The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Breaking News from Vancouver: Black Woman Journalist Has a Lot to Say Regarding Her Feelings About Her Hair
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the Vancouver Star, an immensely long article about … hair:

Why Black people (including me) are cutting our own hair in Vancouver — and what that says about our city

By Melanie Green Star Vancouver
Sun., Nov. 10, 2019 timer9 min. read

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

VANCOUVER—I remember the tears that would roll down my cheeks as my mother combed through my ragged knots. She’d use “grease” to braid my dense coils into two plaits that were so tight they felt like tiny fingertips pulling each individual hair on my head.

That hair distress — a nest of confusion, tears and pain — would follow me into my adult life.

When my family moved to this country from Trinidad and Tobago, hair was the last thing on our mind. But it didn’t take long for 11-year-old me to figure out it would be an issue.

There had been no shortage of options in Trinidad — a historically cosmopolitan island with multiculturalism institutionalized as a policy — to get a trim, style or blowout (a word used to describe blow drying curly hair straight).

But within a week of arriving in the townhouse-lined streets of North Delta, about 45 minutes out of downtown Vancouver, I was crossing the street after school, when a white child in her father’s arms reached out to touch my hair.

She pointed and asked her dad why my skin was “so” dirty and my hair so messy.

He answered: “Because she’s Negro.”

Totally confused, I sprinted home to breathlessly ask my mother if I was, indeed, Black.

You see, I’m mixed race; a mishmash of Black, Indian, Spanish, Chinese and Scottish. In Trinidad, I would never be called Black.

But, inevitably, perception becomes reality. The next day at my elementary school, I keenly observed the faces of my classmates. I was the only Black one. I had an unmistakable sense that I had moved to a land where nobody looked like me.

Even at home, my hair didn’t look like my mother’s, which she calls wavey.

Over the next few years, my mom would go to excruciating lengths to get my hair done. First, it was chemical straighteners, which would cost $150 and need to be reapplied every six weeks.

We would trek about an hour out to Burnaby where one salon was located. There were days I would wait hours just to get in the chair, as the scent of chemicals, peroxide and burnt hair wafted through the neon-lit room.

When it shut down, I saw a stylist in Surrey who ran a pseudo-salon out of her basement.

I began to resent my mom for traipsing me around town only to end up with styles that made me look like there was a wet mop on my head. Looking back, I know she just wanted me to be presentable. After all, I was a reflection of her choices — to come here, to start a new life.

I wanted her to be proud.

Every morning, I would force my curls downward with a flat iron so my strawlike hair could hang down my back. But it was time-consuming and I was convinced it made my already big head look larger.

And so forth and so on …

 
Hide 102 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. At least she’s not a 105 IQ Asian woman who deludes herself she’s a genius because she married a nerdy Jew…

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
  2. ColRebSez says: • Website

    Then why did she come?

    • Replies: @DonnainNH
    , @Mr. Grey
  3. Anonymous[293] • Disclaimer says:

    I know it never rains in LA, Steve, but you might consider carrying an umbrella on your walks:

  4. I just left the following comment. Any bets on how long it stays up?

    “I was crossing the street after school, when a white child in her father’s arms reached out to touch my hair.

    “She pointed and asked her dad why my skin was ‘so’ dirty and my hair so messy.

    “He answered: ‘Because she’s Negro.’”

    Why is it that approximately ten years ago, females who think they are black, or who pass for it, adopted the obsessive fantasy, whereby whites are obsessed with touching their hair?

    I’ve never heard of a real white wanting to touch the hair of a “black” female.

    Most kids do not want to touch anyone’s hair, but when they do, it’s invariably beautiful hair, say that of an Asian. Never a black’s hair.

    Most black women have bad hair. They know it, they obsess over it, and they support a billion-dollar business that seeks to solve the problem.

    My hypothesis: Black supremacists kept on pushing the envelope, with ever-more outrageous hoaxes (“racial profiling,” “mass incarceration,” “nooses,” etc.), and “white people wanting to touch my hair” was the next thing they thought of. They knew that the craziest lie in the world would be supported by racist, white, leftwing editors, publishers, and higher ed commissars.

    P.S.: I just re-read my comment, and find it highly unlikely that a white Canadian man during the 1990s referred to Green as “Negro.”

  5. Ach Steve, why such a short excerpt? It was just getting interesting.

    • LOL: Mr McKenna, sayless
    • Replies: @Jim Christian
  6. Clyde says:

    All these hair obsessing black women would be happier in a huge Wakanda in Africa with no white women to cast aspersions (imaginary or real) on their unmanageable hair. Only problem with this Wakanda scheme would be that the lighter and more mixed women would be seen as Beckys, putting the whammy on the sisters with the more frizzy to kinky hair. How soon before there would be violence?

    As always, we need a photo of the author (Melanie Green) to figure out where she is coming from.

  7. Moses says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    P.S.: I just re-read my comment, and find it highly unlikely that a white Canadian man during the 1990s referred to Green as “Negro.”

    Yeah. You find it highly unlikely because it never happened.

    Lefties fabricate stories like this all the time to make their points. Or they fabricate hate hoaxes for attention.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  8. She doesn’t look like a negro in any way, shape, or form. Somebody might think that she was Jewish or Puerto Rican or nonspecific Mediterranean, but nobody in a million years would call her black. Total theft of another’s victimology.

    • Agree: Change that Matters
  9. It sounds like she needs a one-way plane ticket back home, where white people will no longer terrorize her by trying to touch her hair.

  10. Thomm says:

    Black women with 70s-style afros actually look good (assuming the women are thin). For some reason, they refuse to go back to what actually worked :

  11. @Clyde

    As always, we need a photo of the author (Melanie Green) to figure out where she is coming from.

    Where is she coming from? Welcome Back, Kotter from the look of things.

  12. @Clyde

    As always, we need a photo of the author (Melanie Green) to figure out where she is coming from.

    She’s on the lake side, but this is sunless Vancouver.

    Melanie means “black”. As in hair. Ironically, most of the Melanies I’ve known have been blond.

    I’m entertaining the subversive idea that “Puff the Magic Dragon” and “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” were really about sex, while Melanie’s “Brand New Key” was about drugs.

  13. Obviously, Canada should stop admitting negroes. They can’t meet their needs.

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
  14. jon says:
    @Clyde

    As always, we need a photo of the author (Melanie Green) to figure out where she is coming from.

    These are her pics from her author page and from her twitter account:
    She looks more like she is one of those light skinned “blacks” that goes out of their way to have crazy hair so people don’t accidentally mistake her for white.

    • Agree: Just Saying
    • Replies: @Clyde
    , @Jim Don Bob
  15. @Clyde

    As always, we need a photo of the author (Melanie Green) to figure out where she is coming from.

    She’s on the pale side, but this is sunless Vancouver.

    Melanie means “black”. As in hair. Ironically, most of the Melanies I’ve known have been blond.

    I’m entertaining the subversive idea that “Puff the Magic Dragon” and “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” were really about sex, while Melanie’s “Brand New Key” was about drugs.

  16. Clyde says:
    @jon

    She looks more like she is one of those light skinned “blacks” that goes out of their way to have crazy hair so people don’t accidentally mistake her for white.

    Her photos tell me she can easily pass for white, but for whatever neurotic female reasons and emotions, she is going to parlay her minimal African heritage to pass for black.

  17. So she’s eleven, and…‘The next day at my elementary school, I keenly observed the faces of my classmates. I was the only Black one. ‘

    It was only then she noticed that she was black and the other children were white.

    Possibly this could happen if she were four. She isn’t even a good story teller — but the alarming thing is that the ‘progressive’ critical faculty has become so dulled that most will probably just swallow this without it occurring to them that it’s outrageously implausible.

  18. Anon[281] • Disclaimer says:

    This falls into a class of bullshit conspiracy claims that follow this general pattern:

    1. There is a huge, unserved, pent-up market for a product or service.

    2. There are millions of people with tons of money burning through their wallets who would love to pay someone to fulfill their needs for this product or service.

    3. But nobody serves the market, because they HATE us, and they want us to DIE.

    Examples: Plus sized clothing. Negro-tone bandaids. And now black women’s hair care and styling.

    If there is money to be had, there is someone who will enter the business. When there is an apparent lack of products or services, there is a *reason*, and it’s not hatred.

    For instance:

    Fat women clothing. Fat women complain that fat clothing is not stylish and is tentlike. Well, the only way to create inventory for fat women is to make tents. Otherwise, since women are fat in different ways, you are talking about custom tailoring.

    Negro-tone bandaids. There have been several such companies. They eventually go bankrupt. There is apparently little market for the product, whether because of cost, distribution/inventory problems, or whatever.

    What is the deal with black women’s hair? We can get a hint from YouTube videos complaining about black men’s hair cutting options. Black men go to Korean and Chinese barbers for all but certain specialized cuts. Black barbers charge too much, take too long a time, make you wait while they have fights with their girlfriends on their cell phones, and let their buddies cut in front of you.

    Similarly, many blacks working in retail and restaurants travel to non-black areas for work, because they are constantly hassled for “free stuff” by other blacks. “Hey sister, can you comp us a free dessert? Who’s gonna know?” I’ve heard the same about other minority communities, like native Hawaiians.

    So my suspicion is that the reason that there are few salons for black hair in certain areas, and most people serving the market work (illegally?) out of their homes, is that black businesses serving a black clientele have too many built-in problems, essentially having to pay a sort of protection racket fee to enough people to avoid a bad reputation.

    Also, there seems to be a lack of business savvy among many blacks, the ability to juggle several factors to keep a business afloat. And the ability to save money to start a business. And build up a decent credit rating to qualify for loans. The Bell Curve includes corporate CEOs among its 12 elite professions that suck up most people with high IQs, and if CEOs need super-high intelligence, small business managers need at least above average intelligence.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    , @bomag
    , @Alden
  19. black sea says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Whatever she’s using on her hair, it appears to be working.

  20. Escher says:

    1. She is lying about being called a “Negro”
    2. What seems to have upset her the most as a child was being called Black
    3. Did she bother asking her mom why they couldn’t have stayed in a place where most of the people looked like them?


  21. Squeaky wheel gets the grease!

  22. @Clyde

    Getting promoted faster isn’t a neurotic reason.

  23. If the Afro came back in style, I wonder me (more likely, my grandson) sporting a Jewfro would be considered cultural appropriation.

  24. “I had moved to a land where nobody looked like me.”

    ??!? They didn’t have two eyes, a nose, and a mouth?

  25. @Clyde

    Her photos tell me she can easily pass for white ….

    Her photos suggest she could pass as Jewish … a real Rebecca, so to say.

  26. @Anon

    Negro-tone bandaids. There have been several such companies. They eventually go bankrupt. There is apparently little market for the product, whether because of cost, distribution/inventory problems, or whatever.

    Product gets shoplifted, that’s why.

  27. @Moses

    They make this stuff up because it sells. Their audience loves it.

    Actual black people can’t keep up, so we have ersatz black folk making it up for them now.

    By Melanie Green Star Vancouver

    Gotta admit, I thought that was a masterful multicultural name though.

    There had been no shortage of options in Trinidad — a historically cosmopolitan island with multiculturalism institutionalized as a policy

    Yeah, I’ve been there. Nearly everyone is POC (99.4% Diverse!), and this chick would have stood out for her light skin. But where’s the percentage in that? Better move to a white country, stat.

    A white child in her father’s arms reached out to touch my hair.
    She pointed and asked her dad why my skin was “so” dirty and my hair so messy.
    He answered: “Because she’s Negro.”

    As several other people in this thread have noted, this is what we politely call a fabrication.

    It’s also an extremely hackneyed cliché at this point, but the intended audience sees every instance as though it were the very first one ever.

    BTW, I’ve had to cut my own hair a couple times. It actually wasn’t very traumatic. Still, I was annoyed with the barber shop for closing so early, before I could get there. Don’t they know I operate on CPT? Talk about microagressions. Should I write an article about it? Where would I get it published?

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Genrick Yagoda
  28. Olorin says:
    @Clyde

    Image search her and you’ll see that she’s Obama-tier “black.” (Scarcely taupe and with a taste for Anglo academic and business casual clothes, though with kinky hair.)

    We can easily conclude that

    a) lacking in melanin, she uses this feature of herself to supplement her negritude, a sort of One-A-Day emblackulation vitamin–which prolly sells pretty well in Chongcouver and to the CBC;

    b) like most women, nearly all blacks, and without exception ime black women, she projects her self hatred outward,

    c) making up socially and economically rewarded whoppers about white behaviors that were real in her mind.

    Not much different than that chubby literary minstrel TG Coates and his Escalator Story, or that big ostensibly historic snuff porn epic involving gas chambers, holocoasters, masturbation machines, bear and eagle cages, nazi rape dogs, and human skin lampshades.

    The toxic combination of bile and envy this behavior pattern involves must be hecka awful to live with…and bad for the complexion to boot. Of course that can be blamed on pretty white ladies. It would be beyond this featherweight scribbler’s mental ken to reflect on, say, the racial origin of Max Factor (not his real name), Estee Lauder (not her real name), Vidal Sassoon (his real name), Helena Rubenstein (not her real name), and a host of other FrankenFaceFashion hangers-on in Hollywood, Fifth Avenue, and other “culture” factories.

    IOW once again, a black hired and advanced as antiwhite bullhorn and cannon fodder never figures out that she’s shucking and jiving as a golem, nor to whom are connected the imaginary hands pawing her or the voices passing judgment or the demons teaching her to be bilious and envious for a paycheck.

  29. This could be a subject for a really entertaining musical – starring Steve Sailer as the twelve-year-old whizz-kid who just discovers something really weird going on – in the whole wide world, with the old Robert Mugabe as his utterly cynical old friend and laughing companion. As long as Frank Zappa can’t be revived via a load of genes from his beard or something, I had a second team in mind, which could “quite easily” (M. Jagger) write it: Elvis Costello and Randy Newman. Title is ready too: The Crazy HAIR!-WORLD of Arthuria Brown!

    • LOL: Lurker
  30. @Reg Cæsar

    “Black” in Greek is ‘μαύρος‘ (roughly: ‘mavros’). Pejoratively, sometimes ‘αράπης’ (arapis) or ‘μαυρισμένος’ (mavrismenos) or ‘μουτζουρώνω’ (moutzorono).

    The closest Greek I can think of is μελαινα (melaina – ‘dark’). μελάνια (melania) is the plural for ‘ink’.

    Americans will believe anything. Stupid μαλάκες will believe any μαλακίες anyone puts on a poster.

  31. @Mr McKenna

    I think those boxes use the word ‘men’ ironically. Hence the all-caps.

  32. They hate Becky with the Good Hair because they can’t be Becky with the Good Hair.

  33. DonnainNH says:
    @ColRebSez

    They told her, if you start banging on again about how you’re mostly white “caramela” and not a black kid, or describing your nasty clothes or God forbid that rat’s nest on your head, your outta here. ….
    Turned out to be a blessing . As we all know, if Life gives you nappy hair, go north.

  34. Graham says:
    @Kratoklastes

    Reg is referring to classical Greek, in which ‘melas’ (gen. ‘melanos’) means ‘black’.

    • Replies: @Neuday
  35. @Reg Cæsar

    Looks like there’s a lot of cream in that coffee…

  36. Neuday says:
    @Graham

    I like to use the classical American English, in which they’re called, if well-behaved, “negro”.

  37. mmack says:

    Question for the iSteve commentariat:

    If Melanie put a poppy in her hair would she improve her appearance AND satisfy Don Cherry?

  38. Thirdtwin says:
    @Mr McKenna

    In the real world, all of those are encased in plastic because of the one.

  39. istevefan says:

    There had been no shortage of options in Trinidad — a historically cosmopolitan island with multiculturalism institutionalized as a policy —

    Your family should have stayed in Trinidad.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
  40. @Anonymous

    Blue cities, what do I care? They’re doomed. I wish they could be fixed, but even saying so makes me bad. So I don’t care anymore, hell, I celebrate their misery. All of it. All their troubles, their murderous actions against each other, their depravities of gender, sexual behaviors, their professional tendencies to steal and corrupt. Oh no, I’ve had it with Blue.

  41. bomag says:
    @Anon

    Negro-tone bandaids

    Note here that transparent bandaids negated the need for a separate product, but the narcissistic activists like to have singular products to highlight their specialness.

  42. @kaganovitch

    Hey, it’s a quick-hit. Besides, the roots of the Black Hair of Wokeness has been explained in earlier pieces. Now all Sailerman has to do it point out the latest depravity. It’s working for me.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  43. Basically, it is clear that even *they* think their hair sucks without cultural appropriation.

  44. @Thomm

    Freddy G. sure didn’t mind their tresses.

  45. @jon

    She looks more like she is one of those crazy light skinned “blacks” that goes out of their way to have crazy hair so people don’t accidentally mistake her for white.

    FIFY.

  46. @Anonymous

    One of Carlson’s guests referred to this incident last night.

    Just when you think we’ve hit rock bottom… .

  47. Does this piece not exemplify the old Sixties feminist anthem “the personal is political” or what?

  48. Yngvar says:

    But, inevitably, perception becomes reality.

    This is what shitlibs actually believe.

  49. BB753 says:

    They really need to update the musical “Hair” to the current year. Because “hair” has now gained a richer, intersectional meaning it lacked before.
    The new musical should follow the transcendental voyage of a young white man from a diversity-deprived area in his quest to touch black hair, and his shocking discovery of a long and deep history of white repression and black self-hate, aided by friendly and saintly people of color, regarding the most mysterious, unruly and holy hair on earth: African locks.
    Spoiler alert : our hero does not get to touch black hair at last even when offered to do so by a wise and magical Negro scholar of African Studies because he finally discovers he is not worthy of the honor and refuses to touch his Holy Grail.
    Of course, the entire score would consist of rap pieces, Manuel – Lin Miranda style and rap and urban dancing.

  50. @Nicholas Stix

    Wonder no more. I just checked the linked article, and there are zero comments.

    It’s a Canadian newspaper. Canada is a country where the just fired a sports icon for complaining that today’s new crop of third world immigrants were too cheap to buy poppies for November 11.

    Do you really think they would tolerate an insightful post like yours?

  51. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    He carries a blunt heavy flashlight and larps as a policeman.

  52. Elli says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    When I was 10, I actually did want to touch my the hair of the girls upstairs. They were West Indians in Canada like the author, and their mother did their hair in elaborate braids. But no one was allowed to mess up her work.

    Those girls turned me into a human Barbie; they’d sit behind me on the fire escape and brush my hair and try to style it. They couldn’t; it slipped all holds.

    So it’s a mutual girl thing, ok? I wanted to see what hair was like that would STAY PUT.

    Do I ever get an article about the downside of blond hair, slippery fine stuff that won’t stay up and won’t curl? The blow-dried wings of the 70s, the big hair of the 80s, the beauty standards of my youth that I could not meet?

    Nope. Nope. Nope. Bragging even to complain about it. Excuse me while I go flip my hair.

    Hell, Melanie, you had a mother to fuss over your hair. Count your blessings.

  53. @Mr McKenna

    She’s “crossing the street” and all this happens, including the father’s explanation that the reason she is so dirty is because she is a negro?

    How would that even work? If the father was holding the child in his arms, how long a reach would the kid have had reaching out sideways? 12″? Less? Does anyone walk that closely beside an 11 year old?

    Did they all stop in the middle of the street so they could have a conversation about the dirty negro?

    In Delta in the 1990’s elementary schools all had crossing guards near school zones. Was the crossing guard holding up traffic so the father and the babe in arms could pet the negro and have a conversation about why she was so dirty?

    So many questions……

  54. @Kratoklastes

    The word μέλας‎ is classical Greek, not modern Greek, means black and is part of many compound words in the English language, such as melancholy (= black bile), melanoma, melanin, and Melanesia. The word also occurs in Latin.

    Interesting to think that Trump chose a ‘black’ wife.

  55. Totally confused, I sprinted home to breathlessly ask my mother if I was, indeed, Black.

    You see, I’m mixed race; a mishmash of Black, Indian, Spanish, Chinese and Scottish. In Trinidad, I would never be called Black.

    This entire piece is an elaborate humblebrag about how in Trini she nah black. Blacks still obsess over their admixture and blacker is not beautifuler. Blacks have their paper bag test, but whites have the ‘how many particles of shit in a milkshake before you wouldn’t drink it’ test.

    I remember the tears that would roll down my cheeks as my mother combed through my ragged knots. She’d use “grease” to braid my dense coils into two plaits that were so tight they felt like tiny fingertips pulling each individual hair on my head.

    That hair distress — a nest of confusion, tears and pain — would follow me into my adult life.

    She hates her hair, obviously. To be fair, it does sound like a drag.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  56. I once made a simple inquiry to several organizations that monitor the migration of people. Do you have figures for the number of American blacks who expatriate to black-majority countries, of which Africa has several dozen? They all said that they never looked at it and that the phenomenon, to the extent it exists, must be very very small. Yet I never hear anyone make the simple, obvious point that if life for black people in the United States were really so unpleasant, if “racism” were really so onerous, as we constantly are told then lots of black people would be heading for Africa or Jamaica or Haiti. It is simple as pie today to get a passport, and a plane ticket is within the financial reach of millions. But for some unfathomable reason, blacks are so devoted to this shameful, horrible, viciously racist country that they can’t be bothered to leave. Makes me wonder …

  57. … In Trinidad, I would never be called Black.

    I had an unmistakable sense that I had moved to a land where nobody looked like me.

    From country clubs, through housing or “disparate” school discipline, down to hair salons–the gist of the great minoritarian whine:

    — I want to live with whitey, cause they’ve got nicer stuff (better gibs, better looting!)
    — But I look or behave differently.
    — And whitey isn’t bending over backwards to accommodate me fast enough!
    — And that makes me feel bad.

    Ergo … Whitey is bad!

  58. “I had moved to a land where nobody looked like me.”

    She moved to Zimbabwe?

  59. @Kratoklastes

    I’m drawing a blank right now, but there’s a Mexican slang term for cullut people which translates more or less as “bad hair”. Of course, I wouldn’t know how to pronounce the Greek words you posted, or even read them for that matter. 😉

  60. Alden says:
    @Anon

    You’re sure right about blacks traveling long distances to work in White areas. A couple of black waitresses have told me why they spent 1-2 hours each way on buses. In black areas it’s constant hassling bring me a free drink desert salad soup snitch some extra bacon on and on all day. Then there’s the no tipping policy of black customers. Plus the low level fights and snarling that goes on all day in a black environment

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  61. Stay in Africa. Stay in Trinidad. Stay in Tobago.

    Problem solved.

  62. Neoconned says:

    I visited Vancouver in 2016 when I was doing a cross country road trip. Took Amtrak from Seattle up there.

    Canada’s immigration officers were hard asses…..the woman asked me about my visit, my job, my family, etc.

    When I left American immigration was a joke. The black dude at the border asked me what I was doing in Canada and I told him “vacation”…..he looked my passport over and said “thank you sir” and gave me it back and let me pass

    Vancouver is a cool city….i got there in July and there was a weird fog over the city(git there at 2am)….& a light drizzle….

    I mostly saw Asians while I was there. The only vlacks I saw were a few homeless dudes in Hastings St….

    • Replies: @Henry's Cat
  63. Jack D says:
    @Clyde

    Yes. Nowadays, every black female has a “white person touched my hair” horror story (I assume most of them false). You’re nobody unless you have a “white person touched my hair” horror story. This in itself shows what weak sauce their complaints are – in the past, oppression meant being put in chains and taken across the sea for a lifetime of involuntary servitude or being lynched by the KKK, but the worst that modern black women can come up with is that someone once patted them on the head. Oh, the horror!

    In the Current Year, your status depends on being from an oppressed group. Melanie wants to get in on the action and so she needs a “white person touched my hair story” to signal her bona fides as an authentic “visible minority” and qualify for them AA gibs. It’s the opposite of the old days when someone with Melanie’s coloration would get her hair straightened and try to “pass” as white. “My grandmother was Italian”. When people say that “race is a social construct” they are talking about people like Melanie who do exactly that – their mixed race heritage allows them to socially construct whatever identity is most advantageous at the time and there’s no question which identity is most advantageous nowadays.

  64. The friendliest and best-behaved English-speaking Negroes in the Western Hemisphere today live in places where they were actually the most brutally treated (ie. the Caribbean and the American South). These are places where until relatively recently, they were actually called “Negroes”.

    Until the 1970s, there were virtually no blacks in Canada. Then they came here in droves for all the “milk and honey” after Pierre Trudeau made friends with a couple of Marxist heads of state in the Caribbean and thought it would be cool to flood our borders with vibrancy. Most Canadian blacks have a chip on their shoulder and aren’t afraid to lash out in ways they never would in their home countries. Nice Canadian whites either avoid them or turn the other cheek.

    Vancouver was always nice because it only had whites, well-behaved East Asians and Sikhs who didn’t behave too badly. Now I hear it’s getting more and more enriched with Global South types like Africans, Syrian refugees, etc. I might add these people set a bad example to the South Asians who I’ve noticed over the past few years getting louder, more vulgar and more outspoken. For example, I don’t think that blowhard Jagmeet Singh would exist today without blacks and Jewish cultural commentators egging him on.

    • Replies: @Genrick Yagoda
  65. Jack D says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Black people put a tremendous amount of effort and expense into hair care. The first black millionaire in America made hair care products for blacks, back in the 19th century. There are very few black run businesses in the ghetto nowadays but among the few are many hair salons (not to mention stores that sell wigs and hair extensions). For black women especially, their natural hair looks just awful by any standard let alone Western beauty standards. If a black woman just washed her hair and let it dry naturally, it would look like a fright wig. So they do all sorts of stuff to alter it. White people don’t even realize how processed the average black woman’s hair is – it is anything but natural. What you see on Michelle Obama’s head or Oprah’s head is nothing like their real hair. Many of these things are time consuming and expensive so hair occupies a much bigger amount of their mind space than for white males.

    • Replies: @obwandiyag
    , @anonymous
  66. Neoconned says:
    @istevefan

    Makes you wonder if it’s so nice why she doesn’t abandon cold dreary Canada for hurricane alley…..

    Vancouver is seriously a cool city….their subway is called the “sky train” because it’s literally in the air on concrete pillars…..

    The skyscape of towers, skyscrapers is also unique. VERY FEW American cities have a similar “big city feel”…..amongst the few I can think of are Chicago, NYC, San Francisco, and MAYBE LA and San Diego…..

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    , @Jack D
  67. @Nicholas Stix

    “I’ve never heard of a real white wanting to touch the hair of a ‘black’ female.”

    It is the greatest hoax in human history.

  68. @Neoconned

    I prefer Vancouver, Washington. It’s right across the river from Antifaville, and there’s a great view of the volcano.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
  69. @Anonymous

    The liberals got the asylums closed and then the conservatives shut the halfway houses.

    Congratulations on a perfect trifecta, you boobs.

  70. @Jack D

    A nuanced, logical, knowledgeable, qualified explanation of the actual facts of the matter. Something Sailer would be incapable of. You just utterly crushed the whole import of this lame “article.”

    Good work.

  71. @Alden

    “A couple of black waitresses have told me why they spent 1-2 hours each way on buses.”

    But I bet they stiff the servers at their local IHOP.

  72. @Tono Bungay

    For that matter, why is it that Michelle Obama only wants to vacation in Italy or Paris?

  73. @Thomm

    ‘Can I touch your motorbike helmet?’

    I would prefer natural black hair cut short back and sides.

  74. @Neoconned

    They question you when you leave America?

    • Replies: @Neoconned
  75. @Clyde

    How is it that in the early 20th century, black women were perfectly capable of fixing their hair quite nicely, yet now suddenly it is a problem?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  76. @Clyde

    Black women used to fix their hair just fine. What happened?

  77. Jack D says:

    When I left American immigration was a joke. The black dude at the border asked me what I was doing in Canada and I told him “vacation”…..he looked my passport over and said “thank you sir” and gave me it back and let me pass

    Are you an American citizen? They shouldn’t ask you anything in order to be let back into your own country. In the past (before 9/11), you didn’t even need a passport to go back and forth from Canada. There were no lines at the border and you could stay in Canada, go back to the US for dinner or to pick up gas and groceries and then go back again (or vice versa depending on the exchange rates) in less time than it would take you to go from NJ to NY. But we can’t have nice things anymore.

  78. Jack D says:
    @Neoconned

    NY and Chicago fill the top 10 slots in N. American skyscrapers. You left out Philly, Atlanta, Houston, Toronto and Panama City, Panama.

    Yes, Panama City. As I have mentioned before, skyscraper technology is now 1.5 centuries old and is found all around the world. It’s no longer a uniquely American thing.

    • Replies: @Neoconned
  79. “I had moved to a land where nobody looked like me.”

    I think she meant to say, “I had barged uninvited into another people’s country, a land where the people already had their own thing going, didn’t need me, and nobody wanted me there. But it was still so much nicer than Trinidad, so I refused to go home.”

    • Agree: Moses
  80. Jack D says:
    @Thomm

    The “Afro” look is no more natural than today’s straightened 0r wavy black hair. African hair is brittle and tends to break long before achieving that length. I would be willing to bet that they are all wearing wigs.

    • Replies: @Thomm
  81. Thomm says:
    @Jack D

    I would say about 50% of the larger afros were natural and 50% were wigs.

  82. OT:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-50205190

    Apparently the BBC haven’t read Ms Saini’s new book.

  83. @Tono Bungay

    if “racism” were really so onerous, as we constantly are told then lots of black people would be heading for Africa or Jamaica or Haiti. It is simple as pie today to get a passport, and a plane ticket is within the financial reach of millions.

    It is surprisingly difficult to get visas to visit or reside in some of those countries. For example, you cannot just jump on a plane to Nigeria without applying for a visa and explaining your reason for travel and offering a bribe.

    Jamaica and Haiti are easier to get into if you just want to visit, but there is still a pretty detailed paperwork process to get a residencial visa. You would need to show that you do not have a criminal history, which might rule out a number of applicants.

    Haiti:

    Immigrant or residence visas

    Immigrant or residence visas confers the right to permanent residence in Haiti without prejudice to deportation (see Article 15 of the Law on Immigration and Emigration).The application form for an immigrant visa must be submitted in three (3) copies and include the following information:

    The name(s) of the applicant;
    The date and place of birth;
    Applicant’s current nationality and nationality of origin;
    His or her present profession or occupation, and in the past ten (10) years;
    Applicant’s current address;
    The name(s), current nationality and nationality of origin of applicant’s father and mother;
    If the person is married, name(s), occupation and nationality of the spouse before marriage;
    The reasons why the applicant wants to go to Haiti and the length of stay in Haiti;
    Applicant’s proof of income and bank statements;
    Applicant’s diplomas or certificates of technical knowledge along with an employment contract;
    Information on the people in Haiti whom the applicant knows and for how long, and also the associations to which the applicant is or was a party; and
    Also provide any other useful information.

    In addition, to the above information, the applicant must also provide the following supporting documentation:

    Six (6) passport-sized color photos of the applicant and family members who will accompany the applicant to Haiti.
    A certificate from legal authorities in the applicant’s place of residence stating that during the past ten (10) years, the applicant has not been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor offense.
    A health certificate, issued within fifteen (15) days prior to the visa application.

    Once the duly completed residence application has been submitted to the Consulate or Embassy, the applicant must wait for a notice of approval from the diplomatic or consular agent before traveling to Haiti.

  84. J.Ross says:

    >literally writing a newspaper story in all seriousness about hair
    >anonymous white stranger or child attempts to touch the all-important hair without asking permission
    >”cosmopolitan” and “diverse” employed meaning “the opposite of cosmopolitan or diverse”
    This one checks all the boxes.

  85. anonymous[135] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    A while ago I discovered that the straightened hair on black women were mostly hair extensions and other complicated stuff made out of South Asian Indian hair.

    • Replies: @Alden
  86. @Jim Christian

    Right, black woman journalist wants to talk about her hair is an iSteve running gag.

    Nobody else in the media has yet noticed the pattern, so pointing out how pervasive it is is pretty funny.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
  87. @Canadian Observer

    White people have been entirely displaced from Richmond, Vancouver, most of Burnaby and Surrey.

    Richmond, BC a city that was almost 100% white people in the 70’s now advertises that it has a 78% Asian (read Chinese) population.

    If this was happening to any other racial group NATA would already be dropping bombs.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Canadian Observer
  88. @Genrick Yagoda

    All of this is true, but whenever I go visit the better parts of Vancouver, I’m not afraid that I will be:

    (a) knifed, or
    (b) given a speech about white privilege.

    Although I suppose (b) is slowly changing now with these clueless professional women of colour like Melanie Green charging in.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
  89. Jack D says:
    @Joe Schmoe

    I assure you those women did not fix their own hair. The nature of the processes involved (especially in those days when corrosive lye was used) to “relax” black hair pretty much precludes being able to do it by yourself. Sometimes in the ghetto there were unlicensed salons in people’s houses or friends would help each other, but it’s not something you could do on your own. At the very least you had to be trained in how to do it first. If you did it wrong you could burn your scalp. Normally they would apply a base coating of Vaseline to the scalp in order to protect it from the lye that was applied to their hair as the next step.

  90. @Steve Sailer

    Nobody else in the media has yet noticed the pattern, so pointing out how pervasive it is is pretty funny.

    It’s a riot, the whole thing. Every time you post one of these ninnies, I snort my 3AM EST coffee right out my left nostril, the right one being blocked by scar tissue, heh.. Face facts, were someone in regular media to notice the pattern on their own, they wouldn’t say a word, that is unless they’d like a NEW career writing for Ron and Taki, a far, far better thing if they have the chops. If they have a conscience, they’d sleep nights for the first time in their professional lives. Imagine having to keep your trap shut on so many things especially these days.

    What were you Steve, maybe five minutes out of college before you started chafing from media’s inability to allow you to tell the truth? They cannot possibly look themselves in the eye in the mirror shaving. I like to think so, anyway. Between Becky, Hair, and a half dozen others that point out the shallowness and craven self-indulgence of idiotic girls and boys, thanks for the chuckles.

  91. @Canadian Observer

    Although I suppose (b) is slowly changing now with these clueless professional women of colour like Melanie Green charging in.

    Well, there’s a little more room for them to find work! They fired Don Cherry last night from your Sportsnet!

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/bruins/2019/11/11/don-cherry-fired-sportsnet-following-xenophobic-comments/jFWAQ8FBNTvmu4jrKFGciI/story.html

  92. Mr. Grey says:
    @ColRebSez

    Good question. What a sense of entitlement. One could even call it cultural appropriation, if one was inclined to use such phrases- thinking you can enjoy the benefits of another society without having to undergo any cultural dissonance.

  93. Mr. Grey says:
    @Nicholas Stix

    I never had the urge to touch the hair of some random black person, or even one that I knew. I was actually married to a black woman and she hated her real hair, and she would never be seen in public like that and went to great lengths to have extensions to give her long, flowing locks.

  94. Neoconned says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Talking about Mount Rainier?

    I have a buddy who stays in semi rural Lewis county Washington. Anyway I stopped to see him on Amtrak on my way to Seattle in 2016.

    Centralia(his town) is a weird combination of skeevy meth addicts and logger country. I oddly met 2 fellow New Orleanians while I was visiting there. 1 was a black dude staying in my hotel by the 5 interstate freeway who was doing construction work up there and the other was an “emigrant”….a white guy from NOLA who worked at the Indian(Hindu) restaurant downtown.

    I stayed 2 nights, and oddly there was a documentary about DB Cooper on my hotels tv….i enjoyed Washington State, though I liked Vancouver better than either Seattle or Portland…..and I really enjoyed Seattle.

  95. Neoconned says:
    @Jack D

    Ive never had the luck to visit either Panama or Toronto but would love to.

    I forgot Philly. Houston and Atlanta do have nice downtowns but they dont have that “big city feel” you get in movies because of the low level sprawl.
    Houston takes 2 plus hours to drive through……and thats at 60 mph or faster…..

    Every time I go to Atlanta on Greyhound the joke is how each time you go there ATLs suburbia gets closer to the Alabama border. Last time I went it started about 20 min drive into Georgia.

    My step sister lived til last yr in Macon Georgia…..thats like an hr south of Atlanta and its considered an exurb….just my definition of a vig city feel but its gotta have like a huge amount of skyscrapers.

  96. Neoconned says:
    @Henry's Cat

    Canada’s immigration cop did.

    She asked me about my visit, how much money I made per yr, where I was from, did I have family in Canada and a whole bunch of invasive questions. It caught me off guard. The American guy acted like he could give a flip.

  97. Alden says:
    @anonymous

    More like polyester. The Orthodox Jew women wear the expensive wigs made of S. Asian hair.

  98. EdwardM says:
    @Anonymous

    crimes involving the homeless

    Yep, they of no agency are just swept up into this involvement.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS