The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Breaking News: Some More Women Are Complaining About Office Politics
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

A large fraction of articles in the prestige press these days consists of women complaining about office politics at their jobs.

Yeah, that sounds boring, but, you don’t understand, these are women kvetching about office politics. So that’s News. For example, from the New York Times:

‘I Want What My Male Colleague Has, and That Will Cost a Few Million Dollars’

Women at the Salk Institute say they faced a culture of marginalization and hostility. The numbers from other elite scientific institutions suggest they’re not alone.

By Mallory Pickett
April 18, 2019

… On paper, Nancy Hopkins had a charmed career. As an undergraduate at Radcliffe College, she was handpicked by James Watson, of Watson and Crick, for mentorship.

James Watson? Shouldn’t Nancy Hopkins be Kate Smithed out of her job for her Racism By Association with James Watson?

Alert Amy Harmon!

In 1973, she was hired as an assistant professor at M.I.T.’s Center for Cancer Research, and was quickly promoted to receive tenure. But in the early ’90s, when she began a new set of genetics experiments using zebra fish and requested an extra 200 square feet for aquariums, the faculty member in charge of facilities refused.

Then there follows a lot of details over how much square footage Hopkins had and various office machinations that remind me of old jokes about how vicious academic politics are because the stakes are so low. Here’s a mildly interesting part:

In 2005, [MIT professor Nancy Hopkins] attended an invitation-only conference in Cambridge, where Lawrence Summers, Harvard’s president at the time, wondered aloud whether the scarcity of female scientists at elite universities might be a function of “intrinsic aptitude.” Hopkins immediately closed her computer and left the room. “I think what’s so painful about it is that we’re scientists and we’re supposed to be interested in the truth,” she says. “If it’s true, O.K., it’s true. But then show me the data. And this is a topic on which you cannot show me the data.” For Summers to ask the question “was not science,” she says. “It was not interesting.”

If Nancy Hopkins tells you that a huge topic that gets Nancy Hopkins extremely emotional “was not science,” and “was not interesting,” you can be damn sure it’s an interesting scientific question.

By the way, from the Cornell Chronicle four years ago:

Women preferred 2:1 over men for STEM faculty positions

By Ted Boscia | April 13, 2015

For decades, sexism in higher education has been blamed for blocking women from landing academic positions in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields.

But a new study by Cornell psychologists suggests that era has ended, finding in experiments with professors from 371 colleges and universities across the United States that science and engineering faculty preferred women two-to-one over identically qualified male candidates for assistant professor positions.

Published online April 13 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the paper, “National Hiring Experiments Reveal 2:1 Faculty Preference For Women on STEM Tenure Track,” by Wendy M. Williams, professor of human development, and Stephen J. Ceci, the Helen L. Carr Professor of Developmental Psychology, both in Cornell’s College of Human Ecology, argues that the academic job market has never been better for women Ph.D.s in math-intensive fields.

Williams and Ceci conducted five randomized controlled experiments with 873 tenure-track faculty in all 50 U.S. states to assess gender bias. In three studies, faculty evaluated narrative summaries describing hypothetical male and female applicants for tenure-track assistant professorships in biology, economics, engineering and psychology. In a fourth experiment, engineering faculty evaluated full CVs instead of narratives, and in a fifth study, faculty evaluated one candidate (either a man or identically qualified woman) without comparison to an opposite-gender candidate. Candidates’ personalities were systematically varied to disguise the hypotheses.

The only evidence of bias the authors discovered was in favor of women; faculty in all four disciplines preferred female applicants to male candidates, with the exception of male economists, who showed no gender preference.

 
Hide 83 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. The Left pushes people against the Natural Order, and those people become miserable and hateful.

  2. Hopkins immediately closed her computer and left the room.

    Betcha it didn’t happen.

    Women preferred 2:1 over men for STEM faculty positions

    There you go with that noticing thing again. Haven’t we warned you about that?

  3. indocon says:

    James Watson, of Watson and Crick, for mentorship? Same James Watson?

  4. Hopkins should be grateful to have any job at all, given that she was “handpicked” by the notorious James Watson.

  5. J.Ross says: • Website

    In Japan, Bulgari had a refreshingly honest ad campaign in which a young woman in a little black dress commanded the reader to “Buy me a Bulgari watch,” while standing in such a way as to explain why they should. Saw it in a book, couldn’t get it in image search.
    It’s the same thing as this but infinitely more elegant.

  6. There are two types of MSM pieces on women in science – those that succeed in name-checking Rosalind Franklin, and those that fail.

  7. “Candidates’ personalities were systematically varied to disguise the hypotheses.”

    What does this mean? Is having a pleasant-to-work-with personality assumed not to make a candidate more likely to be hired? How is this accomplished?

  8. jim jones says:

    Women make ideal bureaucrats, just give them a PC with the homepage set to Facebook

    • Replies: @guest
  9. Anon[147] • Disclaimer says:

    Late night drinking?

    If Nancy Hopkins tells you that a huge topic that gets Nancy Hopkins extremely emotional “‘was not science,’ she says. ‘It was not interesting,’” you can be damn sure it’s an interesting scientific question.

    I think you meant:

    If Nancy Hopkins tells you that a huge topic that gets Nancy Hopkins extremely emotional “was not science” and “was not interesting,” you can be damn sure it’s an interesting scientific question.

    She missrepresents what Summers said. He gave three possible explanations, not just “intrinsic aptitude”: Genetics, less willing to work long hours, and sex bias.

    He did, however, “play down the impact of higher ed institutional-side sex bias (as the Cornell Chronicle would seem to confirm) and put much of the blame on the pipeline, or applicant pool, about which he didn’t really express an opinion about the contribution of bias (lower down the pipeline).

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2005/jan/18/educationsgendergap.genderissues

    Apparently she was the only one to walk out: “At least half of his audience comprised women, several said they found the remarks offensive and one walked out.” YOU GO GIRL!

    I just discovered that there is a transcript of Lawrence Summers speech at the Wayback Machine, and it includes a Q and A and occasional “unintelligibles,” so it’s not just an advance draft of his planned remarks:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20111016140145/https://www.harvard.edu/president/speeches/summers_2005/nber.php

    I looked at the Xie and Shauman paper-looked at the book, rather-looked at the evidence on the sex ratios in the top 5% of twelfth graders. If you look at those-they’re all over the map, depends on which test, whether it’s math, or science, and so forth-but 50% women, one woman for every two men, would be a high-end estimate from their estimates.

    From that, you can back out a difference in the implied standard deviations that works out to be about 20%. And from that, you can work out the difference out several standard deviations. If you do that calculation-and I have no reason to think that it couldn’t be refined in a hundred ways-you get five to one, at the high end. Now, it’s pointed out by one of the papers at this conference that these tests are not a very good measure and are not highly predictive with respect to people’s ability to do that. And that’s absolutely right.

    But I don’t think that resolves the issue at all. Because if my reading of the data is right-it’s something people can argue about-that there are some systematic differences in variability in different populations, then whatever the set of attributes are that are precisely defined to correlate with being an aeronautical engineer at MIT or being a chemist at Berkeley, those are probably different in their standard deviations as well.

    I just returned from Israel, where we had the opportunity to visit a kibbutz, and to spend some time talking about the history of the kibbutz movement, and it is really very striking to hear how the movement started with an absolute commitment, of a kind one doesn’t encounter in other places, that everybody was going to do the same jobs.

    Sometimes the women were going to fix the tractors, and the men were going to work in the nurseries, sometimes the men were going to fix the tractors and the women were going to work in the nurseries, and just under the pressure of what everyone wanted, in a hundred different kibbutzes, each one of which evolved, it all moved in the same direction.

    The second problem is the one that Gary Becker very powerfully pointed out in addressing racial discrimination many years ago. If it was really the case that everybody was discriminating, there would be very substantial opportunities for a limited number of people who were not prepared to discriminate to assemble remarkable departments of high quality people at relatively limited cost simply by the act of their not discriminating, because of what it would mean for the pool that was available.

    There is a very simple and straightforward methodology that was used many years ago in the case of baseball. Somebody wrote a very powerful article about baseball, probably in the seventies, in which they basically said, “Look, it is true that if you look at people’s salaries, and you control for their batting averages and their fielding averages and whatnot, whites and blacks are in the same salary once you control. It is also true that there are no black .240 hitters in the major leagues, that the only blacks who are in the major leagues are people who bat over .300-I’m exaggerating-and that is exactly what you’d predict on a model of discrimination, that because there’s a natural bias against. And there’s an absolute and clear prediction.

    The prediction is that if there’s a discriminated-against group, that if you measure subsequent performance, their subsequent performance will be stronger than that of the non-discriminated-against group. And that’s a simple prediction of a theory of discrimination. And it’s a testable prediction of a theory of discrimination,

    Somebody reported to me that-someone who is knowledgeable-said that it is surprisingly hard to get Americans rather than immigrants or the children of immigrants to be cardiac surgeons. Cardiac surgeon is about prestigious, certain kind of prestige as you can be, fact is that people want control of their lifestyles, people want flexibility, they don’t want to do it, and it’s disproportionately immigrants that want to do some of the careers that are most demanding in terms of time and most interfering with your lifestyle. So I think that’s exactly right and I think it’s precisely the package of number of hours’ work what it is, that’s leading more Americans to choose to have careers of one kind or another in business that are less demanding of passionate thought all the time and that includes white males as well.

  10. eah says:

    • Replies: @guest
  11. @Anon

    I wrote an op-ed for the National Post of Canada when the Larry Summers transcript finally came out.

    On the baseball thing, there actually were bad black big leaguers in the 1940s. For example, three of the first four blacks signed by Branch Rickey for the Brooklyn Dodgers (Robinson, Campanella, and Newcombe) won a total of 5 MVP awards. Yet the second black signed by Branch Rickey for the Dodgers, Dan Bankhead has a career ERA of 6.52 over 3 or 4 years.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Bankhead

    Predicting baseball talent is hard.

  12. Harold says:

    No hypotheses should be spoken aloud until the data are in.

    Hopkins immediately closed her computer and left the room. “I think what’s so painful about it is that we’re scientists and we’re supposed to be interested in the truth,” she says. “If it’s true, O.K., it’s true. But then show me the data. And this is a topic on which you cannot show me the data.”

  13. Then there follows a lot of details over how much square footage Hopkins had

    Have you ever had the misfortune of sharing a workspace with a woman, or *shudder*, several women? Jesus Christ himself would be contemplating bloody murder after a week of it. It also reminds of the other sad old “joke” about “her money” and “our money”.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  14. @Oleaginous Outrager

    From 1982-2000, I worked in the market research industry, which has a lot of women in managerial roles. I thought it was fine. I like smart women who like numbers.

  15. “science and engineering faculty preferred women two-to-one over identically qualified male candidates for assistant professor positions”

    I wonder what those identically qualified men end up doing? The Chinese must be rubbing their hands with glee. After all, male scientists in the West haven’t had a bad record of innovation over the last couple of centuries.

    On the BBC, nearly every science news item or science show features women scientists – it’s as if the men have all disappeared over the last ten years.

    • Agree: Endgame Napoleon
    • Replies: @Alice in Wonderland
  16. Mungerite says:

    More of the same, but hey, why not add a race twist to it (though, granted, she is smart enough not to dig too deeply into the sub-categories of whiteness in Hollywood):

    https://www.variety.com/2019/tv/news/cbs-has-a-white-problem-whitney-davis-explains-decision-1203194484/amp/

    The company has a white problem across the board. Did you know that there’s not one black creative executive working at CBS Television Network or CBS Television Studios? Of the network’s 36 creative executives — all upper management roles that deal with content development, casting, current production, daytime and alternative programming — there are only three women of color, none black. There is not one executive of color working in casting at CBS. The one Latinx executive hired in casting last year lasted eight months. He works at Netflix now.

    For the next year, I excelled, covering every breaking news story west of the Mississippi, confident that my work mattered and that I was making a meaningful contribution to CBS News. I soon learned that I was being considered for the L.A.-based weekend-edition producer role. A colleague with insight into the process told me that I had been deemed “not ready.” Although I couldn’t confirm that my career had been sabotaged, I felt as though I had hit a glass ceiling working in news.

    At the completion of the program, I was promoted to manager of CBS Entertainment Diversity and Inclusion — an important department that creates opportunity for emerging talent in front of and behind the camera, but a non-creative role. During my time in Diversity and Inclusion, my boss and I were the only black CBS Entertainment executives, period. Just as when I began my career, white colleagues continued to confuse our names. In 2015, I attended a colleague’s baby shower, where a high-level executive in comedy development called me by my boss’s name three times — even after I corrected her mistake the first time. The following Monday, several of my colleagues apologized on her behalf.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  17. The College of Human Ecology sounds like an organization that could do great work during the purification!

  18. @Steve Sailer

    I worked with a very bright woman analyst in IT, and I learned early that you couldn’t approach her the way you could a man, if you thought she might have made a mistake somewhere. The word “wrong” or “error” would instantly raise hackles and claws, where a male colleague might want to know where the error was asap.

    You needed an approach more like this

    You –

    “Sue, I’m sorry to bother you and I’m sure it’s me, but there’s something I don’t understand here … (explanation follows) …”

    Sue (after maybe 10 seconds consideration – I said she was bright)

    “You don’t understand it because I’ve made a mistake just here in the spec… give me half an hour and I’ll get the change over to you (all sweetness and light) …”

    Btw, what’s happened to the five minute edit window? My posts now disappear into the aether until approval. Is this change related to the outage the other day?

  19. @Steve Sailer

    But did you share a desk or other physical space? I’m not referring to just being around them. Have you ever found something of yours in the trash can and when asked, one of the women who you share desk space with says, “Oh, it was the bottom drawer, so I thought you didn’t want it any more.”

    • LOL: jim jones
  20. @Mungerite

    It’s almost as if the tiny Jewish male population that has won 20+% of the hard science Nobel Prizes over the last 118 years is, on average, more talented than the black female population that, IIRC, hasn’t won any.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  21. Anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    I just returned from Israel, where we had the opportunity to visit a kibbutz, and to spend some time talking about the history of the kibbutz movement, and it is really very striking to hear how the movement started with an absolute commitment, of a kind one doesn’t encounter in other places, that everybody was going to do the same jobs.

    Do Jews tend to be less sex-differentiated than other groups? (The men slightly more feminine, she women slightly more masculine.)

  22. @Anonymous

    Movie moguls? Nuclear physicists? Seem like traditional Jewish jobs that are pretty sex distinguished.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Anonymous
  23. dearieme says:

    with the exception of male economists, who showed no gender preference. Poofs!

  24. Thirdtwin says:

    “Hopkins immediately closed her computer and left the room.”

    U mad, sis? That was epistemic!

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  25. Anon[378] • Disclaimer says:

    Jeesh Steve, you are acting like a woman on this thread, contradicting everything your commenters write.

  26. Every female office worker wears a sign : Please help me to feel offended.

    • Replies: @guest
  27. @Steve Sailer

    Nowadays we have Facebook and Zappos so the socialites who are hired as electrical engineers can spend three years keeping up with their friends and shopping for strappy sandals prior to skating into a cushy managerial role.

  28. kihowi says:
    @Anonymous

    Interesting idea. STEAM greats aside, Jewish strength lies in verbal and social manipulation, something that women are good at anyway. I wouldn’t be surprised.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  29. ic1000 says:
    @Anon

    Anon [147], thanks for posting that transcript. It provides the context to NYT reporter Mallory Pickett’s version of Hopkins’ account (“Hopkins immediately closed her computer and left the room.”) that Pickett and her editors found unfit to print.

    Any professor in the hard sciences is capable of recognizing the validity of the statistical concepts that Summers was discussing. So Prof. Hopkins has used some combination of protective stupidity and dishonesty to construct her self-interested account.

    On the other hand, Ms. Pickett may not know enough to need to be in on the con.

  30. Williams and Ceci

    Why does that sound like an R&B act?

  31. @Anonymous

    Nah, it was the triumph of ideology over reality. My mom was in a religious kibbutz back in the day and she said that despite work assignments, men and women used to cut side deals all the time. You pick up my hay baling and I’ll take care of kinderhaus duty( kinderhaus was where the children were housed communally and the parents could visit an hour or 2 a day.) No prizes for guessing who preferred hay baling and who preferred kinderhaus duty.

    • Replies: @Thea
  32. @Anonymous

    Do Jews tend to be less sex-differentiated than other groups? (The men slightly more feminine, she women slightly more masculine.)

    I’m not into JAP-bashing in general, but really, does anybody else whine as much? That’s pretty female, if not feminine.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  33. @Steve Sailer

    It’s almost as if the tiny Jewish male population that has won 20+% of the hard science Nobel Prizes over the last 118 years is, on average, more talented than the black female population that, IIRC, hasn’t won any.

    Yeah, but can any Jewish guy pull this off?

    Let alone this. (What’s with all the white guys? Jagger in reverse?)

  34. ic1000 says:

    > … in the early ’90s, when [Hopkins] began a new set of genetics experiments using zebra fish and requested an extra 200 square feet for aquariums, the faculty member in charge of facilities refused.

    Mallory Pickett’s account of this intra-departmental infighting may or may not be correct, but it’s almost certainly misleading.

    While research professors are paid by their universities as employees, in some respects they are best viewed as independent contractors, and the host institution as a very-involved landlord.

    After spending their startup package, research professors are expected to be self-supporting. The grants they bring in from outside are big enough to support the costs of their lab (stipends, salaries, benefits, supplies, equipment, travel, etc.). The “landlord” takes the “indirect costs” supplied by the granting agency. For a $1 million 3-year “R01” NIH grant, these indirect costs can amount to $400,000 to $800,000 — not chicken feed.

    This “how much money are you bringing in?” question will be front and center, if a professor puts in a request for more floor space or a new facility. And contra Ms. Pickett’s implication, a zebrafish breeding operation is more elaborate and expensive than a fish tank sitting in a corner.

    Without comparing Hopkins’ situation with those of her peers in that department, there’s no way to say whether the cited refusal was “fair” or “unfair” to her.

    Mallory Pickett may be too new at “reporting” to know this context, or she may be running an active con on NYT readers. I can’t say.

    • Replies: @Anon
  35. Anon[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @ic1000

    There is no way anyone born after 1980 would put that much thought and consideration into ANYTHING

    Woman Good Man Bad

    Woman Victim Man Oppressor

    That’s all you need to know

  36. Art Deco says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “Traditional Jewish jobs” would be varieties of merchantry esp. businesses which thrive on price arbitrage. In the last century, law practice would also be a ‘traditional Jewish job’. The operators of production studios have been an abnormally Jewish set, but it’s a tiny occupational sliver. (By contrast, the number of Jewish lawyers in the U.S. might be in six-digits).

  37. GU says:

    In biglaw, women are routinely taking 6 month (paid) maternity leaves, and often come back on a part-time schedule for 3-6 months afterwards. Those that come back “full time” always work fewer hours, are less available, and don’t volunteer for work relative to pre-baby.

    That all makes sense, but here’s the catch: they are demanding that these extremely long career breaks have *zero* impact on both their pay/raises/bonuses and their advancement to partner. Many of these women have 2 or 3 children, so we’re talking about a substantial loss of experience during the crucial early years of their career and time spent earning the firm money. Yet they “deserve” to be paid the same as their male colleagues who just keep grinding along.

    A fun game play: ask a female biglaw attorney about the firm’s maternity leave policy, then ask a male attorney about the firm’s paternity leave policy. The former will net you an oral dissertation, the latter likely results in “I don’t know.”

  38. @Reg Cæsar

    “can any Jewish guy pull this off”

    I do think Peter Greenbaum, aka Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac, wrote and sang two of the greatest blues songs in the dark, despairing Out Of Reach and the pleading, despairing Love That Burns, and I bet the late Amy Winehouse would have made a good fist at the latter. Can’t understand why more torch singers ain’t touched it – it’s really a girl’s song, not that many blokes complain that girls just want to use them for their bodies. It’s got the lot with the moaning horns and sparse guitar. Janis Joplin would have made a ranting, trembling epic of it.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  39. @Thirdtwin

    “Hopkins immediately closed her computer and left the room.”

    I’ll take S**t that never happened for $1000, Alex.”

  40. Straight white males work longer hours and have way shorter life expectancy than women. Medicare is a classic example of how women get way more benefits than men for way less seniority. Fact at retirement women have less seniority because they routinely work fewer hours and get lots more time off during their working lives. Yet, while they have paid much less into the system both in OASD and Medicare payroll taxes they usually live one to two decades longer than the average white male schmuck. Women run up big Medicare bills at doctors office and hospitals during their very long retirement lives. Men often dont get to cost the system very much usually because the male putz is dead of a stroke in his 50s. But the MSM will never talk about that.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  41. guest says:

    Larry Summers’ speculation on the painfully obvious appears about as famous as Churchill’s Finest Hour speech at this point.

  42. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Movie moguls? Nuclear physicists? Seem like traditional Jewish jobs that are pretty sex distinguished.

    Sure, NAJALT. But the comment was more about tendencies (bell curves), and also more about physical characteristics and to an extent mental attitudes.

  43. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:
    @kihowi

    Interesting idea. STEAM greats aside, Jewish strength lies in verbal and social manipulation, something that women are good at anyway. I wouldn’t be surprised.

    According to stereotype, the women also tend to be more aggressive, something that is typically considered more of a masculine trait.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  44. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I’m not into JAP-bashing in general, but really, does anybody else whine as much? That’s pretty female, if not feminine.

    Dunno. Women are also stereotypically submissive and willing to suffer.

    Whining or aggression?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  45. Thea says:
    @Kaganovitch

    It’s hard to imagine a more German sounding name than kinderhaus. You’d think they wanted distance from such terms at the time.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    , @J.Ross
  46. guest says:
    @jim jones

    Yes, if you don’t expect your bureaucracy to be creative or productive. But sometimes they have to be, just a little.

  47. guest says:
    @eah

    Endured to build? I don even understand that formulation.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  48. guest says:
    @Elmer T. Jones

    They also wear a shawl, because they’re cold. Unless they’re overheated.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  49. @Anonymous

    About 20 minutes after landing at Ben Gurion airport you’ll have the answer to that question.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  50. Even at far less prestigious state universities, department chairs formed search committees to look for female PhDs for high-paying technical positions. This was happening way back in the Eighties, Nineties and early 2000s. That’s why I have never believed that being a woman is a disadvantage in technical / scientific fields. The fact that there are fewer female IQ outliers in those mathmatical / scientific fields means that the lucky women who are top-notch in science and math have a partially paved road to an upper-middle-class lifestyle, doing something that they love no less. They are like big fish in a little pond. They should be grateful, rather than trying to bend nature to get more females into the field. Be careful of what you wish for. When big groups of females control everything, they do not hesitate to weed out the female non culture fits. If they let less scientifically skilled women in to boost “diversity,” some of those women will compete by trying to get rid of their more able competition, using some very un-motherly methods while constantly referring to their motherhood. Oftentimes, groups of women prefer to push out their female competition, not their male competition. I don’t think that has much to do with the work.

  51. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    About 20 minutes after landing at Ben Gurion airport you’ll have the answer to that question.

    Why will I have to answer that question?

  52. @Endgame Napoleon

    The fact that there are fewer female IQ outliers in those mathmatical / scientific fields means that the lucky women who are top-notch in science and math have a partially paved road to an upper-middle-class lifestyle, doing something that they love no less. They are like big fish in a little pond. They should be grateful, rather than trying to bend nature to get more females into the field. Be careful of what you wish for.

    This is exactly correct.

    Under the current paradigm, any young woman with a STEM background and average competance will never hurt for opportunities.

    If she is of above average or better competence she will go quite far.

    If she also happens to be a minority…that’s like the time Charlie won the golden ticket to some chocolate factory…

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  53. @YetAnotherAnon

    I do think Peter Greenbaum, aka Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac

    You date yourself if you can recall Fleetwood Mac as a guy band!

  54. @Anonymous

    Women are also stereotypically submissive and willing to suffer.

    Whining or aggression?

    Passive aggression.

  55. @Anonymous

    According to stereotype, the women also tend to be more aggressive, something that is typically considered more of a masculine trait.

    No, straightforward aggression is masculine.

    And in some cultures, women can be quite feisty, if not literally aggressive (as in starting it), when their and their family’s interests are threatened. Think of Phyllis Schlafly, Sarah Brady, Carolyn McCarthy, Michelle Bachmann, etc.

    I bet you can name only two ethnic Somali politicians– and both would be women.

  56. @guest

    They also wear a shawl, because they’re cold.

    Are you sure that isn’t a hijab?

  57. @RockinSockin

    Yet, while [women] have paid much less into the system both in OASD and Medicare payroll taxes

    Yes, but they did birth the children who are paying taxes at the moment. Their own tax monies were spent decades ago.

  58. @guest

    Endured to build? I don even understand that formulation.

    It’s the opposite of this one:

  59. Larry Summers was wrong. It’s not a question of aptitude. There may be more exceptionally intelligent men than women due to the greater variation among males, but let’s be honest: most professors really aren’t that intelligent. They may be 2 standard deviations above average, but not 4 or 5. There may be a male bias among Nobel prize winners, or Fields medalists, or something like that, but not garden variety professors.

    The most important reason that there are more men than women in science is simple: Women are less interested in science than men are. Highly intelligent women tend to study humanities, or classics, or something like that. Even within science, women are more interested in softer sciences (like psychology or sociology) than in the harder sciences like physics or chemistry.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Desiderius
    , @guest
  60. @The Wild Geese Howard

    These days most of the good ones find something better to do, often involving bearing and raising her own children. Strauss and Howe predicted in 1992 that this would be the time of maximum differentiation in sex roles and, despite some blue-haired outliers and desperate Boomers trying to pretend otherwise and force everyone else to go along, it looks like their prediction is turning out to be pretty accurate.

  61. @Thea

    The kibbutz was founded and populated by yekkes (German Jews). German was their native language and they never abandoned it.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  62. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:
    @president barbicane

    It’s not a question of aptitude. There may be more exceptionally intelligent men than women due to the greater variation among males.

    You just contradicted yourself.

  63. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Thea

    Israeli education is pretty much German education plus a few things they tacked on later. They kept “creepy” stuff about psychometrics and testing because there was legitimate value. I once knew a British guy who could go into more detail on that. Entirely sensible, however they felt about Germans, because it was near-universally accepted that the German system was the best. Israelis had no qualms about using Mausers and MP-40’s in their early years.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  64. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Yeah, that’s how you get Tyrannosaur Jaw versus Ezra Klein Face, and that’s also the apochryphal explanation of Jewish female sexual value, but it doesn’t show up in enough other fields.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  65. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:
    @kaganovitch

    German was their native language and they never abandoned it.

    Was their mother tongue German or rather Yiddish? Is “kinderhaus” clearly the former and not the latter?

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
  66. @J.Ross

    Kahneman and Tversky, the Israeli academic superstars, pretty much started out in the IQ business.

  67. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    that’s also the apochryphal explanation of Jewish female sexual value, but it doesn’t show up in enough other fields.

    What do you mean?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  68. Lawrence Summers, Harvard’s president at the time, wondered aloud whether the scarcity of female scientists at elite universities might be a function of “intrinsic aptitude.”

    Summers’ choice of words was poor. The women who pass the hiring threshold are as good as the men who pass the hiring threshold. The discussion is about relative numbers and is not a slur on those women.

    Hopkins immediately closed her computer and left the room. “I think what’s so painful about it is that we’re scientists and we’re supposed to be interested in the truth,” she says. “If it’s true, O.K., it’s true. But then show me the data. And this is a topic on which you cannot show me the data.”

    However, it might be received as a slur by a woman who feels she has sufficient “intrinsic aptitude” for an even better academic job, and has tried and failed to be promoted.

    Both men and women suffer this fate. Anyone in academic research could do the job of the person one or two levels above them in the hierarchy. The problem is that the incumbents can do the job even better than their aspiring replacements. Not everyone can be James Watson – even if she is one of the hundreds he has taken the trouble to mentor.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  69. @Endgame Napoleon

    “When big groups of females control everything, they do not hesitate to weed out the female non culture fits.”

    In the UK, primary education is almost 100% female these days, including the heads. Just about every primary teacher we know has horror stories of a new (female) head arriving and making their working lives miserable (while bringing in her friends as senior management). Several have moved schools as a result, sometimes after happy decades at a school.

    Now when a company has a new male chief exec, he often brings in a senior team from his old place, who he knows and trusts. But that doesn’t extend to lower-level people – you can respect someone without them being a particular friend or fanboy of yours, if they are doing a good job. Doesn’t apply to women bosses so much – groupthink seems to be more important.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  70. Anonymous[759] • Disclaimer says:
    @James N. Kennett

    The problem is that the incumbents can do the job even better than their aspiring replacements.

    And you know this how?

  71. @Anonymous

    Yiddish would be kinderhoyz or kinderhoes, depending on regional accent.Their Mother tongue was definitely German. Most of them (including my mom)couldn’t speak a word of Yiddish. In the pre-war period, Yiddish ,or rather Ma’arev Yiddish (western as opposed to eastern Yiddish) was in serious decline in Germany ,Holland etc., where it used to be the lingua franca of Jews in those lands. Today there are no native speakers of Ma’arev Yiddish at all. I know one semi-eccentric who devoted a few years to learning perfect M.Y. He used to complain in a Woody Allen voice “Nobody understands me”

  72. @president barbicane

    No reason to get Jimmy the Greek’ed when there are better arguments (like interest). Well said.

    Sure do miss Irv Cross.

  73. @YetAnotherAnon

    Have seen this first hand stateside. Not endemic but prevalent.

  74. @YetAnotherAnon

    “science and engineering faculty preferred women two-to-one over identically qualified male candidates for assistant professor positions”

    I wonder what those identically qualified men end up doing? The Chinese must be rubbing their hands with glee. After all, male scientists in the West haven’t had a bad record of innovation over the last couple of centuries.

    identically qualified?

    Does this mean identically credentialed?

    People with identical credentials could possess significantly different qualities. That work long hours thing…

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  75. J.Ross says: • Website

    Every time I see the Larry Summers gaffe brought up again I visualize Dirlewanger getting arrested in 1947 Manhattan for loitering.

  76. @Reg Cæsar

    Yet, while [women] have paid much less into the system both in OASD and Medicare payroll taxes

    Yes, but they did birth the children who are paying taxes at the moment. Their own tax monies were spent decades ago.

    Oh, please, who paid for the kids that they birthed? The dads who fathered them. The dads who went to earlier graves than the moms.

  77. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Widely observeed but not scientific (there are Jewesses without Tyrannosaur jaw).

  78. Svigor says:

    Heh. Women complaining about office politics. That’s like Hitler complaining about the Autobahn.

  79. guest says:
    @president barbicane

    No. It doesn’t really matter what level of intelligence we’re talking for professors as a whole. Throw all the geniuses out of every discipline if you like. People in softer sciences and non-sciences are not merely uninterested in science. They’re stupider than people with the capacity to be good at science. That’s a fact.

  80. guest says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    They birthed taxpayers. Good for them.

    Who planted seeds in the mothers, and who paid for their fruition?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  81. Kyle says:

    Somebody thought it was an appropriate use of their time to conduct this study. This is why the Chinese are beating us.

  82. @guest

    It takes two to tangle.

    I must be pretty old, or reactionary, or ultramontane, to see the family as a whole, a unit in itself. But that view used to be common. The rule.

    Besides, a lot of commenters here would like to see the Gates and Besos* fortunes go not to the wives, but to the government. Have it out with them.

    *Ha! Look what the Kindle autocorrected! I’m gonna leave it in there!

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?