The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
"Blade Runner 2049"
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

The Sicario/Arrival director’s sequel to Blade Runner, which was set in an Asian-overrun Los Angeles in 2019, looks like La La Land the Sci-Fi Movie: in the future, apparently, white people will still make up most of the cinematically interesting Angelenos.

Judging by the IMDB cast list, Edward James Olmos will be the only Chicano left in Los Angeles.

By the way, Olmos’ police detective in Blade Runner was likely inspired by the Mexican-American police detective in Raymond Chandler’s 1952 novel The Long Goodbye. Olmos then went on to play the mournful Lt. Castillo in Miami Vice. (The TV show wasn’t really in gear until he was added midway through the first season.) The unhappy Mexican detective also shows up in Larry Gelbart’s fine Broadway musical tribute to L.A. noir, City of Angels. If you are going to write a spec script, think about writing a noir one, in part because it’s kind of okay to borrow stuff from the hard boiled masters, as we can see from how even a minor character from The Long Goodbye has had a terrific afterlife in a fine movie, TV show, and musical.

 
Hide 236 CommentsLeave a Comment
236 Comments to ""Blade Runner 2049""
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. syonredux says:

    Depicting a Mestizo Hispanic future would be too depressing.

    As for Blade Runner 2049, they should have just used the source novel (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?) for the plot. Now that would have been interesting. DADOES is a lot more thought-provoking than Blade Runner

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bastion
    Yeah, shooting a film in an LA run by mestizos would have to be challenging, particularly night shots, given the dearth of electric light and all.
    , @This Is Our Home
    They did make a film set in a futuristic Mestizo LA. It was incredibly depressing. Everyone not mediocre had left to a nation in space called Elysium, although somehow the moral of the story was that there should be no border between Elysium and dystopian LA just as the current moral is that there should be no wall between Mexico and the US.

    The film was not great so we will not find out the result of that Dreamified immigration and how people must be allowed to move from newly dystopian and mediocre Elysium to Elysium 2 (a gated community/nation in another dimension perhaps?)

    The maker needed to be less obscurantist about his obvious message. He hid it behind progressive schmaltz which made the film superficially dumb and therefore boring. He should have had more courage in his convictions just as Idiocracy needed to combine its high concept with with rather than hide behind dick jokes; because unfortunately if you lead a film with dumb shit it comes across as just dumb shit.

    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    Hollywood corrupts everything it touches. In Phillip K. Dick's novel the replicants were soulless, anti-life monstrosities. The human hero is briefly tempted by an apparently beautiful female replicant until he sees her callously pulling the legs off a spider. At that point he returns to his imperfect but human wife. Dick was making a serious point here about the dignity and preciousness of life and reality, as opposed to non-life/anti-life and the artificialities which we humans create and with which we surround themselves. (It's pretty obvious why the denizens of Hollywood would miss this message.)

    The movie, Blade Runner, romanticizes the soulless replicants, going so far as to suggest that Decker, the protagonist, is one. A total inversion of Dick's original message.

    Blade Runner was a great movie but it completely inverted Dick's message and to that extent was a travesty. It looks like the sequel goes even further down that path. Based on the trailer, I'm guessing it will also not be nearly as good a movie.
    , @Ray P
    1990 Total Recall used Mexico City locales.
    , @Autochthon
    Having read many of Dick's novels and suffered through many of their adaptations, I observe the phenomenon is ubiquitous, perhaps universal: these films are in many cases so different from Dick's novels it becomes difficult to argue they are adaptations.

    I watched Bladerunner when I was a child, wholly unfamiliar with Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. When I later read the novel, as an adult, I had learned of the film's connection to it, but I was glad I' had essentially forgotten the film, so nothing about the book would be spoilt. Yet even the extremely vague impressions of the film I did retain told me the book I was reading was nothing like the film I had seen. Later, I watched the film again, and confirmed I was correct.

    I understand Mr. Dick was pleased with Bladerunner (who wouldn't be pleased with the money it doubtless made for him?!); I wonder to what extent novelists prefer adaptations inspired by their work not undertake the usually impossible task of replicating the novel in cinematic form, but instead merely draw inspiration from the novel to do something more suited to cinema? Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a very cerebral thing; a great deal of it is to do with the characters' own thoughts, and it is often intentionally unclear what is being imagined and what is actually occurring. Such techniques do not often translate well to the screen, which provides viewers less opportunity to slowly mull what is occurring and appreciate ambiguous or varied interpretations the author may be offering....
    , @guest
    Literature has an inherently greater capacity for thought-provocation. In the hands of a great writer like Dick, that's almost a given. But I'm not sure Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? faithfully adapted would reliably produce a great movie. There's a great movie in there, if you do it right. But there're also a lot of ways to screw it up.

    On the other hand, a good robot action sci-fi noir mystery thriller is waiting for you on the surface. I like the premise of Blade Runner (though I always ask myself why they made the robots so humanlike. Couldn't they have put a red dot on their foreheads, or something, just in case they rebel?), a little less the execution, and the feel above all. Feelz are like lightning in a bottle. The music, for instance, which I loved and gave me intense feelz, wouldn't work in a lot of other contexts.

    You take direction, set design, costuming, acting, music, and so forth all together, and that was the Blade Runner style. But it didn't have a knockout story. Enough to give me great feelz, but not intellectually satisfying.

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? has a knockout story, but would you be able to pull in all the feelz necessary to make it a successful movie? I dunno. Maybe. Safer bet is to work in proven subgenres, like robot action sci-fi noir mystery thrillers, and hope the story is good enough.

    , @Dave Pinsen
    I finally looked up Kim Stanley Robinson's bio on Wikipedia, after reading a handful of his books. Turns out he wrote his PhD thesis on Philip K. Dick's novels: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kim_Stanley_Robinson#Career

    I was surprised to see his degrees are in English. He writes a lot of "engineering fiction", to borrow the Derb's description of Neal Stephenson's Seveneves.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/blade-runner-2049/#comment-1865205
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. Watching the first 5 minutes of the original Blade Runner set in the Fall of 2019, I can see you have much to do in the next 30 months. Those flying cars, pyramid shaped office towers, soup thick smog, and belching fireball plumes need to be manifest soon. A sexbot or Roomba isn’t exactly a Rutger Hauer grade replicant, but maybe they were just off by a decade.

    Hope you’ll review this “2049″ one for us iSteve. Am too cynical now after seeing Prometheus to take the bait. And hope you’ll have a couple paragraphs on Covenant too. Can’t bear to watch another naif “scientist” stare into the opening maw of a barrel-sized egg.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Well, we've got the smog going strong, and LA / OC will likely be one of the earliest adopters of self-driving cars and then computer-assisted low-flying cars, not long from now at least for the rich.
    , @fitzGetty
    ... the Vangelis soundtrack, the rain, the Rutger Hauer dying speech on the roof, the impeccable London visuals, the Frank Lloyd Wright interiors ...
    , @The Z Blog
    Prometheus was so hilariously bad, I suspected it was done on purpose, like an homage to MST3000. It would take quite an effort for this film to reach that level of awfulness.
    , @Clyde

    Am too cynical now after seeing Prometheus to take the bait.
     
    At Amazon -- Feedback for "Alien" (1979) is only 4% negative meaning the one and two star rating added up. "Prometheus" (2012) is 21% negative. Both by Ridley Scott of course, with a 33 year hiatus.
    , @Autochthon
    As with science itself, speculative fiction has increasingly been ruined by an influx of female busybodies with nothing to contribute but plenty of contributions nonetheless. The days of Heinlein, Bradbury, Dick, Vance, Burroughs, and Moorcock have given way to vapid shit like Contact (written by a man, but very much in the metrosexual, "progressive" mode; that the never reproduced is telling...), Arrival, and so on....

    Rather than fascinating works pressing the boundaries of what will be possible or likely given human nature and the possibilities of this or that advance in technology (chain-marriages on the moon, androids' sentience, unnatural long life in the face of finite resources...), we get the kind of ideas one would expect from an episode of My Little Pony:

    – The most important thing is to believe in yourself
    – True love makes it possible to endure any situation, and selfishly ruining another's situation to alleviate one's own is okay if you are handsome (Passengers is essentially this old chestnut in long form)
    – Stupid,lazy, leporine brown people deserve whatever smart, hardworking, restrained white people are able to obtain because "Not Fair!"
    – Mean old science and technology are bad for Mother Earth and simple agrarianism is preferable

    Even the one recent, interesting work in the genre, Life, hinges upon womanish efforts to save a single crewman by endangering the entire ship and, later, the planet – in the old days, Mr. Spock knew better, and stoically died like a man!
    , @Rod1963
    I used to love sci-fi movies. Not anymore. They're either mindless 'ride' pictures like Guardians or idiocy like Interstellar and Contact.

    When you're reduced to using comic books for source material, you're pretty much hit rock bottom.

    Anyways Prometheus is well, so bad as to make one wonder if it was done as a prank. Covenant looks to be a retcon of Alien because none of the writers employed weren't smart enough to come up with a decent story.

    There are good sci-fi writers out there, but they don't get employed by Hollywood. Instead they find idiots who pen something like Prometheus or Interstellar - really, folks looking for a viable planet to colonize next to a black hole?

    That said most good sci-fi stories lend themselves to a mini-series format and would do better if they were done by HBO, Netflix or Cinemax. Trying to compact stories into a 90 minute movie meant for people between 15-30 means the end result is forgettable schlock.
    , @Seth Largo
    Prometheus wasn't so bad. I think Charlize's idiotic death scene retroactively made most people hate everything that had come before. Just fast forward through that scene, pretend she gets killed in a non-idiotic way, and the movie holds up pretty well.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. Bastion says:
    @syonredux
    Depicting a Mestizo Hispanic future would be too depressing.

    As for Blade Runner 2049, they should have just used the source novel (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?) for the plot. Now that would have been interesting. DADOES is a lot more thought-provoking than Blade Runner

    Yeah, shooting a film in an LA run by mestizos would have to be challenging, particularly night shots, given the dearth of electric light and all.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Yeah, shooting a film in an LA run by mestizos would have to be challenging, particularly night shots, given the dearth of electric light and all.
     
    I was thinking more in terms of depicting it onscreen. Hollywood works quite hard to avoid showing the reality of contemporary life in CA. Hence, going on the evidence of films and TV, one would think that CA still has an Anglo European majority.....

    The idea of depicting a future LA that is totally overrun with with Mestizos is just too much for any sane man to bear....
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. O'Really says:

    Within the first 45 seconds, the apparent villians make heavy-handed references to: slavery, law & order, and a “Wall.” I nearly didn’t make it through the rest of the trailer.

    I’ll still go to see the movie. The original (Director’s cut, that is) was a top-5 sci-fi of all time.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    I’ll still go to see the movie. The original (Director’s cut, that is) was a top-5 sci-fi of all time.

    I'll wait until Steve reviews it. There are some movies like Highlander which were only ever meant to be self-contained. Bladerunner is one of those. Anyway a good sequel usually requires actors of approximately the same age as they were in the original. Like Alien and Aliens, and the Terminators.
    , @Georg H
    Yes, the intimated themes in that short clip we're depressingly au courant: characters getting swept up in larger forces, the world-political machinations of the powerful blah, blah, blah. Boring. The original had potency because it avoided such nonsense and touched - if so lightly - on Dick's obsession with the immanence of unseen realms. In that world, death is not a theme to be explored, but a handsome stranger who knocks on your door. It's poetry vs public service announcement. A world of difference.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. I dunno if i’m going to see this based on just the opening line of the trailer.

    “every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force”

    Any one wanna guess WTF that really means………i’m growing tired of the politics in all aspects of life and now i can’t even escape it at the movies…..not that i ever could I guess……facepalm.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux
    Yeah, judging by the trailer, this film is going to go full-SJW....
    , @Anon

    Any one wanna guess WTF that really means
     
    Workers, blue-collar workers...
    , @fitzGetty
    ... you did, actually.
    But film and cinema, as we knew it, has withered and died ... it is unclear how it will be replaced .
    , @neutral

    every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force
     
    If they are trying to sell this as the propaganda line in the movie, then isn't this a bit of contradiction. Since they support mass immigration because it creates cheaper workers, having a movie that is saying that these are disposable workers means it is not helping SJW propaganda.
    , @bored identity


    "Every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force”

     Versus:

    "Every aboriginal cave/ hut dwelling community - from Amazonia to Tasmania- is built on the backs of totally irreplaceable animal gatherers"

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. Steve, I wish you had not bumped the much more interesting twin studies post out of the top 6 spots for the sake of this one. Now very few people will comment on it and it really deserved a long discussion.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Ask Ron to add it to the featured posts in the left column of the homepage?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. syonredux says:
    @Bastion
    Yeah, shooting a film in an LA run by mestizos would have to be challenging, particularly night shots, given the dearth of electric light and all.

    Yeah, shooting a film in an LA run by mestizos would have to be challenging, particularly night shots, given the dearth of electric light and all.

    I was thinking more in terms of depicting it onscreen. Hollywood works quite hard to avoid showing the reality of contemporary life in CA. Hence, going on the evidence of films and TV, one would think that CA still has an Anglo European majority…..

    The idea of depicting a future LA that is totally overrun with with Mestizos is just too much for any sane man to bear….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dumbo

    The idea of depicting a future LA that is totally overrun with with Mestizos is just too much for any sane man to bear….
     
    What future? This is the present, man. The city is gone. It's like El Salvador meets Mexico City meets Seoul.

    Btw, if I am not mistaken, in the original Blade Runner the population was shown as majority Asian.
    , @Autochthon
    I meant to agree with you instead of your interlocutor (though I also agree with him): people who don't live here, even those who visit (because they are often shepherded to carefully chosen or maintained areas for their business and pleasure) have no idea what California is actually like; the typical resident of, say, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, or even New York, has no foggy clue what California is; they conceptualise California as a place that has not existed for several decades. The same phenomenon applies Florida's Dade County
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Well, Elysium had a more realistic portrayal of Los Angeles’ future population demographics and it didn’t do great business.

    One of the most chilling comments I’ve ever heard from a filmmaker was when the South African-born writer/director of Elysium & District 9, Neill Blomkamp, gave an interview in which he said words to the effect of “South Africa is actually my vision of the future,” with a haunted gravitas.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Michaeloh59

    One of the most chilling comments I’ve ever heard from a filmmaker was when the South African-born writer/director of Elysium & District 9, Neill Blomkamp, gave an interview in which he said words to the effect of “South Africa is actually my vision of the future,”
     
    Was it a vision, or a warning?
    , @songbird
    That's funny. Blomkamp's settings are basically all inspired by South African slums. I thought the setting for Chappie was perfect though, in a broken clock sort of way.

    Robocop had it wrong. People simply leave Detroit. Johhanesburg, though extremely violent, is still growing. Private security is a massive industry there, and it is easy to imagine it being the perfect place to deploy robot cops. In a fairly wealthy but safe place like Japan it is hard to imagine it happening.
    , @Altai
    A lot of people have hinted that Blomkamp is not actually enthused by such a future but deeply disturbed by it, but as a white man and especially as an Afrikaner, he can't say that openly. Look up his interviews about South Africa.

    District 9 was actually a metaphor for the mass waves of Zimbabweans and Nigerians streaming into urban South Africa and putting huge competition and strain on the poor. The original low-budget short film he made has actual vox-pops on the street of people complaining about immigrants but made to be about the aliens who have shown up and are sucking up resources, space and disturbing the peace for the very poorest, bringing with them an alienating culture and competing tribe. Their space ship is literally helping itself to free power by illegally connecting to the grid with giant tendrils.

    This is the original short film that got him a gig making District 9.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlgtbEdqVsk
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. syonredux says:
    @interesting
    I dunno if i'm going to see this based on just the opening line of the trailer.

    "every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force"

    Any one wanna guess WTF that really means.........i'm growing tired of the politics in all aspects of life and now i can't even escape it at the movies.....not that i ever could I guess......facepalm.

    Yeah, judging by the trailer, this film is going to go full-SJW….

    Read More
    • Replies: @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Let me save you $40 & 3 hours. The take home message (delivered with modern H'wood's Bruckheimer levels of subtlety) will be: We must stop treating Mestizos, Blacks, and other PoC as mere Drone-grade Replicants. We must recognize our Privilege and let our Humanity shine forth, etc.
    , @Expletive Deleted
    I listened to an interview with Ridley Scott , who apparently was too busy to be fully hands-on with this one (Mark Kermode & Simon Mayo , BBC Radio 5). The guy is 99.98% GoodWhite, right-on bourgeois, white-male-prole-hater. Makes Mutter Merkel sound like that short Austrian fellow. Bullied at skool, I reckon.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. I find it interesting that Ryan Gosling has had such a successful career.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    I find it interesting that Ryan Gosling has had such a successful career.
     
    Young White and Asian girls like him. A lot.
    , @Autochthon
    How come is it interesting? He's very intelligent (therefore good at choosing and developing projects and at avoiding the temptations and excesses of fame, like drugs and such); a talented actor; and a great-looking guy (yes, I'm secure enough in my masculinity to write that). It's a recipe for success in Hollywood.

    You want someone whose success is somewhat unexpected? How about a rough-looking dude like John C. Reilly or a talentless, unfunny hack like Adam Sandler (yes, I know the secret to the latter's success lies in making movies that appeal to twelve-year-old boys and stupid mestizos...).
    , @Autochthon
    How come is it interesting? He's very intelligent (therefore good at choosing and developing projects and at avoiding the temptations and excesses of fame, like drugs and such); a talented actor; and a great-looking guy (yes, I'm secure enough in my masculinity to write that). It's a recipe for success in Hollywood.

    You want someone whose success is somewhat unexpected? How about a rough-looking dude like John C. Reilly or a talentless, unfunny hack like Adam Sandler (yes, I know the secret to the latter's success lies in making movies that appeal to twelve-year-old boys and stupid mestizos...).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. syonredux says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    I find it interesting that Ryan Gosling has had such a successful career.

    I find it interesting that Ryan Gosling has had such a successful career.

    Young White and Asian girls like him. A lot.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Escher
    The other day I saw a young Asian girl wearing a t-shirt that had "Mrs. Gosling" written across its front.
    , @Johan Schmidt
    Well, apart from Laurie Penny.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. Mr. Anon says:

    I’m pissed off that – seemingly – every last story, idea, notion, grocery list, and gin-rummy score-sheet of Phillip K. Dick is going to make it to the big screen, but there has still only ever been one Flashman movie. And it sucked.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    Don't you know? A new Flashman movie is coming. And if the pics of Dominic West as Flashman are any indication, it will be awesome:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/10836577/Dominic-West-its-time-for-a-new-Flashman-film.html

    , @Alden
    I've read every Flashman book and loved, loved them. Big thing against flash man is that the costumes, horses etc in period movies are much more expensive than costumes, sets for contemporary movies.

    It's mostly women who love period movies, but most women love the clothes, women protagonists and romance. I'm one of the few women who's read all the Flashman novels

    Flashman would make a great TV series.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. @syonredux
    Yeah, judging by the trailer, this film is going to go full-SJW....

    Let me save you $40 & 3 hours. The take home message (delivered with modern H’wood’s Bruckheimer levels of subtlety) will be: We must stop treating Mestizos, Blacks, and other PoC as mere Drone-grade Replicants. We must recognize our Privilege and let our Humanity shine forth, etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    Or, to borrow from Huxley's "Brave New World", they all should be treated like Alphas. Right!
    , @bored identity
    I only saw a trailer; but I already want my Harrison Ford, my Sean Young, my Rutger Hauer, and my money back.

    Not to mention my childhood...
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    It’s virtually impossible to do a noir today without it going full Union City.

    For one thing, a real noir has to be shot monochrome (black and white), and not only is that not going to be bankable and restrict you to arthouse distribution, modern cinematographers literally do not know how to shoot monochrome. Sure, they can use monochrome film or set the flag in the digital camera to “mono”, but the art of getting the fine details is lost.

    Union City is not a bad film, but the only reason it even plays art houses and is distributed anymore is it has Deborah Harry and Pat Benatar in it. Benatar still has mainstream rock and roll cred and both women have a gay and hipster following of sorts. (Sadly, the commonly available DVD of this film is poorly mastered.)

    Sadly, this is the only YT video, the copyright nazis have suppressed better clips.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Dark City (1998) did a nice job.
    https://youtu.be/N1V5LcvK2ns
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    My favorite neo-noir is Alan Rudolph's "Trouble in Mind," from 1985. It's set in the near-future as well, after a major war in the Far East, with de-industrialization and a debased currency. It's available on DVD but it looks like the digital transfer was done after the original film stock had deteriorated.
    , @Anonym
    Chinatown was in color. So was Blade Runner. I guess they are neo-noir. I am not sure what your point is.
    , @Truth

    For one thing, a real noir has to be shot monochrome (black and white),
     
    Jake Gittes disagrees.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. donut says:

    OT : Where have we gone wrong ?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  16. This sequel may end up being a good movie, but it will be nothing like the original. Having seen Dangerous Days, a Blade Runner making-of documentary, I realize how much adversity and limited resources (e.g., the movie was dark because they filled on a backlot at night so that the limitations of the sets would not be so obvious) went into the making of that groundbreaking movie.

    It’s exactly why Star Wars was great and The Phantom Menace was shite–Lucas had severe limitations in 1977 and none in 1999.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde
    Easy, lazy prediction is this new Blade Runner (probably a remake) will be weak tea compared to the original. Ryan Gosling has no edge or pizzazz to him. Boring! But he stars because the young white and Asian women really like him so they will pay to see it. So I read. Too many easy-peasy high tech movie making tools at director's disposal today. As you say...... adversity helped make the original Blade Runner great. Probably Ridley Scott's "Alien" too.

    We are inundated with movie dystopias these days. So many that now Hollywood gives them female heroines. No so with the original Blade Runners dystopia. It was fresh and ground breaking. It had me mesmerized and thinking, that sure looks like Los Angeles forty years in the future.

    As an aside, I recently saw a few episodes of ye old Miami Vice. Some of the scenes were so amateurish and improvised on the spot. As in the director grabbing a pretty girl from the crowd of on lookers and telling her to roll on the grass to escape some gunshots. But we did not mind and did not notice back in 1986. We were drawn in.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. Whiskey says: • Website

    Why would the reality of LA being essentially Mexico City with less bad smog be too much to bear? Women love love love highly unequal societies run by oligarchs with lots and lots of peasants. That way, a pretty or cunning woman, or one who is both, can move up by hitching herself to some up and comer in the Oligarchy.

    Little Girls dream of being Princesses. Not ordinary women married to some ordinary guy. Mass Mestizo immigration chased all those ordinary guys out, and for that women are eternally grateful I think. You don’t see women Code, Tinker, Make in Finland do you? No they Eat, Pray Love in some Third World hell-hole. As far from ordinary men as possible.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Paul Walker - Most beautiful man ever...
    Shorter Whiskey. Women bad. Don't mention the Skypes.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  18. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    It looks more like FURY TOAD than BLADE RUNNER.

    The director is very talented. PRISONERS featured top-notch professionalism and a sharp eye. Still, it was trashy-shameless like SILENCE OF LAMBS.

    The trailer makes the sequel look more like ROGUE ONE, a well-made and more adult-telling of STAR WARS saga. The seriousness might have been welcome if Lucas had done it right from the beginning: make young adults the target audience instead of pandering to kids with muppety stuff. But at this point, it’s a lost cause. One cannot salvage STAR WARS from its status as junk epic, albeit with some great designs, music, and effects. ROGUE has some great effects and moments, especially Vader’s light-saber attack in the final part. And it also has an above-par villain in Paul-Craig-Roberts-Gone-Bad.
    Some love ROGUE ONE for its ‘darkness’ and ‘moral ambiguity’(and its relative lack of goofy stuff like Jar Jar and Jabba), but most of the characters, except PCRGB, are zeroes. Remove the action and effects, there’s precious little of substance. Decent actors but given little to do but run around and blow stuff up. And what’s with the blind Chinese guy whupping everyone with a stick? At least Jedi warriors have light-sabers. This guy just has a blooming stick.

    MOANA has same strengths as LIFE OF PI. It is visually ingenious and has some ravishing images. Wit and wonder, a rare combination. But I still think animated movies have too much gab and hipster attitude that prevent genuine emotional involvement.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  19. @Mr. Anon
    I'm pissed off that - seemingly - every last story, idea, notion, grocery list, and gin-rummy score-sheet of Phillip K. Dick is going to make it to the big screen, but there has still only ever been one Flashman movie. And it sucked.

    Don’t you know? A new Flashman movie is coming. And if the pics of Dominic West as Flashman are any indication, it will be awesome:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/10836577/Dominic-West-its-time-for-a-new-Flashman-film.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @donut
    No fucking way !!! I have something to live for . I had a signed first edition of "Flashman and the Redskins" . I sent the book and a SASTE to his agent in NYC , they forwarded it to him on The Isle of Man . He signed the book and paid for the return postage . He cut the US stamps off the Manila Envelope that I had provided and enclosed them in the return package with a note saying he hoped I could still use them . What a generous and gracious man he was . I would recommend "The Complete McAuslan " to his fans .

    He had his own thoughts about our modern world :

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3655560/Betrayal-Britain-years-ago-GEORGE-MacDONALD-FRASER-penned-savage-attack-EU-pygmy-politicians-Unashamedly-patriotic-blisteringly-provo
    , @Anonymous
    Fred Burnaby gets my vote for Flashman:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Gustavus_Burnaby#/media/File:Frederick_Gustavus_Burnaby_by_James_Jacques_Tissot.jpg

    For his look, anyway.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Well, he just says that it's time for a movie to be made, not that one will be made. This West fellow certainly looks more the part than Malcolm MacDowell did, who was all together to thin and reedy to play big bluff Harry.

    I have a hard time imagining that Fraser would even find a publisher today were he starting out in the present day.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “I always told you’re special”

    “Your story isn’t over yet; there is still a page left”

    So the new blade runner will discover that he is a replicant.

    They must figure there is no point in not spilling the beans in the trailer since contemporary movie-goers are unlikely to remember anything from the trailer but emotion and special effects.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  21. cthulhu says:

    By the way, Olmos’ police detective in Blade Runner was likely inspired by the Mexican-American police detective in Raymond Chandler’s 1952 novel The Long Goodbye.

    Steve, I think it’s great that you’re mentioning Chandler’s best novel (which is also one of the best American novels of the twentieth century) because maybe your readers will pick up on it if they haven’t already…but there is no Mexican-American police detective in Chandler’s novel. I think you got this from Robert Altman’s movie adaptation that stars Elliot Gould as Philip Marlowe. I have never watched the whole movie because I caught the last several minutes of it on cable once, and Altman completely fucked up the ending – and The Long Goodbye has the best ending that Chandler ever wrote, which is saying something. So now I refuse to watch the movie on general principles.

    Anyway, there is no Mexican-American detective in the book. There’s a Mexican-American gangster, Mendy Menendez, who is a fairly important character, but all the cops are white men, including the main cop Bernie Ohls, who is a key character and just about the only time that Chandler brought a character (except Marlowe of course) from one book to another (Ohls was the main cop in Chandler’s first and best-known novel The Big Sleep).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I read the Long Goodbye again about 3 or 4 years ago. My vague memory is that there were 4 Hispanic characters in it, one of whom is on the police force and above the rank of basic patrolman who shows up toward the end but not right at the end. Perhaps I'm projecting back the various characters from 1980s noir tributes?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. @Anonymous
    Well, Elysium had a more realistic portrayal of Los Angeles' future population demographics and it didn't do great business.

    One of the most chilling comments I've ever heard from a filmmaker was when the South African-born writer/director of Elysium & District 9, Neill Blomkamp, gave an interview in which he said words to the effect of "South Africa is actually my vision of the future," with a haunted gravitas.

    One of the most chilling comments I’ve ever heard from a filmmaker was when the South African-born writer/director of Elysium & District 9, Neill Blomkamp, gave an interview in which he said words to the effect of “South Africa is actually my vision of the future,”

    Was it a vision, or a warning?

    Read More
    • Replies: @fitzGetty
    ... God bless Tristram VOORSPUY .
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. donut says:

    You know Steve I share your enthusiasm for the cinema if only there was anything to spend 8$ on you feel me ? “John Dies In The End” is good , right ? So here are a few of my recommendations ; “The Liability ” with Tim Roth , “Red Army” , “Boy Wonder ” , “Killer Joe ” , “The Opposite Of Sex”
    “Hit Me” with Elias Koteas , ” The Proposition” , “Freeway” with Kiefer Sutherland and Reese Witherspoon , “A Perfect World ” , “Welcome to the Dollhouse ” , “The Tailor Of Panama” , “The Secret In Their Eyes ” , the original not the Hollywood dreck , “Elling” , “Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai ” , “Spun Unrated” , “The Salton Sea ” . Just for starters . After you have watched and reviewed them I will recommend some more .

    Fer instance :

    Where oh where are the Hanson Brothers now when we need them ?

    Steve , do you have a sports coat like the announcer ? If not wear one for your next $$$$ drive and as broke as Iam I will send you something .

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde
    That Hanson Brother clotheslined Derek Sanderson!!! Great movie btw, 1977.
    , @Bill
    You are awesome.

    It still annoys me that Johnstown was randomly re-named Charlestown in Slapshot. WTF was the point of that? The shots of the working Bethlehem Steel mill in that film are beautiful. Here's an article on the movie and the city.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. donut says:
    @Percy Gryce
    Don't you know? A new Flashman movie is coming. And if the pics of Dominic West as Flashman are any indication, it will be awesome:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/10836577/Dominic-West-its-time-for-a-new-Flashman-film.html

    No fucking way !!! I have something to live for . I had a signed first edition of “Flashman and the Redskins” . I sent the book and a SASTE to his agent in NYC , they forwarded it to him on The Isle of Man . He signed the book and paid for the return postage . He cut the US stamps off the Manila Envelope that I had provided and enclosed them in the return package with a note saying he hoped I could still use them . What a generous and gracious man he was . I would recommend “The Complete McAuslan ” to his fans .

    He had his own thoughts about our modern world :

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3655560/Betrayal-Britain-years-ago-GEORGE-MacDONALD-FRASER-penned-savage-attack-EU-pygmy-politicians-Unashamedly-patriotic-blisteringly-provo

    Read More
    • Replies: @Basil ransom
    Quartered safe out here by Fraser is one of the best memoirs of ww2.
    , @Expletive Deleted
    The McAuslan. Our Good Soldier Švejk. Recommend highly.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. donut says:

    Come on Steve why oh why do you not pass my nonobnoxious posts ?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  26. @cthulhu


    By the way, Olmos’ police detective in Blade Runner was likely inspired by the Mexican-American police detective in Raymond Chandler’s 1952 novel The Long Goodbye.

     

    Steve, I think it's great that you're mentioning Chandler's best novel (which is also one of the best American novels of the twentieth century) because maybe your readers will pick up on it if they haven't already...but there is no Mexican-American police detective in Chandler's novel. I think you got this from Robert Altman's movie adaptation that stars Elliot Gould as Philip Marlowe. I have never watched the whole movie because I caught the last several minutes of it on cable once, and Altman completely fucked up the ending - and The Long Goodbye has the best ending that Chandler ever wrote, which is saying something. So now I refuse to watch the movie on general principles.

    Anyway, there is no Mexican-American detective in the book. There's a Mexican-American gangster, Mendy Menendez, who is a fairly important character, but all the cops are white men, including the main cop Bernie Ohls, who is a key character and just about the only time that Chandler brought a character (except Marlowe of course) from one book to another (Ohls was the main cop in Chandler's first and best-known novel The Big Sleep).

    I read the Long Goodbye again about 3 or 4 years ago. My vague memory is that there were 4 Hispanic characters in it, one of whom is on the police force and above the rank of basic patrolman who shows up toward the end but not right at the end. Perhaps I’m projecting back the various characters from 1980s noir tributes?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Manfred Arcane
    There is a Mexican police detective in chapters 38 and 44 of The Long Goodbye (which I read over this winter)--Captain Hernandez, a tough but fair policeman who questions both Marlowe and (in Spanish) the Chileno houseboy Candy in his first appearance, and in his second appearance joins with Chandler's only recurring policeman character, Bernie Ohls, to tacitly allow Marlowe to take a photostat of a confession that the official higher-ups don't want to get out. Aside from talking Spanish to Candy, however, he doesn't "read" as particularly Mexican in his speech patterns, or even in his physical description ("a big tired-looking man with iron-gray hair").

    The Chandler novella, "Red Wind," has a more emphatically Mexican police detective named Ybarra, whose dialogue is arranged to suggest someone slightly unfamiliar with homegrown Los Angeles English, and is explicitly referred to as a Mexican by Marlowe and as a "guinea" by another police detective. Ybarra might more properly be the prototype of the type of character you're talking about; he's a smallish, quiet-spoken sort with a melancholy demeanor but a sense of duty, who saves Marlowe from being killed by a nastier cop at the end.

    Chandler was a "reactionary" in many ways (he correctly pointed out that Stalin was even worse than Hitler; it's only a matter of time till he gets banished from the American literary pantheon for his "homophobia;" he stated in one of his letters that he would have fought for the Confederacy), but he had an odd fondness for Mexicans which I've noticed in several other right-leaning types in the pre-mass-immigration era (John Wayne and the great comic-book creator Carl Barks being two other examples). If I were to analyze the reasons for it, I'd say that pessimistic conservatives like Chandler and Barks, who both loathed the urbanized, glamorized, and mechanized modern world of Los Angeles, had a certain romantic nostalgia for the rural, pre-industrial "old California" society that the Mexicans represented to them.
    , @Blue
    There's a detective Ybarra that shows up at the end of the Chandler short story "Red Wind" in the collection Trouble is my Business. Also there's a Inspector Delaguerra in the short story "Spanish Blood" in The Simple Art of Murder, but it's probably Ybarra that you're thinking of. Chandler pulled parts of his novels from his short stories so they could have showed up elsewhere, but the short stories are better. I don't think you get a better Chandler paragraph than the first paragraph of Red Wind.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  27. donut says:
    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  28. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous
    It's virtually impossible to do a noir today without it going full Union City.

    For one thing, a real noir has to be shot monochrome (black and white), and not only is that not going to be bankable and restrict you to arthouse distribution, modern cinematographers literally do not know how to shoot monochrome. Sure, they can use monochrome film or set the flag in the digital camera to "mono", but the art of getting the fine details is lost.

    Union City is not a bad film, but the only reason it even plays art houses and is distributed anymore is it has Deborah Harry and Pat Benatar in it. Benatar still has mainstream rock and roll cred and both women have a gay and hipster following of sorts. (Sadly, the commonly available DVD of this film is poorly mastered.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkQWQnGztmM


    Sadly, this is the only YT video, the copyright nazis have suppressed better clips.

    Dark City (1998) did a nice job.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve in Greensboro
    Indeed "Dark City" did. It is one of the few movies that bear watching repeatedly.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Dark City was a good movie.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. donut says:

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  30. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @interesting
    I dunno if i'm going to see this based on just the opening line of the trailer.

    "every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force"

    Any one wanna guess WTF that really means.........i'm growing tired of the politics in all aspects of life and now i can't even escape it at the movies.....not that i ever could I guess......facepalm.

    Any one wanna guess WTF that really means

    Workers, blue-collar workers…

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. Escher says:
    @syonredux

    I find it interesting that Ryan Gosling has had such a successful career.
     
    Young White and Asian girls like him. A lot.

    The other day I saw a young Asian girl wearing a t-shirt that had “Mrs. Gosling” written across its front.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  32. @Whiskey
    Why would the reality of LA being essentially Mexico City with less bad smog be too much to bear? Women love love love highly unequal societies run by oligarchs with lots and lots of peasants. That way, a pretty or cunning woman, or one who is both, can move up by hitching herself to some up and comer in the Oligarchy.

    Little Girls dream of being Princesses. Not ordinary women married to some ordinary guy. Mass Mestizo immigration chased all those ordinary guys out, and for that women are eternally grateful I think. You don't see women Code, Tinker, Make in Finland do you? No they Eat, Pray Love in some Third World hell-hole. As far from ordinary men as possible.

    Shorter Whiskey. Women bad. Don’t mention the Skypes.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  33. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Watching the first 5 minutes of the original Blade Runner set in the Fall of 2019, I can see you have much to do in the next 30 months. Those flying cars, pyramid shaped office towers, soup thick smog, and belching fireball plumes need to be manifest soon. A sexbot or Roomba isn't exactly a Rutger Hauer grade replicant, but maybe they were just off by a decade.

    Hope you'll review this "2049" one for us iSteve. Am too cynical now after seeing Prometheus to take the bait. And hope you'll have a couple paragraphs on Covenant too. Can't bear to watch another naif "scientist" stare into the opening maw of a barrel-sized egg.

    Well, we’ve got the smog going strong, and LA / OC will likely be one of the earliest adopters of self-driving cars and then computer-assisted low-flying cars, not long from now at least for the rich.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. OT

    BBC Radio’s flagship “Today” programme was presented entirely from Twitter’s UK headquarters this morning. Globalist media converging as they try to maintain news monopoly aka “combat fake news”.

    In news that you WON’T find on BBC national bulletins, the murder of 57 year old Tony Banting, repeatedly stabbed to death after getting off a tram at 4.30 on a Friday afternoon in what was apparently a random attack. But there was no suggestion by police or media of a racially or religiously-motivated attack, as happened when a Muslim woman was stabbed to death by a stranger in Essex last year (the killer turned out to be a equal-opportunity serial stabber).

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-39479346

    A guy named Alaeldien Ahmed, 26, has been arrested. Nothing to see here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @fitzGetty
    That all female Twitter booster on R4 today was amateur and tiresome.
    And too high pitched female.
    Immigrant crime is largely ignored by the BBC - as the price of immigration piety it seems.
    That S. Boston double murder -- throats cut -- by a Central African was a shocker at the weekend ... "'' a Boston man"' as he was termed by the local press ...
    , @Yak-15
    The fruits of diversity are many!
    , @Lurker
    I'm still waiting to find out what constitutes 'fake news'. Does anyone know of an example? The MSM keep telling us about it but, for some reason, never get round to actual cases.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  35. @syonredux
    Depicting a Mestizo Hispanic future would be too depressing.

    As for Blade Runner 2049, they should have just used the source novel (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?) for the plot. Now that would have been interesting. DADOES is a lot more thought-provoking than Blade Runner

    They did make a film set in a futuristic Mestizo LA. It was incredibly depressing. Everyone not mediocre had left to a nation in space called Elysium, although somehow the moral of the story was that there should be no border between Elysium and dystopian LA just as the current moral is that there should be no wall between Mexico and the US.

    The film was not great so we will not find out the result of that Dreamified immigration and how people must be allowed to move from newly dystopian and mediocre Elysium to Elysium 2 (a gated community/nation in another dimension perhaps?)

    The maker needed to be less obscurantist about his obvious message. He hid it behind progressive schmaltz which made the film superficially dumb and therefore boring. He should have had more courage in his convictions just as Idiocracy needed to combine its high concept with with rather than hide behind dick jokes; because unfortunately if you lead a film with dumb shit it comes across as just dumb shit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Here in Los Angeles, we constantly deal with people nearly as stupid, ignorant, uneducated, vulgar, and slovenly as the mass of the population in Idiocracy. My wife remarked that the movie is more discouraging than funny anymore because it is already coming true to a degree that we had not expected yet.
    , @Romanian
    Leo Strauss said that the philosopher needs to remember that he is a part of society, not above it or separated from it, which I took to be a reminder of the political dangers of philosophy. Socrates had to drink hemlock. That so many thinkers over the ages had to practice esoteric writing to protect themselves shows that this is true. The fact that we have to do so today is contrary to what made the West great.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Perhaps he had to, in order to get published?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  36. fitzGetty says:
    @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Watching the first 5 minutes of the original Blade Runner set in the Fall of 2019, I can see you have much to do in the next 30 months. Those flying cars, pyramid shaped office towers, soup thick smog, and belching fireball plumes need to be manifest soon. A sexbot or Roomba isn't exactly a Rutger Hauer grade replicant, but maybe they were just off by a decade.

    Hope you'll review this "2049" one for us iSteve. Am too cynical now after seeing Prometheus to take the bait. And hope you'll have a couple paragraphs on Covenant too. Can't bear to watch another naif "scientist" stare into the opening maw of a barrel-sized egg.

    … the Vangelis soundtrack, the rain, the Rutger Hauer dying speech on the roof, the impeccable London visuals, the Frank Lloyd Wright interiors …

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. fitzGetty says:
    @Anonymous Nephew
    OT

    BBC Radio's flagship "Today" programme was presented entirely from Twitter's UK headquarters this morning. Globalist media converging as they try to maintain news monopoly aka "combat fake news".

    https://twitter.com/MishalHusainBBC/status/861809652534784000



    In news that you WON'T find on BBC national bulletins, the murder of 57 year old Tony Banting, repeatedly stabbed to death after getting off a tram at 4.30 on a Friday afternoon in what was apparently a random attack. But there was no suggestion by police or media of a racially or religiously-motivated attack, as happened when a Muslim woman was stabbed to death by a stranger in Essex last year (the killer turned out to be a equal-opportunity serial stabber).

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-39479346

    A guy named Alaeldien Ahmed, 26, has been arrested. Nothing to see here.

    That all female Twitter booster on R4 today was amateur and tiresome.
    And too high pitched female.
    Immigrant crime is largely ignored by the BBC – as the price of immigration piety it seems.
    That S. Boston double murder — throats cut — by a Central African was a shocker at the weekend … “” a Boston man”‘ as he was termed by the local press …

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  38. fitzGetty says:
    @Michaeloh59

    One of the most chilling comments I’ve ever heard from a filmmaker was when the South African-born writer/director of Elysium & District 9, Neill Blomkamp, gave an interview in which he said words to the effect of “South Africa is actually my vision of the future,”
     
    Was it a vision, or a warning?

    … God bless Tristram VOORSPUY .

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  39. fitzGetty says:
    @interesting
    I dunno if i'm going to see this based on just the opening line of the trailer.

    "every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force"

    Any one wanna guess WTF that really means.........i'm growing tired of the politics in all aspects of life and now i can't even escape it at the movies.....not that i ever could I guess......facepalm.

    … you did, actually.
    But film and cinema, as we knew it, has withered and died … it is unclear how it will be replaced .

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  40. They cast Edward James Olmos to attract the Battlestar Galactica fans.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  41. Anonym says:
    @O'Really
    Within the first 45 seconds, the apparent villians make heavy-handed references to: slavery, law & order, and a "Wall." I nearly didn't make it through the rest of the trailer.

    I'll still go to see the movie. The original (Director's cut, that is) was a top-5 sci-fi of all time.

    I’ll still go to see the movie. The original (Director’s cut, that is) was a top-5 sci-fi of all time.

    I’ll wait until Steve reviews it. There are some movies like Highlander which were only ever meant to be self-contained. Bladerunner is one of those. Anyway a good sequel usually requires actors of approximately the same age as they were in the original. Like Alien and Aliens, and the Terminators.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  42. @syonredux

    I find it interesting that Ryan Gosling has had such a successful career.
     
    Young White and Asian girls like him. A lot.

    Well, apart from Laurie Penny.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  43. @Anonymous
    It's virtually impossible to do a noir today without it going full Union City.

    For one thing, a real noir has to be shot monochrome (black and white), and not only is that not going to be bankable and restrict you to arthouse distribution, modern cinematographers literally do not know how to shoot monochrome. Sure, they can use monochrome film or set the flag in the digital camera to "mono", but the art of getting the fine details is lost.

    Union City is not a bad film, but the only reason it even plays art houses and is distributed anymore is it has Deborah Harry and Pat Benatar in it. Benatar still has mainstream rock and roll cred and both women have a gay and hipster following of sorts. (Sadly, the commonly available DVD of this film is poorly mastered.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkQWQnGztmM


    Sadly, this is the only YT video, the copyright nazis have suppressed better clips.

    My favorite neo-noir is Alan Rudolph’s “Trouble in Mind,” from 1985. It’s set in the near-future as well, after a major war in the Far East, with de-industrialization and a debased currency. It’s available on DVD but it looks like the digital transfer was done after the original film stock had deteriorated.

    Read More
    • Replies: @2Mintzin1
    Worth watching just for Keith Carradine's constantly evolving hairdo.
    Good soundtrack, too.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  44. There’s two fine altright articles on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

    One is by Pleasureman at mpcdot.com and it talks about the superiority of the book to the sadly overrated movie.

    Greg Johnson of countercurrents has a similar interpretation.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  45. Altai says:

    Dredd does a better job replicating the highly Brazilian-looking demographics and dysfunction of a future US megalopolis, though on the East coast. Though only for the background characters, everyone else is mostly white.

    Read More
    • Replies: @neutral

    Dredd does a better job replicating the highly Brazilian-looking demographics
     
    Thats because Dredd was filmed in South Africa, which is actually appropriate because if one wants to know what most nations will be like in the future then there is no better than South Africa.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  46. watson79 says:

    Though I can understand why classics suffer remakes; I can’t forgive. A remake of Bladerunner elicits only one response, which I take from Rutger Hauer – “Time to die”.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  47. @Steve Sailer
    I read the Long Goodbye again about 3 or 4 years ago. My vague memory is that there were 4 Hispanic characters in it, one of whom is on the police force and above the rank of basic patrolman who shows up toward the end but not right at the end. Perhaps I'm projecting back the various characters from 1980s noir tributes?

    There is a Mexican police detective in chapters 38 and 44 of The Long Goodbye (which I read over this winter)–Captain Hernandez, a tough but fair policeman who questions both Marlowe and (in Spanish) the Chileno houseboy Candy in his first appearance, and in his second appearance joins with Chandler’s only recurring policeman character, Bernie Ohls, to tacitly allow Marlowe to take a photostat of a confession that the official higher-ups don’t want to get out. Aside from talking Spanish to Candy, however, he doesn’t “read” as particularly Mexican in his speech patterns, or even in his physical description (“a big tired-looking man with iron-gray hair”).

    The Chandler novella, “Red Wind,” has a more emphatically Mexican police detective named Ybarra, whose dialogue is arranged to suggest someone slightly unfamiliar with homegrown Los Angeles English, and is explicitly referred to as a Mexican by Marlowe and as a “guinea” by another police detective. Ybarra might more properly be the prototype of the type of character you’re talking about; he’s a smallish, quiet-spoken sort with a melancholy demeanor but a sense of duty, who saves Marlowe from being killed by a nastier cop at the end.

    Chandler was a “reactionary” in many ways (he correctly pointed out that Stalin was even worse than Hitler; it’s only a matter of time till he gets banished from the American literary pantheon for his “homophobia;” he stated in one of his letters that he would have fought for the Confederacy), but he had an odd fondness for Mexicans which I’ve noticed in several other right-leaning types in the pre-mass-immigration era (John Wayne and the great comic-book creator Carl Barks being two other examples). If I were to analyze the reasons for it, I’d say that pessimistic conservatives like Chandler and Barks, who both loathed the urbanized, glamorized, and mechanized modern world of Los Angeles, had a certain romantic nostalgia for the rural, pre-industrial “old California” society that the Mexicans represented to them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    John Ford, John Wayne, Cormac McCarthy, Mel Gibson: Mexophilics.

    Interest in Mexico, in contrast, has largely disappeared from, say, the NYT, even before Carlos Slim bailed it out. The NYT dutifully covers Mexico, but there's no sign that their subscriber base has any interest in it.

    , @syonredux

    Chandler was a “reactionary” in many ways (he correctly pointed out that Stalin was even worse than Hitler; it’s only a matter of time till he gets banished from the American literary pantheon for his “homophobia;”
     
    Quite possibly. Ta-Nehisi Coates (the living avatar of the PC Lumpengentsia) was quite vocal in his distaste for Chandler's un-PC attitudes:

    It's not so bad that our hero is a homophobe who likes to seems to enjoy slapping women around. I don't really believe that heroes need be "heroic" in any earnest sense of the word. What feels off is Chandler's gaze—not his hero's actions. The thin toughness of Marlowe, the display of women in the novel is masturbatory.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/11/grappling-with-raymond-chandler-and-the-big-sleep/265558/
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  48. Yak-15 says:
    @Anonymous Nephew
    OT

    BBC Radio's flagship "Today" programme was presented entirely from Twitter's UK headquarters this morning. Globalist media converging as they try to maintain news monopoly aka "combat fake news".

    https://twitter.com/MishalHusainBBC/status/861809652534784000



    In news that you WON'T find on BBC national bulletins, the murder of 57 year old Tony Banting, repeatedly stabbed to death after getting off a tram at 4.30 on a Friday afternoon in what was apparently a random attack. But there was no suggestion by police or media of a racially or religiously-motivated attack, as happened when a Muslim woman was stabbed to death by a stranger in Essex last year (the killer turned out to be a equal-opportunity serial stabber).

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-39479346

    A guy named Alaeldien Ahmed, 26, has been arrested. Nothing to see here.

    The fruits of diversity are many!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  49. The prevailing impression I got from the 2049 trailer was one of emptiness and space. There’s lots of space, everywhere. Decker’s apartment has more square footage than my house. Lots of empty lots/desert looking scenes. Even Gosling walking down the street that doesn’t feel crowded.

    Whereas in the original bladerunner, it was very claustrophobic. Streets were crowded, teeming masses of bodies. Buildings were close, high, almost overhanging, and constraining. The only space was in teh office of the corporation-(And the abandoned building of the rich eccentric)- rich people could buy their space, where most people couldn’t.

    It feels like life in 2049 will be better than in the original bladerunner. I wonder if that is intentional, or an error of direction?

    joeyjoejoe

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  50. neutral says:
    @interesting
    I dunno if i'm going to see this based on just the opening line of the trailer.

    "every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force"

    Any one wanna guess WTF that really means.........i'm growing tired of the politics in all aspects of life and now i can't even escape it at the movies.....not that i ever could I guess......facepalm.

    every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force

    If they are trying to sell this as the propaganda line in the movie, then isn’t this a bit of contradiction. Since they support mass immigration because it creates cheaper workers, having a movie that is saying that these are disposable workers means it is not helping SJW propaganda.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force

    If they are trying to sell this as the propaganda line in the movie, then isn’t this a bit of contradiction. Since they support mass immigration because it creates cheaper workers, having a movie that is saying that these are disposable workers means it is not helping SJW propaganda.
     
    Being an SJW takes a lot of Doublethink.....
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  51. Anonym says:
    @Anonymous
    It's virtually impossible to do a noir today without it going full Union City.

    For one thing, a real noir has to be shot monochrome (black and white), and not only is that not going to be bankable and restrict you to arthouse distribution, modern cinematographers literally do not know how to shoot monochrome. Sure, they can use monochrome film or set the flag in the digital camera to "mono", but the art of getting the fine details is lost.

    Union City is not a bad film, but the only reason it even plays art houses and is distributed anymore is it has Deborah Harry and Pat Benatar in it. Benatar still has mainstream rock and roll cred and both women have a gay and hipster following of sorts. (Sadly, the commonly available DVD of this film is poorly mastered.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkQWQnGztmM


    Sadly, this is the only YT video, the copyright nazis have suppressed better clips.

    Chinatown was in color. So was Blade Runner. I guess they are neo-noir. I am not sure what your point is.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  52. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Percy Gryce
    Don't you know? A new Flashman movie is coming. And if the pics of Dominic West as Flashman are any indication, it will be awesome:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/10836577/Dominic-West-its-time-for-a-new-Flashman-film.html

    Fred Burnaby gets my vote for Flashman:

    For his look, anyway.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  53. Georg H says:
    @O'Really
    Within the first 45 seconds, the apparent villians make heavy-handed references to: slavery, law & order, and a "Wall." I nearly didn't make it through the rest of the trailer.

    I'll still go to see the movie. The original (Director's cut, that is) was a top-5 sci-fi of all time.

    Yes, the intimated themes in that short clip we’re depressingly au courant: characters getting swept up in larger forces, the world-political machinations of the powerful blah, blah, blah. Boring. The original had potency because it avoided such nonsense and touched – if so lightly – on Dick’s obsession with the immanence of unseen realms. In that world, death is not a theme to be explored, but a handsome stranger who knocks on your door. It’s poetry vs public service announcement. A world of difference.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  54. The Z Blog says: • Website
    @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Watching the first 5 minutes of the original Blade Runner set in the Fall of 2019, I can see you have much to do in the next 30 months. Those flying cars, pyramid shaped office towers, soup thick smog, and belching fireball plumes need to be manifest soon. A sexbot or Roomba isn't exactly a Rutger Hauer grade replicant, but maybe they were just off by a decade.

    Hope you'll review this "2049" one for us iSteve. Am too cynical now after seeing Prometheus to take the bait. And hope you'll have a couple paragraphs on Covenant too. Can't bear to watch another naif "scientist" stare into the opening maw of a barrel-sized egg.

    Prometheus was so hilariously bad, I suspected it was done on purpose, like an homage to MST3000. It would take quite an effort for this film to reach that level of awfulness.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yak-15
    So many awful oversights in that film. They have amazing drones but still need to send guys into the cave complex?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  55. Sean says:

    I think its largely the singer not the song. Olmos’s has what they need for a hard bioled cop, he does little else well. Olmos’s popularity stems from him being pock marked . Hollywood requires its Hispanics to be like Olmos and Danny Trejo. Cherokee Wes Studi, (great as Geronimo) shows the value of a pox-survivor physog for Amerindian thespians)

    TRe. “hard boiled masters” , !”Trejo looks like he has fought a war with his face,, and was a serious criminal in his youth, in prison he was once in the hole with 2gas chamber offence charges . He knew the 10 most wanted alumnus turned author and screenwriter Edward Bunker (Mr. Blue of Pulp Fiction) in prison, and when Trejo accompanied a pal going to an casting call for a Bunker movie, he was given a job as boxing trainer to star Eric Roberts.

    Trejo has been in nearly 200 movies since , most famously in the “Machete” series of films (the latest of which is called “Machete Kills In Space”. In the original 2010 trailer Trejo growled an anti immigration restrictionist threat, “This is Machete with a special Cinco de Mayo message — to Arizona!”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Antonin Chigurh
    "Hollywood requires its Hispanics to be like Olmos and Danny Trejo"
    Yup and Andy Garcia, Jennifer Lopez, Michael Pena, Garcia Bernal, Penelope Cruz, Salma Hayek, Leguizamo, Antonio Banderas, etc
    , @Dave Pinsen
    Trejo and Wes Studi were both in Heat (of course Studi was also in Michael Mann's The Last of the Mohicans).
    , @Bill

    Olmos’s popularity stems from him being pock marked.
     
    Yeah. Thinking about what it is that makes modern country music stars look so effiminate, I'm pretty sure the answer is lack of skin damage. Same for modern Hollywood stars. Seriously.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  56. @Dave Pinsen
    Dark City (1998) did a nice job.
    https://youtu.be/N1V5LcvK2ns

    Indeed “Dark City” did. It is one of the few movies that bear watching repeatedly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    +1 on Dark City. Much better than the goofy Matrix.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  57. Mr. Anon says:
    @Percy Gryce
    Don't you know? A new Flashman movie is coming. And if the pics of Dominic West as Flashman are any indication, it will be awesome:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/10836577/Dominic-West-its-time-for-a-new-Flashman-film.html

    Well, he just says that it’s time for a movie to be made, not that one will be made. This West fellow certainly looks more the part than Malcolm MacDowell did, who was all together to thin and reedy to play big bluff Harry.

    I have a hard time imagining that Fraser would even find a publisher today were he starting out in the present day.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  58. Mr. Anon says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Dark City (1998) did a nice job.
    https://youtu.be/N1V5LcvK2ns

    Dark City was a good movie.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  59. @donut
    No fucking way !!! I have something to live for . I had a signed first edition of "Flashman and the Redskins" . I sent the book and a SASTE to his agent in NYC , they forwarded it to him on The Isle of Man . He signed the book and paid for the return postage . He cut the US stamps off the Manila Envelope that I had provided and enclosed them in the return package with a note saying he hoped I could still use them . What a generous and gracious man he was . I would recommend "The Complete McAuslan " to his fans .

    He had his own thoughts about our modern world :

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3655560/Betrayal-Britain-years-ago-GEORGE-MacDONALD-FRASER-penned-savage-attack-EU-pygmy-politicians-Unashamedly-patriotic-blisteringly-provo

    Quartered safe out here by Fraser is one of the best memoirs of ww2.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  60. Dumbo says:
    @syonredux

    Yeah, shooting a film in an LA run by mestizos would have to be challenging, particularly night shots, given the dearth of electric light and all.
     
    I was thinking more in terms of depicting it onscreen. Hollywood works quite hard to avoid showing the reality of contemporary life in CA. Hence, going on the evidence of films and TV, one would think that CA still has an Anglo European majority.....

    The idea of depicting a future LA that is totally overrun with with Mestizos is just too much for any sane man to bear....

    The idea of depicting a future LA that is totally overrun with with Mestizos is just too much for any sane man to bear….

    What future? This is the present, man. The city is gone. It’s like El Salvador meets Mexico City meets Seoul.

    Btw, if I am not mistaken, in the original Blade Runner the population was shown as majority Asian.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Felix...
    Have you ever been to Seoul? I have, the women are amazing. We should only be so lucky.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  61. Dumbo says:

    Prometheus 2? It seems that it is going to be pretty bad. Nice ad-like pictures, empty content. But I could be wrong.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  62. Saw a very Isteve-ish op-ed in the Jerusalem Post. http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Terra-Incognita-Israel-is-not-a-Western-country-and-never-has-been-490048

    Summarizing as much as possible, the writer (I presume Moroccan Jewish ancestry?) points out that the more-or-less “cuck”ed European Ashkenazim Jews are only 1/4 of the population and 1/3 of the Jewish population and need to get over themselves–Israel is not and is not going to be “a miniature version of the Upper West Side in New York, only with tanks and a flag.” The idea that Israel will abandon the occupation of the Palestinians (and, the writer doesn’t say, allow rocket attacks on Tel Aviv from the Samarian hills) when Europe snubs them as barbarians runs up against the demographic reality that the Mizhrahim don’t give a good god damn about the Euros calling them barbarians and cold-shouldering them on European vacations.

    He mentions what Steve would call a “boiling off” effect, where the most “cucked” left-wing young Euro-Isrealis move to Europe (or America). He doesn’t mention the Russians, whom I think he counts as part of the 1/3 European Jews, but who tend to line up politically with the Mizhrahim.

    Read More
    • Replies: @neutral
    Yet when I make simply make this comment (and only this part no other extra parts): "Israel is not Western, jews are not Western", it gets banned at most sites, even this comment has a very good chance to not see the light here.
    , @Jack D
    The Upper West Side is pretty small and a "miniature" UWS would be even smaller. Israel is small but not that small.

    I think the author himself confuses "developed" with "Western". Israel is a developed country with a high GDP but not a Western country. Developed countries, even outside the West, still aspire to basic Western norms in human rights. This doesn't mean LEFTIST norms, just basic ones. See e.g. Singapore, Japan, Taiwan, etc. Israel lives in a bad neighborhood but like a cop assigned to a bad neighborhood, just because you are assigned to deal with thugs does not mean that you can go round shooting 15 year olds in the back. You are better than they are and can't sink to their level. But Israel is in no position to retire to the donut shop either. It is just going to have to maintain that balancing act. I know that Mizrahim in Israel resent that they were treated like primitives by the Israeli founders but that was 60+ years ago - time to get that chip off your shoulder.
    , @Bill
    Do you think boiling off the smart Israelis is going to end well?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  63. Blue says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I read the Long Goodbye again about 3 or 4 years ago. My vague memory is that there were 4 Hispanic characters in it, one of whom is on the police force and above the rank of basic patrolman who shows up toward the end but not right at the end. Perhaps I'm projecting back the various characters from 1980s noir tributes?

    There’s a detective Ybarra that shows up at the end of the Chandler short story “Red Wind” in the collection Trouble is my Business. Also there’s a Inspector Delaguerra in the short story “Spanish Blood” in The Simple Art of Murder, but it’s probably Ybarra that you’re thinking of. Chandler pulled parts of his novels from his short stories so they could have showed up elsewhere, but the short stories are better. I don’t think you get a better Chandler paragraph than the first paragraph of Red Wind.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  64. Clyde says:
    @Percy Gryce
    This sequel may end up being a good movie, but it will be nothing like the original. Having seen Dangerous Days, a Blade Runner making-of documentary, I realize how much adversity and limited resources (e.g., the movie was dark because they filled on a backlot at night so that the limitations of the sets would not be so obvious) went into the making of that groundbreaking movie.

    It's exactly why Star Wars was great and The Phantom Menace was shite--Lucas had severe limitations in 1977 and none in 1999.

    Easy, lazy prediction is this new Blade Runner (probably a remake) will be weak tea compared to the original. Ryan Gosling has no edge or pizzazz to him. Boring! But he stars because the young white and Asian women really like him so they will pay to see it. So I read. Too many easy-peasy high tech movie making tools at director’s disposal today. As you say…… adversity helped make the original Blade Runner great. Probably Ridley Scott’s “Alien” too.

    We are inundated with movie dystopias these days. So many that now Hollywood gives them female heroines. No so with the original Blade Runners dystopia. It was fresh and ground breaking. It had me mesmerized and thinking, that sure looks like Los Angeles forty years in the future.

    As an aside, I recently saw a few episodes of ye old Miami Vice. Some of the scenes were so amateurish and improvised on the spot. As in the director grabbing a pretty girl from the crowd of on lookers and telling her to roll on the grass to escape some gunshots. But we did not mind and did not notice back in 1986. We were drawn in.

    Read More
    • Agree: Percy Gryce
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  65. drawbacks says:

    Haven’t read it in ages, but I did recall this quote, more or less: “There is nothing tougher than a tough Mexican, just as there is nothing gentler than a gentle Mexican, nothing more honest than an honest Mexican, and above all nothing sadder than a sad Mexican. This guy was one of the hard boys. They don’t come any harder anywhere.” The guy in question appears to be a hood who’s been given deputy’s stars to carry out some rough work for a crooked police commissioner.
    (Chapter 48 of 53 – the whole book is online, at: http://pdbooks.ca/pdbooks/english/C/Chandler-Raymond–The-Long-Goodbye/zl3awr.html )

    On the subject, I think I always pictured Edward James Olmos as Detective Raymond Cruz, the hero of Elmore Leonard’s superb City Primeval. Let’s see Michael Mann put that on the screen.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_Primeval

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  66. neutral says:
    @Discordiax
    Saw a very Isteve-ish op-ed in the Jerusalem Post. http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Terra-Incognita-Israel-is-not-a-Western-country-and-never-has-been-490048

    Summarizing as much as possible, the writer (I presume Moroccan Jewish ancestry?) points out that the more-or-less "cuck"ed European Ashkenazim Jews are only 1/4 of the population and 1/3 of the Jewish population and need to get over themselves--Israel is not and is not going to be "a miniature version of the Upper West Side in New York, only with tanks and a flag." The idea that Israel will abandon the occupation of the Palestinians (and, the writer doesn't say, allow rocket attacks on Tel Aviv from the Samarian hills) when Europe snubs them as barbarians runs up against the demographic reality that the Mizhrahim don't give a good god damn about the Euros calling them barbarians and cold-shouldering them on European vacations.

    He mentions what Steve would call a "boiling off" effect, where the most "cucked" left-wing young Euro-Isrealis move to Europe (or America). He doesn't mention the Russians, whom I think he counts as part of the 1/3 European Jews, but who tend to line up politically with the Mizhrahim.

    Yet when I make simply make this comment (and only this part no other extra parts): “Israel is not Western, jews are not Western”, it gets banned at most sites, even this comment has a very good chance to not see the light here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    The first half is true, the second is not. (Ashkenazi) Jews have been in the West since Roman times. In many European countries, the current population (or at least the ruling class) has been there a lot less time than that.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  67. rw95 says:

    Yes, Steve we get it. Whites are better. Can we move on now?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  68. @syonredux
    Depicting a Mestizo Hispanic future would be too depressing.

    As for Blade Runner 2049, they should have just used the source novel (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?) for the plot. Now that would have been interesting. DADOES is a lot more thought-provoking than Blade Runner

    Hollywood corrupts everything it touches. In Phillip K. Dick’s novel the replicants were soulless, anti-life monstrosities. The human hero is briefly tempted by an apparently beautiful female replicant until he sees her callously pulling the legs off a spider. At that point he returns to his imperfect but human wife. Dick was making a serious point here about the dignity and preciousness of life and reality, as opposed to non-life/anti-life and the artificialities which we humans create and with which we surround themselves. (It’s pretty obvious why the denizens of Hollywood would miss this message.)

    The movie, Blade Runner, romanticizes the soulless replicants, going so far as to suggest that Decker, the protagonist, is one. A total inversion of Dick’s original message.

    Blade Runner was a great movie but it completely inverted Dick’s message and to that extent was a travesty. It looks like the sequel goes even further down that path. Based on the trailer, I’m guessing it will also not be nearly as good a movie.

    Read More
    • Agree: syonredux
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    I've seen it said that "Blade Runner without Mercerism is like Lord of the Rings without the ring."

    Seems fair.
    , @bomag

    Dick was making a serious point here about the dignity and preciousness of life and reality, as opposed to non-life/anti-life and the artificialities which we humans create and with which we surround themselves. (It’s pretty obvious why the denizens of Hollywood would miss this message.)
     
    I sometimes wonder how precious and dignified. Humans seem to cultivate a lot of self destruction.
    , @Autochthon
    Indeed, as Kenobi observes, Mercerism is an enormous part of the novel.

    To your own point: It is very well made. Modern smartphone-zombies and, especially, the culture of death emanating from pornography and as pornography and videogames – as artificial alternatives which stunt the natural inclination to woo, wed, procreate in the first case and to do, make, experience, and learn in the second, are huge banes in modern societies. Mercerism, as well as your point about the soulless artificiality of the androids, were integral to Dick's messages in the novel.
    , @guest
    I feel the need to point out that among the robots only Sean Young--who didn't know she was a robot--and Rutger Hauer--who desperately wanted not to be a robot (or at least a robot with a short lifespan)--were the only ones they romanticized. Hauer's yearning not to expire, which was entire impetus for the plot, is a fairly strong pro-life message, though he wasn't actually alive.
    , @syonredux
    Yep. When I finally got around to reading Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, I was shocked. The film is a perversion of the novel.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  69. whorefinder says: • Website

    Blade Runner was good, but I was shocked at how many people didn’t get the subtext/hidden implication that Harrison Ford himself was a replicant. To me it was obvious that the filmmakers set up that ambiguity from the start, playing with the idea of the unreliable narrator. But until I said it to people—or they watched the DVDs with the extra scenes, which hammer home the theme more—they didn’t have a clue. Then, once exposed, they said, “OMG, of course!”

    It’s similar to how The Exorcist has a subtext/implication of child molestation/sexual assault. The implication is: Regan is being sexually molested by her mother’s creepy male friend, and afraid to tell her mother, Regan desperately uses her OUIJA board/other occult things to ask for help from the spirit world, hence how she gets possessed and why the first emanation of the demon is murdering the creepy male friend by tossing him out the window.

    It’s a “OMG, of course!” moment that you just don’t see it until someone points it out:

    Anyway, if Harrison Ford is in this film, it might ruin the original Blade Runner, since, IIRC, the replicants were only supposed to live for a short time, so I don’t know how he survived this long, unless he discovered the secret to longevity the other replicants from the original were looking for.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    ...himself was a replicant
     
    From what I've heard, the director/producers argued about this point, and it ended with an ambiguous depiction.
    , @Roy
    Isn't that essentially the plot of the HBO series "Westworld"? Have you seen it and what do you think of it?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  70. Ray P says:
    @syonredux
    Depicting a Mestizo Hispanic future would be too depressing.

    As for Blade Runner 2049, they should have just used the source novel (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?) for the plot. Now that would have been interesting. DADOES is a lot more thought-provoking than Blade Runner

    1990 Total Recall used Mexico City locales.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  71. BenKenobi says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...
    Hollywood corrupts everything it touches. In Phillip K. Dick's novel the replicants were soulless, anti-life monstrosities. The human hero is briefly tempted by an apparently beautiful female replicant until he sees her callously pulling the legs off a spider. At that point he returns to his imperfect but human wife. Dick was making a serious point here about the dignity and preciousness of life and reality, as opposed to non-life/anti-life and the artificialities which we humans create and with which we surround themselves. (It's pretty obvious why the denizens of Hollywood would miss this message.)

    The movie, Blade Runner, romanticizes the soulless replicants, going so far as to suggest that Decker, the protagonist, is one. A total inversion of Dick's original message.

    Blade Runner was a great movie but it completely inverted Dick's message and to that extent was a travesty. It looks like the sequel goes even further down that path. Based on the trailer, I'm guessing it will also not be nearly as good a movie.

    I’ve seen it said that “Blade Runner without Mercerism is like Lord of the Rings without the ring.”

    Seems fair.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  72. Ray P says:

    The wind-powered turbines atop buildings aspect has come true as has digital photo manipulation at home.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  73. Lurker says:
    @Anonymous Nephew
    OT

    BBC Radio's flagship "Today" programme was presented entirely from Twitter's UK headquarters this morning. Globalist media converging as they try to maintain news monopoly aka "combat fake news".

    https://twitter.com/MishalHusainBBC/status/861809652534784000



    In news that you WON'T find on BBC national bulletins, the murder of 57 year old Tony Banting, repeatedly stabbed to death after getting off a tram at 4.30 on a Friday afternoon in what was apparently a random attack. But there was no suggestion by police or media of a racially or religiously-motivated attack, as happened when a Muslim woman was stabbed to death by a stranger in Essex last year (the killer turned out to be a equal-opportunity serial stabber).

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-39479346

    A guy named Alaeldien Ahmed, 26, has been arrested. Nothing to see here.

    I’m still waiting to find out what constitutes ‘fake news’. Does anyone know of an example? The MSM keep telling us about it but, for some reason, never get round to actual cases.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MB
    Fake news?
    Come on.
    For starters, Drumpf won the election and anything to do with antifa.
    You're welcome.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  74. Clyde says:
    @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Watching the first 5 minutes of the original Blade Runner set in the Fall of 2019, I can see you have much to do in the next 30 months. Those flying cars, pyramid shaped office towers, soup thick smog, and belching fireball plumes need to be manifest soon. A sexbot or Roomba isn't exactly a Rutger Hauer grade replicant, but maybe they were just off by a decade.

    Hope you'll review this "2049" one for us iSteve. Am too cynical now after seeing Prometheus to take the bait. And hope you'll have a couple paragraphs on Covenant too. Can't bear to watch another naif "scientist" stare into the opening maw of a barrel-sized egg.

    Am too cynical now after seeing Prometheus to take the bait.

    At Amazon — Feedback for “Alien” (1979) is only 4% negative meaning the one and two star rating added up. “Prometheus” (2012) is 21% negative. Both by Ridley Scott of course, with a 33 year hiatus.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  75. Jack D says:
    @Discordiax
    Saw a very Isteve-ish op-ed in the Jerusalem Post. http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Terra-Incognita-Israel-is-not-a-Western-country-and-never-has-been-490048

    Summarizing as much as possible, the writer (I presume Moroccan Jewish ancestry?) points out that the more-or-less "cuck"ed European Ashkenazim Jews are only 1/4 of the population and 1/3 of the Jewish population and need to get over themselves--Israel is not and is not going to be "a miniature version of the Upper West Side in New York, only with tanks and a flag." The idea that Israel will abandon the occupation of the Palestinians (and, the writer doesn't say, allow rocket attacks on Tel Aviv from the Samarian hills) when Europe snubs them as barbarians runs up against the demographic reality that the Mizhrahim don't give a good god damn about the Euros calling them barbarians and cold-shouldering them on European vacations.

    He mentions what Steve would call a "boiling off" effect, where the most "cucked" left-wing young Euro-Isrealis move to Europe (or America). He doesn't mention the Russians, whom I think he counts as part of the 1/3 European Jews, but who tend to line up politically with the Mizhrahim.

    The Upper West Side is pretty small and a “miniature” UWS would be even smaller. Israel is small but not that small.

    I think the author himself confuses “developed” with “Western”. Israel is a developed country with a high GDP but not a Western country. Developed countries, even outside the West, still aspire to basic Western norms in human rights. This doesn’t mean LEFTIST norms, just basic ones. See e.g. Singapore, Japan, Taiwan, etc. Israel lives in a bad neighborhood but like a cop assigned to a bad neighborhood, just because you are assigned to deal with thugs does not mean that you can go round shooting 15 year olds in the back. You are better than they are and can’t sink to their level. But Israel is in no position to retire to the donut shop either. It is just going to have to maintain that balancing act. I know that Mizrahim in Israel resent that they were treated like primitives by the Israeli founders but that was 60+ years ago – time to get that chip off your shoulder.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  76. Pat Boyle says:

    Some movie directors are good with actors, others are good at organizing complex plots, still others have a way with suspense. Ridley Scott’ s forte has always been set decoration.

    His movies always have great costumes and sets. Many of his big ticket films don’t make a whole lot of sense because he just doesn’t seem to care about plot. I was blown away by his first major movie ‘The Duelists’. I was totally convinced by the setting. It was beautiful to look at and it convinced me that I was seeing Napoleonic Europe. In his subsequent quasi-historical films the same qualities are also seen.

    So his latest film ‘Prometheus’ also looks great. Unfortunately the actors do loony things and act strangely. Scott doesn’t seem to care. His movie about the crusades was similar – great attention to visual detail but a very muddled and inappropriate drama.

    Scott IMHO got lucky with Blade Runner. It became very famous but has not been very influential. The ideas of Blade Runner have not gained traction in films. Cameron’s break through film ‘Terminator’ has spawned a number of sequels, a TV series and who knows what else. But Blade Runner has had no sequels or characters who have suddenly shown up in other films. Everyone knows all of the ‘Star Wars’ characters. Just last week someone on this blog accused me of trying to be C3P0.

    But Blade Runner has had almost no influence outside of the original movie. Ridley Scott is not a good director for science-fiction despite his two big successes. Good science-fiction relies on either ideas or action and that isn’t Scott’s strong suit.

    So I’m glad to see a new young director at the helm.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Altai
    I can only think of Ghost In The Shell and the Battlestar Galactica remake, which, of course also starred Olmos. I find it funny when Steve brings him up as an Ur-Hispanic, my first exposure to him was BSG and his being a believable father to a very pale, blue eyed son played by an Englishman. They even gave him blue contact lenses to sometimes wear on the show! It was weird because he hardly ever wore them and it was obvious he had brown eyes but then sometimes they'd do a closeup (But sometimes also not) and he'd be wearing these really obvious blue contact lenses.

    I never really noticed. His face was so scarred I never really saw him as anything but a white guy, which is what he actually is, I suppose.
    , @Expletive Deleted
    Ridley Scott's world is the world of the typical art student. Gorgeous visuals, total inability to get to grips with the mindset/mores/psychology or even technology of a forgotten (Duellists) or future imagined era. No concept of an overarching religiosity or kin/social class-based order, no matter how attenuated. Bloody Sharpe's Eagle was closer to the mark.
    Starbucks society in glorious drag, with alienated, pretty, relatively wealthy 30-somethings as the only actors with any sort of agency.
    Like a farm run by pigs.
    But then, who else has the time or disposable to waste on this sort of etiolated flummery?
    , @Jim Don Bob

    I was blown away by his first major movie ‘The Duelists’
     
    +10 on The Duelists. Harvey Keitel's best role.

    Ridley Scott started in advertising.
    , @Anon
    Stuff on James Cameron.

    https://soundcloud.com/altright/unconscious-cinema-0-what-are-we-thinking
    , @inselaffen
    'Blade Runner has had almost no influence outside of the original movie'.
    Say what?
    It's extremely influential. For sure one of the top 5 or so influential sci fi movies.
    Maybe that influence comes across more in fiction books (cyberpunk), sci-fi art, video games, japanese anime, electronic music even, as well as more traditional nerd fare like paper RPGs (Shadowrun) (how many movies have inspired a complete RPG system?), but even in plain ol' fashioned movies I lose count of the times I see a cityscape in a sci-fi movie and think 'ah yeah, whoever did that is a fan Blade Runner'.

    I also disagree with the guy saying hollywood 'corruped' the book it was based on here. Basing a plot on another's story but in another light is hardly 'hollywood', it's as old as storytelling. (it's not like it ever claimed to be a faithful attempt at creating the book on screen, either). 'Corrupting' might be an appropriate phrase to use if the new work is irredeemably bad, or it's a historical story and the facts are wildly distorted (now THAT is something Hollywood is good at), but not here IMO.

    Also the part of Steve's comment about Edward Olomos being the last chicano in an otherwise very white cast is kinda ironic as one of the 'prophetic future noir' elements mentioned in reviews of the original, is the very mixed ethnicity of the miserable throning crowds in the city.
    Though maybe that element will be kept in the remake (which would be interesting). Or even... 'enhanced'

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  77. Yak-15 says:
    @The Z Blog
    Prometheus was so hilariously bad, I suspected it was done on purpose, like an homage to MST3000. It would take quite an effort for this film to reach that level of awfulness.

    So many awful oversights in that film. They have amazing drones but still need to send guys into the cave complex?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ray P
    Aliens features the same inconsistency: salvagers use a remotely operated drone to inspect Ripley's shuttle for threats before entering; marines do nothing like this later at the colony in a more dangerous situation.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  78. Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I’m thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    Read More
    • Replies: @owen
    Regarding positive readings for girls, Jane Austen is a cliched but very good answer. Her heroines are all devoted to their families and fathers in particular. The few female characters (never the main heroine herself) who "follow their hearts" and run off with a man whom their families disapprove of are always portrayed as selfish and wrong.

    Of course by modern standards for female characters, some of her heroines (like Fanny Price in Mansfield Park) are extremely passive, but one must understand that Jane Austen was really a virtue moralist at heart, teaching that if someone does what is right and refuses what is wrong they will eventually be rewarded.

    Beyond that, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte is a bit like Pride and Prejudice but with more dark romanticism and hints of spirituality. Religious hypocrisy is consistently condemned but the climax of the book involves an answered prayer and Jane Eyre's relationship with her love interest Mr. Rochester is one of service and devotion.

    I would always recommend Charles Dickens for generally edifying entertainment. Everyone in high school reads his more "serious" works like A Tale of Two Cities or Great Expectations, but his earlier works, like Nicholas Nickelby, the Pickwick Papers, and David Copperfield, are all touching and funny, though of course very wordy.

    P.G. Wodehouse is also a wonderful writer who wrote a lot of truly funny short stories and novels. Any of the Jeeves stories, Blandings stories, or Mr. Muliner stories are outstanding. For stand alone works I've always enjoyed a Damsel in Distress, Uncle Dynamite, the Indiscretions of Archie, and the Girl on the Boat. Wodehouse was writing during a time period in which saying "that's very white of you" was a socially acceptable compliment.

    I'd also recommend any Sherlock Holmes mystery by Arthur Conan Doyle or Father Brown Mystery by G.K. Chesterton for general entertainment (the later is explicitly Christian in its theology of course).

    There are BBC television adaptations of all the authors I've mentioned above, though I can't comment personally on their quality. I realize I've focused more on general entertainment than history, but all of these works offer a window into time periods in which Christianity, family, and pride in one's country and western civilization were celebrated. One could easily use these works as a starting point to discuss actual history if one wished.

    If you want to go a really simple route, you could always just watch a couple of old sitcoms from the 1950's-60's or old movies like the Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers Musicals (which feature some of the finest pop songwriting America's known). Watching something as recent as the Andy Griffith Show feels like another world (though King of the Hill in the 90's sometimes came close; especially the second half of the series which frequently pitted the conservative Hank Hill against liberal/politically correct characters, with Hank always being right). For both shows I'd skip the first season though, since in both cases, it isn't as good as what came afterwards. Good luck!
    , @Almost Missouri
    First off, this subject could be an entire post--nay an entire website. Also, unfortunate timing, my reference library is unavailable right now. But off the top of my head, movies good for kids…

    Though Japanese, Hayao Miyazaki has a deep respect for and interest in traditional Western culture, themes of which often turn up in his otherwise neo-Shintoist oeuvre. Porco Rosso might be the quintessential one here.

    How the West Was Won is kind of corny but its cinematic sweep might make it the most condensed way to get the romantic view of the settlement of the American West, so maybe good for the kids. I haven't managed to watch the whole thing.

    In spite of being cartoonishly exaggerated, 300 is unabashedly pro-Western and really gets the spirit of the event if not the exact details. Unfortunately, it is rated R for a reason, so not suitable for 7-12. N.B.: Sequel was crap.

    The recent British series Victoria isn't bad inasmuch as it simply takes the greatness of the British Empire at its peak as a given. It does imbue the Victoria character with a little more grrl-power than history warrants, but this is antidoted by the very sympathetic portrayal of Albert. If your grandkids are girls, it is likely to please.

    For boys: Zulu, Young Winston (Churchill), Henry V (Branagh), Master and Commander, Patton (these last involve Europeans fighting each other, but, well, that's reality)

    For both: Ingmar Bergman's Magic Flute, Around the World in Eighty Days (1956 version) has a madcap travelogue quality though it moves slowly for modern tastes.

    The Lord of the Rings is good in a pictorial way, but director Peter's unnecessarily jacking with the plot annoyed me. Ironically, the 1978 Ralph Bakshi partial adaptation may be more true to the script.

    For the younger ones, there were some engaging Chuck Jones animations of Kipling's Jungle Book stories. Or better yet, turn off the tube and read them "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" yourself. They will love you for it.
    , @J.Ross
    Objectively superb and criminally underappreciated:
    "White Hunter, Black Heart."
    Clint Eastwood directs and stars as infamous director John Huston, preparing for the on-location shooting of The African Queen. A true story minimally embellished.
    It happens to have two of the best critiques of leftist arrogance and virtue signalling. It doesn't feel political but raises the right questions.
    In one, Huston starts a gratuitous fight with the white hotel manager after an African employee spills food on a guest. This lets Huston feel good about himself for an evening, but either accomplishes nothing or makes life worse for the Africans.
    In the other, a woman contrasts a good Jew to criminals she had known during the war, whereupon the Jew insists that they be conflated. If you're keeping track, the anti-Semite is judging individuals by their merits, and the Jew, as a good tribalist, is lumping disparate elements together. The woman cannot grasp that she must judge different peoples categorically despite the Jew's articulately illogical arguments. So Huston pointedly hurts her feelings and she never shows her face again. This is deeply relevant to the "punch a Nazi" fad of effortless, feel-good hate.

    In a similar vein, by the author of the Flashman papers, and starring Sean Connery and Diana Rigg: "A Good Man in Africa."
    , @Almost Missouri
    Regarding reading, anything by Kipling is like a magical chewable red pill. My young daughter once overheard me listening to some obscure Kipling poetry and instantly became a lifelong devotee, even though I had assumed she was too young to understand it, which I think she probably was, but she recognized it contained real substance and grew into understanding later.

    There was a great vinyl disc of his poetry read by British actors Richard Johnson, Patrick Wymark, and Michael Bates, but I don't think it ever made it to digital.

    https://www.discogs.com/Rudyard-Kipling-The-English-Poets-From-Chaucer-To-Yeats/release/7995875

    There's also a rather good adaptation of some of his poems to music, Naulakha Redux.
    , @Autochthon
    For wholesome messages for young girls, I think you cannot go wrong with the works of Laura Ingalls Wilder, L. Frank Baum, Madeline L'Engle, Astrid Lindgren, or Lucy Maud Montgomery. Brian Jacques' stuff may appeal to some girls; it may be too martial for some, but because it is about fuzzy critters, girls may enjoy it nonetheless.

    The classics bear mention: Greek and Nordic myths written and edited in collections accessible for children are great (girls can learn about wise Athene, athletic Artemis and Atalanta, the folly of Arachne, steadfast Penelope...Medea's doings are probably a bit much for young ones, though!); Hans Christian Anderson's stuff; The Wind in The Willows; Puck of Pook's Hill....

    Gertrude Chandler Warner's The Boxcar Children and it's progeny depict a world in which self-reliance and kindness among real people is front and center, rather than ostensibly helpful intermeddling from the government.

    Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia and Tolkien's works about Middle earth offer excellent rôle models for girls in Lucy; Jill; Éowyn; Lúthien; Varda (whom Melkor feared more than even Manwë, Tulkas, or Oromë!); Galadriel; Melian; etc.*, though the latter is admittedly probably more appealing to boys and too sophisticated for very young girls.

    Steinbeck has his leftist aspects, but for older girls, The Grapes of Wrath has excellent depictions of the strength and the importance of women in supporting families with tenderness, encouragement, peace-making and calming, etc. amongst the Joads; Ma Joad is a great example of a strong, sensible woman.

    As is remarked, this topic is really something one could explore in great depth for a long time, but these are my efforts at quick suggestions with an emphasis on young girls' tastes.

    *It's pretty hilarious that leftists and feminists perennially decry the alleged dearth of important females in Tolkien's works; the females just usually don't fight bloody melees, instead being powerful in other ways more realistic and befitting of women....
    , @Alden
    This is my suggestion for boys and girls. Buy an encyclopedia including the children's book of knowledge published before 1960.

    The Internet, used bookstores, goodwill, garage sales are places to look. The easiest way is to google Antique and rare books. The dealers all have websites. Send an email of what you want and they will look in their stock and contact other dealers.

    The Louisa May Alcott books are wonderful for girls, not just Little Women.
    Nancy Drew is unrealistic but she and her friends are good role models. I wish I could remember authors and titles but I can't remember the endless girls books from the 1920's to 1950's There were hundreds of those books. The heroines were all high school girls who learned that money and popularity weren't everything.

    The Cherry Ames series was about Cherry Ames a nurse. She was a great role model.

    Jean Plaidy and Voctoria Holt wrote great historical novels. Gene Stratton Porter wrote books set on the Indiana lumber forests with teenage heroes and heroines.

    Basically anything published prior to 1960. The greatest book for kids is of course Kim by Rudyard Kipling. Treasure island and Kidnapped by RL Stevenson are great stories of 12 year olds in danger.

    But best is the pre 1960 children's encyclopedia.

    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    Lots of excellent suggestions so far, but allow me to add one broad strategy that has worked well with Daughter Calvinist.

    When she was getting to 'tweeny' age, i.e. old enough to get beyond the Disney stuff, for TV watching we started on Jane Austen adaptations. She loved them, and her taste for historical dramas has run true right into her teens.

    Yes, there are bad adaptations out there, but many historical dramas, especially British-produced ones, are based on bastions of the western tradition that resist retconning pretty well.

    The classic BBC 1995 version of Pride and Prejudice is where we started. We've worked through many, many Austen adaptations, lots of Dickens, Downton Abbey (of course), and branched off into historical-setting detective fiction adaptations, e.g. Poirot and Miss Marple, Endeavour, etc.

    There is a vast sea of this kind of material out there, especially if you're willing to go back and watch series produced from, say, the 90s onward. And there's good stuff still being produced. We've just watched Victoria, which is very good, and Wolf Hall, which is superb. We're on the latest BBC version of War and Peace right now, and it's also very enjoyable.

    There are of course even older TV adaptations of historical fiction out there, too, but the low production values and sometimes-glacial pacing makes them more of a challenge to watch.

    We also watch 1930s-50s movies. Audrey Hepburn films, for example, remain very attractive to young girls. The best part is that you can just jump straight in and choose to watch can't-miss classics.

    We have found that sometimes there's a bit of resistance to getting started on watching something 'classic' -- the kid will moan about another B & W moldy oldy, etc., but if we can just get her watching it, she's often swept up by the quality and ends up loving the film.

    , @Alden
    Remembered a few more. Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Sunstar and Pepper, Johnny Tremaine, Rebecca's War and the Five Little Peppers books and The Little Colonel series
    The authors must have written more children's books.

    Revolution and The Patriot are movies that have children playing big roles in the American Revolution
    , @Whoever

    I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas
     
    Anne of Green Gables and subsequent by Lucy Maud Montgomery
    Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder
    The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes
    Little Women Louisa May Alcott
    Camille by Alexandre Dumas, fils
    My Antonia by Willa Cather
    Wanda by Ouida
    Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

    And somewhat at a tangent, but stories that will stick with them and have them thinking:
    Green Mansions by W.H. Hudson
    A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes
    Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
    Requiem for a Wren by Nevil Shute

    And those are just off the top of my head. If I think about it a little more I could come up with lots of others. The Thomas Hardy novels have very interesting female protagonists.

    I highly recommend Poems Every Child Should Know. You can download it free from Gutenberg . There are some simply wonderful poems for children to learn and love in this volume.
    The collection was to be taught in school, with the children memorizing and reciting the poems. That's a fun way to spend time with your children or grandchildren.
    If your grandchildren learn Felicia Hemans' "Casabianca," "The Captain's Daughter" by James T. Fields or Longfellow's "The Village Blacksmith," they will have something that will stick to their ribs, so to speak.
    And if you think memorizing poems will be dull and boring for kids, try this stanza from "The Captain's Daughter":

    So we shuddered there in silence,
    For the stoutest held his breath,
    While the hungry sea was roaring
    And the breakers talked with Death.


    Don't tell me you can't give those lines a dramatic reading that will hold your grandchildren rapt.
    , @FPD72
    "How the West Was Won" is a really good movie for presenting the American myth of the settling of the American west in epic form. Post-modern audiences will have a difficult time viewing it in any manner but ironically, but to my pre-adolescent self watching the film's original release it was fantastic. I was greatly saddened when "Tom Jones" won the Academy Award for Best Movie.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  79. Jack D says:
    @neutral
    Yet when I make simply make this comment (and only this part no other extra parts): "Israel is not Western, jews are not Western", it gets banned at most sites, even this comment has a very good chance to not see the light here.

    The first half is true, the second is not. (Ashkenazi) Jews have been in the West since Roman times. In many European countries, the current population (or at least the ruling class) has been there a lot less time than that.

    Read More
    • Agree: Dave Pinsen
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/551292772859527169
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  80. Truth says:
    @Anonymous
    It's virtually impossible to do a noir today without it going full Union City.

    For one thing, a real noir has to be shot monochrome (black and white), and not only is that not going to be bankable and restrict you to arthouse distribution, modern cinematographers literally do not know how to shoot monochrome. Sure, they can use monochrome film or set the flag in the digital camera to "mono", but the art of getting the fine details is lost.

    Union City is not a bad film, but the only reason it even plays art houses and is distributed anymore is it has Deborah Harry and Pat Benatar in it. Benatar still has mainstream rock and roll cred and both women have a gay and hipster following of sorts. (Sadly, the commonly available DVD of this film is poorly mastered.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkQWQnGztmM


    Sadly, this is the only YT video, the copyright nazis have suppressed better clips.

    For one thing, a real noir has to be shot monochrome (black and white),

    Jake Gittes disagrees.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  81. songbird says:
    @Anonymous
    Well, Elysium had a more realistic portrayal of Los Angeles' future population demographics and it didn't do great business.

    One of the most chilling comments I've ever heard from a filmmaker was when the South African-born writer/director of Elysium & District 9, Neill Blomkamp, gave an interview in which he said words to the effect of "South Africa is actually my vision of the future," with a haunted gravitas.

    That’s funny. Blomkamp’s settings are basically all inspired by South African slums. I thought the setting for Chappie was perfect though, in a broken clock sort of way.

    Robocop had it wrong. People simply leave Detroit. Johhanesburg, though extremely violent, is still growing. Private security is a massive industry there, and it is easy to imagine it being the perfect place to deploy robot cops. In a fairly wealthy but safe place like Japan it is hard to imagine it happening.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  82. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Let me save you $40 & 3 hours. The take home message (delivered with modern H'wood's Bruckheimer levels of subtlety) will be: We must stop treating Mestizos, Blacks, and other PoC as mere Drone-grade Replicants. We must recognize our Privilege and let our Humanity shine forth, etc.

    Or, to borrow from Huxley’s “Brave New World”, they all should be treated like Alphas. Right!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  83. res says:
    @Intelligent Dasein
    Steve, I wish you had not bumped the much more interesting twin studies post out of the top 6 spots for the sake of this one. Now very few people will comment on it and it really deserved a long discussion.

    Ask Ron to add it to the featured posts in the left column of the homepage?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  84. @Sean
    I think its largely the singer not the song. Olmos's has what they need for a hard bioled cop, he does little else well. Olmos's popularity stems from him being pock marked . Hollywood requires its Hispanics to be like Olmos and Danny Trejo. Cherokee Wes Studi, (great as Geronimo) shows the value of a pox-survivor physog for Amerindian thespians)


    TRe. "hard boiled masters" , !”Trejo looks like he has fought a war with his face,, and was a serious criminal in his youth, in prison he was once in the hole with 2gas chamber offence charges . He knew the 10 most wanted alumnus turned author and screenwriter Edward Bunker (Mr. Blue of Pulp Fiction) in prison, and when Trejo accompanied a pal going to an casting call for a Bunker movie, he was given a job as boxing trainer to star Eric Roberts.

    Trejo has been in nearly 200 movies since , most famously in the "Machete" series of films (the latest of which is called "Machete Kills In Space". In the original 2010 trailer Trejo growled an anti immigration restrictionist threat, “This is Machete with a special Cinco de Mayo message — to Arizona!”.

    “Hollywood requires its Hispanics to be like Olmos and Danny Trejo”
    Yup and Andy Garcia, Jennifer Lopez, Michael Pena, Garcia Bernal, Penelope Cruz, Salma Hayek, Leguizamo, Antonio Banderas, etc

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sean
    A number of those are not very south of the border Hispanic in ancestry. Anyway the film apparently represents HIspanics through Olmos, not Andy Garcia. I thought Olmos's facial peculiarities might have some bearing on his success in Hollywood--playing Hispanics..
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  85. Altai says:
    @Pat Boyle
    Some movie directors are good with actors, others are good at organizing complex plots, still others have a way with suspense. Ridley Scott' s forte has always been set decoration.

    His movies always have great costumes and sets. Many of his big ticket films don't make a whole lot of sense because he just doesn't seem to care about plot. I was blown away by his first major movie 'The Duelists'. I was totally convinced by the setting. It was beautiful to look at and it convinced me that I was seeing Napoleonic Europe. In his subsequent quasi-historical films the same qualities are also seen.

    So his latest film 'Prometheus' also looks great. Unfortunately the actors do loony things and act strangely. Scott doesn't seem to care. His movie about the crusades was similar - great attention to visual detail but a very muddled and inappropriate drama.

    Scott IMHO got lucky with Blade Runner. It became very famous but has not been very influential. The ideas of Blade Runner have not gained traction in films. Cameron's break through film 'Terminator' has spawned a number of sequels, a TV series and who knows what else. But Blade Runner has had no sequels or characters who have suddenly shown up in other films. Everyone knows all of the 'Star Wars' characters. Just last week someone on this blog accused me of trying to be C3P0.

    But Blade Runner has had almost no influence outside of the original movie. Ridley Scott is not a good director for science-fiction despite his two big successes. Good science-fiction relies on either ideas or action and that isn't Scott's strong suit.

    So I'm glad to see a new young director at the helm.

    I can only think of Ghost In The Shell and the Battlestar Galactica remake, which, of course also starred Olmos. I find it funny when Steve brings him up as an Ur-Hispanic, my first exposure to him was BSG and his being a believable father to a very pale, blue eyed son played by an Englishman. They even gave him blue contact lenses to sometimes wear on the show! It was weird because he hardly ever wore them and it was obvious he had brown eyes but then sometimes they’d do a closeup (But sometimes also not) and he’d be wearing these really obvious blue contact lenses.

    I never really noticed. His face was so scarred I never really saw him as anything but a white guy, which is what he actually is, I suppose.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    His son was played by Jamie Bamber on BSG. There was a flashback episode to the first Cylon war, where Bamber played a young Adama, and the hair and makeup people did a great job giving him a spiky Chicano look.
    , @Pat Boyle
    I saw the original Battlestar Galactica - but none of the episodes from the remake series. I presumed that Olmos was cast as an attempt at acquiring some of the Latino audience. But the whole first series had become so cheesy that I couldn't stomach the second.

    When I was a kid and then a young man there were almost no Science Fiction series on TV. In those days everything was a western. I had watched Captain Video when very young but had to wait for Star Trek for another Sci-Fi series. I'm sure I'm forgetting something but I am calmed by the realization that someone in the readership will set me straight.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  86. @syonredux
    Depicting a Mestizo Hispanic future would be too depressing.

    As for Blade Runner 2049, they should have just used the source novel (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?) for the plot. Now that would have been interesting. DADOES is a lot more thought-provoking than Blade Runner

    Having read many of Dick’s novels and suffered through many of their adaptations, I observe the phenomenon is ubiquitous, perhaps universal: these films are in many cases so different from Dick’s novels it becomes difficult to argue they are adaptations.

    I watched Bladerunner when I was a child, wholly unfamiliar with Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. When I later read the novel, as an adult, I had learned of the film’s connection to it, but I was glad I’ had essentially forgotten the film, so nothing about the book would be spoilt. Yet even the extremely vague impressions of the film I did retain told me the book I was reading was nothing like the film I had seen. Later, I watched the film again, and confirmed I was correct.

    I understand Mr. Dick was pleased with Bladerunner (who wouldn’t be pleased with the money it doubtless made for him?!); I wonder to what extent novelists prefer adaptations inspired by their work not undertake the usually impossible task of replicating the novel in cinematic form, but instead merely draw inspiration from the novel to do something more suited to cinema? Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a very cerebral thing; a great deal of it is to do with the characters’ own thoughts, and it is often intentionally unclear what is being imagined and what is actually occurring. Such techniques do not often translate well to the screen, which provides viewers less opportunity to slowly mull what is occurring and appreciate ambiguous or varied interpretations the author may be offering….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ray P
    If Andrey Tarkovsky had directed Android's Dream it could have worked.
    , @dfordoom

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a very cerebral thing; a great deal of it is to do with the characters’ own thoughts, and it is often intentionally unclear what is being imagined and what is actually occurring. Such techniques do not often translate well to the screen
     
    Dick's novels are virtually unfilmable. Blade Runner, considered on its own merits, is a fine movie. It simplifies Dick's ideas to an extreme degree but there's no other way to do a Philip K. Dick movie. I think of it as a movie inspired by Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? rather than as an adaptation.

    The movie is to a very large degree an exercise in style. The style is so impressive that it gets away with it. That's also true of Scott's other great movie, The Duellists.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  87. Altai says:
    @Anonymous
    Well, Elysium had a more realistic portrayal of Los Angeles' future population demographics and it didn't do great business.

    One of the most chilling comments I've ever heard from a filmmaker was when the South African-born writer/director of Elysium & District 9, Neill Blomkamp, gave an interview in which he said words to the effect of "South Africa is actually my vision of the future," with a haunted gravitas.

    A lot of people have hinted that Blomkamp is not actually enthused by such a future but deeply disturbed by it, but as a white man and especially as an Afrikaner, he can’t say that openly. Look up his interviews about South Africa.

    District 9 was actually a metaphor for the mass waves of Zimbabweans and Nigerians streaming into urban South Africa and putting huge competition and strain on the poor. The original low-budget short film he made has actual vox-pops on the street of people complaining about immigrants but made to be about the aliens who have shown up and are sucking up resources, space and disturbing the peace for the very poorest, bringing with them an alienating culture and competing tribe. Their space ship is literally helping itself to free power by illegally connecting to the grid with giant tendrils.

    This is the original short film that got him a gig making District 9.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Here's my 2009 review of District 9:

    http://takimag.com/article/alien_nation/print#axzz4gSvQe6QO

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  88. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Watching the first 5 minutes of the original Blade Runner set in the Fall of 2019, I can see you have much to do in the next 30 months. Those flying cars, pyramid shaped office towers, soup thick smog, and belching fireball plumes need to be manifest soon. A sexbot or Roomba isn't exactly a Rutger Hauer grade replicant, but maybe they were just off by a decade.

    Hope you'll review this "2049" one for us iSteve. Am too cynical now after seeing Prometheus to take the bait. And hope you'll have a couple paragraphs on Covenant too. Can't bear to watch another naif "scientist" stare into the opening maw of a barrel-sized egg.

    As with science itself, speculative fiction has increasingly been ruined by an influx of female busybodies with nothing to contribute but plenty of contributions nonetheless. The days of Heinlein, Bradbury, Dick, Vance, Burroughs, and Moorcock have given way to vapid shit like Contact (written by a man, but very much in the metrosexual, “progressive” mode; that the never reproduced is telling…), Arrival, and so on….

    Rather than fascinating works pressing the boundaries of what will be possible or likely given human nature and the possibilities of this or that advance in technology (chain-marriages on the moon, androids’ sentience, unnatural long life in the face of finite resources…), we get the kind of ideas one would expect from an episode of My Little Pony:

    – The most important thing is to believe in yourself
    – True love makes it possible to endure any situation, and selfishly ruining another’s situation to alleviate one’s own is okay if you are handsome (Passengers is essentially this old chestnut in long form)
    – Stupid,lazy, leporine brown people deserve whatever smart, hardworking, restrained white people are able to obtain because “Not Fair!”
    – Mean old science and technology are bad for Mother Earth and simple agrarianism is preferable

    Even the one recent, interesting work in the genre, Life, hinges upon womanish efforts to save a single crewman by endangering the entire ship and, later, the planet – in the old days, Mr. Spock knew better, and stoically died like a man!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  89. Barnard says:

    OT: https://www.si.com/tech-media/2017/05/09/charles-barkley-racism-american-race-series

    Quote from Barkley:

    “If you are black on television, you are probably going to be some kind of thug, gangster or portrayed in a negative light,” Barkley said.” If you are some type of Muslim, you are going to be blowing stuff up. If you are Hispanic you are going to be some type of gangbanger. I’ve felt like this for years.”

    What on earth is he watching on TV? How many black sitcoms have there been since the Cosby show?

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Maybe he was watching the news?
    , @Jefferson
    "If you are black on television, you are probably going to be some kind of thug, gangster or portrayed in a negative light,”

    If Blacks are portrayed as thugs on television why are they completely absent from home burglary commercials?

    Rosa Parks had her home broken into and the burglar was not a White male.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  90. @syonredux

    Yeah, shooting a film in an LA run by mestizos would have to be challenging, particularly night shots, given the dearth of electric light and all.
     
    I was thinking more in terms of depicting it onscreen. Hollywood works quite hard to avoid showing the reality of contemporary life in CA. Hence, going on the evidence of films and TV, one would think that CA still has an Anglo European majority.....

    The idea of depicting a future LA that is totally overrun with with Mestizos is just too much for any sane man to bear....

    I meant to agree with you instead of your interlocutor (though I also agree with him): people who don’t live here, even those who visit (because they are often shepherded to carefully chosen or maintained areas for their business and pleasure) have no idea what California is actually like; the typical resident of, say, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, or even New York, has no foggy clue what California is; they conceptualise California as a place that has not existed for several decades. The same phenomenon applies Florida’s Dade County

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  91. @Altai
    A lot of people have hinted that Blomkamp is not actually enthused by such a future but deeply disturbed by it, but as a white man and especially as an Afrikaner, he can't say that openly. Look up his interviews about South Africa.

    District 9 was actually a metaphor for the mass waves of Zimbabweans and Nigerians streaming into urban South Africa and putting huge competition and strain on the poor. The original low-budget short film he made has actual vox-pops on the street of people complaining about immigrants but made to be about the aliens who have shown up and are sucking up resources, space and disturbing the peace for the very poorest, bringing with them an alienating culture and competing tribe. Their space ship is literally helping itself to free power by illegally connecting to the grid with giant tendrils.

    This is the original short film that got him a gig making District 9.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlgtbEdqVsk

    Here’s my 2009 review of District 9:

    http://takimag.com/article/alien_nation/print#axzz4gSvQe6QO

    Read More
    • Replies: @Altai
    Heh, I probably read it and that's where I found all the subversive interviews about him musing on the Ponte City Apartments etc.

    I know a lot of people at the time were mad that everyone overlooked that it wasn't about apartheid, particularly since it was set in the modern day and apartheid has been done to death. The anti-immigrant riots were prominent and EVERYONE writing about the film mentioned the original short film. Blomkamp himself was vocally annoyed nobody got it. There he was making a sci-fi film about a fascinating contemporary issue that goes unexplored and everyone thought he was beating a safe dead horse because all anybody knew about South Africa was apartheid.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  92. @JohnnyWalker123
    I find it interesting that Ryan Gosling has had such a successful career.

    How come is it interesting? He’s very intelligent (therefore good at choosing and developing projects and at avoiding the temptations and excesses of fame, like drugs and such); a talented actor; and a great-looking guy (yes, I’m secure enough in my masculinity to write that). It’s a recipe for success in Hollywood.

    You want someone whose success is somewhat unexpected? How about a rough-looking dude like John C. Reilly or a talentless, unfunny hack like Adam Sandler (yes, I know the secret to the latter’s success lies in making movies that appeal to twelve-year-old boys and stupid mestizos…).

    Read More
    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    unfunny hack like Adam Sandler
     
    Um, what?

    Did you miss Happy Gilmore?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  93. @JohnnyWalker123
    I find it interesting that Ryan Gosling has had such a successful career.

    How come is it interesting? He’s very intelligent (therefore good at choosing and developing projects and at avoiding the temptations and excesses of fame, like drugs and such); a talented actor; and a great-looking guy (yes, I’m secure enough in my masculinity to write that). It’s a recipe for success in Hollywood.

    You want someone whose success is somewhat unexpected? How about a rough-looking dude like John C. Reilly or a talentless, unfunny hack like Adam Sandler (yes, I know the secret to the latter’s success lies in making movies that appeal to twelve-year-old boys and stupid mestizos…).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  94. neutral says:
    @Altai
    Dredd does a better job replicating the highly Brazilian-looking demographics and dysfunction of a future US megalopolis, though on the East coast. Though only for the background characters, everyone else is mostly white.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2bA2Gnac9OY

    Dredd does a better job replicating the highly Brazilian-looking demographics

    Thats because Dredd was filmed in South Africa, which is actually appropriate because if one wants to know what most nations will be like in the future then there is no better than South Africa.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Altai
    I didn't realise that. I suppose it explains the ease of access they had to all the minibus taxis, I thought they were just really tied into third world cities.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  95. @Manfred Arcane
    There is a Mexican police detective in chapters 38 and 44 of The Long Goodbye (which I read over this winter)--Captain Hernandez, a tough but fair policeman who questions both Marlowe and (in Spanish) the Chileno houseboy Candy in his first appearance, and in his second appearance joins with Chandler's only recurring policeman character, Bernie Ohls, to tacitly allow Marlowe to take a photostat of a confession that the official higher-ups don't want to get out. Aside from talking Spanish to Candy, however, he doesn't "read" as particularly Mexican in his speech patterns, or even in his physical description ("a big tired-looking man with iron-gray hair").

    The Chandler novella, "Red Wind," has a more emphatically Mexican police detective named Ybarra, whose dialogue is arranged to suggest someone slightly unfamiliar with homegrown Los Angeles English, and is explicitly referred to as a Mexican by Marlowe and as a "guinea" by another police detective. Ybarra might more properly be the prototype of the type of character you're talking about; he's a smallish, quiet-spoken sort with a melancholy demeanor but a sense of duty, who saves Marlowe from being killed by a nastier cop at the end.

    Chandler was a "reactionary" in many ways (he correctly pointed out that Stalin was even worse than Hitler; it's only a matter of time till he gets banished from the American literary pantheon for his "homophobia;" he stated in one of his letters that he would have fought for the Confederacy), but he had an odd fondness for Mexicans which I've noticed in several other right-leaning types in the pre-mass-immigration era (John Wayne and the great comic-book creator Carl Barks being two other examples). If I were to analyze the reasons for it, I'd say that pessimistic conservatives like Chandler and Barks, who both loathed the urbanized, glamorized, and mechanized modern world of Los Angeles, had a certain romantic nostalgia for the rural, pre-industrial "old California" society that the Mexicans represented to them.

    John Ford, John Wayne, Cormac McCarthy, Mel Gibson: Mexophilics.

    Interest in Mexico, in contrast, has largely disappeared from, say, the NYT, even before Carlos Slim bailed it out. The NYT dutifully covers Mexico, but there’s no sign that their subscriber base has any interest in it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Seth Largo
    Also Charles Portis, who set two of his books south of the border. And Fred Reed of course.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  96. Neoconned says:

    OT — so I just took my TEAS entry exam to try to get into nursing school at my local community college here. I made an 82 — which for me was disappointing considering my grades in A and P 1 and 2…..

    BUT — I work 3 jobs and BARELY studied for the test so hearing it was “above average and very good” kinda jolted me.

    While there I noticed probably 2/3 of the people taking the test were blacks — 1 black guy and the rest women. Several of the people in there were on their 2nd or even 3rd times taking the test.

    Guys — if you ever have to go to a hospital — hope the staff is mostly Asian….dunno how many white nurses there will be in the future.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  97. bomag says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...
    Hollywood corrupts everything it touches. In Phillip K. Dick's novel the replicants were soulless, anti-life monstrosities. The human hero is briefly tempted by an apparently beautiful female replicant until he sees her callously pulling the legs off a spider. At that point he returns to his imperfect but human wife. Dick was making a serious point here about the dignity and preciousness of life and reality, as opposed to non-life/anti-life and the artificialities which we humans create and with which we surround themselves. (It's pretty obvious why the denizens of Hollywood would miss this message.)

    The movie, Blade Runner, romanticizes the soulless replicants, going so far as to suggest that Decker, the protagonist, is one. A total inversion of Dick's original message.

    Blade Runner was a great movie but it completely inverted Dick's message and to that extent was a travesty. It looks like the sequel goes even further down that path. Based on the trailer, I'm guessing it will also not be nearly as good a movie.

    Dick was making a serious point here about the dignity and preciousness of life and reality, as opposed to non-life/anti-life and the artificialities which we humans create and with which we surround themselves. (It’s pretty obvious why the denizens of Hollywood would miss this message.)

    I sometimes wonder how precious and dignified. Humans seem to cultivate a lot of self destruction.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  98. bomag says:
    @whorefinder
    Blade Runner was good, but I was shocked at how many people didn't get the subtext/hidden implication that Harrison Ford himself was a replicant. To me it was obvious that the filmmakers set up that ambiguity from the start, playing with the idea of the unreliable narrator. But until I said it to people---or they watched the DVDs with the extra scenes, which hammer home the theme more---they didn't have a clue. Then, once exposed, they said, "OMG, of course!"

    It's similar to how The Exorcist has a subtext/implication of child molestation/sexual assault. The implication is: Regan is being sexually molested by her mother's creepy male friend, and afraid to tell her mother, Regan desperately uses her OUIJA board/other occult things to ask for help from the spirit world, hence how she gets possessed and why the first emanation of the demon is murdering the creepy male friend by tossing him out the window.

    It's a "OMG, of course!" moment that you just don't see it until someone points it out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlLrD1CC5wQ

    Anyway, if Harrison Ford is in this film, it might ruin the original Blade Runner, since, IIRC, the replicants were only supposed to live for a short time, so I don't know how he survived this long, unless he discovered the secret to longevity the other replicants from the original were looking for.

    …himself was a replicant

    From what I’ve heard, the director/producers argued about this point, and it ended with an ambiguous depiction.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Nah, they were always trying to go for the ambiguity. The argument was how many clues pushed it from ambiguous to definite. In the extended version there's a dream sequence by Harrison Ford's character that, when tied with something Edward James Olmos says and does, pretty much gives away the fact that Ford is a replicant. They were right to cut it.

    The producers thought that the audience needed a lot more handholding/explanation, so they forced a voiceover narration in there by Ford's character. Allegedly, Ford agreed with Ridley Scott that the narration really hurt the movie, so Ford explains that his narration was so wooden because he was deliberately trying to get the producers not to use it. The producers, however, used it anyway. (Of course, Ford could have just done a crappy job on the narration and was covering for it via this explanation).

    Movie tip: in a semi-artistic movie any ambiguity you're noticing is deliberate and planned. Inception is another great example: people argue about what the ending meant, but in reality the meaning of the ambiguous ending was simply to get people to argue about it.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  99. @Jus' Sayin'...
    Hollywood corrupts everything it touches. In Phillip K. Dick's novel the replicants were soulless, anti-life monstrosities. The human hero is briefly tempted by an apparently beautiful female replicant until he sees her callously pulling the legs off a spider. At that point he returns to his imperfect but human wife. Dick was making a serious point here about the dignity and preciousness of life and reality, as opposed to non-life/anti-life and the artificialities which we humans create and with which we surround themselves. (It's pretty obvious why the denizens of Hollywood would miss this message.)

    The movie, Blade Runner, romanticizes the soulless replicants, going so far as to suggest that Decker, the protagonist, is one. A total inversion of Dick's original message.

    Blade Runner was a great movie but it completely inverted Dick's message and to that extent was a travesty. It looks like the sequel goes even further down that path. Based on the trailer, I'm guessing it will also not be nearly as good a movie.

    Indeed, as Kenobi observes, Mercerism is an enormous part of the novel.

    To your own point: It is very well made. Modern smartphone-zombies and, especially, the culture of death emanating from pornography and as pornography and videogames – as artificial alternatives which stunt the natural inclination to woo, wed, procreate in the first case and to do, make, experience, and learn in the second, are huge banes in modern societies. Mercerism, as well as your point about the soulless artificiality of the androids, were integral to Dick’s messages in the novel.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  100. Sean says:
    @Antonin Chigurh
    "Hollywood requires its Hispanics to be like Olmos and Danny Trejo"
    Yup and Andy Garcia, Jennifer Lopez, Michael Pena, Garcia Bernal, Penelope Cruz, Salma Hayek, Leguizamo, Antonio Banderas, etc

    A number of those are not very south of the border Hispanic in ancestry. Anyway the film apparently represents HIspanics through Olmos, not Andy Garcia. I thought Olmos’s facial peculiarities might have some bearing on his success in Hollywood–playing Hispanics..

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  101. Edward James Olmos played Jose Menendez – the father of the infamous Menendez brothers – in a cheesy TV movie. It wasn’t his best performance. He looked bloated.

    That same movie featured Beverly D’Angelo as the mother. Someone should do a National Lampoon’s Vacation mashup depicting Ellen Griswold as a miserable drunk married to an abusive husband.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  102. Rod1963 says:
    @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Watching the first 5 minutes of the original Blade Runner set in the Fall of 2019, I can see you have much to do in the next 30 months. Those flying cars, pyramid shaped office towers, soup thick smog, and belching fireball plumes need to be manifest soon. A sexbot or Roomba isn't exactly a Rutger Hauer grade replicant, but maybe they were just off by a decade.

    Hope you'll review this "2049" one for us iSteve. Am too cynical now after seeing Prometheus to take the bait. And hope you'll have a couple paragraphs on Covenant too. Can't bear to watch another naif "scientist" stare into the opening maw of a barrel-sized egg.

    I used to love sci-fi movies. Not anymore. They’re either mindless ‘ride’ pictures like Guardians or idiocy like Interstellar and Contact.

    When you’re reduced to using comic books for source material, you’re pretty much hit rock bottom.

    Anyways Prometheus is well, so bad as to make one wonder if it was done as a prank. Covenant looks to be a retcon of Alien because none of the writers employed weren’t smart enough to come up with a decent story.

    There are good sci-fi writers out there, but they don’t get employed by Hollywood. Instead they find idiots who pen something like Prometheus or Interstellar – really, folks looking for a viable planet to colonize next to a black hole?

    That said most good sci-fi stories lend themselves to a mini-series format and would do better if they were done by HBO, Netflix or Cinemax. Trying to compact stories into a 90 minute movie meant for people between 15-30 means the end result is forgettable schlock.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  103. Altai says:
    @neutral

    Dredd does a better job replicating the highly Brazilian-looking demographics
     
    Thats because Dredd was filmed in South Africa, which is actually appropriate because if one wants to know what most nations will be like in the future then there is no better than South Africa.

    I didn’t realise that. I suppose it explains the ease of access they had to all the minibus taxis, I thought they were just really tied into third world cities.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  104. OT: Duke U. divinity prof. calls “racial equity initiative” a waste of time. Hilarity ensues.

    In the words of the offending prof.:

    The convictions that some of my colleagues hold about justice for racial, ethnic, and gender minorities have led them to attempt occupation of a place of unassailably luminous moral probity. That’s a utopia, and those who seek it place themselves outside the space of reason. Once you’ve made that move, those who disagree with you inevitably seem corrupt and dangerous, better removed than argued with, while you seem to yourself beyond criticism.

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/duke-divinity-crisis-griffiths-documents/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  105. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Gay Blade Runner or ‘muh conservatism’.

    https://www.facebook.com/myiannopoulos/videos/909549809182915/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  106. guest says:
    @syonredux
    Depicting a Mestizo Hispanic future would be too depressing.

    As for Blade Runner 2049, they should have just used the source novel (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?) for the plot. Now that would have been interesting. DADOES is a lot more thought-provoking than Blade Runner

    Literature has an inherently greater capacity for thought-provocation. In the hands of a great writer like Dick, that’s almost a given. But I’m not sure Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? faithfully adapted would reliably produce a great movie. There’s a great movie in there, if you do it right. But there’re also a lot of ways to screw it up.

    On the other hand, a good robot action sci-fi noir mystery thriller is waiting for you on the surface. I like the premise of Blade Runner (though I always ask myself why they made the robots so humanlike. Couldn’t they have put a red dot on their foreheads, or something, just in case they rebel?), a little less the execution, and the feel above all. Feelz are like lightning in a bottle. The music, for instance, which I loved and gave me intense feelz, wouldn’t work in a lot of other contexts.

    You take direction, set design, costuming, acting, music, and so forth all together, and that was the Blade Runner style. But it didn’t have a knockout story. Enough to give me great feelz, but not intellectually satisfying.

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? has a knockout story, but would you be able to pull in all the feelz necessary to make it a successful movie? I dunno. Maybe. Safer bet is to work in proven subgenres, like robot action sci-fi noir mystery thrillers, and hope the story is good enough.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Literature has an inherently greater capacity for thought-provocation. In the hands of a great writer like Dick, that’s almost a given. But I’m not sure Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? faithfully adapted would reliably produce a great movie. There’s a great movie in there, if you do it right. But there’re also a lot of ways to screw it up.
     
    Sure. On the other hand, there's a lot of material in the book (the Buster Friendly show, Mercerism, etc) that could be brought to the screen in an effective fashion.
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    They aren't robots. You are missing the layers to Ridley Scott's film.

    The replicants are genetically engineered humans, dumped out of a tank and engineered for a 4-year lifespan ("Wake up! Time to die!"). They have animal DNA spliced in: Roy is a wolf; Priss is a raccoon; Leon's a turtle; Zhora is a snake. It took me a bit longer to figure out Rachel though they're all pretty obvious actually. She dresses in fur, follows Deckard all around, and is loyal to the death. The other hint is in the Voight-Kampff test: her trigger is the reference to boiled dog, just like Leon lost it with Holden's turtle story.

    The real kicker is Deckard himself: he's a shark who loves the sensation of blood in water.

    Scott's point is that the capacity for moral choice is what makes us human. Thus, Roy makes it to the plan of salvation by saving Deckard's life. Scott incorporates explicitly Christian imagery, with a nail through Roy's palm and a white dove. Scott's from a different era. I doubt the sequel will be as profound or spiritual.

    Speaking of dogs, they are under a genetic selection pressure cooker which we need to dial back. Most dogs are so far removed from their predatory origins they won't eat raw meat, which is good because we don't want them hunting and killing our baby humans or herd animals. On the other hand, golden retrievers are being bred for so much amiability they're becoming big stupid fluffy dolls with no homing instinct. Most dog breeds would rapidly die off without humans. If we ever wanted to bring the dingos back into the fold, it wouldn't take long.

    Can we breed dogs to the point that their brains can figure out moral agency? I guess we'll find out. Now I'm getting into Daniel Dennett's "spectrum of consciousness" theory which apparently has David Chalmers so upset. Interestingly, Daniel Dennett's the one who works with his hands and throws a huge Christmas party where he enthusiastically leads his guests in the carols. Chalmers is the one who gets invited to TED talks.

    Back to Blade Runner: I really want to believe that Villeneuve understands and incorporates Scott's vision but I'm pretty sure I'll be disappointed. At least we'll always have that perfect tear drop of a movie.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  107. owen says:
    @Michaeloh59
    Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I'm thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    Regarding positive readings for girls, Jane Austen is a cliched but very good answer. Her heroines are all devoted to their families and fathers in particular. The few female characters (never the main heroine herself) who “follow their hearts” and run off with a man whom their families disapprove of are always portrayed as selfish and wrong.

    Of course by modern standards for female characters, some of her heroines (like Fanny Price in Mansfield Park) are extremely passive, but one must understand that Jane Austen was really a virtue moralist at heart, teaching that if someone does what is right and refuses what is wrong they will eventually be rewarded.

    Beyond that, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte is a bit like Pride and Prejudice but with more dark romanticism and hints of spirituality. Religious hypocrisy is consistently condemned but the climax of the book involves an answered prayer and Jane Eyre’s relationship with her love interest Mr. Rochester is one of service and devotion.

    I would always recommend Charles Dickens for generally edifying entertainment. Everyone in high school reads his more “serious” works like A Tale of Two Cities or Great Expectations, but his earlier works, like Nicholas Nickelby, the Pickwick Papers, and David Copperfield, are all touching and funny, though of course very wordy.

    P.G. Wodehouse is also a wonderful writer who wrote a lot of truly funny short stories and novels. Any of the Jeeves stories, Blandings stories, or Mr. Muliner stories are outstanding. For stand alone works I’ve always enjoyed a Damsel in Distress, Uncle Dynamite, the Indiscretions of Archie, and the Girl on the Boat. Wodehouse was writing during a time period in which saying “that’s very white of you” was a socially acceptable compliment.

    I’d also recommend any Sherlock Holmes mystery by Arthur Conan Doyle or Father Brown Mystery by G.K. Chesterton for general entertainment (the later is explicitly Christian in its theology of course).

    There are BBC television adaptations of all the authors I’ve mentioned above, though I can’t comment personally on their quality. I realize I’ve focused more on general entertainment than history, but all of these works offer a window into time periods in which Christianity, family, and pride in one’s country and western civilization were celebrated. One could easily use these works as a starting point to discuss actual history if one wished.

    If you want to go a really simple route, you could always just watch a couple of old sitcoms from the 1950′s-60′s or old movies like the Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers Musicals (which feature some of the finest pop songwriting America’s known). Watching something as recent as the Andy Griffith Show feels like another world (though King of the Hill in the 90′s sometimes came close; especially the second half of the series which frequently pitted the conservative Hank Hill against liberal/politically correct characters, with Hank always being right). For both shows I’d skip the first season though, since in both cases, it isn’t as good as what came afterwards. Good luck!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  108. Altai says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Here's my 2009 review of District 9:

    http://takimag.com/article/alien_nation/print#axzz4gSvQe6QO

    Heh, I probably read it and that’s where I found all the subversive interviews about him musing on the Ponte City Apartments etc.

    I know a lot of people at the time were mad that everyone overlooked that it wasn’t about apartheid, particularly since it was set in the modern day and apartheid has been done to death. The anti-immigrant riots were prominent and EVERYONE writing about the film mentioned the original short film. Blomkamp himself was vocally annoyed nobody got it. There he was making a sci-fi film about a fascinating contemporary issue that goes unexplored and everyone thought he was beating a safe dead horse because all anybody knew about South Africa was apartheid.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  109. @Michaeloh59
    Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I'm thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    First off, this subject could be an entire post–nay an entire website. Also, unfortunate timing, my reference library is unavailable right now. But off the top of my head, movies good for kids…

    Though Japanese, Hayao Miyazaki has a deep respect for and interest in traditional Western culture, themes of which often turn up in his otherwise neo-Shintoist oeuvre. Porco Rosso might be the quintessential one here.

    How the West Was Won is kind of corny but its cinematic sweep might make it the most condensed way to get the romantic view of the settlement of the American West, so maybe good for the kids. I haven’t managed to watch the whole thing.

    In spite of being cartoonishly exaggerated, 300 is unabashedly pro-Western and really gets the spirit of the event if not the exact details. Unfortunately, it is rated R for a reason, so not suitable for 7-12. N.B.: Sequel was crap.

    The recent British series Victoria isn’t bad inasmuch as it simply takes the greatness of the British Empire at its peak as a given. It does imbue the Victoria character with a little more grrl-power than history warrants, but this is antidoted by the very sympathetic portrayal of Albert. If your grandkids are girls, it is likely to please.

    For boys: Zulu, Young Winston (Churchill), Henry V (Branagh), Master and Commander, Patton (these last involve Europeans fighting each other, but, well, that’s reality)

    For both: Ingmar Bergman’s Magic Flute, Around the World in Eighty Days (1956 version) has a madcap travelogue quality though it moves slowly for modern tastes.

    The Lord of the Rings is good in a pictorial way, but director Peter’s unnecessarily jacking with the plot annoyed me. Ironically, the 1978 Ralph Bakshi partial adaptation may be more true to the script.

    For the younger ones, there were some engaging Chuck Jones animations of Kipling’s Jungle Book stories. Or better yet, turn off the tube and read them “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” yourself. They will love you for it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Despite the futzing around, I'll say that LoTR still manages to be heavily Restorationist as a viewpoint and as such, is very positive toward the West and traditional values in general. Its sad to think that when I think of "Western values" nowadays, my mind jumps to "European values" as espoused by the EU. Homomania for one and all!
    , @syonredux

    For boys: Zulu, Young Winston (Churchill), Henry V (Branagh), Master and Commander, Patton (these last involve Europeans fighting each other, but, well, that’s reality)

    For both: Ingmar Bergman’s Magic Flute, Around the World in Eighty Days (1956 version) has a madcap travelogue quality though it moves slowly for modern tastes.

    The Lord of the Rings is good in a pictorial way, but director Peter’s unnecessarily jacking with the plot annoyed me. Ironically, the 1978 Ralph Bakshi partial adaptation may be more true to the script.

    For the younger ones, there were some engaging Chuck Jones animations of Kipling’s Jungle Book stories. Or better yet, turn off the tube and read them “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” yourself. They will love you for it.
     
    I'll toss in a few recommendations:


    For Boys:

    Films: Red River, My Darling Clementine, El Cid (1961 Heston version).


    Books: Johnny Tremain, Have Spacesuit-Will Travel, Citizen of the Galaxy, Puck of Pook's Hill, Rewards and Fairies, Edgar Rice Burroughs' original Martian Trilogy (A Princess of Mars, The Gods of Mars, The Warlord of Mars), Owen Wister's The Virginian.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  110. @syonredux
    Yeah, judging by the trailer, this film is going to go full-SJW....

    I listened to an interview with Ridley Scott , who apparently was too busy to be fully hands-on with this one (Mark Kermode & Simon Mayo , BBC Radio 5). The guy is 99.98% GoodWhite, right-on bourgeois, white-male-prole-hater. Makes Mutter Merkel sound like that short Austrian fellow. Bullied at skool, I reckon.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  111. @donut
    No fucking way !!! I have something to live for . I had a signed first edition of "Flashman and the Redskins" . I sent the book and a SASTE to his agent in NYC , they forwarded it to him on The Isle of Man . He signed the book and paid for the return postage . He cut the US stamps off the Manila Envelope that I had provided and enclosed them in the return package with a note saying he hoped I could still use them . What a generous and gracious man he was . I would recommend "The Complete McAuslan " to his fans .

    He had his own thoughts about our modern world :

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3655560/Betrayal-Britain-years-ago-GEORGE-MacDONALD-FRASER-penned-savage-attack-EU-pygmy-politicians-Unashamedly-patriotic-blisteringly-provo

    The McAuslan. Our Good Soldier Švejk. Recommend highly.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  112. res says:
    @Barnard
    OT: https://www.si.com/tech-media/2017/05/09/charles-barkley-racism-american-race-series

    Quote from Barkley:

    “If you are black on television, you are probably going to be some kind of thug, gangster or portrayed in a negative light,” Barkley said.” If you are some type of Muslim, you are going to be blowing stuff up. If you are Hispanic you are going to be some type of gangbanger. I’ve felt like this for years.”
     
    What on earth is he watching on TV? How many black sitcoms have there been since the Cosby show?

    Maybe he was watching the news?

    Read More
    • Replies: @black sea

    Maybe he was watching the news?
     
    Outstanding. Bonus points for you.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  113. @This Is Our Home
    They did make a film set in a futuristic Mestizo LA. It was incredibly depressing. Everyone not mediocre had left to a nation in space called Elysium, although somehow the moral of the story was that there should be no border between Elysium and dystopian LA just as the current moral is that there should be no wall between Mexico and the US.

    The film was not great so we will not find out the result of that Dreamified immigration and how people must be allowed to move from newly dystopian and mediocre Elysium to Elysium 2 (a gated community/nation in another dimension perhaps?)

    The maker needed to be less obscurantist about his obvious message. He hid it behind progressive schmaltz which made the film superficially dumb and therefore boring. He should have had more courage in his convictions just as Idiocracy needed to combine its high concept with with rather than hide behind dick jokes; because unfortunately if you lead a film with dumb shit it comes across as just dumb shit.

    Here in Los Angeles, we constantly deal with people nearly as stupid, ignorant, uneducated, vulgar, and slovenly as the mass of the population in Idiocracy. My wife remarked that the movie is more discouraging than funny anymore because it is already coming true to a degree that we had not expected yet.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  114. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Michaeloh59
    Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I'm thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    Objectively superb and criminally underappreciated:
    “White Hunter, Black Heart.”
    Clint Eastwood directs and stars as infamous director John Huston, preparing for the on-location shooting of The African Queen. A true story minimally embellished.
    It happens to have two of the best critiques of leftist arrogance and virtue signalling. It doesn’t feel political but raises the right questions.
    In one, Huston starts a gratuitous fight with the white hotel manager after an African employee spills food on a guest. This lets Huston feel good about himself for an evening, but either accomplishes nothing or makes life worse for the Africans.
    In the other, a woman contrasts a good Jew to criminals she had known during the war, whereupon the Jew insists that they be conflated. If you’re keeping track, the anti-Semite is judging individuals by their merits, and the Jew, as a good tribalist, is lumping disparate elements together. The woman cannot grasp that she must judge different peoples categorically despite the Jew’s articulately illogical arguments. So Huston pointedly hurts her feelings and she never shows her face again. This is deeply relevant to the “punch a Nazi” fad of effortless, feel-good hate.

    In a similar vein, by the author of the Flashman papers, and starring Sean Connery and Diana Rigg: “A Good Man in Africa.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  115. @Almost Missouri
    First off, this subject could be an entire post--nay an entire website. Also, unfortunate timing, my reference library is unavailable right now. But off the top of my head, movies good for kids…

    Though Japanese, Hayao Miyazaki has a deep respect for and interest in traditional Western culture, themes of which often turn up in his otherwise neo-Shintoist oeuvre. Porco Rosso might be the quintessential one here.

    How the West Was Won is kind of corny but its cinematic sweep might make it the most condensed way to get the romantic view of the settlement of the American West, so maybe good for the kids. I haven't managed to watch the whole thing.

    In spite of being cartoonishly exaggerated, 300 is unabashedly pro-Western and really gets the spirit of the event if not the exact details. Unfortunately, it is rated R for a reason, so not suitable for 7-12. N.B.: Sequel was crap.

    The recent British series Victoria isn't bad inasmuch as it simply takes the greatness of the British Empire at its peak as a given. It does imbue the Victoria character with a little more grrl-power than history warrants, but this is antidoted by the very sympathetic portrayal of Albert. If your grandkids are girls, it is likely to please.

    For boys: Zulu, Young Winston (Churchill), Henry V (Branagh), Master and Commander, Patton (these last involve Europeans fighting each other, but, well, that's reality)

    For both: Ingmar Bergman's Magic Flute, Around the World in Eighty Days (1956 version) has a madcap travelogue quality though it moves slowly for modern tastes.

    The Lord of the Rings is good in a pictorial way, but director Peter's unnecessarily jacking with the plot annoyed me. Ironically, the 1978 Ralph Bakshi partial adaptation may be more true to the script.

    For the younger ones, there were some engaging Chuck Jones animations of Kipling's Jungle Book stories. Or better yet, turn off the tube and read them "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" yourself. They will love you for it.

    Despite the futzing around, I’ll say that LoTR still manages to be heavily Restorationist as a viewpoint and as such, is very positive toward the West and traditional values in general. Its sad to think that when I think of “Western values” nowadays, my mind jumps to “European values” as espoused by the EU. Homomania for one and all!

    Read More
    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Despite the futzing around, I’ll say that LoTR still manages to be heavily Restorationist as a viewpoint and as such, is very positive toward the West and traditional values in general.

     

    I agree. It's as if Tolkien's work was a vast treasure chest of cultural capital that Peter Jackson set fire to -- just at one little corner, at first. The Fellowship of the Ring is therefore the most true-to-Tolkien of all of his films.

    The fire smoldered and flickered throughout LotR, but still didn't destroy too much. Unfortunately, it had grown into a conflagration by the time Jackson made the Hobbit films.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  116. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Sean
    I think its largely the singer not the song. Olmos's has what they need for a hard bioled cop, he does little else well. Olmos's popularity stems from him being pock marked . Hollywood requires its Hispanics to be like Olmos and Danny Trejo. Cherokee Wes Studi, (great as Geronimo) shows the value of a pox-survivor physog for Amerindian thespians)


    TRe. "hard boiled masters" , !”Trejo looks like he has fought a war with his face,, and was a serious criminal in his youth, in prison he was once in the hole with 2gas chamber offence charges . He knew the 10 most wanted alumnus turned author and screenwriter Edward Bunker (Mr. Blue of Pulp Fiction) in prison, and when Trejo accompanied a pal going to an casting call for a Bunker movie, he was given a job as boxing trainer to star Eric Roberts.

    Trejo has been in nearly 200 movies since , most famously in the "Machete" series of films (the latest of which is called "Machete Kills In Space". In the original 2010 trailer Trejo growled an anti immigration restrictionist threat, “This is Machete with a special Cinco de Mayo message — to Arizona!”.

    Trejo and Wes Studi were both in Heat (of course Studi was also in Michael Mann’s The Last of the Mohicans).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  117. J.Ross says: • Website

    1) I want to see Tanit Phoenix play Gwendolyn Ingolfsdottir in a production of SM Stirling’s novel “Drakon.”

    2) I know objectively and instantly that this will never happen. The production will not be made with her or anyone else, not as a film and not as a miniseries. It will never be discussed. It is pointless to bring up, except to illustrate the new distance of Hollywood, which was formerly fixated upon by everyone as if they lived there.

    3) Hollywood might collapse or restore itself or scud along in its committed incompetence, and it might as well be a food additive factory in Laos.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    The entire Domination series makes Stirling persona non grata to a bunch of SJWs. While Drakon really showed its age (or editing), the bones there are sound. I wish he would have characterized Ken the Cyborg Warrior a little better, but what was unsaid about Samothrace and discussed with little context made it that much more interesting. I really wish he would have had Ken accept Gwen's offer on the bench and spun a series off of THAT.

    Sadly, Stirling seems like he's going to be cranking out Change novels until he does a Robert Jordan on us. Id love a continuation of The Peshawar Lancers but instead its gonna be more SCA LARPers save the world.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  118. Clyde says:
    @donut
    You know Steve I share your enthusiasm for the cinema if only there was anything to spend 8$ on you feel me ? "John Dies In The End" is good , right ? So here are a few of my recommendations ; "The Liability " with Tim Roth , "Red Army" , "Boy Wonder " , "Killer Joe " , "The Opposite Of Sex"
    "Hit Me" with Elias Koteas , " The Proposition" , "Freeway" with Kiefer Sutherland and Reese Witherspoon , "A Perfect World " , "Welcome to the Dollhouse " , "The Tailor Of Panama" , "The Secret In Their Eyes " , the original not the Hollywood dreck , "Elling" , "Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai " , "Spun Unrated" , "The Salton Sea " . Just for starters . After you have watched and reviewed them I will recommend some more .

    Fer instance :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHMi-j7W2gM

    Where oh where are the Hanson Brothers now when we need them ?

    Steve , do you have a sports coat like the announcer ? If not wear one for your next $$$$ drive and as broke as Iam I will send you something .

    That Hanson Brother clotheslined Derek Sanderson!!! Great movie btw, 1977.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  119. @Pat Boyle
    Some movie directors are good with actors, others are good at organizing complex plots, still others have a way with suspense. Ridley Scott' s forte has always been set decoration.

    His movies always have great costumes and sets. Many of his big ticket films don't make a whole lot of sense because he just doesn't seem to care about plot. I was blown away by his first major movie 'The Duelists'. I was totally convinced by the setting. It was beautiful to look at and it convinced me that I was seeing Napoleonic Europe. In his subsequent quasi-historical films the same qualities are also seen.

    So his latest film 'Prometheus' also looks great. Unfortunately the actors do loony things and act strangely. Scott doesn't seem to care. His movie about the crusades was similar - great attention to visual detail but a very muddled and inappropriate drama.

    Scott IMHO got lucky with Blade Runner. It became very famous but has not been very influential. The ideas of Blade Runner have not gained traction in films. Cameron's break through film 'Terminator' has spawned a number of sequels, a TV series and who knows what else. But Blade Runner has had no sequels or characters who have suddenly shown up in other films. Everyone knows all of the 'Star Wars' characters. Just last week someone on this blog accused me of trying to be C3P0.

    But Blade Runner has had almost no influence outside of the original movie. Ridley Scott is not a good director for science-fiction despite his two big successes. Good science-fiction relies on either ideas or action and that isn't Scott's strong suit.

    So I'm glad to see a new young director at the helm.

    Ridley Scott’s world is the world of the typical art student. Gorgeous visuals, total inability to get to grips with the mindset/mores/psychology or even technology of a forgotten (Duellists) or future imagined era. No concept of an overarching religiosity or kin/social class-based order, no matter how attenuated. Bloody Sharpe’s Eagle was closer to the mark.
    Starbucks society in glorious drag, with alienated, pretty, relatively wealthy 30-somethings as the only actors with any sort of agency.
    Like a farm run by pigs.
    But then, who else has the time or disposable to waste on this sort of etiolated flummery?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pat Boyle
    You said it better than I did.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  120. @Michaeloh59
    Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I'm thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    Regarding reading, anything by Kipling is like a magical chewable red pill. My young daughter once overheard me listening to some obscure Kipling poetry and instantly became a lifelong devotee, even though I had assumed she was too young to understand it, which I think she probably was, but she recognized it contained real substance and grew into understanding later.

    There was a great vinyl disc of his poetry read by British actors Richard Johnson, Patrick Wymark, and Michael Bates, but I don’t think it ever made it to digital.

    https://www.discogs.com/Rudyard-Kipling-The-English-Poets-From-Chaucer-To-Yeats/release/7995875

    There’s also a rather good adaptation of some of his poems to music, Naulakha Redux.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Michaeloh59
    Thank you for that. I'll look into your suggestions. Especially the literature. They probably get enough TV, and yet when well done nothing is more powerful.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  121. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Jack D
    The first half is true, the second is not. (Ashkenazi) Jews have been in the West since Roman times. In many European countries, the current population (or at least the ruling class) has been there a lot less time than that.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  122. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Altai
    I can only think of Ghost In The Shell and the Battlestar Galactica remake, which, of course also starred Olmos. I find it funny when Steve brings him up as an Ur-Hispanic, my first exposure to him was BSG and his being a believable father to a very pale, blue eyed son played by an Englishman. They even gave him blue contact lenses to sometimes wear on the show! It was weird because he hardly ever wore them and it was obvious he had brown eyes but then sometimes they'd do a closeup (But sometimes also not) and he'd be wearing these really obvious blue contact lenses.

    I never really noticed. His face was so scarred I never really saw him as anything but a white guy, which is what he actually is, I suppose.

    His son was played by Jamie Bamber on BSG. There was a flashback episode to the first Cylon war, where Bamber played a young Adama, and the hair and makeup people did a great job giving him a spiky Chicano look.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  123. Alden says:
    @Mr. Anon
    I'm pissed off that - seemingly - every last story, idea, notion, grocery list, and gin-rummy score-sheet of Phillip K. Dick is going to make it to the big screen, but there has still only ever been one Flashman movie. And it sucked.

    I’ve read every Flashman book and loved, loved them. Big thing against flash man is that the costumes, horses etc in period movies are much more expensive than costumes, sets for contemporary movies.

    It’s mostly women who love period movies, but most women love the clothes, women protagonists and romance. I’m one of the few women who’s read all the Flashman novels

    Flashman would make a great TV series.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Big thing against flash man is that the costumes, horses etc in period movies are much more expensive than costumes, sets for contemporary movies.
     
    True. Costumes, sets, locations, extras for battle scenes, would all be pretty expensive.

    Flashman would make a great TV series.
     
    Aye. That would be best for doing the novels justice.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  124. @Michaeloh59
    Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I'm thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    For wholesome messages for young girls, I think you cannot go wrong with the works of Laura Ingalls Wilder, L. Frank Baum, Madeline L’Engle, Astrid Lindgren, or Lucy Maud Montgomery. Brian Jacques’ stuff may appeal to some girls; it may be too martial for some, but because it is about fuzzy critters, girls may enjoy it nonetheless.

    The classics bear mention: Greek and Nordic myths written and edited in collections accessible for children are great (girls can learn about wise Athene, athletic Artemis and Atalanta, the folly of Arachne, steadfast Penelope…Medea’s doings are probably a bit much for young ones, though!); Hans Christian Anderson’s stuff; The Wind in The Willows; Puck of Pook’s Hill….

    Gertrude Chandler Warner’s The Boxcar Children and it’s progeny depict a world in which self-reliance and kindness among real people is front and center, rather than ostensibly helpful intermeddling from the government.

    Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia and Tolkien’s works about Middle earth offer excellent rôle models for girls in Lucy; Jill; Éowyn; Lúthien; Varda (whom Melkor feared more than even Manwë, Tulkas, or Oromë!); Galadriel; Melian; etc.*, though the latter is admittedly probably more appealing to boys and too sophisticated for very young girls.

    Steinbeck has his leftist aspects, but for older girls, The Grapes of Wrath has excellent depictions of the strength and the importance of women in supporting families with tenderness, encouragement, peace-making and calming, etc. amongst the Joads; Ma Joad is a great example of a strong, sensible woman.

    As is remarked, this topic is really something one could explore in great depth for a long time, but these are my efforts at quick suggestions with an emphasis on young girls’ tastes.

    *It’s pretty hilarious that leftists and feminists perennially decry the alleged dearth of important females in Tolkien’s works; the females just usually don’t fight bloody melees, instead being powerful in other ways more realistic and befitting of women….

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  125. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @syonredux
    Depicting a Mestizo Hispanic future would be too depressing.

    As for Blade Runner 2049, they should have just used the source novel (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?) for the plot. Now that would have been interesting. DADOES is a lot more thought-provoking than Blade Runner

    I finally looked up Kim Stanley Robinson’s bio on Wikipedia, after reading a handful of his books. Turns out he wrote his PhD thesis on Philip K. Dick’s novels: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kim_Stanley_Robinson#Career

    I was surprised to see his degrees are in English. He writes a lot of “engineering fiction”, to borrow the Derb’s description of Neal Stephenson’s Seveneves.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  126. Bill says:
    @donut
    You know Steve I share your enthusiasm for the cinema if only there was anything to spend 8$ on you feel me ? "John Dies In The End" is good , right ? So here are a few of my recommendations ; "The Liability " with Tim Roth , "Red Army" , "Boy Wonder " , "Killer Joe " , "The Opposite Of Sex"
    "Hit Me" with Elias Koteas , " The Proposition" , "Freeway" with Kiefer Sutherland and Reese Witherspoon , "A Perfect World " , "Welcome to the Dollhouse " , "The Tailor Of Panama" , "The Secret In Their Eyes " , the original not the Hollywood dreck , "Elling" , "Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai " , "Spun Unrated" , "The Salton Sea " . Just for starters . After you have watched and reviewed them I will recommend some more .

    Fer instance :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHMi-j7W2gM

    Where oh where are the Hanson Brothers now when we need them ?

    Steve , do you have a sports coat like the announcer ? If not wear one for your next $$$$ drive and as broke as Iam I will send you something .

    You are awesome.

    It still annoys me that Johnstown was randomly re-named Charlestown in Slapshot. WTF was the point of that? The shots of the working Bethlehem Steel mill in that film are beautiful. Here’s an article on the movie and the city.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The hockey movie Slapshot was written by a lady.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  127. OT can the eeyores here explain how AG Sessions got Comey fired? The hands down stupidest meme here lately was that Jared and Ivanka ran the Trump Admin so please square this circle.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  128. Bill says:
    @Sean
    I think its largely the singer not the song. Olmos's has what they need for a hard bioled cop, he does little else well. Olmos's popularity stems from him being pock marked . Hollywood requires its Hispanics to be like Olmos and Danny Trejo. Cherokee Wes Studi, (great as Geronimo) shows the value of a pox-survivor physog for Amerindian thespians)


    TRe. "hard boiled masters" , !”Trejo looks like he has fought a war with his face,, and was a serious criminal in his youth, in prison he was once in the hole with 2gas chamber offence charges . He knew the 10 most wanted alumnus turned author and screenwriter Edward Bunker (Mr. Blue of Pulp Fiction) in prison, and when Trejo accompanied a pal going to an casting call for a Bunker movie, he was given a job as boxing trainer to star Eric Roberts.

    Trejo has been in nearly 200 movies since , most famously in the "Machete" series of films (the latest of which is called "Machete Kills In Space". In the original 2010 trailer Trejo growled an anti immigration restrictionist threat, “This is Machete with a special Cinco de Mayo message — to Arizona!”.

    Olmos’s popularity stems from him being pock marked.

    Yeah. Thinking about what it is that makes modern country music stars look so effiminate, I’m pretty sure the answer is lack of skin damage. Same for modern Hollywood stars. Seriously.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  129. Bill says:
    @Discordiax
    Saw a very Isteve-ish op-ed in the Jerusalem Post. http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Terra-Incognita-Israel-is-not-a-Western-country-and-never-has-been-490048

    Summarizing as much as possible, the writer (I presume Moroccan Jewish ancestry?) points out that the more-or-less "cuck"ed European Ashkenazim Jews are only 1/4 of the population and 1/3 of the Jewish population and need to get over themselves--Israel is not and is not going to be "a miniature version of the Upper West Side in New York, only with tanks and a flag." The idea that Israel will abandon the occupation of the Palestinians (and, the writer doesn't say, allow rocket attacks on Tel Aviv from the Samarian hills) when Europe snubs them as barbarians runs up against the demographic reality that the Mizhrahim don't give a good god damn about the Euros calling them barbarians and cold-shouldering them on European vacations.

    He mentions what Steve would call a "boiling off" effect, where the most "cucked" left-wing young Euro-Isrealis move to Europe (or America). He doesn't mention the Russians, whom I think he counts as part of the 1/3 European Jews, but who tend to line up politically with the Mizhrahim.

    Do you think boiling off the smart Israelis is going to end well?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Discordiax
    Losing high-IQ types is never a good thing. But given the choice between a trickle of top engineers leaving Tel Aviv for London or Palo Alto or wherever, and facing mortars and rockets from the West Bank hills, I'd lose the engineers. Giving up the high ground is a much quicker road to suicide.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  130. OT, but Trump just fired Comey.

    I enjoyed Ann Coulter’s take:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pat Boyle
    My theory - Comey was too tall. It's a lunatic theory but I said it first.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  131. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Totally off topic, but I thought Steve might be interested. I learned yesterday from an internal bulletin board that Goldman Sach is sponsoring interns at Outreachy, a paid summer coding program organized by an impressive list of high-tech corporations. What caught my eye was this unapologetic statement on the main project page:

    Currently, internships are open internationally to women (cis and trans), trans men, and genderqueer people. Additionally, they are open to residents and nationals of the United States of any gender who are Black/African American, Hispanic/Latin@, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander. We are planning to expand the program to more participants from underrepresented backgrounds in the future.

    So basically pretty much everyone is eligible except for cishet white males.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  132. Clyde says:

    OT
    James Comey fired today. He fired himself. He finally got what he wanted.
    ___________

    From The Hill:
    Campaign manager Robby Mook said the move “terrifies” him.

    The White House said Comey was fired at the recommendation of the Justice Department, but Brian Fallon, who was the Clinton campaign’s press secretary last year, said Trump’s decision “smells like a coverup on Russia” coming amid the FBI’s probe of Russian election interference and any possible ties between Trump’s campaign and Moscow.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  133. Alden says:
    @Michaeloh59
    Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I'm thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    This is my suggestion for boys and girls. Buy an encyclopedia including the children’s book of knowledge published before 1960.

    The Internet, used bookstores, goodwill, garage sales are places to look. The easiest way is to google Antique and rare books. The dealers all have websites. Send an email of what you want and they will look in their stock and contact other dealers.

    The Louisa May Alcott books are wonderful for girls, not just Little Women.
    Nancy Drew is unrealistic but she and her friends are good role models. I wish I could remember authors and titles but I can’t remember the endless girls books from the 1920′s to 1950′s There were hundreds of those books. The heroines were all high school girls who learned that money and popularity weren’t everything.

    The Cherry Ames series was about Cherry Ames a nurse. She was a great role model.

    Jean Plaidy and Voctoria Holt wrote great historical novels. Gene Stratton Porter wrote books set on the Indiana lumber forests with teenage heroes and heroines.

    Basically anything published prior to 1960. The greatest book for kids is of course Kim by Rudyard Kipling. Treasure island and Kidnapped by RL Stevenson are great stories of 12 year olds in danger.

    But best is the pre 1960 children’s encyclopedia.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    Nancy Drew is unrealistic but she and her friends are good role models.
     
    While looking for Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books in the library for my children, about a decade ago, I learned that the stories have been either extensively edited or new rewritten versions, with dumbed-down language and "updated" social values have displaced the original editions. I had to search hard to find the versions my siblings read in the 1950s and handed down to me in the 1960s.
    , @Michaeloh59
    Thanks for your suggestions.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  134. The Gosling character will turn out to be the son of the Ford and Young characters.
    It is useless to resist.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dumbo
    Oh no, I hope not. It will be the final Starswarsification of science-fiction.

    I think some films should not have sequels (or remakes), but that's just me.

    The only good sequel was probably Godfather part 2 (the 3rd sucked). Can't think of many more.
    , @Ray P
    Son of Blade Runner? Can Gosling do Bob Hope? Or Gene Wilder?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  135. 2Mintzin1 says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    My favorite neo-noir is Alan Rudolph's "Trouble in Mind," from 1985. It's set in the near-future as well, after a major war in the Far East, with de-industrialization and a debased currency. It's available on DVD but it looks like the digital transfer was done after the original film stock had deteriorated.

    Worth watching just for Keith Carradine’s constantly evolving hairdo.
    Good soundtrack, too.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  136. Dumbo says:

    Apropos, from the Guardian:

    https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2017/may/09/gender-science-fiction-final-frontier

    The notoriously male genre finds itself exploring dreams, feelings, romantic connection – and interpretive dance

    But remember, “There is no difference between men and women’s tastes or psychology”.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  137. Pat Boyle says:
    @Altai
    I can only think of Ghost In The Shell and the Battlestar Galactica remake, which, of course also starred Olmos. I find it funny when Steve brings him up as an Ur-Hispanic, my first exposure to him was BSG and his being a believable father to a very pale, blue eyed son played by an Englishman. They even gave him blue contact lenses to sometimes wear on the show! It was weird because he hardly ever wore them and it was obvious he had brown eyes but then sometimes they'd do a closeup (But sometimes also not) and he'd be wearing these really obvious blue contact lenses.

    I never really noticed. His face was so scarred I never really saw him as anything but a white guy, which is what he actually is, I suppose.

    I saw the original Battlestar Galactica – but none of the episodes from the remake series. I presumed that Olmos was cast as an attempt at acquiring some of the Latino audience. But the whole first series had become so cheesy that I couldn’t stomach the second.

    When I was a kid and then a young man there were almost no Science Fiction series on TV. In those days everything was a western. I had watched Captain Video when very young but had to wait for Star Trek for another Sci-Fi series. I’m sure I’m forgetting something but I am calmed by the realization that someone in the readership will set me straight.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Altai
    You should definitely watch at least the first 2 series. Maybe the third and I try to forget the fourth happened.

    You couldn't make the remake BSG today.

    It is nothing like the original series.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  138. Pat Boyle says:
    @candid_observer
    OT, but Trump just fired Comey.

    I enjoyed Ann Coulter's take:

    https://twitter.com/AnnCoulter/status/862074707302125568

    My theory – Comey was too tall. It’s a lunatic theory but I said it first.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    That's the Sessions' angle on the Comey firing.

    Did you see how tall Sessions' senatorial replacement is?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  139. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Synopsis: The Tyrell Corporation initiates cost-cutting measures on testosterone for all Replicants.

    “More Female Than Male is Our Motto…”

    Blade Runner II: Nancy Boy Edition

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hotcha
    Blade Runner II: The Gay Blade
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  140. @Almost Missouri
    Regarding reading, anything by Kipling is like a magical chewable red pill. My young daughter once overheard me listening to some obscure Kipling poetry and instantly became a lifelong devotee, even though I had assumed she was too young to understand it, which I think she probably was, but she recognized it contained real substance and grew into understanding later.

    There was a great vinyl disc of his poetry read by British actors Richard Johnson, Patrick Wymark, and Michael Bates, but I don't think it ever made it to digital.

    https://www.discogs.com/Rudyard-Kipling-The-English-Poets-From-Chaucer-To-Yeats/release/7995875

    There's also a rather good adaptation of some of his poems to music, Naulakha Redux.

    Thank you for that. I’ll look into your suggestions. Especially the literature. They probably get enough TV, and yet when well done nothing is more powerful.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  141. Felix... says:
    @Dumbo

    The idea of depicting a future LA that is totally overrun with with Mestizos is just too much for any sane man to bear….
     
    What future? This is the present, man. The city is gone. It's like El Salvador meets Mexico City meets Seoul.

    Btw, if I am not mistaken, in the original Blade Runner the population was shown as majority Asian.

    Have you ever been to Seoul? I have, the women are amazing. We should only be so lucky.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dumbo
    Never been there. I've been to Koreatown, though.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  142. Altai says:
    @Pat Boyle
    I saw the original Battlestar Galactica - but none of the episodes from the remake series. I presumed that Olmos was cast as an attempt at acquiring some of the Latino audience. But the whole first series had become so cheesy that I couldn't stomach the second.

    When I was a kid and then a young man there were almost no Science Fiction series on TV. In those days everything was a western. I had watched Captain Video when very young but had to wait for Star Trek for another Sci-Fi series. I'm sure I'm forgetting something but I am calmed by the realization that someone in the readership will set me straight.

    You should definitely watch at least the first 2 series. Maybe the third and I try to forget the fourth happened.

    You couldn’t make the remake BSG today.

    It is nothing like the original series.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pat Boyle
    I appreciate the advice but why?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  143. Steve, I’m glad you remembered that movies exist–even though this year they seem all shite.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  144. Dumbo says:
    @Felix...
    Have you ever been to Seoul? I have, the women are amazing. We should only be so lucky.

    Never been there. I’ve been to Koreatown, though.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  145. syonredux says:
    @Manfred Arcane
    There is a Mexican police detective in chapters 38 and 44 of The Long Goodbye (which I read over this winter)--Captain Hernandez, a tough but fair policeman who questions both Marlowe and (in Spanish) the Chileno houseboy Candy in his first appearance, and in his second appearance joins with Chandler's only recurring policeman character, Bernie Ohls, to tacitly allow Marlowe to take a photostat of a confession that the official higher-ups don't want to get out. Aside from talking Spanish to Candy, however, he doesn't "read" as particularly Mexican in his speech patterns, or even in his physical description ("a big tired-looking man with iron-gray hair").

    The Chandler novella, "Red Wind," has a more emphatically Mexican police detective named Ybarra, whose dialogue is arranged to suggest someone slightly unfamiliar with homegrown Los Angeles English, and is explicitly referred to as a Mexican by Marlowe and as a "guinea" by another police detective. Ybarra might more properly be the prototype of the type of character you're talking about; he's a smallish, quiet-spoken sort with a melancholy demeanor but a sense of duty, who saves Marlowe from being killed by a nastier cop at the end.

    Chandler was a "reactionary" in many ways (he correctly pointed out that Stalin was even worse than Hitler; it's only a matter of time till he gets banished from the American literary pantheon for his "homophobia;" he stated in one of his letters that he would have fought for the Confederacy), but he had an odd fondness for Mexicans which I've noticed in several other right-leaning types in the pre-mass-immigration era (John Wayne and the great comic-book creator Carl Barks being two other examples). If I were to analyze the reasons for it, I'd say that pessimistic conservatives like Chandler and Barks, who both loathed the urbanized, glamorized, and mechanized modern world of Los Angeles, had a certain romantic nostalgia for the rural, pre-industrial "old California" society that the Mexicans represented to them.

    Chandler was a “reactionary” in many ways (he correctly pointed out that Stalin was even worse than Hitler; it’s only a matter of time till he gets banished from the American literary pantheon for his “homophobia;”

    Quite possibly. Ta-Nehisi Coates (the living avatar of the PC Lumpengentsia) was quite vocal in his distaste for Chandler’s un-PC attitudes:

    It’s not so bad that our hero is a homophobe who likes to seems to enjoy slapping women around. I don’t really believe that heroes need be “heroic” in any earnest sense of the word. What feels off is Chandler’s gaze—not his hero’s actions. The thin toughness of Marlowe, the display of women in the novel is masturbatory.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/11/grappling-with-raymond-chandler-and-the-big-sleep/265558/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Manfred Arcane
    Once again, T. Genius Coates demonstrates his remarkable brilliance; can the man write a single sentence that doesn't contain painfully clunky bit of modern academia-speak ("gaze," "thin toughness, "display of women")? He also displays a complete and total inability to understand Chandler; I honestly have a hard time thinking of a writer who's less "masturbatory" in his "display of women;" Chandler always made sex seem only slightly less ugly (and no less dangerous) than death in his novels, which is one of the many things that sets his stories apart from the formulaic, quasi-pornographic writings of innumerable other "hard-boiled" mystery writers and from most of the glitzy, sex-obsessed screen versions of his work.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Such a genius he is!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  146. @Bill
    You are awesome.

    It still annoys me that Johnstown was randomly re-named Charlestown in Slapshot. WTF was the point of that? The shots of the working Bethlehem Steel mill in that film are beautiful. Here's an article on the movie and the city.

    The hockey movie Slapshot was written by a lady.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill
    One who appreciates masculinity, evidently.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  147. Dumbo says:
    @Macumazahn
    The Gosling character will turn out to be the son of the Ford and Young characters.
    It is useless to resist.

    Oh no, I hope not. It will be the final Starswarsification of science-fiction.

    I think some films should not have sequels (or remakes), but that’s just me.

    The only good sequel was probably Godfather part 2 (the 3rd sucked). Can’t think of many more.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  148. syonredux says:
    @Almost Missouri
    First off, this subject could be an entire post--nay an entire website. Also, unfortunate timing, my reference library is unavailable right now. But off the top of my head, movies good for kids…

    Though Japanese, Hayao Miyazaki has a deep respect for and interest in traditional Western culture, themes of which often turn up in his otherwise neo-Shintoist oeuvre. Porco Rosso might be the quintessential one here.

    How the West Was Won is kind of corny but its cinematic sweep might make it the most condensed way to get the romantic view of the settlement of the American West, so maybe good for the kids. I haven't managed to watch the whole thing.

    In spite of being cartoonishly exaggerated, 300 is unabashedly pro-Western and really gets the spirit of the event if not the exact details. Unfortunately, it is rated R for a reason, so not suitable for 7-12. N.B.: Sequel was crap.

    The recent British series Victoria isn't bad inasmuch as it simply takes the greatness of the British Empire at its peak as a given. It does imbue the Victoria character with a little more grrl-power than history warrants, but this is antidoted by the very sympathetic portrayal of Albert. If your grandkids are girls, it is likely to please.

    For boys: Zulu, Young Winston (Churchill), Henry V (Branagh), Master and Commander, Patton (these last involve Europeans fighting each other, but, well, that's reality)

    For both: Ingmar Bergman's Magic Flute, Around the World in Eighty Days (1956 version) has a madcap travelogue quality though it moves slowly for modern tastes.

    The Lord of the Rings is good in a pictorial way, but director Peter's unnecessarily jacking with the plot annoyed me. Ironically, the 1978 Ralph Bakshi partial adaptation may be more true to the script.

    For the younger ones, there were some engaging Chuck Jones animations of Kipling's Jungle Book stories. Or better yet, turn off the tube and read them "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" yourself. They will love you for it.

    For boys: Zulu, Young Winston (Churchill), Henry V (Branagh), Master and Commander, Patton (these last involve Europeans fighting each other, but, well, that’s reality)

    For both: Ingmar Bergman’s Magic Flute, Around the World in Eighty Days (1956 version) has a madcap travelogue quality though it moves slowly for modern tastes.

    The Lord of the Rings is good in a pictorial way, but director Peter’s unnecessarily jacking with the plot annoyed me. Ironically, the 1978 Ralph Bakshi partial adaptation may be more true to the script.

    For the younger ones, there were some engaging Chuck Jones animations of Kipling’s Jungle Book stories. Or better yet, turn off the tube and read them “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” yourself. They will love you for it.

    I’ll toss in a few recommendations:

    For Boys:

    Films: Red River, My Darling Clementine, El Cid (1961 Heston version).

    Books: Johnny Tremain, Have Spacesuit-Will Travel, Citizen of the Galaxy, Puck of Pook’s Hill, Rewards and Fairies, Edgar Rice Burroughs’ original Martian Trilogy (A Princess of Mars, The Gods of Mars, The Warlord of Mars), Owen Wister’s The Virginian.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  149. @J.Ross
    1) I want to see Tanit Phoenix play Gwendolyn Ingolfsdottir in a production of SM Stirling's novel "Drakon."

    2) I know objectively and instantly that this will never happen. The production will not be made with her or anyone else, not as a film and not as a miniseries. It will never be discussed. It is pointless to bring up, except to illustrate the new distance of Hollywood, which was formerly fixated upon by everyone as if they lived there.

    3) Hollywood might collapse or restore itself or scud along in its committed incompetence, and it might as well be a food additive factory in Laos.

    The entire Domination series makes Stirling persona non grata to a bunch of SJWs. While Drakon really showed its age (or editing), the bones there are sound. I wish he would have characterized Ken the Cyborg Warrior a little better, but what was unsaid about Samothrace and discussed with little context made it that much more interesting. I really wish he would have had Ken accept Gwen’s offer on the bench and spun a series off of THAT.

    Sadly, Stirling seems like he’s going to be cranking out Change novels until he does a Robert Jordan on us. Id love a continuation of The Peshawar Lancers but instead its gonna be more SCA LARPers save the world.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux
    Never cared for the Draka series (the Draka were too Mary Sue-ish for my tastes). I did like his aborted Lords of Creation series, though. For those who haven't read it, it takes place in an alternate reality where the '30s pulp versions of Mars and Venus are real. So, Mars is inhabited by an incredibly ancient civilization, while Venus is a jungle-world populated by savages. Lots of fun:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Courts_of_the_Crimson_Kings

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sky_People
    , @J.Ross
    One of the best things about it is how all the elitist leftists start to nod along with what she proposes. Notably an environmentalist excited about Africa turned into a huge game preserve, without any of those pesky Africans. That's not going to be on film any time soon, because that would depict real racism, and Hollywood is currently dedicated to constantly adapting the Haman strawman to other ethnies, so it frequently depicts racism but never anything recognizable to nature or history.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  150. @Pat Boyle
    My theory - Comey was too tall. It's a lunatic theory but I said it first.

    That’s the Sessions’ angle on the Comey firing.

    Did you see how tall Sessions’ senatorial replacement is?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  151. syonredux says:
    @guest
    Literature has an inherently greater capacity for thought-provocation. In the hands of a great writer like Dick, that's almost a given. But I'm not sure Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? faithfully adapted would reliably produce a great movie. There's a great movie in there, if you do it right. But there're also a lot of ways to screw it up.

    On the other hand, a good robot action sci-fi noir mystery thriller is waiting for you on the surface. I like the premise of Blade Runner (though I always ask myself why they made the robots so humanlike. Couldn't they have put a red dot on their foreheads, or something, just in case they rebel?), a little less the execution, and the feel above all. Feelz are like lightning in a bottle. The music, for instance, which I loved and gave me intense feelz, wouldn't work in a lot of other contexts.

    You take direction, set design, costuming, acting, music, and so forth all together, and that was the Blade Runner style. But it didn't have a knockout story. Enough to give me great feelz, but not intellectually satisfying.

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? has a knockout story, but would you be able to pull in all the feelz necessary to make it a successful movie? I dunno. Maybe. Safer bet is to work in proven subgenres, like robot action sci-fi noir mystery thrillers, and hope the story is good enough.

    Literature has an inherently greater capacity for thought-provocation. In the hands of a great writer like Dick, that’s almost a given. But I’m not sure Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? faithfully adapted would reliably produce a great movie. There’s a great movie in there, if you do it right. But there’re also a lot of ways to screw it up.

    Sure. On the other hand, there’s a lot of material in the book (the Buster Friendly show, Mercerism, etc) that could be brought to the screen in an effective fashion.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  152. syonredux says:
    @neutral

    every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force
     
    If they are trying to sell this as the propaganda line in the movie, then isn't this a bit of contradiction. Since they support mass immigration because it creates cheaper workers, having a movie that is saying that these are disposable workers means it is not helping SJW propaganda.

    every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force

    If they are trying to sell this as the propaganda line in the movie, then isn’t this a bit of contradiction. Since they support mass immigration because it creates cheaper workers, having a movie that is saying that these are disposable workers means it is not helping SJW propaganda.

    Being an SJW takes a lot of Doublethink…..

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker

    Being an SJW takes a lot of Doublethink…..
     
    SJWthink is all about maintaining several eigenstates at once. One of my regular online tactics. . .

    SJW (smug status signalling): "I don't care about race, it really doesn't matter to me who immigrants are."


    Me: "OK, so if you learn that from midnight we'll be having a whites-only immigration policy what would you say then? Nothing obviously, because as already stated you have no interest in such matters, it's of no concern to you. All black, all white, whatever, it's all the same to you"

    The whining and howling that result from this are priceless. Often, of course, there is no response after this point. Or all sorts of feeble attempts to change the subject. But what never happens is a straight answer consistent with their original statement. But they refuse to collapse the wave function, they clearly don't and do care very much at the same time.

    Ideally I want them to state how they do in fact care and then we could discuss immigration in something like a rational manner. Like that's ever going to happen.

    Please feel free to replicate wherever possible.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  153. @Daniel Chieh
    Despite the futzing around, I'll say that LoTR still manages to be heavily Restorationist as a viewpoint and as such, is very positive toward the West and traditional values in general. Its sad to think that when I think of "Western values" nowadays, my mind jumps to "European values" as espoused by the EU. Homomania for one and all!

    Despite the futzing around, I’ll say that LoTR still manages to be heavily Restorationist as a viewpoint and as such, is very positive toward the West and traditional values in general.

    I agree. It’s as if Tolkien’s work was a vast treasure chest of cultural capital that Peter Jackson set fire to — just at one little corner, at first. The Fellowship of the Ring is therefore the most true-to-Tolkien of all of his films.

    The fire smoldered and flickered throughout LotR, but still didn’t destroy too much. Unfortunately, it had grown into a conflagration by the time Jackson made the Hobbit films.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Middle-Earth

    The fire smoldered and flickered throughout LotR, but still didn’t destroy too much. Unfortunately, it had grown into a conflagration by the time Jackson made the Hobbit films.
     
    Don't let Walsh and Boyens off the hook. I suspect they had as much or even more to do with that than Jackson.
    , @Mr. Anon

    I agree. It’s as if Tolkien’s work was a vast treasure chest of cultural capital that Peter Jackson set fire to — just at one little corner, at first. The Fellowship of the Ring is therefore the most true-to-Tolkien of all of his films.
     
    I think it was burning pretty well by The Two Towers. The Emo-Hobbits were especially disgusting. On the whole, I much prefer Ralph Bakshi's abortive animated version of The Lord of the Rings.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  154. guest says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...
    Hollywood corrupts everything it touches. In Phillip K. Dick's novel the replicants were soulless, anti-life monstrosities. The human hero is briefly tempted by an apparently beautiful female replicant until he sees her callously pulling the legs off a spider. At that point he returns to his imperfect but human wife. Dick was making a serious point here about the dignity and preciousness of life and reality, as opposed to non-life/anti-life and the artificialities which we humans create and with which we surround themselves. (It's pretty obvious why the denizens of Hollywood would miss this message.)

    The movie, Blade Runner, romanticizes the soulless replicants, going so far as to suggest that Decker, the protagonist, is one. A total inversion of Dick's original message.

    Blade Runner was a great movie but it completely inverted Dick's message and to that extent was a travesty. It looks like the sequel goes even further down that path. Based on the trailer, I'm guessing it will also not be nearly as good a movie.

    I feel the need to point out that among the robots only Sean Young–who didn’t know she was a robot–and Rutger Hauer–who desperately wanted not to be a robot (or at least a robot with a short lifespan)–were the only ones they romanticized. Hauer’s yearning not to expire, which was entire impetus for the plot, is a fairly strong pro-life message, though he wasn’t actually alive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    There is a bunch of Jesus imagery involving Rutger Hauer's character's death.
    , @Holden

    I feel the need to point out that among the robots only Sean Young–who didn’t know she was a robot–and Rutger Hauer–who desperately wanted not to be a robot (or at least a robot with a short lifespan)–were the only ones they romanticized. Hauer’s yearning not to expire, which was entire impetus for the plot, is a fairly strong pro-life message, though he wasn’t actually alive.

     

    True enough. However, press releases for the film stated pretty explicitly that the replicants were artificially-created humans, not human-like robots like the "Andies" from Dick's novel.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  155. syonredux says:
    @Jack Hanson
    The entire Domination series makes Stirling persona non grata to a bunch of SJWs. While Drakon really showed its age (or editing), the bones there are sound. I wish he would have characterized Ken the Cyborg Warrior a little better, but what was unsaid about Samothrace and discussed with little context made it that much more interesting. I really wish he would have had Ken accept Gwen's offer on the bench and spun a series off of THAT.

    Sadly, Stirling seems like he's going to be cranking out Change novels until he does a Robert Jordan on us. Id love a continuation of The Peshawar Lancers but instead its gonna be more SCA LARPers save the world.

    Never cared for the Draka series (the Draka were too Mary Sue-ish for my tastes). I did like his aborted Lords of Creation series, though. For those who haven’t read it, it takes place in an alternate reality where the ’30s pulp versions of Mars and Venus are real. So, Mars is inhabited by an incredibly ancient civilization, while Venus is a jungle-world populated by savages. Lots of fun:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Courts_of_the_Crimson_Kings

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sky_People

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    >Mary Sue

    I haven't read the rest of the series but the great thing about Drakon was the logical explanations. [tldr -- long term advanced genetic engineering and very high metabolism, requiring a comical caloric intake.] A fantasy is legitimate if you reverse engineer it and show your work, and only a failure for these purposes if you leave everything "just because." The snu snu played no part in my judgment (or in my lack of interest in a Draka story with a male protagonist).

    Stirling apparently got in "trouble" a few years back for talking coherently about Islam. Tom Kratzman has a novel (Caliphate) which might be added to the list of redpilled movies and books above. It's about an Islamified Europe and, while not all if it has come true, yet, it's still unnerving.
    , @Jack Hanson
    I never saw the Draka as Mary Sue. I thought their build up was rather realistic, and the climax of the series with Eric's hand being forced was excellent.

    If you liked his take on pulp, I double down on my Peshawar Lancers recommendation. A comet strikes the Atlantic and Disraeli moves the British government to India. The story starts 200 years later in a very different world. Think a steampunk Kim and you have an idea of sorts.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  156. @syonredux

    Chandler was a “reactionary” in many ways (he correctly pointed out that Stalin was even worse than Hitler; it’s only a matter of time till he gets banished from the American literary pantheon for his “homophobia;”
     
    Quite possibly. Ta-Nehisi Coates (the living avatar of the PC Lumpengentsia) was quite vocal in his distaste for Chandler's un-PC attitudes:

    It's not so bad that our hero is a homophobe who likes to seems to enjoy slapping women around. I don't really believe that heroes need be "heroic" in any earnest sense of the word. What feels off is Chandler's gaze—not his hero's actions. The thin toughness of Marlowe, the display of women in the novel is masturbatory.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/11/grappling-with-raymond-chandler-and-the-big-sleep/265558/

    Once again, T. Genius Coates demonstrates his remarkable brilliance; can the man write a single sentence that doesn’t contain painfully clunky bit of modern academia-speak (“gaze,” “thin toughness, “display of women”)? He also displays a complete and total inability to understand Chandler; I honestly have a hard time thinking of a writer who’s less “masturbatory” in his “display of women;” Chandler always made sex seem only slightly less ugly (and no less dangerous) than death in his novels, which is one of the many things that sets his stories apart from the formulaic, quasi-pornographic writings of innumerable other “hard-boiled” mystery writers and from most of the glitzy, sex-obsessed screen versions of his work.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  157. @guest
    I feel the need to point out that among the robots only Sean Young--who didn't know she was a robot--and Rutger Hauer--who desperately wanted not to be a robot (or at least a robot with a short lifespan)--were the only ones they romanticized. Hauer's yearning not to expire, which was entire impetus for the plot, is a fairly strong pro-life message, though he wasn't actually alive.

    There is a bunch of Jesus imagery involving Rutger Hauer’s character’s death.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bored identity
    Pardon my Cityspeak, but:

    "It's too bad that this sequel won't live. But then again, what does?"
    , @MEH 0910
    https://books.google.com/books?id=EvCsY3IEJ14C&pg=PA89&lpg=PA89&dq=norman+spinrad+science+fiction+in+the+real+world+blade+runner&source=bl&ots=P16AEDMbh6&sig=wH_qjf7U88aPIpq0ldbNM72YK5g&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwje47DWtOTTAhVIySYKHS1_DzoQ6AEILzAC#v=onepage&q=norman%20spinrad%20science%20fiction%20in%20the%20real%20world%20blade%20runner&f=false
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  158. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Jack Hanson
    The entire Domination series makes Stirling persona non grata to a bunch of SJWs. While Drakon really showed its age (or editing), the bones there are sound. I wish he would have characterized Ken the Cyborg Warrior a little better, but what was unsaid about Samothrace and discussed with little context made it that much more interesting. I really wish he would have had Ken accept Gwen's offer on the bench and spun a series off of THAT.

    Sadly, Stirling seems like he's going to be cranking out Change novels until he does a Robert Jordan on us. Id love a continuation of The Peshawar Lancers but instead its gonna be more SCA LARPers save the world.

    One of the best things about it is how all the elitist leftists start to nod along with what she proposes. Notably an environmentalist excited about Africa turned into a huge game preserve, without any of those pesky Africans. That’s not going to be on film any time soon, because that would depict real racism, and Hollywood is currently dedicated to constantly adapting the Haman strawman to other ethnies, so it frequently depicts racism but never anything recognizable to nature or history.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  159. @Steve in Greensboro
    Indeed "Dark City" did. It is one of the few movies that bear watching repeatedly.

    +1 on Dark City. Much better than the goofy Matrix.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  160. @Pat Boyle
    Some movie directors are good with actors, others are good at organizing complex plots, still others have a way with suspense. Ridley Scott' s forte has always been set decoration.

    His movies always have great costumes and sets. Many of his big ticket films don't make a whole lot of sense because he just doesn't seem to care about plot. I was blown away by his first major movie 'The Duelists'. I was totally convinced by the setting. It was beautiful to look at and it convinced me that I was seeing Napoleonic Europe. In his subsequent quasi-historical films the same qualities are also seen.

    So his latest film 'Prometheus' also looks great. Unfortunately the actors do loony things and act strangely. Scott doesn't seem to care. His movie about the crusades was similar - great attention to visual detail but a very muddled and inappropriate drama.

    Scott IMHO got lucky with Blade Runner. It became very famous but has not been very influential. The ideas of Blade Runner have not gained traction in films. Cameron's break through film 'Terminator' has spawned a number of sequels, a TV series and who knows what else. But Blade Runner has had no sequels or characters who have suddenly shown up in other films. Everyone knows all of the 'Star Wars' characters. Just last week someone on this blog accused me of trying to be C3P0.

    But Blade Runner has had almost no influence outside of the original movie. Ridley Scott is not a good director for science-fiction despite his two big successes. Good science-fiction relies on either ideas or action and that isn't Scott's strong suit.

    So I'm glad to see a new young director at the helm.

    I was blown away by his first major movie ‘The Duelists’

    +10 on The Duelists. Harvey Keitel’s best role.

    Ridley Scott started in advertising.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    The Duelists was a great movie - Scott's best. I'd say that Black Hawk Down was his second best.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  161. @Michaeloh59
    Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I'm thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    Lots of excellent suggestions so far, but allow me to add one broad strategy that has worked well with Daughter Calvinist.

    When she was getting to ‘tweeny’ age, i.e. old enough to get beyond the Disney stuff, for TV watching we started on Jane Austen adaptations. She loved them, and her taste for historical dramas has run true right into her teens.

    Yes, there are bad adaptations out there, but many historical dramas, especially British-produced ones, are based on bastions of the western tradition that resist retconning pretty well.

    The classic BBC 1995 version of Pride and Prejudice is where we started. We’ve worked through many, many Austen adaptations, lots of Dickens, Downton Abbey (of course), and branched off into historical-setting detective fiction adaptations, e.g. Poirot and Miss Marple, Endeavour, etc.

    There is a vast sea of this kind of material out there, especially if you’re willing to go back and watch series produced from, say, the 90s onward. And there’s good stuff still being produced. We’ve just watched Victoria, which is very good, and Wolf Hall, which is superb. We’re on the latest BBC version of War and Peace right now, and it’s also very enjoyable.

    There are of course even older TV adaptations of historical fiction out there, too, but the low production values and sometimes-glacial pacing makes them more of a challenge to watch.

    We also watch 1930s-50s movies. Audrey Hepburn films, for example, remain very attractive to young girls. The best part is that you can just jump straight in and choose to watch can’t-miss classics.

    We have found that sometimes there’s a bit of resistance to getting started on watching something ‘classic’ — the kid will moan about another B & W moldy oldy, etc., but if we can just get her watching it, she’s often swept up by the quality and ends up loving the film.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  162. J.Ross says: • Website
    @syonredux
    Never cared for the Draka series (the Draka were too Mary Sue-ish for my tastes). I did like his aborted Lords of Creation series, though. For those who haven't read it, it takes place in an alternate reality where the '30s pulp versions of Mars and Venus are real. So, Mars is inhabited by an incredibly ancient civilization, while Venus is a jungle-world populated by savages. Lots of fun:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Courts_of_the_Crimson_Kings

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sky_People

    >Mary Sue

    I haven’t read the rest of the series but the great thing about Drakon was the logical explanations. [tldr -- long term advanced genetic engineering and very high metabolism, requiring a comical caloric intake.] A fantasy is legitimate if you reverse engineer it and show your work, and only a failure for these purposes if you leave everything “just because.” The snu snu played no part in my judgment (or in my lack of interest in a Draka story with a male protagonist).

    Stirling apparently got in “trouble” a few years back for talking coherently about Islam. Tom Kratzman has a novel (Caliphate) which might be added to the list of redpilled movies and books above. It’s about an Islamified Europe and, while not all if it has come true, yet, it’s still unnerving.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    I don't know if Stirling is all that happy from a political standpoint about the reception the Draka series received. I read at least one comment from him about how appalled he was over the number of fans of the books he has met who think the Drakans were the coolest thing, would love to be one, and assumed that Stirling is on the same wavelength. He seems to think that people in the genre have become suspicious of where his sympathies are.
    , @syonredux

    >Mary Sue

    I haven’t read the rest of the series but the great thing about Drakon was the logical explanations. [tldr -- long term advanced genetic engineering and very high metabolism, requiring a comical caloric intake.] A fantasy is legitimate if you reverse engineer it and show your work, and only a failure for these purposes if you leave everything “just because.” The snu snu played no part in my judgment (or in my lack of interest in a Draka story with a male protagonist).
     
    That's my problem. How Stirling got to the "Final Society" in Drakon. He had to put his authorial thumb on a lot of scales to deliver the Draka victory in The Stone Dogs.....

    And, as I mentioned elsewhere, I also don't care for his creepy interest in butch Lesbians....
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  163. Alden says:
    @Michaeloh59
    Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I'm thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    Remembered a few more. Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Sunstar and Pepper, Johnny Tremaine, Rebecca’s War and the Five Little Peppers books and The Little Colonel series
    The authors must have written more children’s books.

    Revolution and The Patriot are movies that have children playing big roles in the American Revolution

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  164. @syonredux

    Chandler was a “reactionary” in many ways (he correctly pointed out that Stalin was even worse than Hitler; it’s only a matter of time till he gets banished from the American literary pantheon for his “homophobia;”
     
    Quite possibly. Ta-Nehisi Coates (the living avatar of the PC Lumpengentsia) was quite vocal in his distaste for Chandler's un-PC attitudes:

    It's not so bad that our hero is a homophobe who likes to seems to enjoy slapping women around. I don't really believe that heroes need be "heroic" in any earnest sense of the word. What feels off is Chandler's gaze—not his hero's actions. The thin toughness of Marlowe, the display of women in the novel is masturbatory.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/11/grappling-with-raymond-chandler-and-the-big-sleep/265558/

    Such a genius he is!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  165. @syonredux
    Never cared for the Draka series (the Draka were too Mary Sue-ish for my tastes). I did like his aborted Lords of Creation series, though. For those who haven't read it, it takes place in an alternate reality where the '30s pulp versions of Mars and Venus are real. So, Mars is inhabited by an incredibly ancient civilization, while Venus is a jungle-world populated by savages. Lots of fun:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Courts_of_the_Crimson_Kings

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sky_People

    I never saw the Draka as Mary Sue. I thought their build up was rather realistic, and the climax of the series with Eric’s hand being forced was excellent.

    If you liked his take on pulp, I double down on my Peshawar Lancers recommendation. A comet strikes the Atlantic and Disraeli moves the British government to India. The story starts 200 years later in a very different world. Think a steampunk Kim and you have an idea of sorts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    I never saw the Draka as Mary Sue. I thought their build up was rather realistic, and the climax of the series with Eric’s hand being forced was excellent.
     
    I have to disagree. The Draka are the Mary Sue-est of Mary Sues. And the build-up was absurd. The Draka conquering North Africa in the early 19th century?A virus that can be triggered via radio waves? Draka tech being decades ahead of everyone else during the Eurasian War?

    And don't get me started on Stirling's creepy obsession with butch Lesbians.....

    If you liked his take on pulp, I double down on my Peshawar Lancers recommendation. A comet strikes the Atlantic and Disraeli moves the British government to India. The story starts 200 years later in a very different world. Think a steampunk Kim and you have an idea of sorts.
     
    I read it. Thought that it was fun....though there were a few holes here and there. For example, I'm quite sure that the 19th century USA would have simply invaded Mexico and Central America.

    I'll toss in a recommendation for another Stirling that I enjoyed: Conquistador . A bunch of nationalist-minded types (American Southerners, Afrikaners, ex-Nazis, Pieds-Noirs, etc) in the 1940s gain access to an alternate reality where the Americas were never colonized by the Old World and technology is still at a Medieval level.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conquistador_(novel)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  166. @interesting
    I dunno if i'm going to see this based on just the opening line of the trailer.

    "every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force"

    Any one wanna guess WTF that really means.........i'm growing tired of the politics in all aspects of life and now i can't even escape it at the movies.....not that i ever could I guess......facepalm.

    “Every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force”

    Versus:

    “Every aboriginal cave/ hut dwelling community – from Amazonia to Tasmania- is built on the backs of totally irreplaceable animal gatherers”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  167. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Let me save you $40 & 3 hours. The take home message (delivered with modern H'wood's Bruckheimer levels of subtlety) will be: We must stop treating Mestizos, Blacks, and other PoC as mere Drone-grade Replicants. We must recognize our Privilege and let our Humanity shine forth, etc.

    I only saw a trailer; but I already want my Harrison Ford, my Sean Young, my Rutger Hauer, and my money back.

    Not to mention my childhood…

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  168. @Steve Sailer
    There is a bunch of Jesus imagery involving Rutger Hauer's character's death.

    Pardon my Cityspeak, but:

    “It’s too bad that this sequel won’t live. But then again, what does?”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  169. @Alden
    This is my suggestion for boys and girls. Buy an encyclopedia including the children's book of knowledge published before 1960.

    The Internet, used bookstores, goodwill, garage sales are places to look. The easiest way is to google Antique and rare books. The dealers all have websites. Send an email of what you want and they will look in their stock and contact other dealers.

    The Louisa May Alcott books are wonderful for girls, not just Little Women.
    Nancy Drew is unrealistic but she and her friends are good role models. I wish I could remember authors and titles but I can't remember the endless girls books from the 1920's to 1950's There were hundreds of those books. The heroines were all high school girls who learned that money and popularity weren't everything.

    The Cherry Ames series was about Cherry Ames a nurse. She was a great role model.

    Jean Plaidy and Voctoria Holt wrote great historical novels. Gene Stratton Porter wrote books set on the Indiana lumber forests with teenage heroes and heroines.

    Basically anything published prior to 1960. The greatest book for kids is of course Kim by Rudyard Kipling. Treasure island and Kidnapped by RL Stevenson are great stories of 12 year olds in danger.

    But best is the pre 1960 children's encyclopedia.

    Nancy Drew is unrealistic but she and her friends are good role models.

    While looking for Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books in the library for my children, about a decade ago, I learned that the stories have been either extensively edited or new rewritten versions, with dumbed-down language and “updated” social values have displaced the original editions. I had to search hard to find the versions my siblings read in the 1950s and handed down to me in the 1960s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    While looking for Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books in the library for my children,....
     
    I understand that a publisher is now coming out with a series of detective stories aimed at trans/queer/gender-fluid childen. They'll be called "The Nancy-Boy Mysteries".
    , @syonredux
    Whenever I buy Nancy Drew books for my nieces, I make sure that they contain the original text:



    https://www.amazon.com/gp/richpub/listmania/fullview/1SWS9QLPRHFH1?tag=findfanapparel-20
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  170. Mr. Anon says:
    @Alden
    I've read every Flashman book and loved, loved them. Big thing against flash man is that the costumes, horses etc in period movies are much more expensive than costumes, sets for contemporary movies.

    It's mostly women who love period movies, but most women love the clothes, women protagonists and romance. I'm one of the few women who's read all the Flashman novels

    Flashman would make a great TV series.

    Big thing against flash man is that the costumes, horses etc in period movies are much more expensive than costumes, sets for contemporary movies.

    True. Costumes, sets, locations, extras for battle scenes, would all be pretty expensive.

    Flashman would make a great TV series.

    Aye. That would be best for doing the novels justice.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  171. Mr. Anon says:
    @PiltdownMan

    Nancy Drew is unrealistic but she and her friends are good role models.
     
    While looking for Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books in the library for my children, about a decade ago, I learned that the stories have been either extensively edited or new rewritten versions, with dumbed-down language and "updated" social values have displaced the original editions. I had to search hard to find the versions my siblings read in the 1950s and handed down to me in the 1960s.

    While looking for Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books in the library for my children,….

    I understand that a publisher is now coming out with a series of detective stories aimed at trans/queer/gender-fluid childen. They’ll be called “The Nancy-Boy Mysteries”.

    Read More
    • LOL: PiltdownMan
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  172. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Despite the futzing around, I’ll say that LoTR still manages to be heavily Restorationist as a viewpoint and as such, is very positive toward the West and traditional values in general.

     

    I agree. It's as if Tolkien's work was a vast treasure chest of cultural capital that Peter Jackson set fire to -- just at one little corner, at first. The Fellowship of the Ring is therefore the most true-to-Tolkien of all of his films.

    The fire smoldered and flickered throughout LotR, but still didn't destroy too much. Unfortunately, it had grown into a conflagration by the time Jackson made the Hobbit films.

    The fire smoldered and flickered throughout LotR, but still didn’t destroy too much. Unfortunately, it had grown into a conflagration by the time Jackson made the Hobbit films.

    Don’t let Walsh and Boyens off the hook. I suspect they had as much or even more to do with that than Jackson.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  173. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    I was blown away by his first major movie ‘The Duelists’
     
    +10 on The Duelists. Harvey Keitel's best role.

    Ridley Scott started in advertising.

    The Duelists was a great movie – Scott’s best. I’d say that Black Hawk Down was his second best.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  174. Mr. Anon says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Despite the futzing around, I’ll say that LoTR still manages to be heavily Restorationist as a viewpoint and as such, is very positive toward the West and traditional values in general.

     

    I agree. It's as if Tolkien's work was a vast treasure chest of cultural capital that Peter Jackson set fire to -- just at one little corner, at first. The Fellowship of the Ring is therefore the most true-to-Tolkien of all of his films.

    The fire smoldered and flickered throughout LotR, but still didn't destroy too much. Unfortunately, it had grown into a conflagration by the time Jackson made the Hobbit films.

    I agree. It’s as if Tolkien’s work was a vast treasure chest of cultural capital that Peter Jackson set fire to — just at one little corner, at first. The Fellowship of the Ring is therefore the most true-to-Tolkien of all of his films.

    I think it was burning pretty well by The Two Towers. The Emo-Hobbits were especially disgusting. On the whole, I much prefer Ralph Bakshi’s abortive animated version of The Lord of the Rings.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    'Emo-Hobbits' -- LOL.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  175. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Pat Boyle
    Some movie directors are good with actors, others are good at organizing complex plots, still others have a way with suspense. Ridley Scott' s forte has always been set decoration.

    His movies always have great costumes and sets. Many of his big ticket films don't make a whole lot of sense because he just doesn't seem to care about plot. I was blown away by his first major movie 'The Duelists'. I was totally convinced by the setting. It was beautiful to look at and it convinced me that I was seeing Napoleonic Europe. In his subsequent quasi-historical films the same qualities are also seen.

    So his latest film 'Prometheus' also looks great. Unfortunately the actors do loony things and act strangely. Scott doesn't seem to care. His movie about the crusades was similar - great attention to visual detail but a very muddled and inappropriate drama.

    Scott IMHO got lucky with Blade Runner. It became very famous but has not been very influential. The ideas of Blade Runner have not gained traction in films. Cameron's break through film 'Terminator' has spawned a number of sequels, a TV series and who knows what else. But Blade Runner has had no sequels or characters who have suddenly shown up in other films. Everyone knows all of the 'Star Wars' characters. Just last week someone on this blog accused me of trying to be C3P0.

    But Blade Runner has had almost no influence outside of the original movie. Ridley Scott is not a good director for science-fiction despite his two big successes. Good science-fiction relies on either ideas or action and that isn't Scott's strong suit.

    So I'm glad to see a new young director at the helm.
    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  176. MB says: • Website
    @Lurker
    I'm still waiting to find out what constitutes 'fake news'. Does anyone know of an example? The MSM keep telling us about it but, for some reason, never get round to actual cases.

    Fake news?
    Come on.
    For starters, Drumpf won the election and anything to do with antifa.
    You’re welcome.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  177. @Mr. Anon

    I agree. It’s as if Tolkien’s work was a vast treasure chest of cultural capital that Peter Jackson set fire to — just at one little corner, at first. The Fellowship of the Ring is therefore the most true-to-Tolkien of all of his films.
     
    I think it was burning pretty well by The Two Towers. The Emo-Hobbits were especially disgusting. On the whole, I much prefer Ralph Bakshi's abortive animated version of The Lord of the Rings.

    ‘Emo-Hobbits’ — LOL.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  178. Alfa158 says:
    @J.Ross
    >Mary Sue

    I haven't read the rest of the series but the great thing about Drakon was the logical explanations. [tldr -- long term advanced genetic engineering and very high metabolism, requiring a comical caloric intake.] A fantasy is legitimate if you reverse engineer it and show your work, and only a failure for these purposes if you leave everything "just because." The snu snu played no part in my judgment (or in my lack of interest in a Draka story with a male protagonist).

    Stirling apparently got in "trouble" a few years back for talking coherently about Islam. Tom Kratzman has a novel (Caliphate) which might be added to the list of redpilled movies and books above. It's about an Islamified Europe and, while not all if it has come true, yet, it's still unnerving.

    I don’t know if Stirling is all that happy from a political standpoint about the reception the Draka series received. I read at least one comment from him about how appalled he was over the number of fans of the books he has met who think the Drakans were the coolest thing, would love to be one, and assumed that Stirling is on the same wavelength. He seems to think that people in the genre have become suspicious of where his sympathies are.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  179. syonredux says:
    @Jack Hanson
    I never saw the Draka as Mary Sue. I thought their build up was rather realistic, and the climax of the series with Eric's hand being forced was excellent.

    If you liked his take on pulp, I double down on my Peshawar Lancers recommendation. A comet strikes the Atlantic and Disraeli moves the British government to India. The story starts 200 years later in a very different world. Think a steampunk Kim and you have an idea of sorts.

    I never saw the Draka as Mary Sue. I thought their build up was rather realistic, and the climax of the series with Eric’s hand being forced was excellent.

    I have to disagree. The Draka are the Mary Sue-est of Mary Sues. And the build-up was absurd. The Draka conquering North Africa in the early 19th century?A virus that can be triggered via radio waves? Draka tech being decades ahead of everyone else during the Eurasian War?

    And don’t get me started on Stirling’s creepy obsession with butch Lesbians…..

    If you liked his take on pulp, I double down on my Peshawar Lancers recommendation. A comet strikes the Atlantic and Disraeli moves the British government to India. The story starts 200 years later in a very different world. Think a steampunk Kim and you have an idea of sorts.

    I read it. Thought that it was fun….though there were a few holes here and there. For example, I’m quite sure that the 19th century USA would have simply invaded Mexico and Central America.

    I’ll toss in a recommendation for another Stirling that I enjoyed: Conquistador . A bunch of nationalist-minded types (American Southerners, Afrikaners, ex-Nazis, Pieds-Noirs, etc) in the 1940s gain access to an alternate reality where the Americas were never colonized by the Old World and technology is still at a Medieval level.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conquistador_(novel)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    US Tech, or Alliance of Free Countries, or whatever they were called, was technologically advanced as well. The Alliance was more mechanically inclined, while the Draka were more biologically inclined. Its why Gwen is a biological masterpiece, but Ken LaFarge is a cyborg: different paths.

    I don't find the North Africa thing unrealistic at all - the French did it IRL. I don't see it being out of the reach for the Dominion.

    As far as the Lancers go, the entire Atlantic seaboard was wiped out and the northern jet streams were disrupted. I don't think the US was in any position to invade anywhere. I keep meaning to read his short story about Erik King hunting in Galveston with a young Robert Howard as a guide.

    Conquistadors was a fun novel, but tended towards Stirling's tendency to lean hard on ethnic stereotyping in place of actual character development when he's not feeling creative.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  180. Boomstick says:

    Take a look at the original Bladerunner effects and compare them to those of the trailer for the new movie. I think I prefer the SFX in the original.

    The modern version seems to be using almost entirely computer graphics while the original feature used more physical miniature model effects in the scenes. Deckard and Gaff flying past the flaming oil wells to the the ziggurats was probably a small physical model with a flying model added to the film afterwards, and it was compelling. So was adding some physical effects to the sets. It looked great. The Vangelis sountrack was fantastic as well.

    The modern film seems to be using almost entirely computer graphics. It’s not as compelling.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  181. syonredux says:
    @PiltdownMan

    Nancy Drew is unrealistic but she and her friends are good role models.
     
    While looking for Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books in the library for my children, about a decade ago, I learned that the stories have been either extensively edited or new rewritten versions, with dumbed-down language and "updated" social values have displaced the original editions. I had to search hard to find the versions my siblings read in the 1950s and handed down to me in the 1960s.

    Whenever I buy Nancy Drew books for my nieces, I make sure that they contain the original text:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/richpub/listmania/fullview/1SWS9QLPRHFH1?tag=findfanapparel-20

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  182. syonredux says:
    @J.Ross
    >Mary Sue

    I haven't read the rest of the series but the great thing about Drakon was the logical explanations. [tldr -- long term advanced genetic engineering and very high metabolism, requiring a comical caloric intake.] A fantasy is legitimate if you reverse engineer it and show your work, and only a failure for these purposes if you leave everything "just because." The snu snu played no part in my judgment (or in my lack of interest in a Draka story with a male protagonist).

    Stirling apparently got in "trouble" a few years back for talking coherently about Islam. Tom Kratzman has a novel (Caliphate) which might be added to the list of redpilled movies and books above. It's about an Islamified Europe and, while not all if it has come true, yet, it's still unnerving.

    >Mary Sue

    I haven’t read the rest of the series but the great thing about Drakon was the logical explanations. [tldr -- long term advanced genetic engineering and very high metabolism, requiring a comical caloric intake.] A fantasy is legitimate if you reverse engineer it and show your work, and only a failure for these purposes if you leave everything “just because.” The snu snu played no part in my judgment (or in my lack of interest in a Draka story with a male protagonist).

    That’s my problem. How Stirling got to the “Final Society” in Drakon. He had to put his authorial thumb on a lot of scales to deliver the Draka victory in The Stone Dogs…..

    And, as I mentioned elsewhere, I also don’t care for his creepy interest in butch Lesbians….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Eh? I think it was a pretty natural progression, on both sides. The Draka pulling the trigger first was because Gwen forced Erik's hand, and ties back to the Draka preponderance for domination. LaFarge found out cause Gwen got lazy, IIRC.

    In Drakon Gwen was a better villain than either of the protagonists, more interesting at least. She was also matched pretty well by Kenneth LaFarge, with her low tech and experience and his weaponry and inexperience matching up against each other pretty well. My first read through, I always thought the battles could have gone either way, and the second one she really got the worst of it with LaFarge.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  183. syonredux says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...
    Hollywood corrupts everything it touches. In Phillip K. Dick's novel the replicants were soulless, anti-life monstrosities. The human hero is briefly tempted by an apparently beautiful female replicant until he sees her callously pulling the legs off a spider. At that point he returns to his imperfect but human wife. Dick was making a serious point here about the dignity and preciousness of life and reality, as opposed to non-life/anti-life and the artificialities which we humans create and with which we surround themselves. (It's pretty obvious why the denizens of Hollywood would miss this message.)

    The movie, Blade Runner, romanticizes the soulless replicants, going so far as to suggest that Decker, the protagonist, is one. A total inversion of Dick's original message.

    Blade Runner was a great movie but it completely inverted Dick's message and to that extent was a travesty. It looks like the sequel goes even further down that path. Based on the trailer, I'm guessing it will also not be nearly as good a movie.

    Yep. When I finally got around to reading Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, I was shocked. The film is a perversion of the novel.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  184. Whoever says:
    @Michaeloh59
    Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I'm thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas

    Anne of Green Gables and subsequent by Lucy Maud Montgomery
    Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder
    The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes
    Little Women Louisa May Alcott
    Camille by Alexandre Dumas, fils
    My Antonia by Willa Cather
    Wanda by Ouida
    Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

    And somewhat at a tangent, but stories that will stick with them and have them thinking:
    Green Mansions by W.H. Hudson
    A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes
    Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
    Requiem for a Wren by Nevil Shute

    And those are just off the top of my head. If I think about it a little more I could come up with lots of others. The Thomas Hardy novels have very interesting female protagonists.

    I highly recommend Poems Every Child Should Know. You can download it free from Gutenberg . There are some simply wonderful poems for children to learn and love in this volume.
    The collection was to be taught in school, with the children memorizing and reciting the poems. That’s a fun way to spend time with your children or grandchildren.
    If your grandchildren learn Felicia Hemans’ “Casabianca,” “The Captain’s Daughter” by James T. Fields or Longfellow’s “The Village Blacksmith,” they will have something that will stick to their ribs, so to speak.
    And if you think memorizing poems will be dull and boring for kids, try this stanza from “The Captain’s Daughter”:

    So we shuddered there in silence,
    For the stoutest held his breath,
    While the hungry sea was roaring
    And the breakers talked with Death.

    Don’t tell me you can’t give those lines a dramatic reading that will hold your grandchildren rapt.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Richard
    You're the first person I've ever known to suggest "Madame Bovary" as a girl's book, alongside "Anne of Green Gables" and "Little House on the Prairie". I suspect I know why, but I also think the intended lesson would be lost on young readers, as it is on many adults.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  185. @Bill
    Do you think boiling off the smart Israelis is going to end well?

    Losing high-IQ types is never a good thing. But given the choice between a trickle of top engineers leaving Tel Aviv for London or Palo Alto or wherever, and facing mortars and rockets from the West Bank hills, I’d lose the engineers. Giving up the high ground is a much quicker road to suicide.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  186. @Alden
    This is my suggestion for boys and girls. Buy an encyclopedia including the children's book of knowledge published before 1960.

    The Internet, used bookstores, goodwill, garage sales are places to look. The easiest way is to google Antique and rare books. The dealers all have websites. Send an email of what you want and they will look in their stock and contact other dealers.

    The Louisa May Alcott books are wonderful for girls, not just Little Women.
    Nancy Drew is unrealistic but she and her friends are good role models. I wish I could remember authors and titles but I can't remember the endless girls books from the 1920's to 1950's There were hundreds of those books. The heroines were all high school girls who learned that money and popularity weren't everything.

    The Cherry Ames series was about Cherry Ames a nurse. She was a great role model.

    Jean Plaidy and Voctoria Holt wrote great historical novels. Gene Stratton Porter wrote books set on the Indiana lumber forests with teenage heroes and heroines.

    Basically anything published prior to 1960. The greatest book for kids is of course Kim by Rudyard Kipling. Treasure island and Kidnapped by RL Stevenson are great stories of 12 year olds in danger.

    But best is the pre 1960 children's encyclopedia.

    Thanks for your suggestions.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  187. @Autochthon
    How come is it interesting? He's very intelligent (therefore good at choosing and developing projects and at avoiding the temptations and excesses of fame, like drugs and such); a talented actor; and a great-looking guy (yes, I'm secure enough in my masculinity to write that). It's a recipe for success in Hollywood.

    You want someone whose success is somewhat unexpected? How about a rough-looking dude like John C. Reilly or a talentless, unfunny hack like Adam Sandler (yes, I know the secret to the latter's success lies in making movies that appeal to twelve-year-old boys and stupid mestizos...).

    unfunny hack like Adam Sandler

    Um, what?

    Did you miss Happy Gilmore?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  188. Lurker says:
    @syonredux

    every civilization is built on the backs of a disposable work force

    If they are trying to sell this as the propaganda line in the movie, then isn’t this a bit of contradiction. Since they support mass immigration because it creates cheaper workers, having a movie that is saying that these are disposable workers means it is not helping SJW propaganda.
     
    Being an SJW takes a lot of Doublethink.....

    Being an SJW takes a lot of Doublethink…..

    SJWthink is all about maintaining several eigenstates at once. One of my regular online tactics. . .

    SJW (smug status signalling): “I don’t care about race, it really doesn’t matter to me who immigrants are.”

    Me: “OK, so if you learn that from midnight we’ll be having a whites-only immigration policy what would you say then? Nothing obviously, because as already stated you have no interest in such matters, it’s of no concern to you. All black, all white, whatever, it’s all the same to you”

    The whining and howling that result from this are priceless. Often, of course, there is no response after this point. Or all sorts of feeble attempts to change the subject. But what never happens is a straight answer consistent with their original statement. But they refuse to collapse the wave function, they clearly don’t and do care very much at the same time.

    Ideally I want them to state how they do in fact care and then we could discuss immigration in something like a rational manner. Like that’s ever going to happen.

    Please feel free to replicate wherever possible.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  189. @syonredux

    >Mary Sue

    I haven’t read the rest of the series but the great thing about Drakon was the logical explanations. [tldr -- long term advanced genetic engineering and very high metabolism, requiring a comical caloric intake.] A fantasy is legitimate if you reverse engineer it and show your work, and only a failure for these purposes if you leave everything “just because.” The snu snu played no part in my judgment (or in my lack of interest in a Draka story with a male protagonist).
     
    That's my problem. How Stirling got to the "Final Society" in Drakon. He had to put his authorial thumb on a lot of scales to deliver the Draka victory in The Stone Dogs.....

    And, as I mentioned elsewhere, I also don't care for his creepy interest in butch Lesbians....

    Eh? I think it was a pretty natural progression, on both sides. The Draka pulling the trigger first was because Gwen forced Erik’s hand, and ties back to the Draka preponderance for domination. LaFarge found out cause Gwen got lazy, IIRC.

    In Drakon Gwen was a better villain than either of the protagonists, more interesting at least. She was also matched pretty well by Kenneth LaFarge, with her low tech and experience and his weaponry and inexperience matching up against each other pretty well. My first read through, I always thought the battles could have gone either way, and the second one she really got the worst of it with LaFarge.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Eh? I think it was a pretty natural progression, on both sides. The Draka pulling the trigger first was because Gwen forced Erik’s hand, and ties back to the Draka preponderance for domination. LaFarge found out cause Gwen got lazy, IIRC.
     
    As I noted above, I'm talking about the world-building that got the series to that point: Draka Conquest of North Africa, Japan being vastly more powerful during the Eurasian War, Britain allowing the Draka an absurd level of independence in the early 19th century,Britain deciding to transport American Tories to South Africa, etc.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  190. @syonredux

    I never saw the Draka as Mary Sue. I thought their build up was rather realistic, and the climax of the series with Eric’s hand being forced was excellent.
     
    I have to disagree. The Draka are the Mary Sue-est of Mary Sues. And the build-up was absurd. The Draka conquering North Africa in the early 19th century?A virus that can be triggered via radio waves? Draka tech being decades ahead of everyone else during the Eurasian War?

    And don't get me started on Stirling's creepy obsession with butch Lesbians.....

    If you liked his take on pulp, I double down on my Peshawar Lancers recommendation. A comet strikes the Atlantic and Disraeli moves the British government to India. The story starts 200 years later in a very different world. Think a steampunk Kim and you have an idea of sorts.
     
    I read it. Thought that it was fun....though there were a few holes here and there. For example, I'm quite sure that the 19th century USA would have simply invaded Mexico and Central America.

    I'll toss in a recommendation for another Stirling that I enjoyed: Conquistador . A bunch of nationalist-minded types (American Southerners, Afrikaners, ex-Nazis, Pieds-Noirs, etc) in the 1940s gain access to an alternate reality where the Americas were never colonized by the Old World and technology is still at a Medieval level.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conquistador_(novel)

    US Tech, or Alliance of Free Countries, or whatever they were called, was technologically advanced as well. The Alliance was more mechanically inclined, while the Draka were more biologically inclined. Its why Gwen is a biological masterpiece, but Ken LaFarge is a cyborg: different paths.

    I don’t find the North Africa thing unrealistic at all – the French did it IRL. I don’t see it being out of the reach for the Dominion.

    As far as the Lancers go, the entire Atlantic seaboard was wiped out and the northern jet streams were disrupted. I don’t think the US was in any position to invade anywhere. I keep meaning to read his short story about Erik King hunting in Galveston with a young Robert Howard as a guide.

    Conquistadors was a fun novel, but tended towards Stirling’s tendency to lean hard on ethnic stereotyping in place of actual character development when he’s not feeling creative.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    US Tech, or Alliance of Free Countries, or whatever they were called, was technologically advanced as well. The Alliance was more mechanically inclined, while the Draka were more biologically inclined. Its why Gwen is a biological masterpiece, but Ken LaFarge is a cyborg: different paths.
     
    My reference was to the Eurasian War....Stirling had to give the Draka a big technological edge in order to have the Draka conquer Europe. As I said, thumb on the scale....

    I don’t find the North Africa thing unrealistic at all – the French did it IRL. I don’t see it being out of the reach for the Dominion.
     
    Sure it was. They had to transport everything from Southern Africa, not merely across the Med....And we also have to buy the notion that the UK would allow the Draka to administer North Africa.....Basically Stirling had the Draka conquer North Africa at a ridiculously early stage because he needed to give them their equivalent of the First Messenian War...

    As far as the Lancers go, the entire Atlantic seaboard was wiped out and the northern jet streams were disrupted. I don’t think the US was in any position to invade anywhere
     
    .

    Which leaves Texas, Arizona, Southern CA.....A conquering army would have set out...

    I keep meaning to read his short story about Erik King hunting in Galveston with a young Robert Howard as a guide.
     
    I enjoyed it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  191. Ray P says:
    @Autochthon
    Having read many of Dick's novels and suffered through many of their adaptations, I observe the phenomenon is ubiquitous, perhaps universal: these films are in many cases so different from Dick's novels it becomes difficult to argue they are adaptations.

    I watched Bladerunner when I was a child, wholly unfamiliar with Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. When I later read the novel, as an adult, I had learned of the film's connection to it, but I was glad I' had essentially forgotten the film, so nothing about the book would be spoilt. Yet even the extremely vague impressions of the film I did retain told me the book I was reading was nothing like the film I had seen. Later, I watched the film again, and confirmed I was correct.

    I understand Mr. Dick was pleased with Bladerunner (who wouldn't be pleased with the money it doubtless made for him?!); I wonder to what extent novelists prefer adaptations inspired by their work not undertake the usually impossible task of replicating the novel in cinematic form, but instead merely draw inspiration from the novel to do something more suited to cinema? Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a very cerebral thing; a great deal of it is to do with the characters' own thoughts, and it is often intentionally unclear what is being imagined and what is actually occurring. Such techniques do not often translate well to the screen, which provides viewers less opportunity to slowly mull what is occurring and appreciate ambiguous or varied interpretations the author may be offering....

    If Andrey Tarkovsky had directed Android’s Dream it could have worked.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  192. Ray P says:
    @Macumazahn
    The Gosling character will turn out to be the son of the Ford and Young characters.
    It is useless to resist.

    Son of Blade Runner? Can Gosling do Bob Hope? Or Gene Wilder?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  193. @guest
    Literature has an inherently greater capacity for thought-provocation. In the hands of a great writer like Dick, that's almost a given. But I'm not sure Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? faithfully adapted would reliably produce a great movie. There's a great movie in there, if you do it right. But there're also a lot of ways to screw it up.

    On the other hand, a good robot action sci-fi noir mystery thriller is waiting for you on the surface. I like the premise of Blade Runner (though I always ask myself why they made the robots so humanlike. Couldn't they have put a red dot on their foreheads, or something, just in case they rebel?), a little less the execution, and the feel above all. Feelz are like lightning in a bottle. The music, for instance, which I loved and gave me intense feelz, wouldn't work in a lot of other contexts.

    You take direction, set design, costuming, acting, music, and so forth all together, and that was the Blade Runner style. But it didn't have a knockout story. Enough to give me great feelz, but not intellectually satisfying.

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? has a knockout story, but would you be able to pull in all the feelz necessary to make it a successful movie? I dunno. Maybe. Safer bet is to work in proven subgenres, like robot action sci-fi noir mystery thrillers, and hope the story is good enough.

    They aren’t robots. You are missing the layers to Ridley Scott’s film.

    The replicants are genetically engineered humans, dumped out of a tank and engineered for a 4-year lifespan (“Wake up! Time to die!”). They have animal DNA spliced in: Roy is a wolf; Priss is a raccoon; Leon’s a turtle; Zhora is a snake. It took me a bit longer to figure out Rachel though they’re all pretty obvious actually. She dresses in fur, follows Deckard all around, and is loyal to the death. The other hint is in the Voight-Kampff test: her trigger is the reference to boiled dog, just like Leon lost it with Holden’s turtle story.

    The real kicker is Deckard himself: he’s a shark who loves the sensation of blood in water.

    Scott’s point is that the capacity for moral choice is what makes us human. Thus, Roy makes it to the plan of salvation by saving Deckard’s life. Scott incorporates explicitly Christian imagery, with a nail through Roy’s palm and a white dove. Scott’s from a different era. I doubt the sequel will be as profound or spiritual.

    Speaking of dogs, they are under a genetic selection pressure cooker which we need to dial back. Most dogs are so far removed from their predatory origins they won’t eat raw meat, which is good because we don’t want them hunting and killing our baby humans or herd animals. On the other hand, golden retrievers are being bred for so much amiability they’re becoming big stupid fluffy dolls with no homing instinct. Most dog breeds would rapidly die off without humans. If we ever wanted to bring the dingos back into the fold, it wouldn’t take long.

    Can we breed dogs to the point that their brains can figure out moral agency? I guess we’ll find out. Now I’m getting into Daniel Dennett’s “spectrum of consciousness” theory which apparently has David Chalmers so upset. Interestingly, Daniel Dennett’s the one who works with his hands and throws a huge Christmas party where he enthusiastically leads his guests in the carols. Chalmers is the one who gets invited to TED talks.

    Back to Blade Runner: I really want to believe that Villeneuve understands and incorporates Scott’s vision but I’m pretty sure I’ll be disappointed. At least we’ll always have that perfect tear drop of a movie.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Do you think that we can even push fiction nowadays with Christian morals, as "cucked" as it might seem sometime?
    , @Ray P
    So Deckard engaged in bestiality with Rachel? Ugh. Thanks for ruining Blade Runner.
    , @guest
    I like saying "robot" better than "replicant," which is, I think, the term the movie uses. Which may be misleading, but the important point is the Blade Runner replicants aren't real humans. They're synthetic organisms designed to look and act like humans, but I don't consider them alive in the true sense. They're bio-machines, if you will.

    I like what Scott did with it, thematically, but I always return to my quibble above. If they're just workers and you're afraid of them rebelling, and you're going to plan ahead enough to give them only four years of life, why bother making them so damn humanlike? With superpowers to make them really hard to catch should they ever get out? Why not make them human enough to work for you, then stop? Okay. you can have Sean Young as a pet, but with the rest maybe we could avoid Big Questions like "What does it truly mean to be human?" Look to the bottom line.

    Dennett, by the way, is a blind alley. There's no spectrum of consciousness with him, because he doesn't actually believe in consciousness. His way of not outright denying it and thus making himself appear foolish is to smear out the boundaries. "Hey, consciousness is all, like relative, man"

    , @guest
    It occurs to me I called them bio-machines but still maintained they weren't alive, which makes no sense. They are alive, I guess.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  194. Romanian says: • Website
    @This Is Our Home
    They did make a film set in a futuristic Mestizo LA. It was incredibly depressing. Everyone not mediocre had left to a nation in space called Elysium, although somehow the moral of the story was that there should be no border between Elysium and dystopian LA just as the current moral is that there should be no wall between Mexico and the US.

    The film was not great so we will not find out the result of that Dreamified immigration and how people must be allowed to move from newly dystopian and mediocre Elysium to Elysium 2 (a gated community/nation in another dimension perhaps?)

    The maker needed to be less obscurantist about his obvious message. He hid it behind progressive schmaltz which made the film superficially dumb and therefore boring. He should have had more courage in his convictions just as Idiocracy needed to combine its high concept with with rather than hide behind dick jokes; because unfortunately if you lead a film with dumb shit it comes across as just dumb shit.

    Leo Strauss said that the philosopher needs to remember that he is a part of society, not above it or separated from it, which I took to be a reminder of the political dangers of philosophy. Socrates had to drink hemlock. That so many thinkers over the ages had to practice esoteric writing to protect themselves shows that this is true. The fact that we have to do so today is contrary to what made the West great.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  195. Roy says:
    @whorefinder
    Blade Runner was good, but I was shocked at how many people didn't get the subtext/hidden implication that Harrison Ford himself was a replicant. To me it was obvious that the filmmakers set up that ambiguity from the start, playing with the idea of the unreliable narrator. But until I said it to people---or they watched the DVDs with the extra scenes, which hammer home the theme more---they didn't have a clue. Then, once exposed, they said, "OMG, of course!"

    It's similar to how The Exorcist has a subtext/implication of child molestation/sexual assault. The implication is: Regan is being sexually molested by her mother's creepy male friend, and afraid to tell her mother, Regan desperately uses her OUIJA board/other occult things to ask for help from the spirit world, hence how she gets possessed and why the first emanation of the demon is murdering the creepy male friend by tossing him out the window.

    It's a "OMG, of course!" moment that you just don't see it until someone points it out:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlLrD1CC5wQ

    Anyway, if Harrison Ford is in this film, it might ruin the original Blade Runner, since, IIRC, the replicants were only supposed to live for a short time, so I don't know how he survived this long, unless he discovered the secret to longevity the other replicants from the original were looking for.

    Isn’t that essentially the plot of the HBO series “Westworld”? Have you seen it and what do you think of it?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  196. @This Is Our Home
    They did make a film set in a futuristic Mestizo LA. It was incredibly depressing. Everyone not mediocre had left to a nation in space called Elysium, although somehow the moral of the story was that there should be no border between Elysium and dystopian LA just as the current moral is that there should be no wall between Mexico and the US.

    The film was not great so we will not find out the result of that Dreamified immigration and how people must be allowed to move from newly dystopian and mediocre Elysium to Elysium 2 (a gated community/nation in another dimension perhaps?)

    The maker needed to be less obscurantist about his obvious message. He hid it behind progressive schmaltz which made the film superficially dumb and therefore boring. He should have had more courage in his convictions just as Idiocracy needed to combine its high concept with with rather than hide behind dick jokes; because unfortunately if you lead a film with dumb shit it comes across as just dumb shit.

    Perhaps he had to, in order to get published?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  197. @The Anti-Gnostic
    They aren't robots. You are missing the layers to Ridley Scott's film.

    The replicants are genetically engineered humans, dumped out of a tank and engineered for a 4-year lifespan ("Wake up! Time to die!"). They have animal DNA spliced in: Roy is a wolf; Priss is a raccoon; Leon's a turtle; Zhora is a snake. It took me a bit longer to figure out Rachel though they're all pretty obvious actually. She dresses in fur, follows Deckard all around, and is loyal to the death. The other hint is in the Voight-Kampff test: her trigger is the reference to boiled dog, just like Leon lost it with Holden's turtle story.

    The real kicker is Deckard himself: he's a shark who loves the sensation of blood in water.

    Scott's point is that the capacity for moral choice is what makes us human. Thus, Roy makes it to the plan of salvation by saving Deckard's life. Scott incorporates explicitly Christian imagery, with a nail through Roy's palm and a white dove. Scott's from a different era. I doubt the sequel will be as profound or spiritual.

    Speaking of dogs, they are under a genetic selection pressure cooker which we need to dial back. Most dogs are so far removed from their predatory origins they won't eat raw meat, which is good because we don't want them hunting and killing our baby humans or herd animals. On the other hand, golden retrievers are being bred for so much amiability they're becoming big stupid fluffy dolls with no homing instinct. Most dog breeds would rapidly die off without humans. If we ever wanted to bring the dingos back into the fold, it wouldn't take long.

    Can we breed dogs to the point that their brains can figure out moral agency? I guess we'll find out. Now I'm getting into Daniel Dennett's "spectrum of consciousness" theory which apparently has David Chalmers so upset. Interestingly, Daniel Dennett's the one who works with his hands and throws a huge Christmas party where he enthusiastically leads his guests in the carols. Chalmers is the one who gets invited to TED talks.

    Back to Blade Runner: I really want to believe that Villeneuve understands and incorporates Scott's vision but I'm pretty sure I'll be disappointed. At least we'll always have that perfect tear drop of a movie.

    Do you think that we can even push fiction nowadays with Christian morals, as “cucked” as it might seem sometime?

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    Depictions of religious practice as a detail of every day life are probably in decline as less and less of the writers et al. have any religious creed.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  198. Pat Boyle says:
    @Expletive Deleted
    Ridley Scott's world is the world of the typical art student. Gorgeous visuals, total inability to get to grips with the mindset/mores/psychology or even technology of a forgotten (Duellists) or future imagined era. No concept of an overarching religiosity or kin/social class-based order, no matter how attenuated. Bloody Sharpe's Eagle was closer to the mark.
    Starbucks society in glorious drag, with alienated, pretty, relatively wealthy 30-somethings as the only actors with any sort of agency.
    Like a farm run by pigs.
    But then, who else has the time or disposable to waste on this sort of etiolated flummery?

    You said it better than I did.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  199. Pat Boyle says:
    @Altai
    You should definitely watch at least the first 2 series. Maybe the third and I try to forget the fourth happened.

    You couldn't make the remake BSG today.

    It is nothing like the original series.

    I appreciate the advice but why?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  200. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Watching the first 5 minutes of the original Blade Runner set in the Fall of 2019, I can see you have much to do in the next 30 months. Those flying cars, pyramid shaped office towers, soup thick smog, and belching fireball plumes need to be manifest soon. A sexbot or Roomba isn't exactly a Rutger Hauer grade replicant, but maybe they were just off by a decade.

    Hope you'll review this "2049" one for us iSteve. Am too cynical now after seeing Prometheus to take the bait. And hope you'll have a couple paragraphs on Covenant too. Can't bear to watch another naif "scientist" stare into the opening maw of a barrel-sized egg.

    Prometheus wasn’t so bad. I think Charlize’s idiotic death scene retroactively made most people hate everything that had come before. Just fast forward through that scene, pretend she gets killed in a non-idiotic way, and the movie holds up pretty well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ray P
    When the best character is an emotionless, snarky, faux-gay Android a film has problems.
    , @syonredux

    Prometheus wasn’t so bad. I think Charlize’s idiotic death scene retroactively made most people hate everything that had come before. Just fast forward through that scene, pretend she gets killed in a non-idiotic way, and the movie holds up pretty well.
     
    Don't forget the pet-the-creepy-alien-cobra scene.....And then there's the bit where the guy who's mapping the alien site gets lost....

    Seems that Weyland hired his staff on the cheap.Must have used the future version of Craigslist .....
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  201. @Steve Sailer
    John Ford, John Wayne, Cormac McCarthy, Mel Gibson: Mexophilics.

    Interest in Mexico, in contrast, has largely disappeared from, say, the NYT, even before Carlos Slim bailed it out. The NYT dutifully covers Mexico, but there's no sign that their subscriber base has any interest in it.

    Also Charles Portis, who set two of his books south of the border. And Fred Reed of course.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  202. Ray P says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    They aren't robots. You are missing the layers to Ridley Scott's film.

    The replicants are genetically engineered humans, dumped out of a tank and engineered for a 4-year lifespan ("Wake up! Time to die!"). They have animal DNA spliced in: Roy is a wolf; Priss is a raccoon; Leon's a turtle; Zhora is a snake. It took me a bit longer to figure out Rachel though they're all pretty obvious actually. She dresses in fur, follows Deckard all around, and is loyal to the death. The other hint is in the Voight-Kampff test: her trigger is the reference to boiled dog, just like Leon lost it with Holden's turtle story.

    The real kicker is Deckard himself: he's a shark who loves the sensation of blood in water.

    Scott's point is that the capacity for moral choice is what makes us human. Thus, Roy makes it to the plan of salvation by saving Deckard's life. Scott incorporates explicitly Christian imagery, with a nail through Roy's palm and a white dove. Scott's from a different era. I doubt the sequel will be as profound or spiritual.

    Speaking of dogs, they are under a genetic selection pressure cooker which we need to dial back. Most dogs are so far removed from their predatory origins they won't eat raw meat, which is good because we don't want them hunting and killing our baby humans or herd animals. On the other hand, golden retrievers are being bred for so much amiability they're becoming big stupid fluffy dolls with no homing instinct. Most dog breeds would rapidly die off without humans. If we ever wanted to bring the dingos back into the fold, it wouldn't take long.

    Can we breed dogs to the point that their brains can figure out moral agency? I guess we'll find out. Now I'm getting into Daniel Dennett's "spectrum of consciousness" theory which apparently has David Chalmers so upset. Interestingly, Daniel Dennett's the one who works with his hands and throws a huge Christmas party where he enthusiastically leads his guests in the carols. Chalmers is the one who gets invited to TED talks.

    Back to Blade Runner: I really want to believe that Villeneuve understands and incorporates Scott's vision but I'm pretty sure I'll be disappointed. At least we'll always have that perfect tear drop of a movie.

    So Deckard engaged in bestiality with Rachel? Ugh. Thanks for ruining Blade Runner.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  203. Ray P says:
    @Seth Largo
    Prometheus wasn't so bad. I think Charlize's idiotic death scene retroactively made most people hate everything that had come before. Just fast forward through that scene, pretend she gets killed in a non-idiotic way, and the movie holds up pretty well.

    When the best character is an emotionless, snarky, faux-gay Android a film has problems.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  204. Ray P says:
    @Yak-15
    So many awful oversights in that film. They have amazing drones but still need to send guys into the cave complex?

    Aliens features the same inconsistency: salvagers use a remotely operated drone to inspect Ripley’s shuttle for threats before entering; marines do nothing like this later at the colony in a more dangerous situation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    Aliens features the same inconsistency: salvagers use a remotely operated drone to inspect Ripley’s shuttle for threats before entering; marines do nothing like this later at the colony in a more dangerous situation.
     
    I saw "Alien" and "Aliens" when they first came out, and the first thought I had w "Aliens" was how crappy and dumbed down it was compared to "Alien". "Alien" (1979) will always be the best of the lot. It had such horror in it that for the only time in my life I had to look at some scenes through my fingers. Good times!
    , @Hicks Lives!
    Presumably, the atmospheric/environmental effects that were interfering with the Marines' helmet-cams and sensors would have rendered a probe drone useless. Anyway, no one (except, secretly, Burke) really believed Ripley's story about there being genuine aliens on LV-426 at that point in the story.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  205. Hotcha says:
    @anonymous
    Synopsis: The Tyrell Corporation initiates cost-cutting measures on testosterone for all Replicants.

    "More Female Than Male is Our Motto..."

    Blade Runner II: Nancy Boy Edition

    Blade Runner II: The Gay Blade

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  206. whorefinder says: • Website
    @bomag

    ...himself was a replicant
     
    From what I've heard, the director/producers argued about this point, and it ended with an ambiguous depiction.

    Nah, they were always trying to go for the ambiguity. The argument was how many clues pushed it from ambiguous to definite. In the extended version there’s a dream sequence by Harrison Ford’s character that, when tied with something Edward James Olmos says and does, pretty much gives away the fact that Ford is a replicant. They were right to cut it.

    The producers thought that the audience needed a lot more handholding/explanation, so they forced a voiceover narration in there by Ford’s character. Allegedly, Ford agreed with Ridley Scott that the narration really hurt the movie, so Ford explains that his narration was so wooden because he was deliberately trying to get the producers not to use it. The producers, however, used it anyway. (Of course, Ford could have just done a crappy job on the narration and was covering for it via this explanation).

    Movie tip: in a semi-artistic movie any ambiguity you’re noticing is deliberate and planned. Inception is another great example: people argue about what the ending meant, but in reality the meaning of the ambiguous ending was simply to get people to argue about it.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  207. @Daniel Chieh
    Do you think that we can even push fiction nowadays with Christian morals, as "cucked" as it might seem sometime?

    Depictions of religious practice as a detail of every day life are probably in decline as less and less of the writers et al. have any religious creed.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  208. syonredux says:
    @Jack Hanson
    Eh? I think it was a pretty natural progression, on both sides. The Draka pulling the trigger first was because Gwen forced Erik's hand, and ties back to the Draka preponderance for domination. LaFarge found out cause Gwen got lazy, IIRC.

    In Drakon Gwen was a better villain than either of the protagonists, more interesting at least. She was also matched pretty well by Kenneth LaFarge, with her low tech and experience and his weaponry and inexperience matching up against each other pretty well. My first read through, I always thought the battles could have gone either way, and the second one she really got the worst of it with LaFarge.

    Eh? I think it was a pretty natural progression, on both sides. The Draka pulling the trigger first was because Gwen forced Erik’s hand, and ties back to the Draka preponderance for domination. LaFarge found out cause Gwen got lazy, IIRC.

    As I noted above, I’m talking about the world-building that got the series to that point: Draka Conquest of North Africa, Japan being vastly more powerful during the Eurasian War, Britain allowing the Draka an absurd level of independence in the early 19th century,Britain deciding to transport American Tories to South Africa, etc.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  209. syonredux says:
    @Seth Largo
    Prometheus wasn't so bad. I think Charlize's idiotic death scene retroactively made most people hate everything that had come before. Just fast forward through that scene, pretend she gets killed in a non-idiotic way, and the movie holds up pretty well.

    Prometheus wasn’t so bad. I think Charlize’s idiotic death scene retroactively made most people hate everything that had come before. Just fast forward through that scene, pretend she gets killed in a non-idiotic way, and the movie holds up pretty well.

    Don’t forget the pet-the-creepy-alien-cobra scene…..And then there’s the bit where the guy who’s mapping the alien site gets lost….

    Seems that Weyland hired his staff on the cheap.Must have used the future version of Craigslist …..

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ray P
    If the super-advanced engineers were found, Weyland wouldn't need his scientists. And if they weren't, who cares?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  210. Richard says:
    @Whoever

    I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas
     
    Anne of Green Gables and subsequent by Lucy Maud Montgomery
    Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder
    The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes
    Little Women Louisa May Alcott
    Camille by Alexandre Dumas, fils
    My Antonia by Willa Cather
    Wanda by Ouida
    Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

    And somewhat at a tangent, but stories that will stick with them and have them thinking:
    Green Mansions by W.H. Hudson
    A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes
    Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
    Requiem for a Wren by Nevil Shute

    And those are just off the top of my head. If I think about it a little more I could come up with lots of others. The Thomas Hardy novels have very interesting female protagonists.

    I highly recommend Poems Every Child Should Know. You can download it free from Gutenberg . There are some simply wonderful poems for children to learn and love in this volume.
    The collection was to be taught in school, with the children memorizing and reciting the poems. That's a fun way to spend time with your children or grandchildren.
    If your grandchildren learn Felicia Hemans' "Casabianca," "The Captain's Daughter" by James T. Fields or Longfellow's "The Village Blacksmith," they will have something that will stick to their ribs, so to speak.
    And if you think memorizing poems will be dull and boring for kids, try this stanza from "The Captain's Daughter":

    So we shuddered there in silence,
    For the stoutest held his breath,
    While the hungry sea was roaring
    And the breakers talked with Death.


    Don't tell me you can't give those lines a dramatic reading that will hold your grandchildren rapt.

    You’re the first person I’ve ever known to suggest “Madame Bovary” as a girl’s book, alongside “Anne of Green Gables” and “Little House on the Prairie”. I suspect I know why, but I also think the intended lesson would be lost on young readers, as it is on many adults.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  211. syonredux says:
    @Jack Hanson
    US Tech, or Alliance of Free Countries, or whatever they were called, was technologically advanced as well. The Alliance was more mechanically inclined, while the Draka were more biologically inclined. Its why Gwen is a biological masterpiece, but Ken LaFarge is a cyborg: different paths.

    I don't find the North Africa thing unrealistic at all - the French did it IRL. I don't see it being out of the reach for the Dominion.

    As far as the Lancers go, the entire Atlantic seaboard was wiped out and the northern jet streams were disrupted. I don't think the US was in any position to invade anywhere. I keep meaning to read his short story about Erik King hunting in Galveston with a young Robert Howard as a guide.

    Conquistadors was a fun novel, but tended towards Stirling's tendency to lean hard on ethnic stereotyping in place of actual character development when he's not feeling creative.

    US Tech, or Alliance of Free Countries, or whatever they were called, was technologically advanced as well. The Alliance was more mechanically inclined, while the Draka were more biologically inclined. Its why Gwen is a biological masterpiece, but Ken LaFarge is a cyborg: different paths.

    My reference was to the Eurasian War….Stirling had to give the Draka a big technological edge in order to have the Draka conquer Europe. As I said, thumb on the scale….

    I don’t find the North Africa thing unrealistic at all – the French did it IRL. I don’t see it being out of the reach for the Dominion.

    Sure it was. They had to transport everything from Southern Africa, not merely across the Med….And we also have to buy the notion that the UK would allow the Draka to administer North Africa…..Basically Stirling had the Draka conquer North Africa at a ridiculously early stage because he needed to give them their equivalent of the First Messenian War…

    As far as the Lancers go, the entire Atlantic seaboard was wiped out and the northern jet streams were disrupted. I don’t think the US was in any position to invade anywhere

    .

    Which leaves Texas, Arizona, Southern CA…..A conquering army would have set out…

    I keep meaning to read his short story about Erik King hunting in Galveston with a young Robert Howard as a guide.

    I enjoyed it.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  212. Clyde says:
    @Ray P
    Aliens features the same inconsistency: salvagers use a remotely operated drone to inspect Ripley's shuttle for threats before entering; marines do nothing like this later at the colony in a more dangerous situation.

    Aliens features the same inconsistency: salvagers use a remotely operated drone to inspect Ripley’s shuttle for threats before entering; marines do nothing like this later at the colony in a more dangerous situation.

    I saw “Alien” and “Aliens” when they first came out, and the first thought I had w “Aliens” was how crappy and dumbed down it was compared to “Alien”. “Alien” (1979) will always be the best of the lot. It had such horror in it that for the only time in my life I had to look at some scenes through my fingers. Good times!

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    The studio made him adopt a "happy" ending, but originally, Scott had the alien kill Ripley, sit in her chair -- and then speak English in her voice to bypass Earth security. This would have been consistent with the theme that it was always one step ahead.
    , @Anonymous

    I saw “Alien” and “Aliens” when they first came out, and the first thought I had w “Aliens” was how crappy and dumbed down it was compared to “Alien”. “Alien” (1979) will always be the best of the lot. It had such horror in it that for the only time in my life I had to look at some scenes through my fingers. Good times!
     
    Not so. "Alien" is the sci-fi equivalent of a chimpanzee hurling paint at a canvas. "Aliens" is actually somewhat clever by comparison.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  213. Ray P says:
    @syonredux

    Prometheus wasn’t so bad. I think Charlize’s idiotic death scene retroactively made most people hate everything that had come before. Just fast forward through that scene, pretend she gets killed in a non-idiotic way, and the movie holds up pretty well.
     
    Don't forget the pet-the-creepy-alien-cobra scene.....And then there's the bit where the guy who's mapping the alien site gets lost....

    Seems that Weyland hired his staff on the cheap.Must have used the future version of Craigslist .....

    If the super-advanced engineers were found, Weyland wouldn’t need his scientists. And if they weren’t, who cares?

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    If the super-advanced engineers were found, Weyland wouldn’t need his scientists. And if they weren’t, who cares?
     
    Wouldn't he want competent people to help him, you know, locate the Engineers?

    But that's thinking logically.....And Scott just wanted some Crystal Lake-style cannon fodder.......

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  214. syonredux says:
    @Ray P
    If the super-advanced engineers were found, Weyland wouldn't need his scientists. And if they weren't, who cares?

    If the super-advanced engineers were found, Weyland wouldn’t need his scientists. And if they weren’t, who cares?

    Wouldn’t he want competent people to help him, you know, locate the Engineers?

    But that’s thinking logically…..And Scott just wanted some Crystal Lake-style cannon fodder…….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ray P
    Locating the engineers involved just happening to descend through the atmosphere and fly past their base. No orbital mapping, radar, just eyeballs. Exploring the interior mostly proceeded by prodding things with fingers.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  215. black sea says:
    @res
    Maybe he was watching the news?

    Maybe he was watching the news?

    Outstanding. Bonus points for you.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  216. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Clyde

    Aliens features the same inconsistency: salvagers use a remotely operated drone to inspect Ripley’s shuttle for threats before entering; marines do nothing like this later at the colony in a more dangerous situation.
     
    I saw "Alien" and "Aliens" when they first came out, and the first thought I had w "Aliens" was how crappy and dumbed down it was compared to "Alien". "Alien" (1979) will always be the best of the lot. It had such horror in it that for the only time in my life I had to look at some scenes through my fingers. Good times!

    The studio made him adopt a “happy” ending, but originally, Scott had the alien kill Ripley, sit in her chair — and then speak English in her voice to bypass Earth security. This would have been consistent with the theme that it was always one step ahead.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  217. @Ray P
    Aliens features the same inconsistency: salvagers use a remotely operated drone to inspect Ripley's shuttle for threats before entering; marines do nothing like this later at the colony in a more dangerous situation.

    Presumably, the atmospheric/environmental effects that were interfering with the Marines’ helmet-cams and sensors would have rendered a probe drone useless. Anyway, no one (except, secretly, Burke) really believed Ripley’s story about there being genuine aliens on LV-426 at that point in the story.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  218. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Clyde

    Aliens features the same inconsistency: salvagers use a remotely operated drone to inspect Ripley’s shuttle for threats before entering; marines do nothing like this later at the colony in a more dangerous situation.
     
    I saw "Alien" and "Aliens" when they first came out, and the first thought I had w "Aliens" was how crappy and dumbed down it was compared to "Alien". "Alien" (1979) will always be the best of the lot. It had such horror in it that for the only time in my life I had to look at some scenes through my fingers. Good times!

    I saw “Alien” and “Aliens” when they first came out, and the first thought I had w “Aliens” was how crappy and dumbed down it was compared to “Alien”. “Alien” (1979) will always be the best of the lot. It had such horror in it that for the only time in my life I had to look at some scenes through my fingers. Good times!

    Not so. “Alien” is the sci-fi equivalent of a chimpanzee hurling paint at a canvas. “Aliens” is actually somewhat clever by comparison.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  219. guest says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    They aren't robots. You are missing the layers to Ridley Scott's film.

    The replicants are genetically engineered humans, dumped out of a tank and engineered for a 4-year lifespan ("Wake up! Time to die!"). They have animal DNA spliced in: Roy is a wolf; Priss is a raccoon; Leon's a turtle; Zhora is a snake. It took me a bit longer to figure out Rachel though they're all pretty obvious actually. She dresses in fur, follows Deckard all around, and is loyal to the death. The other hint is in the Voight-Kampff test: her trigger is the reference to boiled dog, just like Leon lost it with Holden's turtle story.

    The real kicker is Deckard himself: he's a shark who loves the sensation of blood in water.

    Scott's point is that the capacity for moral choice is what makes us human. Thus, Roy makes it to the plan of salvation by saving Deckard's life. Scott incorporates explicitly Christian imagery, with a nail through Roy's palm and a white dove. Scott's from a different era. I doubt the sequel will be as profound or spiritual.

    Speaking of dogs, they are under a genetic selection pressure cooker which we need to dial back. Most dogs are so far removed from their predatory origins they won't eat raw meat, which is good because we don't want them hunting and killing our baby humans or herd animals. On the other hand, golden retrievers are being bred for so much amiability they're becoming big stupid fluffy dolls with no homing instinct. Most dog breeds would rapidly die off without humans. If we ever wanted to bring the dingos back into the fold, it wouldn't take long.

    Can we breed dogs to the point that their brains can figure out moral agency? I guess we'll find out. Now I'm getting into Daniel Dennett's "spectrum of consciousness" theory which apparently has David Chalmers so upset. Interestingly, Daniel Dennett's the one who works with his hands and throws a huge Christmas party where he enthusiastically leads his guests in the carols. Chalmers is the one who gets invited to TED talks.

    Back to Blade Runner: I really want to believe that Villeneuve understands and incorporates Scott's vision but I'm pretty sure I'll be disappointed. At least we'll always have that perfect tear drop of a movie.

    I like saying “robot” better than “replicant,” which is, I think, the term the movie uses. Which may be misleading, but the important point is the Blade Runner replicants aren’t real humans. They’re synthetic organisms designed to look and act like humans, but I don’t consider them alive in the true sense. They’re bio-machines, if you will.

    I like what Scott did with it, thematically, but I always return to my quibble above. If they’re just workers and you’re afraid of them rebelling, and you’re going to plan ahead enough to give them only four years of life, why bother making them so damn humanlike? With superpowers to make them really hard to catch should they ever get out? Why not make them human enough to work for you, then stop? Okay. you can have Sean Young as a pet, but with the rest maybe we could avoid Big Questions like “What does it truly mean to be human?” Look to the bottom line.

    Dennett, by the way, is a blind alley. There’s no spectrum of consciousness with him, because he doesn’t actually believe in consciousness. His way of not outright denying it and thus making himself appear foolish is to smear out the boundaries. “Hey, consciousness is all, like relative, man”

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    Dennett says consciousness depends on having a sufficiently advanced neural network. A functioning human is fully conscious. So is a dog, but not conscious like a human.

    When the wetware breaks down, we lose consciousness. Apparently lots of people are uncomfortable with this, so they theorize about a Mind/Body dichotomy which is not supported by any evidence.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  220. @Pat Boyle
    Some movie directors are good with actors, others are good at organizing complex plots, still others have a way with suspense. Ridley Scott' s forte has always been set decoration.

    His movies always have great costumes and sets. Many of his big ticket films don't make a whole lot of sense because he just doesn't seem to care about plot. I was blown away by his first major movie 'The Duelists'. I was totally convinced by the setting. It was beautiful to look at and it convinced me that I was seeing Napoleonic Europe. In his subsequent quasi-historical films the same qualities are also seen.

    So his latest film 'Prometheus' also looks great. Unfortunately the actors do loony things and act strangely. Scott doesn't seem to care. His movie about the crusades was similar - great attention to visual detail but a very muddled and inappropriate drama.

    Scott IMHO got lucky with Blade Runner. It became very famous but has not been very influential. The ideas of Blade Runner have not gained traction in films. Cameron's break through film 'Terminator' has spawned a number of sequels, a TV series and who knows what else. But Blade Runner has had no sequels or characters who have suddenly shown up in other films. Everyone knows all of the 'Star Wars' characters. Just last week someone on this blog accused me of trying to be C3P0.

    But Blade Runner has had almost no influence outside of the original movie. Ridley Scott is not a good director for science-fiction despite his two big successes. Good science-fiction relies on either ideas or action and that isn't Scott's strong suit.

    So I'm glad to see a new young director at the helm.

    ‘Blade Runner has had almost no influence outside of the original movie’.
    Say what?
    It’s extremely influential. For sure one of the top 5 or so influential sci fi movies.
    Maybe that influence comes across more in fiction books (cyberpunk), sci-fi art, video games, japanese anime, electronic music even, as well as more traditional nerd fare like paper RPGs (Shadowrun) (how many movies have inspired a complete RPG system?), but even in plain ol’ fashioned movies I lose count of the times I see a cityscape in a sci-fi movie and think ‘ah yeah, whoever did that is a fan Blade Runner’.

    I also disagree with the guy saying hollywood ‘corruped’ the book it was based on here. Basing a plot on another’s story but in another light is hardly ‘hollywood’, it’s as old as storytelling. (it’s not like it ever claimed to be a faithful attempt at creating the book on screen, either). ‘Corrupting’ might be an appropriate phrase to use if the new work is irredeemably bad, or it’s a historical story and the facts are wildly distorted (now THAT is something Hollywood is good at), but not here IMO.

    Also the part of Steve’s comment about Edward Olomos being the last chicano in an otherwise very white cast is kinda ironic as one of the ‘prophetic future noir’ elements mentioned in reviews of the original, is the very mixed ethnicity of the miserable throning crowds in the city.
    Though maybe that element will be kept in the remake (which would be interesting). Or even… ‘enhanced’

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Cyberpunk predates Blade Runner. Remember, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? came out in the 60s. I have a hard time thinking Neuromancer, for instance, wasn't inspired by the "New Wave" of sci-fi literature.

    You can thank Blade Runner for popularizing it, maybe.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  221. Holden says:
    @guest
    I feel the need to point out that among the robots only Sean Young--who didn't know she was a robot--and Rutger Hauer--who desperately wanted not to be a robot (or at least a robot with a short lifespan)--were the only ones they romanticized. Hauer's yearning not to expire, which was entire impetus for the plot, is a fairly strong pro-life message, though he wasn't actually alive.

    I feel the need to point out that among the robots only Sean Young–who didn’t know she was a robot–and Rutger Hauer–who desperately wanted not to be a robot (or at least a robot with a short lifespan)–were the only ones they romanticized. Hauer’s yearning not to expire, which was entire impetus for the plot, is a fairly strong pro-life message, though he wasn’t actually alive.

    True enough. However, press releases for the film stated pretty explicitly that the replicants were artificially-created humans, not human-like robots like the “Andies” from Dick’s novel.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    I spoke about this above, but I just like the word robot. The Blade Runner thingies aren't robots strictly speaking , but rather synthetic humanoid organisms. I still prefer to think of them as machines, though I guess technically they're "alive."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  222. guest says:
    @Holden

    I feel the need to point out that among the robots only Sean Young–who didn’t know she was a robot–and Rutger Hauer–who desperately wanted not to be a robot (or at least a robot with a short lifespan)–were the only ones they romanticized. Hauer’s yearning not to expire, which was entire impetus for the plot, is a fairly strong pro-life message, though he wasn’t actually alive.

     

    True enough. However, press releases for the film stated pretty explicitly that the replicants were artificially-created humans, not human-like robots like the "Andies" from Dick's novel.

    I spoke about this above, but I just like the word robot. The Blade Runner thingies aren’t robots strictly speaking , but rather synthetic humanoid organisms. I still prefer to think of them as machines, though I guess technically they’re “alive.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  223. guest says:
    @inselaffen
    'Blade Runner has had almost no influence outside of the original movie'.
    Say what?
    It's extremely influential. For sure one of the top 5 or so influential sci fi movies.
    Maybe that influence comes across more in fiction books (cyberpunk), sci-fi art, video games, japanese anime, electronic music even, as well as more traditional nerd fare like paper RPGs (Shadowrun) (how many movies have inspired a complete RPG system?), but even in plain ol' fashioned movies I lose count of the times I see a cityscape in a sci-fi movie and think 'ah yeah, whoever did that is a fan Blade Runner'.

    I also disagree with the guy saying hollywood 'corruped' the book it was based on here. Basing a plot on another's story but in another light is hardly 'hollywood', it's as old as storytelling. (it's not like it ever claimed to be a faithful attempt at creating the book on screen, either). 'Corrupting' might be an appropriate phrase to use if the new work is irredeemably bad, or it's a historical story and the facts are wildly distorted (now THAT is something Hollywood is good at), but not here IMO.

    Also the part of Steve's comment about Edward Olomos being the last chicano in an otherwise very white cast is kinda ironic as one of the 'prophetic future noir' elements mentioned in reviews of the original, is the very mixed ethnicity of the miserable throning crowds in the city.
    Though maybe that element will be kept in the remake (which would be interesting). Or even... 'enhanced'

    Cyberpunk predates Blade Runner. Remember, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? came out in the 60s. I have a hard time thinking Neuromancer, for instance, wasn’t inspired by the “New Wave” of sci-fi literature.

    You can thank Blade Runner for popularizing it, maybe.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  224. guest says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    They aren't robots. You are missing the layers to Ridley Scott's film.

    The replicants are genetically engineered humans, dumped out of a tank and engineered for a 4-year lifespan ("Wake up! Time to die!"). They have animal DNA spliced in: Roy is a wolf; Priss is a raccoon; Leon's a turtle; Zhora is a snake. It took me a bit longer to figure out Rachel though they're all pretty obvious actually. She dresses in fur, follows Deckard all around, and is loyal to the death. The other hint is in the Voight-Kampff test: her trigger is the reference to boiled dog, just like Leon lost it with Holden's turtle story.

    The real kicker is Deckard himself: he's a shark who loves the sensation of blood in water.

    Scott's point is that the capacity for moral choice is what makes us human. Thus, Roy makes it to the plan of salvation by saving Deckard's life. Scott incorporates explicitly Christian imagery, with a nail through Roy's palm and a white dove. Scott's from a different era. I doubt the sequel will be as profound or spiritual.

    Speaking of dogs, they are under a genetic selection pressure cooker which we need to dial back. Most dogs are so far removed from their predatory origins they won't eat raw meat, which is good because we don't want them hunting and killing our baby humans or herd animals. On the other hand, golden retrievers are being bred for so much amiability they're becoming big stupid fluffy dolls with no homing instinct. Most dog breeds would rapidly die off without humans. If we ever wanted to bring the dingos back into the fold, it wouldn't take long.

    Can we breed dogs to the point that their brains can figure out moral agency? I guess we'll find out. Now I'm getting into Daniel Dennett's "spectrum of consciousness" theory which apparently has David Chalmers so upset. Interestingly, Daniel Dennett's the one who works with his hands and throws a huge Christmas party where he enthusiastically leads his guests in the carols. Chalmers is the one who gets invited to TED talks.

    Back to Blade Runner: I really want to believe that Villeneuve understands and incorporates Scott's vision but I'm pretty sure I'll be disappointed. At least we'll always have that perfect tear drop of a movie.

    It occurs to me I called them bio-machines but still maintained they weren’t alive, which makes no sense. They are alive, I guess.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  225. FPD72 says:
    @Michaeloh59
    Have enjoyed the commentary regarding films and literature. Can anyone suggest films or literature that teaches pride in Western, British, and American Civilization? I'm thinking of the vivid historical novels that our fathers and grandfathers were given, and any non-cultural Marxist non-hate whitey film adaptations? I am particularly interested in material for girls and young ladies which encourage them to develop healthy ideas about themselves, their tribe, and their history as well as material giving them an alternative model to the fame whore Kardashian/slut type.

    Or maybe a better way to ask my question is this: what would you recommend for your kids and grandkids, in the way of reading, tv, films, or other activities to red pill them and develop and alternative personality to the toxic, self hating magical thinking morons our culture aims to produce? I am going to start spending a couple hours a week with the grandkids 7,10,12 and wonder how best to utilize this time with children of conventional, non red pulled parents. So, suggestions please!

    “How the West Was Won” is a really good movie for presenting the American myth of the settling of the American west in epic form. Post-modern audiences will have a difficult time viewing it in any manner but ironically, but to my pre-adolescent self watching the film’s original release it was fantastic. I was greatly saddened when “Tom Jones” won the Academy Award for Best Movie.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    I was greatly saddened when “Tom Jones” won the Academy Award for Best Movie.
     
    I dunno. Tom Jones had Susannah York in it: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2011/jan/16/susannah-york-obituary
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  226. Ray P says:
    @syonredux

    If the super-advanced engineers were found, Weyland wouldn’t need his scientists. And if they weren’t, who cares?
     
    Wouldn't he want competent people to help him, you know, locate the Engineers?

    But that's thinking logically.....And Scott just wanted some Crystal Lake-style cannon fodder.......

    Locating the engineers involved just happening to descend through the atmosphere and fly past their base. No orbital mapping, radar, just eyeballs. Exploring the interior mostly proceeded by prodding things with fingers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Locating the engineers involved just happening to descend through the atmosphere and fly past their base. No orbital mapping, radar, just eyeballs. Exploring the interior mostly proceeded by prodding things with fingers.
     
    And Weyland didn't know that until they got there. For all he knew, they might have had to do extensive digging, surveying, etc.

    As I said, the incompetent crew is there to provide bodies to hack up. Crystal Lake Camp counselors....in Space!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  227. @guest
    I like saying "robot" better than "replicant," which is, I think, the term the movie uses. Which may be misleading, but the important point is the Blade Runner replicants aren't real humans. They're synthetic organisms designed to look and act like humans, but I don't consider them alive in the true sense. They're bio-machines, if you will.

    I like what Scott did with it, thematically, but I always return to my quibble above. If they're just workers and you're afraid of them rebelling, and you're going to plan ahead enough to give them only four years of life, why bother making them so damn humanlike? With superpowers to make them really hard to catch should they ever get out? Why not make them human enough to work for you, then stop? Okay. you can have Sean Young as a pet, but with the rest maybe we could avoid Big Questions like "What does it truly mean to be human?" Look to the bottom line.

    Dennett, by the way, is a blind alley. There's no spectrum of consciousness with him, because he doesn't actually believe in consciousness. His way of not outright denying it and thus making himself appear foolish is to smear out the boundaries. "Hey, consciousness is all, like relative, man"

    Dennett says consciousness depends on having a sufficiently advanced neural network. A functioning human is fully conscious. So is a dog, but not conscious like a human.

    When the wetware breaks down, we lose consciousness. Apparently lots of people are uncomfortable with this, so they theorize about a Mind/Body dichotomy which is not supported by any evidence.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Dog consciousness is not exactly like human consciousness but there is no bright line. Humans are particularly fancy mammals in the brain dept. but they are not really in a separate category although we like to think that we are special.
    , @guest
    People are uncomfortable for irrational reasons, for instance because the idea that they're really just mindless biological machines frightens them. But why focus on them? Let's talk about what makes Dennett uncomfortable. He is a thoroughgoing materialist, and will tolerate no compromise with immaterial mind. Therefore, he denies the existence of consciousness. Simple as that.

    The whole spectrum of consciousness business is neither here nor there on the subject. I have no problem believing non-humans are aware, or that different brains lead to different kinds of thinking and different degrees of consciousness. But what you must understand is that when Dennett speaks of degrees of consciousness, or however he puts it, he might as well be speaking of degrees of flugglebastropffft. Because the thing he calls "consciousness" is not what normal humans understand by the term. He denies the existence of the latter, and whatever he has in his head for the former, pretending they're the same is what keeps him from being laughed off the public stage as a consciousness denier.

    He'll tell you this, too, in so many words. I read him say something like merely setting out with the idea of discovering a definite meaning to the term "consciousness" is a dead end. Why? Wouldn't you at least want to distinguish that which is conscious from that which isn't? For Dennett, no, you wouldn't, because there's no clear difference between consciousness and unconsciousness, because consciousness does not exist. He spends his time talking about dogs versus humans instead of humans versus rocks for this reason.

    As for the mind/body distinction not being supported by evidence, we all have subjective experiences of consciousness. Dennett doesn't believe we actually have any such experiences. To him they are delusions.

    Assuming for the moment they actually exist, they must have a physical explanation, if you're a materialist. If science can't explain them, now, well, that doesn't mean it can't possibly. Dennett is not content to wait for science to explain them, or to sit idly by as people set out to explain them. He'd rather deny they exist, for fear of Mind.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  228. Bill says:
    @Steve Sailer
    The hockey movie Slapshot was written by a lady.

    One who appreciates masculinity, evidently.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  229. Jack D says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    Dennett says consciousness depends on having a sufficiently advanced neural network. A functioning human is fully conscious. So is a dog, but not conscious like a human.

    When the wetware breaks down, we lose consciousness. Apparently lots of people are uncomfortable with this, so they theorize about a Mind/Body dichotomy which is not supported by any evidence.

    Dog consciousness is not exactly like human consciousness but there is no bright line. Humans are particularly fancy mammals in the brain dept. but they are not really in a separate category although we like to think that we are special.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  230. @FPD72
    "How the West Was Won" is a really good movie for presenting the American myth of the settling of the American west in epic form. Post-modern audiences will have a difficult time viewing it in any manner but ironically, but to my pre-adolescent self watching the film's original release it was fantastic. I was greatly saddened when "Tom Jones" won the Academy Award for Best Movie.

    I was greatly saddened when “Tom Jones” won the Academy Award for Best Movie.

    I dunno. Tom Jones had Susannah York in it: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2011/jan/16/susannah-york-obituary

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  231. guest says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic
    Dennett says consciousness depends on having a sufficiently advanced neural network. A functioning human is fully conscious. So is a dog, but not conscious like a human.

    When the wetware breaks down, we lose consciousness. Apparently lots of people are uncomfortable with this, so they theorize about a Mind/Body dichotomy which is not supported by any evidence.

    People are uncomfortable for irrational reasons, for instance because the idea that they’re really just mindless biological machines frightens them. But why focus on them? Let’s talk about what makes Dennett uncomfortable. He is a thoroughgoing materialist, and will tolerate no compromise with immaterial mind. Therefore, he denies the existence of consciousness. Simple as that.

    The whole spectrum of consciousness business is neither here nor there on the subject. I have no problem believing non-humans are aware, or that different brains lead to different kinds of thinking and different degrees of consciousness. But what you must understand is that when Dennett speaks of degrees of consciousness, or however he puts it, he might as well be speaking of degrees of flugglebastropffft. Because the thing he calls “consciousness” is not what normal humans understand by the term. He denies the existence of the latter, and whatever he has in his head for the former, pretending they’re the same is what keeps him from being laughed off the public stage as a consciousness denier.

    He’ll tell you this, too, in so many words. I read him say something like merely setting out with the idea of discovering a definite meaning to the term “consciousness” is a dead end. Why? Wouldn’t you at least want to distinguish that which is conscious from that which isn’t? For Dennett, no, you wouldn’t, because there’s no clear difference between consciousness and unconsciousness, because consciousness does not exist. He spends his time talking about dogs versus humans instead of humans versus rocks for this reason.

    As for the mind/body distinction not being supported by evidence, we all have subjective experiences of consciousness. Dennett doesn’t believe we actually have any such experiences. To him they are delusions.

    Assuming for the moment they actually exist, they must have a physical explanation, if you’re a materialist. If science can’t explain them, now, well, that doesn’t mean it can’t possibly. Dennett is not content to wait for science to explain them, or to sit idly by as people set out to explain them. He’d rather deny they exist, for fear of Mind.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  232. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Autochthon
    Having read many of Dick's novels and suffered through many of their adaptations, I observe the phenomenon is ubiquitous, perhaps universal: these films are in many cases so different from Dick's novels it becomes difficult to argue they are adaptations.

    I watched Bladerunner when I was a child, wholly unfamiliar with Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. When I later read the novel, as an adult, I had learned of the film's connection to it, but I was glad I' had essentially forgotten the film, so nothing about the book would be spoilt. Yet even the extremely vague impressions of the film I did retain told me the book I was reading was nothing like the film I had seen. Later, I watched the film again, and confirmed I was correct.

    I understand Mr. Dick was pleased with Bladerunner (who wouldn't be pleased with the money it doubtless made for him?!); I wonder to what extent novelists prefer adaptations inspired by their work not undertake the usually impossible task of replicating the novel in cinematic form, but instead merely draw inspiration from the novel to do something more suited to cinema? Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a very cerebral thing; a great deal of it is to do with the characters' own thoughts, and it is often intentionally unclear what is being imagined and what is actually occurring. Such techniques do not often translate well to the screen, which provides viewers less opportunity to slowly mull what is occurring and appreciate ambiguous or varied interpretations the author may be offering....

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a very cerebral thing; a great deal of it is to do with the characters’ own thoughts, and it is often intentionally unclear what is being imagined and what is actually occurring. Such techniques do not often translate well to the screen

    Dick’s novels are virtually unfilmable. Blade Runner, considered on its own merits, is a fine movie. It simplifies Dick’s ideas to an extreme degree but there’s no other way to do a Philip K. Dick movie. I think of it as a movie inspired by Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? rather than as an adaptation.

    The movie is to a very large degree an exercise in style. The style is so impressive that it gets away with it. That’s also true of Scott’s other great movie, The Duellists.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    Dick’s novels are virtually unfilmable. Blade Runner, considered on its own merits, is a fine movie. It simplifies Dick’s ideas to an extreme degree but there’s no other way to do a Philip K. Dick movie.
     
    Dunno. I think that things like the Buster Friendly Show and Mercerism would have been quite cinematic....
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  233. syonredux says:
    @Ray P
    Locating the engineers involved just happening to descend through the atmosphere and fly past their base. No orbital mapping, radar, just eyeballs. Exploring the interior mostly proceeded by prodding things with fingers.

    Locating the engineers involved just happening to descend through the atmosphere and fly past their base. No orbital mapping, radar, just eyeballs. Exploring the interior mostly proceeded by prodding things with fingers.

    And Weyland didn’t know that until they got there. For all he knew, they might have had to do extensive digging, surveying, etc.

    As I said, the incompetent crew is there to provide bodies to hack up. Crystal Lake Camp counselors….in Space!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  234. syonredux says:
    @dfordoom

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a very cerebral thing; a great deal of it is to do with the characters’ own thoughts, and it is often intentionally unclear what is being imagined and what is actually occurring. Such techniques do not often translate well to the screen
     
    Dick's novels are virtually unfilmable. Blade Runner, considered on its own merits, is a fine movie. It simplifies Dick's ideas to an extreme degree but there's no other way to do a Philip K. Dick movie. I think of it as a movie inspired by Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? rather than as an adaptation.

    The movie is to a very large degree an exercise in style. The style is so impressive that it gets away with it. That's also true of Scott's other great movie, The Duellists.

    Dick’s novels are virtually unfilmable. Blade Runner, considered on its own merits, is a fine movie. It simplifies Dick’s ideas to an extreme degree but there’s no other way to do a Philip K. Dick movie.

    Dunno. I think that things like the Buster Friendly Show and Mercerism would have been quite cinematic….

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  235. Jefferson says:
    @Barnard
    OT: https://www.si.com/tech-media/2017/05/09/charles-barkley-racism-american-race-series

    Quote from Barkley:

    “If you are black on television, you are probably going to be some kind of thug, gangster or portrayed in a negative light,” Barkley said.” If you are some type of Muslim, you are going to be blowing stuff up. If you are Hispanic you are going to be some type of gangbanger. I’ve felt like this for years.”
     
    What on earth is he watching on TV? How many black sitcoms have there been since the Cosby show?

    “If you are black on television, you are probably going to be some kind of thug, gangster or portrayed in a negative light,”

    If Blacks are portrayed as thugs on television why are they completely absent from home burglary commercials?

    Rosa Parks had her home broken into and the burglar was not a White male.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
A simple remedy for income stagnation