 says:

    I’m in the UK at this moment. They still say “brilliant”. No one’s called me “genius” yet.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dearieme
    They still say “brilliant”

    Amazeballs: so totes yesterday.
    , @El Dato

    Earlier this week it emerged that Oxford University’s History Faculty is to allow students to sit exams at home in an attempt to close the gender gap.

    The university was criticised for the “insulting” decision, with a leading academic warning that the decision implies women are the “weaker sex”. From the start of the next academic year, the department will change its exam system to replace one of the five final-year exams with a “take-home” paper.
     
    I can't believe this liquefaction of practically anything a university stands for.

    Is this really the country of Brunel, Maxwell and Babbage?

    Now I mistrust my Oxford University Press books.
    , @Pat Boyle
    I know what you are doing wrong. It used to be that no one would call me a genius either. Then I began to socialize with some really stupid people. Problem solved.
    , @NickG
    I've just returned to Blighty after 9 months in the arse end of Africa and it's more bollocks than brilliant.

    Mind you, the weather's brilliant; we're having a heatwave. However my fellow Brits bitch like only us Pommies can when it gets much over 26°, and today was 33° (double it, take off 10% and add 32...so that's 92°f in old money), you'd think the effing Luftwaffe had returned.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. What I don’t like now is how people here in America have started using the word genius as an adjective, when what they mean is ingenious.

    “That inventor is genius!” “That’s a genius invention!”

    It sounds ghetto-child-stupid, and it’s all over the place, including among actual adults in media who should know better.

    Languages evolve. I can tell this is on the verge of becoming acceptable, dictionary-approved usage. That pisses me off, because it comes from ignorance.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Realist
    The word genius is used by the left and sometimes the right to describe someone they agree with.
    , @kihowi
    Language evolves, and often into something uglier than it used to be.

    If you don't see what I mean, read a 100 year old book and tell me English hasn't deteriorated.
    , @Moshe
    I don't think that is so new. Growing up 30 years ago in Queens, my father would often refer to something that he was very enthusiastic about as "a piece of genius!"

    You are right to dislike that usage of the term if you don't like how it's used, but my father did not interlocute very much with ghetto people and I doubt that he got it from them when so I doubt that he picked it up from them. Then again, I don't recall offhand hearing that expression from other people, so maybe he made it up.

    I personally use the word "cool" because its entry into the language happened long before I was born and also because I admire and agree with many of the attitudes and words that describe them that are common in the ghetto community. Those are often very different words than the ones that African Studies professors would have us believe are genuine ghetto words. I would imagine that being woke to transphobic bigotry is not something that arose in the deep black community, unlike something like "go easy" that they say or epitaph to someone who got killed young. That might be not the best example but I think it conveys the feeling that I appreciate and admire.

    Fist bumping however I never do. When someone puts out their fist I put out my hand to shake their hand or pat them on the shoulder saying, "Nah, I'm not black".

    Perhaps less popular'i in these quarters would be that when I speak to someone above the age of 40 with a German accent I asked where they are from. If they are from Germany, I either say "I don't speak to Germans" or, preferably, just walk away. [Yes, 40 year olds weren't there but they're mommy and daddy were and they should not exist. Younger Germans still disgust me but less so and my enjoyment in speaking with people from foreign cultures as well as loving/bonding with strangers usually overcomes my extreme distaste at the fact that they exist. In fact, when chatting up a cute bird - unless she's evidently kind such as by working with people in a hospice, or evidently 3rd generations from the enslavement and murder of my kin - if she turns out to be German I cease any masculine interest just as much as if I found out she had herpes. An irrelevant aside but perhaps of interest to people curious about other cultures.]
    , @anonitron1
    "Ingenious" suffers from sounding like it means the inverse of what it does. Same goes for "inflammable."
    , @daniel le mouche
    I agree with your comments on the word 'genius', and see plainly that it's just the tip of the iceburg. Another that bothers me is 'epic', as in, 'That festival was epic'.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    OT

    A programming conference was postponed. All the talks were to be given by men, despite a meritocratic selection process diluted with what they must have hoped would be enough social justice to avoid sexist outcomes: blind-reviewed by a panel “from a range of departments and backgrounds”, only using speakers’ information to break ties “and bring a balance”.

    But it wasn’t enough social justice: a twitteress complained about the all-male line-up. The “VP, Social Impact”, a “OG tech diversifier” and Berkeley business school lecturer on “Diversity in the Workplace” replied: “Youre right. This was a major mistake. Weve decided to postpone the conf until we can get our speaker line-up right.”

    We published a list of speakers that does not reflect the standards to which we hold ourselves. We will be postponing this event until we can deliver a more diverse slate of speakers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, The New England Patriots announced today that they are still going with an all male line up.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Cambridge University examiners are told to avoid using words like “flair”, “brilliance” and “genius” when assessing students’ work

    So MIT isn’t the only place with a lot of gushing gays in authority.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Not gay, just British.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. Spot on.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  7. There may be a reason that words like genius are associated with men. As Steve has often said, political correctness is, above all, a war on noticing.

    Read More
    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @james wilson
    It's a paradox. As the bell tolls, men comprise a disproportionately greater number at both ends of the curve, but nobodies feelings are hurt by males dominating the moron class. Not even men, the insensitive bastards.
    , @guest
    Yes, but you'd think the fact that most geniuses (or recognized geniuses; can't forget all the potential Newtons languishing in motherhood) are male would motivate them to mandate equal genius-naming. Say teachers must either call everyone a genius, or the numbers of those called geniuses by teachers must be equal by sex.

    Forbidding the use of the term altogether is conceding ground. Are progs losing their oomph? What happened to turning perception upside-down, instead of merely running away from male intellectual superiority?

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. black sea says:

    Cambridge University examiners are told to avoid using words like “flair”, “brilliance” and “genius” when assessing students’ work because they are associated with men, an academic has revealed.

    How about “fabulousness?”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    https://youtu.be/jN0GFLDijr8?t=24s
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. @black sea

    Cambridge University examiners are told to avoid using words like “flair”, “brilliance” and “genius” when assessing students’ work because they are associated with men, an academic has revealed.
     
    How about "fabulousness?"

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. tyrone says:

    OMG! you were about to be murdered! the case would then have to be solved by a quirky amateur detective ,and then made into a delightful one hour tv episode……cheers mate, pure genius that is.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  11. G Pinfold says:

    O/T but we have a serious outbreak of ‘frontlash’ in London. It is alleged that the government at all levels (except the Lord Mayoral) has taken more than 8 minutes to describe the incident as a ‘terrorist attack’.
    Everyone is on board now though, and the investigators will report back soon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Speaking to reporters, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said it was just part and parcel of living in a big city, and implored the vulnerable community of White Van Men to report any incidents of hate crime to the Met.

    "White Van Man is the man who literally keeps London moving," he said, "without him, hospitals would close for want of medical supplies, all infrastructure projects would halt, plumbers and electricians would have nowhere to store their tools. White Van Man is London, and London is White Van Man, alongside whom we proudly stand."

    , @Yak-15
    Where are the blatherings about how this white male doesn't represent all white males? Where is the fear of backlash against innocent white males?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. Modern limey lingo is hopeless. Everything is cracking. “We got some cracking avocado on toast for brekkie, t’was smashing”. “Oh I had a cracking poo this morning. Pass the crumpets pater”. :(

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Paul, watch a Claymation video of the genius inventor Wallace and his near human dog Gromit...everything is "cracking," but it is comedy genius.
    , @Anonymous
    That's Nadsat isn't it?
    , @anonymous
    Whatever happened to "smashing" and "splendid?"
    , @Lurker
    Often heard thus: "She's a cracking bird!" = "I say, what an attractive young lady!"
    , @Chrisnonymous
    The British tourist in the South: "This is some crackin' cracklin'!"
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. Realist says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    What I don't like now is how people here in America have started using the word genius as an adjective, when what they mean is ingenious.

    "That inventor is genius!" "That's a genius invention!"

    It sounds ghetto-child-stupid, and it's all over the place, including among actual adults in media who should know better.

    Languages evolve. I can tell this is on the verge of becoming acceptable, dictionary-approved usage. That pisses me off, because it comes from ignorance.

    The word genius is used by the left and sometimes the right to describe someone they agree with.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Chriscom says:

    I’m sure a Brit will weigh in but “brilliant” is till used as a general positive retort. “Brilliance,” I sense, is distinct.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker
    Brit weighing here. . .

    "Brilliant" as a general positive retort - you are correct. At one time shortened to "brill", but I've not heard that in a while. Often associated with middle/upper class speakers.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said “brilliant” all the time just to mean “good” or “OK”, as Americans did, and sometimes still say, “awesome” all the time in the same way.

    I was on a call in a computer software help-desk type of position with a lady in a facility in England. I was able to solve the problem, as I recall, and the lady said “brilliant” twice. I remember thinking, “man, they must not know much over there, as this is just a simple thing … she thinks that was a brilliant idea?” It gave me a swell head for a while, until I figured out after another call with some Englishmen that they say “brilliant” all the time over there.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said “brilliant” all the time just to mean “good” or “OK”, as Americans did, and sometimes still say, “awesome” all the time in the same way.

     

    Yes, Americans' 'Awesome!'* = Brits' 'Brilliant!'

    *'Amazing!' seems to be taking over from 'Awesome!' these days.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    You know the words that they stopped saying? "Bleigh me!" When did Brits stop saying that one?Couldn't turn on BBC classic sit coms or historical dramas and "Bleigh me!" was nearly always used, across eras as well.

    Historically, the English don't throw much away, whereas Americans have continually updated their word usage, vocabulary, slang, etc. for like, forever. Even extends into refurbishing houses, as opposed to completely tearing it down from the foundation and building a new one.

    Maybe that's because we have such vibrant diversity and for the longest time the UK did not. Now that they are catching up in immigration levels, perhaps words from diverse cultures will directly affect their slang, causing it to change more rapidly.

    After all, it's 2017, not 1817.
    , @Autochthon
    It's a versatile word with nuance based upon context and inflection for the British. (We Americans famously use dude similarly.) My immediate supervisor for three years was a charming British expatriate to America. She might use brilliant to express exasperation, anger, joy, unremarkable approval or acknowledgement (as in "okay" or "I heard and I understand")...it really is a wonderful word.
    , @2Mintzin1
    Yeah, the equivalent in upstate New York, for young people anyway, is "Perfect!" You hand the young lady cashier in a store the exact change for your purchase: "Perfect!" You hand a witness the document she has been testifying about and ask her if that is it: "Yes, perfect!"
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. kihowi says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    What I don't like now is how people here in America have started using the word genius as an adjective, when what they mean is ingenious.

    "That inventor is genius!" "That's a genius invention!"

    It sounds ghetto-child-stupid, and it's all over the place, including among actual adults in media who should know better.

    Languages evolve. I can tell this is on the verge of becoming acceptable, dictionary-approved usage. That pisses me off, because it comes from ignorance.

    Language evolves, and often into something uglier than it used to be.

    If you don’t see what I mean, read a 100 year old book and tell me English hasn’t deteriorated.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Agree. I don't know that it was always thus, though.

    I recall a survey of origins of new English words not too long ago--which I can't find now--, which said more or less that for the most of English's history, new word coinages had trickled down from the upper, more educated classes (e.g. King James Bible, Shakespeare), but that sometime in the last century (1960s?) the process had inverted and since then new coinages came mostly from the lower (and nowadays welfarist rap lyricing) classes.

    So, all in all, it's just another brick in the theme-wall of give-up-your-confident-cultural-ascendance-in-the-name-of-equality-and-lose-everything.
    , @robt
    They used too many words then, obscuring meaning.
    , @Anonym
    I hate how things have evolved too.

    However this is in part a general phenomenon when costs are lowered and the customer base expands from wealthy to middle class to poor. In the case you describe you talk about books. See also:
    Music (Classical on down)
    Air travel
    Internet
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. David says:

    “qualities culturally assumed to be male”

    Like virtue?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  18. Rob McX says:

    The adjective varies as you go up the social scale.

    Tory Home Secretary Sir William Whitelaw visiting a prison:

    Whitelaw: And what are you in for?
    Prisoner: Murder.
    Whitelaw: Splendid.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Yes, and I'm sure Sir William Whitelaw later referred to the "gentleman" he met. The term "gentleman" has acquired a new implication as it is so frequently applied to criminal suspects.

    Newsman: "The gentleman you see leaving the subway station in this surveillance video is suspected of pushing the elderly victim to her death."

    "Sir" is slightly less ominous. Homer Simpson: "For once maybe someone will call me 'sir' without adding 'you're making a scene.'"
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @G Pinfold
    O/T but we have a serious outbreak of 'frontlash' in London. It is alleged that the government at all levels (except the Lord Mayoral) has taken more than 8 minutes to describe the incident as a 'terrorist attack'.
    Everyone is on board now though, and the investigators will report back soon.

    Speaking to reporters, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said it was just part and parcel of living in a big city, and implored the vulnerable community of White Van Men to report any incidents of hate crime to the Met.

    “White Van Man is the man who literally keeps London moving,” he said, “without him, hospitals would close for want of medical supplies, all infrastructure projects would halt, plumbers and electricians would have nowhere to store their tools. White Van Man is London, and London is White Van Man, alongside whom we proudly stand.”

    Read More
    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. @Achmed E. Newman
    About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said "brilliant" all the time just to mean "good" or "OK", as Americans did, and sometimes still say, "awesome" all the time in the same way.

    I was on a call in a computer software help-desk type of position with a lady in a facility in England. I was able to solve the problem, as I recall, and the lady said "brilliant" twice. I remember thinking, "man, they must not know much over there, as this is just a simple thing ... she thinks that was a brilliant idea?" It gave me a swell head for a while, until I figured out after another call with some Englishmen that they say "brilliant" all the time over there.

    About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said “brilliant” all the time just to mean “good” or “OK”, as Americans did, and sometimes still say, “awesome” all the time in the same way.

    Yes, Americans’ ‘Awesome!’* = Brits’ ‘Brilliant!’

    *’Amazing!’ seems to be taking over from ‘Awesome!’ these days.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Yes, "amazing" and "incredible" are taking over everywhere nowadays, particularly in science-y venues, where they are especially absurd as those venues are supposed to be to make things as plausible and credible as possible, so in a sense the words' use there is an implicit admission of failure.
    , @Mr. Anon

    *’Amazing!’ seems to be taking over from ‘Awesome!’ these days.
     
    It mostly seems to be used by young women, for whom - it would seem - everything is "Amazing!".

    God, I hate that word - even more than "awesome".
    , @Autochthon
    In the military outstanding fulfills a similar rôle, meaning everything from spectacularly good to spectacularly bad. These uses are appropropriate, though: the connotation that, for example, outstanding should conventionally be positive and that using it negatively is somehow sarcastic is itself a misconstruction of the word's denotative, neutral meaning: out of the ordinary; something which stands out (for good or ill...).
    , @Flip
    Especially young women describing all their "amazing" friends.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. dearieme says:
    @MBlanc46
    I'm in the UK at this moment. They still say "brilliant". No one's called me "genius" yet.

    They still say “brilliant”

    Amazeballs: so totes yesterday.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. dearieme says:

    You may depend upon it, sir, that when I had the honour of being a Cambridge examiner, not once did “flair”, “brilliance” or “genius” escape from my pen, but often did “baloney!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Moshe
    Forgive my ignorance, but were you personally at Cambridge Examiner? And what are the things that someone in that position does?
    , @Buffalo Joe
    dearime, great you use the American spelling , not bologna.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. Charlie_U says:

    Some of my Irish colleagues use the word grand just as frequently as we Britbongs use the word brilliant.

    The Irish have got the gift of the gab, of course, so now I find myself using the word grand all the time, too.

    However, a lot of young Britbongs use the word awesome as it it were a comma. Thanks, America! :-D

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Charlie, Don't want to bring the level of comments down, but in construction we used to use the word fuck as an adjective, as in "Great, just fucking great." Or is that an adverb? I get so fucking confused.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. @Anonymous
    OT

    A programming conference was postponed. All the talks were to be given by men, despite a meritocratic selection process diluted with what they must have hoped would be enough social justice to avoid sexist outcomes: blind-reviewed by a panel "from a range of departments and backgrounds", only using speakers' information to break ties "and bring a balance".

    But it wasn't enough social justice: a twitteress complained about the all-male line-up. The "VP, Social Impact", a "OG tech diversifier" and Berkeley business school lecturer on "Diversity in the Workplace" replied: "Youre right. This was a major mistake. Weve decided to postpone the conf until we can get our speaker line-up right."


    We published a list of speakers that does not reflect the standards to which we hold ourselves. We will be postponing this event until we can deliver a more diverse slate of speakers.
     

    Anonymous, The New England Patriots announced today that they are still going with an all male line up.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous

    all male line up
     
    Brady was cut? He had so much flair!
    , @Joe Schmoe

    The New England Patriots announced today that they are still going with an all male line up.

     

    Brilliant!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. Thea says:

    The point is to keep us on our toes. They will constantly shift the goalposts until we stop appologizing and tell them to f off.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Moshe
    Yes.

    I use the word Oriental. It is a far more descriptive, as well as colorful, term than Asian.

    When using it with a group of Oriental people the first 30 seconds seem as though they are considering smashing me in the head, but once they see that I am genuinely a friendly and nice guy who means no harm but who uses terms as he wishes, we hit it off quite well.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Thea, unlike the N-word, you can feel free to spell the word fuck out. Try it, you'll feel better.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  26. @Paul Walker - Most beautiful man ever...
    Modern limey lingo is hopeless. Everything is cracking. "We got some cracking avocado on toast for brekkie, t'was smashing". "Oh I had a cracking poo this morning. Pass the crumpets pater". :(

    Paul, watch a Claymation video of the genius inventor Wallace and his near human dog Gromit…everything is “cracking,” but it is comedy genius.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  27. George S. says:

    The Brits use miles per hour.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  28. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous

    Cambridge University examiners are told to avoid using words like “flair”, “brilliance” and “genius” when assessing students’ work
     
    So MIT isn't the only place with a lot of gushing gays in authority.

    Not gay, just British.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. Dr. X says:

    Cambridge University examiners are told to avoid using words like “flair”, “brilliance” and “genius” when assessing students’ work because they are associated with men, an academic has revealed.

    “It was always the women, and above all the young ones, who were the most bigoted adherents of the Party.”

    –George Orwell

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  30. I figured after the last two years of Buzzfeed style headlines migrating to CNN with “Watch as Trevor Noah TOTALLY OWNS RACIST RETHUGLICAN” we would notice language was in decline.

    Read More
    • Agree: Abe, Chrisnonymous
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  31. jim jones says:

    What have we done to upset Steve, I thought he loved the English

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  32. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Paul Walker - Most beautiful man ever...
    Modern limey lingo is hopeless. Everything is cracking. "We got some cracking avocado on toast for brekkie, t'was smashing". "Oh I had a cracking poo this morning. Pass the crumpets pater". :(

    That’s Nadsat isn’t it?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  33. Brits enjoy calling people, animals and inanimate objects this word: TWAT.

    I had never heard or seen it before used to the extent that Brits use the word before spending some time on the #UKIP hashtag on Twitter. Everything to the average Brit is a twat. Nigel Farage is a twat; somebody’s dog is a twat; a bus that is late is a twat; twats everywhere to the average Brit.

    I wonder if the Queen has ever called her husband a twat.

    A person who forgot to bring ale to a function is no doubt spoken of as the brilliant twat who forgot the ale.

    Nigel Farage Is The Most Patriotic Twat In England, And He’s a Huguenot.

    #UKIP Twat example:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Charles, I thought twat was, you know, a woman's "naughty bits." Oh how I love that term, learned it here on Steve's.
    , @daniel le mouche
    I once asked a Brit why they use such a disgusting word so casually and frequently. She didn't know its actually significance (at least in American English). It was just a word to her. Similar perhaps to 'conyo' (cono with tilde) in Spanish, which is used by old ladies and everyone else, though twat certainly isn't used in polite company in England (something which hardly exists anymore).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Genius T. Coates

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  35. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Paul Walker - Most beautiful man ever...
    Modern limey lingo is hopeless. Everything is cracking. "We got some cracking avocado on toast for brekkie, t'was smashing". "Oh I had a cracking poo this morning. Pass the crumpets pater". :(

    Whatever happened to “smashing” and “splendid?”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  36. Read More
    • Replies: @slumber_j
    The great Paul Whitehouse!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. Tiny Duck says:

    You guys hear about the Russian airplane debacle

    Looks like Trump is going to lead us into war with Russia!

    Thanks all you morons who voted him in

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Tiny, plenty of time for you to flee the country. Maybe try Mexico or Canada.
    , @fish

    Private Simpson has come down with a case of hepatitis. He's the most remarkable shade of yellow.
     
    - Leonard Pitts
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  38. Coemgen says:
    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  39. El Dato says:
    @MBlanc46
    I'm in the UK at this moment. They still say "brilliant". No one's called me "genius" yet.

    Earlier this week it emerged that Oxford University’s History Faculty is to allow students to sit exams at home in an attempt to close the gender gap.

    The university was criticised for the “insulting” decision, with a leading academic warning that the decision implies women are the “weaker sex”. From the start of the next academic year, the department will change its exam system to replace one of the five final-year exams with a “take-home” paper.

    I can’t believe this liquefaction of practically anything a university stands for.

    Is this really the country of Brunel, Maxwell and Babbage?

    Now I mistrust my Oxford University Press books.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    El, I thought the British used the term "take away", not take home.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  40. Thirdtwin says:

    “Brilliant”=”Bless your heart”.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  41. @The Last Real Calvinist

    About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said “brilliant” all the time just to mean “good” or “OK”, as Americans did, and sometimes still say, “awesome” all the time in the same way.

     

    Yes, Americans' 'Awesome!'* = Brits' 'Brilliant!'

    *'Amazing!' seems to be taking over from 'Awesome!' these days.

    Yes, “amazing” and “incredible” are taking over everywhere nowadays, particularly in science-y venues, where they are especially absurd as those venues are supposed to be to make things as plausible and credible as possible, so in a sense the words’ use there is an implicit admission of failure.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Formerly CARealist
    Yes, the descriptive adjectives are in short supply these days. Please, someone create a nice list of good adjectives to use and do not include amazing, awesome, or perfect.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  42. When I’m answering a secretary’s questions to fill out a form, I notice they say “Perfect!” after each of my answers. As in, “Address?”

    “143 Brook Street.”

    “Perfect!”

    It makes me feel as if I’ve been adjudged mentally retarded and in need of much praise and encouragement.

    As far as “genius,” that term is applied to nearly every successful black singer-songwriter. It’s automatically bestowed upon him if he’s blind.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  43. @Rob McX
    The adjective varies as you go up the social scale.

    Tory Home Secretary Sir William Whitelaw visiting a prison:

    Whitelaw: And what are you in for?
    Prisoner: Murder.
    Whitelaw: Splendid.

    Yes, and I’m sure Sir William Whitelaw later referred to the “gentleman” he met. The term “gentleman” has acquired a new implication as it is so frequently applied to criminal suspects.

    Newsman: “The gentleman you see leaving the subway station in this surveillance video is suspected of pushing the elderly victim to her death.”

    “Sir” is slightly less ominous. Homer Simpson: “For once maybe someone will call me ‘sir’ without adding ‘you’re making a scene.’”

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    When I had to deal with an asshole marine or sailor who outranked me, I always made a point of calling him by his rank rather than as "sir" (e.g., "yes, lieutenant" or "yes, commander"). This was my way of acknowledging that, yes, the person was in fact a lieutenant in the navy, but I did not respect him and therefore would not call him "sir" (a term of respect rather than a mere descriptive or hierarchical title).

    I still called the vast majority of officers, being decent enough folks, "sir" (or "ma'am"). I idly wondered from time to time whether the assholes noticed the phenomenon, and, if they did, whether they put two and two together about my motivation and therefore hated me the more for it....

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Haha, that Homer Simpson line is funny cause it's true! (as Homer himself is wont to say).

    I have thought the same thing (not in the military world): If someone calls me Sir, I usually figure I must be doing something wrong. "Sir, I'm gonna have to ask you to ... [whatever]!"

    BTW, to Autochthon, the comedian in your video didn't use one version of "dude" that I also hear and use the most. (can't make the sound here, of course, but it means "what the hell is wrong with you?!")
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  44. Mr. Anon says:

    To judge from what little exposure to british popular culture I have, “Brilliant” is still in common usage.

    I find modern british speech to be mostly awful. Same for their writing-style. The langauge seems to have become infantalized. And since british television abandoned RP, it all sounds low-brow and prole, or silly and twee. Not that modern american speech is much better, mind you.

    I have heard “brilliant” spoken by some young american women in the same way it is used in Britain.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  45. @kihowi
    Language evolves, and often into something uglier than it used to be.

    If you don't see what I mean, read a 100 year old book and tell me English hasn't deteriorated.

    Agree. I don’t know that it was always thus, though.

    I recall a survey of origins of new English words not too long ago–which I can’t find now–, which said more or less that for the most of English’s history, new word coinages had trickled down from the upper, more educated classes (e.g. King James Bible, Shakespeare), but that sometime in the last century (1960s?) the process had inverted and since then new coinages came mostly from the lower (and nowadays welfarist rap lyricing) classes.

    So, all in all, it’s just another brick in the theme-wall of give-up-your-confident-cultural-ascendance-in-the-name-of-equality-and-lose-everything.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RW
    Hi Missouri,

    If you remember the name or have a cite for that survey or study please respond to my comment here. Thanks.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  46. Mr. Anon says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said “brilliant” all the time just to mean “good” or “OK”, as Americans did, and sometimes still say, “awesome” all the time in the same way.

     

    Yes, Americans' 'Awesome!'* = Brits' 'Brilliant!'

    *'Amazing!' seems to be taking over from 'Awesome!' these days.

    *’Amazing!’ seems to be taking over from ‘Awesome!’ these days.

    It mostly seems to be used by young women, for whom – it would seem – everything is “Amazing!”.

    God, I hate that word – even more than “awesome”.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  47. @Achmed E. Newman
    About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said "brilliant" all the time just to mean "good" or "OK", as Americans did, and sometimes still say, "awesome" all the time in the same way.

    I was on a call in a computer software help-desk type of position with a lady in a facility in England. I was able to solve the problem, as I recall, and the lady said "brilliant" twice. I remember thinking, "man, they must not know much over there, as this is just a simple thing ... she thinks that was a brilliant idea?" It gave me a swell head for a while, until I figured out after another call with some Englishmen that they say "brilliant" all the time over there.

    You know the words that they stopped saying? “Bleigh me!” When did Brits stop saying that one?Couldn’t turn on BBC classic sit coms or historical dramas and “Bleigh me!” was nearly always used, across eras as well.

    Historically, the English don’t throw much away, whereas Americans have continually updated their word usage, vocabulary, slang, etc. for like, forever. Even extends into refurbishing houses, as opposed to completely tearing it down from the foundation and building a new one.

    Maybe that’s because we have such vibrant diversity and for the longest time the UK did not. Now that they are catching up in immigration levels, perhaps words from diverse cultures will directly affect their slang, causing it to change more rapidly.

    After all, it’s 2017, not 1817.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    It was "Blimey!" or "Gor Blimey!", which was actually a contraction of "God blind me" which sounds pretty medieval.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Yojimbo, I had always thought that was "Blimey, mate!" It's been spelled wrong in my head for a long time then.

    BTW, is Yojimbo or Zatoichi your family name? Or, is it one of those hyphenated names like those of kids whose parents both work at National Public Radio? Is up-slash the new hyphen?

    ;-}
    , @Rob McX

    Maybe that’s because we have such vibrant diversity and for the longest time the UK did not. Now that they are catching up in immigration levels, perhaps words from diverse cultures will directly affect their slang, causing it to change more rapidly.
     
    I don't think diversity affects the language much. With the exception of words for new foods and dishes, immigration has hardly changed the British vocabulary at all and doesn't seem likely to do so in the foreseeable future. Most words borrowed from languages of the sub-continent were introduced by white colonists who lived there in the days of the empire.

    It's amusing when you hear immigration enthusiasts talk of how much diversity can enhance and revitalise a country's culture. Language doesn't lie, and it shows that most innovations have their origin in the indigenous white population.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  48. BenKenobi says:

    Steve, would I be correct to think the part where you steal a packet of cookies from a vending machine is the most criminal thing you’ve done in your life?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  49. Brilliant article!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  50. @Achmed E. Newman
    About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said "brilliant" all the time just to mean "good" or "OK", as Americans did, and sometimes still say, "awesome" all the time in the same way.

    I was on a call in a computer software help-desk type of position with a lady in a facility in England. I was able to solve the problem, as I recall, and the lady said "brilliant" twice. I remember thinking, "man, they must not know much over there, as this is just a simple thing ... she thinks that was a brilliant idea?" It gave me a swell head for a while, until I figured out after another call with some Englishmen that they say "brilliant" all the time over there.

    It’s a versatile word with nuance based upon context and inflection for the British. (We Americans famously use dude similarly.) My immediate supervisor for three years was a charming British expatriate to America. She might use brilliant to express exasperation, anger, joy, unremarkable approval or acknowledgement (as in “okay” or “I heard and I understand”)…it really is a wonderful word.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  51. Luke Lea says:

    Good enough.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  52. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, The New England Patriots announced today that they are still going with an all male line up.

    all male line up

    Brady was cut? He had so much flair!

    Read More
    • Replies: @FPD72
    Considering with whom Brady is sleeping every night, I would be loathe to question his masculinity.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    anonymous, as a closet Patriots fan in WNY, I wished Tom played for the Bills.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  53. @The Last Real Calvinist

    About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said “brilliant” all the time just to mean “good” or “OK”, as Americans did, and sometimes still say, “awesome” all the time in the same way.

     

    Yes, Americans' 'Awesome!'* = Brits' 'Brilliant!'

    *'Amazing!' seems to be taking over from 'Awesome!' these days.

    In the military outstanding fulfills a similar rôle, meaning everything from spectacularly good to spectacularly bad. These uses are appropropriate, though: the connotation that, for example, outstanding should conventionally be positive and that using it negatively is somehow sarcastic is itself a misconstruction of the word’s denotative, neutral meaning: out of the ordinary; something which stands out (for good or ill…).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yeah, that word "outstanding" always reminds me of Robert Duval of the Air Cavalry unit in Apocalypse Now. When I read that, that was the first thing that came to mind.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  54. 3g4me says:

    Another British usage which I actually prefer is “clever,” particularly for a child. Instead of cooing “Aren’t you smart” at your toddler, you approvingly note he’s a “clever boy.” As with all similar British usages, this can also be used to take the piss, and I seem to recall a song from the early ’80s there that was called “Clever Trevor.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @jim jones
    I am a Software Engineer and whenever my dumb Christian neighbours ask me to sort out a PC mess I am rewarded with "Oh, you are so clever". Also my keyboard needs cleaning.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  55. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    A lot of gushing word inflation going on. Terms like ‘genius’ or ‘brilliant’ shouldn’t be tossed around like so much confetti unless warranted. And rarely if ever is it anywhere near accurate. Must be an outgrowth of the self-esteem movement where everyone is simply fabulous.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  56. @Harry Baldwin
    Yes, and I'm sure Sir William Whitelaw later referred to the "gentleman" he met. The term "gentleman" has acquired a new implication as it is so frequently applied to criminal suspects.

    Newsman: "The gentleman you see leaving the subway station in this surveillance video is suspected of pushing the elderly victim to her death."

    "Sir" is slightly less ominous. Homer Simpson: "For once maybe someone will call me 'sir' without adding 'you're making a scene.'"

    When I had to deal with an asshole marine or sailor who outranked me, I always made a point of calling him by his rank rather than as “sir” (e.g., “yes, lieutenant” or “yes, commander”). This was my way of acknowledging that, yes, the person was in fact a lieutenant in the navy, but I did not respect him and therefore would not call him “sir” (a term of respect rather than a mere descriptive or hierarchical title).

    I still called the vast majority of officers, being decent enough folks, “sir” (or “ma’am”). I idly wondered from time to time whether the assholes noticed the phenomenon, and, if they did, whether they put two and two together about my motivation and therefore hated me the more for it….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    I would think that most people of your intelligence would become officers rather than enlisted. You're not a former nuke are you?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  57. @Almost Missouri
    Yes, "amazing" and "incredible" are taking over everywhere nowadays, particularly in science-y venues, where they are especially absurd as those venues are supposed to be to make things as plausible and credible as possible, so in a sense the words' use there is an implicit admission of failure.

    Yes, the descriptive adjectives are in short supply these days. Please, someone create a nice list of good adjectives to use and do not include amazing, awesome, or perfect.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Formerly, well I came up with an amazingly awesome list. Try using good and great.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  58. Flip says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said “brilliant” all the time just to mean “good” or “OK”, as Americans did, and sometimes still say, “awesome” all the time in the same way.

     

    Yes, Americans' 'Awesome!'* = Brits' 'Brilliant!'

    *'Amazing!' seems to be taking over from 'Awesome!' these days.

    Especially young women describing all their “amazing” friends.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  59. Can they use these words if they’re being sarcastic?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  60. eah says:

    OT

    America’s addiction epidemic — She was the town’s leading heroin dealer. She was 19 years old

    An investigation found drug companies were delivering 780m painkillers into a state of just 1.8m over a five year period.

    Anything for a buck.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Njguy73
    So what blonde starlet will dye her hair to play her in the movie? I'm guessing, the chick from "Liv & Maddie."

    I have a niece who likes those Disney Channel sitcoms.
    , @Anonymous
    An autopsy revealed that Carrie Fisher had 8 drugs in her system at the time of her very sad death - 4 prescription drugs, although she didn't have a prescription for the OxyContin/Oxycodone, and 4 non-prescription (and non-OTC) drugs.
    , @Autochthon
    I'm hate-noticing more and more it's always some shady quack from Asia shilling death in these cases, just as those scum are disproportionatley prescribing marihuana in places like Mexifornia.

    Anything for a buck indeed. Because what's a dead pile of Americans to Rajagupta and Trang Fan....
    , @Paul Walker - Most beautiful man ever...
    "drug companies were delivering 780m painkillers into a state of just 1.8m over a five year period."
    That's a disgrace. :(
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  61. Njguy73 says:

    You can use “doubleplusgood.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  62. Pat Boyle says:
    @MBlanc46
    I'm in the UK at this moment. They still say "brilliant". No one's called me "genius" yet.

    I know what you are doing wrong. It used to be that no one would call me a genius either. Then I began to socialize with some really stupid people. Problem solved.

    Read More
    • LOL: Jim Don Bob
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  63. Again, again, and again again:

    Read More
    • Replies: @ricardo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B12WBTFLK0Q
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  64. robt says:
    @kihowi
    Language evolves, and often into something uglier than it used to be.

    If you don't see what I mean, read a 100 year old book and tell me English hasn't deteriorated.

    They used too many words then, obscuring meaning.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  65. Lurker says:
    @Chriscom
    I'm sure a Brit will weigh in but "brilliant" is till used as a general positive retort. "Brilliance," I sense, is distinct.

    Brit weighing here. . .

    “Brilliant” as a general positive retort – you are correct. At one time shortened to “brill”, but I’ve not heard that in a while. Often associated with middle/upper class speakers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Matra
    “Brilliant” as a general positive retort – you are correct. At one time shortened to “brill”, but I’ve not heard that in a while

    We always said "brill" growing up but now that you mention it I haven't heard it in donkey's.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  66. Lurker says:
    @Paul Walker - Most beautiful man ever...
    Modern limey lingo is hopeless. Everything is cracking. "We got some cracking avocado on toast for brekkie, t'was smashing". "Oh I had a cracking poo this morning. Pass the crumpets pater". :(

    Often heard thus: “She’s a cracking bird!” = “I say, what an attractive young lady!”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  67. 2Mintzin1 says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    About 15 years ago was when I first realized that the British said "brilliant" all the time just to mean "good" or "OK", as Americans did, and sometimes still say, "awesome" all the time in the same way.

    I was on a call in a computer software help-desk type of position with a lady in a facility in England. I was able to solve the problem, as I recall, and the lady said "brilliant" twice. I remember thinking, "man, they must not know much over there, as this is just a simple thing ... she thinks that was a brilliant idea?" It gave me a swell head for a while, until I figured out after another call with some Englishmen that they say "brilliant" all the time over there.

    Yeah, the equivalent in upstate New York, for young people anyway, is “Perfect!” You hand the young lady cashier in a store the exact change for your purchase: “Perfect!” You hand a witness the document she has been testifying about and ask her if that is it: “Yes, perfect!”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  68. @Paul Walker - Most beautiful man ever...
    Modern limey lingo is hopeless. Everything is cracking. "We got some cracking avocado on toast for brekkie, t'was smashing". "Oh I had a cracking poo this morning. Pass the crumpets pater". :(

    The British tourist in the South: “This is some crackin’ cracklin’!”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  69. ricardo says:
    @theo the kraut
    Again, again, and again again:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS37SNYjg8w

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  70. Of course, at the Average Joe level, genius is sometimes used sarcastically as a form of derision. As in:

    Mr. Swiply: “Wow! The cost of an Ivy League education is tremendous!”

    Average Joe Grabowski (who’s much more intelligent and in tune with the zeitgeist than Mr. Swiply will ever know): “No shit. Thanks for the tip, genius.”

    Mr. Swiply furrows brow condescendingly at Average Joe Grabowski in response to his impertinence; Average Joe Grabowski stares back coolly while one corner of his mouth curls up in a wry smile of derision back at Mr. Swiply.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Captain, and I use that word with distain, find another first name to disparage....you Dick.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  71. @unit472
    I thought 'genius' and 'brilliant' were terms mostly applied to black mediocrities these days.

    Indeed, and here’s your poster child:

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  72. And the speedometer was broken. No way was I going 200 miles per hour.

    Here’s where I stop smiling and nodding. Don’t modern British speedometers display km/h? Is your amiable Yankee goofball confessing to driving 125 miles an hour somewhere between Heathrow and London?

    I am gobsmacked.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist

    "And the speedometer was broken. No way was I going 200 miles per hour ...."
     
    Yeah, must be broken, because the current motor vehicle standard requires speedometers to read accurately in mph. Even in km/h, you would not be doing 200 without appearing on one of the local police car chase shows.

    Funny story, though ... the first time I took my continental rh steering car across, I didn't catch the standard speed limit explanation sign you see rolling off the boat, so I wasn't sure if limits were kph or mph ... so I was chugging along at a snail's pace for a while before I accepted that nearly all UK drivers weren't scofflaws, given the sizeable presence of speed cameras.
    , @mobi

    I am gobsmacked.
     
    You're not gobsmacked until you're litrally gobsmacked.

    ('e' intentionally omitted)

    Related - 'gobsmacked' is slowly creeping into the lexicon of the most insufferably pretentious North American hipsters.

    Along, perhaps, with the prefacing of litrally every single utterance with 'So,...', it's becoming a most reliable indicator that everything that follows is likely to be utter shite.
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    I find the frequency with which 'gobsmacked' is used *amazing*.

    It's a vulgar locution, but I hear it from middle and upper-middle class Brits.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  73. @Diversity Heretic
    There may be a reason that words like genius are associated with men. As Steve has often said, political correctness is, above all, a war on noticing.

    It’s a paradox. As the bell tolls, men comprise a disproportionately greater number at both ends of the curve, but nobodies feelings are hurt by males dominating the moron class. Not even men, the insensitive bastards.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  74. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    You know the words that they stopped saying? "Bleigh me!" When did Brits stop saying that one?Couldn't turn on BBC classic sit coms or historical dramas and "Bleigh me!" was nearly always used, across eras as well.

    Historically, the English don't throw much away, whereas Americans have continually updated their word usage, vocabulary, slang, etc. for like, forever. Even extends into refurbishing houses, as opposed to completely tearing it down from the foundation and building a new one.

    Maybe that's because we have such vibrant diversity and for the longest time the UK did not. Now that they are catching up in immigration levels, perhaps words from diverse cultures will directly affect their slang, causing it to change more rapidly.

    After all, it's 2017, not 1817.

    It was “Blimey!” or “Gor Blimey!”, which was actually a contraction of “God blind me” which sounds pretty medieval.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  75. @Autochthon
    In the military outstanding fulfills a similar rôle, meaning everything from spectacularly good to spectacularly bad. These uses are appropropriate, though: the connotation that, for example, outstanding should conventionally be positive and that using it negatively is somehow sarcastic is itself a misconstruction of the word's denotative, neutral meaning: out of the ordinary; something which stands out (for good or ill...).

    Yeah, that word “outstanding” always reminds me of Robert Duval of the Air Cavalry unit in Apocalypse Now. When I read that, that was the first thing that came to mind.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  76. Njguy73 says:
    @eah
    OT

    America's addiction epidemic -- She was the town’s leading heroin dealer. She was 19 years old

    An investigation found drug companies were delivering 780m painkillers into a state of just 1.8m over a five year period.

    Anything for a buck.

    So what blonde starlet will dye her hair to play her in the movie? I’m guessing, the chick from “Liv & Maddie.”

    I have a niece who likes those Disney Channel sitcoms.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  77. FPD72 says:
    @anonymous

    all male line up
     
    Brady was cut? He had so much flair!

    Considering with whom Brady is sleeping every night, I would be loathe to question his masculinity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous

    Considering with whom …
     
    Considering with whom? You seem to have some flair yourself.
    , @guest
    "Considering with whom Brady is sleeping every night, I would be loathe to question his masculinity"

    Huh? That's one concrete reason to question his sexuality, which goes along with masculinity. If Brady had blown out his knee in college and instead of living in the limelight with its bizarre standards of beauty he was a high school football coach, maybe he'd be married to someone resembling the female of the species. But since he isn't, questions inevitably pop up.

    Unless the reason you'd be loathe is because you fear Gisele coming after you to pick a fight. In which case I sympathize.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  78. Moshe says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    What I don't like now is how people here in America have started using the word genius as an adjective, when what they mean is ingenious.

    "That inventor is genius!" "That's a genius invention!"

    It sounds ghetto-child-stupid, and it's all over the place, including among actual adults in media who should know better.

    Languages evolve. I can tell this is on the verge of becoming acceptable, dictionary-approved usage. That pisses me off, because it comes from ignorance.

    I don’t think that is so new. Growing up 30 years ago in Queens, my father would often refer to something that he was very enthusiastic about as “a piece of genius!”

    You are right to dislike that usage of the term if you don’t like how it’s used, but my father did not interlocute very much with ghetto people and I doubt that he got it from them when so I doubt that he picked it up from them. Then again, I don’t recall offhand hearing that expression from other people, so maybe he made it up.

    I personally use the word “cool” because its entry into the language happened long before I was born and also because I admire and agree with many of the attitudes and words that describe them that are common in the ghetto community. Those are often very different words than the ones that African Studies professors would have us believe are genuine ghetto words. I would imagine that being woke to transphobic bigotry is not something that arose in the deep black community, unlike something like “go easy” that they say or epitaph to someone who got killed young. That might be not the best example but I think it conveys the feeling that I appreciate and admire.

    Fist bumping however I never do. When someone puts out their fist I put out my hand to shake their hand or pat them on the shoulder saying, “Nah, I’m not black”.

    Perhaps less popular’i in these quarters would be that when I speak to someone above the age of 40 with a German accent I asked where they are from. If they are from Germany, I either say “I don’t speak to Germans” or, preferably, just walk away. [Yes, 40 year olds weren't there but they're mommy and daddy were and they should not exist. Younger Germans still disgust me but less so and my enjoyment in speaking with people from foreign cultures as well as loving/bonding with strangers usually overcomes my extreme distaste at the fact that they exist. In fact, when chatting up a cute bird - unless she's evidently kind such as by working with people in a hospice, or evidently 3rd generations from the enslavement and murder of my kin - if she turns out to be German I cease any masculine interest just as much as if I found out she had herpes. An irrelevant aside but perhaps of interest to people curious about other cultures.]

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  79. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    You know the words that they stopped saying? "Bleigh me!" When did Brits stop saying that one?Couldn't turn on BBC classic sit coms or historical dramas and "Bleigh me!" was nearly always used, across eras as well.

    Historically, the English don't throw much away, whereas Americans have continually updated their word usage, vocabulary, slang, etc. for like, forever. Even extends into refurbishing houses, as opposed to completely tearing it down from the foundation and building a new one.

    Maybe that's because we have such vibrant diversity and for the longest time the UK did not. Now that they are catching up in immigration levels, perhaps words from diverse cultures will directly affect their slang, causing it to change more rapidly.

    After all, it's 2017, not 1817.

    Yojimbo, I had always thought that was “Blimey, mate!” It’s been spelled wrong in my head for a long time then.

    BTW, is Yojimbo or Zatoichi your family name? Or, is it one of those hyphenated names like those of kids whose parents both work at National Public Radio? Is up-slash the new hyphen?

    ;-}

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Is up-slash the new hyphen?"

    Uh, yes. Another example of American know how in grammar usage, slang, vocabulary, etc.
    After all, we spell "today" like it sounds, and not "to-day", as in "Gawn, is it REALLY this day, and all?"

    Yes, yes it is. It's today. Not yester-day, but today.

    Also don't need a hyphen for no-one, either. It's no one. Two separate words that convey the thought just fine.

    Now making nouns out of verbs? At this rate, check 'round 2117 for the Brits to try that one.

    Blimey!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  80. Moshe says:
    @dearieme
    You may depend upon it, sir, that when I had the honour of being a Cambridge examiner, not once did “flair”, “brilliance” or “genius” escape from my pen, but often did "baloney!"

    Forgive my ignorance, but were you personally at Cambridge Examiner? And what are the things that someone in that position does?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    The job involves detailed analysis of all things Cambridge.
    , @dearieme
    You set examination papers and mark the scripts. You then agree recommended degree classifications with your fellow examiners, including the External Examiner: for example you might collectively agree that the performance of candidate AP1048 is worthy of third class honours. Once the whole "class list" is agreed then you decrypt the anonymity of the candidates - so that AP1048 might turn out to be, let us say, Joseph Biden of Downing College - and you pass your de-anonymised recommendations to the Board of Examiners. If they are happy that the examiners have done their job properly then the degree list is posted on notice-boards for the candidates, and anyone strolling by, to inspect. Once upon a time the upmarket national newspapers would carry the results; I don't know whether any still do.

    As you might infer, we didn't have the system of the lecturer setting his own exam papers, or scripts being marked by people who knew which candidate's work they were reading. You'll also see that the examinations were treated as public examinations in the sense that results were not confidential. I must say I strongly approved of these habits. So I take it that they are doomed.


    N.B. This was the system a couple of decades ago ago; perhaps it's changed since then.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  81. Moshe says:
    @Thea
    The point is to keep us on our toes. They will constantly shift the goalposts until we stop appologizing and tell them to f off.

    Yes.

    I use the word Oriental. It is a far more descriptive, as well as colorful, term than Asian.

    When using it with a group of Oriental people the first 30 seconds seem as though they are considering smashing me in the head, but once they see that I am genuinely a friendly and nice guy who means no harm but who uses terms as he wishes, we hit it off quite well.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  82. @Harry Baldwin
    Yes, and I'm sure Sir William Whitelaw later referred to the "gentleman" he met. The term "gentleman" has acquired a new implication as it is so frequently applied to criminal suspects.

    Newsman: "The gentleman you see leaving the subway station in this surveillance video is suspected of pushing the elderly victim to her death."

    "Sir" is slightly less ominous. Homer Simpson: "For once maybe someone will call me 'sir' without adding 'you're making a scene.'"

    Haha, that Homer Simpson line is funny cause it’s true! (as Homer himself is wont to say).

    I have thought the same thing (not in the military world): If someone calls me Sir, I usually figure I must be doing something wrong. “Sir, I’m gonna have to ask you to … [whatever]!”

    BTW, to Autochthon, the comedian in your video didn’t use one version of “dude” that I also hear and use the most. (can’t make the sound here, of course, but it means “what the hell is wrong with you?!”)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Be careful though. Being addressed as "Sir" is also the Millennials way of saying, "You're too old to be called dude anymore. You're way past it, ha, ha, and ha!" In their usage, Sir = old and old ain't cool, hip, with it anymore. Put off being called "Sir" for as long as you can.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  83. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Very funny!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  84. @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, The New England Patriots announced today that they are still going with an all male line up.

    The New England Patriots announced today that they are still going with an all male line up.

    Brilliant!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  85. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @eah
    OT

    America's addiction epidemic -- She was the town’s leading heroin dealer. She was 19 years old

    An investigation found drug companies were delivering 780m painkillers into a state of just 1.8m over a five year period.

    Anything for a buck.

    An autopsy revealed that Carrie Fisher had 8 drugs in her system at the time of her very sad death – 4 prescription drugs, although she didn’t have a prescription for the OxyContin/Oxycodone, and 4 non-prescription (and non-OTC) drugs.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  86. I can confirm that “brilliant” was the approving word of choice for at least some parts of the British population (for instance, LSE staff) in 2015. I found it rather irritating.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  87. @dearieme
    You may depend upon it, sir, that when I had the honour of being a Cambridge examiner, not once did “flair”, “brilliance” or “genius” escape from my pen, but often did "baloney!"

    dearime, great you use the American spelling , not bologna.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dearieme
    I enjoy antique slang irrespective of its origins, Joe. I dislike British people using current American slang and using it (probably) incorrectly and (certainly) as a way of showing off.
    , @black sea
    Dearieme perhaps secretly refers to the balogna process as the baloney process.

    (Sorry, lame university joke.)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  88. @unit472
    I thought 'genius' and 'brilliant' were terms mostly applied to black mediocrities these days.

    Ta-Nehisi Coates is a true genius. Those NFL wife beaters are brilliant.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  89. DWright says:

    I don’t know about brilliant but I have been called Einstein numerous times.
    Doesn’t make sense either, if memory serves, it was usually when I wasn’t at my best.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  90. @Charlie_U
    Some of my Irish colleagues use the word grand just as frequently as we Britbongs use the word brilliant.

    The Irish have got the gift of the gab, of course, so now I find myself using the word grand all the time, too.

    However, a lot of young Britbongs use the word awesome as it it were a comma. Thanks, America! :-D

    Charlie, Don’t want to bring the level of comments down, but in construction we used to use the word fuck as an adjective, as in “Great, just fucking great.” Or is that an adverb? I get so fucking confused.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  91. Anonym says:
    @kihowi
    Language evolves, and often into something uglier than it used to be.

    If you don't see what I mean, read a 100 year old book and tell me English hasn't deteriorated.

    I hate how things have evolved too.

    However this is in part a general phenomenon when costs are lowered and the customer base expands from wealthy to middle class to poor. In the case you describe you talk about books. See also:
    Music (Classical on down)
    Air travel
    Internet

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  92. @anonymous

    all male line up
     
    Brady was cut? He had so much flair!

    anonymous, as a closet Patriots fan in WNY, I wished Tom played for the Bills.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  93. @Thea
    The point is to keep us on our toes. They will constantly shift the goalposts until we stop appologizing and tell them to f off.

    Thea, unlike the N-word, you can feel free to spell the word fuck out. Try it, you’ll feel better.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  94. @Charles Pewitt
    Brits enjoy calling people, animals and inanimate objects this word: TWAT.

    I had never heard or seen it before used to the extent that Brits use the word before spending some time on the #UKIP hashtag on Twitter. Everything to the average Brit is a twat. Nigel Farage is a twat; somebody's dog is a twat; a bus that is late is a twat; twats everywhere to the average Brit.

    I wonder if the Queen has ever called her husband a twat.

    A person who forgot to bring ale to a function is no doubt spoken of as the brilliant twat who forgot the ale.

    Nigel Farage Is The Most Patriotic Twat In England, And He's a Huguenot.

    #UKIP Twat example:


    https://twitter.com/Tara_Hewitt/status/873079468369231874

    Charles, I thought twat was, you know, a woman’s “naughty bits.” Oh how I love that term, learned it here on Steve’s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    It is. Brits refer to their mates, when annoyed by them, by several terms for women's genitalia quite frequently.
    , @dearieme
    Joe, it's worth googling for the story of the poet Robert Browning and "twat". You'll enjoy it.


    Ah, the hell, here it is.

    https://www.futilitycloset.com/2015/06/23/a-distressing-blunder/

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  95. @Tiny Duck
    You guys hear about the Russian airplane debacle

    Looks like Trump is going to lead us into war with Russia!

    Thanks all you morons who voted him in

    Tiny, plenty of time for you to flee the country. Maybe try Mexico or Canada.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  96. @El Dato

    Earlier this week it emerged that Oxford University’s History Faculty is to allow students to sit exams at home in an attempt to close the gender gap.

    The university was criticised for the “insulting” decision, with a leading academic warning that the decision implies women are the “weaker sex”. From the start of the next academic year, the department will change its exam system to replace one of the five final-year exams with a “take-home” paper.
     
    I can't believe this liquefaction of practically anything a university stands for.

    Is this really the country of Brunel, Maxwell and Babbage?

    Now I mistrust my Oxford University Press books.

    El, I thought the British used the term “take away”, not take home.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dearieme
    "take away" in England, "carry out" in Scotland.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  97. jim jones says:
    @3g4me
    Another British usage which I actually prefer is "clever," particularly for a child. Instead of cooing "Aren't you smart" at your toddler, you approvingly note he's a "clever boy." As with all similar British usages, this can also be used to take the piss, and I seem to recall a song from the early '80s there that was called "Clever Trevor."

    I am a Software Engineer and whenever my dumb Christian neighbours ask me to sort out a PC mess I am rewarded with “Oh, you are so clever”. Also my keyboard needs cleaning.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  98. Anonym says:
    @Autochthon
    When I had to deal with an asshole marine or sailor who outranked me, I always made a point of calling him by his rank rather than as "sir" (e.g., "yes, lieutenant" or "yes, commander"). This was my way of acknowledging that, yes, the person was in fact a lieutenant in the navy, but I did not respect him and therefore would not call him "sir" (a term of respect rather than a mere descriptive or hierarchical title).

    I still called the vast majority of officers, being decent enough folks, "sir" (or "ma'am"). I idly wondered from time to time whether the assholes noticed the phenomenon, and, if they did, whether they put two and two together about my motivation and therefore hated me the more for it....

    I would think that most people of your intelligence would become officers rather than enlisted. You’re not a former nuke are you?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Thank you, and no (I declined the offer because of the six-year contract).

    (Suffice it to say that military recruiters are someplace just below corporate managers and the editorial board of The New York Times but just above serial rapists in any hierarchy of predatory psychopaths bent on cheating young persons out of their potential.)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  99. dearieme says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    dearime, great you use the American spelling , not bologna.

    I enjoy antique slang irrespective of its origins, Joe. I dislike British people using current American slang and using it (probably) incorrectly and (certainly) as a way of showing off.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    deari, as much as I dislike white people using black idioms such as ..."stay woke."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  100. dearieme says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    El, I thought the British used the term "take away", not take home.

    “take away” in England, “carry out” in Scotland.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Matra
    Hmm. About 20 years ago in Belfast I made the mistake of confusing an English relative's suggestion that we get a "carry out" with a "take away". He had to explain to me that a "carry out" meant booze brought home from an off-licence, not something from a chippy or KFC. Could be a regional thing - either Ulster/Ireland or his native Lancashire - but in the years I lived there I'm pretty sure "carry out" always meant alcohol.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  101. @Weltanschauung

    And the speedometer was broken. No way was I going 200 miles per hour.
     
    Here's where I stop smiling and nodding. Don't modern British speedometers display km/h? Is your amiable Yankee goofball confessing to driving 125 miles an hour somewhere between Heathrow and London?

    I am gobsmacked.

    “And the speedometer was broken. No way was I going 200 miles per hour ….”

    Yeah, must be broken, because the current motor vehicle standard requires speedometers to read accurately in mph. Even in km/h, you would not be doing 200 without appearing on one of the local police car chase shows.

    Funny story, though … the first time I took my continental rh steering car across, I didn’t catch the standard speed limit explanation sign you see rolling off the boat, so I wasn’t sure if limits were kph or mph … so I was chugging along at a snail’s pace for a while before I accepted that nearly all UK drivers weren’t scofflaws, given the sizeable presence of speed cameras.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  102. @Formerly CARealist
    Yes, the descriptive adjectives are in short supply these days. Please, someone create a nice list of good adjectives to use and do not include amazing, awesome, or perfect.

    Formerly, well I came up with an amazingly awesome list. Try using good and great.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  103. @Captain Tripps
    Of course, at the Average Joe level, genius is sometimes used sarcastically as a form of derision. As in:

    Mr. Swiply: "Wow! The cost of an Ivy League education is tremendous!"

    Average Joe Grabowski (who's much more intelligent and in tune with the zeitgeist than Mr. Swiply will ever know): "No shit. Thanks for the tip, genius."

    Mr. Swiply furrows brow condescendingly at Average Joe Grabowski in response to his impertinence; Average Joe Grabowski stares back coolly while one corner of his mouth curls up in a wry smile of derision back at Mr. Swiply.

    Captain, and I use that word with distain, find another first name to disparage….you Dick.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  104. @dearieme
    I enjoy antique slang irrespective of its origins, Joe. I dislike British people using current American slang and using it (probably) incorrectly and (certainly) as a way of showing off.

    deari, as much as I dislike white people using black idioms such as …”stay woke.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  105. @Buzz Mohawk
    What I don't like now is how people here in America have started using the word genius as an adjective, when what they mean is ingenious.

    "That inventor is genius!" "That's a genius invention!"

    It sounds ghetto-child-stupid, and it's all over the place, including among actual adults in media who should know better.

    Languages evolve. I can tell this is on the verge of becoming acceptable, dictionary-approved usage. That pisses me off, because it comes from ignorance.

    “Ingenious” suffers from sounding like it means the inverse of what it does. Same goes for “inflammable.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I always like uninflammable.
    , @guest
    Dr. Nick Riviera: "'Inflammable' means flammable? Ugh, what a country!"
    , @Hippopotamusdrome


    Ingenious

     

    Infamous
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  106. @Achmed E. Newman
    Yojimbo, I had always thought that was "Blimey, mate!" It's been spelled wrong in my head for a long time then.

    BTW, is Yojimbo or Zatoichi your family name? Or, is it one of those hyphenated names like those of kids whose parents both work at National Public Radio? Is up-slash the new hyphen?

    ;-}

    “Is up-slash the new hyphen?”

    Uh, yes. Another example of American know how in grammar usage, slang, vocabulary, etc.
    After all, we spell “today” like it sounds, and not “to-day”, as in “Gawn, is it REALLY this day, and all?”

    Yes, yes it is. It’s today. Not yester-day, but today.

    Also don’t need a hyphen for no-one, either. It’s no one. Two separate words that convey the thought just fine.

    Now making nouns out of verbs? At this rate, check ’round 2117 for the Brits to try that one.

    Blimey!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yes --> we are tops in punctuation over here; you might say punctuation is one of our CORE! STRENGTHS! The USA is a Punctuation Center of Excellence!

    Hey, are sure it's not Crimeny? Which is more emotive: "Crimeny!" or just "Blimey, mite!" ?
    , @dearieme
    "Now making nouns out of verbs? At this rate, check ’round 2117 for the Brits to try that one."

    I think you'll find Shakespeare did it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  107. @Achmed E. Newman
    Haha, that Homer Simpson line is funny cause it's true! (as Homer himself is wont to say).

    I have thought the same thing (not in the military world): If someone calls me Sir, I usually figure I must be doing something wrong. "Sir, I'm gonna have to ask you to ... [whatever]!"

    BTW, to Autochthon, the comedian in your video didn't use one version of "dude" that I also hear and use the most. (can't make the sound here, of course, but it means "what the hell is wrong with you?!")

    Be careful though. Being addressed as “Sir” is also the Millennials way of saying, “You’re too old to be called dude anymore. You’re way past it, ha, ha, and ha!” In their usage, Sir = old and old ain’t cool, hip, with it anymore. Put off being called “Sir” for as long as you can.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Embrace how age has liberated you from any obligation to be cool.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Yo, blacks used to call you 'Mister" not sir or better still, Mister Man.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  108. @anonitron1
    "Ingenious" suffers from sounding like it means the inverse of what it does. Same goes for "inflammable."

    I always like uninflammable.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  109. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Be careful though. Being addressed as "Sir" is also the Millennials way of saying, "You're too old to be called dude anymore. You're way past it, ha, ha, and ha!" In their usage, Sir = old and old ain't cool, hip, with it anymore. Put off being called "Sir" for as long as you can.

    Embrace how age has liberated you from any obligation to be cool.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    You’ll always be cool, Steve.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    Brilliant!
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Cool is merely the lesser mind's observations to attempt to maintain, to stay current, relevant. For men it helps preserve their minds, keeping them up to date, and not permitting any letting up for fear of being overtaken by those just behind them.

    Age is soon overtaken by Father Time and Mother Nature.

    If in Ron Howard's Coocoon we could all age without the consequences, then sure. Who wouldn't take that? That may be one thing that science will never be able to solve, namely, the ability to age without the consequences (e.g. decline; atrophy; regressing; etc) In other words, a ninety yr old will feel, move around, and perform cognitive functions as if he were still about twenty-six. For this individual ninety yr old, age is just a number. He is the ideal ninety yr old. But, alas, that's about 1% of all ninety yr olds. Perhaps one day that percentage can be expanded and more people could be included, but how?

    Aging without the physical and cognitive consequences of what that word tends to mean? Science may never solve that one.


    "Why would you want to buy an old car when you can buy a new one cheaper? It will run better and last longer."--Hitchcock's To Catch a Thief Such an apt Americanism from mid. century, when the US believed it truly could do most things, and that the future was for the eternally young in spirit.
    , @The Alarmist
    So today I asked some young "dude" why someone twice his age and probably twice his weight was going twice as fast and suggested he get his face out of his phone or GTF out of the way. Yeah, I embrace my age.
    , @Joe Schmoe

    Embrace how age has liberated you from any obligation to be cool.

     

    I detest familiarity except from the closest of friends and family. When newly married aged 21, I filled out a card for a salesman to call regarding new windows. I wrote my name as Mrs. Joe Schmoe using my husband's first and last name with Mrs. indicating I was the wife. So, the salesman called and indeed asked for Mrs. Joe Schmoe. I said, I was, and he said that since the card said Mrs. Joe Schmoe, he thought I must be a much older person. Rather than giggle or some such and tell him to call me by first name or something, I just remained silent for a long time until he changed the subject back to the business at hand. I did not choose to buy any windows from him! Perhaps he learned not to assume too much, or not. This was in the 1990's. To me it is the result of the sexual revolution that men learned they could be overly familiar with young women, even married women!
    , @Desiderius
    I'll have plenty of time to be cool (roughly 68 degrees) when I'm dead.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  110. anonymous says: • Website • Disclaimer
    @FPD72
    Considering with whom Brady is sleeping every night, I would be loathe to question his masculinity.

    Considering with whom …

    Considering with whom? You seem to have some flair yourself.

    Read More
    • Replies: @FPD72
    I'm just trying to use proper grammar. I was taught to place prepositions before their objects, with only rare exceptions.

    Flair? Husband of one woman for forty-three years, three children, and five grandkids so far. Spent most of my career in construction and oil & gas. I don't think that using proper English is a marker for being light in the loafers.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  111. guest says:
    @Diversity Heretic
    There may be a reason that words like genius are associated with men. As Steve has often said, political correctness is, above all, a war on noticing.

    Yes, but you’d think the fact that most geniuses (or recognized geniuses; can’t forget all the potential Newtons languishing in motherhood) are male would motivate them to mandate equal genius-naming. Say teachers must either call everyone a genius, or the numbers of those called geniuses by teachers must be equal by sex.

    Forbidding the use of the term altogether is conceding ground. Are progs losing their oomph? What happened to turning perception upside-down, instead of merely running away from male intellectual superiority?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  112. JohnnyD says:

    Didn’t some world famous British author write a book warning us about the destruction of the English language?

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    I think you mean an essay.
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    Didn’t some world famous British author write a book warning us about the destruction of the English language?
     
    Yeah, but who's got time for that now, what with college ball coming up, catching up on "Naked and Afraid" episodes, and the Monster Truck rallies. When my electronics are all on the chargers, I get a lot of my content from "People" and "USA Today".

    Sides, some of those British writers use a lot of fancy long words and shit. I don't even think there were any pictures in that one. They say he was brilliant though.... I dunno.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  113. guest says:
    @anonitron1
    "Ingenious" suffers from sounding like it means the inverse of what it does. Same goes for "inflammable."

    Dr. Nick Riviera: “‘Inflammable’ means flammable? Ugh, what a country!”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  114. Rob McX says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    You know the words that they stopped saying? "Bleigh me!" When did Brits stop saying that one?Couldn't turn on BBC classic sit coms or historical dramas and "Bleigh me!" was nearly always used, across eras as well.

    Historically, the English don't throw much away, whereas Americans have continually updated their word usage, vocabulary, slang, etc. for like, forever. Even extends into refurbishing houses, as opposed to completely tearing it down from the foundation and building a new one.

    Maybe that's because we have such vibrant diversity and for the longest time the UK did not. Now that they are catching up in immigration levels, perhaps words from diverse cultures will directly affect their slang, causing it to change more rapidly.

    After all, it's 2017, not 1817.

    Maybe that’s because we have such vibrant diversity and for the longest time the UK did not. Now that they are catching up in immigration levels, perhaps words from diverse cultures will directly affect their slang, causing it to change more rapidly.

    I don’t think diversity affects the language much. With the exception of words for new foods and dishes, immigration has hardly changed the British vocabulary at all and doesn’t seem likely to do so in the foreseeable future. Most words borrowed from languages of the sub-continent were introduced by white colonists who lived there in the days of the empire.

    It’s amusing when you hear immigration enthusiasts talk of how much diversity can enhance and revitalise a country’s culture. Language doesn’t lie, and it shows that most innovations have their origin in the indigenous white population.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  115. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Buffalo Joe
    Charles, I thought twat was, you know, a woman's "naughty bits." Oh how I love that term, learned it here on Steve's.

    It is. Brits refer to their mates, when annoyed by them, by several terms for women’s genitalia quite frequently.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, I have enjoyed a number of British gangsta movies, especially "Snatch" direct by Guy Richie, but they use the "C" word way more often than I like.
    , @Jonathan Mason
    Brits also refer to their pals as mates, presumably akin to shipmates or playmates, but a bit confusing. Also they use 'invariably' to mean 'usually, but not always'. Also 'sanction' meaning either to permit or to disallow depending on context.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  116. dearieme says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Charles, I thought twat was, you know, a woman's "naughty bits." Oh how I love that term, learned it here on Steve's.

    Joe, it’s worth googling for the story of the poet Robert Browning and “twat”. You’ll enjoy it.

    Ah, the hell, here it is.

    https://www.futilitycloset.com/2015/06/23/a-distressing-blunder/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    deari, thank you and of course a little used item of a nun's attire indeed.
    , @whoever
    I feel some sympathy for Browning. (^_^)
    That story reminded me of the first time I heard the phrase "camel toe," and I asked what it meant only to get smirks and eye-rolls.
    Finally, when someone realized I truly did not know what it meant and defined it, I insisted the explanation didn't make sense because camels don't have toes, they have hooves, provoking exasperated looks.
    I kind of get it now, but not really.
    https://i.imgur.com/original/0/Q/3/c/0Q3c1gM
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  117. @Moshe
    Forgive my ignorance, but were you personally at Cambridge Examiner? And what are the things that someone in that position does?

    The job involves detailed analysis of all things Cambridge.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  118. guest says:
    @FPD72
    Considering with whom Brady is sleeping every night, I would be loathe to question his masculinity.

    “Considering with whom Brady is sleeping every night, I would be loathe to question his masculinity”

    Huh? That’s one concrete reason to question his sexuality, which goes along with masculinity. If Brady had blown out his knee in college and instead of living in the limelight with its bizarre standards of beauty he was a high school football coach, maybe he’d be married to someone resembling the female of the species. But since he isn’t, questions inevitably pop up.

    Unless the reason you’d be loathe is because you fear Gisele coming after you to pick a fight. In which case I sympathize.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Shorter Guest: Real men, like me, are only attracted to a few % of all women; I'm not attracted to Mrs. Brady, therefore Tom Brady isn't a real man.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    You're assuming that a woman's masculine appearance is an indicator of latent homosexual tendencies in her partner. Could be, but I don't know. Have you got any evidence of that? I googled "husband was gay" and "husband came out" and the few images of real women were not very masculine looking. If anything, I'd say gayish men are attracted to dumpy, non-threatening looking women.

    I agree that Gisele is fairly masculine, but she displays standard female beauty traits like long, luxurious hair, make-up, lots of skin, etc. In Brady's world of large, stinky, hairy football players, she probably seems very feminine.
    , @FPD72
    How about his baby mama? Is she feminine enough for you?

    Hint: she plays an ADA on Blue Bloods.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  119. @Steve Sailer
    Embrace how age has liberated you from any obligation to be cool.

    You’ll always be cool, Steve.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  120. @Steve Sailer
    Embrace how age has liberated you from any obligation to be cool.

    Brilliant!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  121. guest says:
    @JohnnyD
    Didn't some world famous British author write a book warning us about the destruction of the English language?

    I think you mean an essay.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  122. @Buzz Mohawk
    What I don't like now is how people here in America have started using the word genius as an adjective, when what they mean is ingenious.

    "That inventor is genius!" "That's a genius invention!"

    It sounds ghetto-child-stupid, and it's all over the place, including among actual adults in media who should know better.

    Languages evolve. I can tell this is on the verge of becoming acceptable, dictionary-approved usage. That pisses me off, because it comes from ignorance.

    I agree with your comments on the word ‘genius’, and see plainly that it’s just the tip of the iceburg. Another that bothers me is ‘epic’, as in, ‘That festival was epic’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I am sick of the word iconic, especially when used by people who do not kn0w what it means. It's as retarded as diva was a few years ago.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    The real problem is not with any particular word but the general style of communication. Young people's lack of expressive and descriptive power is tied to other trends like Jon Stewart-style politi-comedy via the use of communication for signaling and confirming status. There is an underlying lack of thought.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  123. dearieme says:
    @Moshe
    Forgive my ignorance, but were you personally at Cambridge Examiner? And what are the things that someone in that position does?

    You set examination papers and mark the scripts. You then agree recommended degree classifications with your fellow examiners, including the External Examiner: for example you might collectively agree that the performance of candidate AP1048 is worthy of third class honours. Once the whole “class list” is agreed then you decrypt the anonymity of the candidates – so that AP1048 might turn out to be, let us say, Joseph Biden of Downing College – and you pass your de-anonymised recommendations to the Board of Examiners. If they are happy that the examiners have done their job properly then the degree list is posted on notice-boards for the candidates, and anyone strolling by, to inspect. Once upon a time the upmarket national newspapers would carry the results; I don’t know whether any still do.

    As you might infer, we didn’t have the system of the lecturer setting his own exam papers, or scripts being marked by people who knew which candidate’s work they were reading. You’ll also see that the examinations were treated as public examinations in the sense that results were not confidential. I must say I strongly approved of these habits. So I take it that they are doomed.

    N.B. This was the system a couple of decades ago ago; perhaps it’s changed since then.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  124. @Anonymous
    It is. Brits refer to their mates, when annoyed by them, by several terms for women's genitalia quite frequently.

    Anonymous, I have enjoyed a number of British gangsta movies, especially “Snatch” direct by Guy Richie, but they use the “C” word way more often than I like.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  125. @Charles Pewitt
    Brits enjoy calling people, animals and inanimate objects this word: TWAT.

    I had never heard or seen it before used to the extent that Brits use the word before spending some time on the #UKIP hashtag on Twitter. Everything to the average Brit is a twat. Nigel Farage is a twat; somebody's dog is a twat; a bus that is late is a twat; twats everywhere to the average Brit.

    I wonder if the Queen has ever called her husband a twat.

    A person who forgot to bring ale to a function is no doubt spoken of as the brilliant twat who forgot the ale.

    Nigel Farage Is The Most Patriotic Twat In England, And He's a Huguenot.

    #UKIP Twat example:


    https://twitter.com/Tara_Hewitt/status/873079468369231874

    I once asked a Brit why they use such a disgusting word so casually and frequently. She didn’t know its actually significance (at least in American English). It was just a word to her. Similar perhaps to ‘conyo’ (cono with tilde) in Spanish, which is used by old ladies and everyone else, though twat certainly isn’t used in polite company in England (something which hardly exists anymore).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Do bear in mind that the Brits were rather late to getting indoor plumbing, and even then it was second rate, specially compared to the French and Germans. Germany was always a much cleaner nation compared to England.

    So the Brits are rather used to using eschatological words, certainly much more than in the US (at least up to recent decades). They've been shoveling it and up to their...for like forever.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  126. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Be careful though. Being addressed as "Sir" is also the Millennials way of saying, "You're too old to be called dude anymore. You're way past it, ha, ha, and ha!" In their usage, Sir = old and old ain't cool, hip, with it anymore. Put off being called "Sir" for as long as you can.

    Yo, blacks used to call you ‘Mister” not sir or better still, Mister Man.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  127. @dearieme
    Joe, it's worth googling for the story of the poet Robert Browning and "twat". You'll enjoy it.


    Ah, the hell, here it is.

    https://www.futilitycloset.com/2015/06/23/a-distressing-blunder/

    deari, thank you and of course a little used item of a nun’s attire indeed.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  128. @daniel le mouche
    I agree with your comments on the word 'genius', and see plainly that it's just the tip of the iceburg. Another that bothers me is 'epic', as in, 'That festival was epic'.

    I am sick of the word iconic, especially when used by people who do not kn0w what it means. It’s as retarded as diva was a few years ago.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  129. @guest
    "Considering with whom Brady is sleeping every night, I would be loathe to question his masculinity"

    Huh? That's one concrete reason to question his sexuality, which goes along with masculinity. If Brady had blown out his knee in college and instead of living in the limelight with its bizarre standards of beauty he was a high school football coach, maybe he'd be married to someone resembling the female of the species. But since he isn't, questions inevitably pop up.

    Unless the reason you'd be loathe is because you fear Gisele coming after you to pick a fight. In which case I sympathize.

    Shorter Guest: Real men, like me, are only attracted to a few % of all women; I’m not attracted to Mrs. Brady, therefore Tom Brady isn’t a real man.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    The share of women who don't resemble male-to-female transsexuals isn't very small. Most heterosexual males are not attracted to women who look like men. That's not some idiomatic trait possessed by me alone. Brady, who can have his pick of all kinds of women, nevertheless chose one who looks like a man.

    Doesn't mean he's not a "real man." My presumption is that as with a lot of rich, famous, handsome, powerful types he chose on the basis of status. But his wife raises questions instead of answering them. That's the main point.

    , @Anonymous
    guest wouldn't have gone down that path if he thought she was too short or too plump or too soft-featured. Is it really surprising that women who've passed through countless sieves of gay fashion-industry men look mannish?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  130. slumber_j says:
    @TelfoedJohn
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wv_662IqKto

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B12WBTFLK0Q

    The great Paul Whitehouse!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  131. mobi says:
    @Weltanschauung

    And the speedometer was broken. No way was I going 200 miles per hour.
     
    Here's where I stop smiling and nodding. Don't modern British speedometers display km/h? Is your amiable Yankee goofball confessing to driving 125 miles an hour somewhere between Heathrow and London?

    I am gobsmacked.

    I am gobsmacked.

    You’re not gobsmacked until you’re litrally gobsmacked.

    (‘e’ intentionally omitted)

    Related – ‘gobsmacked’ is slowly creeping into the lexicon of the most insufferably pretentious North American hipsters.

    Along, perhaps, with the prefacing of litrally every single utterance with ‘So,…’, it’s becoming a most reliable indicator that everything that follows is likely to be utter shite.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    The "so" phenomenon struck me lately, too. Aside from introducing questions, it should be used to continue some line of thought. Either to refer back to something that's been said, to compare what follows with what has been said, to say what follows is the logical result of what came before (as in "therefore"), or to introduce a next step. But in common usage these days there's no necessary connection to something that's already been said. It's more like a rhetorical tic.

    My guess is it's supposed to imply, consciously or unconsciously, a running thread of reason. If you say "so" every once in a while, it may sound like each part of what you said follows from what was said before. Too often, though, what was said could have been jumbled up and repeated in random order without changing its meaning.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  132. guest says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Shorter Guest: Real men, like me, are only attracted to a few % of all women; I'm not attracted to Mrs. Brady, therefore Tom Brady isn't a real man.

    The share of women who don’t resemble male-to-female transsexuals isn’t very small. Most heterosexual males are not attracted to women who look like men. That’s not some idiomatic trait possessed by me alone. Brady, who can have his pick of all kinds of women, nevertheless chose one who looks like a man.

    Doesn’t mean he’s not a “real man.” My presumption is that as with a lot of rich, famous, handsome, powerful types he chose on the basis of status. But his wife raises questions instead of answering them. That’s the main point.

    Read More
    • Replies: @rob
    The share of women who don’t resemble male-to-female transsexuals isn’t very small. Most heterosexual males are not attracted to women who look like men. That’s not some idiomatic trait possessed by me alone.

    Idiosyncratic.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  133. KunioKun says:

    Having everybody say “Brilliant!” 20 times in the beginning of every Harry Potter movie was really strange.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  134. guest says:
    @mobi

    I am gobsmacked.
     
    You're not gobsmacked until you're litrally gobsmacked.

    ('e' intentionally omitted)

    Related - 'gobsmacked' is slowly creeping into the lexicon of the most insufferably pretentious North American hipsters.

    Along, perhaps, with the prefacing of litrally every single utterance with 'So,...', it's becoming a most reliable indicator that everything that follows is likely to be utter shite.

    The “so” phenomenon struck me lately, too. Aside from introducing questions, it should be used to continue some line of thought. Either to refer back to something that’s been said, to compare what follows with what has been said, to say what follows is the logical result of what came before (as in “therefore”), or to introduce a next step. But in common usage these days there’s no necessary connection to something that’s already been said. It’s more like a rhetorical tic.

    My guess is it’s supposed to imply, consciously or unconsciously, a running thread of reason. If you say “so” every once in a while, it may sound like each part of what you said follows from what was said before. Too often, though, what was said could have been jumbled up and repeated in random order without changing its meaning.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    I was recently working on an academic document produced by a well-known British university. It was very long, but I swear there was nary an instance in which 'and' or 'so' was used as a conjunction on its own. Every single time they were combined as '. . . and so . . .'. What gives?

    Also, what's with the comma splices, dear transatlantic comrades? This grammatical blunder now seems to be accepted usage in British newspapers, and it's even showing up in academic writing.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  135. @JohnnyD
    Didn't some world famous British author write a book warning us about the destruction of the English language?

    Didn’t some world famous British author write a book warning us about the destruction of the English language?

    Yeah, but who’s got time for that now, what with college ball coming up, catching up on “Naked and Afraid” episodes, and the Monster Truck rallies. When my electronics are all on the chargers, I get a lot of my content from “People” and “USA Today”.

    Sides, some of those British writers use a lot of fancy long words and shit. I don’t even think there were any pictures in that one. They say he was brilliant though…. I dunno.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    It would be worth separating the regional least-common-denominator constraints of mass communication from the cultural. (Perhaps you already did: monster truck rallies?)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  136. @eah
    OT

    America's addiction epidemic -- She was the town’s leading heroin dealer. She was 19 years old

    An investigation found drug companies were delivering 780m painkillers into a state of just 1.8m over a five year period.

    Anything for a buck.

    I’m hate-noticing more and more it’s always some shady quack from Asia shilling death in these cases, just as those scum are disproportionatley prescribing marihuana in places like Mexifornia.

    Anything for a buck indeed. Because what’s a dead pile of Americans to Rajagupta and Trang Fan….

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  137. fish says:
    @Tiny Duck
    You guys hear about the Russian airplane debacle

    Looks like Trump is going to lead us into war with Russia!

    Thanks all you morons who voted him in

    Private Simpson has come down with a case of hepatitis. He’s the most remarkable shade of yellow.

    - Leonard Pitts

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  138. @guest
    "Considering with whom Brady is sleeping every night, I would be loathe to question his masculinity"

    Huh? That's one concrete reason to question his sexuality, which goes along with masculinity. If Brady had blown out his knee in college and instead of living in the limelight with its bizarre standards of beauty he was a high school football coach, maybe he'd be married to someone resembling the female of the species. But since he isn't, questions inevitably pop up.

    Unless the reason you'd be loathe is because you fear Gisele coming after you to pick a fight. In which case I sympathize.

    You’re assuming that a woman’s masculine appearance is an indicator of latent homosexual tendencies in her partner. Could be, but I don’t know. Have you got any evidence of that? I googled “husband was gay” and “husband came out” and the few images of real women were not very masculine looking. If anything, I’d say gayish men are attracted to dumpy, non-threatening looking women.

    I agree that Gisele is fairly masculine, but she displays standard female beauty traits like long, luxurious hair, make-up, lots of skin, etc. In Brady’s world of large, stinky, hairy football players, she probably seems very feminine.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Grace Jones
    I heard that, regardless of who they fantasize about, most men marry women who resemble their mothers.
    , @guest
    I draw from no studies. And it doesn't have to be full-on gayness. Could be some flavor of bisexuality, or even past homosexual experience that didn't take. My common sense tells me that men with and admixture of same-sex attractions, whatever the proportions, are more attracted to masculine females.

    "feminine beauty traits like long, luxurious hair, make-up, lots of skin, etc."

    That's an odd list. The hair, surely, but that can be faked. Maybe Gisele has naturally great hair. That's one. Make-up is neither here nor there, as drag queens can have well-applied make-up as well. And presumably he'd see her without make-up much of the time.

    I don't even know what lots of skin means.

    She would appear feminine compared to Belichik and the Gronk. But that's hardly the test. Brady isn't stranded on a desert island with the Patriots and Gisele. He's out in the world after he exits the stadium, a world full of the vast swathe of womanhood.
    , @guest
    About your Google results, there are a couple of confounding factors. First of all, whatever else she is, Gisele is a high-value female, at least in Current Year culture. She's going to be able to attract high-value males. I presume most women who can have their pick won't be going for closet cases. Despite the cultural cachet of gays, and despite women's dubious claims that "all the good ones are gay," they're not as likely to be alpha males and therefore can't have their pick.

    Secondly, Brady can have his pick, whether or not he's gay or gay-ish. So he can take down model-types, who have high status in our culture right now, even though they look like men. (Because they look like men, actually.)

    This confounding factor is also my basis for guessing that Brady married Gisele for status rather than because he's a closet case. That's just another explanation.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  139. @daniel le mouche
    I agree with your comments on the word 'genius', and see plainly that it's just the tip of the iceburg. Another that bothers me is 'epic', as in, 'That festival was epic'.

    The real problem is not with any particular word but the general style of communication. Young people’s lack of expressive and descriptive power is tied to other trends like Jon Stewart-style politi-comedy via the use of communication for signaling and confirming status. There is an underlying lack of thought.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  140. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Is up-slash the new hyphen?"

    Uh, yes. Another example of American know how in grammar usage, slang, vocabulary, etc.
    After all, we spell "today" like it sounds, and not "to-day", as in "Gawn, is it REALLY this day, and all?"

    Yes, yes it is. It's today. Not yester-day, but today.

    Also don't need a hyphen for no-one, either. It's no one. Two separate words that convey the thought just fine.

    Now making nouns out of verbs? At this rate, check 'round 2117 for the Brits to try that one.

    Blimey!

    Yes –> we are tops in punctuation over here; you might say punctuation is one of our CORE! STRENGTHS! The USA is a Punctuation Center of Excellence!

    Hey, are sure it’s not Crimeny? Which is more emotive: “Crimeny!” or just “Blimey, mite!” ?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  141. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Didn’t some world famous British author write a book warning us about the destruction of the English language?
     
    Yeah, but who's got time for that now, what with college ball coming up, catching up on "Naked and Afraid" episodes, and the Monster Truck rallies. When my electronics are all on the chargers, I get a lot of my content from "People" and "USA Today".

    Sides, some of those British writers use a lot of fancy long words and shit. I don't even think there were any pictures in that one. They say he was brilliant though.... I dunno.

    It would be worth separating the regional least-common-denominator constraints of mass communication from the cultural. (Perhaps you already did: monster truck rallies?)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  142. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    Shorter Guest: Real men, like me, are only attracted to a few % of all women; I'm not attracted to Mrs. Brady, therefore Tom Brady isn't a real man.

    guest wouldn’t have gone down that path if he thought she was too short or too plump or too soft-featured. Is it really surprising that women who’ve passed through countless sieves of gay fashion-industry men look mannish?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  143. FPD72 says:
    @anonymous

    Considering with whom …
     
    Considering with whom? You seem to have some flair yourself.

    I’m just trying to use proper grammar. I was taught to place prepositions before their objects, with only rare exceptions.

    Flair? Husband of one woman for forty-three years, three children, and five grandkids so far. Spent most of my career in construction and oil & gas. I don’t think that using proper English is a marker for being light in the loafers.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  144. FPD72 says:
    @guest
    "Considering with whom Brady is sleeping every night, I would be loathe to question his masculinity"

    Huh? That's one concrete reason to question his sexuality, which goes along with masculinity. If Brady had blown out his knee in college and instead of living in the limelight with its bizarre standards of beauty he was a high school football coach, maybe he'd be married to someone resembling the female of the species. But since he isn't, questions inevitably pop up.

    Unless the reason you'd be loathe is because you fear Gisele coming after you to pick a fight. In which case I sympathize.

    How about his baby mama? Is she feminine enough for you?

    Hint: she plays an ADA on Blue Bloods.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    You mean Bridget Moynihan? I haven't studied her too closely. She is a model-type, and actually was a model, I think. Not necessarily a high fashion model, though.

    She is not as offensively unfeminine as Mrs. Brady.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  145. @Anonymous
    It is. Brits refer to their mates, when annoyed by them, by several terms for women's genitalia quite frequently.

    Brits also refer to their pals as mates, presumably akin to shipmates or playmates, but a bit confusing. Also they use ‘invariably’ to mean ‘usually, but not always’. Also ‘sanction’ meaning either to permit or to disallow depending on context.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  146. Yak-15 says:
    @G Pinfold
    O/T but we have a serious outbreak of 'frontlash' in London. It is alleged that the government at all levels (except the Lord Mayoral) has taken more than 8 minutes to describe the incident as a 'terrorist attack'.
    Everyone is on board now though, and the investigators will report back soon.

    Where are the blatherings about how this white male doesn’t represent all white males? Where is the fear of backlash against innocent white males?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  147. @Weltanschauung

    And the speedometer was broken. No way was I going 200 miles per hour.
     
    Here's where I stop smiling and nodding. Don't modern British speedometers display km/h? Is your amiable Yankee goofball confessing to driving 125 miles an hour somewhere between Heathrow and London?

    I am gobsmacked.

    I find the frequency with which ‘gobsmacked’ is used *amazing*.

    It’s a vulgar locution, but I hear it from middle and upper-middle class Brits.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  148. @guest
    The "so" phenomenon struck me lately, too. Aside from introducing questions, it should be used to continue some line of thought. Either to refer back to something that's been said, to compare what follows with what has been said, to say what follows is the logical result of what came before (as in "therefore"), or to introduce a next step. But in common usage these days there's no necessary connection to something that's already been said. It's more like a rhetorical tic.

    My guess is it's supposed to imply, consciously or unconsciously, a running thread of reason. If you say "so" every once in a while, it may sound like each part of what you said follows from what was said before. Too often, though, what was said could have been jumbled up and repeated in random order without changing its meaning.

    I was recently working on an academic document produced by a well-known British university. It was very long, but I swear there was nary an instance in which ‘and’ or ‘so’ was used as a conjunction on its own. Every single time they were combined as ‘. . . and so . . .’. What gives?

    Also, what’s with the comma splices, dear transatlantic comrades? This grammatical blunder now seems to be accepted usage in British newspapers, and it’s even showing up in academic writing.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  149. @anonitron1
    "Ingenious" suffers from sounding like it means the inverse of what it does. Same goes for "inflammable."

    Ingenious

    Infamous

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  150. @Chrisnonymous
    You're assuming that a woman's masculine appearance is an indicator of latent homosexual tendencies in her partner. Could be, but I don't know. Have you got any evidence of that? I googled "husband was gay" and "husband came out" and the few images of real women were not very masculine looking. If anything, I'd say gayish men are attracted to dumpy, non-threatening looking women.

    I agree that Gisele is fairly masculine, but she displays standard female beauty traits like long, luxurious hair, make-up, lots of skin, etc. In Brady's world of large, stinky, hairy football players, she probably seems very feminine.

    I heard that, regardless of who they fantasize about, most men marry women who resemble their mothers.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  151. Matra says:
    @dearieme
    "take away" in England, "carry out" in Scotland.

    Hmm. About 20 years ago in Belfast I made the mistake of confusing an English relative’s suggestion that we get a “carry out” with a “take away”. He had to explain to me that a “carry out” meant booze brought home from an off-licence, not something from a chippy or KFC. Could be a regional thing – either Ulster/Ireland or his native Lancashire – but in the years I lived there I’m pretty sure “carry out” always meant alcohol.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dearieme
    Not in Scotland when I lived there.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  152. Matra says:
    @Lurker
    Brit weighing here. . .

    "Brilliant" as a general positive retort - you are correct. At one time shortened to "brill", but I've not heard that in a while. Often associated with middle/upper class speakers.

    “Brilliant” as a general positive retort – you are correct. At one time shortened to “brill”, but I’ve not heard that in a while

    We always said “brill” growing up but now that you mention it I haven’t heard it in donkey’s.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  153. RW says:
    @Almost Missouri
    Agree. I don't know that it was always thus, though.

    I recall a survey of origins of new English words not too long ago--which I can't find now--, which said more or less that for the most of English's history, new word coinages had trickled down from the upper, more educated classes (e.g. King James Bible, Shakespeare), but that sometime in the last century (1960s?) the process had inverted and since then new coinages came mostly from the lower (and nowadays welfarist rap lyricing) classes.

    So, all in all, it's just another brick in the theme-wall of give-up-your-confident-cultural-ascendance-in-the-name-of-equality-and-lose-everything.

    Hi Missouri,

    If you remember the name or have a cite for that survey or study please respond to my comment here. Thanks.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  154. RW says:

    Aren’t Cambridge/Oxford grads mostly women now? So what’s the point? Make more men feel unwelcome? What they must really be worried about is that if they don’t keep people focused on pointless details others might notice the meaningless tripe that is their research.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  155. black sea says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    dearime, great you use the American spelling , not bologna.

    Dearieme perhaps secretly refers to the balogna process as the baloney process.

    (Sorry, lame university joke.)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  156. @Steve Sailer
    Embrace how age has liberated you from any obligation to be cool.

    Cool is merely the lesser mind’s observations to attempt to maintain, to stay current, relevant. For men it helps preserve their minds, keeping them up to date, and not permitting any letting up for fear of being overtaken by those just behind them.

    Age is soon overtaken by Father Time and Mother Nature.

    If in Ron Howard’s Coocoon we could all age without the consequences, then sure. Who wouldn’t take that? That may be one thing that science will never be able to solve, namely, the ability to age without the consequences (e.g. decline; atrophy; regressing; etc) In other words, a ninety yr old will feel, move around, and perform cognitive functions as if he were still about twenty-six. For this individual ninety yr old, age is just a number. He is the ideal ninety yr old. But, alas, that’s about 1% of all ninety yr olds. Perhaps one day that percentage can be expanded and more people could be included, but how?

    Aging without the physical and cognitive consequences of what that word tends to mean? Science may never solve that one.

    “Why would you want to buy an old car when you can buy a new one cheaper? It will run better and last longer.”–Hitchcock’s To Catch a Thief Such an apt Americanism from mid. century, when the US believed it truly could do most things, and that the future was for the eternally young in spirit.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  157. @daniel le mouche
    I once asked a Brit why they use such a disgusting word so casually and frequently. She didn't know its actually significance (at least in American English). It was just a word to her. Similar perhaps to 'conyo' (cono with tilde) in Spanish, which is used by old ladies and everyone else, though twat certainly isn't used in polite company in England (something which hardly exists anymore).

    Do bear in mind that the Brits were rather late to getting indoor plumbing, and even then it was second rate, specially compared to the French and Germans. Germany was always a much cleaner nation compared to England.

    So the Brits are rather used to using eschatological words, certainly much more than in the US (at least up to recent decades). They’ve been shoveling it and up to their…for like forever.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  158. guest says:
    @FPD72
    How about his baby mama? Is she feminine enough for you?

    Hint: she plays an ADA on Blue Bloods.

    You mean Bridget Moynihan? I haven’t studied her too closely. She is a model-type, and actually was a model, I think. Not necessarily a high fashion model, though.

    She is not as offensively unfeminine as Mrs. Brady.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  159. guest says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    You're assuming that a woman's masculine appearance is an indicator of latent homosexual tendencies in her partner. Could be, but I don't know. Have you got any evidence of that? I googled "husband was gay" and "husband came out" and the few images of real women were not very masculine looking. If anything, I'd say gayish men are attracted to dumpy, non-threatening looking women.

    I agree that Gisele is fairly masculine, but she displays standard female beauty traits like long, luxurious hair, make-up, lots of skin, etc. In Brady's world of large, stinky, hairy football players, she probably seems very feminine.

    I draw from no studies. And it doesn’t have to be full-on gayness. Could be some flavor of bisexuality, or even past homosexual experience that didn’t take. My common sense tells me that men with and admixture of same-sex attractions, whatever the proportions, are more attracted to masculine females.

    “feminine beauty traits like long, luxurious hair, make-up, lots of skin, etc.”

    That’s an odd list. The hair, surely, but that can be faked. Maybe Gisele has naturally great hair. That’s one. Make-up is neither here nor there, as drag queens can have well-applied make-up as well. And presumably he’d see her without make-up much of the time.

    I don’t even know what lots of skin means.

    She would appear feminine compared to Belichik and the Gronk. But that’s hardly the test. Brady isn’t stranded on a desert island with the Patriots and Gisele. He’s out in the world after he exits the stadium, a world full of the vast swathe of womanhood.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Re odd list, I mean that, while her face is rather masculine, she displays other feminine traits (showing off legs, plunging cleavage (such as there is), etc), so it's not like Brady is with a girl who looks and acts like a frat boy.

    There was a Seinfeld episode where there was a woman who would alternate between being attractive and scary. I think Gisele is like this. One photo looks pretty, another virtually butchy. It depends some on fat--she's one of those people who looks better at very low body fat. A little weight gain and she looks like a jowly German farmer. She could never be pleasantly plump and voluptuous.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  160. whoever says: • Website
    @dearieme
    Joe, it's worth googling for the story of the poet Robert Browning and "twat". You'll enjoy it.


    Ah, the hell, here it is.

    https://www.futilitycloset.com/2015/06/23/a-distressing-blunder/

    I feel some sympathy for Browning. (^_^)
    That story reminded me of the first time I heard the phrase “camel toe,” and I asked what it meant only to get smirks and eye-rolls.
    Finally, when someone realized I truly did not know what it meant and defined it, I insisted the explanation didn’t make sense because camels don’t have toes, they have hooves, provoking exasperated looks.
    I kind of get it now, but not really.

    https://i.imgur.com/original/0/Q/3/c/0Q3c1gM

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Camels actually do have toes, not hooves. They are soft, rather like the delightful and eponymous anatomy.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  161. guest says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    You're assuming that a woman's masculine appearance is an indicator of latent homosexual tendencies in her partner. Could be, but I don't know. Have you got any evidence of that? I googled "husband was gay" and "husband came out" and the few images of real women were not very masculine looking. If anything, I'd say gayish men are attracted to dumpy, non-threatening looking women.

    I agree that Gisele is fairly masculine, but she displays standard female beauty traits like long, luxurious hair, make-up, lots of skin, etc. In Brady's world of large, stinky, hairy football players, she probably seems very feminine.

    About your Google results, there are a couple of confounding factors. First of all, whatever else she is, Gisele is a high-value female, at least in Current Year culture. She’s going to be able to attract high-value males. I presume most women who can have their pick won’t be going for closet cases. Despite the cultural cachet of gays, and despite women’s dubious claims that “all the good ones are gay,” they’re not as likely to be alpha males and therefore can’t have their pick.

    Secondly, Brady can have his pick, whether or not he’s gay or gay-ish. So he can take down model-types, who have high status in our culture right now, even though they look like men. (Because they look like men, actually.)

    This confounding factor is also my basis for guessing that Brady married Gisele for status rather than because he’s a closet case. That’s just another explanation.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  162. @eah
    OT

    America's addiction epidemic -- She was the town’s leading heroin dealer. She was 19 years old

    An investigation found drug companies were delivering 780m painkillers into a state of just 1.8m over a five year period.

    Anything for a buck.

    “drug companies were delivering 780m painkillers into a state of just 1.8m over a five year period.”
    That’s a disgrace. :(

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  163. dearieme says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Is up-slash the new hyphen?"

    Uh, yes. Another example of American know how in grammar usage, slang, vocabulary, etc.
    After all, we spell "today" like it sounds, and not "to-day", as in "Gawn, is it REALLY this day, and all?"

    Yes, yes it is. It's today. Not yester-day, but today.

    Also don't need a hyphen for no-one, either. It's no one. Two separate words that convey the thought just fine.

    Now making nouns out of verbs? At this rate, check 'round 2117 for the Brits to try that one.

    Blimey!

    “Now making nouns out of verbs? At this rate, check ’round 2117 for the Brits to try that one.”

    I think you’ll find Shakespeare did it.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  164. dearieme says:
    @Matra
    Hmm. About 20 years ago in Belfast I made the mistake of confusing an English relative's suggestion that we get a "carry out" with a "take away". He had to explain to me that a "carry out" meant booze brought home from an off-licence, not something from a chippy or KFC. Could be a regional thing - either Ulster/Ireland or his native Lancashire - but in the years I lived there I'm pretty sure "carry out" always meant alcohol.

    Not in Scotland when I lived there.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  165. @guest
    I draw from no studies. And it doesn't have to be full-on gayness. Could be some flavor of bisexuality, or even past homosexual experience that didn't take. My common sense tells me that men with and admixture of same-sex attractions, whatever the proportions, are more attracted to masculine females.

    "feminine beauty traits like long, luxurious hair, make-up, lots of skin, etc."

    That's an odd list. The hair, surely, but that can be faked. Maybe Gisele has naturally great hair. That's one. Make-up is neither here nor there, as drag queens can have well-applied make-up as well. And presumably he'd see her without make-up much of the time.

    I don't even know what lots of skin means.

    She would appear feminine compared to Belichik and the Gronk. But that's hardly the test. Brady isn't stranded on a desert island with the Patriots and Gisele. He's out in the world after he exits the stadium, a world full of the vast swathe of womanhood.

    Re odd list, I mean that, while her face is rather masculine, she displays other feminine traits (showing off legs, plunging cleavage (such as there is), etc), so it’s not like Brady is with a girl who looks and acts like a frat boy.

    There was a Seinfeld episode where there was a woman who would alternate between being attractive and scary. I think Gisele is like this. One photo looks pretty, another virtually butchy. It depends some on fat–she’s one of those people who looks better at very low body fat. A little weight gain and she looks like a jowly German farmer. She could never be pleasantly plump and voluptuous.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  166. @whoever
    I feel some sympathy for Browning. (^_^)
    That story reminded me of the first time I heard the phrase "camel toe," and I asked what it meant only to get smirks and eye-rolls.
    Finally, when someone realized I truly did not know what it meant and defined it, I insisted the explanation didn't make sense because camels don't have toes, they have hooves, provoking exasperated looks.
    I kind of get it now, but not really.
    https://i.imgur.com/original/0/Q/3/c/0Q3c1gM

    Camels actually do have toes, not hooves. They are soft, rather like the delightful and eponymous anatomy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whoever
    I did not know that. I stand -- or sit with legs crossed -- corrected. Considering the subject, I shall say, as I believe the Japanese do, hairy gato! (^▽^)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  167. rob says:
    @guest
    The share of women who don't resemble male-to-female transsexuals isn't very small. Most heterosexual males are not attracted to women who look like men. That's not some idiomatic trait possessed by me alone. Brady, who can have his pick of all kinds of women, nevertheless chose one who looks like a man.

    Doesn't mean he's not a "real man." My presumption is that as with a lot of rich, famous, handsome, powerful types he chose on the basis of status. But his wife raises questions instead of answering them. That's the main point.

    The share of women who don’t resemble male-to-female transsexuals isn’t very small. Most heterosexual males are not attracted to women who look like men. That’s not some idiomatic trait possessed by me alone.

    Idiosyncratic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Yes, I think I was autocorrected there.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  168. @Anonym
    I would think that most people of your intelligence would become officers rather than enlisted. You're not a former nuke are you?

    Thank you, and no (I declined the offer because of the six-year contract).

    (Suffice it to say that military recruiters are someplace just below corporate managers and the editorial board of The New York Times but just above serial rapists in any hierarchy of predatory psychopaths bent on cheating young persons out of their potential.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    Thank you, and no (I declined the offer because of the six-year contract).

    I figured as much. While obviously the military attempts to channel the most intelligent recruits into the officer career path, there are certainly exceptions. I didn't realize that these exceptions existed until I met a former nuke who was of the view that his training for that was harder and more intense than university level engineering coursework (which he was completing). It's interesting to take a look at the wikipedia article on it. The enlisted program has a very high attrition rate. No wonder, when you take a look at the coursework.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_Power_School
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  169. When conversing with Australian Gregory R. Copley for 4 minutes in 2013 he said “brilliant” ~3-4 times when I spoke about U.S. immigration policy and the likely future result, secession movements. I felt pretty good about this seeing as some people consider Copley the greatest strategic thinker in Western civilization. Copley’s use of “brilliant” was both an Australian thing and a Sailer/Brimelow thing, seeing as they fine-tuned my thoughts on immigration issues.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  170. @Steve Sailer
    Embrace how age has liberated you from any obligation to be cool.

    So today I asked some young “dude” why someone twice his age and probably twice his weight was going twice as fast and suggested he get his face out of his phone or GTF out of the way. Yeah, I embrace my age.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  171. RobRich says: • Website

    Again, the libertarians are right.

    The real far-Leftist motivation isn’t helping the suffering b BUT hatred of intelligence (self-hatred).

    Genius.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  172. @Steve Sailer
    Embrace how age has liberated you from any obligation to be cool.

    Embrace how age has liberated you from any obligation to be cool.

    I detest familiarity except from the closest of friends and family. When newly married aged 21, I filled out a card for a salesman to call regarding new windows. I wrote my name as Mrs. Joe Schmoe using my husband’s first and last name with Mrs. indicating I was the wife. So, the salesman called and indeed asked for Mrs. Joe Schmoe. I said, I was, and he said that since the card said Mrs. Joe Schmoe, he thought I must be a much older person. Rather than giggle or some such and tell him to call me by first name or something, I just remained silent for a long time until he changed the subject back to the business at hand. I did not choose to buy any windows from him! Perhaps he learned not to assume too much, or not. This was in the 1990′s. To me it is the result of the sexual revolution that men learned they could be overly familiar with young women, even married women!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  173. whoever says: • Website
    @Chrisnonymous
    Camels actually do have toes, not hooves. They are soft, rather like the delightful and eponymous anatomy.

    I did not know that. I stand — or sit with legs crossed — corrected. Considering the subject, I shall say, as I believe the Japanese do, hairy gato! (^▽^)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Hairy gato? Those must foreign loan words. English and... Portuguese? Oh my!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  174. guest says:
    @rob
    The share of women who don’t resemble male-to-female transsexuals isn’t very small. Most heterosexual males are not attracted to women who look like men. That’s not some idiomatic trait possessed by me alone.

    Idiosyncratic.

    Yes, I think I was autocorrected there.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Yeah. rob is automatically pedantic.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  175. NickG says:
    @MBlanc46
    I'm in the UK at this moment. They still say "brilliant". No one's called me "genius" yet.

    I’ve just returned to Blighty after 9 months in the arse end of Africa and it’s more bollocks than brilliant.

    Mind you, the weather’s brilliant; we’re having a heatwave. However my fellow Brits bitch like only us Pommies can when it gets much over 26°, and today was 33° (double it, take off 10% and add 32…so that’s 92°f in old money), you’d think the effing Luftwaffe had returned.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  176. @Steve Sailer
    Embrace how age has liberated you from any obligation to be cool.

    I’ll have plenty of time to be cool (roughly 68 degrees) when I’m dead.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  177. Anonym says:
    @Autochthon
    Thank you, and no (I declined the offer because of the six-year contract).

    (Suffice it to say that military recruiters are someplace just below corporate managers and the editorial board of The New York Times but just above serial rapists in any hierarchy of predatory psychopaths bent on cheating young persons out of their potential.)

    Thank you, and no (I declined the offer because of the six-year contract).

    I figured as much. While obviously the military attempts to channel the most intelligent recruits into the officer career path, there are certainly exceptions. I didn’t realize that these exceptions existed until I met a former nuke who was of the view that his training for that was harder and more intense than university level engineering coursework (which he was completing). It’s interesting to take a look at the wikipedia article on it. The enlisted program has a very high attrition rate. No wonder, when you take a look at the coursework.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_Power_School

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  178. @whoever
    I did not know that. I stand -- or sit with legs crossed -- corrected. Considering the subject, I shall say, as I believe the Japanese do, hairy gato! (^▽^)

    Hairy gato? Those must foreign loan words. English and… Portuguese? Oh my!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  179. @guest
    Yes, I think I was autocorrected there.

    Yeah. rob is automatically pedantic.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
A simple remedy for income stagnation
Confederate Flag Day, State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C. -- March 3, 2007