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A journalistic perennial is to dig up some arcane field that requires high skills but doesn’t pay particularly well and complain about underrepresentation of blacks.

For example, Amy Harmon recently complained that less than once percent of the tenured math professors at research universities are black. She focused on the example of one black male professor who was moving from Purdue U. to Pomona College, supposedly due to microaggressions. (That the professor is a Southern California native who probably likes the weather at Pomona more than in northern Indiana, and that Pomona is the highest ranked small liberal arts college in all of California was considered extraneous).

One issue is that very few national journalists understand just how few blacks there are at the stratospheric levels of IQ, and the logical implication: if one institution goes all out to recruit them, it means fewer at other institutions, some of which might offer a better life.

Anyway, if you look up the resumes of blacks who appear to be legitimately top drawer, you notice that they have options in life.

For example, Roger W. Ferguson Jr., got his Harvard Ph.D. in economics in 1981, then went to work for elite New York law firm Davis Polk & Wardwell, then became a partner at McKinsey consulting. In 1999 he became Vice Chairman of the Federal Reserve. He was one of the leading candidates to replace Alan Greenspan as top dog, but left after Ben Bernanke got the job.

Now Ferguson heads TIAA CREF, the big (trillion dollars) and quite respectable (hopefully) pension fund for college professors. He got paid $17 million in 2017.

He’s on the board of Alphabet (Google). And he might be Fed Chairman under a Democratic president.

Corporate America would love to clone Dr. Ferguson.

Or James Manyika, a black guy from Zimbabwe who got a Ph.D. from Oxford in electrical engineering, worked at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and taught engineering at Oxford. Clearly, blacks are underrepresented at JPL and teaching engineering. But Dr. Manyika hasn’t stuck around in those fields because for the last 25 years he’s been with McKinsey Consulting at their prestigious San Francisco (Silicon Valley) office.

He’s now Chairman and Director, McKinsey Global Institute, and Senior Partner, San Francisco. His life appears to be about 52 weeks per year of what other people of similar backgrounds experience one week per year at Davos. McKinsey’s website explains:

James was appointed by President Barack Obama to serve as vice chair of the Global Development Council at the White House (2012–16) and by Commerce Secretaries to the US Commerce Department’s Digital Economy Board of Advisers (2016–17), as well as the National Innovation Advisory Board (2010–12) as part of the America Competes Act. He serves on the boards of the Council on Foreign Relations, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the Markle Foundation.

James is interested in the power of technology to positively transform society and is a member of advisory boards of Oxford Internet Institute, MIT’s Initiative on the Digital Economy, Khan Academy, and has been on other university advisory boards. He is on the standing committee for the Stanford-based 100 Year Study on Artificial Intelligence, a fellow at DeepMind, and a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

He is a trustee of the Aspen Institute and Harvard’s Hutchins Center which includes the WEB Du Bois Institute for African and African-American Research.

Despite the worries of Amy Harmon types that blacks are under-represented in Dr. Manyika’s old, more technical jobs, he seems to be enjoying a substantially more kick-ass life than if he were still grading engineering problem sets.

 
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  1. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:

    Have you seen Mr. Ferguson interviewed ? He’s paid 10 mm a year at TIAA, unclear what that role involves. More power to him of course.

  2. I am honestly impressed by people that have the time, much less, energy, to be involved in so many organizations. That includes ordinary people where I live that have so much going on, and have their children involved in all kinds of things too.

    I guess I’m a low-energy guy, except on the internet. How these people did all this activity before Red Bull is a mystery to me.

    … he seems to be enjoying a substantially more kick ass life than if he were still grading engineering problem sets.

    Indeed, since they must be hand-graded – tedious indeed. Since you were gonna see this anyway by the 100th comment or so, here we go:

    • Replies: @OFWHAP
    , @bomag
  3. El Dato says:

    James is interested in the power of technology to positively transform society and is a member of advisory boards of Oxford Internet Institute, MIT’s Initiative on the Digital Economy, Khan Academy, and has been on other university advisory boards. He is on the standing committee for the Stanford-based 100 Year Study on Artificial Intelligence, a fellow at DeepMind, and a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

    How does that work? Are these serious side jobs or plaque dispenser devices? How can one find the time jetting between the meetings, venues and lunches while still keeping up with what’s going on? I mean, if you are on the “Stanford-based 100 Year Study on Artificial Intelligence” you are supposed to get a few hours of reading, writing and networking in every week, and just for that subject — which delivers new things of interest far too frequently at this point in time.

    IEEE Xplore lists three papers from the 90s

    https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/author/38276204700

    • Replies: @Clyde
  4. songbird says:

    I always thought that black conservatives like Walter E. Williams and Thomas Sowell really had it made.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  5. Let us speak bluntly. Amy Harmon is worried about academia because that’s the only other area were she could get a job. She wouldn’t be competing against Dr. Manyika or Mr. Ferguson for Fed Chair.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    , @PiltdownMan
  6. Andy says:

    On a more general level, it’s probably bad for a society if its highest IQ people are working in finance instead of trying to solve the hard scientific or engineering problems

    • Agree: Old Prude
  7. @songbird

    I like those guys, Songbird – great Libertarian thinkers both. I wonder what Amy Harmon has to say about them. Is there enough diversity in the Libertard-Pundit space?

    BTW, Steve, now that the pictures are up, even though I reckon the engineer from Rhodesia is smarter vs the Big-Finance guy, the Big-Finance guy LOOKS much smarter. Perhaps Dr. Manyika should get a set of glasses with 3/8″ plate glass to make sure taxi drivers will stop for him. I’m sure he’s thought of that though, and keeps a pair handy.

  8. Roger Ferguson was a key figure in the destruction of AIG during the 2008 Crisis. He is an incompetent buffoon of Biblical proportions.

    How he has evaded responsibility for his epic malfeasance is a testament to the slack afforded all financial executives and minority types in particular (see Stan O’Neill).

    Any sentient observer of the financial industry understands this. Wake up!

  9. OFWHAP says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    That includes ordinary people where I live that have so much going on, and have their children involved in all kinds of things too.

    It’s easy. Just hire nannies (some people even have live-in nannies) to make sure your kids wake up, have food, and make it to/from school and extracurricular activities.

  10. “A journalistic perennial is to dig up some arcane field that requires high skills but doesn’t pay particularly well and complain about underrepresentation of blacks.”

    Just about all of the normal fields have already been filled with the unwarranted representation of blacks. What’s left but the arcane ones to defile?

  11. There’s nothing strikingly “superelite” about these two guys. They got admitted to elite schools and got PhDs, but that doesn’t mean anything anymore. Edray Goins, the mathematician, at least has some publications in peer-reviewed math journals, not all with co-authors.

    A really interesting article would be about an African American that posted a high score on something where there’s no way to get help and the evaluators can’t know his race, like the Putnam Cup math competition. Or (a much lower bar, but still of interest) blacks who got 1600 on the SAT.

    • Replies: @Truth
  12. Add to my list of reparations,… all blacks can add a hyphen and the letters PhD to their name.

    • Agree: Lot
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  13. some arcane field that requires high skills but doesn’t pay particularly well…

    tenured math professors at research universities…

    Where are these exorbitant tuition fees going, if not to the front line?

    He got paid $17 million in 2017.

    He’s on the board of Alphabet (Google). And he might be Fed Chairman under a Democratic president.

    The Ferguson Effect?

    a black guy from Zimbabwe who got a Ph.D. from Oxford in electrical engineering

    I can’t imagine Zimbabwe has a surfeit of electrical engineers. How’s their grid doing?

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Lot
    , @Truth
    , @PV van der Byl
  14. The cruel reality of the bell curve is that the ratio of blacks to whites gets smaller, the further out into the right tail you go. So the mad goal of populating every profession with 13% blacks means that the talent differential between the average black and white Harvard physics prof would have to be enormous — 2 sigma at least.

    Imagine requiring that four out of every five basketball players had to be white. At the high school level, the black guy would be the best player on his starting five but it wouldn’t be too screamingly obvious. Whereas in the NBA, the average white player would be someone like a starter at Princeton — a fine athlete but way way outclassed.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  15. @Redneck farmer

    Despite Amy Harmon’s worries that blacks are under-represented in Dr. Manyika’s old jobs, he seems to be enjoying a substantially more kick ass life than if he were still grading engineering problem sets.

    True. But why do super-elite STEM academics of any race choose the cloistered academic life over buck raking in the private sector?

    Perhaps there is an intangible reward in knowing that you are doing truly elite work with the potential to change the world. But if you know that you are holding your prestigious sounding position only through AA and that you can’t quite do that same level of work, this intangible motivation evaporates. So you might as well go for the bucks.

    As Dr. Manyika’s CV illustrates, eminent blacks are especially in demand as “professional board members.” I am not sure how much that pays but it certainly involves an ample supply of fawning and feting. Nice work if you can get it.

    • Agree: ic1000
  16. anon[331] • Disclaimer says:

    A really interesting article would be about an African American that posted a high score on something where there’s no way to get help and the evaluators can’t know his race, like the Putnam Cup math competition. Or (a much lower bar, but still of interest) blacks who got 1600 on the SAT.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_Leslie#Early_life

    • Replies: @International Jew
  17. jcd1974 says:

    Steve, do you think these guys are legitimately super smart? Or, are they reasonably intelligent but the beneficiaries of affirmative action and the dire shortage of educated blacks in their chosen fields?

    Also do they have any real responsibilities beyond showing up and being black? So many organizations, both public and private have what amounts to black figureheads, where the president or CEO is a black man or woman but the real work is done by underlings.

    • Replies: @Truth
  18. Spangel says:

    I supposedly met a 1600 sat black once. From Nigeria. Also one of the darkest people I’ve ever had a conversation with.

    It was at their high school graduation, which I attended to see my cousin graduate. The principal said this Nigerian got a 1600 and then let him do his valedictorian speech. I guess he could have been lying but salutorian was a Chinese kid who got into Harvard. Later the Chinese kid came over and talked to my cousin and expressed considerable frustration that he didn’t make valedictorian. So it seems this black was in an intense head to head with a Chinese kid who got into Harvard (within the last 10 years). If the Nigerian beat the Chinese kid, I guess he was pretty smart.

    Nigerian got a PhD at hyp in a hard science and then moved on to work at McKinsey. There he made principal in extremely short order.

    • Replies: @bomag
  19. Nathan says:

    So, McKinsey and Company?

    Isn’t that a bit of a racket? I’ve read a few McKinsey case studies, and that’s the impression that I get. They tell huge corporations whatever they want to hear, and get paid exorbitant sums to do it.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  20. Anon[275] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Zimbabwe’s power grid is broken because Manyika left the country and the field of electrical engineering. But look at all his achievements in AI, at Stanford. They are just as great as his successes in “Global Development” at the White House. He is a fellow at the Royal Society for Arts, that’s how “National Innovative” he is!

    My grad school mentor moved to an Ivy. He writes a paper a week, but his boss writes a paper per week in a Top 10 journal. Sometimes it’s plain science, but often it’s “how to do science”, or even better “how to do science in the 21st century”. There’s also an assortment on “how a mentor should act”, “how to get grants funded”, and “how the PhD system should be reformed”, which have very little to do with the reality. (For example, they don’t mention that they hired as assistants children of other grandees, who act as reviewers on their grants.) It helps that they have a bunch of postdocs to put pen on paper, and that they are editors for their respective journal. We, left behind at a mere Top 50 school, mumble that these two guys write more than they read.

    Manyika seems to be a similar basket case. Lots of titles, no actual achievement. Is this how Trump charmed you?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  21. Lab Rat says:

    Professors grade problem sets? Please. That’s why they have grad students.

  22. res says:
    @Captain Willard

    Could you elaborate? I see a Ronald Ferguson mentioned in this article: https://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/08/01/appeals-court-overturns-5-gen-re-and-a-i-g-convictions/

    But I am not seeing Roger Ferguson associated with the AIG blowup. Except in this article: https://www.forbes.com/sites/streettalk/2010/01/20/berkshire-hathaways-gen-re-settles-sham-reinsurance-charges
    which seems like a mistaken account of the first link.

  23. Lot says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    South Africa’s power grid is collapsing due to theft of service and that Gupta guy Steve has mentioned embezzling hundreds of millions.

    https://allafrica.com/stories/201903190798.html

    As for South Africa’s water, they now discourage toilet flushing with the slogan: “If it’s yellow, let it mellow.”

  24. ‘…Despite the worries of Amy Harmon types that blacks are under-represented in Dr. Manyika’s old, more technical jobs, he seems to be enjoying a substantially more kick-ass life than if he were still grading engineering problem sets.’

    The irony here is that however little the Dr. Manyikas of the world might have contributed in a color-blind universe, all that partying means they’ll contribute less still.

    Affirmative action: making sure blacks add absolutely nothing to the sum of human wisdom.

  25. @Andy

    Do you have any idea what finance is. It is determining where accumulated resources are invested. Everywhere and at all times government and bureaucrats have failed miserably at this task. The US govt paid elon musk 2 or 3 thousand dollars per car because . . . they knew it was right! Lets watch while Tesla goes tits up like solandra. Those thousands of cars times those thousands of dollars of subsidies washed away in stupid decisions. Capital lost forever.

    Japan managers knew how to manage an economy and investment. Now Japan is off the radar of everyone. China, tomorrow’s failure. Yet in America, the creation of google, facebook, amazon, uber, ltft, airbnb etc because we have private capital markets and the most difficult decision of all – what to invest in – is private with participants who get the rewards if they are right and loose everything if they are wrong.

    The very highest IQ people should be working in finance and in a free market they are because finance is the most remunerative field as it adds the most value to everything.

  26. @scrivener3

    Why dosen’t Europe have google and facebook? They have very great universities and very smart citizens. What is the secret sauce that makes America produce all the new innovative companies?
    Why are China’s great companies copies of Google and ebay and facebook?

    AMERICAN FINANCE.

    • Replies: @dube
  27. But in the NBA, the average white players would be someone like a starter at Princeton — a fine athlete but way way outclassed.

    True. But the game might actually be better.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  28. @Anon

    Is this how Trump charmed you?

    He can point to buildings, if not walls.

  29. @AnotherDad

    But in the NBA, the average white players would be someone like a starter at Princeton — a fine athlete but way way outclassed.

    True. But the game might actually be better.

    Back when the Lakers represented lakes:

    • Replies: @Truth
  30. Truth says:

    THEY’RE ALL A.A! THEY MIGHT HAVE BEEN GOOD ENOUGH TO GET A SOCIOLOGY DEGREE AT WAYNE STATE (unlike almost of of them) WITHOUT THE WHITE MAN’S HELP, BUT THAT’S ABOUT IT!

    STEVE YOU’RE A CUCK!!!!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  31. Hans says:

    Uptown’s got its hustlers. Bowery’s got it’s bums. DC Fed’s got Ol Rog Ferguson. He’s a smooth talking son of a gun.

    “Ferguson was the only Federal Reserve Governor in Washington, D.C. during the September 11 attacks in 2001. He was responsible for leading the Federal Reserve’s initial response to the terrorist attacks and was praised for his expert handling of the crisis.”

  32. Truth says:
    @International Jew

    There’s nothing strikingly “superelite” about these two guys. They got admitted to elite schools and got PhDs, but that doesn’t mean anything anymore.

    No, it doesn’t; Yale gave me one in the 9th grade.

  33. @Truth

    Truth, put down the 40 oz. For your sake and ours.

  34. Truth says:
    @jcd1974

    Steve, do you think these guys are legitimately super smart? Or, are they reasonably intelligent but the beneficiaries of affirmative action and the dire shortage of educated blacks in their chosen fields?

    The answer is: Super smart…er than you.

    • Replies: @donut
  35. @scrivener3

    Yet in America, the creation of google, facebook, amazon, uber, ltft, airbnb etc

    You have to go down to #5 on that list before you get to a company that hasn’t turned and bit us in the ass.

    If you want to defend finance, pick the good guys at least.

    • LOL: bomag
  36. Truth says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    But in the NBA, the average white players would be someone like a starter at Princeton — a fine athlete but way way outclassed.

    True. But the game might actually be better.

    Back when the Lakers represented lakes:

    Yeah; about that…

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  37. @Hypnotoad666

    But why do super-elite STEM academics of any race choose the cloistered academic life over buck raking in the private sector?

    I’ve been on familiar terms with exactly four people from up in the business stratosphere, and my impression is that high stakes means high stress. The two traders made their money and moved on to more passive stuff by their 40th birthdays. The two senior executives walked a constant tightrope. It gets really hyper-competitive and both slipped off the pyramid. One had a really bad blow-up with his CEO, and the other was in a bad car wreck that rattled his nerves and had to go on extended leave. And that was that; the fraternity tagged them so they were never going to advance and left the Fortune 50 world to go find businesses to buy.

    By contrast, tenured professor at a teaching college for $150K/yr, a generous retirement, some consulting gigs, and having honorariums thrown at you for showing up and being a smart black guy sounds pretty nice.

    Paying the head of TIAA-CREF so much money seems kind of odd. Is his portfolio-weighting ability REALLY that good that they just had to get him for $17 million? He’s a fiduciary whose job is to select sovereign bonds and blue chips and sign the checks. Of course, now I’ve found the data point that wrecks my thesis–maybe this high paid stuff ain’t so stressful after all.

  38. @Redneck farmer

    Amy Harmon is worried about academia because that’s the only other area w[h]ere she could get a job.

    Perhaps as a visiting scholar or a glorified level of adjunct, but not as tenured or tenure-track faculty. She has a B.A. in American Studies from the University of Michigan. But perhaps standards are different for full-time academics at journalism schools, relative to the rest of academia?

  39. Peterike says:

    Speaking of frauds, the Elizabeth Holmes documentary on HBO is very good.

  40. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Lot

    It’s not collapsing, it’s right-sizing.

  41. Escher says:
    @scrivener3

    America did just fine with the creation of new companies and technologies in the past, before the hyper-financialization of the economy.
    The Big 3, GE, Intel, Bell Labs.. not to mention the government-driven R&D programs that laid the foundation for much of modern technology.
    Also, much of the decline of older stalwart corporations can be assigned to short-term thinking by their leadership, driven by guess what…. Wall Street pressure.

  42. @OFWHAP

    Live-in nannies is one of the, if not the, great benefit of being a middle class/upper middle class person in Latin America, as ‘Roma’ showed us. It’s actually incredible how much your quality of life goes up when you can have someone cook all your meals, clean the whole house, make you coffee/breakfast in the morning, wash and fold everything, even do groceries for you, for under $1000/month. It’s like magic. The first world may be safer and more reliable and superior in a multitude of ways, but it’s an absolute slog if you have young kids at home. Housewives don’t get enough credit. You need to be SERIOUSLY rich to afford a permanent live-in maid/nanny/cook all-in-one household servant for basically your entire life since you have kids. In Latin America you can do that just by being a manager somewhere. The downside is you often brush up against the extreme poverty/violence/ineptitude/corruption that allows a surplus of uneducated women from poor families desperate for work to exist in the first place.

  43. @The Anti-Gnostic

    I’ve been on familiar terms with exactly four people from up in the business stratosphere, and my impression is that high stakes means high stress. The two traders made their money and moved on to more passive stuff by their 40th birthdays. The two senior executives walked a constant tightrope. It gets really hyper-competitive and both slipped off the pyramid.

    I’ve recently been enjoying the ‘History of England’ podcast series; I’m deep into the Tudor period now, up to Henry VIII giving poor Anne of Cleves the boot because she failed to ignite the royal libido.

    The point of connection? The Great and Good in Tudor England, as in so many courts and palaces, were compelled to spend much of their time at court, in the king’s presence, jockeying and fawning for his attention and approval. You could be an earl or even a duke, and you still had to attend (sometimes literally) and besmooch the royal posterior, and do so in just the right way. The consequences if you bungled the job ranged all the way up to drawing and quartering, which is arguably an even worse outcome than having to go on extended leave. It was, as you say, walking a constant tightrope, or trying to balance at the apex of a slippery pyramid.

    Contentment, as St Paul tells us, is a condition eagerly to be sought.

  44. I grew up as a professor’s kid, and I spent far more of my adult life in academia than could possibly be healthy.

    Along the way I have known some blacks who were smart or even super smart.

    One of the smartest professors I knew growing up was a black guy, Adolph Reed, Sr. He had brilliant understanding of politics. He told me fascinating stories about his interviews with people like LBJ or Orval Faubus.

    Adolph Reed, Jr. appears to be even smarter than his father. One person called Adolph Jr. “the smartest American of any race”.

    Adoplph Jr. tends to be rather cranky, and seems to hate just about everyone (except Bernie Sanders). He hates the Clintons. Then, he endorsed Hillary in 2008 because Adolph knew Obama personally and considered Obama even worse.

    Adolph Jr. especially despises TNC. According to Adolph Jr., TNC is a low level race huckster hack that conned white men into thinking he was talented. According to Adolph Jr. white liberals look at TNC the way they look at the college educated children of their maids. Anyone who had read “A Man in Full” and remembers the way The Cap’m put his maid’s son through college will know what he is saying.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @peterike
  45. Andy says:
    @scrivener3

    Actually I studied finance in school and I’m quite familiar with your arguments. Nevertheless, I believe the reason that China in a few years will overtake the US as the world’s leading economy (and yes, that will happen) is that China focuses on building real stuff while the US has let its economy become “financialized”

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  46. @TheMediumIsTheMassage

    As Stephen Sondheim, who grew up in the most awesome looking apartment building overlooking Central Park, explained: “Everyone Ought to Have a Maid.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Lot
  47. @res

    I typed the wrong first name Ronald/Roger first time I posted this blog. It’s pretty easy to confuse those first names.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @res
  48. @Truth

    The narrator sounds awfully white. Do they have live jazz at the Starbucks in Portland? I hear it in the background.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  49. @Steve Sailer

    I typed the wrong first name Ronald/Roger first time I posted this blog. It’s pretty easy to confuse those first names.

    Nobody ever ronalded a young lass.

    https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/roger

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  50. dube says:
    @scrivener3

    I’m willing to hear you, Scrivener, but what is it about American Finance that would proscribe a drift into Global Finance? Or perhaps also Casino Finance?

  51. @Steve Sailer

    As Stephen Sondheim, who grew up in the most awesome looking apartment building overlooking Central Park, explained: “Everyone Ought to Have a Maid.”

    Newport princess Emma Lazarus’s version of this trope got tacked onto the Statue of Liberty:

  52. @Reg Cæsar

    Could a hamburger clown Ronald a young lady?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  53. @Lot

    As for South Africa’s water, they now discourage toilet flushing with the slogan: “If it’s yellow, let it mellow.”

    That’s what my wife heard from her stepfather when they moved out to the country in the late ’80s.
    And I saw the same attitude, if not slogan, in Florida in 1990. When the state had only 13m people.

    Even the working-class guys drank bottled water, which always seemed a bit fey up north.

  54. @Nathan

    Oh yes, McKinsey is very much a racket.

    They run basically two separate rackets and one legit business, all of which sorta hang together.

    The first racket is the ‘give management an out for a particular decision.’ In this case management of some particular company wants to do something but they don’t want to take responsibility for the decision. The reasons they don’t want to take responsibility range from the relatively benign to borderline illegal. An example of the benign case: the decision is a risk that could pay off or could tank the company, and if the latter they want a scapegoat. An example of a borderline illegal case: company officers want to buy company stock next year, so they want cover for a way to tank the value before they buy. For example by reorganizing the sales force and drastically missing their numbers one quarter, then making up for it in the following quarter (after the buy is complete.) And there are plenty of other examples in between these two ethical extremes, where management has something they want done but need cover.

    So you hire consultants and give them a ‘problem to solve’ and strongly hint what you want the answer to be. That’s why McKinsey staffs the way that it does–they hire smart people without any particular industry experience and then put them on projects in industries that they know nothing about. You have people with BAs in English, 22 years old, one year out of Harvard, supervised by 27 year olds, one year out of a Wharton MBA, working on projects in the pulp and paper industry or aerospace industry or media or whatever.

    People like that will follow right along with what management suggests because, well, they don’t have any choice. They don’t actually know jack about the industry. However, they are reasonably smart, so they can put a nice gloss on whatever story management wants them to tell. If they hire some consultant with 10-20 years experience in the industry, even if he didn’t go to Harvard, he’s going to have reality-based opinions on things and can’t be relied upon to toe the party line.

    Second racket is the ‘we have insider industry information’ racket. In this case the McK partners approach a company and say, ‘we’ve consulted for all your competitors, maybe we can help you.’ With the implication being that during the project they will share inside info from competitors in a nudge-wink sort of way. However this is often just a bluff and they don’t have much of anything, and even worse they will try to harvest your info and take it back to your competitors on another project.

    They also do some non-racket projects for people but these engagements usually don’t last long because management figures out that they’re bullshitters. The really profitable engagements are in racket #1.

    It’s really a genius system because the more you charge the better your racket works, and the customer doesn’t care because they’re not spending their own money anyway; it’s the company’s cash.

    Anyway if you want to know the intellectual caliber of a place like McKinsey just read the McK quarterly–it’s like the Economist written by an AI that trained on Dilbert cartoons.

    I don’t know about BCG, Bain, Mercer, etc., I assume they are the same deal, just slightly more lowbrow.

  55. @Paleo Liberal

    Could a hamburger clown Ronald a young lady?

    Only if she said, “Have it your way.”

    200 million people… How quaint that sounds now!

  56. @TheMediumIsTheMassage

    You’re absolutely right. We live in Hong Kong, where it’s very easy and relatively low-cost to have a live-in domestic helper, so we do. It makes an enormous difference.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  57. res says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Agreed, but if it was mistaken I think Captain Willard’s comment was libelous and needed correction. His comment was quite harsh and completely unsubstantiated.

    I am surprised Forbes would make the same mistake (assuming it is one) and then leave it uncorrected.

  58. @Buffalo Joe

    How about all blacks get to put “Reverend Doctor” before their name? A nearby city has a street whose sign fully spells out “Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard.”

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @Art Deco
  59. @Captain Willard

    Roger Ferguson is the Fed guy. Ronald Ferguson is the AIG / Gen Re guy, who went to jail.

    Google carefully.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Steve Sailer
  60. It’s something people don’t realize about the dearth of black high school academic teachers. The credential tests actually assess college level ability, I’d guess IQs at 115 or so. Even in states with lower cut scores, it’s 105-110. For blacks, that’s into the top 10%. They have much more remunerative occupations. And even African Americans who are in teaching, becoming a principal pays much better–and districts can commit affirmative action there, so they have an advantage.

    Wrote about this here: https://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2014/09/08/ed-schools-and-affirmative-action/

    Glenn Loury is probably the smartest, most incisive black intellectual I’ve ever seen. I’m sure there are others less commonly in the public eye.

    • Replies: @res
  61. @Andy

    No, the highest IQ people are working on new ways to decide what advertisements to show you.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  62. @SimpleSong

    There’s also the racket where they act as hired guns for a company’s internal political battles, where one department head hires them to tell his peers they should follow his plan and endorse his power grab.

  63. J.Ross says: • Website
    @education realist

    We can’t be expected to keep track of these crazy black people names.

  64. @education realist

    The commenter’s confusion was probably my fault because I first posted “Ronald Ferguson,” then corrected myself a few minutes later to “Roger Ferguson.”

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  65. res says:
    @education realist

    The TFA followup you alluded to at the end of that post is also good. To save others the search: https://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2014/12/23/tfa-diversity-and-the-credibility-gap/
    Did you ever come up with a satisfactory answer to that conundrum? Was also interesting to see James Thompson as the first commenter on the TFA post.

    I think Glenn Loury is very good, but would you rank him ahead of Thomas Sowell?

    And Coleman Hughes is young, but showing promise: https://quillette.com/author/coleman-cruz-hughes/

    • Replies: @education realist
  66. @Paleo Liberal

    Is Roger W. Ferguson Jr. the basis for Tom Wolfe’s Stravinsky-loving black corporate attorney Roger White II (a.k.a., Roger Too White) in “A Man in Full”?

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  67. Pericles says:
    @International Jew

    Whereas in the NBA, the average white player would be someone like a starter at Princeton — a fine athlete but way way outclassed.

    Don’t forget the New York Times would be screaming and crying incessantly about white supremacy zone defense and racist rules against travelling. And HGH would be a human right.

    Speaking of which, the NBA this year seems like a trainwreck. All these absolute top super ultra negroes, overpaid until it apparently makes them puke, shuffling about complaining that they’re unhaaapy while cashing their big checks and failing. Absolutely hysterical.

  68. @res

    Not terribly impressed with Hughes as an intellect, but he’s certainly doing a good job of branding. He’s bright, of course, but nothing special.

    Never been a fan of Sowell. At all. That is–heh–a minority view. But that’s more about politics than his intellect. Still, I like someone who surprises.

    Loury is not just a good thinker, but a brilliant clarifier. The man can restate a position or set a debate with crystalline elegance. He is also fearless, much more so than Sowell, who is fairly traditional.

    TFA: I did try to follow up on that over the years. However, something interesting happened to TFA over the next 18 months: enrollment collapsed. Now, enrollment dived in ed schools generally, so no one’s known if TFA’s collapse was related or not. But it’s still a shadow of its old self.

    Moreover, TFA went full-blown progressive in the ed reform breakup. And that really took away its allure to both the media and actual ed reformers (who TFA now attacks).

    For these reasons (and probably others), reporters aren’t interested in TFA, and without their pressure, TFA is under no constraint to talk about its diversity–or its selectivity. It’s very hard even to find data on its corps after 2016.

    The utter collapse of ed reform in 2016 really hasn’t received much notice in the mainstream media, although the conservative branch of the old movement certainly talks about it.

    Basically, there was a maelstrom of events that decimated the block of moderate right and progressive but neoliberal left that wanted to use charters and accountability to prove public schools were worthless (moderate right) or pressure public schools to improve (neo left). They got everything they wanted:

    1)16 years of two supportive presidents (on education reform, Bush and Obama were basically as one)

    2) NCLB

    3) teacher VAM basically enforced by Duncan

    4) favorable rulings on tenure and union dues

    5) TFA, Michelle Rhee, Mark Zuckerberg, Newark, New Orleans after Katrina–all sexy, media covered, opportunities for charters and accountability to take hold.

    6) Common Core, a national curriculum that they could pretend wasn’t national and optional.

    7) Most states added graduation tests and committed to increase grad rates.

    And it all disappeared. Better yet, it all disappeared because the public *hated* it. NCLB was an obvious failure, since it’s impossible to get 100% above average. That led to NCLB waivers, which Duncan used to enforce school plans that committed to value added testing. Moreover schools that “adopted” Common Core were more likely to get waivers.

    But suburban parents were pissed that their suburban schools were getting put on restrictions because one or two categories werent’ improving, and all the money that was spent on bumping up scores on very easy tests. Then they didn’t realize their states had adopted Common Core, because their states hadn’t told them, because the states didn’t think it’d be a big deal, until it suddenly was because all the textbooks changed in elementary school and worse, the tests were ridiculously hard (again, for elementary school. High school was largely unchanged by Common Core). That led to a testing backlash. I think for a while 1 in 5 NY kids (or maybe just NYC) opted out of testing.

    VAM was a disaster. A lot of times it was unfair, in that teachers were paid by results of kids they didn’t teach. Better yet, even when states scrupulously enforced fairness, the results were the same: 95% of teachers rated effective.

    Meanwhile, California’s tenure ruling was overturned, and Campbell Brown’s anti-tenure lawsuits just fired their one full-time employee because they are running out of money. Janus hasn’t really hurt unions at all–and even if it were, states with weak union protections are seeing teacher rebellions and walkouts that they’re helpless to stop.

    All their success stories turned to shit. TFA is off the radar. Michelle Rhee has, last I checked, completely left education. Zuck’s billion went to teacher salaries, which is hilarious, and the whole effort abandoned while the woman in charge of it had her career (sadly) ruined. New Orleans is probably the closest they have to a success story, but the move to all charters is, as I predicted, leading to more and more constraints. They can’t just expel kids anymore, the teachers are unionizing, and they have a huge problem with dropouts that is exacerbated by kids who really aren’t “owned” by a district.

    And if all that weren’t enough, the progressive side of ed reform went and lost its damn mind in the age of Trump and the conservative side of ed reform was, to a person, Never Trump. So both sides are completely out of power, and education isn’t something Trump gives a damn about.

    It’s been kind of fun to watch.

    I had a point. What was it? Oh, TFA.

    TFA’s decline is very much part of that story. They were on the wrong side of things, and so even though their politics are correct, it’s no where near as cool. And of course, they may just have exploded durign the years of recession.

    If I had to guess, I’d say that they are more “diverse” now, because the students they originally set out for aren’t as interested.

    Thanks for the kind words on my article.

    • Replies: @res
    , @Lot
  69. There is a black man named Ronald Ferguson in academia. I know of him from his work on the achievement gap. His economics degrees are from Cornell and Harvard (PhD). He was a faculty member of both the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Kennedy School until 2014. Due to his more lucrative outside professional activities, he is now an adjunct lecturer at the Kennedy School, “where he remains a fellow at the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy and faculty director of the university-wide Achievement Gap Initiative (AGI)”.

    Outside Professional Activities For Ronald Ferguson

    Ron Ferguson participates in a variety of public policy advising and consulting activities. He is a founding equity partner of Tripod Education Partners, Inc, which provides student and teacher surveys and related services to school districts in the U.S. and abroad. Tripod Education Partners is now home to the Tripod Project for School Improvement, which had been delivered in collaboration with Cambridge Education of Westwood MA fromm 2007 through 2014. Professor Ferguson is a co-owner (along with Freshpond Education, Inc.) of Tripod Education Partners, Inc, which owns the intellectual property of the Tripod surveys developed over the past decade through work with school districts. Professor Ferguson is also on the Board of Directors of The Basics, Inc., which is a non-profit organization founded to disseminate “The Basics” of early childhood caregiving, a project which grew out of the work of the Achievement Gap Initiative at Harvard, which he heads. There are currently 27 localities across the United States that are delivering the Basics in their communities as part of the Basics Learning Network. Professor Ferguson provides speaking and consulting services to some of these communities and often receives a consulting fee as compensation for that work.

    https://www.hks.harvard.edu/faculty/ronald-ferguson

    • Replies: @Ed
  70. JimB says:

    Probably no young black males living in their parents’ basement editing Wikipedia articles.

  71. Arclight says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Some people are not cut out for the higher pressure life entailed in the private sector where you have to produce actual profits with your talent to justify your income. Being a college professor is not a bad gig at all – most manage to make in the low six figures, have great benefits, have lots of time off during a normal year, and are usually required to take a sabbatical periodically.

    My neighbor is a full professor and although he wishes he made more money, he knows he’s got it pretty good in terms of workload and lifestyle.

  72. bomag says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    …to be involved in so many organizations.

    I’m sure these are fine individuals, but many of these types of boards are window dressing, with one or two meetings a year that amount to schmoozing and partying.

  73. bomag says:
    @scrivener3

    …with participants who get the rewards if they are right and lose everything if they are wrong

    Successful enterprises have a lot of moving parts, of which few are controlled by the finance guys.

    That they are so well paid is a bug, not a feature.

  74. Autochthon says: • Website

    With apologies to Mr. Sailer and a hope he may publish this musing… All I read was “blackety, black, black…” then my eyes glazed over, but not before I noticed a couple of photographs of very homely Negroes, which made me wonder:

    Is it conceivable in The Current Year of “body-shaming,” appearance not mattering, and merit trumping sexual wiles and charm (The Man assures us!), for a nondescript, middle-aged, or even downright ugly – yet supremely talented! – person like Bruce Hornsby, Phil Collins, Steve Winwood, Paul Carrack to succeed in music? One does still see it in film, mostly where some are able to carve out niches at rôles comedic or grotesque – Philip Seymour Hoffman, Jack Black, etc., but I can’t think of any such examples in popular music, where appearance, bizarrely, seems to’ve become even more important (in practice, contra whatever nonsense The Man says) than it is in film. Has there ever been a time when so many beautiful, but tone-deaf, arrhythmic trolls have dominated popular music?

  75. bomag says:
    @TheMediumIsTheMassage

    What has happened to us since the days of pioneers raising large families while hand-carrying the water and firewood; cooking every meal from scratch?

    Modern appliances and surfaces have certainly made housekeeping easier relative to the past.

    • Replies: @TheMediumIsTheMassage
  76. @Steve Sailer

    Perhaps.

    Good writers get their inspiration from many different places. Famously, the male protagonist in Love Story was partly based on the writer’s Yale classmate Tommy Lee Jones, partly on Jones’s roommate Al Gore and partly the writer’s imagination.

    I would suspect Roger White II was partly Roger Ferguson Jr. — the names are just too similar. But we can’t discount that Wolfe knew other black intellectuals with some of the same traits, including Roger’s secret evil twin Ronald. 😉

    Perhaps an inspiration in part, but not in full.

  77. Brutusale says:
    @OFWHAP

    Ray Lewis says the live-in help is why Tom Brady is unbeatable. At 1:20.

    And of course Brady abused the kid in question.

    I love how Brady, at the end of the video, is looking for Byard for a few post-game comments, but the kid obviously ran to the locker room as quickly as possible.

  78. bomag says:
    @Spangel

    So it seems this black was in an intense head to head with a Chinese kid [for valedictorian]

    I’m curious about the metric. High school GPA wouldn’t seem to be powerful enough to distinguish between people at this level.

  79. OT:

    Rudy Meredith, the former Yale women’s soccer coach who was indicted for taking a $400k bribe and attempting to arrange a $450k bribe, reportedly forced his players to edit and write significant portions of his papers when he was in graduate school. Meredith received a master’s degree from Ohio University in recreation and sports science and coaching education in 2018.

    After receiving an anonymous letter regarding the papers, the athletic department conducted an investigation and ultimately took no action. Other complaints spanning years against Meredith were ignored. The former athletic director retired in 2018.

    https://yaledailynews.com/blog/2019/03/16/meredith-allegedly-used-players-to-write-his-grad-school-papers/

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  80. @res

    I’m horribly sorry and I apologize utterly and publicly to Mr. Roger Ferguson. It was an unforgivable mistake.

    I lost a lot of money in the Crisis and I’m still angry. But this doesn’t excuse my error and rash comments.

    • Replies: @res
  81. @Harry Baldwin

    Harry, as you travel on the Kensington Expressway from the Buffalo Airport to downtown, that is the exact signage.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  82. @scrivener3

    google, facebook, amazon, uber, ltft, airbnb

    Probably should update your list of free market “successes.” It’s hurting your schtick.

  83. @Reg Cæsar

    No bigger Civil Rights Re-enacters than ((White)) nerds.

  84. @TheMediumIsTheMassage

    Yes, when middle class people from the 3rd world see our nursing homes, they gasp. How can you let your old people go to these places? They should be taken care of by family! But what you don’t realize is that the middle class in those countries have live-in help to care for grandma. It’s completely affordable and you get the satisfaction of knowing you’ve done your best by the old folks.

    The 1st world used to have cheap servants too, and our aristocrats haven’t forgotten that. They want that arrangement back.

  85. @scrivener3

    I’ve heard this kind of thing many times, usually from people so enamored of their own line of work that they think it monopolizes the best and the brightest. Finance, technology, higher mathematics or whatever – but that is total bullshit. Highly intelligent people are as various as people in general and will end up doing all sorts of things.

    That said, here are at least a couple of reasons why finance might not appeal to at least some extremely smart people:

    1) The financial industry is the main culprit behind escalating economic inequality. As such, many people would it morally repugnant. I’d venture to guess that the only kinds of smart people who would be attracted to finance in spite of this would be morally blind, semi-autistic “quants” or the outright sociopathic. In fact, the gifted tend to be even more put off by the morally repugnant effects of rampant capitalism than average people. The Terman study, conducted at Stanford (of all places) during the stock market crazy Roaring Twenties, found a correlation between an IQ of 170 plus and leftist or socialist thinking.

    2) Very highly intelligent people have the wherewithal to find life satisfaction within the confines of their own minds. In many respects, they do not NEED to be materialistic. A fetish for fancy cars, estates in the Bahamas and ten thousand dollar suits is more a sign of status insecurity and puerile boastfulness than of a mature and confident intelligence. And, if one has no need for conspicuous consumption, why would one need all that much more money?

    Last but not least, financial people may be more inclined to insist that the most talented people in America are on Wall Street because they suffer from delusions of grandeur, which is one of the most salient traits of the psychopath. Their opinions don’t so much express the truth as reveal their own pathology.

  86. Anonymous[706] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve now freely borrows from Dr. Lexus on “lots of ‘tards leading kick-ass lives” yet that very scene is an avant-Taleb satire of standardized testing’s normative mediocrity; i.e. it says here Joe Bauers talks like a f** and his s***’s all f***ed up

  87. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Living in HK, your house can always look perfect, you never have to scrub a toilet, your clothing is magically ironed and hung up.

    Still, I’d rather live in suburban CA and do all that crap myself. Or just let it be.

    Want to see me? Come on over. Want to see my house? Better make an appointment.

    • Replies: @Graham
    , @res
    , @donut
  88. bomag says:
    @SimpleSong

    (I heard this from Garrison Keillor):

    I had my cat neutered. Now he goes out at night as a consultant.

  89. Art Deco says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    The D.Min or DD degree is a common professional credential for clergymen in general (not just Convention Baptists and African Methodists, though the mode is the M.Div. I think the completion requirements differ from those of a research degree in theology (PhD).

    M L. King was studying at BU, not a stand-alone divinity school or seminary and I think his was a research degree. What’s curious about it is that over a period of > 35 years, no one well-read in theology seems to have examined it, or, if they did, they threw up their hands. You wouldn’t have had to travel to Boston to look at it. A commercial company (UMI) generated microfilms of these unpublished theses which could be loaned out and, after the advent of desktop publishing, print copies on demand.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  90. res says:
    @education realist

    Not terribly impressed with Hughes as an intellect, but he’s certainly doing a good job of branding. He’s bright, of course, but nothing special.

    He’s young. I don’t have a sense of what Loury was like at that age, but Hughes seems to me to have potential. Being a tenured professor with a named chair in the Ivy League (Loury) does wonders for things like fearlessness.

    Never been a fan of Sowell. At all. That is–heh–a minority view. But that’s more about politics than his intellect. Still, I like someone who surprises.

    I can understand not agreeing with him politically (and I also have disagreements with some of his views), but I really like his “A Conflict of Visions” (and later elaborations like “The Vision of the Anointed”) as a way of thinking about the liberal/conservative divide in the US.

    My big quarrel with his views is his attempt to blame all black dysfunction on their association with lower class Southern whites (I’m probably oversimplifying that), and even there I think he has a point. It’s just not the sole cause, and perhaps not even a major one relatively speaking.

    Loury is not just a good thinker, but a brilliant clarifier. The man can restate a position or set a debate with crystalline elegance. He is also fearless, much more so than Sowell, who is fairly traditional.

    That’s a good summary. I have watched a number of podcasts of him with John McWhorter and the characteristics you mention are frequently on display there.

    Any recommendations for especially good work by Loury?

    I just took a look at his wiki. Didn’t know about the problems he had in 1987. It is good that he managed to recover from that. Here’s a PDF of his “A New American Dilemma”
    https://www.brown.edu/Departments/Economics/Faculty/Glenn_Loury/louryhomepage/The%20New%20Republic%20Articles/A%20New%20American%20Dilemma%20(1984).pdf
    A good piece which seems as relevant (perhaps even more) today as it was 35 years ago when it was written. As a bonus, the final page overlaps with an article from Charles Murray titled “Affirmative Racism.”

    Thanks for the elaboration on TFA.

  91. @scrivener3

    “Japan managers knew how to manage an economy and investment. Now Japan is off the radar of everyone. “

    You mean the Japan that’s eaten car markets worldwide? The one that dominates the hyper-pure silicon that the US doesn’t make any more, but is vital to integrated circuits? The one that dominates the most accurate stepper market that makes the latest ICs? That dominates battery technology? Carbon fibre technology?

    Japan, as Eamonn Fingleton has pointed out, is happy to be off the radar and for the US to ignore the huge trade imbalance.

    ” China, tomorrow’s failure.”

    LOL. China sends the US high-tech consumer goods, and gets soya beans back. Which is the advanced economy?

    “google, facebook, amazon, uber, ltft, airbnb”

    All of these are perfectly replicable, they just have first-mover advantage hence a big installed base. And China and Russia have their own versions.

    “How many divisions does Facebook have?”

    • Replies: @bomag
  92. @TheMediumIsTheMassage

    ” It’s actually incredible how much your quality of life goes up when you can have someone cook all your meals, clean the whole house, make you coffee/breakfast in the morning, wash and fold everything, even do groceries for you, for under $1000/month. It’s like magic.”

    That’s pretty much what the Indian IT guys I worked with said about their lives in Chennai. They were probably on the equivalent of about USD 15k.

    “When I get home my time is completely my own. I never have to do anything for myself.”

  93. peterike says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    According to Adolph Jr., TNC is a low level race huckster hack that conned white men into thinking he was talented.

    He’s got it backwards. It’s white men and women that conned TNC into thinking he was talented.

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
  94. @Andy

    “On a more general level, it’s probably bad for a society if its highest IQ people are working in finance instead of trying to solve the hard scientific or engineering problems”

    This sounds better;

    On a more general level, it’s probably bad for a society if its highest African IQ people are working in Wakanda only instead of trying to solve the problems of Africans in Haiti, Sub-Saharan Africa, Baltimore, Memphis, St Louis, etc. etc, just about anywhere that has a high concentration of Africans.

    Remember what happened to the selfish Wakandians when they did not let other Africans in on the secret of Vibranuim? God expelled them from the Garden of Eden ( Congo ) and had the Evil White Man steal all their secrets.

  95. @Buffalo Joe

    You can see it at 0:44:

    In Riviera Beach, Florida, what was once the Old Dixie Highway is now the President Barack Obama Highway:

  96. Nathan says:
    @SimpleSong

    Wow, that’s worse than I thought. I could tell they were up to something because everything I read just reinforced standard neoliberal talking points- more women in the executive suite, etc.

    I guess there’s no shortage of money telling management what it wants to hear.

    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
  97. @WowJustWow

    “the highest IQ people are working on new ways to decide what advertisements to show you”

    Nah, the advertising people are the bright, well-read, always-playing-with-words people, people who could work in film or TV . The physics PhDs, alas, are all becoming quants on Wall Street or for hedge funds.

    https://infoproc.blogspot.com/2007/07/from-physics-to-finance.html

    https://infoproc.blogspot.com/2010/12/how-other-half-lives-quants.html

    This past summer I spent the long US Independence Day weekend at a reunion with three of my undergraduate classmates. All of us went on to earn PhDs in physics, but I am the only practising physicist. The others work in finance – one at a hedge fund, the other two at major banks. They all seem to be enjoying their work, and they have obviously been very successful: our reunion took place near a famous ski resort, where one of the financiers has built a 1200 m^2 retreat complete with gym, indoor pool and wine cellar.

    Even the brightest graduate students in maths and physics know that their chances of assuming a position like that of their PhD supervisors are slim. For the last 20 years the cream of the crop of physicists leaving the field has gone on to positions in finance, typically in places such as New York or London. Once there, these individuals become hedge-fund managers, derivatives traders and risk managers, to take just a few examples from my own cohort.

    Now scrivener3 seems to think the magic of the market has correctly allocated these brains. I wonder where the top Chinese physics guys are working?

    Let’s hope we never find out the hard way.

  98. Graham says:
    @stillCARealist

    “Living in HK, your house can always look perfect, you never have to scrub a toilet, your clothing is magically ironed and hung up.”

    You don’t have to be rich for that. Here in England we have an expert housekeeper/cleaner come round once a week for five or six hours, which costs the equivalent of $80 (USD). Result: the house looks clean and tidy, the beds get made, and things we would never get around to, like descaling the kettle and cleaning the oven, are done quite regularly. And she scrubs the toilets. Of course a live-in housekeeper is another step up in luxury, but the expense is tenfold greater and it’s rather nice not to have a stranger living in the house; I experienced that when we had a live-in nanny for the kids. Yes, I admit we were lucky. We wouldn’t be able to afford that now.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  99. @Hypnotoad666

    Being a board member of a big company can mean several hundred K a year to attend 4 all expense paid meetings a year where you vote yes on everything that is put in front of you. Theranos comes to mind.

  100. res says:
    @Captain Willard

    Thank you for following up. We all make mistakes. How we deal with them is what is most important IMHO. Looking forward to your future comments here.

  101. res says:
    @stillCARealist

    Want to see me? Come on over. Want to see my house? Better make an appointment.

    LOL! Amen.

  102. Clyde says:
    @El Dato

    How dare you allude to Plaques for Blacks! As in libby Chris Mathews in 2006.

    MATTHEWS: You know, you make White House manipulation, that you accuse them of, of Christian conservatives, look like that book “Bonfire of the Vanities”, the way the New York mayor used African-Americans, giving them, he called them “Plaques for Blacks”, just giving them awards, making them feel good, so he could get their support in elections. Is it that bad?
    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/15317539/ns/msnbc-hardball_with_chris_matthews/t/hardball-chris-matthews-oct/

  103. @Lot

    As for South Africa’s water, they now discourage toilet flushing with the slogan: “If it’s yellow, let it mellow.”

    It’s not bad advice if you have a septic tank.

  104. @Graham

    wow, wages must be low there. Even so, $80/week adds up pretty quick for this saver.

    But the real pain of cleaning is the constancy of it. If you sincerely want your home to look wonderful all the time, it takes either no people living in it, or constant care to details. I could pay someone to come scrub it all up, and 1 day later it would be cluttered and messy again. Sort of like washing the car the day before a trip to the snow.

    I’d rather just tolerate a certain degree of disorder/mess and spend more time doing what I enjoy.

  105. bomag says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I thought Japan was “off the radar” because it is so far ahead in many things, as you note.

  106. People like Amy Harmon have too much time on their hands, and have the pretension that they are doing something to improve the world.

  107. @Truth

    Oh sh*t! A post about black people and Truth is awake and on the warpath!

    Actually this crack about Reg being lazy was pretty funny. Don’t let it go to your head though, you’re still batting under .100

  108. Ed says:
    @Triumph104

    Slightly off-topic but I stumbled on John Roger’s wiki. He owns an investment firm and is the ex-husband of former Obama staffer and Ebony Mag CEO, Desiree Rogers.

    He has a very interesting ancestry. His maternal ancestor was a Yoruba sold into slavery. On his death bed in the 1840s he told his kids to go back to Africa. Some did and founded a prestigious family of Nigerians. The family that stayed in America, which John descends from didn’t do too bad either. His mom was the first black women to graduate from U of Chicago Law.

    John Rogers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_W._Rogers_Jr.

    His mother
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewel_Lafontant

    And their slave ancestor, Scipio Vaughn: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scipio_Vaughan

    • Agree: Triumph104
  109. @Ed

    I read an interview with John W. Rogers Jr. about 25-30 years ago about his fund’s investment strategy on how it beats the Efficient Market. I don’t remember what it was, but it seemed pretty plausible, although somebody in finance later told me that it stopped working after a few years as the market came to incorporate it.

  110. donut says:
    @stillCARealist

    I still water my dead plants .

  111. donut says:
    @Truth

    You’re an uppity Negro aren’t you . Anyway welcome back .

  112. @Reg Cæsar

    Re Zimbabwe: a lack of technical expertise is the least of their problems.

  113. @Captain Willard

    To the racially obsessed media and SJW’s, unz.com and Steve Sailor are racist personified. However one of the reasons I read this site and Steve’s blog is he recognizes there are very talented Blacks, Hispanics, and yes even women. He’s a realist and understands that statistically and per ca pita there just far fewer in number.

    FYI – I’ve met and heard Roger Ferguson speak several times. On both occasions I heard him speak, he was questioned if he would take the role of Chairman of the Federal Reserve and if it had been offered to him. This was while Obama was President. At this time he was already CEO of TIAA. He rather coyly dodged the question if it had been offered to him, and went on to say how much he enjoyed working at TIAA, that the TIAA board of trustee’s had recently extended his contract etc. He went on to discuss the importance of his family life etc. I speculate he had been offered the position but turned it down. As Fed Chairman he would have taken allot of heat, but as CEO of TIAA he’s held up as a pillar of the African American community, respected by Whites and it’s a sweet paying gig. My most racist thought after hearing him speak, was this is the Whitest Black guy I’ve ever heard. Linked is a very interesting article on his role during 9/11.

    https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2014/09/10/1328813/-The-Astonishing-Story-of-the-Federal-Reserve-on-9-11?

  114. @Nathan

    Much of what McKinsey does involves acting as a lightning rod for senior management when large lay-offs seem inevitable.

    Ostensibly, McKinsey determines how many people should be sacked and from which departments. They have also sorts of thick reports to back up the “recommendations” which are compiled AFTER discreet conversations take place between the CEO and some senior McKinsey partner.

    The McKinsey team departs as soon as, or even before, their recommendations are announced to all employees.

    Corporate management then pretends to regret painful lay-offs but refers to the objective analysis performed by outside consultants, blah-blah-blah.

  115. @SimpleSong

    You seem to write from personal experience! All quite accurate.

    Strategy consultants work for CEOs just as takeover defense lawyers do. And, not for shareholders or employees, as a whole.

  116. @anon

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_Leslie

    Thanks for that link. So a black man — a professional rapper yet — who scored 1600 on the SAT. At the age of 14, yow! Well, I was so impressed I looked up Wikipedia’s sources, and it’s starting to look like nothing more than a big joke. The sources seem to converge on this: https://www.letssingit.com/ryan-leslie-f4xmz which says

    Leslie graduated from Harvard University at the age of 4 with 7 degrees in Quantum Physics, International Relations, Macro and Microeconomics, Anthropology, and more.

  117. @SimpleSong

    McK quarterly–it’s like the Economist written by an AI that trained on Dilbert cartoons.

    LOL.

  118. @Nathan

    My idea of “management consulting” is the two Bobs in “Office Space”.

  119. @Ed

    There’s an amusing video of a fantasy basketball camp where rich guys get to play one-on-one versus Michael Jordan. Investor John W. Rogers, who is about the size of Spike Lee, astonishes Jordan 3-2.

    Rogers played on Princeton’s fine team, along with Michelle Obama’s older brother Craig.

    • Replies: @Ed
  120. Lot says:
    @education realist

    People in TFA are actively attacked now as right wing pawns and scabs in a way it wasn’t its first years.

  121. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “Everyone Ought to Have a Maid.”

    A once or twice a week housecleaning can really reduce domestic arguments. When a house is messy after work it is easier to be annoyed about everything else.

  122. Ed says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Lol I’ll see if I can find it on YouTube.

    • Replies: @res
  123. George says:

    8-Year-Old Homeless [superelite] Nigerian Refugee Wins New York State Chess Championship
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/8-year-old-homeless-nigerian-refugee-wins-new-york-state-chess-championship/ar-BBV3hF9

    Tanitoluwa Adewumi, remember that name
    https://nyssc-197622.appspot.com/web/pcc_Standings.html

    The tournament was held in Upstate NY, so it was accessible to the heirs of the decaying Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse’s America. #4 has a ‘traditional’ sounding name and Bruns might refer to Brunswick Central School Dist, Troy NY (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troy%2C_New_York#History

  124. res says:
    @Ed

    You probably found it already, but to save anyone else the search:

    It’s a great video. Rogers’ quiet intensity and execution when faced with Jordan’s trash talking and distraction attempts makes it very clear how he could be a successful investor.

    This article makes a nice postscript. Rogers manages to be exceptionally capable and accomplished while not coming across as an egomaniac.
    https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chicagoinc/ct-john-rogers-steph-curry-20160615-story.html

    He beat Buffett at poker, Jordan at hoops, but Curry is ‘impossible,’ Ariel boss says

    BTW, Rogers may look Spike Lee sized next to Jordan, but his playing height was listed at 6′.
    https://www.sports-reference.com/cbb/schools/princeton/1980.html
    Even allowing for some “optimism” in that, it is pretty far from Spike Lee’s 5’6″
    Here is an old picture (from an ad) of Spike Lee with Jordan:

  125. @Art Deco

    MDiv is the professional degree usually required for ordination.

    DD (Doctor of Divinity) or ThD (Doctor of Theology) require full time study (the seminary equivalent of the PhD). DMin’s are typically completed part-time while serving a congregation.

  126. @bomag

    Our average life expectancy is, what, 30 years higher than the pioneers? And child mortality is 95% lower? I’ll take the appliances and maids, thank you very much.

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