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Black Lives Matter Signs in Canada: "May We Never Again Need to Remind You That WE Built This"
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As I’ve mentioned before, the inner elite of the celebrated Black Lives Matter movement is heavily homosexual. I think that was part of BLM’s appeal to political, NGO, and corporate elites: BLM seemed safer than the typical black agitators. These weren’t ex-con hard men like the Black Panthers of yore, these were irate lesbians and peevish gays. How much damage could they do?

Well, judging from the extraordinary increase in black-on-black homicides since Ferguson, a lot.

BLM’s inner gayness helps explain one reason why it so often gets into spats at Gay Pride Parades, such as in Toronto last month.

Another reason that is kept covered up, but one of the goals of local white gay politicians, such as Harvey Milk in San Francisco a half century ago, was to get the local police department to take it seriously when gay men cruising for rough trade out on the streets late at night were robbed and/or beaten by black youths. In most of urban North America, white gay politicians were eventually quite successful at building ties to the police forces. Thus BLM has been obsessed with shutting down gay pride parades that feature police participation.

The picture above is from the BLM contingent in June’s Toronto gay pride parade. I’m particularly struck by the two posters reading:

“May we never again need to remind you that WE built this”

You can note the recent emphasis on the concept of “emotional labor.” The extremely intersectional have convinced themselves that they deserve to be paid for all the “emotional labor” that your insensitivity and ignorance is putting them through.

The other aspect, of course, is the hilarity of blacks marching through downtown Toronto claiming “WE built this.” This black tendency toward historical megalomania was noted by Evelyn Waugh back in his 1938 masterpiece Scoop, in which the Ishmaelite consul-general orates:

“As that great Negro Karl Marx has so nobly written … Who built the Pyramids? A Negro. Who invented the circulation of the blood? A Negro. … Africa for the African worker, Europe for the African worker, Asia, Oceania, America, Arctic and Antarctic for the African worker.”

P.S., Commenter LKM calls attention to this news photo of the white Gay Pride executive signing his capitulation to BLM Toronto demands with the Gayest Pen Ever:

Screenshot 2017-07-09 01.17.09

 
    []
  1. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    OT

    http://www.newsweek.com/sessionss-roots-lie-lazy-laughing-south-blood-its-mouth-633638

    Sessions’ Roots Lie in ‘the Lazy, Laughing South’
    By Rick Perlstein

    Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III: From commanding the war against immigrants to crusading in defense of the travel ban; from sabotaging the deployment of science on behalf of those wrongly accused to giving urban police departments a free hand to murder blacks; by pioneering new lows in criminalizing dissent and waging jihad against even the medical use of marijuana—and, last but not least, by signing away a decade of bipartisan work to reverse America’s failed, racist mass incarceration policies—the attorney general knows how to get things done.

    Whatever did we do to deserve a chattering class that wishes so much harm and depredation upon us?

    Read More
    • Replies: @backup
    Maybe we can convince Newsweek with a small email campaign to print an apology for the very Islamophobic use of the word "jihad" there. If things go down the drain as they do we might as well get some laughs from it.
    , @Nico

    Whatever did we do to deserve a chattering class that wishes so much harm and depredation upon us?
     
    A cynical and overly-reductionist yet perceptive answer to this question is that this chattering class is a foreign occupier, and the name of the author of the cited piece certainly lends credibility to such a thesis.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Sessions’ Roots Lie in ‘the Lazy, Laughing South’

    By Rick Perlstein
     

    The byline puts the title into sharper focus.

    What would Newsweek think of the following headline:


    Rick Perlstein's Roots Lie in ‘the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl’
     
    , @Rifleman
    What do they mean by "WE built this” ?

    Built - Toronto? Canada? the gay pride movement?

    I know its all about general black ego tripping but are they also referencing to something more specific?

    The BLM movement is both heavily gay/lesbian but also mixed race and in Europe very White. These are people who feel on the fringe of the black world and want to make themselves more of the center.

    So they fixate on an outside threat - White people, the cops - in order to create a stronger bond with a black racial identity that is under siege.
    , @Olorin
    1) Read their crap.

    2) Believed it.

    3) Even after ceasing to believe it, still read it.

    4) Continue to click on it/talk about it.

    5) Supported their advertisers by buying their products.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
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  2. “WE!” Until Toronto became the metropolis of Canada in the 70′s because of the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Quebec separatist movement, it was almost exclusively a WASP city. And before Pierre Trudeau’s multicultural policies, except in Nova Scotia, there was almost no blacks in Canada.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Saxon
    Yes, Canada was 97% white in 1971. This is literally imported American rhetorical propaganda. Cities like Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto were more or less French and British cities.
    , @franktremb
    The revitalization the French language in Montreal in the 70's was more due to the massive exodus of the English-speaking community and headquarters to Toronto than the language laws. Demography=Destiny.

    And now Montreal is welcoming immigrants who couldn't care less about Quebec and the separatist movement is faltering. Again Demography=Destiny.
    , @Rohirrimborn
    Agreed. I was raised in NYC in the fifties and sixties so have experienced black vibrancy from the beginning. My father grew up in Saskatchewan and later Ontario in the twenties and thirties. I thought it hilarious when he described his first sighting of a black person in a Toronto department store around 1935. He said that he and his sister followed him around for a few minutes simply because they'd never seen a black person before. I imaging the few Canadian blacks in those days were used to that reaction from the native whites.
    , @anon
    Until Trudeau the first came to power in 1968 Canada was an overwhelmingly white country. Blacks were extremely few in number. They played zero role in the development of the country. Extreme historical revisionism now has blacks as central players in Canada's heritage (!) and we have even imported the stupid American "black history month" nonsense.
  3. syonredux says:

    The other aspect, of course, is the hilarity of blacks marching through downtown Toronto claiming “WE built this.” This black tendency toward historical megalomania was noted by Evelyn Waugh back in his 1938 masterpiece Scoop, in which the Ishmaelite consul-general orates:

    I once had a chat with a Black academic. Her specialty: Slavery north of the Mason-Dixon Line. She tried to sell me on the idea that Black slaves played a central role in building the Massachusetts Bay Colony. I pointed out to her that Black slaves topped-out at about 2% of the population of Massachusetts, and that was in the middle of the 18th century…..She got really intense and started talking about how the percentage didn’t matter…….

    Read More
  4. eded says:

    BLM leadership also seems very young, and as a result immature and disorganized.

    Last year they granted special status as honorary guests at Pride Toronto, then they turned around and protested the parade anyway. They held it up until the the organizer ,who’d invited them, signed a list of demands on the spot. They also set off coloured smoke bombs in violation of the no pyrotechnics rule.

    This year year they were invited to be participants and then screwed up by missing the registration deadline.

    They don’t seem particularly competent.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    "They don’t seem particularly competent."

    No one could have predicted this.
    , @LKM
    It should be added that they made the organizer sign the list of demands with a really gay pen. If you doubt that an inanimate object can be gay, click below (safe for work)

    Link

    If BLM Toronto cured cancer tomorrow, I still wouldn't forgive them for that pen.
  5. Aaaah…this explains why all the place and street names around my home town are Scots or Irish: the large numbers of blacks in Toronto through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries! Thanks, BLM. Now me no badthink Canuck. Me goodthink Canuck.

    Read More
  6. After their victories in 2015 and 2016, the LGBTs are increasingly dividing along racial lines. As well as all the black gays and lesbians supporting BLM, Milo is busy rallying the libertarian/Repulican gays, and libertarian transsexuals are starting to clash with black LGBTs on YouTube. It’s going to be a nasty cat fight:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker

    It’s going to be a nasty cat fight
     
    By 'nasty' you mean 'highly entertaining'.
    , @jroll
    A rainbow flag with the Star of David was banned from a Chicago "Dyke March."

    The gay struggle and the Palestinian struggle are apparently one.

    Saying that gays have it good in Israel is "pinkwashing."

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/06/27/opinion/im-glad-the-dyke-march-banned-jewish-stars.html?referer=https://www.google.com/

    Jewish girl replies "what about Tibet."

    Reminds me of Cathy Young saying "what about Finland."
  7. Dr. X says:

    “Who built the Pyramids? A Negro. Who invented the circulation of the blood? A Negro. … Africa for the African worker, Europe for the African worker, Asia, Oceania, America, Arctic and Antarctic for the African worker.”

    Yeah.

    I’ve heard blacks say “We built this country.”

    B.S.

    They built nothing: not the transcontinental railroad, not the Hoover Dam, not the Brooklyn Bridge. Blacks were brought here to perform menial, agricultural labor in southern heat, because it was thought that they were able to tolerate heat better than whites, considering how hot most of Africa is.

    They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.

    (In fact, I think that a pseudo-Marxist explanation of the Civil War is the best one: the war happened only when the means of production in the U.S. shifted from Southern agriculture to Northern industry. Indeed, the North won the war not because it had better soldiers, but because it had more money, more people, and more industry. One could say that the slavery issue was a moral cloak thrown over what was primarily a war over which economic system was best).

    Read More
    • Replies: @oddsbodkins
    "They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented."

    Not really, you still needed a lot of cheap labor to pick it. My (white) grandmother picked cotton in the 30s.
    , @Joe Magarac

    I’ve heard blacks say “We built this country.”
     
    Well to be absurdly evenhanded about it, a case can be made that bl*cks built A country.

    But that country was burned to the ground in the 1860s.
    , @RebelWriter
    Black slaves "built" America in the same way mules "grew" cotton and corn.

    Mule Lives Matter.
    , @27 year old
    >They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.

    The way I remember it the southern plantation owners were about ready to give up on slavery but then the invention of the cotton gin actually made slavery more worthwhile again.
    , @Jokah Macpherson
    "They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented."

    Invented, mind you, by Eli Whitney, a black man.
    , @Nico

    I think that a pseudo-Marxist explanation of the Civil War is the best one: the war happened only when the means of production in the U.S. shifted from Southern agriculture to Northern industry. Indeed, the North won the war not because it had better soldiers, but because it had more money, more people, and more industry. One could say that the slavery issue was a moral cloak thrown over what was primarily a war over which economic system was best
     
    This still has to be qualified by the fact that the North did argue, at the time, that the slavery element of the plantation economy was superior to the formally free labor model of the industrial economy. Of course, anyone who knows anything about the Industrial Revolution knows that this was a stretch at best, and it was only even possible to contemplate in North America: the initial proles of industrialization in England lived and worked in perhaps the most horrid conditions ever known to mankind and only after one or two generations of miserable toil did living conditions begin to rise more generally.

    The kernel of truth in your argument however is that slavery qua slavery was in any event far less important to understanding the war than either our contemporaries or theirs would sometimes like or have wanted to think. This is more intuitive if one understands that the socioeconomics of the American Civil War, of an agricultural/remnant feudal and hierarchical structure resisting an industrial and [classically] liberal onslaught closely mirror those of similar European conflicts of the period (the French Revolution, the Austro-Prussian War and the Risorgimento).

  8. Saxon says:
    @franktremb
    "WE!" Until Toronto became the metropolis of Canada in the 70's because of the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Quebec separatist movement, it was almost exclusively a WASP city. And before Pierre Trudeau's multicultural policies, except in Nova Scotia, there was almost no blacks in Canada.

    Yes, Canada was 97% white in 1971. This is literally imported American rhetorical propaganda. Cities like Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto were more or less French and British cities.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Yes, Canada was 97% white in 1971. This is literally imported American rhetorical propaganda. Cities like Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto were more or less French and British cities.
     
    You need to get Woke, bigot.Bet you didn't know that there were 104 Black slaves in Nova Scotia in 1767.And Tories fleeing the American Revolution brought 2,000 enslaved Blacks to Canada.CANADA WAS BUILT ON BLACK BODIES!


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Canada#Under_British_rule

    #BlackCanadianLivesMatter
    , @Perspective
    True, though I've noticed a lot of retconning in the media, especially the Toronto Star and the free Metro News paper, that would have you believe Canada's historical and current demographics are the same as the US. According to this older document http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2003004/article/6802-eng.pdf Canada's black population was just 0.6 percent in 1871, declining to 0.2 percent in 1971.
    , @doc of the bay
    Only 97%?

    Black population of Canada: (StatCan, Wikipedia)
    1871: 21,500 = 0.58%
    1971: 34,400 = 0.16%
    2001: 662,200 = 2.21%

    During Canada's period of greatest growth Blacks were a small and shrinking presence. Their numbers grew after Canada was built up.
  9. Trelane says:
    @syonredux

    The other aspect, of course, is the hilarity of blacks marching through downtown Toronto claiming “WE built this.” This black tendency toward historical megalomania was noted by Evelyn Waugh back in his 1938 masterpiece Scoop, in which the Ishmaelite consul-general orates:
     
    I once had a chat with a Black academic. Her specialty: Slavery north of the Mason-Dixon Line. She tried to sell me on the idea that Black slaves played a central role in building the Massachusetts Bay Colony. I pointed out to her that Black slaves topped-out at about 2% of the population of Massachusetts, and that was in the middle of the 18th century.....She got really intense and started talking about how the percentage didn't matter.......
    Read More
  10. Lurker says:
    @unpc downunder
    After their victories in 2015 and 2016, the LGBTs are increasingly dividing along racial lines. As well as all the black gays and lesbians supporting BLM, Milo is busy rallying the libertarian/Repulican gays, and libertarian transsexuals are starting to clash with black LGBTs on YouTube. It's going to be a nasty cat fight:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeEVgM9Hrvw

    It’s going to be a nasty cat fight

    By ‘nasty’ you mean ‘highly entertaining’.

    Read More
  11. jroll says:
    @unpc downunder
    After their victories in 2015 and 2016, the LGBTs are increasingly dividing along racial lines. As well as all the black gays and lesbians supporting BLM, Milo is busy rallying the libertarian/Repulican gays, and libertarian transsexuals are starting to clash with black LGBTs on YouTube. It's going to be a nasty cat fight:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeEVgM9Hrvw

    A rainbow flag with the Star of David was banned from a Chicago “Dyke March.”

    The gay struggle and the Palestinian struggle are apparently one.

    Saying that gays have it good in Israel is “pinkwashing.”

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/06/27/opinion/im-glad-the-dyke-march-banned-jewish-stars.html?referer=https://www.google.com/

    Jewish girl replies “what about Tibet.”

    Reminds me of Cathy Young saying “what about Finland.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist

    "A rainbow flag with the Star of David was banned from a Chicago “Dyke March.”"
     
    But rainbow flags at the march in Philly had brown and black stripes added as a nod to BLM.
    , @WJ
    A logical assumption regarding the star of david banned would be because Gay Marriage is not legal in Israel.
  12. At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that “emotional labor” is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I’m sure it does with all those who’ve had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I’ve become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one’s youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can’t go back and fix it. It’s only natural to ask yourself, “What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?”

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don’t march in protest of my past and I don’t expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    OK, but what do you suggest we do about it? If we decide to pay people for their "emotional labor," the inevitable outcome is the payments won't be allocated to each on the basis of the tragicness of his backstory, but rather according to his skill at emotional manipulation (at which the damaged-yet-virtuous are going to be bottom-of-the pack).

    Life is not fair.
    , @Anonymous
    I don't think you're describing emotional labor, but you writing that might be some.

    Think: for public-facing workers, putting on a smile no matter how they feel; for wives, asking how their husband's day was; for blacks, having to explain basic facts to you like how they built and built and built until they were exhausted -- until they're exhausted. That's emotional labor.

    , @The True and Original David
    Labor means production. Emotional labor produces what? It produces you. You are your own reward.

    If I had a nickel for every life crisis that ground my soul into dust, I would be driving a Ferrari. So would you and many.

    Schopenhauer said humans should address each other as "Fellow Sufferer."

    It's right to seek God because the Ferrari isn't coming.
    , @anonyymous

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don’t march in protest of my past and I don’t expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.
     
    You're still making the same mistake. You're looking to a paternal archetype to salve your wounds, and make it right. Too many blacks tend to subconsciously paternalize white people, while too many racially obsessed white people allow themselves to take on the paternal role, unwittingly conforming to their deeply rooted subconcious belief that black people are primitives, fundamentally incapable of conforming to modern civilization in appreciable numbers, and can't be held accountable for their actions without white people's help, money and guidance.

    Try internalizing the notion that, if you've been psychologically wronged, unless you're creating significant value for others, or carry the promise of doing so, nobody cares... but you.

    Everyone in this country, no matter what race, who is young is rich... with time. Too many blacks manage their time like too many blacks manage their lotto winnings.

    A relative few years, outta money, outta time.

    Too many black folks never recognize this, while time marches on.

    No matter what the race: a person, a family, a culture in denial always self-destructs.

    White people, or anyone, can't do shit about that. Until more black folks collectively figure that one out, they'll always have a wheel in the ditch, and a wheel on the track. Shaking their black fists at the whites, asians, jews, and hispanics who pass them by.
    , @Erik Sieven
    most people have had bad experiences. But the political usage of such bad experiences or emotional labour are wrong, because they concentrate on some actually rather irrelevant aspects and ignore all others. I am sure on an individual level what really makes people sad are things, which have nothing to do with race or class. What really matters is personal success on the partner market or, although less important, success in a professional career. Diseases, family relationships are also very important. Getting bullied in school often hurts for decades. All of these problems can happen to people of every race and ethnicity. Discrimination because of skin color is a minor issue compared to those issues. Also I am not even sure whether all in all life is morst difficult as a black, white or asian person in a modern western country. Blacks have advantages on the partner market, get a lot of conformation by sports.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    God Says No

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4PXjnjuLYw
    , @Expletive Deleted
    "emotional labor" resonates with another bogus feminist slogan, "mental load", which is the playbook I suspect these imbeciles (took/were provided with) it from.

    http://www.workingmother.com/this-comic-perfectly-explains-mental-load-working-mothers-bear
    (woman complains that bloke hasn't done dishes right there and then because she didn't specifically ask him to. Apparently the "even having to tell the idiot to wash up" part is bestial phallocracy. It's not like she's going to soil her stronk independent hands with it).

    I recently had the end frame of this comic printed out and passive-aggressively stuck on the wall. Presumably because someone spends too much time lost in the cancer that is 'social media' and falls into Mumsnet herd-think, instead of cleaning up. After themselves.

    My response, that that was because I'd just got out of the car an hour ago, after a month away working, and that they weren't there when I left (because it's one of the things that drives me crazy, a sink rammed full of rotting, rusting crap, and unusable, so I just do it all; trivial task, barely registers) didn't go down at all well. I think I saw the Magic Smoke™ leaking out of the upper processors, due to incoherence rage.
    I laughed, and ripped the top off a Stella. Didn't bother with a glass, because washing-up.

    tl;dr boring domestic.
    Somebody is providing the BLM frauds with hackneyed rad-fem concepts and slogans. They didn't think it up themselves. Wite Wymin of Madness built that, long ago.
    , @Jack Hanson
    This is why we lost for so long. Have you learned nothing? You don't concede an inch to these people. You mock their complaints, not enter into a long winded discourse that gets blown up into SEE HE AGREES.
    , @Autochthon

    My argument against God was that the universe seemed so cruel and unjust. But how had I gotten this idea of just and unjust? A man does not call a line crooked unless he has some idea of a straight line. What was I comparing this universe with when I called it unjust? If the whole show was bad and senseless from A to Z, so to speak, why did I, who was supposed to be part of the show, find myself in such violent reaction against it? A man feels wet when he falls into water, because man is not a water animal: a fish would not feel wet. Of course I could have given up my idea of justice by saying it was nothing but a private idea of my own. But if I did that, then my argument against God collapsed too — for the argument depended on saying that the world was really unjust, not simply that it did not happen to please my private fancies. Thus in the very act of trying to prove that God did not exist — in other words, that the whole of reality was senseless — I found I was forced to assume that one part of reality — namely my idea of justice — was full of sense. Consequently, atheism turns out to be too simple. If the whole universe has no meaning, we should never have found out that it has no meaning: just as, if there were no light in the universe and therefore no creatures with eyes, we should never know it was dark. Dark would be without meaning.
     
    Do not lament your past any more than you can help it. A horrific childhood may save one's soul, (and even for an atheist, make his life meaningful and himself a worthy person); cf. Hilton, Paris.
    , @oddsbodkins
    I agree with you that there is something like the "emotional labor" that you describe. I don't know how to quantify it, but I would suspect that by far the greatest toll on the black community in this regard comes from fatherlessness.
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    You want emotional labor, I'll give you emotional labor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8WbxUZbOPQ
  13. @Dr. X

    “Who built the Pyramids? A Negro. Who invented the circulation of the blood? A Negro. … Africa for the African worker, Europe for the African worker, Asia, Oceania, America, Arctic and Antarctic for the African worker.”
     
    Yeah.

    I've heard blacks say "We built this country."

    B.S.

    They built nothing: not the transcontinental railroad, not the Hoover Dam, not the Brooklyn Bridge. Blacks were brought here to perform menial, agricultural labor in southern heat, because it was thought that they were able to tolerate heat better than whites, considering how hot most of Africa is.

    They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.

    (In fact, I think that a pseudo-Marxist explanation of the Civil War is the best one: the war happened only when the means of production in the U.S. shifted from Southern agriculture to Northern industry. Indeed, the North won the war not because it had better soldiers, but because it had more money, more people, and more industry. One could say that the slavery issue was a moral cloak thrown over what was primarily a war over which economic system was best).

    “They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.”

    Not really, you still needed a lot of cheap labor to pick it. My (white) grandmother picked cotton in the 30s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dee
    They were inventing the mechanical cotton picker in the '30s; that was the true end of any work picking cotton. Now you have 10 people; guy driving the picker, 4 truck drivers taking it to the plant, and 5 at the plant, producing what took hundreds before.
  14. backup says:
    @Anonymous
    OT

    http://www.newsweek.com/sessionss-roots-lie-lazy-laughing-south-blood-its-mouth-633638

    Sessions’ Roots Lie in 'the Lazy, Laughing South'
    By Rick Perlstein

    Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III: From commanding the war against immigrants to crusading in defense of the travel ban; from sabotaging the deployment of science on behalf of those wrongly accused to giving urban police departments a free hand to murder blacks; by pioneering new lows in criminalizing dissent and waging jihad against even the medical use of marijuana—and, last but not least, by signing away a decade of bipartisan work to reverse America’s failed, racist mass incarceration policies—the attorney general knows how to get things done.
     
    Whatever did we do to deserve a chattering class that wishes so much harm and depredation upon us?

    Maybe we can convince Newsweek with a small email campaign to print an apology for the very Islamophobic use of the word “jihad” there. If things go down the drain as they do we might as well get some laughs from it.

    Read More
  15. snorlax says:
    @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    OK, but what do you suggest we do about it? If we decide to pay people for their “emotional labor,” the inevitable outcome is the payments won’t be allocated to each on the basis of the tragicness of his backstory, but rather according to his skill at emotional manipulation (at which the damaged-yet-virtuous are going to be bottom-of-the pack).

    Life is not fair.

    Read More
  16. @eded
    BLM leadership also seems very young, and as a result immature and disorganized.

    Last year they granted special status as honorary guests at Pride Toronto, then they turned around and protested the parade anyway. They held it up until the the organizer ,who'd invited them, signed a list of demands on the spot. They also set off coloured smoke bombs in violation of the no pyrotechnics rule.

    This year year they were invited to be participants and then screwed up by missing the registration deadline.

    They don't seem particularly competent.

    “They don’t seem particularly competent.”

    No one could have predicted this.

    Read More
  17. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    I don’t think you’re describing emotional labor, but you writing that might be some.

    Think: for public-facing workers, putting on a smile no matter how they feel; for wives, asking how their husband’s day was; for blacks, having to explain basic facts to you like how they built and built and built until they were exhausted — until they’re exhausted. That’s emotional labor.

    Read More
  18. syonredux says:
    @Saxon
    Yes, Canada was 97% white in 1971. This is literally imported American rhetorical propaganda. Cities like Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto were more or less French and British cities.

    Yes, Canada was 97% white in 1971. This is literally imported American rhetorical propaganda. Cities like Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto were more or less French and British cities.

    You need to get Woke, bigot.Bet you didn’t know that there were 104 Black slaves in Nova Scotia in 1767.And Tories fleeing the American Revolution brought 2,000 enslaved Blacks to Canada.CANADA WAS BUILT ON BLACK BODIES!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Canada#Under_British_rule

    #BlackCanadianLivesMatter

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jeff77450
    So if one-tenth of one percent of Canada was built with black labor that means that blacks "built Canada?" Nonsense. If no black person had ever set foot in Canada we wouldn't be able to tell the difference. Cities, roads, railroads, ports, airports, etc., it would all still be there.

    The same is essentially true of America. If no black person had ever set foot in America the impact would be more profound because we'd be noticeably better off. The death & destruction of the Civil War, which was not the fault of black people, followed by decades of a large part of the country being impoverished, wiped out the "gains" that resulted from slavery.

    "All other things being equal" we wouldn't have 30-50% of the street-crime that we do, depending on what category you're looking at. We wouldn't have all the dysfunction that results from black thug culture to include an out-of-wedlock birthrate of ~72%. Taxes and insurance-rates would be lower.

    Someone once described black people as "the eternal albatross around America's neck" and it's true. I've known a great many good black people in both my military & civilian careers, some of them my supervisors and deservedly so. But "net-net" America would be better off if no black people had been brought to America.
    , @anon
    This may be the most ridiculous comment ever posted.
  19. @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    Labor means production. Emotional labor produces what? It produces you. You are your own reward.

    If I had a nickel for every life crisis that ground my soul into dust, I would be driving a Ferrari. So would you and many.

    Schopenhauer said humans should address each other as “Fellow Sufferer.”

    It’s right to seek God because the Ferrari isn’t coming.

    Read More
    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Nico

    It’s right to seek God because the Ferrari isn’t coming.
     
    The sentiments enunciated by "Intelligent Dasein" are at best quaintly annoying if uttered by a child: when shouted out by an adrenaline-pumped adult they can quickly degenerate into a deadly war cry, as the last few years in Baltimore aptly demonstrate. We have an adult problem in our society on many planes. Your send-up of the stolen childhood victimhood complex hit it right out of the park.
  20. @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don’t march in protest of my past and I don’t expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    You’re still making the same mistake. You’re looking to a paternal archetype to salve your wounds, and make it right. Too many blacks tend to subconsciously paternalize white people, while too many racially obsessed white people allow themselves to take on the paternal role, unwittingly conforming to their deeply rooted subconcious belief that black people are primitives, fundamentally incapable of conforming to modern civilization in appreciable numbers, and can’t be held accountable for their actions without white people’s help, money and guidance.

    Try internalizing the notion that, if you’ve been psychologically wronged, unless you’re creating significant value for others, or carry the promise of doing so, nobody cares… but you.

    Everyone in this country, no matter what race, who is young is rich… with time. Too many blacks manage their time like too many blacks manage their lotto winnings.

    A relative few years, outta money, outta time.

    Too many black folks never recognize this, while time marches on.

    No matter what the race: a person, a family, a culture in denial always self-destructs.

    White people, or anyone, can’t do shit about that. Until more black folks collectively figure that one out, they’ll always have a wheel in the ditch, and a wheel on the track. Shaking their black fists at the whites, asians, jews, and hispanics who pass them by.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    The key (and not often mentioned) fact: in the U.S. about 29%
    of blacks are on welfare as compared to only 5% whites. The figures
    are 2-3 years old but I doubt they've changed much since then.
    I wonder how free today's college professors are to mention this
    fundamental fact in class. Any blacks will instantly
    run to the dean's office to complain, with unpleasant
    consequences in terms of promotion and tenure. I'm kind
    of glad I don't teach sociology or criminal justice.

    What the figures imply is not only a tremendous transfer
    of wealth from whites to blacks that's continually taking
    place but also the fact that many blacks in this country are
    incapable of living in the postindustrial 21st century. I don't
    have the figures in front of me but I'd assume fewer blacks
    (in percentage terms) were on welfare in the 1950s and
    perhaps '60s. There was so much optimism then (e.g.,
    Motown sound), black churches were still strong, Billy Graham
    was frequently on TV. 1968, a horrible year otherwise, was
    the peak year of postwar prosperity in the U.S. And then things
    went economically downhill, slowly at first, and then faster
    after 1973
  21. SnakeEyes says:

    I don’t understand the “… we built this” part of the slogan. Is “this” a reference to the Pride Parade? What are they talking about?

    Read More
    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    They mean they built Western civilization, so they will be paying the reparations for its sins.

    Am I glad I don't have to shell out for that! These people ought to be thanked with a parade or something.
    , @Steve Sailer

    What are they talking about?
     
    The circulation of the blood?
    , @ogunsiron
    Pretty sure they mean that they built Canada. Just like they "built" the United States. Just like they built Germany and Norway. No, they're not kidding.
  22. @SnakeEyes
    I don't understand the "... we built this" part of the slogan. Is "this" a reference to the Pride Parade? What are they talking about?

    They mean they built Western civilization, so they will be paying the reparations for its sins.

    Am I glad I don’t have to shell out for that! These people ought to be thanked with a parade or something.

    Read More
  23. @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    most people have had bad experiences. But the political usage of such bad experiences or emotional labour are wrong, because they concentrate on some actually rather irrelevant aspects and ignore all others. I am sure on an individual level what really makes people sad are things, which have nothing to do with race or class. What really matters is personal success on the partner market or, although less important, success in a professional career. Diseases, family relationships are also very important. Getting bullied in school often hurts for decades. All of these problems can happen to people of every race and ethnicity. Discrimination because of skin color is a minor issue compared to those issues. Also I am not even sure whether all in all life is morst difficult as a black, white or asian person in a modern western country. Blacks have advantages on the partner market, get a lot of conformation by sports.

    Read More
  24. @SnakeEyes
    I don't understand the "... we built this" part of the slogan. Is "this" a reference to the Pride Parade? What are they talking about?

    What are they talking about?

    The circulation of the blood?

    Read More
  25. LKM says:
    @eded
    BLM leadership also seems very young, and as a result immature and disorganized.

    Last year they granted special status as honorary guests at Pride Toronto, then they turned around and protested the parade anyway. They held it up until the the organizer ,who'd invited them, signed a list of demands on the spot. They also set off coloured smoke bombs in violation of the no pyrotechnics rule.

    This year year they were invited to be participants and then screwed up by missing the registration deadline.

    They don't seem particularly competent.

    It should be added that they made the organizer sign the list of demands with a really gay pen. If you doubt that an inanimate object can be gay, click below (safe for work)

    Link

    If BLM Toronto cured cancer tomorrow, I still wouldn’t forgive them for that pen.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    The guy signed off on their demands and the parade marched on. The funny part is they completely ignored that list of demands.

    It's always a major shitshow with that parade. They actually try to celebrate all the infighting - framing it as sort of staying true to it's roots as a protest march.

    For the record this happend in 2016, not this year. The parade in Minneapolis was shut down this year though.
  26. Nico says:
    @Anonymous
    OT

    http://www.newsweek.com/sessionss-roots-lie-lazy-laughing-south-blood-its-mouth-633638

    Sessions’ Roots Lie in 'the Lazy, Laughing South'
    By Rick Perlstein

    Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III: From commanding the war against immigrants to crusading in defense of the travel ban; from sabotaging the deployment of science on behalf of those wrongly accused to giving urban police departments a free hand to murder blacks; by pioneering new lows in criminalizing dissent and waging jihad against even the medical use of marijuana—and, last but not least, by signing away a decade of bipartisan work to reverse America’s failed, racist mass incarceration policies—the attorney general knows how to get things done.
     
    Whatever did we do to deserve a chattering class that wishes so much harm and depredation upon us?

    Whatever did we do to deserve a chattering class that wishes so much harm and depredation upon us?

    A cynical and overly-reductionist yet perceptive answer to this question is that this chattering class is a foreign occupier, and the name of the author of the cited piece certainly lends credibility to such a thesis.

    Read More
    • Replies: @WJ
    The author and his name. Every time. Or so it seems.
  27. El Dato says:

    Maybe they believe that black oil is black bodies grind into a burnable, exploitable resource now pumped by Arabs being used by White Man for building and powering cities?

    Read More
  28. @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    God Says No

    Read More
    • Replies: @oddsbodkins
    God answers boy's prayer:

    https://www.theonion.com/amp/475
  29. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @LKM
    It should be added that they made the organizer sign the list of demands with a really gay pen. If you doubt that an inanimate object can be gay, click below (safe for work)

    Link

    If BLM Toronto cured cancer tomorrow, I still wouldn't forgive them for that pen.

    The guy signed off on their demands and the parade marched on. The funny part is they completely ignored that list of demands.

    It’s always a major shitshow with that parade. They actually try to celebrate all the infighting – framing it as sort of staying true to it’s roots as a protest march.

    For the record this happend in 2016, not this year. The parade in Minneapolis was shut down this year though.

    Read More
  30. WE Built This

    Nope. Whites built this. How, one may ask? Here’s how.

    Show some gratitude, freaks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Unfortunately I am all too familiar with that city; it ain't Toronto (though it's my understanding Toronto is now equally the most wretched hive of scum and villainy in Canadia, just as that other city is superlative in what used to be the U.S.A.)....

    Given the underlying current – in Toronto as elsewhere – of smug sociopaths turning against one another, what I really want to know is: What does Jian Ghomeshi think of all this stuff?
  31. Anon 2 says:
    @anonyymous

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don’t march in protest of my past and I don’t expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.
     
    You're still making the same mistake. You're looking to a paternal archetype to salve your wounds, and make it right. Too many blacks tend to subconsciously paternalize white people, while too many racially obsessed white people allow themselves to take on the paternal role, unwittingly conforming to their deeply rooted subconcious belief that black people are primitives, fundamentally incapable of conforming to modern civilization in appreciable numbers, and can't be held accountable for their actions without white people's help, money and guidance.

    Try internalizing the notion that, if you've been psychologically wronged, unless you're creating significant value for others, or carry the promise of doing so, nobody cares... but you.

    Everyone in this country, no matter what race, who is young is rich... with time. Too many blacks manage their time like too many blacks manage their lotto winnings.

    A relative few years, outta money, outta time.

    Too many black folks never recognize this, while time marches on.

    No matter what the race: a person, a family, a culture in denial always self-destructs.

    White people, or anyone, can't do shit about that. Until more black folks collectively figure that one out, they'll always have a wheel in the ditch, and a wheel on the track. Shaking their black fists at the whites, asians, jews, and hispanics who pass them by.

    The key (and not often mentioned) fact: in the U.S. about 29%
    of blacks are on welfare as compared to only 5% whites. The figures
    are 2-3 years old but I doubt they’ve changed much since then.
    I wonder how free today’s college professors are to mention this
    fundamental fact in class. Any blacks will instantly
    run to the dean’s office to complain, with unpleasant
    consequences in terms of promotion and tenure. I’m kind
    of glad I don’t teach sociology or criminal justice.

    What the figures imply is not only a tremendous transfer
    of wealth from whites to blacks that’s continually taking
    place but also the fact that many blacks in this country are
    incapable of living in the postindustrial 21st century. I don’t
    have the figures in front of me but I’d assume fewer blacks
    (in percentage terms) were on welfare in the 1950s and
    perhaps ’60s. There was so much optimism then (e.g.,
    Motown sound), black churches were still strong, Billy Graham
    was frequently on TV. 1968, a horrible year otherwise, was
    the peak year of postwar prosperity in the U.S. And then things
    went economically downhill, slowly at first, and then faster
    after 1973

    Read More
    • Replies: @theo the kraut
    - in the U.S. about 29% of blacks are on welfare as compared to only 5% whites.

    Do you have a source?

  32. unit472 says:

    I think American TV needs to revive the TV show Queen For A Day. As I barely recall, in it earlier format a panel of women contestants were brought on to tell their story of how life had crushed them. Contestant A might complain that her boy has polio and her husband fell into a wood chipper while she suffers from a brain tumor. The audience would applaud and the applausometer would rate her misfortune based on the audience response. Contestant B would then come out and try and outdo Contestant A’s tale of woe. At the end of the show the emcee would announce the winner and bevy of beautiful women would come out and annoint her Queen For A Day and she would be awarded an iron lung for her polio stricken boy as well as a washing machine and other prizes.

    A modern remake could make the focus of tragedy more social than medical. Husband in prison, son paralyzed by police gunfire, daughter a drug addict etc. and it could all be made right with brand new Cadillac Escalade! Leftist viewers would revel in the tales of oppression and rightists could laugh at the misfortunes and how they are swept all away by the expensive gifts

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I remember "Queen for a Day." I think the modern version is more lucrative: a million-dollar settlement from the city in exchange for shooting your Gentle Giant while he assaulted a police officer. Oh, and the police officer gets to lose his job and never work in law enforcement again as punishment for defending himself.
  33. Jeff77450 says:
    @syonredux

    Yes, Canada was 97% white in 1971. This is literally imported American rhetorical propaganda. Cities like Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto were more or less French and British cities.
     
    You need to get Woke, bigot.Bet you didn't know that there were 104 Black slaves in Nova Scotia in 1767.And Tories fleeing the American Revolution brought 2,000 enslaved Blacks to Canada.CANADA WAS BUILT ON BLACK BODIES!


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Canada#Under_British_rule

    #BlackCanadianLivesMatter

    So if one-tenth of one percent of Canada was built with black labor that means that blacks “built Canada?” Nonsense. If no black person had ever set foot in Canada we wouldn’t be able to tell the difference. Cities, roads, railroads, ports, airports, etc., it would all still be there.

    The same is essentially true of America. If no black person had ever set foot in America the impact would be more profound because we’d be noticeably better off. The death & destruction of the Civil War, which was not the fault of black people, followed by decades of a large part of the country being impoverished, wiped out the “gains” that resulted from slavery.

    “All other things being equal” we wouldn’t have 30-50% of the street-crime that we do, depending on what category you’re looking at. We wouldn’t have all the dysfunction that results from black thug culture to include an out-of-wedlock birthrate of ~72%. Taxes and insurance-rates would be lower.

    Someone once described black people as “the eternal albatross around America’s neck” and it’s true. I’ve known a great many good black people in both my military & civilian careers, some of them my supervisors and deservedly so. But “net-net” America would be better off if no black people had been brought to America.

    Read More
    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Also whoosh
    , @Hhsiii
    At least Canda gave us Ferguson Jenkins.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    America would be better off if no black people had been brought to America.

    And not just "brought here." They continue to immigrate. Close to ten percent of blacks in America are immigrants.
    , @ogunsiron
    During a chat at work, once, a freshly minded "new canadian" had the audacity to tell me that this whole city (big canadian city) had been built by blacks and arabs. This was a guy who had come from the Ivory Coast maybe 3 years before and he was already claiming this city as having been "built" by his kind.
  34. @Dr. X

    “Who built the Pyramids? A Negro. Who invented the circulation of the blood? A Negro. … Africa for the African worker, Europe for the African worker, Asia, Oceania, America, Arctic and Antarctic for the African worker.”
     
    Yeah.

    I've heard blacks say "We built this country."

    B.S.

    They built nothing: not the transcontinental railroad, not the Hoover Dam, not the Brooklyn Bridge. Blacks were brought here to perform menial, agricultural labor in southern heat, because it was thought that they were able to tolerate heat better than whites, considering how hot most of Africa is.

    They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.

    (In fact, I think that a pseudo-Marxist explanation of the Civil War is the best one: the war happened only when the means of production in the U.S. shifted from Southern agriculture to Northern industry. Indeed, the North won the war not because it had better soldiers, but because it had more money, more people, and more industry. One could say that the slavery issue was a moral cloak thrown over what was primarily a war over which economic system was best).

    I’ve heard blacks say “We built this country.”

    Well to be absurdly evenhanded about it, a case can be made that bl*cks built A country.

    But that country was burned to the ground in the 1860s.

    Read More
  35. @jroll
    A rainbow flag with the Star of David was banned from a Chicago "Dyke March."

    The gay struggle and the Palestinian struggle are apparently one.

    Saying that gays have it good in Israel is "pinkwashing."

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/06/27/opinion/im-glad-the-dyke-march-banned-jewish-stars.html?referer=https://www.google.com/

    Jewish girl replies "what about Tibet."

    Reminds me of Cathy Young saying "what about Finland."

    “A rainbow flag with the Star of David was banned from a Chicago “Dyke March.””

    But rainbow flags at the march in Philly had brown and black stripes added as a nod to BLM.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Steve has mentioned that the Blacks Lives Matter movement seems to have dropped from the headlines lately, but I guess it's still a big deal at gay pride marches.
  36. The usual claim is that blacks were barred from employment and held back. Are they building civilization for the white man at night when nobody is looking, and out of the kindness of their hearts?

    I guess I shouldn’t complain the next time my ac unit is stolen or my house is gutted of copper wiring. They have civilizations to build. No wonder they can’t get to work on time!

    Read More
  37. @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    “emotional labor” resonates with another bogus feminist slogan, “mental load”, which is the playbook I suspect these imbeciles (took/were provided with) it from.

    http://www.workingmother.com/this-comic-perfectly-explains-mental-load-working-mothers-bear

    (woman complains that bloke hasn’t done dishes right there and then because she didn’t specifically ask him to. Apparently the “even having to tell the idiot to wash up” part is bestial phallocracy. It’s not like she’s going to soil her stronk independent hands with it).

    I recently had the end frame of this comic printed out and passive-aggressively stuck on the wall. Presumably because someone spends too much time lost in the cancer that is ‘social media’ and falls into Mumsnet herd-think, instead of cleaning up. After themselves.

    My response, that that was because I’d just got out of the car an hour ago, after a month away working, and that they weren’t there when I left (because it’s one of the things that drives me crazy, a sink rammed full of rotting, rusting crap, and unusable, so I just do it all; trivial task, barely registers) didn’t go down at all well. I think I saw the Magic Smoke™ leaking out of the upper processors, due to incoherence rage.
    I laughed, and ripped the top off a Stella. Didn’t bother with a glass, because washing-up.

    tl;dr boring domestic.
    Somebody is providing the BLM frauds with hackneyed rad-fem concepts and slogans. They didn’t think it up themselves. Wite Wymin of Madness built that, long ago.

    Read More
  38. @Dr. X

    “Who built the Pyramids? A Negro. Who invented the circulation of the blood? A Negro. … Africa for the African worker, Europe for the African worker, Asia, Oceania, America, Arctic and Antarctic for the African worker.”
     
    Yeah.

    I've heard blacks say "We built this country."

    B.S.

    They built nothing: not the transcontinental railroad, not the Hoover Dam, not the Brooklyn Bridge. Blacks were brought here to perform menial, agricultural labor in southern heat, because it was thought that they were able to tolerate heat better than whites, considering how hot most of Africa is.

    They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.

    (In fact, I think that a pseudo-Marxist explanation of the Civil War is the best one: the war happened only when the means of production in the U.S. shifted from Southern agriculture to Northern industry. Indeed, the North won the war not because it had better soldiers, but because it had more money, more people, and more industry. One could say that the slavery issue was a moral cloak thrown over what was primarily a war over which economic system was best).

    Black slaves “built” America in the same way mules “grew” cotton and corn.

    Mule Lives Matter.

    Read More
  39. Thea says:

    Can’t really fault the blacks for going insane when whites have gone rather spectacularly off the rails.

    Police participation in these parade is a very touchy subject on both side due to Stonewall. Some officers working the security will literally turn their backs on co workers as they march past.

    Read More
  40. @Saxon
    Yes, Canada was 97% white in 1971. This is literally imported American rhetorical propaganda. Cities like Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto were more or less French and British cities.

    True, though I’ve noticed a lot of retconning in the media, especially the Toronto Star and the free Metro News paper, that would have you believe Canada’s historical and current demographics are the same as the US. According to this older document http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2003004/article/6802-eng.pdf Canada’s black population was just 0.6 percent in 1871, declining to 0.2 percent in 1971.

    Read More
  41. Much of the “intersectional” stuff is just typical coalition-building with a patina of academic jargon slapped on top of it. But some of it, like BLM groups interrupting Pride parades, is about blacks reinforcing the idea that they are the perpetual champions of the Diversity Victimhood Olympics.

    And they probably need to do this. Despite some of their recreational eccentricities and excesses, a lot of gays tend to pretty much have their act together. Because of this, they make much more attractive political mascots and affirmative action beneficiaries than your typical at-risk youth.

    I always want to ask the white gays who declare themselves to be an “allies” of BLM – do you think that they’re your allies too?

    As for the “we built this” trope: no, blacks haven’t really built all that much in North America. To the extent they have, almost all of it has been because some white guys told them what, where, and how.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Count Robert E. Lee among the naysayers on the "blacks built America" controversy. In a private letter, he advised a family member to hire white labor instead of freed slaves, observing “that wherever you find the negro, everything is going down around him, and wherever you find a white man, you see everything around him improving.”
  42. @Anon 2
    The key (and not often mentioned) fact: in the U.S. about 29%
    of blacks are on welfare as compared to only 5% whites. The figures
    are 2-3 years old but I doubt they've changed much since then.
    I wonder how free today's college professors are to mention this
    fundamental fact in class. Any blacks will instantly
    run to the dean's office to complain, with unpleasant
    consequences in terms of promotion and tenure. I'm kind
    of glad I don't teach sociology or criminal justice.

    What the figures imply is not only a tremendous transfer
    of wealth from whites to blacks that's continually taking
    place but also the fact that many blacks in this country are
    incapable of living in the postindustrial 21st century. I don't
    have the figures in front of me but I'd assume fewer blacks
    (in percentage terms) were on welfare in the 1950s and
    perhaps '60s. There was so much optimism then (e.g.,
    Motown sound), black churches were still strong, Billy Graham
    was frequently on TV. 1968, a horrible year otherwise, was
    the peak year of postwar prosperity in the U.S. And then things
    went economically downhill, slowly at first, and then faster
    after 1973

    - in the U.S. about 29% of blacks are on welfare as compared to only 5% whites.

    Do you have a source?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    These numbers are not easy to find. I either
    found them in Wikipedia or one of the
    references suggested by Wikipedia. I
    simply memorized them because I thought
    the contrast was so striking
  43. @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    This is why we lost for so long. Have you learned nothing? You don’t concede an inch to these people. You mock their complaints, not enter into a long winded discourse that gets blown up into SEE HE AGREES.

    Read More
  44. Sargon of Akkad found a hilarious example in this genre:

    This woman claims that the real victims of the holocaust were Black women, who have been whitewashed from history.

    Apparently, they were threatening Germany by producing lots of illegitimate kids.

    Read More
  45. @snorlax
    OK, but what do you suggest we do about it? If we decide to pay people for their "emotional labor," the inevitable outcome is the payments won't be allocated to each on the basis of the tragicness of his backstory, but rather according to his skill at emotional manipulation (at which the damaged-yet-virtuous are going to be bottom-of-the pack).

    Life is not fair.
    Read More
  46. @Dr. X

    “Who built the Pyramids? A Negro. Who invented the circulation of the blood? A Negro. … Africa for the African worker, Europe for the African worker, Asia, Oceania, America, Arctic and Antarctic for the African worker.”
     
    Yeah.

    I've heard blacks say "We built this country."

    B.S.

    They built nothing: not the transcontinental railroad, not the Hoover Dam, not the Brooklyn Bridge. Blacks were brought here to perform menial, agricultural labor in southern heat, because it was thought that they were able to tolerate heat better than whites, considering how hot most of Africa is.

    They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.

    (In fact, I think that a pseudo-Marxist explanation of the Civil War is the best one: the war happened only when the means of production in the U.S. shifted from Southern agriculture to Northern industry. Indeed, the North won the war not because it had better soldiers, but because it had more money, more people, and more industry. One could say that the slavery issue was a moral cloak thrown over what was primarily a war over which economic system was best).

    >They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.

    The way I remember it the southern plantation owners were about ready to give up on slavery but then the invention of the cotton gin actually made slavery more worthwhile again.

    Read More
  47. @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    My argument against God was that the universe seemed so cruel and unjust. But how had I gotten this idea of just and unjust? A man does not call a line crooked unless he has some idea of a straight line. What was I comparing this universe with when I called it unjust? If the whole show was bad and senseless from A to Z, so to speak, why did I, who was supposed to be part of the show, find myself in such violent reaction against it? A man feels wet when he falls into water, because man is not a water animal: a fish would not feel wet. Of course I could have given up my idea of justice by saying it was nothing but a private idea of my own. But if I did that, then my argument against God collapsed too — for the argument depended on saying that the world was really unjust, not simply that it did not happen to please my private fancies. Thus in the very act of trying to prove that God did not exist — in other words, that the whole of reality was senseless — I found I was forced to assume that one part of reality — namely my idea of justice — was full of sense. Consequently, atheism turns out to be too simple. If the whole universe has no meaning, we should never have found out that it has no meaning: just as, if there were no light in the universe and therefore no creatures with eyes, we should never know it was dark. Dark would be without meaning.

    Do not lament your past any more than you can help it. A horrific childhood may save one’s soul, (and even for an atheist, make his life meaningful and himself a worthy person); cf. Hilton, Paris.

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  48. “BLM’s inner gayness helps explain one reason why it so often gets into spats at Gay Pride Parades, such as in Toronto last month.”

    This part doesn’t quite make sense. If BLM’s inner council are gays, then it would stand to reason that they’d be more pro-police than their rank and files marching foot soldiers out on the streets.

    I state that because in light of:

    “…In most of urban North America, white gay politicians were eventually quite successful at building ties to the police forces. Thus BLM has been obsessed with shutting down gay pride parades that feature police participation.”

    Perhaps at this juncture, BLM’s leadership (which, being heavily gay, one would think they’d tend to be pro-police) can no longer control their own members from going too far with anti-police actions in public forums. Because by this reasoning, BLM’s gay leadership would tend to be more pro-police and see the need of wanting to keep law enforcement on their side instead of driving them away.

    Or, perhaps even for these gays, being black trumps being gay. Race trumps gayness, just as race trumps gender. And many within the BLM leadership are BLACK gays. In other words race trumps everything else about one’s personal identity.

    Black trumps being gay, now THAT motive (as to why BLM’s leadership hates the police) would make sense.

    Read More
  49. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    WE Built This
     
    Nope. Whites built this. How, one may ask? Here’s how.

    Show some gratitude, freaks.

    Unfortunately I am all too familiar with that city; it ain’t Toronto (though it’s my understanding Toronto is now equally the most wretched hive of scum and villainy in Canadia, just as that other city is superlative in what used to be the U.S.A.)….

    Given the underlying current – in Toronto as elsewhere – of smug sociopaths turning against one another, what I really want to know is: What does Jian Ghomeshi think of all this stuff?

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  50. @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    I agree with you that there is something like the “emotional labor” that you describe. I don’t know how to quantify it, but I would suspect that by far the greatest toll on the black community in this regard comes from fatherlessness.

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  51. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    A kind of religious war.

    A war among the gods.

    The three holy ‘races’: Jews, blacks, and homos.

    It used to be Jews and blacks neck and neck, with homos totally out of the picture.

    But under Obama, homos surpassed the blacks almost overnight. Urban elites found homos more useful than criminal blacks. He could do it because he is black. Blacks were too excited over having one of their own to notice that Obama was a tool of homos.

    Blacks were to be treated like Titans who were overthrown by Olympians.

    So, blacks would keep the title of greatness… but be kept underground.

    But the black volcano is trembling again.

    Homos got the flame and the dollar but blacks got the game and the holler.

    Jews prefer homos but need the blacks as cash cow(in music and sports) and ‘white guilt’ talisman.

    The holy three have the most megalo-personalities.

    Jewish chutzpah, homo ‘pride’, and black swagger.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ulJCB-yq1Go

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  52. @franktremb
    "WE!" Until Toronto became the metropolis of Canada in the 70's because of the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Quebec separatist movement, it was almost exclusively a WASP city. And before Pierre Trudeau's multicultural policies, except in Nova Scotia, there was almost no blacks in Canada.

    The revitalization the French language in Montreal in the 70′s was more due to the massive exodus of the English-speaking community and headquarters to Toronto than the language laws. Demography=Destiny.

    And now Montreal is welcoming immigrants who couldn’t care less about Quebec and the separatist movement is faltering. Again Demography=Destiny.

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  53. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Interesting that the holy three, Jews-blacks-homos, are most energized and empowered in Anglo-sphere nations.

    This paradoxically makes them most attracted to Anglo nations(that offer them most freedom and tolerance to gain power and prestige) but also most hostile to them as well.

    Why the hostility? Because if Anglos wake up and put Anglo identity-and-interests first, the holy three will be knocked off their pedestals and the red carpet will be withdrawn. So, the holy three must always rip into Anglos and demand that they put Jews, blacks, and homos above Anglo identity and interests. They love what the Anglos created and got but they want it for themselves.

    So, the holy three are pro-Anglo-world but anti-Anglo-people.

    But why would Anglos put up with this?
    Two reasons. ‘White Guilt’ disseminated by media and academia paralyzes them.
    But there’s also the carrot along with the stick. If ‘progressive’ Anglos express reverence and proper deference to the holy three, they are blessed and praised as ‘good whites’ who reject ‘racism’, ‘homophobia’, and ‘antisemitism’, the three greatest taboos/sins. (Homosexuality is appealing esp to Anglos because an Anglo who is homo is washed of sin and holy. So, a white homo has innate purity missing in white straights. In the Current Year, a white man’s ticket to holiness is taking it up the bung.)

    Holy three are noble simply for what they are.

    But Anglos are only noble for what they DO, and this means they must tirelessly DO the things that appease the holy three. No matter what they did in the past, if they stop doing they are ignoble once again.

    It’s like the holy three are clean without washing.

    In contrast, Anglos can only temporarily be clean by washing their sins. Once their obsessive-compulsive behavior stops, they are dirty and stained again. The whole SJW mentality. Really a form of Political OCD.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsessive%E2%80%93compulsive_disorder

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rh8TLaXGvMs

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  54. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anonymous
    OT

    http://www.newsweek.com/sessionss-roots-lie-lazy-laughing-south-blood-its-mouth-633638

    Sessions’ Roots Lie in 'the Lazy, Laughing South'
    By Rick Perlstein

    Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III: From commanding the war against immigrants to crusading in defense of the travel ban; from sabotaging the deployment of science on behalf of those wrongly accused to giving urban police departments a free hand to murder blacks; by pioneering new lows in criminalizing dissent and waging jihad against even the medical use of marijuana—and, last but not least, by signing away a decade of bipartisan work to reverse America’s failed, racist mass incarceration policies—the attorney general knows how to get things done.
     
    Whatever did we do to deserve a chattering class that wishes so much harm and depredation upon us?

    Sessions’ Roots Lie in ‘the Lazy, Laughing South’

    By Rick Perlstein

    The byline puts the title into sharper focus.

    What would Newsweek think of the following headline:

    Rick Perlstein’s Roots Lie in ‘the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl’

    Read More
    • Replies: @the Supreme Gentleman

    What would Newsweek think of the following headline:

    Rick Perlstein’s Roots Lie in ‘the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl’
     

    I don't understand this accusation of hypocrisy, because "Rick Perlstein's Roots lie in 'the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl'" is what I presume you, and iSteve commenters/paleocons/white nationalists more generally, genuinely believe.

    Indeed, I'm not sure what the difference is between iSteve commenters and Newsweek here except that they disagree on the merits: mainstream progressives would agree that progressive Jews have had their political opinions shaped by their ethno-cultural background and that white Gentile Southerners have had their political opinions shaped by their ethno-cultural background.

    Except that progressives would say that Jews' view of 19th century Russian Jewish life is accurate whereas white nationalists' view of mid-2oth century white American life is a myth, and the reality supports their opinions, and white nationalists would say the reverse.

    That is to say, Newsweek wouldn't agree with your hypothetical characterization of putatively shtetl-derived opinions as hateful/evil etc., but they would probably agree that the opinions are partially shtetl-derived.

    Likewise, I presume that you wouldn't agree with Newsweek's description of Sessions' views as bigoted/hateful/racist etc., but that you would agree that his views have been shaped by his upbringing in the American South.

    So really I don't see that Newsweek is being hypocritical here, or at least if so then it's equally hypocritical as many of the iSteve commenters accusing it of hypocrisy.

    , @Anonymous
    And the following lede:

    From commanding the illegal demographic war against Americans to waging jihad against even the puniest of measures to keep terrorists out; from sabotaging law enforcement to neglecting citizens' safety for the sake of race hucksterism; from something, something to something, something Reefer Madness; by pioneering new lows in criminalizing dissent (wait a minute, didn't Perlstein just say that?) to taking away life-and-death decisions from parents -- and, last but not least, by signing away Bill Clinton's work to reverse decades of America's failed, soft-on-crime policies -- the shtetl-pundit knows how to cheerlead everything a government can inflict on its kulaks.
     
  55. Anon 2 says:
    @theo the kraut
    - in the U.S. about 29% of blacks are on welfare as compared to only 5% whites.

    Do you have a source?

    These numbers are not easy to find. I either
    found them in Wikipedia or one of the
    references suggested by Wikipedia. I
    simply memorized them because I thought
    the contrast was so striking

    Read More
  56. “Historical Megalomania”. I like that. As you mention with hate hoaxes, it’s a phenomenon I’d noticed before but never had a name to put to it.

    Read More
  57. @Dr. X

    “Who built the Pyramids? A Negro. Who invented the circulation of the blood? A Negro. … Africa for the African worker, Europe for the African worker, Asia, Oceania, America, Arctic and Antarctic for the African worker.”
     
    Yeah.

    I've heard blacks say "We built this country."

    B.S.

    They built nothing: not the transcontinental railroad, not the Hoover Dam, not the Brooklyn Bridge. Blacks were brought here to perform menial, agricultural labor in southern heat, because it was thought that they were able to tolerate heat better than whites, considering how hot most of Africa is.

    They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.

    (In fact, I think that a pseudo-Marxist explanation of the Civil War is the best one: the war happened only when the means of production in the U.S. shifted from Southern agriculture to Northern industry. Indeed, the North won the war not because it had better soldiers, but because it had more money, more people, and more industry. One could say that the slavery issue was a moral cloak thrown over what was primarily a war over which economic system was best).

    “They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.”

    Invented, mind you, by Eli Whitney, a black man.

    Read More
  58. @Saxon
    Yes, Canada was 97% white in 1971. This is literally imported American rhetorical propaganda. Cities like Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto were more or less French and British cities.

    Only 97%?

    Black population of Canada: (StatCan, Wikipedia)
    1871: 21,500 = 0.58%
    1971: 34,400 = 0.16%
    2001: 662,200 = 2.21%

    During Canada’s period of greatest growth Blacks were a small and shrinking presence. Their numbers grew after Canada was built up.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    They came here from abroad to reap the benefits of a white society and country created by whites.
    , @Saxon
    Canada had blacks come in from the US "underground railroad" movement which is why there were any at all, but the 3% non-whites was largely the natives and some small number of Chinese who, while demographically larger a number than blacks were still not very demographically significant. Now there are so many that Vancouver for example is no longer a British city and is often called Hongcouver.

    The point being here is that they had nothing to do with building anything up in Canada and that most of the ones currently in Canada can't even claim to be descendants of muh slavery since they're post-1970s Trudeau Sr. dystopia and also that they can't even claim that slavery even really happened in Canada since it was outlawed before confederation owing to it being considered British soil thus having British laws.
  59. @franktremb
    "WE!" Until Toronto became the metropolis of Canada in the 70's because of the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Quebec separatist movement, it was almost exclusively a WASP city. And before Pierre Trudeau's multicultural policies, except in Nova Scotia, there was almost no blacks in Canada.

    Agreed. I was raised in NYC in the fifties and sixties so have experienced black vibrancy from the beginning. My father grew up in Saskatchewan and later Ontario in the twenties and thirties. I thought it hilarious when he described his first sighting of a black person in a Toronto department store around 1935. He said that he and his sister followed him around for a few minutes simply because they’d never seen a black person before. I imaging the few Canadian blacks in those days were used to that reaction from the native whites.

    Read More
  60. @Intelligent Dasein
    At the risk of sounding very out of place, I have to say that "emotional labor" is not a concept to which I am totally opposed. It resonates with me personally, as I'm sure it does with all those who've had to shoulder unjust burdens in life. After much reflection I've become very familiar with the manifold ways in which the bad environment of one's youth compounds to make life more difficult than it otherwise might have been. Even if you manage to overcome a lot of it, you will always have that anchor weighing you down. You may come to understand why your life went wrong, but you still can't go back and fix it. It's only natural to ask yourself, "What is there to compensate me for the lost time, for the years sent in pain and ignorance and missed opportunities, groping my way towards some sort of stability?"

    The difference with me, of course, is that I don't march in protest of my past and I don't expect compensation from the socio-political system. The yearning takes on more of a religious dimension. It is God from Whom I desire justice, or at least a sympathetic ear. The desire for a life made right, hoped for but unrealized, is the substance of every true prayer of supplication.

    BLM is certainly making a rather unconvincing abuse of the concept that will fail to impress anybody who still retains a semblance of honesty and humility. It is a morality play put on by the sociopathically proud for the amusement of the hypocritically proud. But the abuse of a thing is no argument against its right usage. It would be a mistake to think that our emotional labors do not legitimately seek some sort of reward.

    You want emotional labor, I’ll give you emotional labor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8WbxUZbOPQ

    Read More
  61. I can’t wait until Negro (and faggot) Fatigue transitions to the next logical viewpoint.

    I figure it will coincide with discovery that unlimited borrowing is not.

    Buy stock in (or of) Remington, Federal and Winchester to beat the rush.

    Read More
  62. WJ says:
    @Nico

    Whatever did we do to deserve a chattering class that wishes so much harm and depredation upon us?
     
    A cynical and overly-reductionist yet perceptive answer to this question is that this chattering class is a foreign occupier, and the name of the author of the cited piece certainly lends credibility to such a thesis.

    The author and his name. Every time. Or so it seems.

    Read More
  63. Rifleman says:
    @Anonymous
    OT

    http://www.newsweek.com/sessionss-roots-lie-lazy-laughing-south-blood-its-mouth-633638

    Sessions’ Roots Lie in 'the Lazy, Laughing South'
    By Rick Perlstein

    Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III: From commanding the war against immigrants to crusading in defense of the travel ban; from sabotaging the deployment of science on behalf of those wrongly accused to giving urban police departments a free hand to murder blacks; by pioneering new lows in criminalizing dissent and waging jihad against even the medical use of marijuana—and, last but not least, by signing away a decade of bipartisan work to reverse America’s failed, racist mass incarceration policies—the attorney general knows how to get things done.
     
    Whatever did we do to deserve a chattering class that wishes so much harm and depredation upon us?

    What do they mean by “WE built this” ?

    Built – Toronto? Canada? the gay pride movement?

    I know its all about general black ego tripping but are they also referencing to something more specific?

    The BLM movement is both heavily gay/lesbian but also mixed race and in Europe very White. These are people who feel on the fringe of the black world and want to make themselves more of the center.

    So they fixate on an outside threat – White people, the cops – in order to create a stronger bond with a black racial identity that is under siege.

    Read More
  64. WJ says:
    @jroll
    A rainbow flag with the Star of David was banned from a Chicago "Dyke March."

    The gay struggle and the Palestinian struggle are apparently one.

    Saying that gays have it good in Israel is "pinkwashing."

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/06/27/opinion/im-glad-the-dyke-march-banned-jewish-stars.html?referer=https://www.google.com/

    Jewish girl replies "what about Tibet."

    Reminds me of Cathy Young saying "what about Finland."

    A logical assumption regarding the star of david banned would be because Gay Marriage is not legal in Israel.

    Read More
  65. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Why do we never see movies about the brave teams of Negroes who pulled all those sledges and made the conquest of the Yukon possible?

    Read More
  66. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @franktremb
    "WE!" Until Toronto became the metropolis of Canada in the 70's because of the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Quebec separatist movement, it was almost exclusively a WASP city. And before Pierre Trudeau's multicultural policies, except in Nova Scotia, there was almost no blacks in Canada.

    Until Trudeau the first came to power in 1968 Canada was an overwhelmingly white country. Blacks were extremely few in number. They played zero role in the development of the country. Extreme historical revisionism now has blacks as central players in Canada’s heritage (!) and we have even imported the stupid American “black history month” nonsense.

    Read More
  67. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @syonredux

    Yes, Canada was 97% white in 1971. This is literally imported American rhetorical propaganda. Cities like Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto were more or less French and British cities.
     
    You need to get Woke, bigot.Bet you didn't know that there were 104 Black slaves in Nova Scotia in 1767.And Tories fleeing the American Revolution brought 2,000 enslaved Blacks to Canada.CANADA WAS BUILT ON BLACK BODIES!


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Canada#Under_British_rule

    #BlackCanadianLivesMatter

    This may be the most ridiculous comment ever posted.

    Read More
  68. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @doc of the bay
    Only 97%?

    Black population of Canada: (StatCan, Wikipedia)
    1871: 21,500 = 0.58%
    1971: 34,400 = 0.16%
    2001: 662,200 = 2.21%

    During Canada's period of greatest growth Blacks were a small and shrinking presence. Their numbers grew after Canada was built up.

    They came here from abroad to reap the benefits of a white society and country created by whites.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico
    Wrong. The Magical Negro instructed the white master and the white prole by telepathy.

    THEY. BUILT. THIS.
  69. Olorin says:
    @Anonymous
    OT

    http://www.newsweek.com/sessionss-roots-lie-lazy-laughing-south-blood-its-mouth-633638

    Sessions’ Roots Lie in 'the Lazy, Laughing South'
    By Rick Perlstein

    Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III: From commanding the war against immigrants to crusading in defense of the travel ban; from sabotaging the deployment of science on behalf of those wrongly accused to giving urban police departments a free hand to murder blacks; by pioneering new lows in criminalizing dissent and waging jihad against even the medical use of marijuana—and, last but not least, by signing away a decade of bipartisan work to reverse America’s failed, racist mass incarceration policies—the attorney general knows how to get things done.
     
    Whatever did we do to deserve a chattering class that wishes so much harm and depredation upon us?

    1) Read their crap.

    2) Believed it.

    3) Even after ceasing to believe it, still read it.

    4) Continue to click on it/talk about it.

    5) Supported their advertisers by buying their products.

    Read More
  70. Nico says:
    @Dr. X

    “Who built the Pyramids? A Negro. Who invented the circulation of the blood? A Negro. … Africa for the African worker, Europe for the African worker, Asia, Oceania, America, Arctic and Antarctic for the African worker.”
     
    Yeah.

    I've heard blacks say "We built this country."

    B.S.

    They built nothing: not the transcontinental railroad, not the Hoover Dam, not the Brooklyn Bridge. Blacks were brought here to perform menial, agricultural labor in southern heat, because it was thought that they were able to tolerate heat better than whites, considering how hot most of Africa is.

    They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented.

    (In fact, I think that a pseudo-Marxist explanation of the Civil War is the best one: the war happened only when the means of production in the U.S. shifted from Southern agriculture to Northern industry. Indeed, the North won the war not because it had better soldiers, but because it had more money, more people, and more industry. One could say that the slavery issue was a moral cloak thrown over what was primarily a war over which economic system was best).

    I think that a pseudo-Marxist explanation of the Civil War is the best one: the war happened only when the means of production in the U.S. shifted from Southern agriculture to Northern industry. Indeed, the North won the war not because it had better soldiers, but because it had more money, more people, and more industry. One could say that the slavery issue was a moral cloak thrown over what was primarily a war over which economic system was best

    This still has to be qualified by the fact that the North did argue, at the time, that the slavery element of the plantation economy was superior to the formally free labor model of the industrial economy. Of course, anyone who knows anything about the Industrial Revolution knows that this was a stretch at best, and it was only even possible to contemplate in North America: the initial proles of industrialization in England lived and worked in perhaps the most horrid conditions ever known to mankind and only after one or two generations of miserable toil did living conditions begin to rise more generally.

    The kernel of truth in your argument however is that slavery qua slavery was in any event far less important to understanding the war than either our contemporaries or theirs would sometimes like or have wanted to think. This is more intuitive if one understands that the socioeconomics of the American Civil War, of an agricultural/remnant feudal and hierarchical structure resisting an industrial and [classically] liberal onslaught closely mirror those of similar European conflicts of the period (the French Revolution, the Austro-Prussian War and the Risorgimento).

    Read More
  71. Nico says:
    @anon
    They came here from abroad to reap the benefits of a white society and country created by whites.

    Wrong. The Magical Negro instructed the white master and the white prole by telepathy.

    THEY. BUILT. THIS.

    Read More
  72. snorlax says:
    @Jeff77450
    So if one-tenth of one percent of Canada was built with black labor that means that blacks "built Canada?" Nonsense. If no black person had ever set foot in Canada we wouldn't be able to tell the difference. Cities, roads, railroads, ports, airports, etc., it would all still be there.

    The same is essentially true of America. If no black person had ever set foot in America the impact would be more profound because we'd be noticeably better off. The death & destruction of the Civil War, which was not the fault of black people, followed by decades of a large part of the country being impoverished, wiped out the "gains" that resulted from slavery.

    "All other things being equal" we wouldn't have 30-50% of the street-crime that we do, depending on what category you're looking at. We wouldn't have all the dysfunction that results from black thug culture to include an out-of-wedlock birthrate of ~72%. Taxes and insurance-rates would be lower.

    Someone once described black people as "the eternal albatross around America's neck" and it's true. I've known a great many good black people in both my military & civilian careers, some of them my supervisors and deservedly so. But "net-net" America would be better off if no black people had been brought to America.

    Also whoosh

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jeff77450
    I'm guessing that "whoosh" in this context is meant to signal agreement in which case thank you.
    , @Tex
    We are living in the Onion Singularity after all.
  73. Rob McX says:

    There’s a whole continent to remind us of what blacks can build if left to themselves. And they can’t get out of it fast enough in their overcrowded boats.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hhsiii
    Haiti is s better example dice they kicked whitey out centuries ago. The DR next door on Hispaniola is a veritable economic juggernaut by comparison.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome


    And they can’t get out of it fast enough in their overcrowded boats.

     

    "Our" overcrowded boats.
  74. @unit472
    I think American TV needs to revive the TV show Queen For A Day. As I barely recall, in it earlier format a panel of women contestants were brought on to tell their story of how life had crushed them. Contestant A might complain that her boy has polio and her husband fell into a wood chipper while she suffers from a brain tumor. The audience would applaud and the applausometer would rate her misfortune based on the audience response. Contestant B would then come out and try and outdo Contestant A's tale of woe. At the end of the show the emcee would announce the winner and bevy of beautiful women would come out and annoint her Queen For A Day and she would be awarded an iron lung for her polio stricken boy as well as a washing machine and other prizes.

    A modern remake could make the focus of tragedy more social than medical. Husband in prison, son paralyzed by police gunfire, daughter a drug addict etc. and it could all be made right with brand new Cadillac Escalade! Leftist viewers would revel in the tales of oppression and rightists could laugh at the misfortunes and how they are swept all away by the expensive gifts

    I remember “Queen for a Day.” I think the modern version is more lucrative: a million-dollar settlement from the city in exchange for shooting your Gentle Giant while he assaulted a police officer. Oh, and the police officer gets to lose his job and never work in law enforcement again as punishment for defending himself.

    Read More
  75. @Mr. Anon

    Sessions’ Roots Lie in ‘the Lazy, Laughing South’

    By Rick Perlstein
     

    The byline puts the title into sharper focus.

    What would Newsweek think of the following headline:


    Rick Perlstein's Roots Lie in ‘the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl’
     

    What would Newsweek think of the following headline:

    Rick Perlstein’s Roots Lie in ‘the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl’

    I don’t understand this accusation of hypocrisy, because “Rick Perlstein’s Roots lie in ‘the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl’” is what I presume you, and iSteve commenters/paleocons/white nationalists more generally, genuinely believe.

    Indeed, I’m not sure what the difference is between iSteve commenters and Newsweek here except that they disagree on the merits: mainstream progressives would agree that progressive Jews have had their political opinions shaped by their ethno-cultural background and that white Gentile Southerners have had their political opinions shaped by their ethno-cultural background.

    Except that progressives would say that Jews’ view of 19th century Russian Jewish life is accurate whereas white nationalists’ view of mid-2oth century white American life is a myth, and the reality supports their opinions, and white nationalists would say the reverse.

    That is to say, Newsweek wouldn’t agree with your hypothetical characterization of putatively shtetl-derived opinions as hateful/evil etc., but they would probably agree that the opinions are partially shtetl-derived.

    Likewise, I presume that you wouldn’t agree with Newsweek’s description of Sessions’ views as bigoted/hateful/racist etc., but that you would agree that his views have been shaped by his upbringing in the American South.

    So really I don’t see that Newsweek is being hypocritical here, or at least if so then it’s equally hypocritical as many of the iSteve commenters accusing it of hypocrisy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    What if he isn't accusing them of hypocrisy but pointing out that "shtetl-derived" opinions are mainstream and their proponents untouchable (and perhaps that they're harmful to the white Gentile minority, just as Perlstein says Southern views are harmful to the black minority)?
    , @kaganovitch
    "So really I don’t see that Newsweek is being hypocritical here, or at least if so then it’s equally hypocritical as many of the iSteve commenters accusing it of hypocrisy"

    The point is that Newsweek would view the Perlstein/Shtetl argument as not just empirically unjustified but as an illegitimate FORM of argument, i.e. the dreaded "antisemitic stereotype". This constrains them not at all from employing the very same form of argument against Southerners, hence the accusations of hypocrisy.
  76. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Mr. Anon

    Sessions’ Roots Lie in ‘the Lazy, Laughing South’

    By Rick Perlstein
     

    The byline puts the title into sharper focus.

    What would Newsweek think of the following headline:


    Rick Perlstein's Roots Lie in ‘the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl’
     

    And the following lede:

    From commanding the illegal demographic war against Americans to waging jihad against even the puniest of measures to keep terrorists out; from sabotaging law enforcement to neglecting citizens’ safety for the sake of race hucksterism; from something, something to something, something Reefer Madness; by pioneering new lows in criminalizing dissent (wait a minute, didn’t Perlstein just say that?) to taking away life-and-death decisions from parents — and, last but not least, by signing away Bill Clinton’s work to reverse decades of America’s failed, soft-on-crime policies — the shtetl-pundit knows how to cheerlead everything a government can inflict on its kulaks.

    Read More
  77. Dee says:
    @oddsbodkins
    "They became superfluous as soon as the cotton gin was invented."

    Not really, you still needed a lot of cheap labor to pick it. My (white) grandmother picked cotton in the 30s.

    They were inventing the mechanical cotton picker in the ’30s; that was the true end of any work picking cotton. Now you have 10 people; guy driving the picker, 4 truck drivers taking it to the plant, and 5 at the plant, producing what took hundreds before.

    Read More
  78. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @the Supreme Gentleman

    What would Newsweek think of the following headline:

    Rick Perlstein’s Roots Lie in ‘the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl’
     

    I don't understand this accusation of hypocrisy, because "Rick Perlstein's Roots lie in 'the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl'" is what I presume you, and iSteve commenters/paleocons/white nationalists more generally, genuinely believe.

    Indeed, I'm not sure what the difference is between iSteve commenters and Newsweek here except that they disagree on the merits: mainstream progressives would agree that progressive Jews have had their political opinions shaped by their ethno-cultural background and that white Gentile Southerners have had their political opinions shaped by their ethno-cultural background.

    Except that progressives would say that Jews' view of 19th century Russian Jewish life is accurate whereas white nationalists' view of mid-2oth century white American life is a myth, and the reality supports their opinions, and white nationalists would say the reverse.

    That is to say, Newsweek wouldn't agree with your hypothetical characterization of putatively shtetl-derived opinions as hateful/evil etc., but they would probably agree that the opinions are partially shtetl-derived.

    Likewise, I presume that you wouldn't agree with Newsweek's description of Sessions' views as bigoted/hateful/racist etc., but that you would agree that his views have been shaped by his upbringing in the American South.

    So really I don't see that Newsweek is being hypocritical here, or at least if so then it's equally hypocritical as many of the iSteve commenters accusing it of hypocrisy.

    What if he isn’t accusing them of hypocrisy but pointing out that “shtetl-derived” opinions are mainstream and their proponents untouchable (and perhaps that they’re harmful to the white Gentile minority, just as Perlstein says Southern views are harmful to the black minority)?

    Read More
  79. Dee says:

    PBS is re-running The Civil War . I think the 152 years of peace are going to be replaced with some ultra-violence. If I lived in the city or suburbs, I’d have some kind of bug out planned ahead of need. Hamburg riots should give you a little to think about….

    Just saw the BART management (bay area rapid transit) won’t release the security camera footage when feral negros pile into a car and rob the passengers of phones, wallets, anything else of value. They be afraid it would make their patrons even more fearful of feral negros, that being a stereotype an all.

    Local news is just one feral negro criminal after another, usually attacking whites…

    Read More
  80. Hhsiii says:
    @Jeff77450
    So if one-tenth of one percent of Canada was built with black labor that means that blacks "built Canada?" Nonsense. If no black person had ever set foot in Canada we wouldn't be able to tell the difference. Cities, roads, railroads, ports, airports, etc., it would all still be there.

    The same is essentially true of America. If no black person had ever set foot in America the impact would be more profound because we'd be noticeably better off. The death & destruction of the Civil War, which was not the fault of black people, followed by decades of a large part of the country being impoverished, wiped out the "gains" that resulted from slavery.

    "All other things being equal" we wouldn't have 30-50% of the street-crime that we do, depending on what category you're looking at. We wouldn't have all the dysfunction that results from black thug culture to include an out-of-wedlock birthrate of ~72%. Taxes and insurance-rates would be lower.

    Someone once described black people as "the eternal albatross around America's neck" and it's true. I've known a great many good black people in both my military & civilian careers, some of them my supervisors and deservedly so. But "net-net" America would be better off if no black people had been brought to America.

    At least Canda gave us Ferguson Jenkins.

    Read More
  81. Hhsiii says:
    @Rob McX
    There's a whole continent to remind us of what blacks can build if left to themselves. And they can't get out of it fast enough in their overcrowded boats.

    Haiti is s better example dice they kicked whitey out centuries ago. The DR next door on Hispaniola is a veritable economic juggernaut by comparison.

    Read More
  82. @Jeff77450
    So if one-tenth of one percent of Canada was built with black labor that means that blacks "built Canada?" Nonsense. If no black person had ever set foot in Canada we wouldn't be able to tell the difference. Cities, roads, railroads, ports, airports, etc., it would all still be there.

    The same is essentially true of America. If no black person had ever set foot in America the impact would be more profound because we'd be noticeably better off. The death & destruction of the Civil War, which was not the fault of black people, followed by decades of a large part of the country being impoverished, wiped out the "gains" that resulted from slavery.

    "All other things being equal" we wouldn't have 30-50% of the street-crime that we do, depending on what category you're looking at. We wouldn't have all the dysfunction that results from black thug culture to include an out-of-wedlock birthrate of ~72%. Taxes and insurance-rates would be lower.

    Someone once described black people as "the eternal albatross around America's neck" and it's true. I've known a great many good black people in both my military & civilian careers, some of them my supervisors and deservedly so. But "net-net" America would be better off if no black people had been brought to America.

    America would be better off if no black people had been brought to America.

    And not just “brought here.” They continue to immigrate. Close to ten percent of blacks in America are immigrants.

    Read More
  83. @The Alarmist

    "A rainbow flag with the Star of David was banned from a Chicago “Dyke March.”"
     
    But rainbow flags at the march in Philly had brown and black stripes added as a nod to BLM.

    Steve has mentioned that the Blacks Lives Matter movement seems to have dropped from the headlines lately, but I guess it’s still a big deal at gay pride marches.

    Read More
  84. @Darwin's Sh-tlist
    Much of the "intersectional" stuff is just typical coalition-building with a patina of academic jargon slapped on top of it. But some of it, like BLM groups interrupting Pride parades, is about blacks reinforcing the idea that they are the perpetual champions of the Diversity Victimhood Olympics.

    And they probably need to do this. Despite some of their recreational eccentricities and excesses, a lot of gays tend to pretty much have their act together. Because of this, they make much more attractive political mascots and affirmative action beneficiaries than your typical at-risk youth.

    I always want to ask the white gays who declare themselves to be an "allies" of BLM - do you think that they're your allies too?

    As for the "we built this" trope: no, blacks haven't really built all that much in North America. To the extent they have, almost all of it has been because some white guys told them what, where, and how.

    Count Robert E. Lee among the naysayers on the “blacks built America” controversy. In a private letter, he advised a family member to hire white labor instead of freed slaves, observing “that wherever you find the negro, everything is going down around him, and wherever you find a white man, you see everything around him improving.”

    Read More
  85. @the Supreme Gentleman

    What would Newsweek think of the following headline:

    Rick Perlstein’s Roots Lie in ‘the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl’
     

    I don't understand this accusation of hypocrisy, because "Rick Perlstein's Roots lie in 'the Scheming, Grasping Shtetl'" is what I presume you, and iSteve commenters/paleocons/white nationalists more generally, genuinely believe.

    Indeed, I'm not sure what the difference is between iSteve commenters and Newsweek here except that they disagree on the merits: mainstream progressives would agree that progressive Jews have had their political opinions shaped by their ethno-cultural background and that white Gentile Southerners have had their political opinions shaped by their ethno-cultural background.

    Except that progressives would say that Jews' view of 19th century Russian Jewish life is accurate whereas white nationalists' view of mid-2oth century white American life is a myth, and the reality supports their opinions, and white nationalists would say the reverse.

    That is to say, Newsweek wouldn't agree with your hypothetical characterization of putatively shtetl-derived opinions as hateful/evil etc., but they would probably agree that the opinions are partially shtetl-derived.

    Likewise, I presume that you wouldn't agree with Newsweek's description of Sessions' views as bigoted/hateful/racist etc., but that you would agree that his views have been shaped by his upbringing in the American South.

    So really I don't see that Newsweek is being hypocritical here, or at least if so then it's equally hypocritical as many of the iSteve commenters accusing it of hypocrisy.

    “So really I don’t see that Newsweek is being hypocritical here, or at least if so then it’s equally hypocritical as many of the iSteve commenters accusing it of hypocrisy”

    The point is that Newsweek would view the Perlstein/Shtetl argument as not just empirically unjustified but as an illegitimate FORM of argument, i.e. the dreaded “antisemitic stereotype”. This constrains them not at all from employing the very same form of argument against Southerners, hence the accusations of hypocrisy.

    Read More
  86. Nico says:
    @The True and Original David
    Labor means production. Emotional labor produces what? It produces you. You are your own reward.

    If I had a nickel for every life crisis that ground my soul into dust, I would be driving a Ferrari. So would you and many.

    Schopenhauer said humans should address each other as "Fellow Sufferer."

    It's right to seek God because the Ferrari isn't coming.

    It’s right to seek God because the Ferrari isn’t coming.

    The sentiments enunciated by “Intelligent Dasein” are at best quaintly annoying if uttered by a child: when shouted out by an adrenaline-pumped adult they can quickly degenerate into a deadly war cry, as the last few years in Baltimore aptly demonstrate. We have an adult problem in our society on many planes. Your send-up of the stolen childhood victimhood complex hit it right out of the park.

    Read More
  87. Jeff77450 says:
    @Harry Baldwin
    America would be better off if no black people had been brought to America.

    And not just "brought here." They continue to immigrate. Close to ten percent of blacks in America are immigrants.

    Valid point. Thank you.

    Read More
  88. Jeff77450 says:
    @snorlax
    Also whoosh

    I’m guessing that “whoosh” in this context is meant to signal agreement in which case thank you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    You’re most welcome.

    In all seriousness, rereading your comment I may’ve been too hasty in accusing you of not getting that syonredux’s post was sarcastic. And also it was a good comment, you made your points well and I agree fully. So, my apologies. :)
  89. ogunsiron says:
    @SnakeEyes
    I don't understand the "... we built this" part of the slogan. Is "this" a reference to the Pride Parade? What are they talking about?

    Pretty sure they mean that they built Canada. Just like they “built” the United States. Just like they built Germany and Norway. No, they’re not kidding.

    Read More
  90. ogunsiron says:
    @Jeff77450
    So if one-tenth of one percent of Canada was built with black labor that means that blacks "built Canada?" Nonsense. If no black person had ever set foot in Canada we wouldn't be able to tell the difference. Cities, roads, railroads, ports, airports, etc., it would all still be there.

    The same is essentially true of America. If no black person had ever set foot in America the impact would be more profound because we'd be noticeably better off. The death & destruction of the Civil War, which was not the fault of black people, followed by decades of a large part of the country being impoverished, wiped out the "gains" that resulted from slavery.

    "All other things being equal" we wouldn't have 30-50% of the street-crime that we do, depending on what category you're looking at. We wouldn't have all the dysfunction that results from black thug culture to include an out-of-wedlock birthrate of ~72%. Taxes and insurance-rates would be lower.

    Someone once described black people as "the eternal albatross around America's neck" and it's true. I've known a great many good black people in both my military & civilian careers, some of them my supervisors and deservedly so. But "net-net" America would be better off if no black people had been brought to America.

    During a chat at work, once, a freshly minded “new canadian” had the audacity to tell me that this whole city (big canadian city) had been built by blacks and arabs. This was a guy who had come from the Ivory Coast maybe 3 years before and he was already claiming this city as having been “built” by his kind.

    Read More
  91. snorlax says:
    @Jeff77450
    I'm guessing that "whoosh" in this context is meant to signal agreement in which case thank you.

    You’re most welcome.

    In all seriousness, rereading your comment I may’ve been too hasty in accusing you of not getting that syonredux’s post was sarcastic. And also it was a good comment, you made your points well and I agree fully. So, my apologies. :)

    Read More
  92. @Rob McX
    There's a whole continent to remind us of what blacks can build if left to themselves. And they can't get out of it fast enough in their overcrowded boats.

    And they can’t get out of it fast enough in their overcrowded boats.

    “Our” overcrowded boats.

    Read More
  93. Saxon says:
    @doc of the bay
    Only 97%?

    Black population of Canada: (StatCan, Wikipedia)
    1871: 21,500 = 0.58%
    1971: 34,400 = 0.16%
    2001: 662,200 = 2.21%

    During Canada's period of greatest growth Blacks were a small and shrinking presence. Their numbers grew after Canada was built up.

    Canada had blacks come in from the US “underground railroad” movement which is why there were any at all, but the 3% non-whites was largely the natives and some small number of Chinese who, while demographically larger a number than blacks were still not very demographically significant. Now there are so many that Vancouver for example is no longer a British city and is often called Hongcouver.

    The point being here is that they had nothing to do with building anything up in Canada and that most of the ones currently in Canada can’t even claim to be descendants of muh slavery since they’re post-1970s Trudeau Sr. dystopia and also that they can’t even claim that slavery even really happened in Canada since it was outlawed before confederation owing to it being considered British soil thus having British laws.

    Read More

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