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From the Harvard Crimson:

Till the Stars in the Firmament Die: Harvard’s Alma Mater and the Making of a Trade School

By PHILIP O. BALSON a day ago

… Yet as the scholarship of the humanities and social sciences has become more postmodern, more politically correct, and, yes, more centered on issues of inclusion and belonging, the pure and applied sciences overwhelmingly have not. In response, my peers have voted with their feet. From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively. This cannot merely be due to rising interest in science and technology, as psychology, a humanistic department that still focuses on method over values, has seen concentrator numbers hold steady. …

And enrollment in my department pales in comparison not only to other departments, but also (say it softly) to the history department at Yale. This spring, five Yale history courses had over 100 students planning to enroll. Last fall, 176 students attended Paul M. Kennedy’s “Military History of the West Since 1500.”

But that’s boy history.

Harvard offers no similarly broad course and no Cold War survey course. Instead, we have “Cold War in the Global South.” Meanwhile, History 1046: “Islamicate Societies to 1500” “addresses the topics of gender and religious minorities in Islamicate societies,” in a lecture with just six undergraduate enrollees.

Apparently that’s not girl history …

As the humanistic departments have focused increasing attention on ensuring everyone feels included and studied in their syllabi, they have seemingly cared less about whether undergraduates as a whole actually want their new offerings….

But the laudable push for inclusion and the lamentable decline of the most inclusive departments are perversely linked. With a new president and dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences incoming, we now have an opportunity to seriously address this phenomenon of bright flight. …

The upshot, five or 10 years from now, could be humanistic departments that increasingly reflect our proclaimed values even as they teach fewer and fewer of our students. Nobody wins in that scenario, in which Harvard becomes a Vassar joined at the hip to an MIT.

 
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  1. Harvard offers no similarly broad course and no Cold War survey course. Instead, we have “Cold War in the Global South.”

    I’ve repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You’d expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it’s sparsely covered.

    My surmise is that academics saw themselves as losers in the Cold War in some sense, and aren’t eager to study it as a result.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    The Cold War was a fraud. It wasn't fake for the poor bastards who got killed or wounded in Korea or Vietnam. It was all too real for them. The ruling classes of the Soviet Empire and the American Empire used the spiritual and existential dread of nuclear war to reformulate their populations into something more docile, more materialistic and more likely to follow orders on a continent wide scale.

    The global economy was a fraud. It was always a smash and grab job from the get-go. Central banker shysters just whittle another ring on the magic debt stick. How much longer can they do it?

    When the average White Core American peasant figures out that globalization and financialization are evil frauds meant to steal away his country he will be set for patriotic retaliation. Then you will see the ruling class rats scurry off to China or Paraguay to escape the pitchforks.
    , @the Supreme Gentleman

    I’ve repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You’d expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it’s sparsely covered.
     
    Did you mean to write "highest...ratio", or did I misunderstand your point?
    , @Anon
    In college in the 1980s, I had an international relations course that turned out to be nothing but a history of the Cold War, and I'll tell you, even though it was taught by a very good prof (I had him for another course, so I know for certain) the Cold War was a very, very dull subject, and NOBODY came out looking well, either Soviets of US. Frankly, I see the entire Cold War as nothing but a blip in the history of countries. Since it's behind us now, I'm not surprised it's been dropped by academics everywhere.

    Ultimately, if the subject isn't interesting or fun, it's going to die as a subject.
    , @syonredux

    I’ve repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You’d expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it’s sparsely covered.
     
    I have some colleagues who specialize in "Cold War Cultural Studies." Lots of SF and movies for the exegesis: North by North-West, Heinlein's Puppet Masters, Invasion of the Body-Snatchers (both the book and the film), The Manchurian Candidate (both the book and the film), etc
    , @J.Ross
    Yes. At the time it justified huge government expenditure and programming in academia, but I have seen an Arbusto-worthy incuriosity coupled with an emotional nostalgia for a dishonestly idealized Soyuz. There is a feeling that overall, socialism won, and that the fall of the Soviet Union was a combination of illegitimate and deplorable Reaganite terrorism with the racial inferiority of the Slav. I hear special features all the time on BBC radio examining every last toenail claimed to have been ripped out by the Apartheid South African "regime." There is never any mention of the Soviet-sponsored Communist terrorists that government was fighting, let alone of the normality of terror and want in the Bolshevik empire itself. "The Americans" is about as rigorous as "Man Men" and, funnily enough, along the same lines. There is apparently lots of money for any film project showing the very small and non-representative "fun" side of Communism, such as "Goodbye, Lenin," but also now including wierd ersatz documentaries and cartoon clips on YouTube, many held up by younger Eastern Europeans who see Communism as a vague part of their heritage. About the best treatment of actually considering that communism wasn't fun in pop culture is still ("the Long Walk" and) "The Lives Of Others," which I cannot mention without thinking of "Baader Meinhof Complex." BMC is a very good movie and pretty accurate in general, but it is viciously propagandisticon some points. Leftist violence is depicted amorally (this is an important thing to watch for because it's also all over our propaganda programming. The idea is to be ostensibly condemning the act but actually intimidating the audience. Cf "The Counselor," both the overall story, but also in brief the Green Hornet's answer to the dog food saleswoman). Right-wing identification is depicted as partly justifying left-wing violence (these first two ideas were also on display in Mesrine -- Nazi collaboration is a moral crisis justifying crime, a rightwing journalist gets beaten and we're not saying it's right but we are going to take our time showing it). Most brazenly, no firearm in BMC is ever handled properly, not once, not even in the hands of a police officer or an instructor. Compare the depiction of firearms in Rumpole: the idea is to create a hysterical Overton kick in which guns are characterized as too inherently dangerous to have such a thing as a responsible use. tldr you'll shoot your eye out.
    The inpression I got from academics studying Soviet history is often that they thought theBolsheviks were well-intentioned but technically imprecise (and their judgment of the peasantry was often the same as that of the Bolsheviks).
    , @Paul Jolliffe
    Well, maybe that's because the Cold War did not end in a dramatic bang (thank goodness).

    But, our 1992 "victory" brought about not a better America, but one in which many of us feel increasingly disaffected and uneasy about the future.

    To me, the Cold War is fascinating/horrifying because most people have no idea that the world really did almost end - twice! - in the 1980's, not to mention the tension of the early 1960's.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-505009/September-26th-1983-The-day-world-died.html

    https://youtu.be/5R87YhYbnkA
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  2. The Puritan divine dirtbags who started Harvard were East Anglian bug-eyed bog dwellers back in England. Now the arrogant money-grubbers are holding the rest of us over an open fire. The worst sin according to the Puritan divines was to sleep through one of their boring sermons.

    New England maritime bourgeoisie drug dealers got the Chinks hooked on drugs and they brought the loot back and gave it to Harvard.

    Harvard has been the original spawning ground of the treasonous rats in the WASP / Jew ruling class.

    Harvard is a hedge fund with a school attached to it.

    Harvard Hates America; America Don’t Much Care For Harvard.

    Tweet from 2015:

    One for laughs from 2015:

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    • Replies: @Anon
    The Harvard teachers used to get mad if you slept through a sermon because you denied their authority. Now they get mad if you ignore their sermons on global warming, rascism, etc., and deny their authority. They haven't changed a whit. It's just as well they are turning into a trade school. I'm waiting for the name change to Cambridge College of Agriculture and Mechanics.

    A warning for Harvard: If they do become a science and engineering school, expect those donations to drop off dramatically. Scientists and engineers don't make as much money as wealthy WASP businessmen.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The worst sin according to the Puritan divines was to sleep through one of their boring sermons.
     
    The worst sin of the Puritans was denying the sacramental nature of marriage. The anchor was barely dry on the Mayflower when William Bradford made that pronouncement.

    Now we see the result of what happens when you turn something that properly belongs to the church over to the state, which is spectacularly ill-equipped to handle it.

    But people are more interested in that miscegenous marriage down in Virginia.
    , @bartok

    The Puritan divine dirtbags who started Harvard were East Anglian bug-eyed bog dwellers back in England.
     
    I think you're trying to channel Moldbug, but maybe read a bit closer. High-church wealthy Puritans and low-church Congregationalists, etc., worked together to conquer Massachusetts for the Left.

    The Puritans were never poor.
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    Puritan sermons were not boring; they were traumatic. Look at "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.". The idea was to make small children afraid to go to bed.
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  3. Well done, Philip Balson.

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  4. As someone who has been forced to drink from the spigot of “inclusiveness” in order to graduate, suck it, Harvard.

    The upshot, five or 10 years from now, could be humanistic departments that increasingly reflect our proclaimed values even as they teach fewer and fewer of our students. Nobody wins in that scenario,

    That’s where you’re wrong, kiddo.

    As an additional point where we are winning, the white intake is at historical lows, actually less than 50% now, while the number of white goys is even lower than that.

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  5. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    What is this ‘inclusion’ stuff?

    A subject is a subject. It is what it is. It doesn’t exist to make people FEEL included.

    And what does it even mean? If you teach Japanese history and cover stuff like Rape of Nanking, it might hurt the feelings of Japanese-American students? So, the story must be changed to Japanese going to Nanking to pass out free food and become friends with Chinese? I suppose Japanese-American students will feel more ‘included’ in gooey way.

    Or what would ‘inclusive’ film studies be like? Since there are too many white male directors — Kubrick, Welles, Lang, Ford, Hitchcock, Hawks, etc — , they must include some obscure film-maker from Burma? But if you do that, won’t kids from 200 other nations feel un-included? The world has over 200 nations. So, should film studies class include a film by each nation to make everyone feel ‘included’?

    If a dwarf is a student in a literary class, must there be reading of a dwarf poet?

    Who thinks like this?

    Of course, when it comes to ‘inclusion’, it usually means homos, Jews, and blacks. But in some areas, homo need no ‘inclusion’ since they are very well represented… like in the arts. And Jews are well-represented in so many intellectual fields. Stressing Jewishness is most unnecessary since you find Jewish names all over the place in literature, philosophy, film, music. And blacks don’t need special attention in American popular music. So, if there’s a classroom of many different peoples, ‘inclusion’ doesn’t mean all of them. It means they must share in the ‘inclusion’ of Jews, homos, and blacks. But the media still act as homos are some pitiable group that needs more of our love(in a dumb nation where people think 25% of the people are homo). The media still go on and on about Jewish this and Jewish that. It’s as if Jews don’t get enough respect when US foreign policy is all about serving Israel. Trump shows a bit of sympathy for white working class, and rich Jews get all antsy about how it’s so unfair to Jews. And blacks who dominate sports and pop music.. they bitch about how there not be more blacks in this or that.

    [MORE]

    Now, the biggest problem with ‘inclusion’ is maybe women, and this is where feminists makes a big fuss. Unlike Jews, homos, and even blacks, women are half the population, but they’ve been less prominent in many fields even though some made their mark esp in the 20th century, a good number of them being Jewesses: Rand, Sontag, Kael, Friedan, Ferber, Hellman, Jong, Carole King, etc.

    But then, the very cult of ‘inclusion’ is the thing that holds so many women back. To attain greatness, you need individuality than inclusionality. It’s no wonder that women like Sontag and Kael did so much more than today’s pampered PC female dolts who emphasize consensus, even to the point where most of sisterhood has been browbeaten into acknowledging men with puds and balls wigs and dresses as ‘women’. What had been studied as ‘camp’ by Sontag has become Champ.
    Kael didn’t join feminism because she didn’t want to be hemmed in by the sisterhood. Sontag didn’t come out as homo because she didn’t want special favors(or demerits) as a homo or bi. She wanted respect simply as a critic and commentator.

    As PC made women into inclusionals than individuals, they all sound alike. They’ve become Stepford Sisters. And their minds are like jelly. So, when the official line was ‘pornography is crime against women’, they all droned on. Later, when the new line is ‘slut pride is empowering’, they all chanted the same crap. And then, ‘me too, me too’, and all of sudden, they were back to acting like poor little damsels hunted by horny men. Poor little damsels wearing pussy costumers yelling ‘dont’ grab my pussy’.

    Greatness is never inclusional. It is individual. Welles got himself the best talent to work with. In an age when inclusionals feel obligated to praise dumb STAR WARS movies or some idiot movie about Wakanda, there too much puppetry and parrotry.

    All said and done, there was a reason why Dylan, Stones, and Beatles won out over Joan Baez and Phil Ochs. Message is secondary to the power of expression.

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    • Replies: @jim jones
    The Inclusivity Centre at a nearby school is where they stick the disruptive kids.
    , @George Taylor

    And what does it even mean? If you teach Japanese history and cover stuff like Rape of Nanking, it might hurt the feelings of Japanese-American students? So, the story must be changed to Japanese going to Nanking to pass out free food and become friends with Chinese? I suppose Japanese-American students will feel more ‘included’ in gooey way.
     
    Upon visiting Hawaii some 15 years ago I did some of the traditional tourist visits that included the Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor. Before you boat over to the memorial they present a film on the history WWII in the Pacific from the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the nuking of Hiroshima. At time and I hear it still is, Hawaii is popular with Japanese tourist. I'd say about a third of the visitors that day were Japanese tourist. Overall the White audience had much more emotional response to both the film and the actual memorial than the Japanese tourist. Not sure it was gooey or otherwise for them.
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  6. English and History have declined, but what’s happened in the explicitly radicalized departments — African-American Studies and Women’s Studies? Have they declined too, or have they grown by peeling off students from the traditional humanities?

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  7. Solution:

    Step 1: Expel all current white goy students and refuse admission to any more white goyim. Replace them with more Jews and PoC, especially non-Asian PoC.

    Step 2: ????

    Step 3: Profit!

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    • Replies: @Cortes
    From Ivy League to Oy Veh League?

    (Must have been done before).
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  8. As university humanity departments have championed these hard left political causes and “values”, they have lost respect of regular people, and lost the interest of regular undergrads.

    The STEM subjects have aggressively avoided the politics and “values” and even this crowd still genuinely respects them. And younger people respect them as well and are interested in studying those subjects.

    That makes perfect sense.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The STEM subjects have aggressively avoided the politics and “values” and even this crowd still genuinely respects them.
     
    Not for long. Maybe not in engineering, but the whole gender/LGBT/trans equity mania is coming to science departments. It's effect will be seen first in faculty hiring, and among departmental committees and in matters dealing with graduate students. But as the result of all that will be the hiring of a cadre of ideologues, you can expect all that stuff to eventually filter down to the point where undergraduates will be exposed to it.

    Science won't really be about science anymore, but about "social justice".
    , @ben tillman

    As university humanity departments have championed these hard left political causes and “values”, they have lost respect of regular people, and lost the interest of regular undergrads.
     
    Don't forget about the alumni.
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  9. That sounds a tad depressed.

    (Lose / lose options like the ones drawn out here, by and large, are not that uplifting according to their very nature – (lose (track of interesting subjects)/ lose (interested students) looks like a widely underrated phenomenon).

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  10. ” From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively. This cannot merely be due to rising interest in science and technology, as psychology, a humanistic department that still focuses on method over values, has seen concentrator numbers hold steady. …”

    My first guess reading that was that Harvard had started admitting a lot more Asians for some reason.

    Be fascinating to see an ethnicity breakdown of class enrollments at Harvard. If we had a man on the yard, we could get a firsthand report by just observing who was walking into which lecture hall at a given time.

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    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    "Concentrator"

    Does that mean students? Or does it mean students majoring in...? Can a student have a different major and concentration? And please, tell me about budgets and faculty numbers. That would tell the real story.
    , @Anonymous
    Here are some links to info. on the demographics of Harvard’s students.

    http://features.thecrimson.com/2017/freshman-survey/makeup/

    http://features.thecrimson.com/2016/freshman-survey/makeup/

    http://features.thecrimson.com/2015/freshman-survey/makeup/

    https://nypost.com/2017/08/04/minorities-make-up-majority-of-harvards-incoming-class/

    , @Yan Shen
    Isn't the entire Harvard lawsuit thing related to the fact that % of Asians at Harvard has more or less fluctuated around the same narrow range over the past however many years?
    , @slumber_j
    "My first guess reading that was that Harvard had started admitting a lot more Asians for some reason."

    Yeah, probably. But more important is the top-down attitude shift that's happened over the last 10-15 years: Harvard has become way more open about being gross, which is a direct consequence of its secret terror at the prospect of being second to Stanford.

    If you're an alumnus, you can smell it on the the spam that clogs your inbox: the acrid stench of branding. The Drew Gilpin Faust presidency at Harvard coincided with a very clear push to emulate--and thereby quash the perceived threat posed by--Stanford.

    Among the undergraduates the four-year experience is now essentially The Apprentice: Harvard Edition. It has been really weird to witness, and it's very real.
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  11. It’s almost as if industry wants trained workers and wants it’s humanities studies types to do that on their own time and on their own dime.,..

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    • Replies: @The Plutonium Kid
    That's one of the many problems you get when the only thing that matters to you is next quarter's profit and loss statement.
    , @Bill
    Not only that. If you were to teach Westerners the actual history of the West, then they would have a "place" from which to legitimately critique and resist their masters. Better to have them atomized, illegitimized, and demoralized. Good little individualists. But, hey, don't despair, we'll sell you heroin!
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  12. From that article:

    “Snappily entitled “Pursuing Excellence on a Foundation of Inclusion,” the report consists of almost 80 brightly colored pages and contains eight recommendations. One of those eight, which has attracted notable media attention, changes the school’s alma mater. Its last lines will now read, “Be the herald of Light, and the bearer of Love, Till the stars in the firmament die.” (The latter part replaces “Till the stock of the Puritans die.”)”

    And at the end written by this young man:

    “I have no doubt that Harvard will remain an excellent institution to attend, get a banking job, and get out. And as a Jewish Cold War historian, I feel as little ownership over the distant stars as I do over Puritan stock. At Commencement just over a year from now, I will happily sing the alma mater’s new lines. I will do so next to my roommates, who study biology and computer science. Amidst the chorus I will look over at them, fearing that my liberal arts Harvard, inclusive and shrinking, may meet a lonely fate long before the stars in the firmament begin to flicker.”

    They probably did the right thing changing the alma mater. I think the “stock of the Puritans” died a couple decades ago.

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    • Replies: @Alfa158
    I didn’t know there even was a Jewish Cold War. Who were the antagonists? Orthodox versus Reform? Ashkenazi versus Sephardic? Zionists versus Assimalists? Sounds like an esoteric field of study to me. What kind of a career can you have with a degree in that other than teaching classes on the Jewish Cold War?
    , @Neuday
    My forefather arrived in 1637 in Mass., from England. We're not dead. Just really pissed.
    , @slumber_j
    I dunno, my children get The Mayflower from one side and 1630s Massachusetts from mine, along with a bunch of other Northwestern European ancestors. (Plus they're 1/8 Hungarian, for cheekbone enhancement. Spicy!)

    There's plenty of Puritan stock sloshing around out there.
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  13. Lot says:

    From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively

    Harvard students rapidly abandoning SJW dominated majors in favor of useful ones like CS and Statistics is yet another data point showing the young people of today are in most respects superior to those in the past, especially when you control for race.

    They also have less sex in high school and use drugs, alcohol and tobacco far less than before, and commit less crime.

    The only negative thing you can really say about them using objective data is they are low-T lardbutts.

    A few more 2008/2016 comparisons

    African American Studies 21 to 6
    Comparative Lit 48 to 16
    Comparative Religion 34 to 19
    Sociology 144 to 116
    Women’s Studies 10 to 14
    Anthropology 126 to 43
    Social Studies 296 to 246

    Mechanical Engineering (new major) 0 to 64
    Electrical Engineering (new major) 0 to 39

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    • Replies: @Simon in London
    "Anthropology 126 to 43"

    The Programme I run has ca 100-120 postgrads typically. If it went from 126 to 43 quite a lot of people would be out of a job, likely including me!
    , @S. Anonyia
    They have sex and drink less because they are shut-ins with semi-autistic social skills, not because they are better. Just because they aren’t dumb enough to waste their tuition dollars doesn’t mean they aren’t still left wing, especially those from upper middle class backgrounds. Based on what I’ve seen, they will probably be even less likely to get married/have kids than milennials.
    , @International Jew
    You're looking at the bright side! The pessimistic view is that despite some dropoff, hundreds of the brightest kids in the country are still majoring in pernicious nonsense.
    , @ben tillman

    Harvard students rapidly abandoning SJW dominated majors in favor of useful ones like CS and Statistics is yet another data point showing the young people of today are in most respects superior to those in the past, especially when you control for race.
     
    Surely you jest. They simply face a different world.
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  14. I used to take these bullshiticate studies myself in undergrad because they tended to be easy. I assume that’s why 90% of the other students in those courses took them as well. Is this not a motivation at Harvard? Perhaps these post modern nonsense courses are somehow not comparably easy at harvard? Or perhaps they are but Harvard students are unconcerned about taking easy classes to get As because Harvard students are really good at getting As.

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    • Replies: @Barnard
    I think the grade inflation in the Ivy League is so bad that they don't need to take these courses for an easy A. Any non STEM course will do for an easy A.
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  15. I suspect the increasing number of Asian students has a role to play in this.

    Tiger moms don’t force their kids to do extra homework every day so they can go to an Ivy League school and study the humanities, they do it so they can enter programs that have a direct path to high paying and prestigious jobs.

    Once upon a time a math degree led to an academic career, now its seen as a gateway to a career as a hedge fund manager. Hence its popularity with those students who prefer commerce over academia.

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    • Replies: @little spoon
    It is well known that the percentage of asian students at schools like Harvard has not increased despite the percentage of Americans who are Asian increasing.
    , @Bernardo Pizzaro Cortez Del Castro
    Many more half Asian students , with Anglo names , they claim to be white to increase their acceptance rates...
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  16. It should hardly be surprising that hard-science devotees with 130+ IQs would want the classes they’re forced to take as distributional requirements to at least proffer legitimate scholarship.

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  17. Harvard students rapidly abandoning SJW dominated majors in favor of useful ones like CS and Statistics is yet another data point showing the young people of today are in most respects superior to those in the past, especially when you control for race.

    This is what jumped out at me while reading this posting. It is very encouraging to me.

    I think the kids are going to be just fine.

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  18. How is Philosophy, a non-SJW, high-IQ but almost totally pointless subject doing?

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    • Replies: @little spoon
    I think that's a key question. It seems that from 2008 to 2018, phil went from 48 to 51. Classics didn't change that much from 34 to 26.

    These are indications that the shift away from humanities majors is not necessarily reflecting a declining interest in humanities based subjects. It really might be an exodus from post-modernism.
    , @JeremiahJohnbalaya
    Actually, i'm intimately familiar with SJWs/hardcore-leftists taking over the philosophy department at a major public university. They controlled the hiring process to the point that they wouldn't hire even moderates, and they tried to physically intimidate/provoke conservatives. Liberals really do ruin everything they touch.
    , @MBlanc46
    Pointless according to what, and whose, standard?
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  19. Lot says:

    Ann Coulter interviewed in the NY Times

    (warning video autoplays)

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/30/opinion/ann-coulter-trump-former-trumpers.html

    On Trump’s No Wall

    I don’t know what more horrible thing you could come up with than violating your central campaign promise that became the chant and the theme of the campaign that he promised at every single rally.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    President Trump got tremendous crowd reactions from the get-go in the early stages of the GOP presidential primary campaign when he would thunder out "we have to build a wall on the border."

    Israel has a fencing system and a substantial wall on its borders. I don't know why Israel chose to use walls in some sectors and a fencing system in others; but the fences and walls keep the infiltrators out of Israel. The wall looks like it has a massive foundation that protrudes a few feet from the ground and it also has towers to provide security.

    President Trump must begin attacking Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell for their failure to provide for the safety and security of the United States in regards to immigration. Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell push open borders mass immigration and amnesty for illegal alien invaders. Mid-term independent voters want to hear Trump go after both Democrats and Republicans on immigration. Trump must call for Ryan and McConnell to be removed from power.

    Tweet from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/634071092215345153
    , @anon
    Ann Coulter speaks the truth. Trump's failure to get anything done on immigration will be his downfall. He's not even trying, next month another 85,000 will easily pick up their H1b visa, he hasn't done jack on OPT, or H1b spousal work permit. At this point we should just be happy that he at least hasn't expanded the H1b program, but wait for it, he might just do it. What a disappointment he's turned into. He'd better make good on the threat to end NAFTA and foreign aid to Mexico if they don't stop the caravan, and send the national guards down there to seal off the border or he is toast.
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  20. Islamicate

    I’ve never heard this term before.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    iSteve, it's like fornicate, but where you take it in the rear for the sake of including Muslims.
    , @benjaminl
    I think it comes from this guy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Hodgson

    Most importantly, he distinguished between Islamic (religious) and Islamicate phenomena, which were the products of regions in which Muslims were culturally dominant, but were not, properly speaking religious. For example, wine poetry was certainly Islamicate, but not Islamic. This distinction helped bring to the fore the rich cultural worlds that Islam developed within.
     
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  21. @little spoon
    I used to take these bullshiticate studies myself in undergrad because they tended to be easy. I assume that's why 90% of the other students in those courses took them as well. Is this not a motivation at Harvard? Perhaps these post modern nonsense courses are somehow not comparably easy at harvard? Or perhaps they are but Harvard students are unconcerned about taking easy classes to get As because Harvard students are really good at getting As.

    I think the grade inflation in the Ivy League is so bad that they don’t need to take these courses for an easy A. Any non STEM course will do for an easy A.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    I think the grade inflation in the Ivy League is so bad that they don’t need to take these courses for an easy A. Any non STEM course will do for an easy A.
     
    Not all Ivies. Princeton went through a process of grade deflation a few years ago. Harvard and Yale, though, are terrified to make the first move, lest their graduates be out-competed by those of the other institution in the jobs and post-graduate studies marketplace.

    Cornell never did inflate its grades in its core Arts and Sciences school and still grades to a B average. I am reliably informed that this is a sore point with the undergraduates there currently, who will face uninformed employers with a preference for Brown and Dartmouth graduates instead. ImmigrantFromFormerUSSR, who used to post here, has also talked about the problem.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2013/12/04/harvard-colleges-median-grade-is-an-a-dean-admits/?utm_term=.421c82ef4db2

    A humorous take:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/15/opinion/sunday/leaked-harvards-grading-rubric.html

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  22. @Lot

    From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively
     
    Harvard students rapidly abandoning SJW dominated majors in favor of useful ones like CS and Statistics is yet another data point showing the young people of today are in most respects superior to those in the past, especially when you control for race.

    They also have less sex in high school and use drugs, alcohol and tobacco far less than before, and commit less crime.

    The only negative thing you can really say about them using objective data is they are low-T lardbutts.

    A few more 2008/2016 comparisons

    African American Studies 21 to 6
    Comparative Lit 48 to 16
    Comparative Religion 34 to 19
    Sociology 144 to 116
    Women's Studies 10 to 14
    Anthropology 126 to 43
    Social Studies 296 to 246

    Mechanical Engineering (new major) 0 to 64
    Electrical Engineering (new major) 0 to 39

    “Anthropology 126 to 43″

    The Programme I run has ca 100-120 postgrads typically. If it went from 126 to 43 quite a lot of people would be out of a job, likely including me!

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  23. @Lot

    From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively
     
    Harvard students rapidly abandoning SJW dominated majors in favor of useful ones like CS and Statistics is yet another data point showing the young people of today are in most respects superior to those in the past, especially when you control for race.

    They also have less sex in high school and use drugs, alcohol and tobacco far less than before, and commit less crime.

    The only negative thing you can really say about them using objective data is they are low-T lardbutts.

    A few more 2008/2016 comparisons

    African American Studies 21 to 6
    Comparative Lit 48 to 16
    Comparative Religion 34 to 19
    Sociology 144 to 116
    Women's Studies 10 to 14
    Anthropology 126 to 43
    Social Studies 296 to 246

    Mechanical Engineering (new major) 0 to 64
    Electrical Engineering (new major) 0 to 39

    They have sex and drink less because they are shut-ins with semi-autistic social skills, not because they are better. Just because they aren’t dumb enough to waste their tuition dollars doesn’t mean they aren’t still left wing, especially those from upper middle class backgrounds. Based on what I’ve seen, they will probably be even less likely to get married/have kids than milennials.

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  24. @Lot
    Ann Coulter interviewed in the NY Times

    (warning video autoplays)

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/30/opinion/ann-coulter-trump-former-trumpers.html

    On Trump's No Wall


    I don’t know what more horrible thing you could come up with than violating your central campaign promise that became the chant and the theme of the campaign that he promised at every single rally.
     

    President Trump got tremendous crowd reactions from the get-go in the early stages of the GOP presidential primary campaign when he would thunder out “we have to build a wall on the border.”

    Israel has a fencing system and a substantial wall on its borders. I don’t know why Israel chose to use walls in some sectors and a fencing system in others; but the fences and walls keep the infiltrators out of Israel. The wall looks like it has a massive foundation that protrudes a few feet from the ground and it also has towers to provide security.

    President Trump must begin attacking Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell for their failure to provide for the safety and security of the United States in regards to immigration. Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell push open borders mass immigration and amnesty for illegal alien invaders. Mid-term independent voters want to hear Trump go after both Democrats and Republicans on immigration. Trump must call for Ryan and McConnell to be removed from power.

    Tweet from 2015:

    Read More
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  25. @Sunbeam
    " From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively. This cannot merely be due to rising interest in science and technology, as psychology, a humanistic department that still focuses on method over values, has seen concentrator numbers hold steady. …"

    My first guess reading that was that Harvard had started admitting a lot more Asians for some reason.

    Be fascinating to see an ethnicity breakdown of class enrollments at Harvard. If we had a man on the yard, we could get a firsthand report by just observing who was walking into which lecture hall at a given time.

    “Concentrator”

    Does that mean students? Or does it mean students majoring in…? Can a student have a different major and concentration? And please, tell me about budgets and faculty numbers. That would tell the real story.

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    • Replies: @Lot
    Concentrator at Harvard means exactly the same as major.
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  26. Somewhat OT: Black apologists constantly complain that IQ tests are “culturally biased” and that this explains the differences in both mean and standard deviation between the scores of blacks and whites.
    Has anyone ever developed an intelligence test that’s “culturally biased” in the opposite direction? I mean a serious test, not some joke based on ebonics or ghetto slang. I can’t find one.

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    • Replies: @anon

    Has anyone ever developed an intelligence test that’s “culturally biased” in the opposite direction? I mean a serious test, not some joke based on ebonics or ghetto slang. I can’t find one.
     
    Anything that involves written words or pictures is culturally biased. The only non-culturally biased IQ tests are ones that do not involve anything on a piece of paper, e.g. rapping skills, sense of rhythm or basketball skills.
    , @Yan Shen
    Don't blacks tend to skew more towards verbal and away from spatial/mathematical reasoning? The vast majority of black academics are in softer social science and humanities areas. The irony of blacks complaining about culturally biased tests is that they actually tend to do relatively better in such culturally biased , more verbally loaded tests.

    I suspect the black deficit would be particularly high on something like the ravens.

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  27. … a Vassar joined at the hip to an MIT.

    That actually sounds like a nice couple. They’d have a bright and happy future together.

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    • Replies: @Mishra
    If only. Vassar students tend to be pissy homos and angry dykes, and MIT students may be among the ugliest creatures this side of a warthog. But we can dream, can't we?
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  28. Any data on how many of those in liberal arts are women? What was the gender breakdown of those concentrations 10 years ago?

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Is Tiny Duck retiring from trollhood?
    , @anon
    Tiny, you asked a reasonable question! What's gotten into you?
    , @Anon
    Td, whatever you do, don't give up on le trollen... We've had enough disappointments as it is, what with Old Ivy changing the lyrics to their Alma mater; I actually didn't realize that still existed but it's a tragic day
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  29. I would want to see the breakdown of majors by race, sex, etc.

    I have a female family member who is a Harvard undergraduate. She is a bright, diligent girl but like most girls not a math genius, in other words she is not capable of coming up with a creative solution to a math or physics problem which is different from problems she has practiced.

    20 or 30 years ago, someone like her would have taken Physics her first semester and then quickly switched to something like History, etc. But she’s getting A’s in her Math and Physics classes.

    So it could be what’s going on is that STEM type fields are getting watered down at places like Harvard so that more girls are studying them, and this is responsible for the exodus from History.

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    • Replies: @anon
    Interesting. I have read that it's nearly impossible to flunk out of Harvard, the average grade is an A-, and 90% graduate with honors each year. I didn't think they would go that far as to water down STEM classes, but looks like for these libtards, the end always justifies the means. It's not just for the women either, I'm sure they have quotas to pass more "minority" engineers, architects, computer scientists. Whatever Harvard does, the rest of academia follows.

    Unchecked power always corrupts, and libtards have had unchecked power in media, academia and the deep state for at least 5 decades. American is plunging down the abyss in the hands of these corrupt libtards, with education leading the way.

    , @TheJester
    But, as we are told, males and females ... and Blacks, Whites, and Asians all have different learning styles. The "old" STEM classes only addressed the traditional, rigorous White male learning style. Now, it's time to make amends and make room for female, minority, and other creative learning styles in math, physics, etc.

    As an axiom, since everyone is equal in IQ and other capabilities, one will not know one has arrived at this until all student grades in all courses are the same ... that is, that all possible learning styles have been accommodated. Therefore, the fact that almost everyone at Harvard makes an "A" or "A-" in STEM as well as humanities courses is testimony that Harvard is leading academia in this revolutionary approach to education.

    I know this sounds like nonsense, but the whole point of diversity is to prove that there is no diversity. The whole point of accommodating the different race- and gender-based learning styles is to prove there are no such things as race and gender. The objective is to "normalize" education to prove that everyone is the same ... and that race, gender, and IQ are no longer relevant. If you don't get this, you don't get what Harvard and contemporary academia are about.

    I apologize for not being succinct in my explanation. I'm trying to sort of this out as best I can. It's heavy stuff!
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  30. @jcd1974
    I suspect the increasing number of Asian students has a role to play in this.

    Tiger moms don't force their kids to do extra homework every day so they can go to an Ivy League school and study the humanities, they do it so they can enter programs that have a direct path to high paying and prestigious jobs.

    Once upon a time a math degree led to an academic career, now its seen as a gateway to a career as a hedge fund manager. Hence its popularity with those students who prefer commerce over academia.

    It is well known that the percentage of asian students at schools like Harvard has not increased despite the percentage of Americans who are Asian increasing.

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  31. Harvard’s new president

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_S._Bacow

    Jew from Michigan, married to a pediatrician’s daughter from Jacksonville, FL, who had that something something the WaPo harpy lacked.

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  32. @DFH
    How is Philosophy, a non-SJW, high-IQ but almost totally pointless subject doing?

    I think that’s a key question. It seems that from 2008 to 2018, phil went from 48 to 51. Classics didn’t change that much from 34 to 26.

    These are indications that the shift away from humanities majors is not necessarily reflecting a declining interest in humanities based subjects. It really might be an exodus from post-modernism.

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  33. Inclusion. Just another word for narcissism. I must see my own image reflected in everything I learn. BS.

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  34. Deeply depressing, except for young Mr Balson himself, who is a sterling example of the best that the USA can still offer.
    He is a National Merit Scholar form Roxbury Latin, the oldest uninterrupted (still) all boys school in the USA, with a tiny enrollment of 300 and an endowment of near to $200 million.
    He is one of six children, all sparklingly clean-cut. His family is obviously well off and well-travelled – even Santa Barbara seems to be a family haunt, South Africa and the Baltic too (the J effect perhaps?)
    His facebook page shows a life-style and a set of ultra preppy friends who would make even Frank Merriweather (think Yale) envious.
    And, despite the off-putting virtue signalling (which I suspect is no more than that), he appears to be of a conservative and thoughtful nature.

    The depressing part is not only the tale of woe he recounts but also the reaction of too many of you here.
    The idea that science and math are all that matter is barbarism pure and simple.
    The civilised man wants to know why and not merely how. For that he needs the history of our race, the philosophy of our fathers, and the theology of the (uncorrupted) Church.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dearieme
    An uncorrupted church? Not an easy thing to find.
    , @Charles Pewitt
    Give me control of the electronics of the American Empire and the military and I'll hunt down the shyster who only wants control of the currency. An empire of bases says Chalmers Johnson, but really the American Empire is an empire of electronics. Electronics is the game, we must assume the electronics fellows have read some Shakespeare and Thomas Hardy and the like. You can do both.

    We must be practical in the manner of our approach to retaking control of the American Empire. Brute force deployed therapeutically has rendered many Whites drugged out zombies. Those drugged out bastards must be abandoned.

    The focus must be on getting the Great Lakes Germans and the Southern Anglo-Celts together in a fighting force. This Trumpian demographic combination is the one that frightens the ruling class of the American Empire.

    Explicit White Identity Politics Will Win
    , @PSR
    He needs a little life-seasoning though. Like limiting access to his Facebook page, for example.
    , @syonredux

    His facebook page shows a life-style and a set of ultra preppy friends who would make even Frank Merriweather (think Yale) envious.
     
    Frank Merriwell.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Merriwell
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  35. >>>Nobody wins in that scenario, in which Harvard becomes a Vassar joined at the hip to an MIT.

    Harvard has an engineering school. Offers majors in Mechanical, Electrical, Computer, Biological and others. Has anybody known, or even heard of somebody who graduated Harvard engineering? I have never met and am not aware of a Harvard engineering graduate.

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    • Replies: @donut
    Science, technology, medicine, and mathematics
    Name Class year Notability Reference(s)
    Roger Adams (1889–1971) College 1909, PhD 1912 Pioneering organic chemist [88]
    Howard H. Aiken (1900–1973) M.A. 1937; PhD 1939 Computer scientist; designer of the Harvard Mark I [89]
    James Gilbert Baker (1914–2005) PhD 1942 Astronomer, optician [90]
    John Bartlett (1784–1849) College 1805 Minister, founder of Massachusetts General Hospital [91]
    Manjul Bhargava (born 1974) College 1996 Mathematician, Fields Medal winner
    Craig Call Black PhD 1962 Paleontologist
    Francine D. Blau (born 1946) M.A. 1969; PhD 1975 Economist at the National Bureau of Economic Research, first woman to receive the IZA Prize in Labor Economics [92]
    Hilary Blumberg College 1986 Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience [93]
    Dan Bricklin (born 1951) Business 1979 Creator of VisiCalc [94]
    Fred Brooks (born 1931) PhD 1956 Turing Award laureate
    Thomas H. Clark (1893–1996) College 1917; A.M. 1921; PhD 1923 Geologist; one of the top Canadian scientists of the 20th century; namesake of Thomasclarkite [95]
    Stephen Cook S.M. 1962; PhD 1966 Computer scientist [96]
    Don Coppersmith S.M. 1975; PhD 1977 Computer scientist [97]
    Leda Cosmides (born 1957) College 1979; PhD 1985 Evolutionary psychologist [98]
    Robert K. Crane PhD 1950 Biochemist [99]
    Harvey Cushing (1869–1939) Medical 1895 Neurosurgeon
    Elliott Cutler (1888–1947) College 1909, M.D. 1913; Professor Surgeon and medical educator [100]
    Samuel J. Danishefsky (born 1936) PhD 1962 Chemist, winner of the Wolf Prize in Chemistry in 1995/96 [101]
    Neil deGrasse Tyson (born 1958) College 1980 Astrophysicist, Director of the Hayden Planetarium, Television Host [102]
    Fe Del Mundo (1909-2011) Medical 1938 National Scientist of the Philippines; pediatrician; recipient of Ramon Magsaysay Award; devised an incubator made out of bamboo, designed for use in rural communities without electrical power; the first woman admitted as a student at Harvard Medical School
    Russell Doolittle PhD, 1962 Biochemist [103]
    Gideon Dreyfuss PhD 1978 Biochemist, HHMI investigator [104]
    E. Allen Emerson (born 1954) PhD 1981 Turing Award laureate
    Charles Epstein Harvard Medical College 1959 Geneticist; injured by Ted Kaczynski a.k.a. Unabomber [105]
    Paul Farmer (born 1959) Medical 1988; PhD 1990; Professor Founder of Partners in Health [106]
    Lewis J. Feldman PhD 1975 Professor of plant biology at the University of California, Berkeley [107]
    Rabab Fetieh (born 1954) Dental 1987 First Saudi Arabian female orthodontist
    Robert Galambos (1914–2010) PhD Researcher who discovered how bats use echolocation [108]
    Paul Graham (born 1964) S.M. 1988; PhD 1990 Computer programmer and essayist
    Ulysses S. Grant IV (1893–1977) College 1915 Paleontologist
    Brian Greene (born 1963) College 1984 Famous in the world of string theory; Columbia University professor [109]
    Victor Guillemin (born 1937) PhD 1962 Differential geometer [110]
    G. Stanley Hall (1844–1924) PhD 1878 First president of APA and Clark University [111]
    Benjamin Morgan Harrod (1837–1912) College 1856; Civil Engineering 1859 Designed the water and sewerage systems in his native New Orleans, Louisiana [112]
    Donald Olding Hebb (1904–1985) PhD 1936 Canadian psychologist; "father of neuropsychology"; President of the American Psychological Association 1960; Fellow of the Royal Society; Chancellor of McGill University 1970–1974
    Heisuke Hironaka (born 1931) PhD 1960; Professor Mathematician, Fields Medal winner [113]
    Arthur Allen Hoag (1921–1999) PhD 1953 Discovered Hoag's object
    L. Emmett Holt Jr. (1895–1974) College 1916 Pediatrician [114]
    Tony Hsieh (born 1973) College 1995 CEO of online shoe and clothing shop Zappos, co-founder of LinkExchange, author of Delivering Happiness [115]
    Ruth Hubbard (born 1924) PhD 1950 Radcliffe professor, biologist [116]
    Ernest Ingersoll (1852–1946) Naturalist, writer and explorer
    Kenneth E. Iverson (1920-2004) PhD 1954 Turing Award laureate
    Thomas Jaggar PhD 1897 Geologist, founder of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory [117]
    William James (1842–1910) Medical 1869 Philosopher; psychologist; namesake of William James Hall [118]
    Michio Kaku (born 1947) College 1968 Theoretical physicist, activist
    Richard M. Karp (born 1935) College 1955, PhD 1959 Turing Award laureate
    Alfred Kinsey (1894–1956) Sc. D. 1919 Sexologist [119]
    Ivan Krstić College Computer security expert
    Butler Lampson (born 1943) College 1964 Turing Award laureate
    Theodore K. Lawless (1892-1971) dermatologist; Spingarn Medal [120]
    Saul Levin M.A. 1994 Psychiatrist [121]
    Holbrook Mann MacNeille (1907–1973) PhD 1935 Mathematician [122]
    Rustin McIntosh (1894–1986) College 1914; M.D. 1918 Pediatrician [123]
    Curtis T. McMullen (born 1958) PhD 1985 Fields Medal winner
    Scott McNealy (born 1954) College 1976 Co-founder and chairman of Sun Microsystems [124]
    John S. Meyer (1924–2011) Physician
    Marvin Minsky (1927–2016) College 1950 Computer scientist [125]
    Maryam Mirzakhani (1977-2017) PhD 2004 Fields Medal winner
    Sylvanus G. Morley (1883–1948) College 1908 Mayanist scholar and archaeologist [126]
    Robert Tappan Morris (born 1965) College 1987; S.M. 1993; PhD 1999 CS professor at MIT, creator of the first computer worm
    David Mumford (born 1937) College 1957; PhD 1961 Mathematician, Fields Medal winner [127]
    Major General Spurgeon Neel (1919–2003) MPH 1958 Pioneer of aeromedical evacuation [128]
    J. Robert Oppenheimer (1904–1967) College 1925 Physicist, "father of the atomic bomb" [129]
    Tim O'Reilly College 1975 Founder of O'Reilly Media [130]
    George Parkman (1790–1849) College 1809; Medical 1813 Physician, businessman, murder victim [131]
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914) College 1859 Philosopher, mathematician [132]
    A. Sivathanu Pillai (born 1947) Business 1991 Distinguished Scientist and Chief Controller DRDO and CEO of BrahMos Aerospace [133]
    Mark Plotkin (born 1955) Extension 1979 Ethnobotanist; founder of Amazon Conservation Team [134]
    Daniel Quillen (1940–2011) College 1961; PhD 1964 Mathematician, Fields Medal winner [135]
    Christian R. H. Raetz M.D. and PhD 1973 Professor of biochemistry at Duke University and member of National Academy of Sciences [136]
    Joseph Ransohoff (1915–2001) College 1938 Neurosurgeon, professor and chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at the New York University School of Medicine
    Charles Reigeluth B.A. Economics, 1969 Professor of instructional design systems and creator of Elaboration Theory [137]
    Stuart A. Rice (born 1932) A.M. 1954; PhD 1955 Physical chemist at The University of Chicago [138]
    Dennis Ritchie College 1963; PhD 1968 Computer scientist [139]
    Vern L. Schramm M.S. nutrition Professor of biochemistry at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine [140]
    Jon Seger Ph.D. 1980 Developed theory of bet-hedging in biology; recipient of MacArthur Genius Grant [141]
    Oscar Elton Sette (1900–1972) M.A. biology 1930 Influential fisheries scientist who pioneered fisheries oceanography and modern fisheries science [142][143]
    Harold Hill Smith (1910–1994) PhD Geneticist [144]
    Richard Stallman (born 1953) College 1974 Founder of the Free Software Foundation
    John Tooby PhD 1985 Anthropologist and evolutionary psychologist
    Marius Vassiliou College 1978 Computational scientist and research executive
    Vladimir Voevodsky (1966-2017) PhD 1966 Fields Medal winner
    An Wang (1920–1990) PhD 1948 Computer pioneer; inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame for magnetic core memory; philanthropist [145]
    John White Webster (1793–1850) College 1811; Medical 1815 Physician, professor, killer; Parkman-Webster murder case
    Edward Osborne Wilson (born 1929) PhD 1955; professor Biologist [146]
    Charles F. Winslow (1811–1877) Medical 1834 Physician, diplomat, and atomic theorist [147]
    John Winthrop (1714–1779) College 1732; professor Astronomer, mathematician
    Chauncey Wright (1830–1875) College 1852 Mathematician, philosopher, professor [148]

    From just looking at the dates one might get the impression that Harvard shut down sometime in the 90's .
    , @Lot
    It appears the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering undergraduate majors at Harvard started in 2011.
    , @Anonymous

    Harvard has an engineering school. Offers majors in Mechanical, Electrical, Computer, Biological and others.
     
    I thought that was called MIT.
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  36. I always find it hilarious that an elite-exclusive institution like Harvard or Yale would yammer about ‘inclusion’.

    If they want it, it’s easy. Go for open admission like city colleges.

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  37. @istevefan

    Islamicate
     
    I've never heard this term before.

    iSteve, it’s like fornicate, but where you take it in the rear for the sake of including Muslims.

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  38. Obviously the problem here is too many Asian and white males. Harvard needs to restrict admission to only Jews, homos, blacks, trans, muslim refugees, illegal immigrants, native americans and women. Then all these inclusive classes and majors will be packed.

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  39. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    Too bad we don’t have movies like PAPER CHASE anymore.

    Even though the classroom is filled with kids with counterculture attitude and hair styles, they are there to study. And Hart really reveres Kingsfield and the tradition. He wants to be a part of it. In looks, Hart looks like a hippie. In heart, he is sworn to carry the torch, like Michael via Vito.

    But then, the story tries to have it both ways. On the one hand, its attraction is giving us a glimpse into a very exclusive world. But lest we hoi polloi feel intimidated and even insulted, the final message is, “It’s all BS and grades are just a piece of paper.”

    Osbourne the author said Kingsfield violated the contract when he willfully snubbed Hart in the elevator by pretending not to recognize him. Osbourne thinks there was an unspoken contract between Hart who gave it his all to win the respect of Kingsfield who, in the end, turned out to be a cold-hearted son-a-bitch.

    But I see it as Kingsfield remaining true to the contract. He is in a profession and he must be fair to all students. He can’t have favorites. And as he’s taught so many over the years, he’s seen it all before. And the law has to be a cold profession. It can’t be about personalities. So, Kingsfield’s coldness was in keeping with the spirit of his role as professor.

    The 2001-like moment from TPC.

    the TV show was pretty fun. This one is hilarious.

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  40. anon[213] • Disclaimer says:
    @sabril
    I would want to see the breakdown of majors by race, sex, etc.

    I have a female family member who is a Harvard undergraduate. She is a bright, diligent girl but like most girls not a math genius, in other words she is not capable of coming up with a creative solution to a math or physics problem which is different from problems she has practiced.

    20 or 30 years ago, someone like her would have taken Physics her first semester and then quickly switched to something like History, etc. But she's getting A's in her Math and Physics classes.

    So it could be what's going on is that STEM type fields are getting watered down at places like Harvard so that more girls are studying them, and this is responsible for the exodus from History.

    Interesting. I have read that it’s nearly impossible to flunk out of Harvard, the average grade is an A-, and 90% graduate with honors each year. I didn’t think they would go that far as to water down STEM classes, but looks like for these libtards, the end always justifies the means. It’s not just for the women either, I’m sure they have quotas to pass more “minority” engineers, architects, computer scientists. Whatever Harvard does, the rest of academia follows.

    Unchecked power always corrupts, and libtards have had unchecked power in media, academia and the deep state for at least 5 decades. American is plunging down the abyss in the hands of these corrupt libtards, with education leading the way.

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  41. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sunbeam
    " From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively. This cannot merely be due to rising interest in science and technology, as psychology, a humanistic department that still focuses on method over values, has seen concentrator numbers hold steady. …"

    My first guess reading that was that Harvard had started admitting a lot more Asians for some reason.

    Be fascinating to see an ethnicity breakdown of class enrollments at Harvard. If we had a man on the yard, we could get a firsthand report by just observing who was walking into which lecture hall at a given time.
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  42. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Harvard offers no similarly broad course and no Cold War survey course. Instead, we have “Cold War in the Global South.”
     
    I've repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You'd expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it's sparsely covered.

    My surmise is that academics saw themselves as losers in the Cold War in some sense, and aren't eager to study it as a result.

    The Cold War was a fraud. It wasn’t fake for the poor bastards who got killed or wounded in Korea or Vietnam. It was all too real for them. The ruling classes of the Soviet Empire and the American Empire used the spiritual and existential dread of nuclear war to reformulate their populations into something more docile, more materialistic and more likely to follow orders on a continent wide scale.

    The global economy was a fraud. It was always a smash and grab job from the get-go. Central banker shysters just whittle another ring on the magic debt stick. How much longer can they do it?

    When the average White Core American peasant figures out that globalization and financialization are evil frauds meant to steal away his country he will be set for patriotic retaliation. Then you will see the ruling class rats scurry off to China or Paraguay to escape the pitchforks.

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  43. One of the larger questions here is what to do with faculty who have far more power than they ought to set curriculum and admissions policy, and thus can stir up all sorts of trouble at institutions, magnified by media. (At least till somebody else’s media show something they don’t like, then they get very touchy indeed.)

    These are faculty who seek to fill their own disciplinary and career rice bowls at the expense of the students, parents, and institutions that employ them. They tend to hold in contempt taxpayers and voters whose views don’t mesh with Teacher’s.

    These faculty are also at war with other faculty for resources, students, and attention. Today, many have union representation, so any challenge to their particular, often extreme minority views, runs smash into the wall of massive litigation/legal remedies originally intended for the industrial working class. Indeed, many of these third-or-worse-rate teachers consider themselves every bit as important as, say, the 20th century coal miner, shipbuilder, teamster, longshoreman, or electrical line worker. And worthier of salaries. While AFSCME and AFT and the like hasten to bolster that growth industry in overweening self-regard.

    This is at the crux (I’m told) of the matters at The Evergreen State College. A very small group of teachers, administrators, and students collaborate to control the entire institution, often winning battles and territory thanks to administrators like its current milquetoast Machiavelli president and blue-city voting blocs.

    In any event, whoever has nads and brains big enough to create new institutions of learning that mesh with what bright parents want for their bright children, and are willing to pay for, will immanentize a flourishing new sector of supporting human achievement and evolution. While the traditional Ed Biz withers and dies on its poisoned bolshie mass marketing vine.

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    • Replies: @Anom
    Some of the faculty are real problem. But a lot of the liberal pressure in Academia is really from the administrators. The president's Dean's vice presidents all come from the diversity loving cultural Marxist wing of America. Especially the student services people are completely indoctrinated into the latest White Privilege arguments. They often organize the students to do all this crazy stuff. I'd love to get all the studies departments abolished, but it's the board's and presidents who want the stuff. They put the pressure on departments to do diversity hires which then those hires go on to be the leftist activist.
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  44. @Old Palo Altan
    Deeply depressing, except for young Mr Balson himself, who is a sterling example of the best that the USA can still offer.
    He is a National Merit Scholar form Roxbury Latin, the oldest uninterrupted (still) all boys school in the USA, with a tiny enrollment of 300 and an endowment of near to $200 million.
    He is one of six children, all sparklingly clean-cut. His family is obviously well off and well-travelled - even Santa Barbara seems to be a family haunt, South Africa and the Baltic too (the J effect perhaps?)
    His facebook page shows a life-style and a set of ultra preppy friends who would make even Frank Merriweather (think Yale) envious.
    And, despite the off-putting virtue signalling (which I suspect is no more than that), he appears to be of a conservative and thoughtful nature.

    The depressing part is not only the tale of woe he recounts but also the reaction of too many of you here.
    The idea that science and math are all that matter is barbarism pure and simple.
    The civilised man wants to know why and not merely how. For that he needs the history of our race, the philosophy of our fathers, and the theology of the (uncorrupted) Church.

    An uncorrupted church? Not an easy thing to find.

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  45. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

    From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively.

    This might be due to the financial crash following the housing boom, and the subsequent tech boom of the past 10 years.

    Until the financial crash, Harvard grads were heavily going into investment banking and consulting, which don’t require science degrees. Following the crash, there was a lot less hiring and high salaries for these fields, and tech investing and startups become more prominent industries, and they tend to look for people with more science backgrounds.

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    • Replies: @Kyle
    So you are saying that after the downturn in the economy, Harvard students focussed more on developing marketable skills. How lowbrow.
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  46. @stillCARealist
    "Concentrator"

    Does that mean students? Or does it mean students majoring in...? Can a student have a different major and concentration? And please, tell me about budgets and faculty numbers. That would tell the real story.

    Concentrator at Harvard means exactly the same as major.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Treated that way colloquially. I'm aware of an institution which favors it as part of a formulation wherein everyone is receiving a degree in liberal arts concentrating in x. That allows them to maintain the fiction that they're not running a shizzy shop in giving people degrees in subjects in which they've only accumulated 24 credits.
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  47. anon[213] • Disclaimer says:
    @Macumazahn
    Somewhat OT: Black apologists constantly complain that IQ tests are "culturally biased" and that this explains the differences in both mean and standard deviation between the scores of blacks and whites.
    Has anyone ever developed an intelligence test that's "culturally biased" in the opposite direction? I mean a serious test, not some joke based on ebonics or ghetto slang. I can't find one.

    Has anyone ever developed an intelligence test that’s “culturally biased” in the opposite direction? I mean a serious test, not some joke based on ebonics or ghetto slang. I can’t find one.

    Anything that involves written words or pictures is culturally biased. The only non-culturally biased IQ tests are ones that do not involve anything on a piece of paper, e.g. rapping skills, sense of rhythm or basketball skills.

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  48. @Old Palo Altan
    Deeply depressing, except for young Mr Balson himself, who is a sterling example of the best that the USA can still offer.
    He is a National Merit Scholar form Roxbury Latin, the oldest uninterrupted (still) all boys school in the USA, with a tiny enrollment of 300 and an endowment of near to $200 million.
    He is one of six children, all sparklingly clean-cut. His family is obviously well off and well-travelled - even Santa Barbara seems to be a family haunt, South Africa and the Baltic too (the J effect perhaps?)
    His facebook page shows a life-style and a set of ultra preppy friends who would make even Frank Merriweather (think Yale) envious.
    And, despite the off-putting virtue signalling (which I suspect is no more than that), he appears to be of a conservative and thoughtful nature.

    The depressing part is not only the tale of woe he recounts but also the reaction of too many of you here.
    The idea that science and math are all that matter is barbarism pure and simple.
    The civilised man wants to know why and not merely how. For that he needs the history of our race, the philosophy of our fathers, and the theology of the (uncorrupted) Church.

    Give me control of the electronics of the American Empire and the military and I’ll hunt down the shyster who only wants control of the currency. An empire of bases says Chalmers Johnson, but really the American Empire is an empire of electronics. Electronics is the game, we must assume the electronics fellows have read some Shakespeare and Thomas Hardy and the like. You can do both.

    We must be practical in the manner of our approach to retaking control of the American Empire. Brute force deployed therapeutically has rendered many Whites drugged out zombies. Those drugged out bastards must be abandoned.

    The focus must be on getting the Great Lakes Germans and the Southern Anglo-Celts together in a fighting force. This Trumpian demographic combination is the one that frightens the ruling class of the American Empire.

    Explicit White Identity Politics Will Win

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  49. Wait, wait, wait, wait. Isn’t the whole point of elite schools like Harvard to be some place where you can study liberal arts without worrying about sacrificing your elite status and future income? Then you can get into a different elite law or business school with your elite liberal arts degree and be a master of the universe, right? If you want to study STEM, or something else useful, then it doesn’t matter where you go. You can get your P.E. from any number of really excellent engineering schools. If you want to do hard science, then you go to one of the big R1 state flagship schools and work in the lab of a professor that knows the other prominent researchers in the field and who will get you into those other researcher’s grad programs, where the grant money is.

    Are we letting in a bunch of foreigners that don’t understand these things? Is that what’s happening?

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    • Replies: @Jeff the Donleavy Fan
    Getting your degree at Harvard rather than the U. of State may make it easier to apply to top grad programs. Or to go directly into the workplace after you get your bachelor's degree. And the networking opportunities can't be any worse.

    One thing I have always wondered is whether it is more difficult to get a degree in electrical engineering or in math or physics at Harvard or Stanford than a place like the University of Oklahoma or Texas A&M. Is the coursework genuinely tougher at Harvard, or Cal Tech or MIT, than at Berkeley or the University of Texas or Ohio State? Does anyone know?
    , @SimpleSong
    I have experience at a state school and an ivy. Same textbooks are used for pretty much all subjects in physics at least at the undergrad level (Thornton, Griffiths, Kittel, Reif, more Griffiths). These seem to be pretty standardized across the country. I think this is true of most STEM texts, there is a standardized 'hard' set of books which is used at all flagship state Us and up. The more elite places may have covered a few extra chapters or asked slightly tougher questions but I don't think a big difference. Below the flagship state U level they might use a different set, I'm not sure.

    I think MIT, Caltech, and Stanford might do their own thing, however. I actually think this is bad for learning. The popular texts are popular for a reason. Griffiths in particular is an amazing pedagogue.
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  50. @Old Palo Altan
    Deeply depressing, except for young Mr Balson himself, who is a sterling example of the best that the USA can still offer.
    He is a National Merit Scholar form Roxbury Latin, the oldest uninterrupted (still) all boys school in the USA, with a tiny enrollment of 300 and an endowment of near to $200 million.
    He is one of six children, all sparklingly clean-cut. His family is obviously well off and well-travelled - even Santa Barbara seems to be a family haunt, South Africa and the Baltic too (the J effect perhaps?)
    His facebook page shows a life-style and a set of ultra preppy friends who would make even Frank Merriweather (think Yale) envious.
    And, despite the off-putting virtue signalling (which I suspect is no more than that), he appears to be of a conservative and thoughtful nature.

    The depressing part is not only the tale of woe he recounts but also the reaction of too many of you here.
    The idea that science and math are all that matter is barbarism pure and simple.
    The civilised man wants to know why and not merely how. For that he needs the history of our race, the philosophy of our fathers, and the theology of the (uncorrupted) Church.

    He needs a little life-seasoning though. Like limiting access to his Facebook page, for example.

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  51. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Harvard offers no similarly broad course and no Cold War survey course. Instead, we have “Cold War in the Global South.”
     
    I've repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You'd expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it's sparsely covered.

    My surmise is that academics saw themselves as losers in the Cold War in some sense, and aren't eager to study it as a result.

    I’ve repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You’d expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it’s sparsely covered.

    Did you mean to write “highest…ratio”, or did I misunderstand your point?

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    • Replies: @Yan Shen
    No I think he did mean to write highest significance to academic interest ratio. :)
    , @Alec Leamas

    Did you mean to write “highest…ratio”, or did I misunderstand your point?
     
    Indeed I did.
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  52. Efforts at “inclusion” means putting front and center people who would normally just be minor footnotes in terms of their impact on a given discipline in an effort to convince everyone that the domination of certain fields by people of an unacceptable melanin content doesn’t mean what you think it does.

    This works fairly well on the more dim-witted, but people who are actually intellectually curious eventually realize that the traditional greats are considered great and worth studying for a reason. They will seek out venues that can scratch that itch.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Efforts at “inclusion” means putting front and center people who would normally just be minor footnotes in terms of their impact on a given discipline in an effort to convince everyone that the domination of certain fields by people of an unacceptable melanin content doesn’t mean what you think it does.
     
    Tell me about it. I had The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano assigned in four separate classes (twice as an undergrad, twice as a grad student).
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  53. @Sunbeam
    From that article:

    "Snappily entitled “Pursuing Excellence on a Foundation of Inclusion,” the report consists of almost 80 brightly colored pages and contains eight recommendations. One of those eight, which has attracted notable media attention, changes the school’s alma mater. Its last lines will now read, “Be the herald of Light, and the bearer of Love, Till the stars in the firmament die.” (The latter part replaces “Till the stock of the Puritans die.”)"

    And at the end written by this young man:

    "I have no doubt that Harvard will remain an excellent institution to attend, get a banking job, and get out. And as a Jewish Cold War historian, I feel as little ownership over the distant stars as I do over Puritan stock. At Commencement just over a year from now, I will happily sing the alma mater’s new lines. I will do so next to my roommates, who study biology and computer science. Amidst the chorus I will look over at them, fearing that my liberal arts Harvard, inclusive and shrinking, may meet a lonely fate long before the stars in the firmament begin to flicker."

    They probably did the right thing changing the alma mater. I think the "stock of the Puritans" died a couple decades ago.

    I didn’t know there even was a Jewish Cold War. Who were the antagonists? Orthodox versus Reform? Ashkenazi versus Sephardic? Zionists versus Assimalists? Sounds like an esoteric field of study to me. What kind of a career can you have with a degree in that other than teaching classes on the Jewish Cold War?

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    • Replies: @Crawfurdmuir

    I didn’t know there even was a Jewish Cold War. Who were the antagonists?
     
    How about the Soviet nomenklatura vs. the U.S. neoconservatives?
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  54. @Anon
    What is this 'inclusion' stuff?

    A subject is a subject. It is what it is. It doesn't exist to make people FEEL included.

    And what does it even mean? If you teach Japanese history and cover stuff like Rape of Nanking, it might hurt the feelings of Japanese-American students? So, the story must be changed to Japanese going to Nanking to pass out free food and become friends with Chinese? I suppose Japanese-American students will feel more 'included' in gooey way.

    Or what would 'inclusive' film studies be like? Since there are too many white male directors --- Kubrick, Welles, Lang, Ford, Hitchcock, Hawks, etc --- , they must include some obscure film-maker from Burma? But if you do that, won't kids from 200 other nations feel un-included? The world has over 200 nations. So, should film studies class include a film by each nation to make everyone feel 'included'?

    If a dwarf is a student in a literary class, must there be reading of a dwarf poet?

    Who thinks like this?

    Of course, when it comes to 'inclusion', it usually means homos, Jews, and blacks. But in some areas, homo need no 'inclusion' since they are very well represented... like in the arts. And Jews are well-represented in so many intellectual fields. Stressing Jewishness is most unnecessary since you find Jewish names all over the place in literature, philosophy, film, music. And blacks don't need special attention in American popular music. So, if there's a classroom of many different peoples, 'inclusion' doesn't mean all of them. It means they must share in the 'inclusion' of Jews, homos, and blacks. But the media still act as homos are some pitiable group that needs more of our love(in a dumb nation where people think 25% of the people are homo). The media still go on and on about Jewish this and Jewish that. It's as if Jews don't get enough respect when US foreign policy is all about serving Israel. Trump shows a bit of sympathy for white working class, and rich Jews get all antsy about how it's so unfair to Jews. And blacks who dominate sports and pop music.. they bitch about how there not be more blacks in this or that.

    Now, the biggest problem with 'inclusion' is maybe women, and this is where feminists makes a big fuss. Unlike Jews, homos, and even blacks, women are half the population, but they've been less prominent in many fields even though some made their mark esp in the 20th century, a good number of them being Jewesses: Rand, Sontag, Kael, Friedan, Ferber, Hellman, Jong, Carole King, etc.

    But then, the very cult of 'inclusion' is the thing that holds so many women back. To attain greatness, you need individuality than inclusionality. It's no wonder that women like Sontag and Kael did so much more than today's pampered PC female dolts who emphasize consensus, even to the point where most of sisterhood has been browbeaten into acknowledging men with puds and balls wigs and dresses as 'women'. What had been studied as 'camp' by Sontag has become Champ.
    Kael didn't join feminism because she didn't want to be hemmed in by the sisterhood. Sontag didn't come out as homo because she didn't want special favors(or demerits) as a homo or bi. She wanted respect simply as a critic and commentator.

    As PC made women into inclusionals than individuals, they all sound alike. They've become Stepford Sisters. And their minds are like jelly. So, when the official line was 'pornography is crime against women', they all droned on. Later, when the new line is 'slut pride is empowering', they all chanted the same crap. And then, 'me too, me too', and all of sudden, they were back to acting like poor little damsels hunted by horny men. Poor little damsels wearing pussy costumers yelling 'dont' grab my pussy'.

    Greatness is never inclusional. It is individual. Welles got himself the best talent to work with. In an age when inclusionals feel obligated to praise dumb STAR WARS movies or some idiot movie about Wakanda, there too much puppetry and parrotry.

    All said and done, there was a reason why Dylan, Stones, and Beatles won out over Joan Baez and Phil Ochs. Message is secondary to the power of expression.

    The Inclusivity Centre at a nearby school is where they stick the disruptive kids.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Shouldn't they be called Intrusive?

    Intrusives are what the hoi polloi get.
    Unfiltered louts.

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/KLgXmtmDoYuJ/

    Elites get the Inclusives by a process of selection. So, they get to choose an Obama over Michael Brown.

    Michael Brown: Intrusive.

    Barack Obama: Inclusive.

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  55. @Lot
    Concentrator at Harvard means exactly the same as major.

    Treated that way colloquially. I’m aware of an institution which favors it as part of a formulation wherein everyone is receiving a degree in liberal arts concentrating in x. That allows them to maintain the fiction that they’re not running a shizzy shop in giving people degrees in subjects in which they’ve only accumulated 24 credits.

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  56. Wow, however will the Eeyores here recover from being wrong yet again:

    https://t.co/Be5Yee9E24?amp=1

    Ignore it and moan about TRUMP CUCK as usual.

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  57. Read More
    • Replies: @DFH

    Hardest Course in Humanities
     
    They don't even have to learn the languages
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  58. anon[213] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot
    Ann Coulter interviewed in the NY Times

    (warning video autoplays)

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/30/opinion/ann-coulter-trump-former-trumpers.html

    On Trump's No Wall


    I don’t know what more horrible thing you could come up with than violating your central campaign promise that became the chant and the theme of the campaign that he promised at every single rally.
     

    Ann Coulter speaks the truth. Trump’s failure to get anything done on immigration will be his downfall. He’s not even trying, next month another 85,000 will easily pick up their H1b visa, he hasn’t done jack on OPT, or H1b spousal work permit. At this point we should just be happy that he at least hasn’t expanded the H1b program, but wait for it, he might just do it. What a disappointment he’s turned into. He’d better make good on the threat to end NAFTA and foreign aid to Mexico if they don’t stop the caravan, and send the national guards down there to seal off the border or he is toast.

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  59. Totally off topic. YouTube headquarters shooter is a “white” women wearing a headscarf.

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    • Replies: @larry lurker
    Her name is Nasim Aghdam. Nasim is ultimately Arabic but in this transliteration it seems to be a common Persian name. Aghdam is a region of Azerbaijan - apparently there are 15 to 17 million "Iranian Azerbaijanis" living in Iran.

    A commenter on one of her YouTube videos writes:


    Thats turkish but with a veeeeery strange accent. Know it because i am a kurd from turkey.
     
    Azerbaijani is a Turkic language. Her website links to both YouTube Farsi and YouTube Turkish, so yeah, she's likely Iranian Azerbaijani.
    , @Dave from Oz
    @Danand "YouTube headquarters shooter is a “white” women wearing a headscarf."

    Nasim Aghdam. Not exactly an "Elizabeth Winchester" type of name, eh?

    "A regular YouTuber with her own channel and 5,000 subscribers, she described herself as an animal rights activist and vegan bodybuilder. She is understood to have been angry at recent changes on the platform that affected how much money she received. In a video posted in January 2017, she said YouTube "discriminated and filtered" her content, NBC reports."

    LOL. Once again, a liberal actually does what all the conservatives have been threatening to do.
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  60. @istevefan

    Islamicate
     
    I've never heard this term before.

    I think it comes from this guy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Hodgson

    Most importantly, he distinguished between Islamic (religious) and Islamicate phenomena, which were the products of regions in which Muslims were culturally dominant, but were not, properly speaking religious. For example, wine poetry was certainly Islamicate, but not Islamic. This distinction helped bring to the fore the rich cultural worlds that Islam developed within.

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    • Replies: @George
    Sounds like a grad course, not undergrad. Maybe that's why they only had 6 undergrads in it.
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  61. Admission to Harvard undergrad is a high school academic achievement award. A Harvard diploma is a booby prize.

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  62. @Lot

    From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively
     
    Harvard students rapidly abandoning SJW dominated majors in favor of useful ones like CS and Statistics is yet another data point showing the young people of today are in most respects superior to those in the past, especially when you control for race.

    They also have less sex in high school and use drugs, alcohol and tobacco far less than before, and commit less crime.

    The only negative thing you can really say about them using objective data is they are low-T lardbutts.

    A few more 2008/2016 comparisons

    African American Studies 21 to 6
    Comparative Lit 48 to 16
    Comparative Religion 34 to 19
    Sociology 144 to 116
    Women's Studies 10 to 14
    Anthropology 126 to 43
    Social Studies 296 to 246

    Mechanical Engineering (new major) 0 to 64
    Electrical Engineering (new major) 0 to 39

    You’re looking at the bright side! The pessimistic view is that despite some dropoff, hundreds of the brightest kids in the country are still majoring in pernicious nonsense.

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  63. Interesting to compare that account to this course at the U of Oklahoma, co-taught by the U of O’s 37-year old provost Kyle Harper, a Harvard-trained classicist:

    https://micahmattix.us9.list-manage.com/track/click?u=09f1740da57f3d9169001129e&id=216fb8f43d&e=ba1764cd46

    It’s modeled on Auden’s course, with a few changes. The instructors — Kyle Harper, a classicist and the university’s provost; the historian Wilfred McClay; and David Anderson, a professor of English — have spread it out over an entire year, and they’ve excised a few books (Dante’s Paradiso, Baudelaire and Rimbaud, Kafka). But they added The Odyssey, The Aeneid, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Paradise Lost, Robinson Crusoe, Pride and Prejudice, Nietzsche, Invisible Man, and other 20th-century masterpieces such as Derek Walcott’s neo-Homeric epic Omeros. They dropped most of the operas but kept Don Giovanni and Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde. They speak frankly in the course description of taking “delight in the Western canon” and hold fast to themes of little currency in the research world: destiny, God and “the gods,” a meaningful life, authority.

    When enrollment opened last semester, the unexpected happened. The course filled up within minutes.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    and other 20th-century masterpieces such as Derek Walcott’s neo-Homeric epic Omeros.
     
    Which, as "20th-century masterpieces " go, is rather meh. One point in its favor: it's a quick read. Back in grad school, I read it cover-to-cover on a Monday night.
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  64. Anon[304] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Harvard offers no similarly broad course and no Cold War survey course. Instead, we have “Cold War in the Global South.”
     
    I've repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You'd expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it's sparsely covered.

    My surmise is that academics saw themselves as losers in the Cold War in some sense, and aren't eager to study it as a result.

    In college in the 1980s, I had an international relations course that turned out to be nothing but a history of the Cold War, and I’ll tell you, even though it was taught by a very good prof (I had him for another course, so I know for certain) the Cold War was a very, very dull subject, and NOBODY came out looking well, either Soviets of US. Frankly, I see the entire Cold War as nothing but a blip in the history of countries. Since it’s behind us now, I’m not surprised it’s been dropped by academics everywhere.

    Ultimately, if the subject isn’t interesting or fun, it’s going to die as a subject.

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    Ultimately, if the subject isn’t interesting or fun, it’s going to die as a subject.
     
    I fail to understand how a decades-long existential struggle between two superpowers each with the power to extinguish humanity, influencing all manner of art and culture is "not interesting or fun" to study.

    What could be a more interesting field of study?
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  65. @AndrewR
    Solution:

    Step 1: Expel all current white goy students and refuse admission to any more white goyim. Replace them with more Jews and PoC, especially non-Asian PoC.

    Step 2: ????

    Step 3: Profit!

    From Ivy League to Oy Veh League?

    (Must have been done before).

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  66. @benjaminl
    I think it comes from this guy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Hodgson

    Most importantly, he distinguished between Islamic (religious) and Islamicate phenomena, which were the products of regions in which Muslims were culturally dominant, but were not, properly speaking religious. For example, wine poetry was certainly Islamicate, but not Islamic. This distinction helped bring to the fore the rich cultural worlds that Islam developed within.
     

    Sounds like a grad course, not undergrad. Maybe that’s why they only had 6 undergrads in it.

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  67. Anon[304] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    The Puritan divine dirtbags who started Harvard were East Anglian bug-eyed bog dwellers back in England. Now the arrogant money-grubbers are holding the rest of us over an open fire. The worst sin according to the Puritan divines was to sleep through one of their boring sermons.

    New England maritime bourgeoisie drug dealers got the Chinks hooked on drugs and they brought the loot back and gave it to Harvard.

    Harvard has been the original spawning ground of the treasonous rats in the WASP / Jew ruling class.

    Harvard is a hedge fund with a school attached to it.

    Harvard Hates America; America Don't Much Care For Harvard.

    Tweet from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/590944702569979904

    One for laughs from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/570298920561201154

    The Harvard teachers used to get mad if you slept through a sermon because you denied their authority. Now they get mad if you ignore their sermons on global warming, rascism, etc., and deny their authority. They haven’t changed a whit. It’s just as well they are turning into a trade school. I’m waiting for the name change to Cambridge College of Agriculture and Mechanics.

    A warning for Harvard: If they do become a science and engineering school, expect those donations to drop off dramatically. Scientists and engineers don’t make as much money as wealthy WASP businessmen.

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  68. This article has some more data.

    http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2017/11/6/concentration-data-analysis/

    What the writers call “applied STEM” fields are obviously growing for good reason. Social Sciences (Economics, Government, etc.) remain popular with Obama types who just want to join the overclass elite, i.e via law school, and the “Pure Sciences” i.e. chemistry, with the many pre-meds.

    Meanwhile, the soft subjects have three options. They can pursue the path of SJW Studies

    http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2017/5/23/road-to-ethnic-studies/

    Or, they can be content as technical, antiquarian studies for future professors (i.e. Sanskrit, Latin, Hebrew, etc.)

    Or, they can try to deal with the big questions about the Good, True and Beautiful and the Great Books… But that ends up more in the general education and core curriculum, than in producing majors.

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  69. @Sunbeam
    From that article:

    "Snappily entitled “Pursuing Excellence on a Foundation of Inclusion,” the report consists of almost 80 brightly colored pages and contains eight recommendations. One of those eight, which has attracted notable media attention, changes the school’s alma mater. Its last lines will now read, “Be the herald of Light, and the bearer of Love, Till the stars in the firmament die.” (The latter part replaces “Till the stock of the Puritans die.”)"

    And at the end written by this young man:

    "I have no doubt that Harvard will remain an excellent institution to attend, get a banking job, and get out. And as a Jewish Cold War historian, I feel as little ownership over the distant stars as I do over Puritan stock. At Commencement just over a year from now, I will happily sing the alma mater’s new lines. I will do so next to my roommates, who study biology and computer science. Amidst the chorus I will look over at them, fearing that my liberal arts Harvard, inclusive and shrinking, may meet a lonely fate long before the stars in the firmament begin to flicker."

    They probably did the right thing changing the alma mater. I think the "stock of the Puritans" died a couple decades ago.

    My forefather arrived in 1637 in Mass., from England. We’re not dead. Just really pissed.

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  70. “Inclusion” means while getting your English degree you read a lot of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth but never once crack open Alexander Pope or Samuel Johnson.

    I do think that some of the drop is due to humanities becoming almost entirely grievance studies of one sort or other. The classes must be insufferable to anyone not 100% on the SJW bandwagon. For starters, any straight white Gentile male would be told, daily, that he is the Great Villain of Creation. Who wants to sit through this other than a twisted masochist?

    Even the white girls probably grow weary of being fed a diet of anti-white-ism, though they nod in agreement to it in class. The black, Hispanic and Asians admitted in the Humanities will be largely over-the-top SJWs of the shrieking variety (think of our buddy Yung In Chae over at Eidolon).

    On the other hand, this has made the classes far easier. Just take your “text” and run it through the Grievance Sausage Grinder and out pops your term paper which gets an A for being “brave.” Seriously, you could come up with a clever AI that could write these term papers. Don’t expect much actual scholarship to be going on. And in any case the rot has been around for so many decades, that most of the critics and scholars being cited in humanities papers are just peddling the same po-mo drivel. My guess is that T.S. Eliot’s “Tradition and the Individual Talent,” to take one example, isn’t cited very much in undergrad term papers any more.

    Passages like this are probably now considered hate speech:

    Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality, but an escape from personality. But, of course, only those who have personality and emotions know what it means to want to escape from these things.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    “Inclusion” means while getting your English degree you read a lot of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth but never once crack open Alexander Pope or Samuel Johnson.
     
    Morrison, yes. Roth, not so much. Feminists don't like him.

    And, as someone who specializes in 18th century lit, I can confidently note that undergrads really like Pope. I'm used to having 18 year-olds tell me that they that, prior to reading Pope, they never knew that poetry could be funny.
    , @syonredux

    Even the white girls probably grow weary of being fed a diet of anti-white-ism, though they nod in agreement to it in class.
     
    I run a conservative studies group on campus. Invitation only (I'd be sacked if my colleagues found out). Lots of White cis-het students are fed-up with the SJW garbage that they have to read....and that includes White girls.
    , @syonredux
    Lindsay Shepard:

    GOODBYE TO THE LEFT

    I've come to the realization that I am no longer a leftist. Here's why.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qpg6P1PNWR8
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  71. @Neoconned
    It's almost as if industry wants trained workers and wants it's humanities studies types to do that on their own time and on their own dime.,..

    That’s one of the many problems you get when the only thing that matters to you is next quarter’s profit and loss statement.

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  72. It’s almost as if those majors do not enable high paying salaries to cover your college loans.

    OT

    Active shooter at YouTube

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  73. I’ve repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You’d expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it’s sparsely covered.

    I think you meant to say highest ratio, not lowest.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    No he's right. While it was going on the CIA, DOD, DARPA etc took over whole campuses. When it ended you effectively had all these commies who had a choice between examining their personal convictions against the record of history, or pretending it wasn't so bad and talking about something else.
    Also, Russians themselves do not like talking about any of the bad stuff, the archives are bizarrely hard to get to, there is no (((lobby))) that derives cosmological meaning and purpose from building museums and cranking out media products to Always Remember (remember how Weir's "Long Walk" was promoted? See how every Nazi movie is promoted?), Russia was not an economically important country for years after the fall, we do not have a strong population-connection to Eastern Europe the way we do with Central Europe, and if you started a militant anti-Communist historical project now it would be interpreted as a vieled insult by certain celestial kingdom.
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  74. Anon[304] • Disclaimer says:

    Harvard isn’t seeing a shift from Humanities students to Science students out of nowhere. The admissions depart is of course asking students what they want to major in–all admissions departments do that–and is consciously shifting towards the kind of students they want.

    A word about college in-fighting. It is not unheard of for an admissions department, having gotten the word from higher up, to be told to drop the acceptance numbers for students wanting to major in Women’s studies or suchlike as a method of plunging the class size for a teacher whom the administration wants to cut down to size.

    If the prof gets the school into trouble via lawsuits or otherwise gives the college bad publicity, the administration can get back at the prof without actually bearing the onus of firing the prof. You just cut that prof’s students, then say, “We don’t have enough students to stock a classroom for Women’s Studies this semester, so we want you to teach the Remedial English lab for the incoming freshmen and do Sociology 101.” That way the prof isn’t so likely to end up bonding with individual students through a 4-year association the way you do if you’re their major professor, and it isn’t so easy to become the mentor/brainwasher of a little radical. That sort of demotion tends to cause profs to go job hunting elsewhere, and admins are rid of a power-hungry and troublesome personality without a fuss or getting involved in a costly lawsuit if they fire the prof or deny the prof tenure.

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  75. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Harvard offers no similarly broad course and no Cold War survey course. Instead, we have “Cold War in the Global South.”
     
    I've repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You'd expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it's sparsely covered.

    My surmise is that academics saw themselves as losers in the Cold War in some sense, and aren't eager to study it as a result.

    I’ve repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You’d expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it’s sparsely covered.

    I have some colleagues who specialize in “Cold War Cultural Studies.” Lots of SF and movies for the exegesis: North by North-West, Heinlein’s Puppet Masters, Invasion of the Body-Snatchers (both the book and the film), The Manchurian Candidate (both the book and the film), etc

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    A cynical surmise from that list: they spend a lot of time interrogating how a hysterical fear of red boogeys justified near-fascistic policy and public sentiment in American society, and not noting how accurately the red boogeys were depicted?
    The real take-away from "Billion Dollar Brain" is that detente was just a fashionable term for an inappropriate friendliness among our elites and artists that long predated it.
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  76. @benjaminl
    Interesting to compare that account to this course at the U of Oklahoma, co-taught by the U of O's 37-year old provost Kyle Harper, a Harvard-trained classicist:

    https://micahmattix.us9.list-manage.com/track/click?u=09f1740da57f3d9169001129e&id=216fb8f43d&e=ba1764cd46

    It’s modeled on Auden’s course, with a few changes. The instructors — Kyle Harper, a classicist and the university’s provost; the historian Wilfred McClay; and David Anderson, a professor of English — have spread it out over an entire year, and they’ve excised a few books (Dante’s Paradiso, Baudelaire and Rimbaud, Kafka). But they added The Odyssey, The Aeneid, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Paradise Lost, Robinson Crusoe, Pride and Prejudice, Nietzsche, Invisible Man, and other 20th-century masterpieces such as Derek Walcott’s neo-Homeric epic Omeros. They dropped most of the operas but kept Don Giovanni and Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde. They speak frankly in the course description of taking "delight in the Western canon" and hold fast to themes of little currency in the research world: destiny, God and "the gods," a meaningful life, authority.

    When enrollment opened last semester, the unexpected happened. The course filled up within minutes. Harper had already warned his students, "This is the hardest class you will ever take." The syllabus was posted online in advance, so that students knew exactly what they were getting into. The course meets a general-education requirement at Oklahoma, but so do many other courses with half the workload. To accommodate the unexpected demand, the class was expanded from 22 to 30 students, the maximum number that the assigned classroom could hold.

    I sat in on a class in October. McClay lectured on Inferno. The atmosphere was genial but focused. You can tell after five minutes whether a class has an esprit de corps — no sullen faces, no eyes drifting to windows and cellphones, even the bad jokes get a laugh. McClay slid from Augustine to Bonaventura to Jesus, Jonah, Exodus, and the prodigal son before taking up Paolo and Francesca, and then the suicides, sodomites, murderers, and frauds in Dante’s torture zones.

    One fellow grumbled that he had to do three times as much work as he did in his other classes. The rest nodded. But you could hear in his words the self-respect that comes from doing more work than the norm, from climbing the highest hill while your peers dog it. Another student said that the page-count of the syllabus had flattered her, that it showed the professors respected her enough to demand that she take on a heavy load of historic literature. "This is what I came to college for," another said. One more chimed in, "This class is changing my life."

    They acknowledged, too, the distinctiveness of the works they read, one student calling them a "foundation" for things they study elsewhere. They admired the professors, to be sure, but the real draw was the material. When I asked what they would change about the course, they went straight to the books: add The Iliad and some of the Bible.

    Their attitude was enlivening. But the only thing that really matters is enrollment. "Will you sign up for next semester’s course?" I asked. "Definitely," they replied, all of them. (This semester has 32 students enrolled, more than the original cap of 22 because many more petitioned to get in.)

    This is now the measure of success for the humanities. Do undergraduates want to come? The material decline of the humanities has made theoretical and political debates secondary, if not irrelevant. Recovery and survival must start from the base.

    The Auden-based course at Oklahoma is a small but significant instance of how it may be done. Western-canon talk offends many people in the humanities these days, the few faculty traditionalists often contesting the progressive orthodoxy. But 30 years ago, when the Eurocentrism-versus-multiculturalism debate became a national story, nothing much changed within the departments. The trend toward contemporary, "nontraditional," and "relevant" readings continued.

    I advise the traditionalists to try the Oklahoma way. Design your Western-civ or Great Books course and ramp it up to Auden levels. Be frank about the reading challenge. Boast of the aged, uncontemporary nature of the materials. Highlight the old-fashioned themes of greatness, heroism and villainy, love and betrayal, God and Truth, and say nothing against intersectionality and other currencies. Your antagonists are mediocrity, youth culture, presentism, and the disengagement of professors and students. You occupy a competitive terrain, and your brand is Achilles, Narcissus, the Wyf of Bath, Isolde, and Bigger. Let’s see what happens. Let the undergrads decide.
     

    and other 20th-century masterpieces such as Derek Walcott’s neo-Homeric epic Omeros.

    Which, as “20th-century masterpieces ” go, is rather meh. One point in its favor: it’s a quick read. Back in grad school, I read it cover-to-cover on a Monday night.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I think the putdown that Bill Henry used in "In Defense of Elitism" was that Walcott's output was "up to the admittedly mixed standards of the Nobel committee"
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  77. @Arclight
    Efforts at "inclusion" means putting front and center people who would normally just be minor footnotes in terms of their impact on a given discipline in an effort to convince everyone that the domination of certain fields by people of an unacceptable melanin content doesn't mean what you think it does.

    This works fairly well on the more dim-witted, but people who are actually intellectually curious eventually realize that the traditional greats are considered great and worth studying for a reason. They will seek out venues that can scratch that itch.

    Efforts at “inclusion” means putting front and center people who would normally just be minor footnotes in terms of their impact on a given discipline in an effort to convince everyone that the domination of certain fields by people of an unacceptable melanin content doesn’t mean what you think it does.

    Tell me about it. I had The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano assigned in four separate classes (twice as an undergrad, twice as a grad student).

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  78. @peterike
    "Inclusion" means while getting your English degree you read a lot of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth but never once crack open Alexander Pope or Samuel Johnson.

    I do think that some of the drop is due to humanities becoming almost entirely grievance studies of one sort or other. The classes must be insufferable to anyone not 100% on the SJW bandwagon. For starters, any straight white Gentile male would be told, daily, that he is the Great Villain of Creation. Who wants to sit through this other than a twisted masochist?

    Even the white girls probably grow weary of being fed a diet of anti-white-ism, though they nod in agreement to it in class. The black, Hispanic and Asians admitted in the Humanities will be largely over-the-top SJWs of the shrieking variety (think of our buddy Yung In Chae over at Eidolon).

    On the other hand, this has made the classes far easier. Just take your "text" and run it through the Grievance Sausage Grinder and out pops your term paper which gets an A for being "brave." Seriously, you could come up with a clever AI that could write these term papers. Don't expect much actual scholarship to be going on. And in any case the rot has been around for so many decades, that most of the critics and scholars being cited in humanities papers are just peddling the same po-mo drivel. My guess is that T.S. Eliot's "Tradition and the Individual Talent," to take one example, isn't cited very much in undergrad term papers any more.

    Passages like this are probably now considered hate speech:

    Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality, but an escape from personality. But, of course, only those who have personality and emotions know what it means to want to escape from these things.

    “Inclusion” means while getting your English degree you read a lot of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth but never once crack open Alexander Pope or Samuel Johnson.

    Morrison, yes. Roth, not so much. Feminists don’t like him.

    And, as someone who specializes in 18th century lit, I can confidently note that undergrads really like Pope. I’m used to having 18 year-olds tell me that they that, prior to reading Pope, they never knew that poetry could be funny.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    I say get rid of Great Books and Humanities departments.

    We don't need them anymore. I can see why such were necessary when only big cities and colleges had wide array of intellectual materials. So, if you grew up in a small town with a small library and limited horizons, I can see how going to college was a big deal. You finally came upon things you had no access to in your small town.

    So, learning about Great Books and discussing them in class meant a great deal.

    But now... you can access all the great books online or for cheap through ebay. You can see all the lectures about them by experts and amateurs on youtube. You can find tons of essays on such stuff.

    So, you don't need an institutional setting to study Great Books, Big Ideas, or Literature. All you need is a curious mind.

    Also, study of literature, arts, and ideas should be a lifelong process, not something you can squeeze into a few years.

    Therefore, I don't care if Humanities have turned into Inhumanities.

    We can now appreciate such stuff OUTSIDE the academe.
    , @J.Ross
    That's fascinating because you can't go three words in Pope without the sort of Classical reference that's not getting a cartoon treatment any time soon.
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  79. @peterike
    "Inclusion" means while getting your English degree you read a lot of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth but never once crack open Alexander Pope or Samuel Johnson.

    I do think that some of the drop is due to humanities becoming almost entirely grievance studies of one sort or other. The classes must be insufferable to anyone not 100% on the SJW bandwagon. For starters, any straight white Gentile male would be told, daily, that he is the Great Villain of Creation. Who wants to sit through this other than a twisted masochist?

    Even the white girls probably grow weary of being fed a diet of anti-white-ism, though they nod in agreement to it in class. The black, Hispanic and Asians admitted in the Humanities will be largely over-the-top SJWs of the shrieking variety (think of our buddy Yung In Chae over at Eidolon).

    On the other hand, this has made the classes far easier. Just take your "text" and run it through the Grievance Sausage Grinder and out pops your term paper which gets an A for being "brave." Seriously, you could come up with a clever AI that could write these term papers. Don't expect much actual scholarship to be going on. And in any case the rot has been around for so many decades, that most of the critics and scholars being cited in humanities papers are just peddling the same po-mo drivel. My guess is that T.S. Eliot's "Tradition and the Individual Talent," to take one example, isn't cited very much in undergrad term papers any more.

    Passages like this are probably now considered hate speech:

    Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality, but an escape from personality. But, of course, only those who have personality and emotions know what it means to want to escape from these things.

    Even the white girls probably grow weary of being fed a diet of anti-white-ism, though they nod in agreement to it in class.

    I run a conservative studies group on campus. Invitation only (I’d be sacked if my colleagues found out). Lots of White cis-het students are fed-up with the SJW garbage that they have to read….and that includes White girls.

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  80. @Old Palo Altan
    Deeply depressing, except for young Mr Balson himself, who is a sterling example of the best that the USA can still offer.
    He is a National Merit Scholar form Roxbury Latin, the oldest uninterrupted (still) all boys school in the USA, with a tiny enrollment of 300 and an endowment of near to $200 million.
    He is one of six children, all sparklingly clean-cut. His family is obviously well off and well-travelled - even Santa Barbara seems to be a family haunt, South Africa and the Baltic too (the J effect perhaps?)
    His facebook page shows a life-style and a set of ultra preppy friends who would make even Frank Merriweather (think Yale) envious.
    And, despite the off-putting virtue signalling (which I suspect is no more than that), he appears to be of a conservative and thoughtful nature.

    The depressing part is not only the tale of woe he recounts but also the reaction of too many of you here.
    The idea that science and math are all that matter is barbarism pure and simple.
    The civilised man wants to know why and not merely how. For that he needs the history of our race, the philosophy of our fathers, and the theology of the (uncorrupted) Church.

    His facebook page shows a life-style and a set of ultra preppy friends who would make even Frank Merriweather (think Yale) envious.

    Frank Merriwell.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Merriwell

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  81. Meanwhile, back at the feminist “Hear Me Roar!” camp, SweetBriar College for Amazons, the Spotify ads are marketing to FIERCE WOMAN WARRIORS!

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  82. @El_Nathan
    Wait, wait, wait, wait. Isn't the whole point of elite schools like Harvard to be some place where you can study liberal arts without worrying about sacrificing your elite status and future income? Then you can get into a different elite law or business school with your elite liberal arts degree and be a master of the universe, right? If you want to study STEM, or something else useful, then it doesn't matter where you go. You can get your P.E. from any number of really excellent engineering schools. If you want to do hard science, then you go to one of the big R1 state flagship schools and work in the lab of a professor that knows the other prominent researchers in the field and who will get you into those other researcher's grad programs, where the grant money is.

    Are we letting in a bunch of foreigners that don't understand these things? Is that what's happening?

    Getting your degree at Harvard rather than the U. of State may make it easier to apply to top grad programs. Or to go directly into the workplace after you get your bachelor’s degree. And the networking opportunities can’t be any worse.

    One thing I have always wondered is whether it is more difficult to get a degree in electrical engineering or in math or physics at Harvard or Stanford than a place like the University of Oklahoma or Texas A&M. Is the coursework genuinely tougher at Harvard, or Cal Tech or MIT, than at Berkeley or the University of Texas or Ohio State? Does anyone know?

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    • Replies: @Nathan
    (Same guy.) Well, I don't know first hand, but I've heard the Ivy league isn't the Ivy league for everything. I also know that a few of my professors at State U where also professors at more elite schools that didn't happen to also be adjacent to ski country, and I doubt they bothered to adjust their curriculum.
    , @Excal
    Back when I was in engineering school, the word on the street was that a few engineering schools -- Cal Tech, MIT, Georgia Tech, maybe a few lesser-knowns like Harvey Mudd and Rose-Hullman -- were a cut above, in that the the work was indeed much harder, like a sort of boot camp. Georgia Tech grads didn't talk about when they graduated -- they talked about when they "got out". An undergrad from one of these sorts of schools was effectively a master's from most other US engineering schools.

    I don't know about Georgia Tech these days, but my understanding is that this is still the case with Cal Tech: lots of people don't bother with grad school after having their clocks cleaned there, and employers who don't know about it aren't worth working for. MIT was an odd duck -- extremely rigorous for undergrad, but expressly designed as a feeder for graduate school. They'd even take their own. Again, may have changed.
    , @Alice
    Yes the coursework is actually tougher at MIT and Caltech than Cal or U T Austin or U Mich. Yes the coursework at Harvard in mathematics is harder than the coursework anywhere else but maybe MIT and Princeton.

    More is taught in less time.

    I was the top student in a UC San Diego linear algebra course when I was a high school student; high A, with the highest score in the class on the final. Went to MIT for ugrad; didn't know *anything* past week three of them linear algebra course there. In physics, classes that were upper division at MIT used the same texts that only grad students used at UCSD and Cal (and everyhwre else.) Grad students from non MIT schools as ugrads took those courses routinely next to sophomores and juniors from MIT.

    The physics lab junior year at MIT did five experiments in 13 week semester; Cal did six in a 30 week year. MIT taught three extra weeks of CS material in a semester one week short than Cal's. Physics problem sets at MIT for a given week had ten problems; same course at Cal with same lectures had 6 problems.

    Same in math; the basic analysis course at Cal covered 6 chapters of Rudin in a semester. Same class, same book, shorter semester covered 8-9 at MIT.
    Same in the engineering fields though the extent varied with the major.
    , @Lagertha
    Are you seriously, asking this? Sheesh - If you can do the course work (or speak in 2+ languages...) than Oklahoma or MIT is equal. Science/engineering is no different anywhere, world wide, for God's sake! To be nice: Caltech is the last meritocratic U for undergrads. All graduate schools will take the top students from effing " East Arkansas north of Oklahoma U." Jesus....If all you guys are the smartest people in the world posting here, we are screwed.
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  83. @johnmark7
    Meanwhile, the Hardest Course in Humanities is resurrected in Oklahoma to a class high in demand:

    https://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Hardest-Course-in-the/242896?key=HnRoS7rGU2F1XrEi2rMQqrwppoXgIr2IjPSPFLl4HVIE1frNERzrIPfrUG_b1dn6MnVXVnp5UlpoWWRPN3FBMkpHaXROZ3JnOTB2WWc3a1RxSG9ld01hRjhDMA

    Hardest Course in Humanities

    They don’t even have to learn the languages

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  84. @jim jones
    The Inclusivity Centre at a nearby school is where they stick the disruptive kids.

    Shouldn’t they be called Intrusive?

    Intrusives are what the hoi polloi get.
    Unfiltered louts.




    Elites get the Inclusives by a process of selection. So, they get to choose an Obama over Michael Brown.

    Michael Brown: Intrusive.

    Barack Obama: Inclusive.

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  85. @Anon
    What is this 'inclusion' stuff?

    A subject is a subject. It is what it is. It doesn't exist to make people FEEL included.

    And what does it even mean? If you teach Japanese history and cover stuff like Rape of Nanking, it might hurt the feelings of Japanese-American students? So, the story must be changed to Japanese going to Nanking to pass out free food and become friends with Chinese? I suppose Japanese-American students will feel more 'included' in gooey way.

    Or what would 'inclusive' film studies be like? Since there are too many white male directors --- Kubrick, Welles, Lang, Ford, Hitchcock, Hawks, etc --- , they must include some obscure film-maker from Burma? But if you do that, won't kids from 200 other nations feel un-included? The world has over 200 nations. So, should film studies class include a film by each nation to make everyone feel 'included'?

    If a dwarf is a student in a literary class, must there be reading of a dwarf poet?

    Who thinks like this?

    Of course, when it comes to 'inclusion', it usually means homos, Jews, and blacks. But in some areas, homo need no 'inclusion' since they are very well represented... like in the arts. And Jews are well-represented in so many intellectual fields. Stressing Jewishness is most unnecessary since you find Jewish names all over the place in literature, philosophy, film, music. And blacks don't need special attention in American popular music. So, if there's a classroom of many different peoples, 'inclusion' doesn't mean all of them. It means they must share in the 'inclusion' of Jews, homos, and blacks. But the media still act as homos are some pitiable group that needs more of our love(in a dumb nation where people think 25% of the people are homo). The media still go on and on about Jewish this and Jewish that. It's as if Jews don't get enough respect when US foreign policy is all about serving Israel. Trump shows a bit of sympathy for white working class, and rich Jews get all antsy about how it's so unfair to Jews. And blacks who dominate sports and pop music.. they bitch about how there not be more blacks in this or that.

    Now, the biggest problem with 'inclusion' is maybe women, and this is where feminists makes a big fuss. Unlike Jews, homos, and even blacks, women are half the population, but they've been less prominent in many fields even though some made their mark esp in the 20th century, a good number of them being Jewesses: Rand, Sontag, Kael, Friedan, Ferber, Hellman, Jong, Carole King, etc.

    But then, the very cult of 'inclusion' is the thing that holds so many women back. To attain greatness, you need individuality than inclusionality. It's no wonder that women like Sontag and Kael did so much more than today's pampered PC female dolts who emphasize consensus, even to the point where most of sisterhood has been browbeaten into acknowledging men with puds and balls wigs and dresses as 'women'. What had been studied as 'camp' by Sontag has become Champ.
    Kael didn't join feminism because she didn't want to be hemmed in by the sisterhood. Sontag didn't come out as homo because she didn't want special favors(or demerits) as a homo or bi. She wanted respect simply as a critic and commentator.

    As PC made women into inclusionals than individuals, they all sound alike. They've become Stepford Sisters. And their minds are like jelly. So, when the official line was 'pornography is crime against women', they all droned on. Later, when the new line is 'slut pride is empowering', they all chanted the same crap. And then, 'me too, me too', and all of sudden, they were back to acting like poor little damsels hunted by horny men. Poor little damsels wearing pussy costumers yelling 'dont' grab my pussy'.

    Greatness is never inclusional. It is individual. Welles got himself the best talent to work with. In an age when inclusionals feel obligated to praise dumb STAR WARS movies or some idiot movie about Wakanda, there too much puppetry and parrotry.

    All said and done, there was a reason why Dylan, Stones, and Beatles won out over Joan Baez and Phil Ochs. Message is secondary to the power of expression.

    And what does it even mean? If you teach Japanese history and cover stuff like Rape of Nanking, it might hurt the feelings of Japanese-American students? So, the story must be changed to Japanese going to Nanking to pass out free food and become friends with Chinese? I suppose Japanese-American students will feel more ‘included’ in gooey way.

    Upon visiting Hawaii some 15 years ago I did some of the traditional tourist visits that included the Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor. Before you boat over to the memorial they present a film on the history WWII in the Pacific from the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the nuking of Hiroshima. At time and I hear it still is, Hawaii is popular with Japanese tourist. I’d say about a third of the visitors that day were Japanese tourist. Overall the White audience had much more emotional response to both the film and the actual memorial than the Japanese tourist. Not sure it was gooey or otherwise for them.

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  86. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    “Inclusion” means while getting your English degree you read a lot of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth but never once crack open Alexander Pope or Samuel Johnson.
     
    Morrison, yes. Roth, not so much. Feminists don't like him.

    And, as someone who specializes in 18th century lit, I can confidently note that undergrads really like Pope. I'm used to having 18 year-olds tell me that they that, prior to reading Pope, they never knew that poetry could be funny.

    I say get rid of Great Books and Humanities departments.

    We don’t need them anymore. I can see why such were necessary when only big cities and colleges had wide array of intellectual materials. So, if you grew up in a small town with a small library and limited horizons, I can see how going to college was a big deal. You finally came upon things you had no access to in your small town.

    So, learning about Great Books and discussing them in class meant a great deal.

    But now… you can access all the great books online or for cheap through ebay. You can see all the lectures about them by experts and amateurs on youtube. You can find tons of essays on such stuff.

    So, you don’t need an institutional setting to study Great Books, Big Ideas, or Literature. All you need is a curious mind.

    Also, study of literature, arts, and ideas should be a lifelong process, not something you can squeeze into a few years.

    Therefore, I don’t care if Humanities have turned into Inhumanities.

    We can now appreciate such stuff OUTSIDE the academe.

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    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    The entire educational apparatus, from kindergarten to the post-graduate level, is utterly outmoded and obsolete. A good number of the mouth-breathing seat-warmers inhabiting our high schools shouldn't be there, to say nothing of the stoodentz cluttering up our colleges.

    The sheer insanity of forcing kids to incur hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt to obtain a worthless piece of paper that signifies nothing should be self-evident to everyone, and yet our "leaders" continue to perpetuate the lie that a degree is a ticket to the good life.

    That being said, the dysfunction in the (mis-)education system is merely a symptom of a larger social disease. We turn our girls into credentialist GoGrl grinders and encourage them to squander their years of prime fertility running laps on the corporate treadmill/hamster wheel. We emasculate our boys. And we teach both sexes that life has no inherent meaning, that the only way to fill up the soulless emptiness of modern existence is to engorge oneself on a steady diet of sexual perversion, drugs, and iPhones. The only spiritual causes worth endorsing are migrant-veneration, tranny-worship, and homo-adulation.

    Modern existence need not be soulless. Nihilists are made, not born. But our entire system is set up to produce them. Few can overcome the relentless cultural programming.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    I say get rid of Great Books and Humanities departments.
     
    You really have no idea how education works, do you?
    , @MBlanc46
    You can appreciate anything outside academe.
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  87. @the Supreme Gentleman

    I’ve repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You’d expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it’s sparsely covered.
     
    Did you mean to write "highest...ratio", or did I misunderstand your point?

    No I think he did mean to write highest significance to academic interest ratio. :)

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  88. @Macumazahn
    Somewhat OT: Black apologists constantly complain that IQ tests are "culturally biased" and that this explains the differences in both mean and standard deviation between the scores of blacks and whites.
    Has anyone ever developed an intelligence test that's "culturally biased" in the opposite direction? I mean a serious test, not some joke based on ebonics or ghetto slang. I can't find one.

    Don’t blacks tend to skew more towards verbal and away from spatial/mathematical reasoning? The vast majority of black academics are in softer social science and humanities areas. The irony of blacks complaining about culturally biased tests is that they actually tend to do relatively better in such culturally biased , more verbally loaded tests.

    I suspect the black deficit would be particularly high on something like the ravens.

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    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    Steve has noted this before. Since their lower level of intelligence is "innate" and not the result of some organic defect, blacks tend to "talk smarter" than they really are. Many 85-IQ blacks are engaging conversationalists, while most 85-IQ whites are about as articulate as the average brick wall.

    I know a middle-aged black guy who survived being shot in the head as a child. When you first hear him speak, you assume immediately that he is mentally retarded. His highest educational attainment is a high-school certificate of completion. But he can tell you, off the top of his head, with uncanny accuracy, the entire backstory of every single character on all of the CBS soap operas, including shows that went off the air ten or twenty years ago. He spends most of his waking hours watching television, and he has an impressive ability to keep up with the plotlines of the various shows. (The last time I saw him, he complained that his sister, with whom he lives, was stealing his disability benefits.)

    Mohammed Ali had a 78 IQ.
    , @Mishra

    Don’t blacks tend to skew more towards verbal and away from spatial/mathematical reasoning?
     
    So long as everything rhymes, then yeah.
    , @Kyle
    Listen to rap battles, check out the list of world ranked scrabble players, or observe large gatherings of black people. There is no doubt that they have robust Brocas areas. No doubt more robust than those of Caucasoids and especially of mongoloids. Of course this is all just anecdotal speculation of a non professional.
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  89. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Harvard offers no similarly broad course and no Cold War survey course. Instead, we have “Cold War in the Global South.”
     
    I've repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You'd expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it's sparsely covered.

    My surmise is that academics saw themselves as losers in the Cold War in some sense, and aren't eager to study it as a result.

    Yes. At the time it justified huge government expenditure and programming in academia, but I have seen an Arbusto-worthy incuriosity coupled with an emotional nostalgia for a dishonestly idealized Soyuz. There is a feeling that overall, socialism won, and that the fall of the Soviet Union was a combination of illegitimate and deplorable Reaganite terrorism with the racial inferiority of the Slav. I hear special features all the time on BBC radio examining every last toenail claimed to have been ripped out by the Apartheid South African “regime.” There is never any mention of the Soviet-sponsored Communist terrorists that government was fighting, let alone of the normality of terror and want in the Bolshevik empire itself. “The Americans” is about as rigorous as “Man Men” and, funnily enough, along the same lines. There is apparently lots of money for any film project showing the very small and non-representative “fun” side of Communism, such as “Goodbye, Lenin,” but also now including wierd ersatz documentaries and cartoon clips on YouTube, many held up by younger Eastern Europeans who see Communism as a vague part of their heritage. About the best treatment of actually considering that communism wasn’t fun in pop culture is still (“the Long Walk” and) “The Lives Of Others,” which I cannot mention without thinking of “Baader Meinhof Complex.” BMC is a very good movie and pretty accurate in general, but it is viciously propagandisticon some points. Leftist violence is depicted amorally (this is an important thing to watch for because it’s also all over our propaganda programming. The idea is to be ostensibly condemning the act but actually intimidating the audience. Cf “The Counselor,” both the overall story, but also in brief the Green Hornet’s answer to the dog food saleswoman). Right-wing identification is depicted as partly justifying left-wing violence (these first two ideas were also on display in Mesrine — Nazi collaboration is a moral crisis justifying crime, a rightwing journalist gets beaten and we’re not saying it’s right but we are going to take our time showing it). Most brazenly, no firearm in BMC is ever handled properly, not once, not even in the hands of a police officer or an instructor. Compare the depiction of firearms in Rumpole: the idea is to create a hysterical Overton kick in which guns are characterized as too inherently dangerous to have such a thing as a responsible use. tldr you’ll shoot your eye out.
    The inpression I got from academics studying Soviet history is often that they thought theBolsheviks were well-intentioned but technically imprecise (and their judgment of the peasantry was often the same as that of the Bolsheviks).

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Wow, line breaks, much?
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  90. @syonredux

    “Inclusion” means while getting your English degree you read a lot of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth but never once crack open Alexander Pope or Samuel Johnson.
     
    Morrison, yes. Roth, not so much. Feminists don't like him.

    And, as someone who specializes in 18th century lit, I can confidently note that undergrads really like Pope. I'm used to having 18 year-olds tell me that they that, prior to reading Pope, they never knew that poetry could be funny.

    That’s fascinating because you can’t go three words in Pope without the sort of Classical reference that’s not getting a cartoon treatment any time soon.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    That’s fascinating because you can’t go three words in Pope without the sort of Classical reference that’s not getting a cartoon treatment any time soon.
     
    Pope can be rather quick with his allusions, true, but he can also be surprisingly colloquial:

    She said; then raging to Sir Plume repairs,
    And bids her Beau demand the precious hairs;
    (Sir Plume of amber snuff-box justly vain,
    And the nice conduct of a clouded cane)
    With earnest eyes, and round unthinking face,
    He first the snuff-box open'd, then the case,
    And thus broke out — "My Lord, why, what the devil?
    "Z — ds! damn the lock! 'fore Gad, you must be civil!
    Plague on't!'t is past a jest — nay prithee, pox!
    Give her the hair" — he spoke, and rapp'd his box.
     
    Rape of the Lock, Canto IV
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  91. @syonredux

    I’ve repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You’d expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it’s sparsely covered.
     
    I have some colleagues who specialize in "Cold War Cultural Studies." Lots of SF and movies for the exegesis: North by North-West, Heinlein's Puppet Masters, Invasion of the Body-Snatchers (both the book and the film), The Manchurian Candidate (both the book and the film), etc

    A cynical surmise from that list: they spend a lot of time interrogating how a hysterical fear of red boogeys justified near-fascistic policy and public sentiment in American society, and not noting how accurately the red boogeys were depicted?
    The real take-away from “Billion Dollar Brain” is that detente was just a fashionable term for an inappropriate friendliness among our elites and artists that long predated it.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    A cynical surmise from that list: they spend a lot of time interrogating how a hysterical fear of red boogeys justified near-fascistic policy and public sentiment in American society, and not noting how accurately the red boogeys were depicted?
     
    Pretty much. A recurring theme in the seminars that I've attended involves how Cold War books and films depict the Anglo characters as "romantic individualists, " whereas the Sin0-Slavic enemy is a robotic collective.....
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  92. @the Supreme Gentleman

    I’ve repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You’d expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it’s sparsely covered.
     
    Did you mean to write "highest...ratio", or did I misunderstand your point?

    Did you mean to write “highest…ratio”, or did I misunderstand your point?

    Indeed I did.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Possible illustration: go to a used book store and look at the Russian or Eastern European section, there will be a ton of stuff from the middle Cold War that was more or less government mandated: dictionaries, grammars, readers, technical dictionaries, popular introductory courses, examinations of the Russian mind. There is no post-Cold War shelf that groans as much. There has been some very interesting stuff from the always-good publishing house Fuel (including the encyclopedia of prisoner tattoos and gulag drawings of Baldaev), there's Matthew Maly, there's Batumen, there's Klebnikov and stuff about the Oligarches, there's a certain amount of "Putin is the devil" stuff (which persuades no knowledgeable person and has no popular reach), there's a very nice book by a Dane about vodka, there was a fashion of people taking pictures at Chernobyl and getting that published, but it's not the same in volume or range. In a way this is good because it allows for more sober considerations (apart from calling Putin the devil). There have actually always been travelogues about exotic Muscovy and some of these are getting new attention, I just picked up one I haven't read yet by an all but out homosexual during the Enlightenment.
    But none of this is comparable to the Black Bodies or interrogation of whiteness, or hand-wringings over crime and education, or the academic interest in colonialism, or the massive lot of nothing churned out about China. There's definitely more and higher priority stuff on HBD than about the steppe.
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  93. @Sunbeam
    " From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively. This cannot merely be due to rising interest in science and technology, as psychology, a humanistic department that still focuses on method over values, has seen concentrator numbers hold steady. …"

    My first guess reading that was that Harvard had started admitting a lot more Asians for some reason.

    Be fascinating to see an ethnicity breakdown of class enrollments at Harvard. If we had a man on the yard, we could get a firsthand report by just observing who was walking into which lecture hall at a given time.

    Isn’t the entire Harvard lawsuit thing related to the fact that % of Asians at Harvard has more or less fluctuated around the same narrow range over the past however many years?

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  94. @jcd1974
    I suspect the increasing number of Asian students has a role to play in this.

    Tiger moms don't force their kids to do extra homework every day so they can go to an Ivy League school and study the humanities, they do it so they can enter programs that have a direct path to high paying and prestigious jobs.

    Once upon a time a math degree led to an academic career, now its seen as a gateway to a career as a hedge fund manager. Hence its popularity with those students who prefer commerce over academia.

    Many more half Asian students , with Anglo names , they claim to be white to increase their acceptance rates…

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Many more half Asian students , with Anglo names , they claim to be white to increase their acceptance rates…
     
    A lot of them think of themselves as White. I know a few girls who are half-East Asian, half-European who identify as White.
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  95. @peterike
    "Inclusion" means while getting your English degree you read a lot of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth but never once crack open Alexander Pope or Samuel Johnson.

    I do think that some of the drop is due to humanities becoming almost entirely grievance studies of one sort or other. The classes must be insufferable to anyone not 100% on the SJW bandwagon. For starters, any straight white Gentile male would be told, daily, that he is the Great Villain of Creation. Who wants to sit through this other than a twisted masochist?

    Even the white girls probably grow weary of being fed a diet of anti-white-ism, though they nod in agreement to it in class. The black, Hispanic and Asians admitted in the Humanities will be largely over-the-top SJWs of the shrieking variety (think of our buddy Yung In Chae over at Eidolon).

    On the other hand, this has made the classes far easier. Just take your "text" and run it through the Grievance Sausage Grinder and out pops your term paper which gets an A for being "brave." Seriously, you could come up with a clever AI that could write these term papers. Don't expect much actual scholarship to be going on. And in any case the rot has been around for so many decades, that most of the critics and scholars being cited in humanities papers are just peddling the same po-mo drivel. My guess is that T.S. Eliot's "Tradition and the Individual Talent," to take one example, isn't cited very much in undergrad term papers any more.

    Passages like this are probably now considered hate speech:

    Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality, but an escape from personality. But, of course, only those who have personality and emotions know what it means to want to escape from these things.

    Lindsay Shepard:

    GOODBYE TO THE LEFT

    I’ve come to the realization that I am no longer a leftist. Here’s why.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Impressive video. Thanks for posting.
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  96. Learn some empathy

    especially the last ten minutes

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  97. @Anon
    In college in the 1980s, I had an international relations course that turned out to be nothing but a history of the Cold War, and I'll tell you, even though it was taught by a very good prof (I had him for another course, so I know for certain) the Cold War was a very, very dull subject, and NOBODY came out looking well, either Soviets of US. Frankly, I see the entire Cold War as nothing but a blip in the history of countries. Since it's behind us now, I'm not surprised it's been dropped by academics everywhere.

    Ultimately, if the subject isn't interesting or fun, it's going to die as a subject.

    Ultimately, if the subject isn’t interesting or fun, it’s going to die as a subject.

    I fail to understand how a decades-long existential struggle between two superpowers each with the power to extinguish humanity, influencing all manner of art and culture is “not interesting or fun” to study.

    What could be a more interesting field of study?

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    • Agree: Anonym, AndrewR
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Oh come on, surely you see that he's explaining why Holocaust studies, Holocaust classes, Holocaust museums, Holocaust made for tv movies, Holocaust movies, Holocaust books and Holocaust art installations are so omnipresent. As opposed to say that three hour yawner about the Cold War driving calculating scientists and testosterone-drunk pilots to better and better flight technology, I mean, who wouldn't choose the pyjamas?
    , @Anonym
    Tom Clancy built his career on the Cold War. So did several other authors of note. This is of course because the Cold War was dull as dishwater, as movies like The Hunt for Red October can attest.
    , @dfordoom

    I fail to understand how a decades-long existential struggle between two superpowers each with the power to extinguish humanity, influencing all manner of art and culture is “not interesting or fun” to study.

    What could be a more interesting field of study?
     
    The Cold War was about politics, and about genuine political differences. These days the last thing our masters want is people thinking or writing about actual politics. They want us to focus on the fake politics of gender and race - identity politics. And the last thing academics these days want to do is to confront actual political issues.
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  98. @Felix...

    I’ve repeatedly said the Cold War has to have been the historical phenomenon with the lowest significance to academic interest ratio ever. You’d expect reams to have been written about it, especially following its end, but it’s sparsely covered.
     
    I think you meant to say highest ratio, not lowest.

    No he’s right. While it was going on the CIA, DOD, DARPA etc took over whole campuses. When it ended you effectively had all these commies who had a choice between examining their personal convictions against the record of history, or pretending it wasn’t so bad and talking about something else.
    Also, Russians themselves do not like talking about any of the bad stuff, the archives are bizarrely hard to get to, there is no (((lobby))) that derives cosmological meaning and purpose from building museums and cranking out media products to Always Remember (remember how Weir’s “Long Walk” was promoted? See how every Nazi movie is promoted?), Russia was not an economically important country for years after the fall, we do not have a strong population-connection to Eastern Europe the way we do with Central Europe, and if you started a militant anti-Communist historical project now it would be interpreted as a vieled insult by certain celestial kingdom.

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  99. @Alec Leamas

    Ultimately, if the subject isn’t interesting or fun, it’s going to die as a subject.
     
    I fail to understand how a decades-long existential struggle between two superpowers each with the power to extinguish humanity, influencing all manner of art and culture is "not interesting or fun" to study.

    What could be a more interesting field of study?

    Oh come on, surely you see that he’s explaining why Holocaust studies, Holocaust classes, Holocaust museums, Holocaust made for tv movies, Holocaust movies, Holocaust books and Holocaust art installations are so omnipresent. As opposed to say that three hour yawner about the Cold War driving calculating scientists and testosterone-drunk pilots to better and better flight technology, I mean, who wouldn’t choose the pyjamas?

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  100. @Sunbeam
    " From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively. This cannot merely be due to rising interest in science and technology, as psychology, a humanistic department that still focuses on method over values, has seen concentrator numbers hold steady. …"

    My first guess reading that was that Harvard had started admitting a lot more Asians for some reason.

    Be fascinating to see an ethnicity breakdown of class enrollments at Harvard. If we had a man on the yard, we could get a firsthand report by just observing who was walking into which lecture hall at a given time.

    “My first guess reading that was that Harvard had started admitting a lot more Asians for some reason.”

    Yeah, probably. But more important is the top-down attitude shift that’s happened over the last 10-15 years: Harvard has become way more open about being gross, which is a direct consequence of its secret terror at the prospect of being second to Stanford.

    If you’re an alumnus, you can smell it on the the spam that clogs your inbox: the acrid stench of branding. The Drew Gilpin Faust presidency at Harvard coincided with a very clear push to emulate–and thereby quash the perceived threat posed by–Stanford.

    Among the undergraduates the four-year experience is now essentially The Apprentice: Harvard Edition. It has been really weird to witness, and it’s very real.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Interesting to hear this. When I read the original post, I thought it seemed like Harvard's response to Stanford.

    Some random thoughts:
    - Anecdotally, Stanford's engineering departments are good at attracting smart, well-rounded dudes, like a Bill Belichick School of Engineering. Aside from proximity to Silicon Valley, it seems like a combination of California sunshine, respectable D1 sports (making it seem accessible to high-aptitude guys in flyover country), and strong academics.
    - In tech, the only the people I have encountered from the Ivy League who do well have a pre-2008 Harvard MBA or Wharton Economics undergrad. I have seen quite a few from the Ivy League fired in the first two years, get passed up for promotion then go back the East Coast, or otherwise mar their careers, much like James Damore (as much as I agree with his essay).

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  101. Lindsay Shepard:

    GOODBYE TO THE LEFT

    I’ve come to the realization that I am no longer a leftist. Here’s why.

    In my experience, people who self-identify as leftists are very far left. Usually the consider themselves liberals, progressives, moderates, or Republicans.

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  102. @syonredux
    Lindsay Shepard:

    GOODBYE TO THE LEFT

    I've come to the realization that I am no longer a leftist. Here's why.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qpg6P1PNWR8

    Impressive video. Thanks for posting.

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  103. @Alec Leamas

    Did you mean to write “highest…ratio”, or did I misunderstand your point?
     
    Indeed I did.

    Possible illustration: go to a used book store and look at the Russian or Eastern European section, there will be a ton of stuff from the middle Cold War that was more or less government mandated: dictionaries, grammars, readers, technical dictionaries, popular introductory courses, examinations of the Russian mind. There is no post-Cold War shelf that groans as much. There has been some very interesting stuff from the always-good publishing house Fuel (including the encyclopedia of prisoner tattoos and gulag drawings of Baldaev), there’s Matthew Maly, there’s Batumen, there’s Klebnikov and stuff about the Oligarches, there’s a certain amount of “Putin is the devil” stuff (which persuades no knowledgeable person and has no popular reach), there’s a very nice book by a Dane about vodka, there was a fashion of people taking pictures at Chernobyl and getting that published, but it’s not the same in volume or range. In a way this is good because it allows for more sober considerations (apart from calling Putin the devil). There have actually always been travelogues about exotic Muscovy and some of these are getting new attention, I just picked up one I haven’t read yet by an all but out homosexual during the Enlightenment.
    But none of this is comparable to the Black Bodies or interrogation of whiteness, or hand-wringings over crime and education, or the academic interest in colonialism, or the massive lot of nothing churned out about China. There’s definitely more and higher priority stuff on HBD than about the steppe.

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    • Replies: @ERM

    There have actually always been travelogues about exotic Muscovy and some of these are getting new attention, I just picked up one I haven’t read yet by an all but out homosexual during the Enlightenment.
     
    Sounds great! Name?
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  104. @Sunbeam
    From that article:

    "Snappily entitled “Pursuing Excellence on a Foundation of Inclusion,” the report consists of almost 80 brightly colored pages and contains eight recommendations. One of those eight, which has attracted notable media attention, changes the school’s alma mater. Its last lines will now read, “Be the herald of Light, and the bearer of Love, Till the stars in the firmament die.” (The latter part replaces “Till the stock of the Puritans die.”)"

    And at the end written by this young man:

    "I have no doubt that Harvard will remain an excellent institution to attend, get a banking job, and get out. And as a Jewish Cold War historian, I feel as little ownership over the distant stars as I do over Puritan stock. At Commencement just over a year from now, I will happily sing the alma mater’s new lines. I will do so next to my roommates, who study biology and computer science. Amidst the chorus I will look over at them, fearing that my liberal arts Harvard, inclusive and shrinking, may meet a lonely fate long before the stars in the firmament begin to flicker."

    They probably did the right thing changing the alma mater. I think the "stock of the Puritans" died a couple decades ago.

    I dunno, my children get The Mayflower from one side and 1630s Massachusetts from mine, along with a bunch of other Northwestern European ancestors. (Plus they’re 1/8 Hungarian, for cheekbone enhancement. Spicy!)

    There’s plenty of Puritan stock sloshing around out there.

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    • Replies: @Sunbeam
    Darn it, I was hoping we (the South) had outlasted our ancient enemy. I know their spiritual children are kicking in lots of places like the Pacific Northwest, but it would have been rewarding, you know?
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  105. @Olorin
    One of the larger questions here is what to do with faculty who have far more power than they ought to set curriculum and admissions policy, and thus can stir up all sorts of trouble at institutions, magnified by media. (At least till somebody else's media show something they don't like, then they get very touchy indeed.)

    These are faculty who seek to fill their own disciplinary and career rice bowls at the expense of the students, parents, and institutions that employ them. They tend to hold in contempt taxpayers and voters whose views don't mesh with Teacher's.

    These faculty are also at war with other faculty for resources, students, and attention. Today, many have union representation, so any challenge to their particular, often extreme minority views, runs smash into the wall of massive litigation/legal remedies originally intended for the industrial working class. Indeed, many of these third-or-worse-rate teachers consider themselves every bit as important as, say, the 20th century coal miner, shipbuilder, teamster, longshoreman, or electrical line worker. And worthier of salaries. While AFSCME and AFT and the like hasten to bolster that growth industry in overweening self-regard.

    This is at the crux (I'm told) of the matters at The Evergreen State College. A very small group of teachers, administrators, and students collaborate to control the entire institution, often winning battles and territory thanks to administrators like its current milquetoast Machiavelli president and blue-city voting blocs.

    In any event, whoever has nads and brains big enough to create new institutions of learning that mesh with what bright parents want for their bright children, and are willing to pay for, will immanentize a flourishing new sector of supporting human achievement and evolution. While the traditional Ed Biz withers and dies on its poisoned bolshie mass marketing vine.

    Some of the faculty are real problem. But a lot of the liberal pressure in Academia is really from the administrators. The president’s Dean’s vice presidents all come from the diversity loving cultural Marxist wing of America. Especially the student services people are completely indoctrinated into the latest White Privilege arguments. They often organize the students to do all this crazy stuff. I’d love to get all the studies departments abolished, but it’s the board’s and presidents who want the stuff. They put the pressure on departments to do diversity hires which then those hires go on to be the leftist activist.

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  106. @Alfa158
    I didn’t know there even was a Jewish Cold War. Who were the antagonists? Orthodox versus Reform? Ashkenazi versus Sephardic? Zionists versus Assimalists? Sounds like an esoteric field of study to me. What kind of a career can you have with a degree in that other than teaching classes on the Jewish Cold War?

    I didn’t know there even was a Jewish Cold War. Who were the antagonists?

    How about the Soviet nomenklatura vs. the U.S. neoconservatives?

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I thought that by the time the neocons in their strictest definition came around, the Soviets had done a final and more thorough purge of any Jews that looked Zionistish or had relatives in Israel.
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  107. @Bernardo Pizzaro Cortez Del Castro
    Many more half Asian students , with Anglo names , they claim to be white to increase their acceptance rates...

    Many more half Asian students , with Anglo names , they claim to be white to increase their acceptance rates…

    A lot of them think of themselves as White. I know a few girls who are half-East Asian, half-European who identify as White.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar


    Many more half Asian students , with Anglo names , they claim to be white to increase their acceptance rates…
     
    A lot of them think of themselves as White. I know a few girls who are half-East Asian, half-European who identify as White.
     
    I don't know how they "identify", but I saw a father-son folk duo perform recently. The surname was Japanese. The father looked half, perhaps favoring the white side. (Though that may have been as much his backwoods expression and dress. They're from near Lake Superior.) The kid's mother was clearly white; he didn't look like he had any Asian in him at all.

    I know another family where the father (I just learned) is half-Thai. His son is blond and looks like the young soldier the swarthy old officers are drooling over in Triumph of the Will. But their surname is English. The young singer's is Japanese. That must be weird if you don't look it.
    , @ScarletNumber
    I know two girls with Japanese mothers who you would never guess were half-Asian.
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  108. @sabril
    I would want to see the breakdown of majors by race, sex, etc.

    I have a female family member who is a Harvard undergraduate. She is a bright, diligent girl but like most girls not a math genius, in other words she is not capable of coming up with a creative solution to a math or physics problem which is different from problems she has practiced.

    20 or 30 years ago, someone like her would have taken Physics her first semester and then quickly switched to something like History, etc. But she's getting A's in her Math and Physics classes.

    So it could be what's going on is that STEM type fields are getting watered down at places like Harvard so that more girls are studying them, and this is responsible for the exodus from History.

    But, as we are told, males and females … and Blacks, Whites, and Asians all have different learning styles. The “old” STEM classes only addressed the traditional, rigorous White male learning style. Now, it’s time to make amends and make room for female, minority, and other creative learning styles in math, physics, etc.

    As an axiom, since everyone is equal in IQ and other capabilities, one will not know one has arrived at this until all student grades in all courses are the same … that is, that all possible learning styles have been accommodated. Therefore, the fact that almost everyone at Harvard makes an “A” or “A-” in STEM as well as humanities courses is testimony that Harvard is leading academia in this revolutionary approach to education.

    I know this sounds like nonsense, but the whole point of diversity is to prove that there is no diversity. The whole point of accommodating the different race- and gender-based learning styles is to prove there are no such things as race and gender. The objective is to “normalize” education to prove that everyone is the same … and that race, gender, and IQ are no longer relevant. If you don’t get this, you don’t get what Harvard and contemporary academia are about.

    I apologize for not being succinct in my explanation. I’m trying to sort of this out as best I can. It’s heavy stuff!

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    One thing that I've never been able to get clear in my mind is why, if Harvard, Yale, Stanford etal. really believe in "equality", why don't they simply admit the first two thousand or so applicants regardless of SAT score? In other words make admission to, say, Harvard the equivalent of a lottery. Most of 'em will probably flunk out. If so, so what? The point is that every one of the applicants had a shot at making The Show. The answer will probably that, well, there's "equality" and then there's, er, Equality. Or something like that.
    , @schnellandine

    I know this sounds like nonsense, but the whole point of diversity is to prove that there is no diversity.
     
    Yeah, would be nice if the vibrancy grifters would get their story straight. Like Mrs. Gump taking to Forrest:
    "You're special."
    Ten minutes later:
    "You're no different from anybody else."

    That sums the die-versity swindle. It's permissible to laud a vibrant group over white men, generalizing all the way (eg "wise Latina"). It's forbidden to generalize negatively compared to whites, males, and especially white males. As with Mrs. Gump, the truth changes depending on the comparison, with Forrest triumphing by at worst being normal. Regarding vibrants, the nons must always--deservedly, contentedly--get the shit end of the stick.

    Doublethink
    No difference, but innately special, desirable, superior. No difference. You need to include these people because they bring something you cannot ever. They are the same as you.
    , @ScarletNumber
    If you want to hear more than you could ever care to about accommodating learning styles, talk to a special-education teacher. You will hear that fake Einstein quote about fish and trees.
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  109. @slumber_j
    I dunno, my children get The Mayflower from one side and 1630s Massachusetts from mine, along with a bunch of other Northwestern European ancestors. (Plus they're 1/8 Hungarian, for cheekbone enhancement. Spicy!)

    There's plenty of Puritan stock sloshing around out there.

    Darn it, I was hoping we (the South) had outlasted our ancient enemy. I know their spiritual children are kicking in lots of places like the Pacific Northwest, but it would have been rewarding, you know?

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    • Replies: @slumber_j
    I'm not saying the world wouldn't be a more fun place if our bloodlines were utterly eradicated--just that it hasn't happened yet.
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  110. OT: The Youtube shooter was a woman who was wearing a headscarf. She shot her boyfriend and plugged 3 other women. People were at an outdoor party when she appeared. I wonder if her boyfriend was Muslim and cheating on her?

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    The boyfriend theory has been abandoned at the moment. They weren't posting her stuff and therefore she wasn't getting paid.
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  111. @J.Ross
    That's fascinating because you can't go three words in Pope without the sort of Classical reference that's not getting a cartoon treatment any time soon.

    That’s fascinating because you can’t go three words in Pope without the sort of Classical reference that’s not getting a cartoon treatment any time soon.

    Pope can be rather quick with his allusions, true, but he can also be surprisingly colloquial:

    She said; then raging to Sir Plume repairs,
    And bids her Beau demand the precious hairs;
    (Sir Plume of amber snuff-box justly vain,
    And the nice conduct of a clouded cane)
    With earnest eyes, and round unthinking face,
    He first the snuff-box open’d, then the case,
    And thus broke out — “My Lord, why, what the devil?
    “Z — ds! damn the lock! ‘fore Gad, you must be civil!
    Plague on’t!’t is past a jest — nay prithee, pox!
    Give her the hair” — he spoke, and rapp’d his box.

    Rape of the Lock, Canto IV

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    • Replies: @Benjaminl
    Syon, did you see the series on contemporary American literature published by "Sandra Kotta" at Quillette?

    http://quillette.com/author/sandra-kotta/
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  112. @J.Ross
    A cynical surmise from that list: they spend a lot of time interrogating how a hysterical fear of red boogeys justified near-fascistic policy and public sentiment in American society, and not noting how accurately the red boogeys were depicted?
    The real take-away from "Billion Dollar Brain" is that detente was just a fashionable term for an inappropriate friendliness among our elites and artists that long predated it.

    A cynical surmise from that list: they spend a lot of time interrogating how a hysterical fear of red boogeys justified near-fascistic policy and public sentiment in American society, and not noting how accurately the red boogeys were depicted?

    Pretty much. A recurring theme in the seminars that I’ve attended involves how Cold War books and films depict the Anglo characters as “romantic individualists, ” whereas the Sin0-Slavic enemy is a robotic collective…..

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Oho, specializing in Cold War literature while being this ignorant of Socialist Realism ... wow.
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  113. @Jeff the Donleavy Fan
    Getting your degree at Harvard rather than the U. of State may make it easier to apply to top grad programs. Or to go directly into the workplace after you get your bachelor's degree. And the networking opportunities can't be any worse.

    One thing I have always wondered is whether it is more difficult to get a degree in electrical engineering or in math or physics at Harvard or Stanford than a place like the University of Oklahoma or Texas A&M. Is the coursework genuinely tougher at Harvard, or Cal Tech or MIT, than at Berkeley or the University of Texas or Ohio State? Does anyone know?

    (Same guy.) Well, I don’t know first hand, but I’ve heard the Ivy league isn’t the Ivy league for everything. I also know that a few of my professors at State U where also professors at more elite schools that didn’t happen to also be adjacent to ski country, and I doubt they bothered to adjust their curriculum.

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  114. @Daniel H
    >>>Nobody wins in that scenario, in which Harvard becomes a Vassar joined at the hip to an MIT.

    Harvard has an engineering school. Offers majors in Mechanical, Electrical, Computer, Biological and others. Has anybody known, or even heard of somebody who graduated Harvard engineering? I have never met and am not aware of a Harvard engineering graduate.

    Science, technology, medicine, and mathematics
    Name Class year Notability Reference(s)
    Roger Adams (1889–1971) College 1909, PhD 1912 Pioneering organic chemist [88]
    Howard H. Aiken (1900–1973) M.A. 1937; PhD 1939 Computer scientist; designer of the Harvard Mark I [89]
    James Gilbert Baker (1914–2005) PhD 1942 Astronomer, optician [90]
    John Bartlett (1784–1849) College 1805 Minister, founder of Massachusetts General Hospital [91]
    Manjul Bhargava (born 1974) College 1996 Mathematician, Fields Medal winner
    Craig Call Black PhD 1962 Paleontologist
    Francine D. Blau (born 1946) M.A. 1969; PhD 1975 Economist at the National Bureau of Economic Research, first woman to receive the IZA Prize in Labor Economics [92]
    Hilary Blumberg College 1986 Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience [93]
    Dan Bricklin (born 1951) Business 1979 Creator of VisiCalc [94]
    Fred Brooks (born 1931) PhD 1956 Turing Award laureate
    Thomas H. Clark (1893–1996) College 1917; A.M. 1921; PhD 1923 Geologist; one of the top Canadian scientists of the 20th century; namesake of Thomasclarkite [95]
    Stephen Cook S.M. 1962; PhD 1966 Computer scientist [96]
    Don Coppersmith S.M. 1975; PhD 1977 Computer scientist [97]
    Leda Cosmides (born 1957) College 1979; PhD 1985 Evolutionary psychologist [98]
    Robert K. Crane PhD 1950 Biochemist [99]
    Harvey Cushing (1869–1939) Medical 1895 Neurosurgeon
    Elliott Cutler (1888–1947) College 1909, M.D. 1913; Professor Surgeon and medical educator [100]
    Samuel J. Danishefsky (born 1936) PhD 1962 Chemist, winner of the Wolf Prize in Chemistry in 1995/96 [101]
    Neil deGrasse Tyson (born 1958) College 1980 Astrophysicist, Director of the Hayden Planetarium, Television Host [102]
    Fe Del Mundo (1909-2011) Medical 1938 National Scientist of the Philippines; pediatrician; recipient of Ramon Magsaysay Award; devised an incubator made out of bamboo, designed for use in rural communities without electrical power; the first woman admitted as a student at Harvard Medical School
    Russell Doolittle PhD, 1962 Biochemist [103]
    Gideon Dreyfuss PhD 1978 Biochemist, HHMI investigator [104]
    E. Allen Emerson (born 1954) PhD 1981 Turing Award laureate
    Charles Epstein Harvard Medical College 1959 Geneticist; injured by Ted Kaczynski a.k.a. Unabomber [105]
    Paul Farmer (born 1959) Medical 1988; PhD 1990; Professor Founder of Partners in Health [106]
    Lewis J. Feldman PhD 1975 Professor of plant biology at the University of California, Berkeley [107]
    Rabab Fetieh (born 1954) Dental 1987 First Saudi Arabian female orthodontist
    Robert Galambos (1914–2010) PhD Researcher who discovered how bats use echolocation [108]
    Paul Graham (born 1964) S.M. 1988; PhD 1990 Computer programmer and essayist
    Ulysses S. Grant IV (1893–1977) College 1915 Paleontologist
    Brian Greene (born 1963) College 1984 Famous in the world of string theory; Columbia University professor [109]
    Victor Guillemin (born 1937) PhD 1962 Differential geometer [110]
    G. Stanley Hall (1844–1924) PhD 1878 First president of APA and Clark University [111]
    Benjamin Morgan Harrod (1837–1912) College 1856; Civil Engineering 1859 Designed the water and sewerage systems in his native New Orleans, Louisiana [112]
    Donald Olding Hebb (1904–1985) PhD 1936 Canadian psychologist; “father of neuropsychology”; President of the American Psychological Association 1960; Fellow of the Royal Society; Chancellor of McGill University 1970–1974
    Heisuke Hironaka (born 1931) PhD 1960; Professor Mathematician, Fields Medal winner [113]
    Arthur Allen Hoag (1921–1999) PhD 1953 Discovered Hoag’s object
    L. Emmett Holt Jr. (1895–1974) College 1916 Pediatrician [114]
    Tony Hsieh (born 1973) College 1995 CEO of online shoe and clothing shop Zappos, co-founder of LinkExchange, author of Delivering Happiness [115]
    Ruth Hubbard (born 1924) PhD 1950 Radcliffe professor, biologist [116]
    Ernest Ingersoll (1852–1946) Naturalist, writer and explorer
    Kenneth E. Iverson (1920-2004) PhD 1954 Turing Award laureate
    Thomas Jaggar PhD 1897 Geologist, founder of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory [117]
    William James (1842–1910) Medical 1869 Philosopher; psychologist; namesake of William James Hall [118]
    Michio Kaku (born 1947) College 1968 Theoretical physicist, activist
    Richard M. Karp (born 1935) College 1955, PhD 1959 Turing Award laureate
    Alfred Kinsey (1894–1956) Sc. D. 1919 Sexologist [119]
    Ivan Krstić College Computer security expert
    Butler Lampson (born 1943) College 1964 Turing Award laureate
    Theodore K. Lawless (1892-1971) dermatologist; Spingarn Medal [120]
    Saul Levin M.A. 1994 Psychiatrist [121]
    Holbrook Mann MacNeille (1907–1973) PhD 1935 Mathematician [122]
    Rustin McIntosh (1894–1986) College 1914; M.D. 1918 Pediatrician [123]
    Curtis T. McMullen (born 1958) PhD 1985 Fields Medal winner
    Scott McNealy (born 1954) College 1976 Co-founder and chairman of Sun Microsystems [124]
    John S. Meyer (1924–2011) Physician
    Marvin Minsky (1927–2016) College 1950 Computer scientist [125]
    Maryam Mirzakhani (1977-2017) PhD 2004 Fields Medal winner
    Sylvanus G. Morley (1883–1948) College 1908 Mayanist scholar and archaeologist [126]
    Robert Tappan Morris (born 1965) College 1987; S.M. 1993; PhD 1999 CS professor at MIT, creator of the first computer worm
    David Mumford (born 1937) College 1957; PhD 1961 Mathematician, Fields Medal winner [127]
    Major General Spurgeon Neel (1919–2003) MPH 1958 Pioneer of aeromedical evacuation [128]
    J. Robert Oppenheimer (1904–1967) College 1925 Physicist, “father of the atomic bomb” [129]
    Tim O’Reilly College 1975 Founder of O’Reilly Media [130]
    George Parkman (1790–1849) College 1809; Medical 1813 Physician, businessman, murder victim [131]
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914) College 1859 Philosopher, mathematician [132]
    A. Sivathanu Pillai (born 1947) Business 1991 Distinguished Scientist and Chief Controller DRDO and CEO of BrahMos Aerospace [133]
    Mark Plotkin (born 1955) Extension 1979 Ethnobotanist; founder of Amazon Conservation Team [134]
    Daniel Quillen (1940–2011) College 1961; PhD 1964 Mathematician, Fields Medal winner [135]
    Christian R. H. Raetz M.D. and PhD 1973 Professor of biochemistry at Duke University and member of National Academy of Sciences [136]
    Joseph Ransohoff (1915–2001) College 1938 Neurosurgeon, professor and chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at the New York University School of Medicine
    Charles Reigeluth B.A. Economics, 1969 Professor of instructional design systems and creator of Elaboration Theory [137]
    Stuart A. Rice (born 1932) A.M. 1954; PhD 1955 Physical chemist at The University of Chicago [138]
    Dennis Ritchie College 1963; PhD 1968 Computer scientist [139]
    Vern L. Schramm M.S. nutrition Professor of biochemistry at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine [140]
    Jon Seger Ph.D. 1980 Developed theory of bet-hedging in biology; recipient of MacArthur Genius Grant [141]
    Oscar Elton Sette (1900–1972) M.A. biology 1930 Influential fisheries scientist who pioneered fisheries oceanography and modern fisheries science [142][143]
    Harold Hill Smith (1910–1994) PhD Geneticist [144]
    Richard Stallman (born 1953) College 1974 Founder of the Free Software Foundation
    John Tooby PhD 1985 Anthropologist and evolutionary psychologist
    Marius Vassiliou College 1978 Computational scientist and research executive
    Vladimir Voevodsky (1966-2017) PhD 1966 Fields Medal winner
    An Wang (1920–1990) PhD 1948 Computer pioneer; inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame for magnetic core memory; philanthropist [145]
    John White Webster (1793–1850) College 1811; Medical 1815 Physician, professor, killer; Parkman-Webster murder case
    Edward Osborne Wilson (born 1929) PhD 1955; professor Biologist [146]
    Charles F. Winslow (1811–1877) Medical 1834 Physician, diplomat, and atomic theorist [147]
    John Winthrop (1714–1779) College 1732; professor Astronomer, mathematician
    Chauncey Wright (1830–1875) College 1852 Mathematician, philosopher, professor [148]

    From just looking at the dates one might get the impression that Harvard shut down sometime in the 90′s .

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    • Replies: @Daniel H
    Few engineers. I know that Harvard students excel in the pure sciences but few engineers.
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  115. @Daniel H
    >>>Nobody wins in that scenario, in which Harvard becomes a Vassar joined at the hip to an MIT.

    Harvard has an engineering school. Offers majors in Mechanical, Electrical, Computer, Biological and others. Has anybody known, or even heard of somebody who graduated Harvard engineering? I have never met and am not aware of a Harvard engineering graduate.

    It appears the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering undergraduate majors at Harvard started in 2011.

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    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    Yeah Harvard & Yale for a long time thought engineering was too downscale. Yale actually had an engineering school that they eliminated (I believe) back in the '60s and had to reconstitute. This despite the fact that Yale in its early days counted among its alums most of the great American inventors who bothered to go to college in the US (Morse, Eli Whitney) as well as J.W. Gibbs. Apparently that part of their history they weren't too interested in.

    But that was when Yale was new. Upstart colleges tend to focus on engineering and physical science as a way to break into the big leagues, then they shift to teaching non-falsifiable things to scions. Same pattern as you see through the generations within families, as John Adams pointed out.

    , @Benjaminl
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvard_John_A._Paulson_School_of_Engineering_and_Applied_Sciences#Notable_alumni

    For a long time, computer science made up the majority of the "Engineering" program. Most of those famous alumni were in CS. More recently, Harvard decided it would have to pay more attention to the field, or get left behind by Stanford and MIT. Gates and Ballmer paid for a new building. And, Engineering and Applied Sciences was established as its own School, being formerly a mere division of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Engineering was and remains the only field in which you can receive a undergraduate Bachelor of Science from Harvard.
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  116. @syonredux

    A cynical surmise from that list: they spend a lot of time interrogating how a hysterical fear of red boogeys justified near-fascistic policy and public sentiment in American society, and not noting how accurately the red boogeys were depicted?
     
    Pretty much. A recurring theme in the seminars that I've attended involves how Cold War books and films depict the Anglo characters as "romantic individualists, " whereas the Sin0-Slavic enemy is a robotic collective.....

    Oho, specializing in Cold War literature while being this ignorant of Socialist Realism … wow.

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  117. @Charles Pewitt
    The Puritan divine dirtbags who started Harvard were East Anglian bug-eyed bog dwellers back in England. Now the arrogant money-grubbers are holding the rest of us over an open fire. The worst sin according to the Puritan divines was to sleep through one of their boring sermons.

    New England maritime bourgeoisie drug dealers got the Chinks hooked on drugs and they brought the loot back and gave it to Harvard.

    Harvard has been the original spawning ground of the treasonous rats in the WASP / Jew ruling class.

    Harvard is a hedge fund with a school attached to it.

    Harvard Hates America; America Don't Much Care For Harvard.

    Tweet from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/590944702569979904

    One for laughs from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/570298920561201154

    The worst sin according to the Puritan divines was to sleep through one of their boring sermons.

    The worst sin of the Puritans was denying the sacramental nature of marriage. The anchor was barely dry on the Mayflower when William Bradford made that pronouncement.

    Now we see the result of what happens when you turn something that properly belongs to the church over to the state, which is spectacularly ill-equipped to handle it.

    But people are more interested in that miscegenous marriage down in Virginia.

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    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    Yeah, what was that all about? Just trying to get away from the Anglican/Catholic ceremonies? I assume they didn't deny that marriage was instituted by God in the garden as a permanent feature for humanity and society.

    But I wouldn't go blaming Puritans for no-fault divorce, life-long birth control, or the current menace of "same-sex marriage." Those abominations are much too recent.
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  118. Woman shoots her boyfriend at YouTube. Bystander wishes he had a gun.

    White boyfriend to blame for all this violence and bad thought!

    https://ijr.com/2018/04/1081818-youtube-shooting-witness-says-wish-gun/

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  119. @Anon
    I say get rid of Great Books and Humanities departments.

    We don't need them anymore. I can see why such were necessary when only big cities and colleges had wide array of intellectual materials. So, if you grew up in a small town with a small library and limited horizons, I can see how going to college was a big deal. You finally came upon things you had no access to in your small town.

    So, learning about Great Books and discussing them in class meant a great deal.

    But now... you can access all the great books online or for cheap through ebay. You can see all the lectures about them by experts and amateurs on youtube. You can find tons of essays on such stuff.

    So, you don't need an institutional setting to study Great Books, Big Ideas, or Literature. All you need is a curious mind.

    Also, study of literature, arts, and ideas should be a lifelong process, not something you can squeeze into a few years.

    Therefore, I don't care if Humanities have turned into Inhumanities.

    We can now appreciate such stuff OUTSIDE the academe.

    The entire educational apparatus, from kindergarten to the post-graduate level, is utterly outmoded and obsolete. A good number of the mouth-breathing seat-warmers inhabiting our high schools shouldn’t be there, to say nothing of the stoodentz cluttering up our colleges.

    The sheer insanity of forcing kids to incur hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt to obtain a worthless piece of paper that signifies nothing should be self-evident to everyone, and yet our “leaders” continue to perpetuate the lie that a degree is a ticket to the good life.

    That being said, the dysfunction in the (mis-)education system is merely a symptom of a larger social disease. We turn our girls into credentialist GoGrl grinders and encourage them to squander their years of prime fertility running laps on the corporate treadmill/hamster wheel. We emasculate our boys. And we teach both sexes that life has no inherent meaning, that the only way to fill up the soulless emptiness of modern existence is to engorge oneself on a steady diet of sexual perversion, drugs, and iPhones. The only spiritual causes worth endorsing are migrant-veneration, tranny-worship, and homo-adulation.

    Modern existence need not be soulless. Nihilists are made, not born. But our entire system is set up to produce them. Few can overcome the relentless cultural programming.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    That being said, the dysfunction in the (mis-)education system is merely a symptom of a larger social disease. We turn our girls into credentialist GoGrl grinders and encourage them to squander their years of prime fertility running laps on the corporate treadmill/hamster wheel. We emasculate our boys. And we teach both sexes that life has no inherent meaning, that the only way to fill up the soulless emptiness of modern existence is to engorge oneself on a steady diet of sexual perversion, drugs, and iPhones. The only spiritual causes worth endorsing are migrant-veneration, tranny-worship, and homo-adulation.

    I teach my daughters that there is power in a large family. They get the concept!
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  120. @El_Nathan
    Wait, wait, wait, wait. Isn't the whole point of elite schools like Harvard to be some place where you can study liberal arts without worrying about sacrificing your elite status and future income? Then you can get into a different elite law or business school with your elite liberal arts degree and be a master of the universe, right? If you want to study STEM, or something else useful, then it doesn't matter where you go. You can get your P.E. from any number of really excellent engineering schools. If you want to do hard science, then you go to one of the big R1 state flagship schools and work in the lab of a professor that knows the other prominent researchers in the field and who will get you into those other researcher's grad programs, where the grant money is.

    Are we letting in a bunch of foreigners that don't understand these things? Is that what's happening?

    I have experience at a state school and an ivy. Same textbooks are used for pretty much all subjects in physics at least at the undergrad level (Thornton, Griffiths, Kittel, Reif, more Griffiths). These seem to be pretty standardized across the country. I think this is true of most STEM texts, there is a standardized ‘hard’ set of books which is used at all flagship state Us and up. The more elite places may have covered a few extra chapters or asked slightly tougher questions but I don’t think a big difference. Below the flagship state U level they might use a different set, I’m not sure.

    I think MIT, Caltech, and Stanford might do their own thing, however. I actually think this is bad for learning. The popular texts are popular for a reason. Griffiths in particular is an amazing pedagogue.

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  121. @syonredux

    Many more half Asian students , with Anglo names , they claim to be white to increase their acceptance rates…
     
    A lot of them think of themselves as White. I know a few girls who are half-East Asian, half-European who identify as White.

    Many more half Asian students , with Anglo names , they claim to be white to increase their acceptance rates…

    A lot of them think of themselves as White. I know a few girls who are half-East Asian, half-European who identify as White.

    I don’t know how they “identify”, but I saw a father-son folk duo perform recently. The surname was Japanese. The father looked half, perhaps favoring the white side. (Though that may have been as much his backwoods expression and dress. They’re from near Lake Superior.) The kid’s mother was clearly white; he didn’t look like he had any Asian in him at all.

    I know another family where the father (I just learned) is half-Thai. His son is blond and looks like the young soldier the swarthy old officers are drooling over in Triumph of the Will. But their surname is English. The young singer’s is Japanese. That must be weird if you don’t look it.

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    • Replies: @Lot
    Japanese and Thai hybrids with whites look less Asian than Chinese or Korean mixes. Thais and Burmese are hybrids between South and East Asians.
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  122. @Lot
    It appears the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering undergraduate majors at Harvard started in 2011.

    Yeah Harvard & Yale for a long time thought engineering was too downscale. Yale actually had an engineering school that they eliminated (I believe) back in the ’60s and had to reconstitute. This despite the fact that Yale in its early days counted among its alums most of the great American inventors who bothered to go to college in the US (Morse, Eli Whitney) as well as J.W. Gibbs. Apparently that part of their history they weren’t too interested in.

    But that was when Yale was new. Upstart colleges tend to focus on engineering and physical science as a way to break into the big leagues, then they shift to teaching non-falsifiable things to scions. Same pattern as you see through the generations within families, as John Adams pointed out.

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  123. OT Today’s psychopathic meltdown was not at YouTube, which is mysteriously already disappearing from news sites (guess the shooter wasn’t a white male), it’s at the Dallas home of tentacle porn enthusiast and wannabe epileptic Kurt Eichenwald.

    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/166634112

    Eichenwald was a journalist for years (his work was the basis of the Matt Damon movie The Informant) and was recently fired without explanation from Vanity Fair. Before that happened he got into wierd things with boys, some of which might just be claims by Eichenwald.
    >Eichenwald claimed to have admin provileges on a very bad site, as part of an investigation into runaway child prostitution, but that he was trying to help one particular boy.
    >He claimed that when he first saw tentacle porn, he thought it was so unbelievable that he showed it to his wife and kids. So that they would believe him.
    >He claimed that an animated gif (which oscillated at the same frequency as a TV screen, and which had to be deliberately activated by Eichenwald, and which bore a warning messsge) caused him to have an epileptic seizure on a night when he admitted he had been drinking wine — and a judge believed him and had the kid arrested. The trial is ongoing. During the “attack” Eichenwald claimed to be his wife (he couldn’t type, see, because of the “seizure”) and crowed that the police were on their way.
    If proven this would be the first time an animated gif caused an epileptic seizure in a guy whose medication is compatible with wine.
    >He has since made a habit of threatening people he does not like with police action.
    >He recently got into it (on twitter) with some kid who has a YouTube channel. Eichenwald can’t stay away from troubled young men.
    >Eichenwald attacked a Parkland shooting survivor (on twitter), who is not part of the prescripted astroturf drama club, and has tried to counter their message but for some mysterious reason had not gotten a lot of attention from the legacy media. Eichenwald claims he confused this kid with the other YouTube kid.
    >Then Eichenwald attacked (on twitter) Ben, brother of the lovely Abigail Shapiro, implying that Ben was working together with the variois troubled young men to make Eichenwald look bad. In the last line Eichenwald claimed to be an editor at Vanity Fair.
    >Most recently Eichenwald received word that his contract at Vanity Fair was not renewed and that some people he knew at the magazine aren’t there any more.

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  124. @Yan Shen
    Don't blacks tend to skew more towards verbal and away from spatial/mathematical reasoning? The vast majority of black academics are in softer social science and humanities areas. The irony of blacks complaining about culturally biased tests is that they actually tend to do relatively better in such culturally biased , more verbally loaded tests.

    I suspect the black deficit would be particularly high on something like the ravens.

    Steve has noted this before. Since their lower level of intelligence is “innate” and not the result of some organic defect, blacks tend to “talk smarter” than they really are. Many 85-IQ blacks are engaging conversationalists, while most 85-IQ whites are about as articulate as the average brick wall.

    I know a middle-aged black guy who survived being shot in the head as a child. When you first hear him speak, you assume immediately that he is mentally retarded. His highest educational attainment is a high-school certificate of completion. But he can tell you, off the top of his head, with uncanny accuracy, the entire backstory of every single character on all of the CBS soap operas, including shows that went off the air ten or twenty years ago. He spends most of his waking hours watching television, and he has an impressive ability to keep up with the plotlines of the various shows. (The last time I saw him, he complained that his sister, with whom he lives, was stealing his disability benefits.)

    Mohammed Ali had a 78 IQ.

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    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome


    Many 85-IQ blacks are engaging conversationalists

     

    LOL.
    , @ScarletNumber

    while most 85-IQ whites are about as articulate as the average brick wall.
     
    This is what hurts the Democratic Party. They can't pretend that these dumb white people are worth talking to. A white Democrat from the coasts has literally nothing in common with them besides skin color. Meanwhile, an above-average-IQ person from middle America can at least discuss hunting and fishing with their dim-witted brother.
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  125. @Tiny Duck
    Any data on how many of those in liberal arts are women? What was the gender breakdown of those concentrations 10 years ago?

    Is Tiny Duck retiring from trollhood?

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  126. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel H
    >>>Nobody wins in that scenario, in which Harvard becomes a Vassar joined at the hip to an MIT.

    Harvard has an engineering school. Offers majors in Mechanical, Electrical, Computer, Biological and others. Has anybody known, or even heard of somebody who graduated Harvard engineering? I have never met and am not aware of a Harvard engineering graduate.

    Harvard has an engineering school. Offers majors in Mechanical, Electrical, Computer, Biological and others.

    I thought that was called MIT.

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  127. @Jeff the Donleavy Fan
    Getting your degree at Harvard rather than the U. of State may make it easier to apply to top grad programs. Or to go directly into the workplace after you get your bachelor's degree. And the networking opportunities can't be any worse.

    One thing I have always wondered is whether it is more difficult to get a degree in electrical engineering or in math or physics at Harvard or Stanford than a place like the University of Oklahoma or Texas A&M. Is the coursework genuinely tougher at Harvard, or Cal Tech or MIT, than at Berkeley or the University of Texas or Ohio State? Does anyone know?

    Back when I was in engineering school, the word on the street was that a few engineering schools — Cal Tech, MIT, Georgia Tech, maybe a few lesser-knowns like Harvey Mudd and Rose-Hullman — were a cut above, in that the the work was indeed much harder, like a sort of boot camp. Georgia Tech grads didn’t talk about when they graduated — they talked about when they “got out”. An undergrad from one of these sorts of schools was effectively a master’s from most other US engineering schools.

    I don’t know about Georgia Tech these days, but my understanding is that this is still the case with Cal Tech: lots of people don’t bother with grad school after having their clocks cleaned there, and employers who don’t know about it aren’t worth working for. MIT was an odd duck — extremely rigorous for undergrad, but expressly designed as a feeder for graduate school. They’d even take their own. Again, may have changed.

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  128. The shift in majors at Harvard away from soft humanities has two major drivers.

    First, Harvard has gotten unimaginably hard to get into for white & Asian kids, who make up the large majority of the class. Every last one of them has very strong math aptitude, such that none of them NEEDS a soft humanities or social science major. Don’t underestimate that factor in populating the soft majors at schools with less rigorous admission standards.

    Second, career focus has changed. 20 years ago it was law school, Wall Street, consulting, med school and grad school. Law school and grad school are each deeply degraded / discredited as career paths, med school isn’t was it was, and Silicon Valley has come in huge — in other words, the vast majority of Harvard undergrads aspire to a post-grad step in which evident rigor, and quantitative if not scientific capability is required, even of someone with a Harvard degree. It makes perfect sense for the most quantitative of humanities disciplines — philosophy — and the most rigorous — classics — to have held up.

    I’d say that revulsion at SJWs dominating humanities syllabi contributes very little to things. Loan balances not at all, because Harvard has very little student loans anymore — 100% grants for financial aid. The only people who take loans are people whose parents are income-rich but cash poor and fail the need calculator, and there aren’t a lot of them.

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    • Replies: @bartok

    Silicon Valley has come in huge
     
    Private equity has come in huge as well, at the undergraduate level.
    , @Ivy
    Admissions officers also need to keep an eye on future donations, and some majors are just not likely to generate much wealth. How many basket weaving or idiot studies majors even graduate?

    The business model gets reviewed periodically. In Harvard's case, that little Russia problem (Summers, Schleifer et al) and some lackluster endowment returns have caused some heartburn. Failure to perform on plan is just dipping into principal, for God's sake!
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  129. Duh. The smartest, sciency guys (now, girls, they stilll, follow those guys) are going to State U, and like, Villanova, Xavier, Holy Cross, Loyola, or Norte Dame – who give them awesome scholarships. The math geeks, the guys….like that great Red Head Nordic :) giant at Notre Dame, are also getting, full effin’ rides. I have screamed for 3 years on this blog: the smartest/intellectually gifted are going to “honors college’ at state U !!!, or taking full ride at Catholic U.

    If you are in the top 2% academically, your college tu, and your room and board is free) on the house, in at least, 900+ Universities in this country! MIT embraced the whole: “comprehensive application, ” – now, so, so, sooooo regretting it (they are nothing as far as cool, sports, wunderkinds) ….bc….schools live Nova, RIT, WPI, USD, UU, UC, CSM, URI, UMaine, are producing more patent-strong kids. MIT is a total Bullshit U – I can say this.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    MIT is a total Bullshit U
     
    Dear Lagertha,

    Don’t drink and comment.
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  130. anonymous[803] • Disclaimer says:
    @TheJester
    But, as we are told, males and females ... and Blacks, Whites, and Asians all have different learning styles. The "old" STEM classes only addressed the traditional, rigorous White male learning style. Now, it's time to make amends and make room for female, minority, and other creative learning styles in math, physics, etc.

    As an axiom, since everyone is equal in IQ and other capabilities, one will not know one has arrived at this until all student grades in all courses are the same ... that is, that all possible learning styles have been accommodated. Therefore, the fact that almost everyone at Harvard makes an "A" or "A-" in STEM as well as humanities courses is testimony that Harvard is leading academia in this revolutionary approach to education.

    I know this sounds like nonsense, but the whole point of diversity is to prove that there is no diversity. The whole point of accommodating the different race- and gender-based learning styles is to prove there are no such things as race and gender. The objective is to "normalize" education to prove that everyone is the same ... and that race, gender, and IQ are no longer relevant. If you don't get this, you don't get what Harvard and contemporary academia are about.

    I apologize for not being succinct in my explanation. I'm trying to sort of this out as best I can. It's heavy stuff!

    One thing that I’ve never been able to get clear in my mind is why, if Harvard, Yale, Stanford etal. really believe in “equality”, why don’t they simply admit the first two thousand or so applicants regardless of SAT score? In other words make admission to, say, Harvard the equivalent of a lottery. Most of ‘em will probably flunk out. If so, so what? The point is that every one of the applicants had a shot at making The Show. The answer will probably that, well, there’s “equality” and then there’s, er, Equality. Or something like that.

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  131. Anonymous[382] • Disclaimer says:

    The professors replaced themselves. They held their noses and hired other professors who weren’t that bright, but were diverse. A critical mass was reached, and they are now all post-modern types, hiring people like themselves. There is no going back.

    If I were king of the university, I’d:

    - Rename the English department “Critical English,” without consulting with the faculty. The same with every one of these departments, Critical Gender Studies, etc. One year later I’d announce a bunch of brand new departments: English, Gender Studies, etc. I’d hire all new staff for these new departments. The English department would teach reading comprehension a la the LSAT, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, vocabulary, structuring of essays, articles, nonfiction journalism, and so on. Gender Studies would hire researchers from biology, psychology, neurology, and so on to try to figure out what the hell is going on, scientifically, with trans people. Self-reported feelings and lived experience would have no more weight than the self-reported feelings of schizophrenics would have in studying them. And so on with all the new departments. Legacy “critical” departments would be phased out as their enrollment drops.

    - I would institute a new grading system and no more than 20 percent could get an A. I would make sure that at least 20 percent were given Ds. Classroom attendance would be mandatory, cell phones and laptops banned. I would have a quota for flunking out 5 percent of the student body each quarter, sending them off to other universities with our best wishes. I would figure out a way to have an outside administrative department administer all tests. The professor would consult with this department on the nature of the tests, but would not write, administer, or grade them. I would have an exit exam along the lines of the bar exam or the medical boards for graduation.

    I think there is a pent-up demand for something like this, and with all the thousands of colleges offering the current recipe, there is room for one like this.

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    • Replies: @anon
    If I were president of Harvard I would make the school 100% black. Why waste time pussyfooting around AA, just go whole hog. And it will stay that way until black and white income and achievement are at parity.
    , @Peter Akuleyev
    The English department would teach reading comprehension a la the LSAT, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, vocabulary, structuring of essays, articles, nonfiction journalism, and so on.

    All of this should be taught in high school, not college.
    , @ScarletNumber

    I would institute a new grading system and no more than 20 percent could get an A. I would make sure that at least 20 percent were given Ds.
     
    If grades meant anything, they would be given in the following proportions:
    A 10
    B 20
    C 30
    D 20
    F 10

    Quibble with the numbers, but the median grade should be a C, and there should be as many A's and B's as there are D's and F's.
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  132. Anon[574] • Disclaimer says:
    @slumber_j
    "My first guess reading that was that Harvard had started admitting a lot more Asians for some reason."

    Yeah, probably. But more important is the top-down attitude shift that's happened over the last 10-15 years: Harvard has become way more open about being gross, which is a direct consequence of its secret terror at the prospect of being second to Stanford.

    If you're an alumnus, you can smell it on the the spam that clogs your inbox: the acrid stench of branding. The Drew Gilpin Faust presidency at Harvard coincided with a very clear push to emulate--and thereby quash the perceived threat posed by--Stanford.

    Among the undergraduates the four-year experience is now essentially The Apprentice: Harvard Edition. It has been really weird to witness, and it's very real.

    Interesting to hear this. When I read the original post, I thought it seemed like Harvard’s response to Stanford.

    Some random thoughts:
    – Anecdotally, Stanford’s engineering departments are good at attracting smart, well-rounded dudes, like a Bill Belichick School of Engineering. Aside from proximity to Silicon Valley, it seems like a combination of California sunshine, respectable D1 sports (making it seem accessible to high-aptitude guys in flyover country), and strong academics.
    – In tech, the only the people I have encountered from the Ivy League who do well have a pre-2008 Harvard MBA or Wharton Economics undergrad. I have seen quite a few from the Ivy League fired in the first two years, get passed up for promotion then go back the East Coast, or otherwise mar their careers, much like James Damore (as much as I agree with his essay).

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  133. @TheJester
    But, as we are told, males and females ... and Blacks, Whites, and Asians all have different learning styles. The "old" STEM classes only addressed the traditional, rigorous White male learning style. Now, it's time to make amends and make room for female, minority, and other creative learning styles in math, physics, etc.

    As an axiom, since everyone is equal in IQ and other capabilities, one will not know one has arrived at this until all student grades in all courses are the same ... that is, that all possible learning styles have been accommodated. Therefore, the fact that almost everyone at Harvard makes an "A" or "A-" in STEM as well as humanities courses is testimony that Harvard is leading academia in this revolutionary approach to education.

    I know this sounds like nonsense, but the whole point of diversity is to prove that there is no diversity. The whole point of accommodating the different race- and gender-based learning styles is to prove there are no such things as race and gender. The objective is to "normalize" education to prove that everyone is the same ... and that race, gender, and IQ are no longer relevant. If you don't get this, you don't get what Harvard and contemporary academia are about.

    I apologize for not being succinct in my explanation. I'm trying to sort of this out as best I can. It's heavy stuff!

    I know this sounds like nonsense, but the whole point of diversity is to prove that there is no diversity.

    Yeah, would be nice if the vibrancy grifters would get their story straight. Like Mrs. Gump taking to Forrest:
    “You’re special.”
    Ten minutes later:
    “You’re no different from anybody else.”

    That sums the die-versity swindle. It’s permissible to laud a vibrant group over white men, generalizing all the way (eg “wise Latina”). It’s forbidden to generalize negatively compared to whites, males, and especially white males. As with Mrs. Gump, the truth changes depending on the comparison, with Forrest triumphing by at worst being normal. Regarding vibrants, the nons must always–deservedly, contentedly–get the shit end of the stick.

    Doublethink
    No difference, but innately special, desirable, superior. No difference. You need to include these people because they bring something you cannot ever. They are the same as you.

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  134. @Tiny Duck
    Any data on how many of those in liberal arts are women? What was the gender breakdown of those concentrations 10 years ago?

    Tiny, you asked a reasonable question! What’s gotten into you?

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  135. @Anon
    I say get rid of Great Books and Humanities departments.

    We don't need them anymore. I can see why such were necessary when only big cities and colleges had wide array of intellectual materials. So, if you grew up in a small town with a small library and limited horizons, I can see how going to college was a big deal. You finally came upon things you had no access to in your small town.

    So, learning about Great Books and discussing them in class meant a great deal.

    But now... you can access all the great books online or for cheap through ebay. You can see all the lectures about them by experts and amateurs on youtube. You can find tons of essays on such stuff.

    So, you don't need an institutional setting to study Great Books, Big Ideas, or Literature. All you need is a curious mind.

    Also, study of literature, arts, and ideas should be a lifelong process, not something you can squeeze into a few years.

    Therefore, I don't care if Humanities have turned into Inhumanities.

    We can now appreciate such stuff OUTSIDE the academe.

    I say get rid of Great Books and Humanities departments.

    You really have no idea how education works, do you?

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    • Replies: @Anon
    You really have no idea how education works, do you?

    In college, I wondered... why do we have to sit through lectures when the info is in the book? It was like excuse for professors to have a job and to make us pay tuition.
    Why have the professor explain what he wrote in his book which he assigned us to read.

    I never learned anything in film class. I learned on my own. I took a class on classical music. Bored to tears. I learned on my own. Not an expert in anything, but it was more fun to learn on my own.
    I enjoyed a few history classes, and that's about it.

    Prior to wide availability of reading and learning materials, I can understand why people went to college.

    NOW, when it comes to earning credentials for certain professions, organized education is important. Sure, you can learn law on your own, but it's really a group effort. Also, stuff like science needs lab work. And advanced studies require constant interaction with professors.

    But most people who study humanities or Great Books are not going to get jobs based on them. SOME will, those who aspire to be professors or scholars. And they need to get credentials.
    But for most of us... that stuff isn't to get jobs but to develop more knowledge about life and stuff. And we no longer need college for that.

    Also, professionalization of education had led many to feel that education ends with college. So many people almost never read a book after college. Come to think of it, they don't read a book during college.

    So, I think we need to re-conceptualize education as a lifelong pursuit apart from organized education. It's like for serious religious folks, religion must have life and meaning apart from church and institutions. It must be about you and God at all times.
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  136. Harvard’s had a terrible decade: plagiarism among the faculty, cheating among the students, and frauds in the Div School.

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    • Replies: @bartok

    Harvard’s had a terrible decade
     
    lol .. may I have a decade like any of Harvard's..
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  137. @Reg Cæsar


    Many more half Asian students , with Anglo names , they claim to be white to increase their acceptance rates…
     
    A lot of them think of themselves as White. I know a few girls who are half-East Asian, half-European who identify as White.
     
    I don't know how they "identify", but I saw a father-son folk duo perform recently. The surname was Japanese. The father looked half, perhaps favoring the white side. (Though that may have been as much his backwoods expression and dress. They're from near Lake Superior.) The kid's mother was clearly white; he didn't look like he had any Asian in him at all.

    I know another family where the father (I just learned) is half-Thai. His son is blond and looks like the young soldier the swarthy old officers are drooling over in Triumph of the Will. But their surname is English. The young singer's is Japanese. That must be weird if you don't look it.

    Japanese and Thai hybrids with whites look less Asian than Chinese or Korean mixes. Thais and Burmese are hybrids between South and East Asians.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Japanese and Thai hybrids with whites look less Asian than Chinese or Korean mixes. Thais and Burmese are hybrids between South and East Asians.
     
    Wrong and wrong.

    Learn some genetics, man!
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  138. One thing that I’ve never been able to get clear in my mind is why, if Harvard, Yale, Stanford etal. really believe in “equality”, why don’t they simply admit the first two thousand or so applicants regardless of SAT score? In other words make admission to, say, Harvard the equivalent of a lottery. Most of ‘em will probably flunk out. If so, so what? The point is that every one of the applicants had a shot at making The Show. The answer will probably that, well, there’s “equality” and then there’s, er, Equality. Or something like that.

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  139. @Charles Pewitt
    The Puritan divine dirtbags who started Harvard were East Anglian bug-eyed bog dwellers back in England. Now the arrogant money-grubbers are holding the rest of us over an open fire. The worst sin according to the Puritan divines was to sleep through one of their boring sermons.

    New England maritime bourgeoisie drug dealers got the Chinks hooked on drugs and they brought the loot back and gave it to Harvard.

    Harvard has been the original spawning ground of the treasonous rats in the WASP / Jew ruling class.

    Harvard is a hedge fund with a school attached to it.

    Harvard Hates America; America Don't Much Care For Harvard.

    Tweet from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/590944702569979904

    One for laughs from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/570298920561201154

    The Puritan divine dirtbags who started Harvard were East Anglian bug-eyed bog dwellers back in England.

    I think you’re trying to channel Moldbug, but maybe read a bit closer. High-church wealthy Puritans and low-church Congregationalists, etc., worked together to conquer Massachusetts for the Left.

    The Puritans were never poor.

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  140. @Percy Gryce
    Harvard's had a terrible decade: plagiarism among the faculty, cheating among the students, and frauds in the Div School.

    Harvard’s had a terrible decade

    lol .. may I have a decade like any of Harvard’s..

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  141. anonymous 1** said – Off topic, but I am a little concerned that, with the comments section at Taki’s Mag being shut down, there will be an influx of bigoted mediocre commenters here. I am not looking forward to that. Maybe there can be an ignore function for any commenter here whose first comment post-dates the Takist shutdown, such a function would help.

    On topic – I have no doubt that, if there is no intervening apocalypse, the young people accepted into the Harvard Freshman class of 2078 (a century after my freshman year at a more epic/mythological /profoundly archetypal but less famous “college”, hard by the shores of a cold Northern stretch of water) will tow the line of their day and will expect in the subsequent future decades – as do the Harvard freshmen of today – to live financially secure lives of self expression and gentle but serious respect from their fellow intellectuals. Well, God bless them, God loves us all, I can’t fault them for wanting a little bit of intellectual pleasure in their lives. Life is hard even for the most fortunate of us, liberal or not! I can’t fault our current crew of celebrity thinkers either, for thinking they are artists and not just entertainers. God loves entertainers, but God would be happy if they were a little more independent in their thinking. Of course, only if they are capable of that, if they aren’t, God bless them, nobody expects anyone to be smarter than they are. It would be nice, but it isn’t expected.

    Anyway, once the Taki refugees show up in force, I am going to have to learn even more about the block commenter function. General Patton had a few pals on his staff who were good at keeping bad info out of the commander’s vicinity. And yes, vicinity was one of Patton’s favorite words. If I remember right, it reminded him of his days studying the campaigns of Caesar. “Block the bastards, anyway.” I remember.

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    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Don’t let the door swat you in the rear end.
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  142. @Suburban Dad
    The shift in majors at Harvard away from soft humanities has two major drivers.

    First, Harvard has gotten unimaginably hard to get into for white & Asian kids, who make up the large majority of the class. Every last one of them has very strong math aptitude, such that none of them NEEDS a soft humanities or social science major. Don't underestimate that factor in populating the soft majors at schools with less rigorous admission standards.

    Second, career focus has changed. 20 years ago it was law school, Wall Street, consulting, med school and grad school. Law school and grad school are each deeply degraded / discredited as career paths, med school isn't was it was, and Silicon Valley has come in huge -- in other words, the vast majority of Harvard undergrads aspire to a post-grad step in which evident rigor, and quantitative if not scientific capability is required, even of someone with a Harvard degree. It makes perfect sense for the most quantitative of humanities disciplines -- philosophy -- and the most rigorous -- classics -- to have held up.

    I'd say that revulsion at SJWs dominating humanities syllabi contributes very little to things. Loan balances not at all, because Harvard has very little student loans anymore -- 100% grants for financial aid. The only people who take loans are people whose parents are income-rich but cash poor and fail the need calculator, and there aren't a lot of them.

    Silicon Valley has come in huge

    Private equity has come in huge as well, at the undergraduate level.

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  143. Fear not. The new president of Harvard, Lawrence Bacow, is a Jewish lawyer and son of a holocaust survivor. If the last 11 years under Drew Faust the first female president (married to a Jew) doesn’t make Harvard “inclusive” enough, this new president is sure to take it to a whole new level.

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  144. @Crawfurdmuir

    I didn’t know there even was a Jewish Cold War. Who were the antagonists?
     
    How about the Soviet nomenklatura vs. the U.S. neoconservatives?

    I thought that by the time the neocons in their strictest definition came around, the Soviets had done a final and more thorough purge of any Jews that looked Zionistish or had relatives in Israel.

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  145. @Lagertha
    Duh. The smartest, sciency guys (now, girls, they stilll, follow those guys) are going to State U, and like, Villanova, Xavier, Holy Cross, Loyola, or Norte Dame - who give them awesome scholarships. The math geeks, the guys....like that great Red Head Nordic :) giant at Notre Dame, are also getting, full effin' rides. I have screamed for 3 years on this blog: the smartest/intellectually gifted are going to "honors college' at state U !!!, or taking full ride at Catholic U.


    If you are in the top 2% academically, your college tu, and your room and board is free) on the house, in at least, 900+ Universities in this country! MIT embraced the whole: "comprehensive application, " - now, so, so, sooooo regretting it (they are nothing as far as cool, sports, wunderkinds) ....bc....schools live Nova, RIT, WPI, USD, UU, UC, CSM, URI, UMaine, are producing more patent-strong kids. MIT is a total Bullshit U - I can say this.

    MIT is a total Bullshit U

    Dear Lagertha,

    Don’t drink and comment.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    I'm like this all the time! hahaa! You, condescend, as always (sigh- thought you would have been enlightened, by now) still believe that the Ivies and MIT are soooooo sacrosanct; will honor alumni children - wait till your kids are rejected (and they will be, unless you are a billionaire - truth) , and then tsk, tsk to me about drinking - don't be gauche. I am, what is known, as an eccentric. I am of a dying breed: non-conformist. But, go ahead, believe what you wanna believe. I don't care. I don't care about what people think about me. I can afford to not care.
    , @Lagertha
    I saw my 'typo'; for you to think I am a drunk. Should have typed 'like' and not 'live.' However, MIT is really, a bullshit institution these days (they are complicit in the whole' "white people suck stuff" - don't you get it???) ...but, I should have said FOR UNDERGRADS....who are just cash cows for the professors to get their funding for their research.

    Seriously, Twinkie, you have always been a douche in the past, and, I have tried to like you...but do you not realize that MIT doesn't give a rat's ass about undergraduates???? You tell all of us, here, all the effin' time how smart you are, but do you not realize how trivial a B.A. degree is to most research institutions? Never mind, you will continue to argue and be a douche.... I think I will take another shot now, ;) .

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    Dear Lagertha,

    Don’t drink and comment.
     

    I must respectfully disagree. Lagertha, even if drunker than Cooter Brown, is more fun to read than most of the posters here. :-)
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  146. Steve knows, erhmmm!..that several years ago I stated, that the smartest boys are not bothering with Harvard & Co. I am feeling so happy right now!!!

    I fully expect Balkanism, or nihilism in the USA for the next 10 years; tick tock, tick tock. The powers of the Elite U’s threw the rats (survivors/the smartest beings, like cockroaches, off the ship in the early-to-mid-2000′s) off of the acceptance lists of the elite U’s undergraduate class of wtf evah class of debt. And, now these rats (the smartest guys on the planet) determine who is worthy – who lives who dies. Their brain power can not be socially engineered or crushed – they are the Kraken! – ok, hahhahhhaaa, it was a long, long, long week…..:0 I just can’t stand Progressives!!!

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  147. Anonymous[300] • Disclaimer says:

    Thinking about the Steve Sailer fundraising month, it occurred to me that he could fund-raise year-round by taking a page from Gregory Cochran: Set up YouFundMe’s for various specific projects.

    For instance, golf course reviews. If X dollars are pledged, Steve travels to a course, plays a round, and reviews it.

    This could expand to a sort of “Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee” thing, with Steve playing golf with a luminary in the iSteve world and then posting here the resulting video of the play and conversation.

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  148. @Lot
    Japanese and Thai hybrids with whites look less Asian than Chinese or Korean mixes. Thais and Burmese are hybrids between South and East Asians.

    Japanese and Thai hybrids with whites look less Asian than Chinese or Korean mixes. Thais and Burmese are hybrids between South and East Asians.

    Wrong and wrong.

    Learn some genetics, man!

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  149. @Anonymous
    The professors replaced themselves. They held their noses and hired other professors who weren't that bright, but were diverse. A critical mass was reached, and they are now all post-modern types, hiring people like themselves. There is no going back.

    If I were king of the university, I'd:

    - Rename the English department "Critical English," without consulting with the faculty. The same with every one of these departments, Critical Gender Studies, etc. One year later I'd announce a bunch of brand new departments: English, Gender Studies, etc. I'd hire all new staff for these new departments. The English department would teach reading comprehension a la the LSAT, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, vocabulary, structuring of essays, articles, nonfiction journalism, and so on. Gender Studies would hire researchers from biology, psychology, neurology, and so on to try to figure out what the hell is going on, scientifically, with trans people. Self-reported feelings and lived experience would have no more weight than the self-reported feelings of schizophrenics would have in studying them. And so on with all the new departments. Legacy "critical" departments would be phased out as their enrollment drops.

    - I would institute a new grading system and no more than 20 percent could get an A. I would make sure that at least 20 percent were given Ds. Classroom attendance would be mandatory, cell phones and laptops banned. I would have a quota for flunking out 5 percent of the student body each quarter, sending them off to other universities with our best wishes. I would figure out a way to have an outside administrative department administer all tests. The professor would consult with this department on the nature of the tests, but would not write, administer, or grade them. I would have an exit exam along the lines of the bar exam or the medical boards for graduation.

    I think there is a pent-up demand for something like this, and with all the thousands of colleges offering the current recipe, there is room for one like this.

    If I were president of Harvard I would make the school 100% black. Why waste time pussyfooting around AA, just go whole hog. And it will stay that way until black and white income and achievement are at parity.

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    • LOL: Alec Leamas
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    If I were president of Harvard I would make the school 100% black. Why waste time pussyfooting around AA, just go whole hog. And it will stay that way until black and white income and achievement are at parity.
     
    Harvard: The Howard of New England.

    Practically markets itself.
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  150. As the humanistic departments have focused increasing attention on ensuring everyone feels included and studied in their syllabi, they have seemingly cared less about whether undergraduates as a whole actually want their new offerings….

    The answer is re-education camps inside education.

    Undergrads must be *made* to attend these courses. We will prop their eyes open with toothpicks if need be. We will show them the the true meaning of “sensitivity” and “inclusion.”

    And if they resist? They are crimethinkers, racists and bigots. We will deny them jobs. Silence them. Stone them.

    [/sarcasm. Leftism really is totalitarianism.]

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  151. @Twinkie

    MIT is a total Bullshit U
     
    Dear Lagertha,

    Don’t drink and comment.

    I’m like this all the time! hahaa! You, condescend, as always (sigh- thought you would have been enlightened, by now) still believe that the Ivies and MIT are soooooo sacrosanct; will honor alumni children – wait till your kids are rejected (and they will be, unless you are a billionaire – truth) , and then tsk, tsk to me about drinking – don’t be gauche. I am, what is known, as an eccentric. I am of a dying breed: non-conformist. But, go ahead, believe what you wanna believe. I don’t care. I don’t care about what people think about me. I can afford to not care.

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  152. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    Yes. At the time it justified huge government expenditure and programming in academia, but I have seen an Arbusto-worthy incuriosity coupled with an emotional nostalgia for a dishonestly idealized Soyuz. There is a feeling that overall, socialism won, and that the fall of the Soviet Union was a combination of illegitimate and deplorable Reaganite terrorism with the racial inferiority of the Slav. I hear special features all the time on BBC radio examining every last toenail claimed to have been ripped out by the Apartheid South African "regime." There is never any mention of the Soviet-sponsored Communist terrorists that government was fighting, let alone of the normality of terror and want in the Bolshevik empire itself. "The Americans" is about as rigorous as "Man Men" and, funnily enough, along the same lines. There is apparently lots of money for any film project showing the very small and non-representative "fun" side of Communism, such as "Goodbye, Lenin," but also now including wierd ersatz documentaries and cartoon clips on YouTube, many held up by younger Eastern Europeans who see Communism as a vague part of their heritage. About the best treatment of actually considering that communism wasn't fun in pop culture is still ("the Long Walk" and) "The Lives Of Others," which I cannot mention without thinking of "Baader Meinhof Complex." BMC is a very good movie and pretty accurate in general, but it is viciously propagandisticon some points. Leftist violence is depicted amorally (this is an important thing to watch for because it's also all over our propaganda programming. The idea is to be ostensibly condemning the act but actually intimidating the audience. Cf "The Counselor," both the overall story, but also in brief the Green Hornet's answer to the dog food saleswoman). Right-wing identification is depicted as partly justifying left-wing violence (these first two ideas were also on display in Mesrine -- Nazi collaboration is a moral crisis justifying crime, a rightwing journalist gets beaten and we're not saying it's right but we are going to take our time showing it). Most brazenly, no firearm in BMC is ever handled properly, not once, not even in the hands of a police officer or an instructor. Compare the depiction of firearms in Rumpole: the idea is to create a hysterical Overton kick in which guns are characterized as too inherently dangerous to have such a thing as a responsible use. tldr you'll shoot your eye out.
    The inpression I got from academics studying Soviet history is often that they thought theBolsheviks were well-intentioned but technically imprecise (and their judgment of the peasantry was often the same as that of the Bolsheviks).

    Wow, line breaks, much?

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Bad command.
    But hey, YouTube got attacked by a Jewish Democrat Transsexual Vegan E-Celeb.
    Anything can happen.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    Wow, line breaks, much?
     
    Even though he did not mention the Germans bombing Pearl Harbor, he was definitely on a roll.
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  153. @Jeff the Donleavy Fan
    Getting your degree at Harvard rather than the U. of State may make it easier to apply to top grad programs. Or to go directly into the workplace after you get your bachelor's degree. And the networking opportunities can't be any worse.

    One thing I have always wondered is whether it is more difficult to get a degree in electrical engineering or in math or physics at Harvard or Stanford than a place like the University of Oklahoma or Texas A&M. Is the coursework genuinely tougher at Harvard, or Cal Tech or MIT, than at Berkeley or the University of Texas or Ohio State? Does anyone know?

    Yes the coursework is actually tougher at MIT and Caltech than Cal or U T Austin or U Mich. Yes the coursework at Harvard in mathematics is harder than the coursework anywhere else but maybe MIT and Princeton.

    More is taught in less time.

    I was the top student in a UC San Diego linear algebra course when I was a high school student; high A, with the highest score in the class on the final. Went to MIT for ugrad; didn’t know *anything* past week three of them linear algebra course there. In physics, classes that were upper division at MIT used the same texts that only grad students used at UCSD and Cal (and everyhwre else.) Grad students from non MIT schools as ugrads took those courses routinely next to sophomores and juniors from MIT.

    The physics lab junior year at MIT did five experiments in 13 week semester; Cal did six in a 30 week year. MIT taught three extra weeks of CS material in a semester one week short than Cal’s. Physics problem sets at MIT for a given week had ten problems; same course at Cal with same lectures had 6 problems.

    Same in math; the basic analysis course at Cal covered 6 chapters of Rudin in a semester. Same class, same book, shorter semester covered 8-9 at MIT.
    Same in the engineering fields though the extent varied with the major.

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    That is awesome, Alice, and I mean it. Please post here more often.

    I love linear algebra, it reminds me of those dreams one has where friends from back in the day randomly show up to test out the ferris wheel that you have invented that does not necessarily obey the laws of gravity. And you say - well, it was a warm summer night, and i had nothing better to do, so I invented this really cool ferris wheel, thanks for showing up!

    You might think I am an idiot child, maybe some 2018 loser version of a DeVries or a Toole Kennedy or Don Colacho character, but not at all - to be fair, you don't know this, but I do --- I used to hang out with the sort of people who are sought out by the sort of person who basically declines Nobel Prizes (Literature, Peace, Medicine, and, to stretch a point, Physics - well, not really Physics, I didn't hang out with anyone who knew anyone who could win a Physics prize, although some of Feynman's ex-girlfriends may have hit on me when I lived for a few weeks in L.A., back in the day - I was never a big fan of libertinism so I lost out on a lot of good conversation from Feynman's sloppy seconds, although of course I myself would never consider myself better than a sloppy seconds, were I to live in such a world - I hope I phrased that right) because those sorts of things are for people who, well, desire those sort of things, and are not for the sort of people who desire, well, better things (Proverbs Book 8 and 17, if you are intellectually inclined).

    The Fields Medal crowd is not a crowd I am familiar with, though, and I often wondered - do real mathematicians resent the fact that almost everybody who is good at math has to, like, spend years in school to get a job as a mathematician - there are exceptions of course, Airdish and a few bridge players, Persi Diaconis, Bill Gates, bless his little Babbitized heart - but for most mathematical youths the prescribed future includes years of "course work" with middle aged losers who once excelled, in their turn, at "math courses". Isn't that humiliating? I mean, real poets just talk to people, and hang out, and after years of talking and hanging out, write eternally memorable poems. Why can't mathematicians do the same?
    I remember. Maybe I remember wrong, but I remember.

    , @Anonymous
    Yeah, high school vs. college is a big difference no matter where you go. I was annoyed that half of my French 1 class obviously already had a year or two of it from high school under their belts. Three weeks later I felt fine, because their advantage was fading fast.
    , @Lagertha
    Can I just brag and say: in 4 languages. Study engineering and master 4 languages- add patents. MIT had its golden age. Caltech is the last of the last....but, we are simply, talking about undergraduates...so whatever.
    , @Almost Missouri
    Thanks.
    , @Highlander
    The most difficult majors at Cal in Letters and Science 50 years ago were math and physics. The Engineering school's BscEE degree had the most brutal course load though and particularly so as we were on the quarter system back then. For first year honors calculus we used Michael Spivak's Calculus which was as much about analysis as it was about solving differential equations. We spent more time demonstrating proofs than the EE calculus course which was heavily into solving real world problems.
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  154. @Twinkie

    MIT is a total Bullshit U
     
    Dear Lagertha,

    Don’t drink and comment.

    I saw my ‘typo’; for you to think I am a drunk. Should have typed ‘like’ and not ‘live.’ However, MIT is really, a bullshit institution these days (they are complicit in the whole’ “white people suck stuff” – don’t you get it???) …but, I should have said FOR UNDERGRADS….who are just cash cows for the professors to get their funding for their research.

    Seriously, Twinkie, you have always been a douche in the past, and, I have tried to like you…but do you not realize that MIT doesn’t give a rat’s ass about undergraduates???? You tell all of us, here, all the effin’ time how smart you are, but do you not realize how trivial a B.A. degree is to most research institutions? Never mind, you will continue to argue and be a douche…. I think I will take another shot now, ;) .

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    you have always been a douche in the past
     
    That's not quite lady-like now, is it? It's sad to see you descend from being a likable ditz to a vulgar, bitter shrew.

    they are complicit in the whole’ “white people suck stuff”
     
    Which university among the top tier is not? For that matter, do you think that political correctness is not alive and well at, say, the University of Iowa? Take a pick and choose one of your beloved "flagship state U," and I will show you some PC inanity from the same. Often the leftist radicalism is WORSE at such places, because the denizens of them desperately try to out-do the urban/elite institutions, so as to prove just how enlightened they are (just like the elite places!) compared to the rubes surrounding the state U's.

    MIT doesn’t give a rat’s ass about undergraduates... do you not realize how trivial a B.A. degree is to most research institutions?
     
    Yes, dear, I know better than you do because I actually went on to a top-ranked Ph.D. program. Generically speaking, undergrads are a very low priority at research institutions.

    And while one can get just good an education from, say, Iowa State, a top-tier undergrad degree 1) signals your cognitive status quickly (e.g. top consulting firms don't even bother to recruit from other schools), 2) readily puts you in the midst of other elites, and 3) makes available to you a powerful alumni network in many prestigious fields.

    Mind you, although my wife and I are multiple Ivy alums, we abhor what the elite education system has become and plan to send our children to either the service academies (for boys) or something like Thomas Aquinas College (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Aquinas_College).

    But to say that "MIT is a total Bullshit U" is just moronic and reeks of someone who is a bitter hanger-on of the fringe of the elite.
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  155. Ivy says:
    @Suburban Dad
    The shift in majors at Harvard away from soft humanities has two major drivers.

    First, Harvard has gotten unimaginably hard to get into for white & Asian kids, who make up the large majority of the class. Every last one of them has very strong math aptitude, such that none of them NEEDS a soft humanities or social science major. Don't underestimate that factor in populating the soft majors at schools with less rigorous admission standards.

    Second, career focus has changed. 20 years ago it was law school, Wall Street, consulting, med school and grad school. Law school and grad school are each deeply degraded / discredited as career paths, med school isn't was it was, and Silicon Valley has come in huge -- in other words, the vast majority of Harvard undergrads aspire to a post-grad step in which evident rigor, and quantitative if not scientific capability is required, even of someone with a Harvard degree. It makes perfect sense for the most quantitative of humanities disciplines -- philosophy -- and the most rigorous -- classics -- to have held up.

    I'd say that revulsion at SJWs dominating humanities syllabi contributes very little to things. Loan balances not at all, because Harvard has very little student loans anymore -- 100% grants for financial aid. The only people who take loans are people whose parents are income-rich but cash poor and fail the need calculator, and there aren't a lot of them.

    Admissions officers also need to keep an eye on future donations, and some majors are just not likely to generate much wealth. How many basket weaving or idiot studies majors even graduate?

    The business model gets reviewed periodically. In Harvard’s case, that little Russia problem (Summers, Schleifer et al) and some lackluster endowment returns have caused some heartburn. Failure to perform on plan is just dipping into principal, for God’s sake!

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Ivy, the days of big donors are over. Baby boomers, thankfully, are no longer going to be the parents of incoming students (much poorer parents). And, the students that Ivies have accepted these last 10 years, are totally useless, monetary-wise, since they majored in crap. haha, kinda' revenge for them turning down all those 10's of thousands of bright, white boys! Revenge of the Nerds, indeed.

    https://youtu.be/Hw6zr1nbtQE

    , @ScarletNumber

    How many basket weaving or idiot studies majors even graduate?
     
    Most of them. That's the whole point of the major.
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  156. @Stan Adams
    Steve has noted this before. Since their lower level of intelligence is "innate" and not the result of some organic defect, blacks tend to "talk smarter" than they really are. Many 85-IQ blacks are engaging conversationalists, while most 85-IQ whites are about as articulate as the average brick wall.

    I know a middle-aged black guy who survived being shot in the head as a child. When you first hear him speak, you assume immediately that he is mentally retarded. His highest educational attainment is a high-school certificate of completion. But he can tell you, off the top of his head, with uncanny accuracy, the entire backstory of every single character on all of the CBS soap operas, including shows that went off the air ten or twenty years ago. He spends most of his waking hours watching television, and he has an impressive ability to keep up with the plotlines of the various shows. (The last time I saw him, he complained that his sister, with whom he lives, was stealing his disability benefits.)

    Mohammed Ali had a 78 IQ.

    Many 85-IQ blacks are engaging conversationalists

    LOL.

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    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    Relatively speaking, that is.
    , @ScarletNumber
    Laugh all you want, but I would much rather talk to an 85-IQ black than an 85-IQ white.
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  157. @Anonymous
    Wow, line breaks, much?

    Bad command.
    But hey, YouTube got attacked by a Jewish Democrat Transsexual Vegan E-Celeb.
    Anything can happen.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Follow-up to this. She (Nasim Aghdam) identified as Jewish once but that may have been a political stunt, since her whole life was devoted to activism. She was a female Iranian immigrant who used Islamic arguments to sell veganism. Not a transsexual (although I would have bet otherwise). Very important point -- the lying press is talking about a white woman angry over a boyfriend. I have come across no mention of a boyfriend, no human relationships other than parents and fellow protesters, and no reason to believe she knew anyone at YouTube. YouTube had been aggressively demonetizing, censoring, etc, channels and her veganism channel went from popular enough to rate an article on Know Your Meme to making ten cents a month off ad revenue during the censorship campaign. Maybe YouTube didn't even censor her and she just got massively unpopular by coincidence but it looks pretty set in her mind that she was being persecuted by YouTube. Will YouTube change its attitude toward censorship now?
    , @Kyle
    If that girl is transsexual than I must be gay. She is one handsome woman. Fair, thin and waifish, two swollen bee stings, and sharp features.
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  158. @DFH
    How is Philosophy, a non-SJW, high-IQ but almost totally pointless subject doing?

    Actually, i’m intimately familiar with SJWs/hardcore-leftists taking over the philosophy department at a major public university. They controlled the hiring process to the point that they wouldn’t hire even moderates, and they tried to physically intimidate/provoke conservatives. Liberals really do ruin everything they touch.

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  159. @Jeff the Donleavy Fan
    Getting your degree at Harvard rather than the U. of State may make it easier to apply to top grad programs. Or to go directly into the workplace after you get your bachelor's degree. And the networking opportunities can't be any worse.

    One thing I have always wondered is whether it is more difficult to get a degree in electrical engineering or in math or physics at Harvard or Stanford than a place like the University of Oklahoma or Texas A&M. Is the coursework genuinely tougher at Harvard, or Cal Tech or MIT, than at Berkeley or the University of Texas or Ohio State? Does anyone know?

    Are you seriously, asking this? Sheesh – If you can do the course work (or speak in 2+ languages…) than Oklahoma or MIT is equal. Science/engineering is no different anywhere, world wide, for God’s sake! To be nice: Caltech is the last meritocratic U for undergrads. All graduate schools will take the top students from effing ” East Arkansas north of Oklahoma U.” Jesus….If all you guys are the smartest people in the world posting here, we are screwed.

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  160. Former web site of the person who attacked a YouTube office:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20160302144805/http://www.peacethunder.com/

    Warning — it looks exactly like you might expect.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    There's a lot of drama on Youtube right now. Someone yanked four videos off the shooter's Facebook page before it was scrubbed and posted them on . . . where else? Youtube. These include her rant about Youtube. Somehow, I bet Youtube is not going to leave them up very long. One of the commentators claimed to know the guy who got shot, and after following the link to the commentator's profile, he's posted a message for the victim. One of the commentators to that is the victim himself posting from his hospital bed. He's a father with a son, according to his information.
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  161. anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alice
    Yes the coursework is actually tougher at MIT and Caltech than Cal or U T Austin or U Mich. Yes the coursework at Harvard in mathematics is harder than the coursework anywhere else but maybe MIT and Princeton.

    More is taught in less time.

    I was the top student in a UC San Diego linear algebra course when I was a high school student; high A, with the highest score in the class on the final. Went to MIT for ugrad; didn't know *anything* past week three of them linear algebra course there. In physics, classes that were upper division at MIT used the same texts that only grad students used at UCSD and Cal (and everyhwre else.) Grad students from non MIT schools as ugrads took those courses routinely next to sophomores and juniors from MIT.

    The physics lab junior year at MIT did five experiments in 13 week semester; Cal did six in a 30 week year. MIT taught three extra weeks of CS material in a semester one week short than Cal's. Physics problem sets at MIT for a given week had ten problems; same course at Cal with same lectures had 6 problems.

    Same in math; the basic analysis course at Cal covered 6 chapters of Rudin in a semester. Same class, same book, shorter semester covered 8-9 at MIT.
    Same in the engineering fields though the extent varied with the major.

    That is awesome, Alice, and I mean it. Please post here more often.

    I love linear algebra, it reminds me of those dreams one has where friends from back in the day randomly show up to test out the ferris wheel that you have invented that does not necessarily obey the laws of gravity. And you say – well, it was a warm summer night, and i had nothing better to do, so I invented this really cool ferris wheel, thanks for showing up!

    You might think I am an idiot child, maybe some 2018 loser version of a DeVries or a Toole Kennedy or Don Colacho character, but not at all – to be fair, you don’t know this, but I do — I used to hang out with the sort of people who are sought out by the sort of person who basically declines Nobel Prizes (Literature, Peace, Medicine, and, to stretch a point, Physics – well, not really Physics, I didn’t hang out with anyone who knew anyone who could win a Physics prize, although some of Feynman’s ex-girlfriends may have hit on me when I lived for a few weeks in L.A., back in the day – I was never a big fan of libertinism so I lost out on a lot of good conversation from Feynman’s sloppy seconds, although of course I myself would never consider myself better than a sloppy seconds, were I to live in such a world – I hope I phrased that right) because those sorts of things are for people who, well, desire those sort of things, and are not for the sort of people who desire, well, better things (Proverbs Book 8 and 17, if you are intellectually inclined).

    The Fields Medal crowd is not a crowd I am familiar with, though, and I often wondered – do real mathematicians resent the fact that almost everybody who is good at math has to, like, spend years in school to get a job as a mathematician – there are exceptions of course, Airdish and a few bridge players, Persi Diaconis, Bill Gates, bless his little Babbitized heart – but for most mathematical youths the prescribed future includes years of “course work” with middle aged losers who once excelled, in their turn, at “math courses”. Isn’t that humiliating? I mean, real poets just talk to people, and hang out, and after years of talking and hanging out, write eternally memorable poems. Why can’t mathematicians do the same?
    I remember. Maybe I remember wrong, but I remember.

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    the whole point of that comment was to get someone, somewhere, to seriously consider the possibility that the most intellectually challenging words that have ever been written are not some refinements from one of the later chapters of Newton's Principia Mathematica or even the most intricate and astounding paragraphs or schematics of Maxwell or (my grandmother's uncle, or something like that) Graham Bell, but the simple but astoundingly profound Chapters 8 and 17 of Proverbs.

    Of course, if I misunderstood "Feynman's sloppy seconds" as simply meaning " former sexual partners of Feynman" rather than the possibly more accurate "recently rejected for a continuing relationship and former sexual partners of Feynman" then of course I was even more simplistic and inaccurate than I realized. But really, who among us is not simplistic and inaccurate most of the time? It gets better, one hopes. I remember when it was worse, I remember. As Don Colacho (actually, Casey Stengel) liked to say - well, you can look it up.

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  162. Anonymous[300] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alice
    Yes the coursework is actually tougher at MIT and Caltech than Cal or U T Austin or U Mich. Yes the coursework at Harvard in mathematics is harder than the coursework anywhere else but maybe MIT and Princeton.

    More is taught in less time.

    I was the top student in a UC San Diego linear algebra course when I was a high school student; high A, with the highest score in the class on the final. Went to MIT for ugrad; didn't know *anything* past week three of them linear algebra course there. In physics, classes that were upper division at MIT used the same texts that only grad students used at UCSD and Cal (and everyhwre else.) Grad students from non MIT schools as ugrads took those courses routinely next to sophomores and juniors from MIT.

    The physics lab junior year at MIT did five experiments in 13 week semester; Cal did six in a 30 week year. MIT taught three extra weeks of CS material in a semester one week short than Cal's. Physics problem sets at MIT for a given week had ten problems; same course at Cal with same lectures had 6 problems.

    Same in math; the basic analysis course at Cal covered 6 chapters of Rudin in a semester. Same class, same book, shorter semester covered 8-9 at MIT.
    Same in the engineering fields though the extent varied with the major.

    Yeah, high school vs. college is a big difference no matter where you go. I was annoyed that half of my French 1 class obviously already had a year or two of it from high school under their belts. Three weeks later I felt fine, because their advantage was fading fast.

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  163. @Ivy
    Admissions officers also need to keep an eye on future donations, and some majors are just not likely to generate much wealth. How many basket weaving or idiot studies majors even graduate?

    The business model gets reviewed periodically. In Harvard's case, that little Russia problem (Summers, Schleifer et al) and some lackluster endowment returns have caused some heartburn. Failure to perform on plan is just dipping into principal, for God's sake!

    Ivy, the days of big donors are over. Baby boomers, thankfully, are no longer going to be the parents of incoming students (much poorer parents). And, the students that Ivies have accepted these last 10 years, are totally useless, monetary-wise, since they majored in crap. haha, kinda’ revenge for them turning down all those 10′s of thousands of bright, white boys! Revenge of the Nerds, indeed.

    Read More
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  164. @donut
    Science, technology, medicine, and mathematics
    Name Class year Notability Reference(s)
    Roger Adams (1889–1971) College 1909, PhD 1912 Pioneering organic chemist [88]
    Howard H. Aiken (1900–1973) M.A. 1937; PhD 1939 Computer scientist; designer of the Harvard Mark I [89]
    James Gilbert Baker (1914–2005) PhD 1942 Astronomer, optician [90]
    John Bartlett (1784–1849) College 1805 Minister, founder of Massachusetts General Hospital [91]
    Manjul Bhargava (born 1974) College 1996 Mathematician, Fields Medal winner
    Craig Call Black PhD 1962 Paleontologist
    Francine D. Blau (born 1946) M.A. 1969; PhD 1975 Economist at the National Bureau of Economic Research, first woman to receive the IZA Prize in Labor Economics [92]
    Hilary Blumberg College 1986 Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience [93]
    Dan Bricklin (born 1951) Business 1979 Creator of VisiCalc [94]
    Fred Brooks (born 1931) PhD 1956 Turing Award laureate
    Thomas H. Clark (1893–1996) College 1917; A.M. 1921; PhD 1923 Geologist; one of the top Canadian scientists of the 20th century; namesake of Thomasclarkite [95]
    Stephen Cook S.M. 1962; PhD 1966 Computer scientist [96]
    Don Coppersmith S.M. 1975; PhD 1977 Computer scientist [97]
    Leda Cosmides (born 1957) College 1979; PhD 1985 Evolutionary psychologist [98]
    Robert K. Crane PhD 1950 Biochemist [99]
    Harvey Cushing (1869–1939) Medical 1895 Neurosurgeon
    Elliott Cutler (1888–1947) College 1909, M.D. 1913; Professor Surgeon and medical educator [100]
    Samuel J. Danishefsky (born 1936) PhD 1962 Chemist, winner of the Wolf Prize in Chemistry in 1995/96 [101]
    Neil deGrasse Tyson (born 1958) College 1980 Astrophysicist, Director of the Hayden Planetarium, Television Host [102]
    Fe Del Mundo (1909-2011) Medical 1938 National Scientist of the Philippines; pediatrician; recipient of Ramon Magsaysay Award; devised an incubator made out of bamboo, designed for use in rural communities without electrical power; the first woman admitted as a student at Harvard Medical School
    Russell Doolittle PhD, 1962 Biochemist [103]
    Gideon Dreyfuss PhD 1978 Biochemist, HHMI investigator [104]
    E. Allen Emerson (born 1954) PhD 1981 Turing Award laureate
    Charles Epstein Harvard Medical College 1959 Geneticist; injured by Ted Kaczynski a.k.a. Unabomber [105]
    Paul Farmer (born 1959) Medical 1988; PhD 1990; Professor Founder of Partners in Health [106]
    Lewis J. Feldman PhD 1975 Professor of plant biology at the University of California, Berkeley [107]
    Rabab Fetieh (born 1954) Dental 1987 First Saudi Arabian female orthodontist
    Robert Galambos (1914–2010) PhD Researcher who discovered how bats use echolocation [108]
    Paul Graham (born 1964) S.M. 1988; PhD 1990 Computer programmer and essayist
    Ulysses S. Grant IV (1893–1977) College 1915 Paleontologist
    Brian Greene (born 1963) College 1984 Famous in the world of string theory; Columbia University professor [109]
    Victor Guillemin (born 1937) PhD 1962 Differential geometer [110]
    G. Stanley Hall (1844–1924) PhD 1878 First president of APA and Clark University [111]
    Benjamin Morgan Harrod (1837–1912) College 1856; Civil Engineering 1859 Designed the water and sewerage systems in his native New Orleans, Louisiana [112]
    Donald Olding Hebb (1904–1985) PhD 1936 Canadian psychologist; "father of neuropsychology"; President of the American Psychological Association 1960; Fellow of the Royal Society; Chancellor of McGill University 1970–1974
    Heisuke Hironaka (born 1931) PhD 1960; Professor Mathematician, Fields Medal winner [113]
    Arthur Allen Hoag (1921–1999) PhD 1953 Discovered Hoag's object
    L. Emmett Holt Jr. (1895–1974) College 1916 Pediatrician [114]
    Tony Hsieh (born 1973) College 1995 CEO of online shoe and clothing shop Zappos, co-founder of LinkExchange, author of Delivering Happiness [115]
    Ruth Hubbard (born 1924) PhD 1950 Radcliffe professor, biologist [116]
    Ernest Ingersoll (1852–1946) Naturalist, writer and explorer
    Kenneth E. Iverson (1920-2004) PhD 1954 Turing Award laureate
    Thomas Jaggar PhD 1897 Geologist, founder of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory [117]
    William James (1842–1910) Medical 1869 Philosopher; psychologist; namesake of William James Hall [118]
    Michio Kaku (born 1947) College 1968 Theoretical physicist, activist
    Richard M. Karp (born 1935) College 1955, PhD 1959 Turing Award laureate
    Alfred Kinsey (1894–1956) Sc. D. 1919 Sexologist [119]
    Ivan Krstić College Computer security expert
    Butler Lampson (born 1943) College 1964 Turing Award laureate
    Theodore K. Lawless (1892-1971) dermatologist; Spingarn Medal [120]
    Saul Levin M.A. 1994 Psychiatrist [121]
    Holbrook Mann MacNeille (1907–1973) PhD 1935 Mathematician [122]
    Rustin McIntosh (1894–1986) College 1914; M.D. 1918 Pediatrician [123]
    Curtis T. McMullen (born 1958) PhD 1985 Fields Medal winner
    Scott McNealy (born 1954) College 1976 Co-founder and chairman of Sun Microsystems [124]
    John S. Meyer (1924–2011) Physician
    Marvin Minsky (1927–2016) College 1950 Computer scientist [125]
    Maryam Mirzakhani (1977-2017) PhD 2004 Fields Medal winner
    Sylvanus G. Morley (1883–1948) College 1908 Mayanist scholar and archaeologist [126]
    Robert Tappan Morris (born 1965) College 1987; S.M. 1993; PhD 1999 CS professor at MIT, creator of the first computer worm
    David Mumford (born 1937) College 1957; PhD 1961 Mathematician, Fields Medal winner [127]
    Major General Spurgeon Neel (1919–2003) MPH 1958 Pioneer of aeromedical evacuation [128]
    J. Robert Oppenheimer (1904–1967) College 1925 Physicist, "father of the atomic bomb" [129]
    Tim O'Reilly College 1975 Founder of O'Reilly Media [130]
    George Parkman (1790–1849) College 1809; Medical 1813 Physician, businessman, murder victim [131]
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914) College 1859 Philosopher, mathematician [132]
    A. Sivathanu Pillai (born 1947) Business 1991 Distinguished Scientist and Chief Controller DRDO and CEO of BrahMos Aerospace [133]
    Mark Plotkin (born 1955) Extension 1979 Ethnobotanist; founder of Amazon Conservation Team [134]
    Daniel Quillen (1940–2011) College 1961; PhD 1964 Mathematician, Fields Medal winner [135]
    Christian R. H. Raetz M.D. and PhD 1973 Professor of biochemistry at Duke University and member of National Academy of Sciences [136]
    Joseph Ransohoff (1915–2001) College 1938 Neurosurgeon, professor and chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at the New York University School of Medicine
    Charles Reigeluth B.A. Economics, 1969 Professor of instructional design systems and creator of Elaboration Theory [137]
    Stuart A. Rice (born 1932) A.M. 1954; PhD 1955 Physical chemist at The University of Chicago [138]
    Dennis Ritchie College 1963; PhD 1968 Computer scientist [139]
    Vern L. Schramm M.S. nutrition Professor of biochemistry at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine [140]
    Jon Seger Ph.D. 1980 Developed theory of bet-hedging in biology; recipient of MacArthur Genius Grant [141]
    Oscar Elton Sette (1900–1972) M.A. biology 1930 Influential fisheries scientist who pioneered fisheries oceanography and modern fisheries science [142][143]
    Harold Hill Smith (1910–1994) PhD Geneticist [144]
    Richard Stallman (born 1953) College 1974 Founder of the Free Software Foundation
    John Tooby PhD 1985 Anthropologist and evolutionary psychologist
    Marius Vassiliou College 1978 Computational scientist and research executive
    Vladimir Voevodsky (1966-2017) PhD 1966 Fields Medal winner
    An Wang (1920–1990) PhD 1948 Computer pioneer; inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame for magnetic core memory; philanthropist [145]
    John White Webster (1793–1850) College 1811; Medical 1815 Physician, professor, killer; Parkman-Webster murder case
    Edward Osborne Wilson (born 1929) PhD 1955; professor Biologist [146]
    Charles F. Winslow (1811–1877) Medical 1834 Physician, diplomat, and atomic theorist [147]
    John Winthrop (1714–1779) College 1732; professor Astronomer, mathematician
    Chauncey Wright (1830–1875) College 1852 Mathematician, philosopher, professor [148]

    From just looking at the dates one might get the impression that Harvard shut down sometime in the 90's .

    Few engineers. I know that Harvard students excel in the pure sciences but few engineers.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    The School of Engineering at Harvard is totally sucky. They can not attract people to teach engineering (or have smart enough students to enroll there) - which is really...crazy...but so, so, soooo true! The current department is full of foreigners who can't even "have a conversation" as to how to make the.......... wait for it.... department (fracking, effing...no dif) of engineering RELEVANT. Harvard is a joke for the most important concentration in the world for survival: engineering. SO, all you pompous asses on iSteve: don't you dare put down lowly State U's unless...unless you are a multi millionaire: this is a serious caveat. Harvard and MIT are bastions of socialists...sigh...cry.
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  165. @anon
    If I were president of Harvard I would make the school 100% black. Why waste time pussyfooting around AA, just go whole hog. And it will stay that way until black and white income and achievement are at parity.

    If I were president of Harvard I would make the school 100% black. Why waste time pussyfooting around AA, just go whole hog. And it will stay that way until black and white income and achievement are at parity.

    Harvard: The Howard of New England.

    Practically markets itself.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    exactement.
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  166. affirmative action is turning Harvard into a shithole. I love it. What is going to be screamingly funny is the moment Harvard alumni realize that Malia Obama is bad for Harvard. Guarantee you alumni giving decreases as the Malias of Harvard multiply. “Malia of Harvard” would make a good title for a horror film. Harvard’s horror

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    affirmative action is turning Harvard into a shithole. I love it. What is going to be screamingly funny is the moment Harvard alumni realize that Malia Obama is bad for Harvard. Guarantee you alumni giving decreases as the Malias of Harvard multiply. “Malia of Harvard” would make a good title for a horror film. Harvard’s horror
     
    I think you probably need to stop conceiving of Harvard as a place for the 2,000 or so smartest 18 year olds, and see it as a Country Club where the new international elite is formed.

    There have always been scions of political families given hearty admissions preferences (the 2000 Presidential Election let us pick between two), but the modern push seems to be to mix these types with the sons of Saudi Sheikhs, African Potentates and Hague Bureaucrats with a smattering of white nerds who have already invented some computer whizbang.
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  167. @Alice
    Yes the coursework is actually tougher at MIT and Caltech than Cal or U T Austin or U Mich. Yes the coursework at Harvard in mathematics is harder than the coursework anywhere else but maybe MIT and Princeton.

    More is taught in less time.

    I was the top student in a UC San Diego linear algebra course when I was a high school student; high A, with the highest score in the class on the final. Went to MIT for ugrad; didn't know *anything* past week three of them linear algebra course there. In physics, classes that were upper division at MIT used the same texts that only grad students used at UCSD and Cal (and everyhwre else.) Grad students from non MIT schools as ugrads took those courses routinely next to sophomores and juniors from MIT.

    The physics lab junior year at MIT did five experiments in 13 week semester; Cal did six in a 30 week year. MIT taught three extra weeks of CS material in a semester one week short than Cal's. Physics problem sets at MIT for a given week had ten problems; same course at Cal with same lectures had 6 problems.

    Same in math; the basic analysis course at Cal covered 6 chapters of Rudin in a semester. Same class, same book, shorter semester covered 8-9 at MIT.
    Same in the engineering fields though the extent varied with the major.

    Can I just brag and say: in 4 languages. Study engineering and master 4 languages- add patents. MIT had its golden age. Caltech is the last of the last….but, we are simply, talking about undergraduates…so whatever.

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  168. @Alec Leamas

    If I were president of Harvard I would make the school 100% black. Why waste time pussyfooting around AA, just go whole hog. And it will stay that way until black and white income and achievement are at parity.
     
    Harvard: The Howard of New England.

    Practically markets itself.

    exactement.

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  169. @Anonymous

    From 2008 to 2016, English, History, and Government departments have seen their number of concentrators decline from 236 to 144, 231 to 146, and 477 to 333 respectively. Applied Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science have meanwhile seen surges from 101 to 279, 17 to 163, and 86 to 363, respectively.
     
    This might be due to the financial crash following the housing boom, and the subsequent tech boom of the past 10 years.

    Until the financial crash, Harvard grads were heavily going into investment banking and consulting, which don't require science degrees. Following the crash, there was a lot less hiring and high salaries for these fields, and tech investing and startups become more prominent industries, and they tend to look for people with more science backgrounds.

    So you are saying that after the downturn in the economy, Harvard students focussed more on developing marketable skills. How lowbrow.

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  170. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    I say get rid of Great Books and Humanities departments.
     
    You really have no idea how education works, do you?

    You really have no idea how education works, do you?

    In college, I wondered… why do we have to sit through lectures when the info is in the book? It was like excuse for professors to have a job and to make us pay tuition.
    Why have the professor explain what he wrote in his book which he assigned us to read.

    I never learned anything in film class. I learned on my own. I took a class on classical music. Bored to tears. I learned on my own. Not an expert in anything, but it was more fun to learn on my own.
    I enjoyed a few history classes, and that’s about it.

    Prior to wide availability of reading and learning materials, I can understand why people went to college.

    NOW, when it comes to earning credentials for certain professions, organized education is important. Sure, you can learn law on your own, but it’s really a group effort. Also, stuff like science needs lab work. And advanced studies require constant interaction with professors.

    But most people who study humanities or Great Books are not going to get jobs based on them. SOME will, those who aspire to be professors or scholars. And they need to get credentials.
    But for most of us… that stuff isn’t to get jobs but to develop more knowledge about life and stuff. And we no longer need college for that.

    Also, professionalization of education had led many to feel that education ends with college. So many people almost never read a book after college. Come to think of it, they don’t read a book during college.

    So, I think we need to re-conceptualize education as a lifelong pursuit apart from organized education. It’s like for serious religious folks, religion must have life and meaning apart from church and institutions. It must be about you and God at all times.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You're such a consummate self-starter that you just figured out college isn't necessary to learn things? Congrats on turning 12
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  171. anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    That is awesome, Alice, and I mean it. Please post here more often.

    I love linear algebra, it reminds me of those dreams one has where friends from back in the day randomly show up to test out the ferris wheel that you have invented that does not necessarily obey the laws of gravity. And you say - well, it was a warm summer night, and i had nothing better to do, so I invented this really cool ferris wheel, thanks for showing up!

    You might think I am an idiot child, maybe some 2018 loser version of a DeVries or a Toole Kennedy or Don Colacho character, but not at all - to be fair, you don't know this, but I do --- I used to hang out with the sort of people who are sought out by the sort of person who basically declines Nobel Prizes (Literature, Peace, Medicine, and, to stretch a point, Physics - well, not really Physics, I didn't hang out with anyone who knew anyone who could win a Physics prize, although some of Feynman's ex-girlfriends may have hit on me when I lived for a few weeks in L.A., back in the day - I was never a big fan of libertinism so I lost out on a lot of good conversation from Feynman's sloppy seconds, although of course I myself would never consider myself better than a sloppy seconds, were I to live in such a world - I hope I phrased that right) because those sorts of things are for people who, well, desire those sort of things, and are not for the sort of people who desire, well, better things (Proverbs Book 8 and 17, if you are intellectually inclined).

    The Fields Medal crowd is not a crowd I am familiar with, though, and I often wondered - do real mathematicians resent the fact that almost everybody who is good at math has to, like, spend years in school to get a job as a mathematician - there are exceptions of course, Airdish and a few bridge players, Persi Diaconis, Bill Gates, bless his little Babbitized heart - but for most mathematical youths the prescribed future includes years of "course work" with middle aged losers who once excelled, in their turn, at "math courses". Isn't that humiliating? I mean, real poets just talk to people, and hang out, and after years of talking and hanging out, write eternally memorable poems. Why can't mathematicians do the same?
    I remember. Maybe I remember wrong, but I remember.

    the whole point of that comment was to get someone, somewhere, to seriously consider the possibility that the most intellectually challenging words that have ever been written are not some refinements from one of the later chapters of Newton’s Principia Mathematica or even the most intricate and astounding paragraphs or schematics of Maxwell or (my grandmother’s uncle, or something like that) Graham Bell, but the simple but astoundingly profound Chapters 8 and 17 of Proverbs.

    Of course, if I misunderstood “Feynman’s sloppy seconds” as simply meaning ” former sexual partners of Feynman” rather than the possibly more accurate “recently rejected for a continuing relationship and former sexual partners of Feynman” then of course I was even more simplistic and inaccurate than I realized. But really, who among us is not simplistic and inaccurate most of the time? It gets better, one hopes. I remember when it was worse, I remember. As Don Colacho (actually, Casey Stengel) liked to say – well, you can look it up.

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  172. @Daniel H
    Few engineers. I know that Harvard students excel in the pure sciences but few engineers.

    The School of Engineering at Harvard is totally sucky. They can not attract people to teach engineering (or have smart enough students to enroll there) – which is really…crazy…but so, so, soooo true! The current department is full of foreigners who can’t even “have a conversation” as to how to make the………. wait for it…. department (fracking, effing…no dif) of engineering RELEVANT. Harvard is a joke for the most important concentration in the world for survival: engineering. SO, all you pompous asses on iSteve: don’t you dare put down lowly State U’s unless…unless you are a multi millionaire: this is a serious caveat. Harvard and MIT are bastions of socialists…sigh…cry.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Also, forget the students... the professors & their departments should be attacked as to their purported relevancy/merit/purpose/efficacy. Professors over 45 should just be forcefully retired...give it up to the computer age :) . I hate baby boomers...and Gen Xrs. I hate Bolsheviks!
    , @Anonymous
    Engineering at Harvard is sort of like why rock bands in New Jersey are usually nt.wth.sht.
    The exceptions test the rule (as exceptions do).

    Any one in NJ that wants to be a rock and roller goes to New York.

    Anyone of Harvard caliber that wants to be an engineer goes to MIT or Caltech.
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  173. Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    Am solve differential equation
     
    All your base R belong to Us! :-)
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  174. OT: Nasim Aghdam appears to be world’s first shadowban retribution shooter. Historic.

    And her videos were apparently directed by David Lynch. Will he disavow?

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  175. Alas, You tube has gone full Bolshevik !!!! – losers, and their loser subordinants. I have tried, like 9 times to show the trailer of Revenge of the Nerds, here, right now, …but the Bolsheviks of You Tube will not allow me to present this.

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    • Replies: @jim jones
    Vimeo and Daily Motion are alternatives to Youtube
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  176. @J.Ross
    Bad command.
    But hey, YouTube got attacked by a Jewish Democrat Transsexual Vegan E-Celeb.
    Anything can happen.

    Follow-up to this. She (Nasim Aghdam) identified as Jewish once but that may have been a political stunt, since her whole life was devoted to activism. She was a female Iranian immigrant who used Islamic arguments to sell veganism. Not a transsexual (although I would have bet otherwise). Very important point — the lying press is talking about a white woman angry over a boyfriend. I have come across no mention of a boyfriend, no human relationships other than parents and fellow protesters, and no reason to believe she knew anyone at YouTube. YouTube had been aggressively demonetizing, censoring, etc, channels and her veganism channel went from popular enough to rate an article on Know Your Meme to making ten cents a month off ad revenue during the censorship campaign. Maybe YouTube didn’t even censor her and she just got massively unpopular by coincidence but it looks pretty set in her mind that she was being persecuted by YouTube. Will YouTube change its attitude toward censorship now?

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    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome


    Nasim Aghdam

     

    Nazi Adam?
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  177. @Lagertha
    I saw my 'typo'; for you to think I am a drunk. Should have typed 'like' and not 'live.' However, MIT is really, a bullshit institution these days (they are complicit in the whole' "white people suck stuff" - don't you get it???) ...but, I should have said FOR UNDERGRADS....who are just cash cows for the professors to get their funding for their research.

    Seriously, Twinkie, you have always been a douche in the past, and, I have tried to like you...but do you not realize that MIT doesn't give a rat's ass about undergraduates???? You tell all of us, here, all the effin' time how smart you are, but do you not realize how trivial a B.A. degree is to most research institutions? Never mind, you will continue to argue and be a douche.... I think I will take another shot now, ;) .

    you have always been a douche in the past

    That’s not quite lady-like now, is it? It’s sad to see you descend from being a likable ditz to a vulgar, bitter shrew.

    they are complicit in the whole’ “white people suck stuff”

    Which university among the top tier is not? For that matter, do you think that political correctness is not alive and well at, say, the University of Iowa? Take a pick and choose one of your beloved “flagship state U,” and I will show you some PC inanity from the same. Often the leftist radicalism is WORSE at such places, because the denizens of them desperately try to out-do the urban/elite institutions, so as to prove just how enlightened they are (just like the elite places!) compared to the rubes surrounding the state U’s.

    MIT doesn’t give a rat’s ass about undergraduates… do you not realize how trivial a B.A. degree is to most research institutions?

    Yes, dear, I know better than you do because I actually went on to a top-ranked Ph.D. program. Generically speaking, undergrads are a very low priority at research institutions.

    And while one can get just good an education from, say, Iowa State, a top-tier undergrad degree 1) signals your cognitive status quickly (e.g. top consulting firms don’t even bother to recruit from other schools), 2) readily puts you in the midst of other elites, and 3) makes available to you a powerful alumni network in many prestigious fields.

    Mind you, although my wife and I are multiple Ivy alums, we abhor what the elite education system has become and plan to send our children to either the service academies (for boys) or something like Thomas Aquinas College (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Aquinas_College).

    But to say that “MIT is a total Bullshit U” is just moronic and reeks of someone who is a bitter hanger-on of the fringe of the elite.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I don't think you're a douche Twinkie.
    Also check out Hillsdale.
    , @Lagertha
    My family members are ensconced (well, dead, now, mostly) in the Ivies and MIT/British/German U's. We have been embedded in the Leagues and UK & GR U's for a century. We all speak 5-6 languages...and we are all a dying breed.

    You, my friend ( I thought?) assume that meritocracy is alive in the USA! But, your first instinct of not understanding people is to attack people like me (who you do not know, at all) and assume they are stupid/invalid/whatever. Don't assume.... when you just don't know...don't know who they are. You are not a mind reader.

    That, exactly that, is what I am trying to tell you....sadly, meritocracy is totally dead. Everything is corrupt now, everything - nothing is sacred. And, give up on Army, Navy and AirForce - they've all drunk the Diversity Kool Aid. Look at all the collisions...the deaths of people lost because they ram into tankers/containerships/fishing boats, for eff's sake.

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  178. @Twinkie

    you have always been a douche in the past
     
    That's not quite lady-like now, is it? It's sad to see you descend from being a likable ditz to a vulgar, bitter shrew.

    they are complicit in the whole’ “white people suck stuff”
     
    Which university among the top tier is not? For that matter, do you think that political correctness is not alive and well at, say, the University of Iowa? Take a pick and choose one of your beloved "flagship state U," and I will show you some PC inanity from the same. Often the leftist radicalism is WORSE at such places, because the denizens of them desperately try to out-do the urban/elite institutions, so as to prove just how enlightened they are (just like the elite places!) compared to the rubes surrounding the state U's.

    MIT doesn’t give a rat’s ass about undergraduates... do you not realize how trivial a B.A. degree is to most research institutions?
     
    Yes, dear, I know better than you do because I actually went on to a top-ranked Ph.D. program. Generically speaking, undergrads are a very low priority at research institutions.

    And while one can get just good an education from, say, Iowa State, a top-tier undergrad degree 1) signals your cognitive status quickly (e.g. top consulting firms don't even bother to recruit from other schools), 2) readily puts you in the midst of other elites, and 3) makes available to you a powerful alumni network in many prestigious fields.

    Mind you, although my wife and I are multiple Ivy alums, we abhor what the elite education system has become and plan to send our children to either the service academies (for boys) or something like Thomas Aquinas College (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Aquinas_College).

    But to say that "MIT is a total Bullshit U" is just moronic and reeks of someone who is a bitter hanger-on of the fringe of the elite.

    I don’t think you’re a douche Twinkie.
    Also check out Hillsdale.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    I don’t think you’re a douche Twinkie.
     
    Why, thank you.

    Also check out Hillsdale.
     
    It's been on my radar a long time - I have known about it thanks to Erik Prince and Ron Tripp.

    Thomas Aquinas is specifically Catholic, which is a big part of the appeal.
    , @Brutusale
    The academic world needs more college presidents like Larry Arnn.
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  179. Anonymous[273] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    and other 20th-century masterpieces such as Derek Walcott’s neo-Homeric epic Omeros.
     
    Which, as "20th-century masterpieces " go, is rather meh. One point in its favor: it's a quick read. Back in grad school, I read it cover-to-cover on a Monday night.

    I think the putdown that Bill Henry used in “In Defense of Elitism” was that Walcott’s output was “up to the admittedly mixed standards of the Nobel committee”

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  180. OT Heard about London knife crime exploding lately? Worse than New York! But have no fear. See, they made this statue of an angel. That’s public safety for you.
    Bonus: the statue is made out of surrendered knives, so with a little work it works as a distribution kiosk.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/knife-angel-sculpture-made-of-100000-knives-2017-1

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  181. @Danand
    Totally off topic. YouTube headquarters shooter is a "white" women wearing a headscarf.

    Her name is Nasim Aghdam. Nasim is ultimately Arabic but in this transliteration it seems to be a common Persian name. Aghdam is a region of Azerbaijan – apparently there are 15 to 17 million “Iranian Azerbaijanis” living in Iran.

    A commenter on one of her YouTube videos writes:

    Thats turkish but with a veeeeery strange accent. Know it because i am a kurd from turkey.

    Azerbaijani is a Turkic language. Her website links to both YouTube Farsi and YouTube Turkish, so yeah, she’s likely Iranian Azerbaijani.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Thanks. There was a bit of confusion about this. A few of her veganism messages had text in what looked like Turkish on one end and what looked like Persian/Arabic at the other. She tried to conflate all slaughtering of animals for food with haram pagan sacrifice, which, somehow, I do not expect went over well with the relatives.
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  182. @Twinkie

    you have always been a douche in the past
     
    That's not quite lady-like now, is it? It's sad to see you descend from being a likable ditz to a vulgar, bitter shrew.

    they are complicit in the whole’ “white people suck stuff”
     
    Which university among the top tier is not? For that matter, do you think that political correctness is not alive and well at, say, the University of Iowa? Take a pick and choose one of your beloved "flagship state U," and I will show you some PC inanity from the same. Often the leftist radicalism is WORSE at such places, because the denizens of them desperately try to out-do the urban/elite institutions, so as to prove just how enlightened they are (just like the elite places!) compared to the rubes surrounding the state U's.

    MIT doesn’t give a rat’s ass about undergraduates... do you not realize how trivial a B.A. degree is to most research institutions?
     
    Yes, dear, I know better than you do because I actually went on to a top-ranked Ph.D. program. Generically speaking, undergrads are a very low priority at research institutions.

    And while one can get just good an education from, say, Iowa State, a top-tier undergrad degree 1) signals your cognitive status quickly (e.g. top consulting firms don't even bother to recruit from other schools), 2) readily puts you in the midst of other elites, and 3) makes available to you a powerful alumni network in many prestigious fields.

    Mind you, although my wife and I are multiple Ivy alums, we abhor what the elite education system has become and plan to send our children to either the service academies (for boys) or something like Thomas Aquinas College (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Aquinas_College).

    But to say that "MIT is a total Bullshit U" is just moronic and reeks of someone who is a bitter hanger-on of the fringe of the elite.

    My family members are ensconced (well, dead, now, mostly) in the Ivies and MIT/British/German U’s. We have been embedded in the Leagues and UK & GR U’s for a century. We all speak 5-6 languages…and we are all a dying breed.

    You, my friend ( I thought?) assume that meritocracy is alive in the USA! But, your first instinct of not understanding people is to attack people like me (who you do not know, at all) and assume they are stupid/invalid/whatever. Don’t assume…. when you just don’t know…don’t know who they are. You are not a mind reader.

    That, exactly that, is what I am trying to tell you….sadly, meritocracy is totally dead. Everything is corrupt now, everything – nothing is sacred. And, give up on Army, Navy and AirForce – they’ve all drunk the Diversity Kool Aid. Look at all the collisions…the deaths of people lost because they ram into tankers/containerships/fishing boats, for eff’s sake.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    My family members are ensconced (well, dead, now, mostly) in the Ivies and MIT/British/German U’s. We have been embedded in the Leagues and UK & GR U’s for a century. We all speak 5-6 languages…and we are all a dying breed.
     
    I note the conspicuous absence of the pronoun "I" in this list of accomplishments.

    my friend ( I thought?)
     
    I can't tell if you are drunk or on drugs. Why would you think I were your friend and then call me a "douche"?

    To be very frank, I am friendly - my ribbing toward you has been gentle always. I don't like being vicious to women. But, no, we are not friends - we don't even know each other. But that does not mean we can't be civil - even anonymously.

    assume that meritocracy is alive in the USA
     
    Meritocracy is not an "on" or "off" proposition.

    meritocracy is totally dead
     
    What is your evidence for this? You assert a lot of things.

    And, give up on Army, Navy and AirForce – they’ve all drunk the Diversity Kool Aid.
     
    West Point still requires boxing. Let me know when the snowflakes at "flagship state U" have to take a combat sport and get punched in the face or dropped on the head as a graduation requirement.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/30/us/despite-concussions-boxing-is-still-required-for-military-cadets.html

    And notwithstanding the influences of the toxic elements of the larger culture, the service academies still try to inculcate quaint notions such as sacrifice, patriotism, and duty.
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  183. Anon[304] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    Former web site of the person who attacked a YouTube office:
    https://web.archive.org/web/20160302144805/http://www.peacethunder.com/
    Warning -- it looks exactly like you might expect.

    There’s a lot of drama on Youtube right now. Someone yanked four videos off the shooter’s Facebook page before it was scrubbed and posted them on . . . where else? Youtube. These include her rant about Youtube. Somehow, I bet Youtube is not going to leave them up very long. One of the commentators claimed to know the guy who got shot, and after following the link to the commentator’s profile, he’s posted a message for the victim. One of the commentators to that is the victim himself posting from his hospital bed. He’s a father with a son, according to his information.

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  184. @Tiny Duck
    Any data on how many of those in liberal arts are women? What was the gender breakdown of those concentrations 10 years ago?

    Td, whatever you do, don’t give up on le trollen… We’ve had enough disappointments as it is, what with Old Ivy changing the lyrics to their Alma mater; I actually didn’t realize that still existed but it’s a tragic day

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  185. @Massimo Heitor
    As university humanity departments have championed these hard left political causes and "values", they have lost respect of regular people, and lost the interest of regular undergrads.

    The STEM subjects have aggressively avoided the politics and "values" and even this crowd still genuinely respects them. And younger people respect them as well and are interested in studying those subjects.

    That makes perfect sense.

    The STEM subjects have aggressively avoided the politics and “values” and even this crowd still genuinely respects them.

    Not for long. Maybe not in engineering, but the whole gender/LGBT/trans equity mania is coming to science departments. It’s effect will be seen first in faculty hiring, and among departmental committees and in matters dealing with graduate students. But as the result of all that will be the hiring of a cadre of ideologues, you can expect all that stuff to eventually filter down to the point where undergraduates will be exposed to it.

    Science won’t really be about science anymore, but about “social justice”.

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    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    No...never gonna happen. We starve to death without STEM people. Starvation is hard to watch...especially when you can do nothing to help the person starving to death. Science is empirical, after all. Science cares for neither gender nor race. Entropy always wins over emotion.
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  186. @Lagertha
    The School of Engineering at Harvard is totally sucky. They can not attract people to teach engineering (or have smart enough students to enroll there) - which is really...crazy...but so, so, soooo true! The current department is full of foreigners who can't even "have a conversation" as to how to make the.......... wait for it.... department (fracking, effing...no dif) of engineering RELEVANT. Harvard is a joke for the most important concentration in the world for survival: engineering. SO, all you pompous asses on iSteve: don't you dare put down lowly State U's unless...unless you are a multi millionaire: this is a serious caveat. Harvard and MIT are bastions of socialists...sigh...cry.

    Also, forget the students… the professors & their departments should be attacked as to their purported relevancy/merit/purpose/efficacy. Professors over 45 should just be forcefully retired…give it up to the computer age :) . I hate baby boomers…and Gen Xrs. I hate Bolsheviks!

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  187. Anonymous[273] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    You really have no idea how education works, do you?

    In college, I wondered... why do we have to sit through lectures when the info is in the book? It was like excuse for professors to have a job and to make us pay tuition.
    Why have the professor explain what he wrote in his book which he assigned us to read.

    I never learned anything in film class. I learned on my own. I took a class on classical music. Bored to tears. I learned on my own. Not an expert in anything, but it was more fun to learn on my own.
    I enjoyed a few history classes, and that's about it.

    Prior to wide availability of reading and learning materials, I can understand why people went to college.

    NOW, when it comes to earning credentials for certain professions, organized education is important. Sure, you can learn law on your own, but it's really a group effort. Also, stuff like science needs lab work. And advanced studies require constant interaction with professors.

    But most people who study humanities or Great Books are not going to get jobs based on them. SOME will, those who aspire to be professors or scholars. And they need to get credentials.
    But for most of us... that stuff isn't to get jobs but to develop more knowledge about life and stuff. And we no longer need college for that.

    Also, professionalization of education had led many to feel that education ends with college. So many people almost never read a book after college. Come to think of it, they don't read a book during college.

    So, I think we need to re-conceptualize education as a lifelong pursuit apart from organized education. It's like for serious religious folks, religion must have life and meaning apart from church and institutions. It must be about you and God at all times.

    You’re such a consummate self-starter that you just figured out college isn’t necessary to learn things? Congrats on turning 12

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    • Replies: @Anon
    You’re such a consummate self-starter that you just figured out college isn’t necessary to learn things?

    Most people haven't figured this out yet.

    For most people, to be 'educated' means credentials and degrees.

    It doesn't mean life experience, practical wisdom, attainment of truth, spiritual quest(if religious), and insights gathered over the yrs. We need it more than ever, but the art has been lost.

    I'm not just talking of reading any book and learning stuff. Anyone can watch PBS and learn general knowledge about 'stuff'. But the deepest and most essential kind of education/knowledge comes from the understanding of what one is, where one came from, to which tribe and community one belongs. Because that art has been lost, we have people seeking identities, and our debased educational institutions ascribe identities for them.

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  188. What was it the French used to say about the Right?

    Cet animal est très méchant,
    Quand on l’attaque il se défend.

    How dare those wicked students vote with their feet!

    In the meantime, I would just LOVE to give Harvard Grads the same college graduate test I give everybody else:

    1.What is the derivative of e to the x?
    2. Who were the major combatants in the Seven Years War?
    3. What is the next line: “And post o’er land and ocean without rest:”

    Because I have never had anybody pass it yet. And frankly, if you are an alleged college grad and can’t answer those questions, you are completely pathetic. I have had STEM majors miss the first question, and English Majors flub the last. And if you can’t answer the second, go watch Barry Lyndon.

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy

    Cet animal est très méchant,
    Quand on l’attaque il se défend
     
    Is that French for "it all started when he hit me back"?
    , @Meretricious
    1.What is the derivative of e to the x? e to the x power
    2. Who were the major combatants in the Seven Years War? GB and France but many countries were involved
    3. What is the next line: “And post o’er land and ocean without rest:”--from Milton's On his blindness--forget last line but something like for those and sit and wait
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  189. @Danand
    Totally off topic. YouTube headquarters shooter is a "white" women wearing a headscarf.

    “YouTube headquarters shooter is a “white” women wearing a headscarf.”

    Nasim Aghdam. Not exactly an “Elizabeth Winchester” type of name, eh?

    “A regular YouTuber with her own channel and 5,000 subscribers, she described herself as an animal rights activist and vegan bodybuilder. She is understood to have been angry at recent changes on the platform that affected how much money she received. In a video posted in January 2017, she said YouTube “discriminated and filtered” her content, NBC reports.”

    LOL. Once again, a liberal actually does what all the conservatives have been threatening to do.

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  190. @larry lurker
    Her name is Nasim Aghdam. Nasim is ultimately Arabic but in this transliteration it seems to be a common Persian name. Aghdam is a region of Azerbaijan - apparently there are 15 to 17 million "Iranian Azerbaijanis" living in Iran.

    A commenter on one of her YouTube videos writes:


    Thats turkish but with a veeeeery strange accent. Know it because i am a kurd from turkey.
     
    Azerbaijani is a Turkic language. Her website links to both YouTube Farsi and YouTube Turkish, so yeah, she's likely Iranian Azerbaijani.

    Thanks. There was a bit of confusion about this. A few of her veganism messages had text in what looked like Turkish on one end and what looked like Persian/Arabic at the other. She tried to conflate all slaughtering of animals for food with haram pagan sacrifice, which, somehow, I do not expect went over well with the relatives.

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    • Replies: @larry lurker

    She tried to conflate all slaughtering of animals for food with haram pagan sacrifice, which, somehow, I do not expect went over well with the relatives.
     
    I'll bet not. What a mess.

    When I first heard about this yesterday I thought the perp might very well be a disgruntled YouTuber. Then the police said that it wasn't terrorism, but rather "workplace or domestic" violence - clearly implying that the shooter either worked at YouTube or was romantically involved with someone who did.

    Now it looks like a disgruntled YouTuber again. Sort of. Is it terrorism when someone shoots up YouTube because their videos were demonetized? I'm not sure, but "workplace violence" doesn't seem to capture it either. What a mess.
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  191. @Mr. Anon

    The STEM subjects have aggressively avoided the politics and “values” and even this crowd still genuinely respects them.
     
    Not for long. Maybe not in engineering, but the whole gender/LGBT/trans equity mania is coming to science departments. It's effect will be seen first in faculty hiring, and among departmental committees and in matters dealing with graduate students. But as the result of all that will be the hiring of a cadre of ideologues, you can expect all that stuff to eventually filter down to the point where undergraduates will be exposed to it.

    Science won't really be about science anymore, but about "social justice".

    No…never gonna happen. We starve to death without STEM people. Starvation is hard to watch…especially when you can do nothing to help the person starving to death. Science is empirical, after all. Science cares for neither gender nor race. Entropy always wins over emotion.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    No…never gonna happen.
     
    It's happening now.

    APS to Study Sexual and Gender Diversity Issues in Physics

    Physical Review Physics Education Research: Gender in Physics

    We starve to death without STEM people.
     
    That's ridiculous. Particle physicists and topologists don't grow your food.
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  192. @Alec Leamas

    Ultimately, if the subject isn’t interesting or fun, it’s going to die as a subject.
     
    I fail to understand how a decades-long existential struggle between two superpowers each with the power to extinguish humanity, influencing all manner of art and culture is "not interesting or fun" to study.

    What could be a more interesting field of study?

    Tom Clancy built his career on the Cold War. So did several other authors of note. This is of course because the Cold War was dull as dishwater, as movies like The Hunt for Red October can attest.

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    • LOL: Twinkie
    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    James Bond!
    , @Twinkie
    When I was in college and then grad school in the late 80's and early 90's, Cold War politics and military competition were still a hot topic. Then again, back then, military history was still a seriously studied subject at many universities. Now only a handful of civilian universities even have a formal military history program (Ohio State being the best known).

    On the other hand, "interdisciplinary" fields such as "international relations," "peace studies," and such have risen in the last 30 years, and frequently shift to hot topics du jour, e.g. radical Islam, low intensity conflicts/insurgency/counterinsurgency, information warfare, refugee crises, etc.

    Not so many nuclear deterrence and (mechanized) maneuver warfare courses nowadays...
    , @Alec Leamas
    Yeah - and that's my point. It was a world historical event that shaped the globe for decades, was the backdrop to art, culture, and media, and then it just ended and the academy responded with an "oh, well that's over." It seems to me like a phenomenon that would generate reams upon reams upon reams of analysis and spin off middlebrow books that would make best seller's lists. But none of that really happened.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    This is of course because the Cold War was dull as dishwater, as movies like The Hunt for Red October can attest
     
    What the Hell is the matter with you? Clancy was a jackass, yes, and the rest of the Clancy movies were okay, at best, but Hunt had Sean Connery, and he was superb. Baldwin, for all his infantile stupidity, did pretty well. Fred Thompson, Sam Neill, James Earl Jones, Joss Ackland, Richard Jordan, Courtney Vance, Stellan Skarsgard, Tim Curry, Daniel Davis and Scott Glenn, all nailed their roles.

    Dull as dishwater? Nope.
    , @Anon
    Personally: Cold War history is too recent for a really good survey course at most universities, especially when the professor is some sort of Gramsci acolyte who has bolted on a Derridaesque "post-Marxist" conceptual language.

    OT: One good thing about the three-digit anon IDs-- I wouldn't have responded to a thread started by another anonymity before.
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  193. Anonymous[433] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stan Adams
    The entire educational apparatus, from kindergarten to the post-graduate level, is utterly outmoded and obsolete. A good number of the mouth-breathing seat-warmers inhabiting our high schools shouldn't be there, to say nothing of the stoodentz cluttering up our colleges.

    The sheer insanity of forcing kids to incur hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt to obtain a worthless piece of paper that signifies nothing should be self-evident to everyone, and yet our "leaders" continue to perpetuate the lie that a degree is a ticket to the good life.

    That being said, the dysfunction in the (mis-)education system is merely a symptom of a larger social disease. We turn our girls into credentialist GoGrl grinders and encourage them to squander their years of prime fertility running laps on the corporate treadmill/hamster wheel. We emasculate our boys. And we teach both sexes that life has no inherent meaning, that the only way to fill up the soulless emptiness of modern existence is to engorge oneself on a steady diet of sexual perversion, drugs, and iPhones. The only spiritual causes worth endorsing are migrant-veneration, tranny-worship, and homo-adulation.

    Modern existence need not be soulless. Nihilists are made, not born. But our entire system is set up to produce them. Few can overcome the relentless cultural programming.

    That being said, the dysfunction in the (mis-)education system is merely a symptom of a larger social disease. We turn our girls into credentialist GoGrl grinders and encourage them to squander their years of prime fertility running laps on the corporate treadmill/hamster wheel. We emasculate our boys. And we teach both sexes that life has no inherent meaning, that the only way to fill up the soulless emptiness of modern existence is to engorge oneself on a steady diet of sexual perversion, drugs, and iPhones. The only spiritual causes worth endorsing are migrant-veneration, tranny-worship, and homo-adulation.

    I teach my daughters that there is power in a large family. They get the concept!

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  194. @Anonymous
    The professors replaced themselves. They held their noses and hired other professors who weren't that bright, but were diverse. A critical mass was reached, and they are now all post-modern types, hiring people like themselves. There is no going back.

    If I were king of the university, I'd:

    - Rename the English department "Critical English," without consulting with the faculty. The same with every one of these departments, Critical Gender Studies, etc. One year later I'd announce a bunch of brand new departments: English, Gender Studies, etc. I'd hire all new staff for these new departments. The English department would teach reading comprehension a la the LSAT, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, vocabulary, structuring of essays, articles, nonfiction journalism, and so on. Gender Studies would hire researchers from biology, psychology, neurology, and so on to try to figure out what the hell is going on, scientifically, with trans people. Self-reported feelings and lived experience would have no more weight than the self-reported feelings of schizophrenics would have in studying them. And so on with all the new departments. Legacy "critical" departments would be phased out as their enrollment drops.

    - I would institute a new grading system and no more than 20 percent could get an A. I would make sure that at least 20 percent were given Ds. Classroom attendance would be mandatory, cell phones and laptops banned. I would have a quota for flunking out 5 percent of the student body each quarter, sending them off to other universities with our best wishes. I would figure out a way to have an outside administrative department administer all tests. The professor would consult with this department on the nature of the tests, but would not write, administer, or grade them. I would have an exit exam along the lines of the bar exam or the medical boards for graduation.

    I think there is a pent-up demand for something like this, and with all the thousands of colleges offering the current recipe, there is room for one like this.

    The English department would teach reading comprehension a la the LSAT, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, vocabulary, structuring of essays, articles, nonfiction journalism, and so on.

    All of this should be taught in high school, not college.

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  195. @Alice
    Yes the coursework is actually tougher at MIT and Caltech than Cal or U T Austin or U Mich. Yes the coursework at Harvard in mathematics is harder than the coursework anywhere else but maybe MIT and Princeton.

    More is taught in less time.

    I was the top student in a UC San Diego linear algebra course when I was a high school student; high A, with the highest score in the class on the final. Went to MIT for ugrad; didn't know *anything* past week three of them linear algebra course there. In physics, classes that were upper division at MIT used the same texts that only grad students used at UCSD and Cal (and everyhwre else.) Grad students from non MIT schools as ugrads took those courses routinely next to sophomores and juniors from MIT.

    The physics lab junior year at MIT did five experiments in 13 week semester; Cal did six in a 30 week year. MIT taught three extra weeks of CS material in a semester one week short than Cal's. Physics problem sets at MIT for a given week had ten problems; same course at Cal with same lectures had 6 problems.

    Same in math; the basic analysis course at Cal covered 6 chapters of Rudin in a semester. Same class, same book, shorter semester covered 8-9 at MIT.
    Same in the engineering fields though the extent varied with the major.

    Thanks.

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  196. Southeast Asians appear to be hybrids of Indians and East Asians. Darker in complexion, rounder eyed, than East Asians. Sort of goes along with the (outdated) place name “Indochina.”

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Should anyone expect to get away with a comment like Lot's on an HBD site?
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  197. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lagertha
    The School of Engineering at Harvard is totally sucky. They can not attract people to teach engineering (or have smart enough students to enroll there) - which is really...crazy...but so, so, soooo true! The current department is full of foreigners who can't even "have a conversation" as to how to make the.......... wait for it.... department (fracking, effing...no dif) of engineering RELEVANT. Harvard is a joke for the most important concentration in the world for survival: engineering. SO, all you pompous asses on iSteve: don't you dare put down lowly State U's unless...unless you are a multi millionaire: this is a serious caveat. Harvard and MIT are bastions of socialists...sigh...cry.

    Engineering at Harvard is sort of like why rock bands in New Jersey are usually nt.wth.sht.
    The exceptions test the rule (as exceptions do).

    Any one in NJ that wants to be a rock and roller goes to New York.

    Anyone of Harvard caliber that wants to be an engineer goes to MIT or Caltech.

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  198. @Hibernian
    Southeast Asians appear to be hybrids of Indians and East Asians. Darker in complexion, rounder eyed, than East Asians. Sort of goes along with the (outdated) place name "Indochina."

    Should anyone expect to get away with a comment like Lot’s on an HBD site?

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  199. @Charles Pewitt
    The Puritan divine dirtbags who started Harvard were East Anglian bug-eyed bog dwellers back in England. Now the arrogant money-grubbers are holding the rest of us over an open fire. The worst sin according to the Puritan divines was to sleep through one of their boring sermons.

    New England maritime bourgeoisie drug dealers got the Chinks hooked on drugs and they brought the loot back and gave it to Harvard.

    Harvard has been the original spawning ground of the treasonous rats in the WASP / Jew ruling class.

    Harvard is a hedge fund with a school attached to it.

    Harvard Hates America; America Don't Much Care For Harvard.

    Tweet from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/590944702569979904

    One for laughs from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/570298920561201154

    Puritan sermons were not boring; they were traumatic. Look at “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.”. The idea was to make small children afraid to go to bed.

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  200. @Anon
    OT: The Youtube shooter was a woman who was wearing a headscarf. She shot her boyfriend and plugged 3 other women. People were at an outdoor party when she appeared. I wonder if her boyfriend was Muslim and cheating on her?

    The boyfriend theory has been abandoned at the moment. They weren’t posting her stuff and therefore she wasn’t getting paid.

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  201. @Barnard
    I think the grade inflation in the Ivy League is so bad that they don't need to take these courses for an easy A. Any non STEM course will do for an easy A.

    I think the grade inflation in the Ivy League is so bad that they don’t need to take these courses for an easy A. Any non STEM course will do for an easy A.

    Not all Ivies. Princeton went through a process of grade deflation a few years ago. Harvard and Yale, though, are terrified to make the first move, lest their graduates be out-competed by those of the other institution in the jobs and post-graduate studies marketplace.

    Cornell never did inflate its grades in its core Arts and Sciences school and still grades to a B average. I am reliably informed that this is a sore point with the undergraduates there currently, who will face uninformed employers with a preference for Brown and Dartmouth graduates instead. ImmigrantFromFormerUSSR, who used to post here, has also talked about the problem.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2013/12/04/harvard-colleges-median-grade-is-an-a-dean-admits/?utm_term=.421c82ef4db2

    A humorous take:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/15/opinion/sunday/leaked-harvards-grading-rubric.html

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Cornell never did inflate its grades in its core Arts and Sciences school and still grades to a B average. I am reliably informed that this is a sore point with the undergraduates there currently, who will face uninformed employers with a preference for Brown and Dartmouth graduates instead.
     
    Doesn't Cornell have the highest suicide rate among the Ivies while Brown students were surveyed to be the happiest students not just among the Ivies but all universities queried?
    , @Steve Sailer
    Top schools now seem to grade where A = A, A- = B, B+ = C, B = D.

    It seems to work OK if you know the code. If you are too out of it to understand that a B+ = C these days, well, that's your problem, not their's seems to be the thinking.

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  202. @Yan Shen
    Don't blacks tend to skew more towards verbal and away from spatial/mathematical reasoning? The vast majority of black academics are in softer social science and humanities areas. The irony of blacks complaining about culturally biased tests is that they actually tend to do relatively better in such culturally biased , more verbally loaded tests.

    I suspect the black deficit would be particularly high on something like the ravens.

    Don’t blacks tend to skew more towards verbal and away from spatial/mathematical reasoning?

    So long as everything rhymes, then yeah.

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  203. @theMann
    What was it the French used to say about the Right?

    Cet animal est très méchant,
    Quand on l'attaque il se défend.

    How dare those wicked students vote with their feet!


    In the meantime, I would just LOVE to give Harvard Grads the same college graduate test I give everybody else:

    1.What is the derivative of e to the x?
    2. Who were the major combatants in the Seven Years War?
    3. What is the next line: "And post o'er land and ocean without rest:"


    Because I have never had anybody pass it yet. And frankly, if you are an alleged college grad and can't answer those questions, you are completely pathetic. I have had STEM majors miss the first question, and English Majors flub the last. And if you can't answer the second, go watch Barry Lyndon.

    Cet animal est très méchant,
    Quand on l’attaque il se défend

    Is that French for “it all started when he hit me back”?

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    • LOL: Mishra
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  204. @Anonym
    Tom Clancy built his career on the Cold War. So did several other authors of note. This is of course because the Cold War was dull as dishwater, as movies like The Hunt for Red October can attest.

    James Bond!

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  205. @Buzz Mohawk

    ... a Vassar joined at the hip to an MIT.
     
    That actually sounds like a nice couple. They'd have a bright and happy future together.

    https://68.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lx2qi0ZzhL1r9oy67o1_400.jpg

    If only. Vassar students tend to be pissy homos and angry dykes, and MIT students may be among the ugliest creatures this side of a warthog. But we can dream, can’t we?

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  206. @J.Ross
    I don't think you're a douche Twinkie.
    Also check out Hillsdale.

    I don’t think you’re a douche Twinkie.

    Why, thank you.

    Also check out Hillsdale.

    It’s been on my radar a long time – I have known about it thanks to Erik Prince and Ron Tripp.

    Thomas Aquinas is specifically Catholic, which is a big part of the appeal.

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  207. @Lagertha
    My family members are ensconced (well, dead, now, mostly) in the Ivies and MIT/British/German U's. We have been embedded in the Leagues and UK & GR U's for a century. We all speak 5-6 languages...and we are all a dying breed.

    You, my friend ( I thought?) assume that meritocracy is alive in the USA! But, your first instinct of not understanding people is to attack people like me (who you do not know, at all) and assume they are stupid/invalid/whatever. Don't assume.... when you just don't know...don't know who they are. You are not a mind reader.

    That, exactly that, is what I am trying to tell you....sadly, meritocracy is totally dead. Everything is corrupt now, everything - nothing is sacred. And, give up on Army, Navy and AirForce - they've all drunk the Diversity Kool Aid. Look at all the collisions...the deaths of people lost because they ram into tankers/containerships/fishing boats, for eff's sake.

    My family members are ensconced (well, dead, now, mostly) in the Ivies and MIT/British/German U’s. We have been embedded in the Leagues and UK & GR U’s for a century. We all speak 5-6 languages…and we are all a dying breed.

    I note the conspicuous absence of the pronoun “I” in this list of accomplishments.

    my friend ( I thought?)

    I can’t tell if you are drunk or on drugs. Why would you think I were your friend and then call me a “douche”?

    To be very frank, I am friendly – my ribbing toward you has been gentle always. I don’t like being vicious to women. But, no, we are not friends – we don’t even know each other. But that does not mean we can’t be civil – even anonymously.

    assume that meritocracy is alive in the USA

    Meritocracy is not an “on” or “off” proposition.

    meritocracy is totally dead

    What is your evidence for this? You assert a lot of things.

    And, give up on Army, Navy and AirForce – they’ve all drunk the Diversity Kool Aid.

    West Point still requires boxing. Let me know when the snowflakes at “flagship state U” have to take a combat sport and get punched in the face or dropped on the head as a graduation requirement.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/30/us/despite-concussions-boxing-is-still-required-for-military-cadets.html

    And notwithstanding the influences of the toxic elements of the larger culture, the service academies still try to inculcate quaint notions such as sacrifice, patriotism, and duty.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    And notwithstanding the influences of the toxic elements of the larger culture, the service academies still try to inculcate quaint notions such as sacrifice, patriotism, and duty.
     
    Perhaps inculcating sacrifice and duty in defence of this:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/fashion/weddings/two-active-duty-soldiers-marry-in-same-sex-wedding-at-west-point.html

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/10/05/west-point-grad-behind-pro-communist-photos-reportedly-was-flagged-to-superiors-in-2015.html

    is not a good idea.
    , @J.Ross
    There can be no doubt that we have a crisis of escaping consequences and therefore a weakening of meritocracy. This is one of those unkillable evils that is always there but which has definitely become overgrown lately. The result is civil war, because the ensconced elite have no reason to meet halfway people they consider to be wrong or insane. "It worked in my model! Everybody else at my symposium agrees with me, as do I! People who fail to accept our brilliance are just too dumb (and just need to die)! The fact is, this program was never really funded, I mean, it was funded millions of dollars, but it was never really funded, and if only they'd really fund it in italics then we'd see the results I predicted!" At the other end, this is the result of the Venetian civilizational model of all-powerful, all-knowing patrons who buy their science and laws, and have enough money left over to magick up apparent consensus and confirmation using mass media, and to silence and exile critics. Our technology and weath concentration are reaching a point where reality matters as much as deficits or democracy (and for about forty per cent of the country we're already there).
    But consigning MIT to the flames is a bit much. Harvard though deserves everything it has coming.
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  208. @PiltdownMan

    I think the grade inflation in the Ivy League is so bad that they don’t need to take these courses for an easy A. Any non STEM course will do for an easy A.
     
    Not all Ivies. Princeton went through a process of grade deflation a few years ago. Harvard and Yale, though, are terrified to make the first move, lest their graduates be out-competed by those of the other institution in the jobs and post-graduate studies marketplace.

    Cornell never did inflate its grades in its core Arts and Sciences school and still grades to a B average. I am reliably informed that this is a sore point with the undergraduates there currently, who will face uninformed employers with a preference for Brown and Dartmouth graduates instead. ImmigrantFromFormerUSSR, who used to post here, has also talked about the problem.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2013/12/04/harvard-colleges-median-grade-is-an-a-dean-admits/?utm_term=.421c82ef4db2

    A humorous take:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/15/opinion/sunday/leaked-harvards-grading-rubric.html

    Cornell never did inflate its grades in its core Arts and Sciences school and still grades to a B average. I am reliably informed that this is a sore point with the undergraduates there currently, who will face uninformed employers with a preference for Brown and Dartmouth graduates instead.

    Doesn’t Cornell have the highest suicide rate among the Ivies while Brown students were surveyed to be the happiest students not just among the Ivies but all universities queried?

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  209. @Anonym
    Tom Clancy built his career on the Cold War. So did several other authors of note. This is of course because the Cold War was dull as dishwater, as movies like The Hunt for Red October can attest.

    When I was in college and then grad school in the late 80′s and early 90′s, Cold War politics and military competition were still a hot topic. Then again, back then, military history was still a seriously studied subject at many universities. Now only a handful of civilian universities even have a formal military history program (Ohio State being the best known).

    On the other hand, “interdisciplinary” fields such as “international relations,” “peace studies,” and such have risen in the last 30 years, and frequently shift to hot topics du jour, e.g. radical Islam, low intensity conflicts/insurgency/counterinsurgency, information warfare, refugee crises, etc.

    Not so many nuclear deterrence and (mechanized) maneuver warfare courses nowadays…

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    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Anonym
    Cold war setting movies in the imdb top 100...
    Apocalypse Now
    Dr Strangelove
    Lives of others
    2001
    North by Northwest
    Full metal jacket

    It seems like the setting made an impression on a few people.
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  210. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    You're such a consummate self-starter that you just figured out college isn't necessary to learn things? Congrats on turning 12

    You’re such a consummate self-starter that you just figured out college isn’t necessary to learn things?

    Most people haven’t figured this out yet.

    For most people, to be ‘educated’ means credentials and degrees.

    It doesn’t mean life experience, practical wisdom, attainment of truth, spiritual quest(if religious), and insights gathered over the yrs. We need it more than ever, but the art has been lost.

    I’m not just talking of reading any book and learning stuff. Anyone can watch PBS and learn general knowledge about ‘stuff’. But the deepest and most essential kind of education/knowledge comes from the understanding of what one is, where one came from, to which tribe and community one belongs. Because that art has been lost, we have people seeking identities, and our debased educational institutions ascribe identities for them.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Quite right.

    Don't let the Taki refugee types talk you down.

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  211. @Lagertha
    https://youtu.be/Hw6zrlnbtQE

    Alas, You tube has gone full Bolshevik !!!! - losers, and their loser subordinants. I have tried, like 9 times to show the trailer of Revenge of the Nerds, here, right now, ...but the Bolsheviks of You Tube will not allow me to present this.

    Vimeo and Daily Motion are alternatives to Youtube

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  212. @PiltdownMan

    I think the grade inflation in the Ivy League is so bad that they don’t need to take these courses for an easy A. Any non STEM course will do for an easy A.
     
    Not all Ivies. Princeton went through a process of grade deflation a few years ago. Harvard and Yale, though, are terrified to make the first move, lest their graduates be out-competed by those of the other institution in the jobs and post-graduate studies marketplace.

    Cornell never did inflate its grades in its core Arts and Sciences school and still grades to a B average. I am reliably informed that this is a sore point with the undergraduates there currently, who will face uninformed employers with a preference for Brown and Dartmouth graduates instead. ImmigrantFromFormerUSSR, who used to post here, has also talked about the problem.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2013/12/04/harvard-colleges-median-grade-is-an-a-dean-admits/?utm_term=.421c82ef4db2

    A humorous take:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/15/opinion/sunday/leaked-harvards-grading-rubric.html

    Top schools now seem to grade where A = A, A- = B, B+ = C, B = D.

    It seems to work OK if you know the code. If you are too out of it to understand that a B+ = C these days, well, that’s your problem, not their’s seems to be the thinking.

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  213. @J.Ross
    Possible illustration: go to a used book store and look at the Russian or Eastern European section, there will be a ton of stuff from the middle Cold War that was more or less government mandated: dictionaries, grammars, readers, technical dictionaries, popular introductory courses, examinations of the Russian mind. There is no post-Cold War shelf that groans as much. There has been some very interesting stuff from the always-good publishing house Fuel (including the encyclopedia of prisoner tattoos and gulag drawings of Baldaev), there's Matthew Maly, there's Batumen, there's Klebnikov and stuff about the Oligarches, there's a certain amount of "Putin is the devil" stuff (which persuades no knowledgeable person and has no popular reach), there's a very nice book by a Dane about vodka, there was a fashion of people taking pictures at Chernobyl and getting that published, but it's not the same in volume or range. In a way this is good because it allows for more sober considerations (apart from calling Putin the devil). There have actually always been travelogues about exotic Muscovy and some of these are getting new attention, I just picked up one I haven't read yet by an all but out homosexual during the Enlightenment.
    But none of this is comparable to the Black Bodies or interrogation of whiteness, or hand-wringings over crime and education, or the academic interest in colonialism, or the massive lot of nothing churned out about China. There's definitely more and higher priority stuff on HBD than about the steppe.

    There have actually always been travelogues about exotic Muscovy and some of these are getting new attention, I just picked up one I haven’t read yet by an all but out homosexual during the Enlightenment.

    Sounds great! Name?

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Sorry it so long to respond.
    LETTERS FROM RUSSIA
    ASTOLPHE DE CUSTINE (note: not Adolphe)
    New York Review of Books (apparently they publish as well as review)
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  214. @Hippopotamusdrome


    Many 85-IQ blacks are engaging conversationalists

     

    LOL.

    Relatively speaking, that is.

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  215. @Sunbeam
    Darn it, I was hoping we (the South) had outlasted our ancient enemy. I know their spiritual children are kicking in lots of places like the Pacific Northwest, but it would have been rewarding, you know?

    I’m not saying the world wouldn’t be a more fun place if our bloodlines were utterly eradicated–just that it hasn’t happened yet.

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  216. @Twinkie
    When I was in college and then grad school in the late 80's and early 90's, Cold War politics and military competition were still a hot topic. Then again, back then, military history was still a seriously studied subject at many universities. Now only a handful of civilian universities even have a formal military history program (Ohio State being the best known).

    On the other hand, "interdisciplinary" fields such as "international relations," "peace studies," and such have risen in the last 30 years, and frequently shift to hot topics du jour, e.g. radical Islam, low intensity conflicts/insurgency/counterinsurgency, information warfare, refugee crises, etc.

    Not so many nuclear deterrence and (mechanized) maneuver warfare courses nowadays...

    Cold war setting movies in the imdb top 100…
    Apocalypse Now
    Dr Strangelove
    Lives of others
    2001
    North by Northwest
    Full metal jacket

    It seems like the setting made an impression on a few people.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie
    Red Dawn.
    First Blood and Rambo II & III.
    Rocky IV.
    Platoon.
    WarGames.
    Gotcha!
    Top Gun.

    Those are just a few from the '80's.

    We can keep going and going.
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  217. @J.Ross
    Bad command.
    But hey, YouTube got attacked by a Jewish Democrat Transsexual Vegan E-Celeb.
    Anything can happen.

    If that girl is transsexual than I must be gay. She is one handsome woman. Fair, thin and waifish, two swollen bee stings, and sharp features.

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    She wears theatrical-level make-up, tries to always be photographed from a particular angle, dives headfirst into exotic clothing (eg, leopard print spandex), does a lot of freaky art experiments, and her career is hard to define but always involves being in the public eye. All that together will make the wrong needle twitch as it is classic tranny stuff.
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  218. @J.Ross
    Follow-up to this. She (Nasim Aghdam) identified as Jewish once but that may have been a political stunt, since her whole life was devoted to activism. She was a female Iranian immigrant who used Islamic arguments to sell veganism. Not a transsexual (although I would have bet otherwise). Very important point -- the lying press is talking about a white woman angry over a boyfriend. I have come across no mention of a boyfriend, no human relationships other than parents and fellow protesters, and no reason to believe she knew anyone at YouTube. YouTube had been aggressively demonetizing, censoring, etc, channels and her veganism channel went from popular enough to rate an article on Know Your Meme to making ten cents a month off ad revenue during the censorship campaign. Maybe YouTube didn't even censor her and she just got massively unpopular by coincidence but it looks pretty set in her mind that she was being persecuted by YouTube. Will YouTube change its attitude toward censorship now?

    Nasim Aghdam

    Nazi Adam?

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  219. @J.Ross
    Thanks. There was a bit of confusion about this. A few of her veganism messages had text in what looked like Turkish on one end and what looked like Persian/Arabic at the other. She tried to conflate all slaughtering of animals for food with haram pagan sacrifice, which, somehow, I do not expect went over well with the relatives.

    She tried to conflate all slaughtering of animals for food with haram pagan sacrifice, which, somehow, I do not expect went over well with the relatives.

    I’ll bet not. What a mess.

    When I first heard about this yesterday I thought the perp might very well be a disgruntled YouTuber. Then the police said that it wasn’t terrorism, but rather “workplace or domestic” violence – clearly implying that the shooter either worked at YouTube or was romantically involved with someone who did.

    Now it looks like a disgruntled YouTuber again. Sort of. Is it terrorism when someone shoots up YouTube because their videos were demonetized? I’m not sure, but “workplace violence” doesn’t seem to capture it either. What a mess.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    It was uncomplicatedly terrorism as soon as she decided to use the threat of violence to achieve a policy end (ie, stop YouTube's current censorship spree, which goal I happen to agree with).
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  220. @J.Ross
    I don't think you're a douche Twinkie.
    Also check out Hillsdale.

    The academic world needs more college presidents like Larry Arnn.

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  221. @theMann
    What was it the French used to say about the Right?

    Cet animal est très méchant,
    Quand on l'attaque il se défend.

    How dare those wicked students vote with their feet!


    In the meantime, I would just LOVE to give Harvard Grads the same college graduate test I give everybody else:

    1.What is the derivative of e to the x?
    2. Who were the major combatants in the Seven Years War?
    3. What is the next line: "And post o'er land and ocean without rest:"


    Because I have never had anybody pass it yet. And frankly, if you are an alleged college grad and can't answer those questions, you are completely pathetic. I have had STEM majors miss the first question, and English Majors flub the last. And if you can't answer the second, go watch Barry Lyndon.

    1.What is the derivative of e to the x? e to the x power
    2. Who were the major combatants in the Seven Years War? GB and France but many countries were involved
    3. What is the next line: “And post o’er land and ocean without rest:”–from Milton’s On his blindness–forget last line but something like for those and sit and wait

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  222. @Lagertha
    No...never gonna happen. We starve to death without STEM people. Starvation is hard to watch...especially when you can do nothing to help the person starving to death. Science is empirical, after all. Science cares for neither gender nor race. Entropy always wins over emotion.

    No…never gonna happen.

    It’s happening now.

    APS to Study Sexual and Gender Diversity Issues in Physics

    Physical Review Physics Education Research: Gender in Physics

    We starve to death without STEM people.

    That’s ridiculous. Particle physicists and topologists don’t grow your food.

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    ugh! how awful; btw, meant without STEM people, who cultivate and grow our food, make sure our drinking water stays free of contaminants, we won't survive long. I suppose the administrators of elite U's will keep drumming the idea that there is no gender/no race/and we are just all the same - yeah, you are correct, the indoctrination is going full force into contaminating science and engineering departments to make sure there are no free thinkers/curious people, questioning everything, or anything in the future. Sad.
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  223. @Twinkie

    My family members are ensconced (well, dead, now, mostly) in the Ivies and MIT/British/German U’s. We have been embedded in the Leagues and UK & GR U’s for a century. We all speak 5-6 languages…and we are all a dying breed.
     
    I note the conspicuous absence of the pronoun "I" in this list of accomplishments.

    my friend ( I thought?)
     
    I can't tell if you are drunk or on drugs. Why would you think I were your friend and then call me a "douche"?

    To be very frank, I am friendly - my ribbing toward you has been gentle always. I don't like being vicious to women. But, no, we are not friends - we don't even know each other. But that does not mean we can't be civil - even anonymously.

    assume that meritocracy is alive in the USA
     
    Meritocracy is not an "on" or "off" proposition.

    meritocracy is totally dead
     
    What is your evidence for this? You assert a lot of things.

    And, give up on Army, Navy and AirForce – they’ve all drunk the Diversity Kool Aid.
     
    West Point still requires boxing. Let me know when the snowflakes at "flagship state U" have to take a combat sport and get punched in the face or dropped on the head as a graduation requirement.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/30/us/despite-concussions-boxing-is-still-required-for-military-cadets.html

    And notwithstanding the influences of the toxic elements of the larger culture, the service academies still try to inculcate quaint notions such as sacrifice, patriotism, and duty.

    And notwithstanding the influences of the toxic elements of the larger culture, the service academies still try to inculcate quaint notions such as sacrifice, patriotism, and duty.

    Perhaps inculcating sacrifice and duty in defence of this:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/fashion/weddings/two-active-duty-soldiers-marry-in-same-sex-wedding-at-west-point.html

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/10/05/west-point-grad-behind-pro-communist-photos-reportedly-was-flagged-to-superiors-in-2015.html

    is not a good idea.

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  224. @Meretricious
    affirmative action is turning Harvard into a shithole. I love it. What is going to be screamingly funny is the moment Harvard alumni realize that Malia Obama is bad for Harvard. Guarantee you alumni giving decreases as the Malias of Harvard multiply. "Malia of Harvard" would make a good title for a horror film. Harvard's horror

    affirmative action is turning Harvard into a shithole. I love it. What is going to be screamingly funny is the moment Harvard alumni realize that Malia Obama is bad for Harvard. Guarantee you alumni giving decreases as the Malias of Harvard multiply. “Malia of Harvard” would make a good title for a horror film. Harvard’s horror

    I think you probably need to stop conceiving of Harvard as a place for the 2,000 or so smartest 18 year olds, and see it as a Country Club where the new international elite is formed.

    There have always been scions of political families given hearty admissions preferences (the 2000 Presidential Election let us pick between two), but the modern push seems to be to mix these types with the sons of Saudi Sheikhs, African Potentates and Hague Bureaucrats with a smattering of white nerds who have already invented some computer whizbang.

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  225. @Anonym
    Tom Clancy built his career on the Cold War. So did several other authors of note. This is of course because the Cold War was dull as dishwater, as movies like The Hunt for Red October can attest.

    Yeah – and that’s my point. It was a world historical event that shaped the globe for decades, was the backdrop to art, cul