The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Birthing Babies
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the New York Times:

Why Textbooks May Need to Update What They Say About Birth Canals

A new study shows that the structure of the human pelvis varies between populations [races], which could have implications for how babies are birthed.

By Steph Yin, Oct. 27, 2018

… But such characterizations have long been based on anatomical studies of people of European descent. In reality, the structure of the pelvic canal, the bony structure through which most of us enter the world, varies tremendously between populations, according to a new study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

The findings have implications for how obstetricians treat patients of color, the authors say. In the United States, racial disparities in maternal health care are prevalent. Compounding factors like interpersonal and institutional racism, poverty, poor health care access and environmental burdens disproportionately harm black mothers.

Also STDs.

These contribute to the risk of pregnancy-related deaths being three to four times higher for black women than for white women.

Limited prescriptions of what constitutes a “normal” pelvis or birthing process might lead doctors to perform unnecessary interventions — like induced labor, cesarean sections or the use of forceps — which can further exacerbate harm, said Lia Betti, an anthropologist at the University of Roehampton in London, and the study’s lead author.

“What worries me is that doctors come out of school thinking of the European model of the pelvis,” Dr. Betti said. In the early 1900s, this led to “horrific situations” in which American doctors used forceps on black mothers, trying to force babies to align with “the rotation pattern for a European classical pelvis,” she added. …

They found that pelvic shape varied enormously, even more than measures of leg, arm and general body proportion that are known to vary significantly between populations. That was “remarkable and unexpected,” the researchers wrote.

Mostly, they found, pelvic shape varied along lines of geographic ancestry. People of sub-Saharan origin generally had the deepest pelvises back-to-front, while Native Americans had the widest side-to-side. Europeans, North Africans and Asians fell in the middle of the range.

My guess would be that sub-Saharan pelvis shapes are conducive to an efficient running stride, which ties into their impressive record in Olympic running races. But they do seem to cause more trouble for gestation and birth. It would also be interesting to study how adult children’s head shapes and head sizes are related to differences in mothers’ birth canal.

In the comments, various doctors, nurses, and midwives mention that instruction in racial differences were a normal part of training, at least in the past:

PM NYCOct. 30

What textbooks was the author consulting? I guess I’m showing my age, but it has been long known in obstetrical circles that pelvic types differ among populations.

As I recall, the types are gynecoid, the most common overall. Anthropoid, common in African women. Android, common in European women. Platypelloid, common in Asian women.

But of course, most women have some variant/combination of the above.

 
Hide 259 CommentsLeave a Comment
259 Comments to "Birthing Babies"
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Tyrion 2 says:

    As I recall, the types are gynecoid, the most common overall. Anthropoid, common in African women. Android, common in European women. Platypelloid, common in Asian women.

    Great names.

    Womanly, humanly, manly and like a platypus?

    Which group should be most aggrieved by these horrible baby-saving stereotypes?

  2. Tyrion 2 says:

    Genuine friendliness was my biggest takeaway from the American rural south. Sadly, obesity was second. White Southerners are huge, but black Southerners put them in the shade. I imagine this latter fact, along with (tragically) STDs, explains a lot of the disparate impact in healthy births.

    Healthy mother, healthy baby. Hopefully.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    , @AndrewR
    , @Flip
  3. @Tyrion 2

    I’d have thought platypelloid would be for Australian Aborigines.

  4. @Tyrion 2

    You have to remember also we are the only country that includes severely premature births (<20 weeks old) in infant mortality rates. Somehow, critics of the American health care system forget that little statistics keeping oddity.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
  5. I didn’t read the article, but did it imply this was the fault of racist white doctors?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @Hypnotoad666
  6. What about Jewish women?
    Hebroid? Chosenoid?

    • Replies: @Lurker
  7. jlee says: • Website

    Ok! so this creature is a gynocologist and anthropologist too.
    The increasing birth canal over evolutionary time exists to accomodate increasing head (i.e brain) size.
    This has been observed over evolutionary time (irrespective of , uh ,) race. Not going to argue any further with a creature with a nose piercing.

  8. Speaking of births, a Christian anti-abortion website is getting de-platformed by the Silicon Valley pooh-bahs:

    https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2018/10/29/christian-news-site-lifesite-blackhosted-by-web-host/

    This is a significant expansion of the great web censorship purge of right-wing wrongthink, attacking the very core of the USA fundamentalist Christian communities, what were once upon a time the great USA waves of Jerry Falwell and the ‘Moral Majority’

    Censorship of the Bible Christians, may be what further exposes the establishment ‘Christian leaders’ as hypocrites not really interested in the doctrines they preach, but rather just in serving the establishment … going along with the Powers That Be even when the wrecking ball is brought upon the Christian websites of the passionate believers who believed the TV evangelists

    • Replies: @notanon
  9. B36 says:

    Pelvic “shape” is a social construct.

    • Agree: NickG, Logan
    • Replies: @ben tillman
    , @Reg Cæsar
  10. Amazing how we’ve managed to socially construct a difference in birth canals between rac… er, populations.

  11. lead doctors to perform unnecessary interventions — like induced labor, cesarean sections or the use of forceps — which can further exacerbate harm,

    My understanding is that inducing labor is basically now the standard practice in commercial births. This and many other unnecessary and inhumane things are done to maximize revenue for the hospital and create conveniences for the medical staff. As well, women request inducement as it allows them to plan the birth of their child around their employer’s schedule (!).

    Documentary called Business of Being Born discusses this and paints a disturbing picture.

    Likely inspired by this movie, White mothers of means are increasingly opting for home births with midwives in order to avoid subjecting themselves and their newborns to the hospital birth experience.

    I rate this article as another entry in the genre of “neoliberal modernity really sucks, but our brains only work one way so racism must be to blame for it”.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  12. Aardvark says:

    It would also be interesting to study how adult children’s head shapes and head sizes are related to differences in mothers’ birth canal.

    Stewie says he totally wrecked Louis on the way out…

    • LOL: Dtbb
  13. slumber_j says:

    a European classical pelvis

    Nice! I guess that makes me generally a Classicist.

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  14. Jaypo says:

    Somebody needs to save the NYT columnists from the Ancestrist views of these doctors.

  15. “Compounding factors like interpersonal and institutional racism, poverty, poor health care access and environmental burdens disproportionately harm black mothers. ”

    And Kermit Gosnells. Wait what? He’s black? Nevermind!

    “And STD’s”

    That’s true Steve. Related:

    ““What worries me is that doctors come out of school thinking of the European model of the pelvis,” Dr. Betti said. In the early 1900s, this led to “horrific situations” in which American doctors used forceps on black mothers, trying to force babies to align with “the rotation pattern for a European classical pelvis,” she added. … ”

    Gosh they are really really scrapping the bottom of the racism barrel now aren’t they? Now racist white OB’s are performing racist white techniques of child birth on victimized black pelvises.

    Easy solution: Going forward ensure only African witch doctors deliver black babies.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  16. … it has been long known in obstetrical circles that pelvic types differ among populations.

    … the types are gynecoid, the most common overall. Anthropoid, common in African women. Android, common in European women. Platypelloid, common in Asian women.

    No doubt we will be seeing more of the Android type in the future.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    , @Seminumerical
  17. C-section births have become so common that one wonders what effect that will have on evolution. Will women become more narrow hipped?

    For a long time, like many men, I preferred slim women who tended to have narrow hips. (I was a sucker for little Audrey Hepburn types.) Among the ones who had children, a little, horizontal scar right above the Delta of Venus was common.

    I brought one of those women to meet my father, a wiser man, and he whispered to me, “she’s very pretty, but women are supposed to have hips.”

  18. “In the comments, various doctors, nurses, and midwives mention that instruction in racial differences were a normal part of training, at least in the past”

    My God, they, er, “noticed.”

  19. Frank G says:

    Or you could say Europeans have a more human pelvic shape.

  20. @Buzz Mohawk

    As an assman, that future seems bleak to me.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  21. “Strange thing, culture,” remarked senior nurse to junior—a rookie—as they cleaned up afterwards. “Whites curse and blacks holler. Hispanics I’ve known to actually sing. But the Chinese—not a whisper.” [Fire from the Sun, Ch. 71]

    Which I heard from an actual New York Ob-Gyn.

  22. @Buzz Mohawk

    I brought one of those women to meet my father, a wiser man, and he whispered to me, “she’s very pretty, but women are supposed to have hips.”

    Your Dad may just have had slightly different tastes, Buzz. I used to not really care about breasts at all. I saw the light though. I was not thinking of milk production, just like guys who like hippier girls aren’t really thinking about that birth canal, well, most of it. ;-}

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  23. “What worries me is that doctors come out of school thinking of the European model of the pelvis,” Dr. Betti said. In the early 1900s, this led to “horrific situations” in which American doctors used forceps on black mothers, trying to force babies to align with “the rotation pattern for a European classical pelvis,” she added. …

    It’s like the “redlining” of obstetrics; the further we are removed from it temporally, the more pernicious are its effects.

    • Replies: @Pericles
  24. “That was ‘remarkable and unexpected,’ the researchers wrote.”

    I am thinking of trees and insects and remembering vaguely that the flowering parts and sexual organs are the keys for unambiguous species identification. (Also the keys to keeping species separate.) So, if the human species has genetically distinct sub-groups, then the shape of the pelvis is one of the characteristics I would most expect to be different between the sub-groups.

  25. @John Derbyshire

    Interesting, Steve. You don’t know if they just don’t feel as much pain, or they really are that tough. Pain is something that can not be quantified, at least for one person vs. another.

    BTW, the Chinese woman are not tough in some ways – they stay at home at rest early on in the pregnancy, as I believe, they must have more trouble keeping a baby at the early stages. Additionally, they will stay in the hospital, or at least in bed at home, for a month after birth.

    Because this site is political in nature, it’s too bad you couldn’t get the real scoop from an actual OB, Dr. Ron Paul, right here. He’s got a lot more to say then END THE FED!

    • Replies: @3g4me
    , @Pat Boyle
  26. @John Derbyshire

    Sorry ’bout that. I just assumed Steve Sailer was up at this hour, Mr. Derbyshire! You should have 2 pieces of data on this, anyway.

  27. So how is this going to play out? “Racist white doctors, thinking all races are just the same”?

  28. Polynikes says:

    An interesting analysis would be how many articles from The New York Times claim that race exist as a biological factor versus how many articles claim that race is purely a social construct over, say, the last decade. I would guess at least three to one the latter over the former.

  29. @Buzz Mohawk

    For a long time, like many men, I preferred slim women who tended to have narrow hips. (I was a sucker for little Audrey Hepburn types.) Among the ones who had children, a little, horizontal scar right above the Delta of Venus was common.

    I brought one of those women to meet my father, a wiser man, and he whispered to me, “she’s very pretty, but women are supposed to have hips.”

    A young man is far more interested in what he can put into a young lady’s pelvis than what he can take out of it.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Desiderius
  30. @John Derbyshire

    But the Chinese—not a whisper.

    Which seems like the opposite of what one would expect, given the ratio of hip size to mental capacity. Amazing.

  31. @Buzz Mohawk

    C-section births have become so common that one wonders what effect that will have on evolution. Will women become more narrow hipped?

    C-sections have long been available but are now a sort of elective thing, and women have multiple reasons for choosing them over vaginal births – preserving the recreational utility of their lady parts among them. But it is one of those paradoxes of modern medicine that the technical ability to rescue mother and child from death during childbirth would leave large skulled, narrow hipped women in the gene pool.

    You have to imagine if this continues for a long enough time over many generations that some day humans may be so top-heavy with massive heads and tiny hips that they’ll have trouble standing upright without toppling over.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Autochthon
  32. AndrewR says:
    @Tyrion 2

    The curse of sweet tea and six months per year of sweltering humidity

  33. Tyrion 2 says:
    @John Derbyshire

    As with pain, pleasure also has reasonably distinct manners of expression.

  34. Jack D says:
    @John Derbyshire

    I heard the same thing from my wife’s Ob-Gyn – women of different races/cultures have very distinct ways of expressing themselves during delivery.

    • Replies: @anon
  35. @John Derbyshire

    When something is going in, Asians tend to squeak in a higher pitch. Whites and blacks get louder and lower in tone.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  36. Jack D says:

    This strikes me as being like the article about the “new discovery” that the Greeks and Romans painted their statues, when in fact this has been known for decades if not centuries.

    Maybe this is related to the fact that NY Times reporterettes nowadays all look like they are 12 years old and have been half-educated in some grievance studies program (albeit at a prestigious U). I have socks in my drawer that are older than they are.

    The old cynical line is “I was born at night but not last night” but these women really were born yesterday. For them, everything is new (especially when viewed through the amazing kaleidoscope of race/gender which allows you to see the world in a wonderfully new and woke way), even things that others have known for decades.

  37. Veracitor says:

    Does the article mention that Emmett Till was killed with obstetrical forceps?

    Pelvis shape variation is not news, at least not in the USA. To get American women riled up against evil white male Republican doctors, the article quotes a professor at a minor university in England:

    [British (but we don't mention that) medical textbooks are insufficiently multiracial] said Lia Betti, an anthropologist at the University of Roehampton in London, and the study’s lead author.

    The focacta New York Times should run more articles on Chagas disease and other tropical horrors coming to us with caravans of illegal aliens.

    The theory that the Northern races evolved wider hips to accommodate bigger heads holding bigger brains is not new either.

  38. Jack D says:
    @Alec Leamas

    The main driver of C-sections is doctors’ concern over getting sued for malpractice, not women’s desire to preserve their lady parts. Shawntavious come out a little short on oxygen and the doctor’s malpractice carrier has to pay millions to supposedly fund his care for the rest of his long life. Dr. does the C-section – Shawntavious ain’t no genius anyway but the Dr. doesn’t have to pay.

  39. anon[364] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alec Leamas

    That’s funny. But hip width (or, more precisely, female waist-to-hip ratio of about .69) is one of the most important sexual cues. However, it must vary between the races, or else we wouldn’t be seeing such pelvic width differences and preferences. E.g., black men are famously into steatopygy, which requires a particular pelvic structure to layer abundant fat “correctly” – i.e., a deep, narrow, Hottentot-type pelvis. I would guess that the mean waist-hip ratio in Oriental women also must be much less with those slim hips.

    But now it’s all a “social construct”, so such studies are just rediscovering what midwives had known for ages. Since it’s hard to dispute anatomical bone differences that can be plainly seen, the Chinese restaurant crowd at the NYT and elsewhere use it to smear the host White societies with charges of “interpersonal and institutional racism”. No, it can’t be anatomical differences that make some tasks more difficult or even dangerous, it’s racism.

  40. Cherub says:

    Thought you would find this interesting Sailer. A nice review I saw of She Has Her Mother’s Laugh, which I remember you mentioning on here. Link at the bottom.

    “What do we make of “She Has Her Mother’s Laugh”, Carl Zimmer’s latest, and at 600 pages, plumpest work? While ordinarily, I’d say you can skip the theatrics and read Korf’s genetics textbook and keep up with Am J Hum Genet, I still recommend “SHHML” to the layperson and scientist alike.
    Zimmer takes disperate fields and has mostly positive results in annealing a reasonable and cohesive narrative that leaves you satisfied. From the history of heredity, which is mostly an exercise in anthropology, and perhaps zoology, Zimmer then tackles the Darwin-Mendel-Lamarck-Galton pre-genetics era with the air of a historian. The problem is that half of this volume is retelling what Gould, Dawkisn and others have already done, and better. There’s far too much “gemmule” and far too little exon.
    So why pay attention? First, Zimmer is a tremendous writer. While it took time to finish and synthesize SHHML, there are few moments when the story drugs or is unreadable. Second, Gould is dated: epigenetics, let alone CRISPR, didn’t exist when he was alive. Zimmer impressively weaves bleeding edge advances without temporal distinction. In general, the book moves from the past to the future, but Zimmer prevents SHHML from becoming an encyclopedia by dragging the future backwards and vice versa when appropriate, and by bringing his personal genetics journey into the story to illuminate the science. Unfortunately, this works only to break monotony of what would be a reasonable textbook on the history of genetics–Zimmer feels impersonal and detached. She may have her mother’s laugh, but we never hear the joke.
    Another shortcoming is the substantial body of recent advances and basic facets of the subject which are completely left out. We can forgive Zimmer for excising topics like synthetic biology, alternative splicing, vaccines, CART and more, as he’s approaching the limit for a reasonable printing of a somewhat technical subject. This is not Principia Genetica.
    Despite this amnesty, Zimmer comes up short when we ventures into a few places, including alternative modes of inheritance. Nodding to the meme, Zimmer nonetheless biopasses prions or any discussion at all of computer science and bioinformatics. Recent papers on algorithms imitating nature and vice versa would have been a nice addition to admittedly already myriad vignettes.
    So, occassionally long-winded Zimmer does a great job of explaining sometimes abstract, sometimes concrete and always dense science. We’re left with an awfully preachy and bizarrely placed ending rant on the environment and politics. It would not be a modern mass-market published work without some social justice plea, I suppose. As someone who has made his living off of the subject matter in question, I can’t help but love SHHML. If you’re looking for a modern, up-to-date and reasonably comprehensive history of heredity and genetrics, Zimmer delivers.

    Figured I’d save this for after, to say it’s from Martin Shkreli’s blogs from jail. The 10/25 post at martinshkreli.com

    • Replies: @gcochran
    , @Pericles
  41. anon[364] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Not just women. A White or Black baby on a long flight – guaranteed screeching. Dozens of Asian babies on a 16-hour flight – nary a peep. I was absolutely amazed. Perhaps they were saving their screeching for the NYT pages some 20-odd years later.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @TheBoom
    , @Twinkie
    , @Lot
  42. Stick says:

    Even with vaginas, women of color are hardest hit. Is there no end to these racist discoveries? Who did black women consult before the advent of white doctors of no particular color?

    • Replies: @dr kill
  43. @Veracitor

    She’s not a professor, she’s a “Senior Lecturer in Evolutionary Anthropology”. Quite easy on the eye despite the SJW head-tilt.

    https://twitter.com/liabetti

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
  44. But they do seem to cause more trouble for gestation and birth.

    This is quite at odds with what I’ve heard from some hippy midwives, who say that European women think too hard about birth, and that they need to get more in touch with their inner monkeys, like their African sisters.

    I’m not making this up. I’ve actually heard midwives say these things, though usually not all in one go.

  45. L Woods says:

    In the early 1900s, this led to “horrific situations” in which American doctors used forceps on black mothers, trying to force babies to align with “the rotation pattern for a European classical pelvis,” she added. …

    Practicing racial non-discrimination is “horrific?”

    Everything they’ve forced on us for the past half-century is based on militant ignorance and flat out lies. And they’ll never be held accountable for it. They’ll keep their sinecures and their pensions and their status, and all their lives’ felicity. The norms and policies that define their multigenerational reign of destruction will continue, with slight modification to their supporting rationalizations at best. Above all they’ll never, ever allow that their hated, ‘stupid’ political enemies were right. Conservatives? They’ll keep watching ESPN.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  46. Flip says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Do you think it is fried foods?

  47. Truth says:

    For a long time, like many men, I preferred slim women who tended to have narrow hips. (I was a sucker for little Audrey Hepburn types.) Among the ones who had children, a little, horizontal scar right above the Delta of Venus was common.

    I brought one of those women to meet my father, a wiser man, and he whispered to me, “she’s very pretty, but women are supposed to have hips.”

    Hey, Old Sport, please join the conversation on the other thread. It begins at post #59.

    http://www.unz.com/jderbyshire/were-going-back-to-puritanism-how-did-this-happen-why-wasnt-i-asked/#comment-2599407

  48. @Veracitor

    ‘[British (but we don't mention that) medical textbooks are insufficiently multiracial] said Lia Betti, an anthropologist at the University of Roehampton in London, and the study’s lead author.

    Man, I’m behind the times. My immediate reaction to that was ‘why should British medical textbooks be multi-racial’?

  49. BenKenobi says:

    Evil YT, at it again.

    “Become a physician, so that you may do harm to the [blacks].”

    Maybe I’m remembering that last part wrong…

    • Replies: @rbbebrod
  50. @Jack D

    AGREED about the apparent naivety of these young reporters, Jack. Upon reading the excerpts again, there is another thing that keeps standing out as a theme in lots of these articles that Steve Sailer reads for us (NY Times, Atlantic, whatever…) . That is, we all are supposed to be getting more aware that it’s not a white country anymore. That’s what this article seems to be preaching:

    Hey, even OB docs better get with the times! This is not just your country anymore. Not all birth canals are the same. Did you know that? Well, now you do! (ohh, you did, well, DIVERSITY!”

    The reason I wrote “apparent naivety” above is that I think, as Veracitor below (and the excellent Brenda Walker @ VDare) points out, there are SERIOUS health problems that Americans haven’t had to deal with for a half-century or more that have come back. It’s all do to uncontrolled immigration.

    One would think, that to be an ace reporter and do a service to the public to make one’s life meaningful, one should get into these stories of these old diseases coming back. Lots of people get sick, even lots of women and minorities (so there’s that), and some die. I guess destroying the American culture and white race is more meaningful – I mean, that’s what I’m getting from all of this.

  51. Lowe says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    My wife is a small woman. Her giving birth to my son is among the most traumatic experiences of my life. I sat there watching nurses and doctors come and go. They did some interventions, such as putting an electrode on the baby’s head to more accurately measure heart rate, manually bursting her water, and finally a cesarean section. I asked them about everything, but couldn’t find good reason to object to any one thing.

    By the time they rolled her out to the OR, I was deeply worried for my child’s health, as well as my wife’s. It was not an experience I remember fondly, at least not until we had the baby, finally. One of my paternal aunts had a similar experience with her first child, only it lasted even longer. She was also not a large person, her hips fairly narrow.

  52. Liza says:

    How can anyone discuss this topic without mentioning the grossly un-natural birthing position forced on women of all races – resulting in gross medical interventions.

  53. @Alec Leamas

    I don’t know, by this logic shouldn’t we all also be going blind due to spectacles, and any other number of things? It would happen over such a long span of time – millennia – that it is probably kind of like worrying about the sun’s inevitable demise: humans just aren’t much cañable of being that concerned for such distant future events.

    • Replies: @donut
  54. Whowhom says:

    I’m enjoying this new MSM article trend of “race is real, but it’s not real.”

  55. Could they please publish a comprehensive list of the biological racial differences it is racist to know about as well as a list of the biological racial differences it is racist NOT to know about? Let’s also get daily update emails when a thing moves from one list to the other.

    It’s tough when you get called a racist who doesn’t care about the deaths of black babies for not knowing that black women have big butts… ahem… deep pelvises. Even the original Becky from Baby Got Back is more woke than you on the PQ.

    Maybe some of you keep up with all this, but there are some unclear points. For example, I’m pretty sure it’s okay to know about bone density differences since this shows that black people are tougher than white people. We already covered pelvis shapes… so you may think you’re in the clear with the skeletal system but… is it okay to know about skull circumference differences also? How about if you know about skull circumference but make very sure not to know about IQ correlation?

    But skull shape might be relevant to birth and that means healthcare outcome disparities… so you might also be a racist white person who murders black babies on purpose if you DON’T know it. Maybe you can know it if you’re currently delivering a baby but not at other times?

    It’s bad to say blacks are biologically better at running when you’re talking about football or sprinting but good to say they are better at running when it’s DISTANCE running. I think. If you relate this to the pelvic differences that are racist not to know, does that then make it okay?

    Also not sure about the status of innate black rhythmic ability. It’s been scientifically shown and it suggests a positive ability that could make blacks superior to whites, so that’s good, but it could also suggest that you believe in stereotypes about black people singing and dancing, which is bad, unless it’s a black comedian / writer for the root making fun of white people dancing, which is also good.

    I’ve been getting screened for sickle cell to show how much I don’t believe in race but I find I’m getting dirty looks from people with deep pelvises.

    It’s getting hard out here for an NPC.

    • Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat
  56. “It would also be interesting to study how adult children’s head shapes and head sizes are related to differences in mothers’ birth canal.”

    I’m sure funding for this study will be forthcoming, schnarf, schnarf.

    • Replies: @anon
  57. OT

    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2018/10/how-trumps-dark-genius-is-rolling-back-the-blue-wave

    “Trump’s fecklessness at least comes with threat awareness, which is why, despite doing nothing meaningful to address the caravan, he can capitalize on it. We’ve seen that wealthy developed nations are paralyzed by a central reality of life in the 21st century: billions of poor people in distant countries have the means and motive to move to rich countries. A momentary loosening of borders in Germany for a few months in 2015 led to the arrival of over a million people. The pressures will only grow in the decades ahead. By 2050, the population of Mexico alone will have increased by 30 million. The population of India will have increased by 400 million. The population of Africa, now at 1.2 billion, will have doubled. Barring economic miracles, wealth disparities between nations will remain vast and the attraction of Europe and North America great. The incentive for mass migration will only increase as climate change makes vast areas of the tropics less and less habitable for millions of people. Refugee resettlement and unauthorized migration are poised to become the most pressing issues in Western politics, surpassing even their current contentiousness.”

    • Replies: @Lurker
  58. @Jack D

    It sounds like some kind of tort reform is needed. Would you agree?

    A while back, I read what you wrote about the detrimental effect of lawsuits on private aviation, a field I have had some exposure to. You were spot on. No doubt the lawsuits you mentioned here concerning childbirths has had a similar effect on medical insurance costs.

    This seems like the kind of thing in need of a Goldilocks optimum solution (which is perhaps analogous to what you said about dynamite on the internet).

    People have the right to seek justice when they are wronged, but how do we draw limits? My father’s career (and my personal fortune) was effected by a historic class action against his company, and he told me a lot about it over the dinner table. That’s how I first became aware of the massive effects these things can have, right or wrong.

    What can be done?

  59. notanon says:

    the NYT had an article a while back where they didn’t mention racial differences in pelvis shape and size but instead blamed the differences in miscarriage rates on white racism

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/11/magazine/black-mothers-babies-death-maternal-mortality.html

    every article in the NYT has to conform to their anti-white narrative

  60. Damn lies Steve! Race does not exist, or is socially constructed, or is only “skin deep”, or something.

  61. JimB says:

    Steph Yin should have formulated his thesis sentence after checking the internet. Western medicine in the fashion of Galen continually updates its information about human anatomy. Here is something posted in 2013.

    http://www2.birthbalance.com/pelvic-types/

    It’s interesting because it relates the pelvis type to how body fat is distributed. Apparently 20% of women are born with an android “true male” pelvis and are the most likely candidates for a caesarean section. Woman with a gynecoid pelvis are the ones who can look like a Barbie doll and have the easiest time giving birth. 50% of white women have a gynecoid pelvis.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  62. Anon[273] • Disclaimer says:

    There’s an amazing amount of nonsense in race/sex medical reporting. For example, it’s been said that black women have a higher rate of premature births than white women. What they don’t mention is that one of the side effects of herpes or chlamyida infection is that they can cause premature birth.

    Almost half (48%) of all black women have herpes. Their infection rate is insanely high. Well, there’s the reason why they have more premature births right there, yet no admits it. They don’t have premature births because of ‘racism,’ as stupid white liberals say.

    One more interesting fact. The rate of black male herpes infection is 30%. The only way women can have a 48% ratio to the men’s 30% ratio is that the long-held complaints of black men about black women happen to be correct. Black women are ‘hos’ and do sleep around more than black men do. The sexual disease rate confirms this. It’s as solid an indicator of real-life sexual activity and cheating on your partner as any you can come across.

    Link for disease rates:

    https://newsone.com/539725/leading-black-doctor-we-cant-ignore-truth-about-herpes/

    • Replies: @notanon
  63. @Jack D

    ‘The main driver of C-sections is doctors’ concern over getting sued for malpractice, not women’s desire to preserve their lady parts. Shawntavious come out a little short on oxygen and the doctor’s malpractice carrier has to pay millions to supposedly fund his care for the rest of his long life. Dr. does the C-section – Shawntavious ain’t no genius anyway but the Dr. doesn’t have to pay.’

    Yeah. I’ve seen other examples of this as well. The fear of malpractice drives a tendency to prescribe unnecessary procedures. If there is even the possibility of something occurring, the doctor needs to show he did everything possible.

    First example: my wife’s first delivery was artificially induced. She had elevated levels of protein in her urine — theoretically, a sign of impending kidney failure, I think it was.

    The next birth, we have a midwife. She looks at the figures and says ‘these aren’t anything to worry about. We’ll monitor it, but if that’s as high as they go, there’s no need to do anything at all.’

    Second example. I had had a heart attack. I thought I might be having another. I wasn’t sure, but needless to say, having almost died once, I was disinclined to take a chance. So it was off to the local clinic.

    After about three hours of tests and observation, it was abundantly clear to me that I had not had a heart attack. I had failed to allow for being nearly sixty and had pushed myself too hard while coming off a cold.

    Moreover, this must have been obvious to everyone else in the clinic as well. But I had to practically fight my way out of the place. They were not going to take the responsibility of agreeing ‘yeah, you’re fine: go home.’

    The irony here is that of course I’m not an expert on heart attacks. I’ve only had experience with one — mine. Yet I was the one who had to make the call. The medical profession was effectively rendered incapable of making a reasoned, balanced decision — and they’re the ones who had the expertise.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  64. @Buzz Mohawk

    What can be done?

    I dunno. Why are you asking me? Ask Bill Shakespeare.*

    The Senator(s) from Kansas helped get tort reform legislation passed to help General Aviation back in 1998 or so. The idea was to make it difficult to sue Piper, Cessna, and Beechcraft for problems with airplanes that were 20 years old or more (most likely not due to the original engineering on the plane). It helped Cessna (based in Kansas) and Piper (Florida) get back into the business of building single-engine piston planes again.

    However, the liability concerns, along with just inflation, made these new airplanes so expensive compared to the restoration of an older plane to just as nice (back to a zero-time engine). Sales have not been anything like those in the 1950′s through 1970′s. Within 5-10 years after that, gas went way up, the economy was already in its steady slide, and so general aviation at that level never recovered.

    BTW, with local governments and all 3 branches of Fed-Gov filled with lawyers, it’s pretty to find any way to reduce the number of economy-draining lawyers.

    .

    * In Accounts Receivable.

  65. Anonymous[105] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Convenience (of both doctor and patient) is still a significant driver of C-section rates as well.

    C-section deliveries showed the greatest clustering at certain times, peaking at 8 a.m. (11.6 percent of such deliveries) and again at noon (7.4 percent). Induced vaginal births were also clustered in the 9-to-5 workday, in contrast to non-induced vaginal births, which were spread evenly throughout the 24-hour day.

  66. Jack D says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Don’t have answers but this explains why childbirth might cost whoever pays $500 in some European countries where midwives are used and vaginal births are the norm, vs $25,000 in the US for a C-section of which half or more represents the legal costs in the system.

    Once you understand this you understand in part why the US health care system is heading toward consuming 100% of our GDP but with no better outcomes than places that spend a fraction of what we spend. Our neighbor to the South, Mexico, spends bubkes on their whole health care system but their life expectancy is within spitting distance of US levels, which makes you wonder what we are getting for all that money.

    One possible answer is some sort of “no fault” or “workmen’s comp” type system where injuries are compensated but with very strict limits. No awards of millions of $ for “pain & suffering”, no punitive damages, etc.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  67. George says:

    Maybe different races have the same IQ potential just like they have the same baby potential if each race is given optimal opportunity to achieve their maximum IQ.

    For some reason, the low birthrate in the west is not attributed to some genetic inferiority that cannot be overcome when compared to Africans.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  68. Trick or Treat? In case you are having a hard time deciding, here’s my birth canal:

  69. Jack D says:
    @Colin Wright

    The latest findings are that inducing labor a little early (which we ended up doing for both of my kids) is really a good idea. Much better than waiting until Johnny is the size of a linebacker and isn’t going to come out other than by C-section. It’s not a big or costly intervention – just a shot of the right hormone to trigger labor (and may be the solution for the evolutionary big head/small hips issue). After that, labor proceeds just as nature intended. The kid will “ripen” just fine out of the womb if you get him out a few days early while he still stands a chance of fitting thru the hips.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    , @AnonAnon
  70. @Alec Leamas

    Hips come in handy there as well.

    • Replies: @Je Suis Omar Mateen
  71. Jack D says:
    @JimB

    Steph is a she. This kind of crap reporting, especially where the subject matter is female issues, is almost always written by a woman, although the woman doesn’t always appear to be female.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  72. @Jack D

    Sounds like even more government interference, when I thought no more was even possible. Every tried a free market?

    Yes, we had that 50-odd years ago*, and China has something very close nowadays (Part 2, Part 3, and a postscript) – personal experience talking here.

    .

    * and don’t confuse the business end with the science/technology. Sure, the science and tech is way advanced compared to 1965, but the business end is a complete shitshow compared to the old days.

  73. Anonymous[271] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    GA product liability is an irrational market because the airframe manufacturers didn’t want to win. They wanted to make corporate jets and not single engine recips, and this made such a policy easy for the MBAs to implement, before the Texteon and Raytheon buyouts. I lived in Wichita in those years and watched it happen.

    Ban product liability insurance or at least put in mandatory copays and coinsurance and outlaw secret settlements and of course, loser pays. Problem largely solved.

  74. @Jack D

    “What was the name again?”

    “Steph, as in ‘Stephalococcus’.”

    “Ohhh, whyn’t ya just say Stephanie?”

  75. @Jack D

    Hard to know much when all one reads is Twitter.

  76. Lurker says:
    @Veracitor

    Ive just been arguing with an anthropologist on Disqus. He informs me that there are no significant differences between people (race isn’t real). In effect rendering his discipline entirely redundant. Unbelievable!

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  77. anon[331] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mark P Miller

    I think there are NIH RFAs (requests for applications, i.e. grant proposal solicitations) to investigate “disparities in health outcomes”. Be sure to incorporate pelvis shape, STDs, and drug use as causes you propose to investigate for the health disparities, it’s sure to get funded!

  78. @Jack D

    ‘The latest findings are that inducing labor a little early…is really a good idea…’

    I only have a sample of one to go on — but I can’t agree. My wife’s delivery was induced about two weeks early (this being in 1988). She was lying there quivering and jerking for about eleven hours — not pleasant to watch, and I’m sure not pleasant to endure.

    Then while our daughter has always been healthy and is extremely intelligent, her hair has always been very thin, and she’s somewhat shorter than one would expect — she’s 5’5″ and her brother is 6’2″.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  79. Lurker says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Only a racist would want to combat climate change since it points to an unconscious desire to avoid mass-enrichment.

  80. It sounds like some kind of tort reform is needed. Would you agree?

    A while back, I read what you wrote about the detrimental effect of lawsuits on private aviation, a field I have had some exposure to. You were spot on. No doubt the lawsuits you mentioned here concerning childbirths has had a similar effect on medical insurance costs.

    I know that Jack is a current or retired practitioner (can’t remember which) as am I (active).

    It would require Constitutional Amendments and raise the costs of trying cases but I think a change from lay to professional jurors would be the most positive change in terms of delivering the correct outcome to cases and controversies by applying the law to facts established by evidence. Marginal cases with bad facts that could nevertheless withstand Summary Judgment would probably have much less value as well.

    If you’ve ever participated in a jury trial you’d know that it is a special sort of insanity to believe that laymen impressed into service after being chosen from a random pool can listen to a complex set of contested and conflicting evidence, pull out the relevant facts, listen to the Judge explain the relevant law to them cold one time, and then render a correct result in concert with other laypeople who have just done the same thing.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  81. @Buzz Mohawk

    “For a long time, like many men, I preferred slim women who tended to have narrow hips.”

    For a long time I also preferred narrow hips…. and then I hit puberty. Suddenly I noticed women were much more than boobies and a pretty face.

    The gaystream media condition men of normal sexuality to adopt the sexual ideal of pedosomites: i.e., bird-chested prepubescent boys with delicate shoulders and nonexistent hips.

    The most attractive, head-turning women are curvy, not boyish. 19th-Century authors frequently praised women as “plump” or even “fat” — but there was no gaystream media back then to pollute their minds and loins.

    • Agree: Federalist
    • Replies: @jim jones
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  82. @George

    ‘…For some reason, the low birthrate in the west is not attributed to some genetic inferiority that cannot be overcome when compared to Africans.’

    Could the reason be historical, statistically verifiable evidence? Birthrates among whites in the West can be very high. No fear.

  83. @Lurker

    ‘Ive just been arguing with an anthropologist on Disqus. He informs me that there are no significant differences between people (race isn’t real)…’

    I’ve always found this so bizarre. Aside from statistical evidence, you have to literally disregard what you see in front of you every day — either that or simply never encounter a good, random sampling of — say — blacks.

    It’s a mental feat on the order of living in Michigan and insisting winter is no cooler than summer. I don’t understand how people can delude themselves to this extent.

  84. @Desiderius

    “Hips come in handy there as well.”

    LOL. Well, handy two-thirds of the time, though not so much in the One True Christian Way of making babies promoted by the Missionary’s.

  85. jJay says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Buzz,

    Off hand, I don’t see much of a correlation between hip width and C-section births. There are a billion Chinese after all, and most haven’t had access to modern surgery until recently.

    My first GF was of Irish descent. After some examination I could tell she would need a C-section. She was of normal girth, not Audrey Hepburn thin. I was right, it turned out.

    I can’t find a link to it now, but Cecil Adams was asked the question “How do I find the sex of cat?” To which he replied, “You pick it up and examine it.”

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  86. notanon says:
    @Brabantian

    they’ve been shutting down leftist anti-war sites too – social media tyrants seems to be hell-bent on creating as big a hostile revolutionary coalition as possible.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  87. Clever headline to this blog post.

  88. @Redneck farmer

    Red, so confusing. One day there are no races and the next day we have racist doctors. “La Raza’ should change their name to “Social Constructo.”

  89. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Mike, the most unsafe place in the USA for a black baby is the black womb.

  90. For a long time I also preferred narrow hips…. and then I hit puberty. Suddenly I noticed women were much more than boobies and a pretty face.

    The gaystream media condition men of normal sexuality to adopt the sexual ideal of pedosomites: i.e., bird-chested prepubescent boys with delicate shoulders and nonexistent hips.

    The most attractive, head-turning women are curvy, not boyish. 19th-Century authors frequently praised women as “plump” or even “fat” — but there was no gaystream media back then to pollute their minds and loins.

    My understanding is that the ideal female body type in popular culture fluctuates with other social stimuli, particularly economic factors.

    I recall reading that in times of plenty, slender framed women seem to come to the fore. The ideal flapper of the roaring 20s was thin and willowy, complemented by the popular straight cut dresses. During the Great Depression and WWII, the ideal female form became bustier and curvier as typified from the pinup girls of that age.

    There’s probably some obvious evolutionary factors at work here – you don’t have to ask why male biology might favor a curvier female form during times of strife and deprivation when you think about the relative ability of thin and curvy women to withstand that deprivation in carrying a healthy baby to full term.

    Personally I have found women all along the spectrum of female body types from thin and light of bust all the way to curvy quite attractive. (where curvy isn’t a ridiculous synonym for fat). I would say anything from Keira Knightly to Christina Hendricks is fine by me.

  91. Lurker says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    If the one on the right is an android – sign me up!

    • Replies: @Seminumerical
  92. Maybe one of the more talented commenters here could link to Monty Python’s “The Meaning of life” where the Catholic mother births a baby while washing dishes.

  93. Jack D says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    For criminal trials it makes sense to have a jury system with the possibility of jury nullification – ultimately the jury is applying its common sense and gut feeling to whether the guy deserves to be in jail or not , statutes and jury instructions (which they don’t really understand anyway) be damned. This serves as a check on the power of the state.

    But for civil suits I agree that asking people with sometimes 8th grade educations to apply complex legal doctrines to difficult fact patterns is insanity. We don’t let random groups of lay people make decisions about bridge design or surgical treatments or other complex matters and for damn good reasons.

  94. L Woods says:

    women were much more than boobies and a pretty face.

    Citation needed.

  95. notanon says:
    @Anon

    that must mean there’s a lot of black incels – which is obvious now you mention it but never occurred to me.

    useful info in the context of criminal justice policy i.e. “hey black dudes – if we lock up all the gangstas you will have a better chance of getting a gf”

  96. …varies tremendously between populations, according to a new study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

    Races.

    …measures of leg, arm and general body proportion that are known to vary significantly between populations.

    Races.

    Mostly, they found, pelvic shape varied along lines of geographic ancestry.

    Races.

    …it has been long known in obstetrical circles that pelvic types differ among populations.

    Races.

    And that’s only in Steve’s quoted sections.

  97. What textbooks was the author consulting? I guess I’m showing my age, but it has been long known in obstetrical circles that pelvic types differ among populations.

    The narrative is more important than mere facts!

  98. @Jack D

    Agreed about the criminal cases – I think the transactions are generally within the ken of a layman to understand (i.e., a stabbing, robbery), and the elements of those crimes are often simple enough that a lay jury can handle deciding whether the prosecution has proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt. Things probably get trickier with more complex criminal statutes, conspiracies, and dueling scientific or financial experts.

    Early in my career I worked on a large commercial litigation file. The primary document was probably eighty plus pages in length, and it literally took me at least a year and a half until the real fundamentals of the deal sunk in to my understanding. After a week and a half jury trial with 600+ exhibits admitted into evidence, the jury went back for an afternoon and didn’t take a scrap of paper with them to render a verdict on a Friday afternoon in August.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  99. notanon says:

    the BBC says there has been lots of black people in Britain since Roman times which means UK doctors must have had lots of experience with different pelvises which means their not teaching about those differences in medical school is clearly racist.

    unless the BBC is lying about there being lots of black people in the UK before the 1950s but denying that is racist too.

    tricky.

  100. Michelle says:

    As a woman, let me just say that I am happy that men like a variety of pelvic types, as women possess a variety of pelvic types. If men only liked one width, large, small or in-between, that would leave women with one of the other types without male companionship and I would feel very sad for them/myself. Although I imagine there would be less pelvic variety if men chose to breed only with women of one pelvic types. Just occasional throwbacks or mutations.

  101. fish says:
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    Once an attention whore always an attention whore!

  102. Jack D says:
    @Colin Wright

    A sample of 1 is really hard to go by. My understanding is that things like height and hair texture are driven largely by genetics (and to some extent by diet) and a couple of weeks, more or less, of gestation vs. full term (not so much as to require incubation and other interventions) doesn’t change that. (Prematurity is usually defined as more than 3 weeks before full term).

    Both of my kids were induced and they both are of above average height (and taller than you would expect from parental height).

    While your wife apparently had an unpleasant day, vaginal birth is, statistically, preferable in terms of maternal health to C-section which is, after all, a type of surgery, with all the concomitant risks of complications (infection, bleeding, etc.) that go with surgery. This was confirmed by the most recent studies.

    • Replies: @Anne Lid
  103. Kylie says:
    @White Guy In Japan

    “As an assman, that future seems bleak to me.”

    It shouldn’t. The future seems to be Africa.

    • Disagree: Rosie
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @Rosie
    , @anon
  104. Dan Smith says:

    I retired from medicine 6 years ago. When I was in training (late 70s), controversy raged about the the indications for C sections. Textbooks taught that X-Ray pelvimetry (dimensions of the pelvis objectively measured)had utility in predicting the likelihood of failure to progress in labor. Some smart aleck family practice residents then published a study showing no correlation between pelvimetry and successful vaginal delivery. So what these anthropologists are writing about is no more accurate than phrenology.

  105. It’s almost as if race is a biological construct and not a social one.

  106. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT Terrence Malick, the greatest living auteur filmmaker in the Anglosphere and a traditional Catholic, is producing a documentary about overdosed aspiring gangster rapper Lil Peep.

    https://www.indiewire.com/2018/10/terrence-malick-lil-peep-documentary-1202016842/

  107. jim jones says:
    @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    I find that Korean girls have the best proportions:

  108. Jack D says:
    @anon

    They put Ambien in their baby bottles before the flight.

  109. J.Ross says: • Website
    @John Derbyshire

    What is it the Chinese say about the inescapable theme of human life being quietly storing up frustration and pain?
    But yeah, this proves they’re Scientologists.

  110. Rosie says:
    @L Woods

    Practicing racial non-discrimination is “horrific?”

    Imagine if they didn’t use forceps or whatever! It’s probably a DIYD/DIYD situation.

  111. @YetAnotherAnon

    At the University of Roehampton, ha ha ha. Founded as recently as 2004.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Roehampton

    Not a real professor, not a real university.

  112. Rosie says:
    @Kylie

    Disagree was supposed to be an LOL!

  113. 3g4me says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    @25 Achmed E. Newman: ” Chinese woman are not tough in some ways – they stay at home at rest early on in the pregnancy, as I believe, they must have more trouble keeping a baby at the early stages. Additionally, they will stay in the hospital, or at least in bed at home, for a month after birth.”

    I’ve commented here before on the Han practice of confinement (which includes not bathing so as not to get rheumatism or arthritis), which was widely practiced in Singapore when I lived there in the early ’90s. No idea whether or not Han women are ‘tough’ re childbirth, because in Singapore at that time a huge % of births were elective C sections (so they could keep their figure) or induced labor (for an auspicious birthday) with lots of epidurals and drugs. The only women who wanted ‘natural childbirth’ were the White Westerners (they kept telling me to shush as they hurried me to the delivery room).

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @Liza
  114. njguy73 says:

    OK, how about this: any White woman who acts as a surrogate for a Black couple’s baby, as to prevent the Black woman from any bad birthing experience, is permanently exempt from being labelled “Becky”, and may speak to the manager whenever she wants.

    Fair enough?

  115. anon[117] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    I can’t tell if you’re kidding or not.

  116. anon[117] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kylie

    If you’re into Hottentot-type protuberances.

  117. @Saint Louis

    Well,didn’t Elvis have a black pelvis?

  118. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT It’s over. I was like yourselves fellow normal teenaged American persons a Trump supporter, but now; that he has done this one offensive thing he has assuredly gone too far: and I am now … a Cruz missile. HILLDAWGS RISE UP!

    “Republicans don’t know how to fight. I will teach them!”

  119. “Birthing babies”? Someone is going to be getting mad at Steve King pretty soon, again

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @L Woods
  120. dr kill says:
    @Tyrion 2

    Boy, that reminds me of a great joke.

  121. @Saint Louis

    Move on, peasant, nothing to see here…

  122. donut says:
    @Jack D

    You may have heard the one about American tourist in SE Asia . There’s a mother holding a squalling baby at a bus stop . The mother casually starts playing with his little pecker and he quiets down pretty quick . They’d have a swat team on her here .

  123. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT The Deep State is probably using crowdfunding to launder money and support subversive projects, and political crowdfunding could stand some police attention, especially when you have a wealthy and well-employed person like the terrifiedly globetrotting Doctor Professor Kahuna Ford receiving huge and unnecessary gifts through GoFundMe. But not everyone is a scumbag:

    https://www.dailywire.com/news/37801/brett-kavanaugh-turns-down-over-600k-raised-hank-berrien

  124. dr kill says:
    @Stick

    I’m not going to explain this joke, either.

  125. @Buck Turgidson

    Or Butterfly McQueen from Gone With the Wind.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  126. donut says:
    @Autochthon

    I read some where that hunter gatherers pretty much all have 20/20 vision so maybe we are all going near sighted at least .

    After an exhaustive 60 second search I did find this :

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2009-07-men-distance-vision-due-hunter-gatherer.html

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @J.Ross
    , @Dtbb
  127. @donut

    Baseball hitters tend to have sensational eyesight. I doubt many of them sat inside during summer days reading books.

  128. L Woods says:
    @Buck Turgidson

    Does anyone follow his facebook page? It’s like 24/7 4chan memes.

  129. Key to understanding the human brain is understanding the human pelvis.

    Narrower pelvic brims are biomechanically more efficient for standing, walking, running and jumping. Think about the extreme of the legs completely splayed out in a lizard-like stance. You don’t see this much; pretty much all animals have evolved to put their legs as directly beneath their weight as possible so that weight can be passively supported by compression forces on the femur, instead of active contraction of the supporting musculature.

    Unfortunately this creates a big problem for large-brained creatures since they have to give birth through the pelvis. So there evolutionary counter-pressure to expand the hips, (as well as give birth to relatively immature infants; think about how it takes a human a year to walk while a horse can walk the day it is born…)

    Not surprisingly there is a large amount of sexual dimorphism between men and women, one of the easiest ways to tell if a pelvis is male or female is to check the angle of the pubic symphisis.

    There is also racial variation in pelvis size; different races end up with the narrowest pelvis that they can get away with, essentially, given the baby’s expected cranial volume. Although it seems like black women have larger hips on average, the pelvic outlet itself is actually narrower than in Europeans and Asians. I’m too lazy to look up a citation but you can find papers on this on Google scholar or sci hub pretty easily.

    The upshot of this is that you would expect the race with the smallest cranial volume to be the best at activities that involve lots of running and jumping (on average.)

    Note also that the shoulder girdle is not subject to this evolutionary constraint. And you see a much more even racial distribution in sports that are more about upper body movement/coordination/strength. For example quarterback or pitcher. And when you remove gravity (e.g. aquatic sports) this is no longer an issue and pelvic anatomy is much less important.

  130. Anne Lid says:
    @Jack D

    “An unpleasant day”, you say? From the birth stories I have read it is clear that for most women when they get a shot of artificial oxytocin the pain level goes through the roof. Not at all like a natural birth that goes as expected. I don’t know about the US, but in other countries women don’t automatically get EDA or some other efficient painkiller. Sometimes the oxytocin doesn’t even help and it ends in a C-section.

  131. OT: The bodies of two dead Saudi sisters were found, duct-taped together, in the Hudson River. The elder sister was a student in NYC, and the younger sister lived with her.

    From https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6337459/Sisters-drowned-duct-taped-ordered-Saudi-Arabia-DAY-bodies-washed-up.html

    On October 23, the girls’ mother Wafa’a received a phone call from an official at the Saudi Arabian consulate who ordered the entire family to return to their home country. It was in response to an application by the two sisters for political asylum in the United States.

    The sisters’ father has since arrived in New York following news of their death.

    It remains unclear what he did for a living but he frequently traveled between the US and Saudi Arabia for work.

    The family moved to Virginia in 2015. It is not known why this was where they chose to settle.

    They lived in Falls Church, VA, inside the Beltway.

    This may be a tragic double suicide. If it is not, it might be as sinister as the murder of Jamal Khashoggi.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  132. Whiskey says: • Website

    Steve can’t we have another golf architecture post?

  133. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT thread discussing Bowling Alone: Samhain Edition. Multiple people complain about basketball-Americans showing up from out of town, by car, with no costumes, and looking a wee bit old to be trick or treating. A Canadian confirms that this is an international phenomenon. Many want to be able to get whatever costume they choose without puritanical grievances. A polack joke. One guy claims he still has the old-fashioned open-ended neighborhood costume party without any of these encumbrances — in Idaho.

    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/191570726

  134. @Anonymousse

    It’s bad to say blacks are biologically better at running when you’re talking about football or sprinting but good to say they are better at running when it’s DISTANCE running. I think.

    The reason it’s OK to say blacks are better at distance running is because distance running is an upper-class sport. You can’t say blacks are good at sprinting and football because those are prole sports.

    • Replies: @Logan
  135. J.Ross says: • Website
    @donut

    Apparently refined sugar (in addition to all its other gifts) kills eyesight, but one guy that was on Oprah (the quantum of scientific certainty) has claimed that your eyesight can come back if you eliminate refined sugar and keep it out. The theory goes that cells don’t expect to find a lot of sugar and are using its frequency as a kind of clock. A normal amount of fruit means you are aging properly and cells should continue making themselves. An American way of snacking means you must have gone through your lifetime already.

  136. @White Guy In Japan

    As an assman, why are you in Japan?

    • Replies: @White Guy In Japan
  137. Anonymous[373] • Disclaimer says:

    Six Degrees of Guilt-By-Association: ADL Calls on Paul Ryan to denounce Steve King.

  138. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT It is claimed that there are coordinated riots in France.

    A purge is happening right now in multiple [F]rench towns. People are out in the streets destroying things and breaking into cars. When was the last time you had something like this, [USA]?

  139. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Jack D

    Jury nullification and not voting is the purest expression of the ideals of the Founders, but it doesn’t work at all with multikulti or the new racial consciousness. NPR did this triumphalist Stasi piece on catching out prosecutors admitting that they didn’t want blacks on juries. Nobody admits that for all practical purposes they are not Americans. Giving the keys to a hostile alien who hates your laws if he thinks of them at all doesn’t make any self-interested sense. The solution to the information gap should be a drastic reform of administrative and overgrown law coupled with education. For the time being you’re right that the average person cannot intelligently rewrite legal technicalities, but it seems to me that we could fix that. And of course law talkers are present to explain things; procedure could be modified to accommodate answering questions.

  140. @Jack D

    The hapless scandal-ridden Senator and two-time presidential candidate John Edwards made a lot of money in this racket:

    From John Edwards wiki page:

    In 1985, Edwards represented a five-year-old child born with cerebral palsy – a child whose mother’s doctor did not choose to perform an immediate Caesarean delivery when a fetal monitor showed she was in distress. Edwards won a $6.5 million verdict for his client, but five weeks later, the presiding judge sustained the verdict, but overturned the award on grounds that it was “excessive” and that it appeared “to have been given under the influence of passion and prejudice,” adding that in his opinion “the evidence was insufficient to support the verdict.”[7] He offered the plaintiffs $3.25 million, half of the jury’s award, but the child’s family appealed the case and received $4.25 million in a settlement.[7] Winning this case established the North Carolina precedent of physician and hospital liability for failing to determine if the patient understood the risks of a particular procedure.[9]

    After this trial, Edwards gained national attention as a plaintiff’s lawyer. He filed at least twenty similar lawsuits in the years following and achieved verdicts and settlements of more than $60 million for his clients. Similar lawsuits followed across the country. When asked about an increase in Caesarean deliveries nationwide, perhaps to avoid similar medical malpractice lawsuits, Edwards said, “The question is, would you rather have cases where that happens instead of having cases where you don’t intervene and a child either becomes disabled for life or dies in utero?”[7]

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  141. @Buffalo Joe

    Kylie. touche’

    Non. Ne touchez pas!

    #MoiAussi!

    • LOL: Kylie
  142. @Redneck farmer

    Indeed, remember that being mentioned back during the days of the Clinton Administration. Somehow it never gets mentioned by the media, I can’t imagine why.

  143. AnonAnon says:
    @Jack D

    The latest findings are that inducing labor a little early (which we ended up doing for both of my kids) is really a good idea.

    Yeah, I suspect it’s a “good idea” for the doctor who wants a more regular workday. I had two induced labors. You don’t get a “shot” of the right hormone, you get an IV with Pitocin. IVs limits your ability to walk around and help labor progress. I had two induced labors, one because my water burst (a couple days beyond my due date) but I didn’t naturally go into labor and the second because my blood pressure spiked at my 38 week appointment and the doctor didn’t want to take any chances. That child turned out to have the cord wrapped twice around his neck and it had a knot in it. Both of those labors involved lots of interventions – internal fetal monitoring, oxygen masks, breaking my water, refilling my water, epidurals – because being on pitocin is like being in the transition phase of labor (the last, most painful part right before the baby is born, where women do all the yelling and swearing) except instead of it being only the last 20 minutes it’s how the entire labor feels, episiotomy and a vacuum extraction in the case of my first because he was rather large (8lb 9 oz) and I was exhausted from pushing for two hours.

    Maybe doctors should tell women not to eat so much instead if big babies are really the issue, and I suspect they are not. My brother and sister and I were all in the 6lb range because back in the 60s doctors told women to only gain about 15lbs. The child that was two weeks early had one lazy eye (that straightened out in a couple weeks) but he was the most fussy sleeper and eater of my three. I’m sure he would have benefited from two more weeks of cooking. I much preferred the 100% natural birth I had with my second – I was hooked up to nothing and the final phase of labor took about 20 minutes. I felt great after, too, unlike the other two induced births. My sister needed c-sections and her kids were small, but she’s petite and took after my mom and grandmother, both of whom had their kids by c-section.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  144. @Achmed E. Newman

    We’re thinking about the fun part of it.

  145. Pat Boyle says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Pain is something that can not be quantified… Of course it can. It’s called a dolorimeter.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  146. @Buzz Mohawk

    As the diet changes, Japanese rumps are getting better every year.

    Plus, they age better.

  147. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT Sophia Benoit doesn’t want to hurt you, just see how deep the bullet lies …

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  148. @Buzz Mohawk

    The ditz has her king and queen set up on the wrong squares. White queen goes on white.

  149. @Lurker

    She is opening with king’s rook pawn! She’s no android.

  150. @B36

    Pelvic “shape” is a social construct.

    Indeed.

  151. @John Derbyshire

    When my mother did her Obstetrics rotation in nursing college in the 80s the instructor made this comment, which amazed her. “When a Jewish or Italian woman comes in she’ll be fussing and surrounded by family. You can take your time. If a Native American or Chinese woman comes in alone, don’t walk, run! to admitting because she is about to give birth.”

  152. @Pat Boyle

    That measures reaction to pain. There’s no way to measure the actual feeling from one human being to another. One person may feel it much more intensely but be more stoic and have the same reaction of a hypochondria with much less of a subjective feeling. It’s subjective, being felt in the brain. Maybe some measure of actual brain electricity in a region of the brain known to be the pain center would help.

  153. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT Amid the “blue wave” Portlanders are worrying about a Republican governor.

    https://www.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_5bd33944e4b0d38b5882f306?ncid=NEWSSTAND0001

    https://hotair.com/archives/2018/10/31/liberals-beginning-panic-oregon-governors-race/

    This would be the same place where Antifa is allowed to attack cars, not as part of a mayorally-approved riot with the police stood down, but as an everyday thing.

  154. It’s almost entirely a marriage gap. African immigrant mothers, including refugees, tend to have smaller birthweight kids, but white lady outcomes. The other part to better outcomes is involvement from the extended families and breastfeeding, also things black immigrants do and have compared to native-born black American women.

    Also, maternal mortality includes being beaten by your boyfriend six months postpartum for not aborting the baby and dying from the injuries. It’s any death up to a year after the birth, and does include violence the mother experiences unrelated to the birth. Perinatal I think is birth-related only and surprise surprise the gap is much smaller, because even in supposedly racist America not that many women die from birth complications.

  155. Twinkie says:
    @27 year old

    My understanding is that inducing labor is basically now the standard practice in commercial births. This and many other unnecessary and inhumane things are done to maximize revenue for the hospital and create conveniences for the medical staff.

    That’s a hyperbole, to say the least.

    Labor induction is encouraged, because “over-cooking” babies makes delivery much more difficult and dangerous. My wife refused induction for our first child on the target date, because she wanted the whole thing done naturally. Unfortunately for us, the baby refused to come out and stayed put longer (and grew bigger inside), and both my wife and child almost died during delivery. After a great deal of difficulty, he came out, but he didn’t breathe for what seemed like an eternity to me (I heard the desperate panic in the voice of the doctor who was trying to get him to breathe – “Come on, come on, come on…” – which, for once in my life, scared me).

    Caesarean births are also encouraged nowadays for the same reason – because the risk for both mother and baby is substantially reduced (the main downside is that the recovery is longer for the mother). Liability for obstetrics is very high and compensation very low, which makes the doctors in the field practice “defensive medicine.” Still, plenty of “earthy” or “naturalistic” women (usually of higher educational/socio-economic backgrounds) do natural births.

    White mothers of means are increasingly opting for home births with midwives in order to avoid subjecting themselves and their newborns to the hospital birth experience.

    That’s a stupid fad, because midwives make them “feel” better. If something were to go wrong, they are going to wish they were at a hospital. A good compromise is to utilize a midwifery practice that uses all the modern diagnostic tools AND chooses to deliver at a hospital, just in case things go south. That way, you can experience the sweet touchy-feeliness of a midwife and also have the best and the latest medical techniques and technologies available as backup.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  156. @Tyrion 2

    Womanly, humanly, manly and like a platypus?

    According to PBS Kids, platypelloidal matriarchy is our future:

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  157. TheBoom says:
    @anon

    Noticed the same. Asian babies may make some noise in the departure lounge and very early in the flight then you forget that the kids are there. When I get up to roam the aisles, I see them sleeping or, engaged with a phone, if a little older

  158. @B36

    Pelvic “shape” is a social construct.

    Yes. Prusish Puritan Yankee Ed Sullivan wouldn’t allow a certain Memphian’s to be visible on his show.

  159. Twinkie says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    For a long time, like many men, I preferred slim women who tended to have narrow hips. (I was a sucker for little Audrey Hepburn types.)

    Audrey Hepburn was slim certainly (especially compared to the obese women of today), but she did not have narrow hips.

    There has been some research and controversy over this, but there is such a thing as the golden (waist-to-hip) ratio of 0.7 that is appealing to most men. That ratio holds for every point in the weight/size spectrum. In other words, whether size 0 or size 10, what’s attractive on a woman is her waist size being 70% of the hip size.

    Most American women fail at this, because, they are too obese and carry a tube around their waist. Some of it is, of course, genetic. Some women just put on weight more easily around their waist than on hips (the apple shape) while others are the other way around (the pear shape). Unsurprisingly, the more attractive type (the pear shape) is also correlated with better health outcomes.

  160. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Cuckoo interviews Zimmy.

  161. Twinkie says:
    @John Derbyshire

    “Whites curse and blacks holler. Hispanics I’ve known to actually sing. But the Chinese—not a whisper.”

    Those are stupid and inaccurate stereotypes.

    Are there cultural differences to dealing with pain? Yes, there certainly are. For example, East Asian patients tend to be a bit more stoic than, say, South Asian patients (including birthing mothers).

    But you see a whole gamut among each race/ethnicity. East Asian mothers who scream or curse. Black mothers who are quiet. White mothers who whine.

    The idea that all or most Chinese birthing mothers emit nary “a whisper” while their lady parts are being torn apart (unless under anesthesia) is silly in the extreme. That’s the kind of unscientific racial talk that appeals to HBD fanatics who think race is everything.

  162. Twinkie says:
    @anon

    Not just women. A White or Black baby on a long flight – guaranteed screeching. Dozens of Asian babies on a 16-hour flight – nary a peep. I was absolutely amazed.

    I see you haven’t been on enough flights to Asia.

    Much of screeching control has to do with parents, not the babies. Most all babies screech if they are uncomfortable.

  163. Twinkie says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Baseball hitters tend to have sensational eyesight. I doubt many of them sat inside during summer days reading books.

    Obviously genes play a role, but exposure to bright light – sunlight, that is – tends to preserve good eyesight. Yet another reason why kids should be playing outside in sunlight (with sunscreen on, obviously) rather than glued to electronic screen inside.

  164. Dr Lia Betti, senior lecturer at Roehampton University, in Anthropology is the author of the pointless paper. Pointless because she could have just asked an MD to point her to the nearest medical school library.

    Roehampton University ranks 71st out of 131 on the UK “University League Tables 2019” and ranks 121st out of 131 on “entry standards”.

    Roehampton University was until recently Roehampton Institute of Higher Learning. It is a union of four teacher’s colleges.

    Sixty-six per cent of Roehampton University research submissions were classed as ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’. Dance was the top performing subject.

    Wikipedia lists 25 notable alumni for Roehampton University. Here are eight:

    Niki Albon, Youtuber and twin
    Sammy Albon, Youtuber and twin
    Alize Mounter, former Miss England
    Danielle Perez, former Miss Gibraltar
    Joey Barton, footballer
    Jon Goodman, footballer
    Djoumin Sangaré, footballer
    Joe Tillen, footballer

    Dr Lia Betti is advertising her very important discovery on twitter and other social media. It is a very important discovery because The Guardian was able to get this very truthful and honest headline out of it: Focus on western women ‘skewed our ideas of what birth should look like’.

  165. nglaer says:

    My son is married to a Filipina, and she just had a C-section. He is large, she is tiny, and though she wanted to go through childbirth, all her Filipina relatives said: white guy? have a c section.
    She’s 1/4 Spanish and 1/4 Chinese btw, not sure how common such mixtures are there.

  166. newrouter says:

    ot fyi for mr. sailer:

    Officials say Oroville Dam spillway WILL be ready for winter – but the $300m cost has spiraled to $1.1BILLION

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6339333/Officials-California-dam-spillway-ready-rain.html

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  167. @Steve Sailer

    Baseball hitters tend to have sensational eyesight. I doubt many of them sat inside during summer days reading books.

    Yogi Berra refused to read at all during the season. He thought it interfered with his hitting.

  168. @TelfoedJohn

    When something is going in, Asians tend to squeak in a higher pitch. Whites and blacks get louder and lower in tone.

    Freddie Prinze had a routine in which black men only use their lower voice to seduce. They prefer to argue with one another in falsetto.

  169. @Twinkie

    What I think, Twinkie, is that oftentimes it is the inability to equalize pressure between the inside of the head and the cabin. How is a baby supposed to tell you that? It is very painful, and I’ve seen a grown man very close to crying on a 4-hour flight when he could not get the air through those ear tubes.

    When I see a baby crying like this close by, I will ask the parents if they have tried giving him something to drink, but that is much better to do ahead of time.

    The screeching of the parents is just due to their lack of understanding that $650 round trip fare does not pay for a lot of kiss-ass service. They are barely paying for their share of fuel, the next hot-section overhauls, and hydraulic fluid. Those people in the front are the one helping that airline make money.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    , @Anonymous
  170. @newrouter

    “Officials say Oroville Dam spillway WILL be ready for winter – but the $300m cost has spiraled to $1.1BILLION”

    Surprise! California infrastructure project exceeds budget. But every so often they can get things done fast.

    They are going need to expand the boat launching ramp at Lake Oroville for all the guys who have been hauling in the big bucks working overtime on fixing the dam’s spillway.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  171. Twinkie says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    When I see a baby crying like this close by, I will ask the parents if they have tried giving him something to drink, but that is much better to do ahead of time.

    Yes. Drinking/suckling something helps with pressure equalization. If you are not dumb parents, you prepare for this. You also prepare to hold and rock that baby a long time. Bringing new toys or pictures books the baby hasn’t seen yet also helps.

  172. @Fred Boynton

    John Edwards’ cases seem less sleazy than many plaintiffs’ attorneys. In 2004 I kept waiting for the GOP researchers to dig up something ridiculous he’d won a big payday upon, but everything they came up with all seemed at least arguable.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Lot
  173. @James N. Kennett

    If it turns out to be a double murder in the United States, that’s something I really don’t like. A murder of a Saudi in a Saudi consulate in a foreign country is disgraceful, and I was sick of the Saudis long ago, but if this is murder within the United States, that’s something very bad.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  174. @SimpleSong

    Yeah, that seems pretty plausible. It would be nice to see more research into this, but it’s pretty hot topic so there isn’t much.

    • Replies: @SimpleSong
    , @Buzz Mohawk
  175. @Reg Cæsar

    That’s from Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood (based on Mr. Rogers) that actually features several conventional nuclear families including a white (!) one with two boys (!). Lady Elaine ended up with a black dude, which is actual pretty true to life.

  176. @Steve Sailer

    He’s as responsible as anyone for the (likely deleterious) prevalence of C-sections in U.S. medical practice noted on another thread. His sleazy trial attorney play acting was very much played up by the GOP and was likely a drag on his (and thus Kerry’s) candidacy as many of the kind of people who were considering jumping ship from the GOP due to Iraq (as many eventually did) hate the shenanigans of trial attorneys with the heat of a thousand suns.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  177. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    The one jury I served on was a case of a car dealer paying only half the sales tax due by writing down half the price he sold the car for. It was an awfully simple con, but most of the jury was clueless.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  178. @Steve Sailer

    Did you recuse yourself because you were the only one who knew WTF was going on? Lawyers would expect you to do that. You should have been stricken before they let it get this far.

  179. @Steve Sailer

    Maybe Jared Diamond could look into it.

  180. @Seminumerical

    Is that film supposed to be evidence of Barack Obama’s African birth?

    Babies scream on airplanes because their ears pop, and they don’t understand it. It frightens them. This goes on for several years after infancy.

    Some claim Oriental earwax is different from that of other races. How that would affect ear-popping, you tell me.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Seminumerical
  181. @Buffalo Joe

    La Raza needs to keep up with the latest science. I visited laraza.com to ask about the rumored change of their name from “La Raza” to “La Construccion Social”, but I couldn’t find a way to contact them. Maybe someone else will be more successful.

  182. rbbebrod says:
    @BenKenobi

    old arab saying: “He is no doctor who has not killed many patients”

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  183. Lot says:

    The Chinese business press interviews birth tourism fraud companies about Trump promised EO

    https://m.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2171093/will-donald-trump-end-chinese-boom-us-birthright-citizenship

  184. Lot says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    It is a very well studied single gene.

  185. Alfa158 says:
    @J.Ross

    She said “literally”. That means if you oppose invaders she wants to reward you for it by having sex with you. This reminds me of the good old ‘60’s when hippie girls were encouraged to have sex with soldiers who turned against the war. A comrade of mine spent the night with one of them in Oakland during the war. Next morning he gets back in his uniform and starts heading for the door. She asks where he’s going and he tells her he had to get to Travis AFB for his flight.
    Anyone know how I can get in touch with Miss Benoit personally? (And I hope she doesn’t mind coming out to SoCal for my turn.)

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @L Woods
    , @FPD72
  186. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Birth injuries are routine and result in severely disabled/retarded babies.

    We pay for this socially in the USA with our tort system and OB malpractice premiums.

    The expensive lifelong care they require is socialized other ways elsewhere, but the cost doesn’t go away.

  187. Lot says:
    @anon

    This is the case everywhere, not just airplanes.

  188. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    What about that Muslim taxi driver who murdered his daughter and then successfully disappeared into his ethnic community — Remember Obama insisting he be brought to justice? Be suspicious of well lit victims on soundstages, that the media wants you to pay attention to, when at the same time they are censoring “unworthy” victims (and protecting “worthy” killers). We must never forget the Kuwaiti incubators. Who is the putative bad guy here? A Saudi reformer, who is killing or unseating Muslim Brotherhood aligned bad guys, guys who sponsored terrorism and political Islam.
    Khaashaqji was filth. I don’t know anything about these girls, but their lives were probably as precious as the lives of unreported Saudi victims from back when the mainstream media carried Saudi water, and the lives of modern day Muslim slaves who are tortured and killed or driven to suicide. Saudi Arabia is normally a divine right monarchy with nothing we would consider to be law, and right now they’re having a purge following a coup.

  189. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Alfa158

    During the Trumpening there were these really unattractive women who offered blowjobs for voting for Hillary. I never looked further into it but am pretty sure that plan didn’t work.

  190. @Twinkie

    My impression of Audrey Hepburn comes mostly from movies and photographs in which her waist/hip ratio is not really apparent to me. I can just tell she’s slim. She embodies the style and general physical appearance of one of the types that I am attracted to and that I dated a lot.

    Months ago, I commented on the very same subject you just did: the ideal waist/hip ratio and the studies that discovered it. I even posted an illustrative chart. I believe the concept has merit, and I find that I am no different from most men: that ratio is very appealing to me. Anything beyond it is too much, though. I prefer a women’s figure to be a little bit elongated, as I myself am, and as many people with my ancestry are. (Well, we may seem that way to stocky people from other groups. To us we’re just normal. We are the ones who buy “tall” sized shirts so they’re long enough.)

    With my DNA, it’s no surprise then that I like slender women. I find bodies that are biased toward the vertical to be more attractive than bodies that are biased toward the horizontal. On a woman that means long-looking legs and a slender torso, regardless of height. To put it in simple terms: I am a leg and ass man who doesn’t like big butts. How’s that for a comment?

    It wasn’t narrow hips that did it for me; it was slender women with low body fat. They were physically fit and had no extra pounds around their little waists to effect the ratio, so whatever you are implying about American women does not hold true in their cases. I lived in a town that is known for healthy, active people, in the state that ranks as having the lowest level of obesity among all 50 states.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  191. J.Ross says: • Website
    @rbbebrod

    Is that what Arab doctors say? I mean I was already planning on leaning Jewish but now I’m definitely going to make sure …

  192. Anon[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @jJay

    My first GF was of Irish descent. After some examination I could tell she would need a C-section. She was of normal girth, not Audrey Hepburn thin. I was right, it turned out.

    How could you tell she would need a C-Section?

  193. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @notanon

    they’ve been shutting down leftist anti-war sites too –

    Like which ones?

    • Replies: @notanon
  194. L Woods says:
    @Alfa158

    That would be considered “rape” nowadays.

  195. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Is this really true?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  196. I am happy to learn that different-shaped pelvises proves blacks to be inferior. I did not know that. Good to know.

    • Replies: @notanon
  197. @Steve Sailer

    But how does this eyesight thing help to prove that blacks are inferior? I’m confused.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  198. @jJay

    That’s interesting. Maybe it has something to do with Chinese vs. American women tending to have those different pelvis types mentioned: Platypelloid vs. Android. Perhaps a narrow Platypelloid pelvis can better pass a baby head than a narrow Android pelvis can. (If it sounds like I know what I’m talking about, I don’t.)

  199. @Redneck farmer

    Of course it’s white people’s fault. But the NYT can’t keep its story straight on exactly why.

    Back in April the NYT ran a long, cosmically stupid piece about how black women have premature births because their uteruses (uturi?) have been “weathered” by white “microaggressions.” I kid you not.

    Even by NYT standards that story was especially idiotic. I think Steve even blogged about it.

    But the author went to great lengths to assert that the “science is settled” that there are no genetic or anatomical differences that could account for different rates of problem pregnancies.

    Now this latest NYT article says there are, in fact, crucial anatomical differences and white doctors are at fault for not being aware of the differences.

  200. Twinkie says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    so whatever you are implying about American women

    I mean the average today in the U.S.

  201. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    A large transport uses a couple of drums of Skydrol, but I don’t think the stuff is lost very much or needs frequent replacing (although it is hygroscopic). Hot sections are big money but large transport engines have a very long TBO.

    And for decades airlines were buying fuel very, very cheaply, much cheaper than a FBO charges or even less than regular gasoline or diesel fuel in some cases. I don’t know what they pay now.

    It seems like airliners themselves are much more expensive in adjusted dollars than they were forty or fifty years ago, but without easily comparable pricing data that I can find, it’s hard to tell for sure. The modern ones are much more fuel efficient and carry more people, but per aircraft they seem to be much more expensive.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  202. @Twinkie

    There has been some research and controversy over this, but there is such a thing as the golden (waist-to-hip) ratio of 0.7 that is appealing to most men

    While in junior high-school, I conducted an extensive review of the literature (late 70′s Playboy magazines mostly). Can confirm that 36-24-36 is, indeed, scientifically optimal.

  203. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie

    That’s a stupid fad, because midwives make them “feel” better. If something were to go wrong, they are going to wish they were at a hospital. A good compromise is to utilize a midwifery practice that uses all the modern diagnostic tools AND chooses to deliver at a hospital, just in case things go south. That way, you can experience the sweet touchy-feeliness of a midwife and also have the best and the latest medical techniques and technologies available as backup.

    If the mothers are properly selected, home birth programs are pretty safe. Most of the midwives do not have the kind 0f insurance hospital based programs have and require of practitioners, though, so they don’t get sued: there is nothing to collect.

    Liability insurance creates its own demand, because people know there is a bonanza there if you can get to it, and the gatekeeper is twelve people from which anyone with any firsthand experience or knowledge is specifically excluded.

    Women who have tried it tell me that truly natural birth is about impossible in a hospital: they are always trying to inflict this or that and that, combined with the noisy environment wears them down to where they finally “just give in”. Plus which, hospitals are very intense with infectious agents. Every time I visit someone in one or have to get an outpatient procedure in one I wind up with some sort of low grade issue.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  204. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Desiderius

    hate the shenanigans of trial attorneys with the heat of a thousand suns.

    Lawyers in the US can accept contingent fee cases and if they lose there is no downside. If the attorneys were jointly and severally liable for the defendant’s costs if they lose in such cases things would be different.

    As it is, any tort is a free lottery ticket so to speak.

  205. @Je Suis Omar Mateen

    I think you’re mostly wrong, and here’s why:

    Like every other red-blooded adolescent boy I knew, I grew up with soft pornographic magazines like Playboy, Penthouse, and even Hustler. We all looked at them and used them for our pleasure. The girls in there were not gay-ideal-boyish in any way. They were the typical porn star type women: big boobs, curves, big hair, extremely female and fertile.

    They did the trick for us, and they no doubt influenced our sexual perspective as much or more than whatever other media we were exposed to. No, they definitely influenced us more.

    If you really wanted to f*ck up boys’ sex preference, you would put pictures of boyish stick figures in there. But it wouldn’t work. Pornographers don’t do that because they know what turns men on and what doesn’t. It is hardwired and hasn’t changed in thousands of years.

    Those magazines and other porn probably influenced women more than men, the same way fashion magazine do, and anything else that tells females what will attract males. My own careful research showed that as the women in the magazines began shaving off their pubic hair to better expose their lady parts, within a few years women I got to know were getting extreme wax jobs or just shaving everything off. Women today are much less hairy than they used to be. I watched it happen. Porn influenced women’s own sexual style.

    The real point is that our sex drives are genetic, while styles are cultural. Whatever body type tuns me on is in my DNA, and by the way, the skinny girl is only one of several types I like to be with. Most of us guys get horny for a variety of women. That’s how we are, and that’s how nature wants us to be.

    • Replies: @Truth
    , @Jonathan Mason
  206. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:

    If you really wanted to f*ck up boys’ sex preference, you would put pictures of boyish stick figures in there. But it wouldn’t work. Pornographers don’t do that because they know what turns men on and what doesn’t. It is hardwired and hasn’t changed in thousands of years.

    A perusal of vintage erotica will quickly disabuse one of this. None of that stuff will turn modern teenage boys on very much: the women are gross looking to them.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  207. gcochran says:
    @Cherub

    Shkreli is as erudite as he is charming.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  208. Pericles says:
    @kaganovitch

    Reminds me of the recent UK case where the baby was decapitated by means of forceps. Happily, the doctor has subsequently been cleared to go back to work, so no worries.

    Dr Vishnavy Laxman was a consultant gynaecologist at Ninewells Hospital in March 2014 when the tragedy occurred.

    She wrongly chose a natural delivery over a caesarean section for the pregnant mother.

    The Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service said there had not been an impairment of her fitness to practise.

    It also decided it was not necessary to impose a warning on the doctor and it has revoked the current restrictions which had been put in place on her registration.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/uk-scotland-tayside-central-44376442

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  209. Pericles says:
    @Cherub

    Thank you kindly for that find, and by the way Free Shkreli!

  210. Twinkie says:
    @Anonymous

    If the mothers are properly selected, home birth programs are pretty safe.

    1. If, if, if…

    2. Things go wrong with with seemingly perfect patients all the time. If risk prediction were perfect…

    truly natural birth

    You know what I like? Safe births.

  211. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)

    The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) *has* changed its name, but not to the “National Council of La Construccion Social”. Its new name (as of July 10, 2017) is “UnidosUS”. According to
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UnidosUS ,
    “By 1980, the NCLR was funded almost entirely by the federal government.”

  212. Jack D says:
    @AnonAnon

    Natural delivery is preferable to induced labor but induced labor is preferable to C-section.

    • Replies: @AnonAnon
  213. @Anonymous

    I was being just a tad facetious, Mr. #367 (at least concerning the Skydrol). Yeah, Delta Airlines OWNS the refinery, and right now fuel is down, but it becomes very significant during the high-0il-price times.

    Yeah, it’d be hard to compare airframe price on any kind of apples-to-apples basis. As far as fares go, the economy ones are close to 1/3 the REAL price about 30 years ago from numbers I remember (domestic flying, that is) That’s why you can’t expect as much personal service – sure, computers take care of a lot now, as that’s only a fixed cost. People cost money each time they help you, but passengers sure miss that (maybe not the young ones, as they are more comfortable interacting with their little screens than any actual person).

    In the front of that 777, A-330 or 767, those people lying flat are the ones really paying for that big bird to fly continent-to-continent.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  214. @Pericles

    What do we want, Single-Payer!

    When do we want it, we want it now!

  215. @obwandiyag

    I’m confused.

    OK, we’ve got 3 conclusions here.

    1) Black women have inferior pelvises
    2) Black people have superior eyesight
    3) Black men are more easily confused.

  216. @Anonymous

    “A perusal of vintage erotica will quickly disabuse one of this. None of that stuff will turn modern teenage boys on very much: the women are gross looking to them.”

    It may be that there were lower-quality (physically) women available to the pornographer in more Christian times past, when very few women would want to do it?

    In times past they seem to have liked a bit more flesh on the bones, if paintings are any guide. Not surprising in ages when a poor harvest meant famine.

    I think Botticelli’s women would be pretty acceptable to modern youth, Modigliani and Velasquez too. Pierre Bonnard’s and Rubens’ more problematic, told to come back when they’d lost 30 pounds.

  217. @Steve Sailer

    Hmm… well, that creates jobs for the launching ramp builders, so could we call it trickle down corruption?

    There is a nearby road project that has been holding up traffic every day for a about a year now. All they are doing is burying some electrical cables (Woo hoo, finally the trees won’t cut the power, at least there!) Every day they cut open the pavement, do whatever, and then cover over it at the end of the day. Over and over for a year.

    I’ve seen lots of projects like that around here over the years. A recent school renovation was reported to have cost One-Hundred-Million Dollars.

    And people wonder why our local and state taxes are so high…

  218. LindaF says: • Website

    I remember reading a book by a doctor who interned at a NY hospital. He discussed the birthing difficulties of the Puerto Rican women. Their pelvic type was known as a “Puerto Rican pelvis” – too narrow to handle vaginal birth. He thought it might have to do with poor diet in childhood.

  219. Truth says:
    @Twinkie

    Well He certainly had massive hands and feet. Aubrey could have been a stone mason with those mitts.

  220. Anonymous[107] • Disclaimer says:
    @gcochran

    Sarcasm?

  221. Truth says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    The women you spent your youth lusting after, and still do, were and are eunuchs.

    I mean this literally, not figuratively.

    It will be 5 years from now until your overseers corroborate me, but they will. Hopefully, if you are still alive in 5 years, this post will lessen the shock.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  222. FPD72 says:
    @Alfa158

    I think she is missing the preposition “up” after the verb that describes her intended action.

  223. @Steve Sailer

    After reading the comments here, I am convinced now that hip size has little to do with brain size or ease of birth. What matters is the opening inside the pelvis and how it is shaped for childbirth.

    The example of sub-Saharan African women vs. European and East Asian women has convinced me.

    All the discussion about skinny white girls was a waste of time. Live and learn.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  224. notanon says:
    @Anonymous

    pro palestinian/syrian/iranian ones – i don’t recall the names

  225. notanon says:
    @obwandiyag

    a narrower pelvic gap explains part of the reason they have a higher rate of miscarriage

    the media claiming it is caused by white racism are lying as always

  226. NickG says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    For a long time, like many men, I preferred slim women who tended to have narrow hips. (I was a sucker for little Audrey Hepburn types.) Among the ones who had children, a little, horizontal scar right above the Delta of Venus was common.

    On the matter of being either a breast man or a leg man – I confess to my preference being something in between.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  227. Dtbb says:
    @donut

    There is a large problem in asia where children are losing sight by remaining indoors and too much up close study.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  228. AnonAnon says:
    @Jack D

    Natural delivery is preferable to induced labor but induced labor is preferable to C-section.

    For sure, but I question inducing early becoming the new standard. My inducements were for valid reasons but the OB for child #3 had been hinting around at inducing me early for a few weeks – she kept going on and on about how “big” he was going to be but I didn’t take the bait since I had a natural birth under my belt and knew how much better it was. Moreover, since my first was 8.5 lb I had a good reference point for how uncomfortable a big baby felt so knew #3 wasn’t going to be nearly as big. If he had gone full term he would have been ~7 lb 12oz, the same size as #2 – which I had naturally with zero issues and minimal pushing. For the natural birth I spent the early labor comfortably at home and only spent about 4.5 hours at the hospital in labor, mostly walking around to speed things up, vs. 11 hours in heavy labor on my back, hooked up to numerous machines for baby #3, and ready to ask for a c-section at the end when it seemed like things had stalled. Induced labor is more painful and longer than a natural because your body is just not ready. Sure, go ahead and induce if you go much beyond 40 weeks but I think it’s always best not to mess with mother nature and let labor start on its own. And, FWIW, both my mom and sister had three c-sections each with zero issues.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  229. @Truth

    That’s funny, because a lot of them have children now. Do eunuchs bear children?

    • Replies: @Truth
  230. @3g4me

    Not bathing during pregnancy, or never ever?

    • Replies: @3g4me
  231. Jack D says:
    @AnonAnon

    FWIW is nothing – anecdote is not the singular of data.

    The rate of serious complications for c-sections in the US is around 10%. This includes more than 1,500 ml of blood loss, need for blood transfusion, hysterectomy, needing another surgery, septicemia (blood infection), blood clots, pulmonary edema, and pneumonia.

    https://drjengunter.wordpress.com/2011/07/17/what-is-the-rate-of-serious-complications-with-a-c-section/

    So out of 9 pregnancies, the statistical expectation would be less than 1 serious complication (i.e. 0) but they were right at the edge. Probably if there were a few more pregnancies in your data set the odds would have caught up with your family, not that I wish this upon them.

    • Replies: @Anne Lid
    , @res
  232. Jack D says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Whether you are skinny or fat has little to do with it – the bone structure is the constraint. “Big hips” usually means well padded hips, which tells you nothing.

    The other constraint is the size of the baby, especially the head. Whoever said that pelvimetry was useless was probably not taking into account race and racial differences in birth weight/head circumference. I’ll bet that if you re-examined the data and took race (oh, sorry, ancestry) into account (and discounted for c-sections driven by legal concerns – it’s really amazing how European women “progress” in labor when they are back home but in America they “fail to progress” and need C-sections) then it wouldn’t be so worthless after all.

    • Agree: Liza
  233. Jack D says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Yeah, it’d be hard to compare airframe price on any kind of apples-to-apples basis.

    Especially since the “list” price of aircraft bears very little resemblance to what the airlines actually pay when for example, Southwest orders 300 737s in a single order.

    Keep in mind that the high price of 1st/business class fares is somewhat offset by the much larger footprint of the seats and by the added costs of the services and amenities provided. Just on square footage alone, upper class fares would have to be 2.5 or 3x economy fares just to come out even.

    But very high price fares more than make up for this. For example on LAX-JFK, 3.6% of passengers flying on tickets priced over $2,000 contributed 21% of the route’s aggregate revenue, and the 13% of passengers paying $800 or more accounted for 40% of the revenue. The cheapest fares might be as low as $400 so the guys up front are paying 2 to 5x or more to arrive at the same time as the people in the back (albeit with a little more leg room).

    https://qz.com/225470/the-economics-of-business-class-explained-through-americas-most-popular-flight/

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  234. @NickG

    LOL. A laurel and hearty handshake to you, Sir.

  235. Liza says:
    @3g4me

    Staying mostly in bed for a month after a birth is or was common traditional practice everywhere on earth, from what I hear & read. Doing this is old as the hills. Birthing “in the field” then picking up the baby and continuing on as if nothing happened is garbage, it’s propaganda. This is a recipe for serious health problems if and when it does happen.

    A few smart women in USA rest in this manner, too. It takes that long for the body to get back to normal. Either paid help or, more usually, family members would help run the household so the woman could rest. I suspect that women who are so fortunate would have fewer health issues later in life.

    • Troll: 3g4me
    • Replies: @Twinkie
    , @res
  236. Anne Lid says:
    @Jack D

    You are conflating elective/planned C-section with emergency C-section. From the study your article mentions elective had 7.1, emergency 11.7 and crash a whopping 25% rate of serious complications, not very surprising when you consider that the alternative to the operation is death of the baby or the mother.
    If a birth looks to be difficult, it is safe to choose an elective Cesarean, if you are not planning a large family. There is no assurance either way that something won’t go wrong. This is just my subjective opinion after reading a million birth stories.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  237. @Jack D

    It’s true that domestic 1st class is just not a good deal – not much for your money, unless they happen to have wide-body jet set up for international on that route (this would be due to a sort of repositioning to get another overseas route done from a different city – part of the schedule, but just kind of an odd thing.)

    For the long international flights, Jack, it’s not quite like the business class passengers take the PLACE of 2 or 3 economy passengers. I wrote “place” because, they might take that much SPACE, but, even with the seat weight (the thing with 6 motors in in it and all) they would not make up the weight of more than 1 1/2 economy passengers, as a guess*. The total weight is limited. On a short/wide route (lots of people for a short haul) in Japan, the plane CAN be filled with all normal seats, but not on a long route due to the weight of the large amount of fuel required.

    I’d be surprised to find out that the meal, wine, and extra toiletry kits, etc. added up to much more than $150, even on these long flights with 2 – 3 meals. The flight attendant cost is probably quintuple per passenger, but also well under $100 one-way (my in-the-head calculation), so maybe $500 extra. The fare could easily be $12,000 for America to Asia.

    One more thing – that NYC market (along with LA to some degree) is something different. It is a big mess for the airlines to handle all the delays, reroutes, and cancellations out of JFK, LGA and EWR. However, they put up with this because the big finance money is there, and there are lots more passengers who got the seat last minute without even thinking about the cost. The profit margin has got to be WAY, WAY higher, making up for the screwage and also big airport departure fees, gate rental, and what-have-you.

    .

    * I noted that the biz-class seats can weigh up to 180 lb, while the economy ones are in the neighborhood of 40-50 lb. Big difference, say 140 lb, but keep in mind the passenger and carry-on belongings will be counted as ~ 225 lb. So, 405 lb. / 270 lb. = 1.5 (How ’bout that, Jack, I swear I looked up this seat wt. info AFTER I had written that 1 1/2 above!)

  238. 3g4me says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    @236 Achmed E. Newman: “Not bathing during pregnancy, or never ever?”

    Not bathing for the duration of post-birth ‘confinement’ – 4-8 weeks. Superstitious and extremely unhygienic, but widely believed and practiced, at least back when I was there. Primarily due to influence of grandmothers, but even today you can find younger Han women – many of them immivaders here – wax rhapsodic about the putative benefits of the tradition of confinement (the not bathing aspect will not be mentioned, only the resting at home part): wonders of Chinese tradition

    • Replies: @Twinkie
  239. Twinkie says:
    @3g4me

    at least back when I was there.

    You don’t seem to realize that things have changed in Singapore since you were there, and Singaporean women are now doing pre-natal and post-natal Yoga and Pilates and such.

  240. Twinkie says:
    @Liza

    Staying mostly in bed for a month after a birth is or was common traditional practice everywhere on earth, from what I hear & read. Doing this is old as the hills. Birthing “in the field” then picking up the baby and continuing on as if nothing happened is garbage, it’s propaganda. This is a recipe for serious health problems if and when it does happen.

    While I wouldn’t quite go so far as to say it’s “a recipe for serious health problems,” you are right that pre-natal and post-natal “confinement” and similar practices were once prevalent in the West, particularly among the upper classes.

    Life was often backbreaking and harsh for ordinary people and poor peasant women leading hard-scrabble lives were forced by circumstances to toil through pregnancy. Things were different for those women of means. They were often given bedrest and refrained from doing any physical activity and were shielded from the public. This made sense in the days when public hygiene was atrocious and communicable diseases were very common (you don’t want to use public bath when you are pregnant).

    Of course things are different now. Many people lead highly sedentary lives in relatively sterile environments with plenty of nutrients. Now it’s reached a point where obesity is leading to fertility problems! Pregnant women are, therefore, advised to exercise (usually moderately).

    In South Korea, pregnant women were “protected” similarly. But now they have gone completely SWPL and work and work out through pregnancy. Chinese are about 15-20 years behind South Koreans in economic development and Westernization, so I suspect they will reach that point in the next decade or so.

    • Replies: @Liza
  241. Twinkie says:
    @Anne Lid

    If a birth looks to be difficult, it is safe to choose an elective Cesarean, if you are not planning a large family.

    I know several Catholic women who have done multiple VBACs (vaginal births after Caesarean). That’s not for the faint of heart!

  242. Anonymous[107] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dtbb

    There is a large problem in asia where children are losing sight by remaining indoors and too much up close study.

    Citation needed.

  243. res says:
    @Jack D

    FWIW is nothing – anecdote is not the singular of data.

    One counterpoint is that for health related issues (that likely have a genetic component) looking at the experiences of family members (especially of those who seem phenotypically similar) can be valuable.

    There is a reason taking a family history is an important component of medical practice.

  244. res says:
    @Liza

    It would be interesting to see a study on that. My suspicion is that “taking it easy”, but staying somewhat active, would be best. Too much atrophy associated with bed rest.

    Practically speaking I suspect your second paragraph maps pretty well to what I have in mind.

    • Replies: @Liza
  245. Liza says:
    @Twinkie

    Yes. Point of diminishing returns and all that.

  246. Liza says:
    @res

    Yes, you have the right idea. Things seem to lurch from one extreme to the other. However, total bed rest is the prescription given to women for “threatened abortion”.

  247. Truth says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Oh, so you are a licensed pediatrician to the rich? Or did you just see a picture of someone holding a baby in a magaz…

    On second thought don’t answer, it depresses me too much.

  248. @SimpleSong

    Although it seems like black women have larger hips on average, the pelvic outlet itself is actually narrower than in Europeans and Asians.

    This may well be true, in fact I think it is, but there are many other factors involved in childbirth, for example the extent to which the ligaments that hold the pelvic bones together become more flexible around the time of childbirth–perhaps more so in younger mothers than older ones. At time of birth the vagina also becomes much more elastic, though this does not preclude the need for episiotomies to make the vaginal opening wider and expedite the delivery.

    The size of the head is also a factor. A black woman who has already had a child with a black father via vaginal delivery, if she becomes pregnant by a white man end up having a Cesarian due to a baby with a larger skull.

    Instructional video on Pelvimetry.

  249. @Buzz Mohawk

    I grew up with soft pornographic magazines like Playboy, Penthouse, and even Hustler. We all looked at them and used them for our pleasure. The girls in there were not gay-ideal-boyish in any way. They were the typical porn star type women: big boobs, curves, big hair, extremely female and fertile.

    The women in Playboy were generally quite young, like around 20 years of age with breasts that were big and round and still too young to sag, and had rather slender waists and hips, and long legs.

  250. Romanian says: • Website
    @SimpleSong

    Wow, such an erudite post. Thank you. This really clears some things up.

  251. Logan says:
    @Faraday's Bobcat

    East African blacks dominate distance running. Tall, slender.

    West African blacks dominate sprinting. Shorter and wider.

    These are quite different groups.

  252. @Reg Cæsar

    Yes there are at least two types of earwax. Mine is wet and if overproduced it can reduce my hearing. In my life this has happened twice. It had to be syringed out when I was 15 and again when I was 55.

    I had a Chinese girlfriend for a number of years. She had the dry type of earwax. She said occasionally it would dry up into a ball and roll out of her ear when she was sleeping.

    I can attest that the wet type can cause excruciating pain when the pressure changes. It happened once when I was 55 and flying a short hop from Botswana to Cape Town. I think I burst an eardrum.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Hundreds of POWs may have been left to die in Vietnam, abandoned by their government—and our media.