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If you are a mid-Baby Boomer born in the late 1950s, you probably have a memory of the mid-1960s as a Golden Era of live-action sitcoms for six-year olds, such as Gilligan’s Island, Get Smart, Adams Family, Munsters, Green Acres, I Dream of Jeannie, and Bewitched.

It’s not clear if it really was a halcyon era or if all six year olds look back fondly on the TV shows when they were six. In the defense of the former view, I don’t recall that many animated shows from the same era. (I was a big fan of Johnny Quest, though.)

I think it’s plausible that a lot of money and talent poured into sitcoms in 1964-65, creating a brief period of shows that appealed both to grown-ups and kids. “Bewitched,” for instance, started out as a relatively straightforward study of the sociological stresses of a mixed marriage. (Marrying a shiksa was a huge theme looming just below the surface in 1960s TV, although in Bewitched the allegory is kept ambiguous. Elizabeth Montgomery, for example, was the daughter of Hollywood Republican stalwart Robert Montgomery.) But the network kept demanding more goofy magic For the Kids.

The latter two shows involved ladies in mixed (magical / human) relationships who use magic to get their housekeeping chores done (a concept that greatly appealed to my future wife at the time), while the man of the house disapproves of the woman taking unfair advantage of her powers to make his life better, but the woman knows best what he really needs.

Also, both magical ladies have relatives who disapprove of the man of the house, such as Darren’s mother-in-law Endora (Agnes Moorhead), brunette evil twin Serena (Elizabeth Montgomery in a dual role), and Uncle Arthur (Paul Lynde — I was surprised to see the memorable Lynde only appeared in 10 of the 254 episodes).

From Deadline:

Bewitched’ Reboot With Interracial Family …

by Nellie Andreeva • tip August 23, 2018 11:44am

EXCLUSIVE: Just before he recently departed ABC Studios to embark on a rich overall deal at Netflix, Black-ish creator Kenya Barris sold one last high-profile project to ABC: Bewitched, a single camera, interracial blended family comedy based on the popular 1960s sitcom of the same name. …

In Bewitched, written by Barris and Taylor, Samantha, a hardworking black single mom who happens to be a witch, marries Darren, a white mortal who happens to be a bit of a slacker. They struggle to navigate their differences as she discovers that even when a black girl is literally magic, she’s still not as powerful as a decently tall white man with a full head of hair in America.

Okay …

Maybe in the new “Bewitched,” the black people will have explicit White Magic, while all white people have the implicit Black Magic of white privilege?

A friend suggests he’d watch a sitcom where the black husband is a down-to-earth Army sergeant and the white wife’s family are annoying New Age Wiccans.

 
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  1. The shows you mentioned remained popular in reruns at least into the Eighties. They were shown after school and before the evening news, so I’d say there’s a lot of nostalgia for them. Hopefully this remake will annoy some Gen-X mopes.

    • Agree: Nathan
    • Replies: @Lot
    Well into the 1990s.

    Bewitched and Jeannie were probably the most popular old sitcoms kids watched.

    Will Smith had a 1987 hit that was him rapping about his poor luck with women over the Jeannie theme song that got MTV play into the 1990's as well.
    , @mikeInThe716
    Bewitched was part of my after school fare in the Eighties - although more for my sisters. It left a mark - my college buddies and I still refer to a common friend, Darren, as Derrwood.

    Will the new slacker Derrwood be in advertising? That wouldn't be a bad choice, given the possible virtue signaling plot themes.
  2. Yes! Finally, short balding men can flee from white. The idea that the short and balding are beneficiaries of a genetic lottery because we are white was preposterous. Now we can rightfully reconstitute our identity to highlight our underappreciated victim status. Emmet Till meet George Costanza!

    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    Intelligent, good-looking people of all races with courteous manners and quicks wits tend to be likeable.

    Anyone who does not possess one of those traits or a component of one of those traits (i.e full head of hair) are disadvantaged.

    Onbviously, something must be done. There ate three possiblr solutions.

    1. Create big money government programmes to help the disadvatanged and give equity minded zealots jobs.

    2. Actively try to punish the privileged through workplace discrimination or, hopefully one day, facial scarring for the good looking or something.

    3. Sophistically ask "what is intelligence" or "what is beauty" and attack and destroy anybody noticing or categorising anything and undermine the very foundations of knowledge. The utterly ignorant know nothing.

    Which of those three aren't already happening and at an already (minorly) dystopian scale?
  3. Shouldn’t it be called ‘Bewiatched’?

    • Replies: @duncsbaby
    Beweyotched?
    , @Bard of Bumperstickers
    Besmirched.

    I Dream of Je'annie. Or Jihadi.

    We will be spared NOTHING.

    , @Bro3886
    Unwatched?
  4. A blast from the past, it’s like lightning striking again.

    • Replies: @Anon
    This video of the #ScienceMustFall meeting is initially hilarious, but I wonder if it's just another thing like transgenderism that seems ridiculous now, but will come to haunt us in the future.

    I don't mean in the sense that science will stop being used, but more in the way like in Canada they must pay obeisance to First Nations in all kinds of silly ways, and teach alternative ways of thought as though they were in some way anything other than folklore.

    Also, the cultural revolutionesque struggle session nature of the meeting is scary. "Apologize to the panel for your saying that witchcraft is not true!"

  5. Tell me again how Hollywood is really conservative?

    And for all her magic the single Black mother couldn’t get baby daddy to stay.

    They will cast the really gay dude from the Big Bang Theory.

    • Replies: @Harvolssen
    "They will cast the really gay dude from the Big Bang Theory."

    Can you be more specific?
    , @Tyrion 2
    If you've seen Kenya Baris' other stuff you would see that she is a huge fan of Wax's "white bourgoise values" but that she also likes to (understandably) build up a mild fantasy of black authenticity and realness.

    I've found her stuff fairly enjoyable whereas the perfectly reviewed Boot Riley movie is unwatchable garbage.
  6. It will suck. But when it is canceled it will be because we are racist.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • LOL: bomag, Clyde
    • Replies: @tyrone
    Dude ,it's almost like you have a crystal ball…….spooky
    , @Truth
    No, it will probably be because you chose to watch some other CIA-created, Tavistock, mind-control piece of shit, that you found more to your liking.
  7. OT ISIS has lost one of its greatest allies and Trump will have to try to sound tactful.
    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2018/08/25/john-mccain-dead-at-81.html

  8. Children of boomers watched all those shows in the 80s and 90s. Perfect television for tweens who graduated past cartoons but are not worldy enough for 80s/90s sitcoms.

    Get Smart I only remember from Nick at Nite, the others were on TV every day in syndication.

    The cartoon version of Get Smart, voiced by Don Adams, Inspector Gadget, was also very big.

    The Munsters and Addams Family were really bad the few times I attempted to watch, though the 90s Addams Family movie was great.

    I remember Uncle Arthur quite well, did not realize he was Paul Lynde, who I also watched as a kid in syndicated reruns of 1970s episodes of Hollywood Squares.

    • Troll: International Jew
    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    I dont know if Paul Lynde was a comic genius,( let Dear Leader and other wise men judge him) but I will say his work on Hollywood Squares was first rate comedy!
    Being gay couldn't really be acknowledged,or one could get away away w/o acknowledging it,so when Lynde was asked these sleazy,leering questions he would answer in a way that is as perceived as nongay,but everyone,who was wise,knew to be EXTREMELY GAY! The implicit subtext of monstrously sexual depredations,which we were pretending didn't exist,was sick humor at its best!
  9. I never liked Bewitched, but I loved I dream of Jeannie. Larry Hagman and Barbara Eden had great chemistry.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Eden was a magnificent physical specimen. Her stand-in was Evelyn Moriarty, who had been the stand-in previously for Marilyn Monroe-e.g., she fit the costumes almost perfectly. I'd say MM had the prettier face but Eden if anything had a slightly better figure-better breasts and bottom, for sure.

    Eden was not the actress Monroe was (Marilyn was better than people gave her credit for at the time, though admittedly she was no Meryl Streep) but she looked good on the small screen and played the role of Jeannie the genie as well as anyone probably could have.

    Either one would have looked really good in the female Starfleet uniform of Star Trek TOS.

    Just saying.
    , @Old Palo Altan
    You beat me to it - I was going to say exactly that.

    "Great chemistry" You either have it or you don't, and those two definitely did, while the other two (who were they now?) definitely did not.

    On the other hand, given that my memories go back further than those of most of you here, I confess that my all time favourite couple was Anne Jeffreys and Robert Sterling in Topper.
    Sophistication as well as great chemistry - that's the ticket.
  10. Well, (((Bob Iger’s))) Magic Negress Channing Dungey is the one calling the shots at ABC… so I wouldn’t be expecting shows along the lines of Duck Dynasty anytime soon.

  11. Well, a black/white ‘I Dream of Jeannie’ would fit. For decades, while every other form of racial integration was pumped at us, black-white couples were streng verboten. It really was striking. You could have your interracial threesome on billboards, and your black supervisors on TV shows, and the wise black woman in ads promoting household cleaners — but no inter-racial couples. Never.

    Then of a sudden, starting a year or two ago, we started being bombarded with black-white couples, usually in ads, but now, evidently, to appear on TV as well. There was some series Netflix was promoting the other night as well…

    It’s curious. I’m not sure precisely what either the motive or the mechanism is for this sudden, rather choreographed onslaught.

    The funny thing is, studies have shown people find black/white couples viscerally disgusting — whatever they may consciously pretend to themselves. So from a commercial point of view, this innovation obviously makes no sense at all. After all, if you’re trying to sell a sandwich, going for an ad that conveys the subliminal message ‘tastes like shit!’ is not a good marketing strategy.

    So what’s up?

    • Replies: @Gordo

    The funny thing is, studies have shown people find black/white couples viscerally disgusting — whatever they may consciously pretend to themselves. So from a commercial point of view, this innovation obviously makes no sense at all. After all, if you’re trying to sell a sandwich, going for an ad that conveys the subliminal message ‘tastes like shit!’ is not a good marketing strategy.
     
    It's the miscegenation that is the product they are trying to sell.
    , @Alfa158
    What’s up is that they have realized they have total power and command of the high ground of our civilization, therefore it doesn’t matter what we like or don’t like. They’ll cram whatever they want down our throats and we won’t have any alternatives. It’s like the political censorship on internet social channels and payment providers. They’ll say if you don’t like it, just develop your own channels, and as soon as you do they’ll shut them down. If White people just turn off the tube they don’t care, there are now hordes of low IQ new Americans who will still watch this dreck and justify the ad income.
  12. Remember the “Sisters at Heart” Bewitched? The Christmas episode where Samantha turned herself, her husband, and her husband’s boss black in order to shame a racist? (Go to 21:24 in the video.) This may well have been the very first “very special” episode of a sitcom. Back then, when Elizabeth Montgomery put on blackface it made her a Goodwhite. I don’t think the episode would be quite as well received today.

    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2q5030

    • Replies: @40 Acres and A Kardashian
    Actually, it starts around 20:24, not 21:24
    , @J.Ross
    This was a device in regular use. There were plenty of movies, tv shows, comic books and stories treating white physical safety concerns as deep stupidity and racism as a straightforward matter of skin color only, so that when the main character turns black there is no corresponding increase in violence or over-sensitivity. The blackening of the main character was something of a more limited sub-genre but these were the boundaries of the expressible on the issue.
    http://www.comicbookdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/Lois-lane-106.jpg
    https://soulsisstarreviews.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/watermelon-man.jpg?w=600
    Perverse note: I cannot see the title "I Am Curious (Black)" without thinking of an obscene Swedish film with unrelated subject matter, I wonder if that's deliberate ...
    , @njguy73
    And there was this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kwe1sFgUTTU
    , @Hrw-500
    Yeah, I could imagine the uproar and we could wonder the same question about the "All in the Family" episode "Lionel's Engagement".
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Qc9yR8VfW0
  13. @40 Acres and A Kardashian
    Remember the "Sisters at Heart" Bewitched? The Christmas episode where Samantha turned herself, her husband, and her husband's boss black in order to shame a racist? (Go to 21:24 in the video.) This may well have been the very first "very special" episode of a sitcom. Back then, when Elizabeth Montgomery put on blackface it made her a Goodwhite. I don't think the episode would be quite as well received today.

    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2q5030

    Actually, it starts around 20:24, not 21:24

  14. @Cagey Beast
    The shows you mentioned remained popular in reruns at least into the Eighties. They were shown after school and before the evening news, so I'd say there's a lot of nostalgia for them. Hopefully this remake will annoy some Gen-X mopes.

    Well into the 1990s.

    Bewitched and Jeannie were probably the most popular old sitcoms kids watched.

    Will Smith had a 1987 hit that was him rapping about his poor luck with women over the Jeannie theme song that got MTV play into the 1990’s as well.

  15. Anon[298] • Disclaimer says:

    They are probably trying to play up the family not liking the guy aspect; which would be realistic if the witch is black and the guy is white. If they went really politically incorrect and portrayed the black family as kind of ghetto with magic powers and the white guy as a normal person, I might give it a shot. But we all know they don’t have the balls for that.

    The new Bewitched family:

    And: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crichton_Leprechaun

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    It could be truly hilarious and satirical if they had a family with magic powers in the ghetto, using their magic to settle grievances or reserve parking spaces, but never to escape the ghetto and improve their lives. Obviously they will never go near that.
    , @Colin Wright
    '...If they went really politically incorrect and portrayed the black family as kind of ghetto with magic powers and the white guy as a normal person, I might give it a shot. But we all know they don’t have the balls for that...'

    You're still at the stage of hoping for arriving at some kind of amicable racial harmony...like the husband who's still trying to make his marriage work after twenty years.

    Sometimes, it's time to realize it just isn't going to get better. Unpleasant as the prospect may be, one has to decide what comes next.

    There are some that rejoice at this realization. I don't. However, I think it's time to consider what Plan B might be.
  16. @Anon
    Shouldn't it be called 'Bewiatched'?

    Beweyotched?

  17. So even when the sister is literally magic she can’t escape the undeserved power of the white man who may or may not be bald or something blah blah blah whatever.

    The Left dwells in Stark Terror that somehow some of us will forget their horse manure concepts like white privilege. So everything in our lives is salted with this crap. We can’t forget if we can never escape. As soon as they discover some way to inject it into our food, we’re done for.

  18. @Cagey Beast
    The shows you mentioned remained popular in reruns at least into the Eighties. They were shown after school and before the evening news, so I'd say there's a lot of nostalgia for them. Hopefully this remake will annoy some Gen-X mopes.

    Bewitched was part of my after school fare in the Eighties – although more for my sisters. It left a mark – my college buddies and I still refer to a common friend, Darren, as Derrwood.

    Will the new slacker Derrwood be in advertising? That wouldn’t be a bad choice, given the possible virtue signaling plot themes.

    • Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown

    Will the new slacker Derrwood be in advertising? That wouldn’t be a bad choice, given the possible virtue signaling plot themes.
     
    Based on what we've seen on Blackish, this is a very safe bet.
  19. Marrying a shiksa was a huge theme looming just below the surface in 1960s TV, although in Bewitched the allegory is kept ambiguous.

    Bewitched would be the situation of a WASP marrying a yenta, not a mensch marrying a shiksa. Remember that Darren’s family are old founding stock Yankees while Samantha has all the eccentric relatives from the old country — fairly analogous to Jewish inlaws.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    That's one way to look at it. Another is that the dark haired Darren(s) in the New York ad business marries a blonde who in real life was the daughter of President Eisenhower's advisor on appearing on camera, Robert Montgomery.

    The people who put these shows together weren't dumb and they knew that having multiple interpretations made for a richer show and gave them more options.

    As it was, Bewitched ran for so long (250+ episodes) that toward the end they were reduced to reusing old plots and/or lifting from previous shows they had worked on, such as the I Love Lucy assembly line show.

    , @syonredux

    Bewitched would be the situation of a WASP marrying a yenta, not a mensch marrying a shiksa. Remember that Darren’s family are old founding stock Yankees while Samantha has all the eccentric relatives from the old country — fairly analogous to Jewish inlaws.
     
    Dunno. Elizabeth Montgomery, Agnes Moorehead, and Maurice Evans are some of the least Jewish looking/acting people to ever appear on TV.....
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    The mother from Bewitched had Jewish personality characteristics.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzbCoecfdow

    Darren Stevens was definitely a WASP.

    Hard to say about Samantha Stevens.

    The neighbors (Mr. and Mrs. Kravitz) were Jewish.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLC1b8nUF74

    If you watch the first minute of the first episode of Bewitched, you'll see that both Darren and Samantha are portrayed as all-American, typical WASPs.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0H5kDCEH-2Q
  20. They should make the Black wife’s magical practices genuinely African. Have her kill the occasional albino, for example.

    • LOL: jim jones, Kylie
    • Replies: @gcochran
    But she should use _all_ of the albino.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    Darrin is watching tv news. We hear the reporter talk about finding the body of a black man with albinism with his hands missing.

    Close up of Darrin as he yells "Samantha!" Cue laugh track.
  21. “Well into the 1990s. Bewitched and Jeannie were probably the most popular old sitcoms kids watched.”

    Definitely. But Adam West’s Batman was also good. Get Smart, too. So was Lost in Space (more of a morning deal, though). I even liked Taxi and Mork and Mindy.

    • Replies: @Flip
    Gilligan's Island was the primo after school show for my grade school crowd.
  22. I thought Serena was played by Pandora Spocks? You’ve shattered the illusions of my first love.

  23. So even when the sister is literally magic she can’t escape the undeserved power of the white man…

    Maybe (((the show’s writers))) will create a future episode where she ditches the white husband and moves to Wakanda… problem solved.

  24. ‘Bewitched’ had nothing to do with marrying shiksas. It was basically a TV version of the movie https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell,_Book_and_Candle (unless you think Jimmy Stewart could play a Jew very well)

    If you want another interpretation of the show that acutally refers to the actors: http://www.outuk.com/index.php?http://www.outuk.com/content/features/bewitched/index.html

  25. Hasn’t this already been done?

  26. Anon[117] • Disclaimer says:

    “Democrats drop “superdelegates,” implies greater odds for Sanders types.”

    I’m not so sure. If I recall, Sanders would have still lost even without Hillary’s superdelegates, and primarily due to the heavily black vote against him in Southern states. Their nomination process wasn’t much more than a racial headcount. What this actually could portend is a bloody fight between a black grievance monger who wins Southern states, a pale male like Mark Warner (D – CIA) who wins Northern states, and a Hispanic immigrant-supremacist Alexandria “Ban ICE” Ocasio-Cortez who wins Western states like California. 2020 could be the year the CotF comes flying apart and Trump, for the good of the nation, calls off the election and remains president for life with secret agent Omarosa as Secretary of State. Here’s hoping.

  27. @40 Acres and A Kardashian
    Remember the "Sisters at Heart" Bewitched? The Christmas episode where Samantha turned herself, her husband, and her husband's boss black in order to shame a racist? (Go to 21:24 in the video.) This may well have been the very first "very special" episode of a sitcom. Back then, when Elizabeth Montgomery put on blackface it made her a Goodwhite. I don't think the episode would be quite as well received today.

    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2q5030

    This was a device in regular use. There were plenty of movies, tv shows, comic books and stories treating white physical safety concerns as deep stupidity and racism as a straightforward matter of skin color only, so that when the main character turns black there is no corresponding increase in violence or over-sensitivity. The blackening of the main character was something of a more limited sub-genre but these were the boundaries of the expressible on the issue.https://soulsisstarreviews.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/watermelon-man.jpg?w=600
    Perverse note: I cannot see the title “I Am Curious (Black)” without thinking of an obscene Swedish film with unrelated subject matter, I wonder if that’s deliberate …

    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    The film I Am Curious (Yellow) was quite popular in the USA in 1969, gaining much free publicity when it was “banned in Boston.” Many, many jokes were made about it. It is surprising, though, to see a reference to it in a kids’ comic book.
  28. @JimB

    Marrying a shiksa was a huge theme looming just below the surface in 1960s TV, although in Bewitched the allegory is kept ambiguous.
     
    Bewitched would be the situation of a WASP marrying a yenta, not a mensch marrying a shiksa. Remember that Darren’s family are old founding stock Yankees while Samantha has all the eccentric relatives from the old country — fairly analogous to Jewish inlaws.

    That’s one way to look at it. Another is that the dark haired Darren(s) in the New York ad business marries a blonde who in real life was the daughter of President Eisenhower’s advisor on appearing on camera, Robert Montgomery.

    The people who put these shows together weren’t dumb and they knew that having multiple interpretations made for a richer show and gave them more options.

    As it was, Bewitched ran for so long (250+ episodes) that toward the end they were reduced to reusing old plots and/or lifting from previous shows they had worked on, such as the I Love Lucy assembly line show.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    Well Jews ran TV,so I guess it's a Jewish theme. Had the show arrived earlier it might've been seen as a WASP marries an Irish girl.

    Note: Her father,Robert,made furniture as a hobby. Off his daughters fame,he got a commercial for Pledge on shining your wood furniture. (Respect the wood!)
    The comics had a great time lampooning the ad. It was begging for parody.

    And yes,the show went on way too long. Losing Darren? Huge. Losing Darren AND Gladys Kravitz? You don't come back from that.
  29. Anon[214] • Disclaimer says:

    Somehow I knew Steve would be writing about this.

    I hope the show explains all the mysterious African witchcraft aspects of modern American society, like how implicit bias and structural racism work, and how the servile condition of your great great great great great grandparents manages to travel through time and cause your IQ to drop 15 points and your credit rating to tank.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Maybe in the new show the black people will have explicit White Magic, while all white people have implicit Black Magic?
    , @Corvinus
    "I hope the show explains all the mysterious African witchcraft aspects of modern American society..."

    According to the Hollywood trade winds, the storyline will also include the next door gay neighbors, the Androphagi's, who engage in cannibalism while growing cannabis and making their own brand of malt liquor. Steve Buscemi and Forest Whitaker are already signed on as part of an ensemble cast. Apparently Buscemi's part was offered to Luis Guzman, who declined for unknown reasons.

  30. As a kid, Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie were the two TV shows that I absolutely loathed. Unfortunately my parents loved both of them so I didn’t have much chance to escape them. At the time, I thought it was because they were incredibly insulting to Whites, Christians, Husbands, and Air Force Officers, as well as being spectacularly unfunny. Now…..oh wait, even as a kid I had good judgement.

    Given the entertainment industry’s determination to remake every piece of crap, film and television, from the past, one has to wonder what the point is. There have actually been a large number of genuinely good tv shows made the last few years, so what is the point of remaking crap? What, it is going to be better crap? On the other hand, is there any point to remaking the good shows? I might actually watch a remake of Combat if it was good, but really, what is the point – I could just rewatch Combat.

    I really wonder about these people who copy the work of others, there is almost no chance of being as good, let alone better, than the originals, and as “artists” they are the moral equivalent of Xerox machines.

    • Replies: @songbird
    I wasn't a big fan of Jeanie, but I did think they had one or two funny bits. The psychiatrist character seeing stuff that made him wonder if he was crazy was always kind of funny, IMO.
    , @Anonymous
    IDOJ bettered reality one way-one of the astronauts in IDOJ was an Army officer, whereas in reality the Army had no astronauts until mid-Shuttle era. The demand of NASA that astronauts be "jet test pilots" was both arbitrary and ridiculous. Helo pilots would have made better LM pilots and submariners, divers and UDT/SEAL/EOD guys probably as good or better mission commanders. A Mercury, Gemini or Apollo CSM/LM spacecraft operated by principles as different from a fixed wing aircraft as a blimp or a submarine.

    The Army got screwed, as did the nonaviation branches of the Navy, in the astronaut game.
    , @Alfa158
    I only saw a few episodes of Bewitched, and it was pretty bad, but looking back on it I realize the show was ahead of it’s time in depicting a surreal version of reality. This was a universe in which a race of god-like beings with almost unlimited power, instead of ruling the planet, somehow had to hide themselves, and in which everybody in the country drove the same brand of car, a Chevrolet. David Lynch could not have come up with something this bizarre.
  31. They should make the witch an African witchdoctor (trans pre-op).

    • Replies: @Truth
    Like Barbara Eden?

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/RARE-STILL-BARBARA-EDEN-COLOR-SEXY-/232871084172
  32. They have no new ideas. Some day soon, Hollywood will reboot “Hogan’s Heroes”.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    How about an out of the closet "Gomer Pyle?"

    Roseann Barr does a bit about how when you are an adult going back to watch an old show, it's hard to overlook how gay the Gomer Pyle character is.

    , @Cagey Beast
    They could do a remake of “Hogan’s Heroes" as a tribute to John McCain.
  33. So, White Privilege beats supernatural powers? Who would’a thunk it?

  34. Abe says: • Website

    Just before he recently departed ABC Studios to embark on a rich overall deal at Netflix, Black-ish creator Kenya Barris sold one last high-profile project to ABC

    Steve, you have been sadly AWOL on the topic of powerful and I guess successful black ladies in entertainment. Kenya Barris, the lady who’s president of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, and, of course, Shonda Rhymes.

    The thing is- what is she exactly paid for? Show producer comes up with a concept, writes a generally poor pilot episode, and then the show lives or dies based on how talented a writing staff it puts together with the producer pocketing most of the cash from their success.

    • Replies: @Abe
    To be fair this applies to any race. Matt Groeing’s SIMPSONS was grotesque, unfunny, ugly, and plodding, yet it became a cultural phenomenon for about a decade based on its crackerjack Harvard Mafia writers. Until they left and material ran out and the show kept plodding along in zombie mode (ugh, 30 years soon) while anti-Nixon child of Woodstock Groening kept pocketing every dirty dollar.

    But maybe this is a good niche for somewhat talented, kinda creative, and self-disciplined black women? Be an inspirational figurehead and big idea person while a galley of white betas self-sacrificingly do the real work? Wasn’t that basically Obama’s gig?
  35. @Anon
    They are probably trying to play up the family not liking the guy aspect; which would be realistic if the witch is black and the guy is white. If they went really politically incorrect and portrayed the black family as kind of ghetto with magic powers and the white guy as a normal person, I might give it a shot. But we all know they don't have the balls for that.

    The new Bewitched family: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpUb8TS4bHM

    And: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crichton_Leprechaun

    It could be truly hilarious and satirical if they had a family with magic powers in the ghetto, using their magic to settle grievances or reserve parking spaces, but never to escape the ghetto and improve their lives. Obviously they will never go near that.

    • Replies: @Johan Schmidt
    That would essentially be the Harry Potter franchise, but for TV. No-one ever seems to dare to address the implications of a book series, written by a woman, in which wizards and witches have godlike powers to warp reality, but primarily use them to perform simple household chores.


    @hhsiii

    Race Bannon: Don’t worry boys, Bandit can take care of himself.
     
    Isn't that a good message for children, though? All the time I hear of people getting themselves killed to "rescue" a dog which turned out to be perfectly capable of escaping from the situation itself.
    , @Seth
    Isn’t there a show called “Black Jesus” based on this premise?
  36. In Bewitched, written by Barris and Taylor, Samantha, a hardworking black single mom who happens to be a witch, marries Darren, a white mortal who happens to be a bit of a slacker. They struggle to navigate their differences as she discovers that even when a black girl is literally magic, she’s still not as powerful as a decently tall white man with a full head of hair in America.

    Interesting to see that they’re going in the White man-Black woman direction, but I suppose that that is the safe option, as it both placates the fears of Black women (no White she-devil stealing one of their men) and strokes their egos…..

    Rather doubt that they will be able to find a Black woman who is as alluring as ’60s Elizabeth Montgomery, though….

    • Agree: Steve in Greensboro
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Now THAT is a picture worthy of the era. You will notice that the make-up from the mid. '60's is less garrish (less Aunt Jemimah batter, as compared to the smutty pictures of the mid. '40's).

    The '60's were the era when Hollywood women were finally, FINALLY, becoming more smoldering, sizzling, and earthy in their sexuality, due in no small part, because women were finally letting their hair down. No more of that '50's butch puppy Poodle cut. Actual tresses, long and loose, past the shoulders, goodness it is amazing to behold.

    Montgomery. Welch. Fonda. Natalie Wood. Andress. Bardot. The lead Italian redhead chick in 007's Thunderball. And Emma Peel.

    Yes, yes, yes! This is how a woman should look (at least a Hollywood Alister).

    There is a word for Lizzy, and she definitely has got it. More natural looking makeup, not piles of goop poured upon the face.

    Here the beauty of the ages is to be found; there the wonderment, Aphrodite, forever lies.

    Amazing Lizzy. Simply and totally amazing.

    , @jcd1974
    A local channel has lately re-running Bewitched every weeknight. The charms of Elizabeth Montgomery were lost on me as a kid, now I think she's the most alluring women to ever grace the TV screen. Her sex appeal is off the charts.

    The same channel also shows the Mary Tyler Moore Show, and poor Mary is simply not in the same league as the stunning Samantha Stevens.
    , @ACommenter
    One good thing about this, it made me google Elizabeth Montgomery,
    As a kid after school I watched these shows, but wow, I never realized how hot she was.. her character had waspy name Samantha (High Society, Philadelphia story) and she's actually anglo-scots-irish...

    like all around
    https://www.phactual.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Montgomery-1900x1357_c.jpg

    , @Steve in Greensboro
    I was going to post another photo of Miss Montgomery to compliment the one you posted, but I couldn't make up my mind which one to choose. Apparently it was impossible to take a bad photo of the girl. She is someone to whom I can sincerely wish RIP.
    , @anon
    She has really good hair.
  37. @Anon
    Somehow I knew Steve would be writing about this.

    I hope the show explains all the mysterious African witchcraft aspects of modern American society, like how implicit bias and structural racism work, and how the servile condition of your great great great great great grandparents manages to travel through time and cause your IQ to drop 15 points and your credit rating to tank.

    Maybe in the new show the black people will have explicit White Magic, while all white people have implicit Black Magic?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Maybe in the new show the black people will have explicit White Magic, while all white people have implicit Black Magic?
     
    Maybe all the White characters will have amulets containing the eldritch energies of whiteness....
    , @George
    They could have the Black witch married to a white silicon valley technologist. He is late in getting a feature added to one of his gizmos. Running late his wife uses her black magic to provide the feature at a demonstration in front of his bosses. Having sold the idea to venture capitalists the fun begins when he has to actually add the feature in reality using his white magic.
  38. @Bugg
    They have no new ideas. Some day soon, Hollywood will reboot "Hogan's Heroes".

    How about an out of the closet “Gomer Pyle?”

    Roseann Barr does a bit about how when you are an adult going back to watch an old show, it’s hard to overlook how gay the Gomer Pyle character is.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    Geez, Steve don’t give them any ideas. Especially since it isn’t like they are going to bring you into the development team so you can get some of the schmundo and stop blegging for donations.
    , @anon
    Isn’t a mixed race Brady Bunch an obvious winner?
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    Please, I knew he was gay even before I knew what gay was.
  39. @Whiskey
    Tell me again how Hollywood is really conservative?

    And for all her magic the single Black mother couldn't get baby daddy to stay.

    They will cast the really gay dude from the Big Bang Theory.

    “They will cast the really gay dude from the Big Bang Theory.”

    Can you be more specific?

    • LOL: Dtbb
  40. (Marrying a shiksa was a huge theme looming just below the surface in 1960s TV, although in Bewitched the allegory is kept ambiguous. Elizabeth Montgomery, for example, was the daughter of Hollywood Republican stalwart Robert Montgomery.)

    Along those lines, it’s interesting to note that Bewitched producer (and husband to star Elizabeth Montgomery) William Asher was the product of an interfaith union:

    Asher was born in New York City to stage actress Lillian Bonner and producer Ephraim M. Asher (1887-1937), whose movie credits were mostly as an associate producer. His sister, Betty Asher, was an MGM publicist for Judy Garland.[4] His father was Jewish, his mother Catholic.[2] Asher’s family moved to Los Angeles when he was 10, where he often accompanied his father to the movie studio.[5]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Asher

  41. Has there been a recent reboot that didn’t have a mixed-race family, in some form or other? Or race/sex-swapped characters?

  42. (I was a big fan of Johnny Quest, though.)

    • Agree: L Woods
    • Replies: @Toddy Cat
    The opening themes to "Jonny Quest" and "Mannix" represent the high point of Western civilization. It's no surprise that it's been all downhill from there.
    , @MEH 0910
    https://thumbs.gfycat.com/MadLameCanvasback-size_restricted.gif
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    The new Johnny Quest had a pretty cool opening too.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIuuPTM3nSc

    The 1993 Johnny Quest movie had a villain who vaguely reminded me of "Ming the Merciless."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGnHB5i2wk0
    , @Romanian
    I wonder what Steve thinks of the later Johnny Quest reboots. I grew up on those, like The Real Adventures of Johnny Quest.
    , @hhsiii
    We always made fun of the way they dealt with Bandit the dog, who was always comic relief.

    Hadji: Johnny, Bandit’s caught in those pile drivers.

    Race Bannon: Don’t worry boys, Bandit can take care of himself.
  43. Abe says: • Website
    @Abe

    Just before he recently departed ABC Studios to embark on a rich overall deal at Netflix, Black-ish creator Kenya Barris sold one last high-profile project to ABC
     
    Steve, you have been sadly AWOL on the topic of powerful and I guess successful black ladies in entertainment. Kenya Barris, the lady who’s president of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, and, of course, Shonda Rhymes.

    The thing is- what is she exactly paid for? Show producer comes up with a concept, writes a generally poor pilot episode, and then the show lives or dies based on how talented a writing staff it puts together with the producer pocketing most of the cash from their success.

    To be fair this applies to any race. Matt Groeing’s SIMPSONS was grotesque, unfunny, ugly, and plodding, yet it became a cultural phenomenon for about a decade based on its crackerjack Harvard Mafia writers. Until they left and material ran out and the show kept plodding along in zombie mode (ugh, 30 years soon) while anti-Nixon child of Woodstock Groening kept pocketing every dirty dollar.

    But maybe this is a good niche for somewhat talented, kinda creative, and self-disciplined black women? Be an inspirational figurehead and big idea person while a galley of white betas self-sacrificingly do the real work? Wasn’t that basically Obama’s gig?

  44. @40 Acres and A Kardashian
    Remember the "Sisters at Heart" Bewitched? The Christmas episode where Samantha turned herself, her husband, and her husband's boss black in order to shame a racist? (Go to 21:24 in the video.) This may well have been the very first "very special" episode of a sitcom. Back then, when Elizabeth Montgomery put on blackface it made her a Goodwhite. I don't think the episode would be quite as well received today.

    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2q5030

    And there was this:

    • Replies: @Angular momentum
    Montgomery and Eden were both hot pieces of ass. Just sayin, I’m sure that had something to do with their success.
  45. @JimB

    Marrying a shiksa was a huge theme looming just below the surface in 1960s TV, although in Bewitched the allegory is kept ambiguous.
     
    Bewitched would be the situation of a WASP marrying a yenta, not a mensch marrying a shiksa. Remember that Darren’s family are old founding stock Yankees while Samantha has all the eccentric relatives from the old country — fairly analogous to Jewish inlaws.

    Bewitched would be the situation of a WASP marrying a yenta, not a mensch marrying a shiksa. Remember that Darren’s family are old founding stock Yankees while Samantha has all the eccentric relatives from the old country — fairly analogous to Jewish inlaws.

    Dunno. Elizabeth Montgomery, Agnes Moorehead, and Maurice Evans are some of the least Jewish looking/acting people to ever appear on TV…..

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    When I lived in Hollywood in the late Eighties I would often take long walks around the then-ratty neighborhood. It was on one of these that I discovered that if you stopped at Agnes Moorhead's star on the Walk of Fame and turned to look due west, you would see across the vast waste of parking lots, spray-painted on the wall of the Pantages Theater in letters that must have been like ten feet tall: "AGNES MOORHEAD IS GOD." It was glorious.
  46. @theMann
    As a kid, Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie were the two TV shows that I absolutely loathed. Unfortunately my parents loved both of them so I didn't have much chance to escape them. At the time, I thought it was because they were incredibly insulting to Whites, Christians, Husbands, and Air Force Officers, as well as being spectacularly unfunny. Now.....oh wait, even as a kid I had good judgement.


    Given the entertainment industry's determination to remake every piece of crap, film and television, from the past, one has to wonder what the point is. There have actually been a large number of genuinely good tv shows made the last few years, so what is the point of remaking crap? What, it is going to be better crap? On the other hand, is there any point to remaking the good shows? I might actually watch a remake of Combat if it was good, but really, what is the point - I could just rewatch Combat.


    I really wonder about these people who copy the work of others, there is almost no chance of being as good, let alone better, than the originals, and as "artists" they are the moral equivalent of Xerox machines.

    I wasn’t a big fan of Jeanie, but I did think they had one or two funny bits. The psychiatrist character seeing stuff that made him wonder if he was crazy was always kind of funny, IMO.

  47. “A friend suggests he’d watch a sitcom where the black husband is a down-to-earth Army sergeant and the white wife’s family are annoying New Age Wiccans.”

    Sounds like you’re talking about Dharma and Greg.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    That wasn't bad the couple of times I saw it.
  48. Steve is really reaching for conspiracy theories. Thats a problem with the comments on this site. Every problem in the world isn’t the fault of the USA or especially, the CIA.

    Bewitched was based on two earlier movies – “Bell Book and Candle” and “I Married a Witch”.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Missing the best one, The Eagle. No origin can obviate spins and deliberate subtexts. In fact, even leaning heavily on the origin stuff is useless, because a basic idea is not a show, and because (especially in this era) the writers tended to be both similar and clubbish, and would have the same idea at the same time.
    , @syonredux

    Bewitched was based on two earlier movies – “Bell Book and Candle” and “I Married a Witch”.
     
    Those were the inspirations, yes, but the themes/sub-texts were different.Bell, Book, and Candle used witchcraft as a metaphor for homosexuality, and I Married a Witch was Thorne Smith's (he wrote the novel, The Passionate Witch, upon which the film was based)send-up of gothic fiction.
  49. @Steve Sailer
    Maybe in the new show the black people will have explicit White Magic, while all white people have implicit Black Magic?

    Maybe in the new show the black people will have explicit White Magic, while all white people have implicit Black Magic?

    Maybe all the White characters will have amulets containing the eldritch energies of whiteness….

  50. @bicycle
    "A friend suggests he’d watch a sitcom where the black husband is a down-to-earth Army sergeant and the white wife’s family are annoying New Age Wiccans."

    Sounds like you're talking about Dharma and Greg.

    That wasn’t bad the couple of times I saw it.

    • Replies: @njguy73
    Dharma and Greg were the least interesting characters on the show. The parents and the friends were funnier.
  51. @Anon
    "Well into the 1990s. Bewitched and Jeannie were probably the most popular old sitcoms kids watched."

    Definitely. But Adam West's Batman was also good. Get Smart, too. So was Lost in Space (more of a morning deal, though). I even liked Taxi and Mork and Mindy.

    Gilligan’s Island was the primo after school show for my grade school crowd.

    • Replies: @Kylie
    I still love "Gilligan's Island" and "Green Acres". Staging "Hamlet" to the music from "Carmen", climbing a telephone pole to talk on the telephone, farming in a suit and tie, a pig who's feelings are hurt when he's told he's watching a front-loading washing machine instead of a television.
    , @Anonymous Human Intelligence Operative

    Gilligan’s Island was the primo after school show for my grade school crowd.
     
    I know it isn't a sitcom, but Dark Shadows (on UHF!) had a pretty good run of things.
    , @Clyde
    Gilligan’s Island, McHale's Navy, Hogan's Heroes and Get Smart got me laughing or at least got me watching them. Jeanie and Bewitched...did not watch. McHale's Navy was number one for me. Sanford and Son came later and was good.
  52. @Bugg
    They have no new ideas. Some day soon, Hollywood will reboot "Hogan's Heroes".

    They could do a remake of “Hogan’s Heroes” as a tribute to John McCain.

    • Replies: @Truth
    Or John Kerry...
  53. @GSR
    Steve is really reaching for conspiracy theories. Thats a problem with the comments on this site. Every problem in the world isn't the fault of the USA or especially, the CIA.

    Bewitched was based on two earlier movies - "Bell Book and Candle" and "I Married a Witch".

    Missing the best one, The Eagle. No origin can obviate spins and deliberate subtexts. In fact, even leaning heavily on the origin stuff is useless, because a basic idea is not a show, and because (especially in this era) the writers tended to be both similar and clubbish, and would have the same idea at the same time.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Missing the best one, The Eagle.
     
    Do you mean Night of the Eagle, the 1962 adaptation of Fritz Leiber's classic Conjure Wife? Never saw it, but the book is great, one of Leiber's best.
  54. @GSR
    Steve is really reaching for conspiracy theories. Thats a problem with the comments on this site. Every problem in the world isn't the fault of the USA or especially, the CIA.

    Bewitched was based on two earlier movies - "Bell Book and Candle" and "I Married a Witch".

    Bewitched was based on two earlier movies – “Bell Book and Candle” and “I Married a Witch”.

    Those were the inspirations, yes, but the themes/sub-texts were different.Bell, Book, and Candle used witchcraft as a metaphor for homosexuality, and I Married a Witch was Thorne Smith’s (he wrote the novel, The Passionate Witch, upon which the film was based)send-up of gothic fiction.

  55. @Cagey Beast
    They should make the Black wife's magical practices genuinely African. Have her kill the occasional albino, for example.

    But she should use _all_ of the albino.

  56. @J.Ross
    This was a device in regular use. There were plenty of movies, tv shows, comic books and stories treating white physical safety concerns as deep stupidity and racism as a straightforward matter of skin color only, so that when the main character turns black there is no corresponding increase in violence or over-sensitivity. The blackening of the main character was something of a more limited sub-genre but these were the boundaries of the expressible on the issue.
    http://www.comicbookdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/Lois-lane-106.jpg
    https://soulsisstarreviews.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/watermelon-man.jpg?w=600
    Perverse note: I cannot see the title "I Am Curious (Black)" without thinking of an obscene Swedish film with unrelated subject matter, I wonder if that's deliberate ...

    The film I Am Curious (Yellow) was quite popular in the USA in 1969, gaining much free publicity when it was “banned in Boston.” Many, many jokes were made about it. It is surprising, though, to see a reference to it in a kids’ comic book.

  57. A panel from the above comic illustrates exactly what lefties think will save them on the day of burning:

    tldr “I’m not like the other [white] girls.”

  58. The idea that those shows were about marrying a shiksa is news to me (are gentiles magical?), but I’m young enough that I didn’t watch very much of those. I know there was a more explicit attempt at that in “Bridget Loves Bernie”, but that was controversial enough to get cancelled. Another 60s domestic comedy pairing a normal man with a fantastical woman was “My Living Doll”, although that was inspired by Pygmalion.

    Speaking of that set, a few years ago it was noted that there were a lot of procedurals pairing a relatively ordinary female cop with an extraordinary man. Limitless, Minority Report, Sleepy Hollow & The Blacklist all used that formula in 2015, Forever had tried & failed at that the previous year (fitting, as it was a copy of the one-season show New Amsterdam from 2008). Elementary was close to that, although their female Watson wasn’t actually a cop, while Blindspot flips the genders of each role. The French import Taxi Brooklyn was also sort of a version of that. Straussians are welcome to conjecture about what that trend was “really” about.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    I have always thought that Bewitched was about marrying up and I Dream of Genie was about marrying down.
    , @WowJustWow
    What about Medium, where the wife solves crimes with her magic powers, her three daughters have her magic, but her husband is a useless British Muggle?
  59. “In the defense of the former view, I don’t recall that many animated shows from the same era.”

    What do you mean?

    The Flintstones; the Jetsons; Abbott and Costello; Top Hat; the Chan Clan; even Hong Kong Fooey. Speed Racer (a Trans-LUX global distribution) was ’66-’67. Trans-LUX also distributed Hercules as well. ’65 was I think, the first animated special of Peanuts (It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown).

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Tobor, the 8 Man; Astro Boy; Prince Planet.... shown on the same UHF station that showed Speed Racer years after they were acquired from Japan and badly dubbed.
  60. @syonredux

    In Bewitched, written by Barris and Taylor, Samantha, a hardworking black single mom who happens to be a witch, marries Darren, a white mortal who happens to be a bit of a slacker. They struggle to navigate their differences as she discovers that even when a black girl is literally magic, she’s still not as powerful as a decently tall white man with a full head of hair in America.
     
    Interesting to see that they're going in the White man-Black woman direction, but I suppose that that is the safe option, as it both placates the fears of Black women (no White she-devil stealing one of their men) and strokes their egos.....


    Rather doubt that they will be able to find a Black woman who is as alluring as '60s Elizabeth Montgomery, though....

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/56/25/83/5625835fddb644e99f30f125f761fa50.jpg

    Now THAT is a picture worthy of the era. You will notice that the make-up from the mid. ’60’s is less garrish (less Aunt Jemimah batter, as compared to the smutty pictures of the mid. ’40’s).

    The ’60’s were the era when Hollywood women were finally, FINALLY, becoming more smoldering, sizzling, and earthy in their sexuality, due in no small part, because women were finally letting their hair down. No more of that ’50’s butch puppy Poodle cut. Actual tresses, long and loose, past the shoulders, goodness it is amazing to behold.

    Montgomery. Welch. Fonda. Natalie Wood. Andress. Bardot. The lead Italian redhead chick in 007’s Thunderball. And Emma Peel.

    Yes, yes, yes! This is how a woman should look (at least a Hollywood Alister).

    There is a word for Lizzy, and she definitely has got it. More natural looking makeup, not piles of goop poured upon the face.

    Here the beauty of the ages is to be found; there the wonderment, Aphrodite, forever lies.

    Amazing Lizzy. Simply and totally amazing.

    • Replies: @Truth

    Montgomery. Welch. Fonda. Natalie Wood. Andress. Bardot. The lead Italian redhead chick in 007′s Thunderball. And Emma Peel.

    Yes, yes, yes! This is how a woman should look (at least a Hollywood Alister).
     
    (...cough...cough...)
  61. @J.Ross
    Missing the best one, The Eagle. No origin can obviate spins and deliberate subtexts. In fact, even leaning heavily on the origin stuff is useless, because a basic idea is not a show, and because (especially in this era) the writers tended to be both similar and clubbish, and would have the same idea at the same time.

    Missing the best one, The Eagle.

    Do you mean Night of the Eagle, the 1962 adaptation of Fritz Leiber’s classic Conjure Wife? Never saw it, but the book is great, one of Leiber’s best.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    That's the one, it explored the same idea but placed witchcraft (really, wife politicking, such as made up several subplots of Mad Men) in direct confrontation with science in the context of academia. It was a kind of acknowledgment that nominally meritocratic institutions cared less about scientific aptitude than they professed.
  62. I think it was maybe Ben Shapiro who wrote a book about the history of the television industry in which he pointed out that a major underlying theme of many television shows of the 1960-70s was how it was normal that I divorced my Jewish first wife and married a younger shiksa.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Could also be because most of the TV writers of the era were Jewish.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    OJ did that to his Black first wife. He then remarried super Shiksa-looking Nicole. His wife then left him and later started hanging out with Ron Goldman.

    Blacks were overjoyed when OJ was found innocent. Watch this video below.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nsnuhz-Kb7k

    As I recall, at the time, the large majority of Whites seemed taken aback by the verdict. The few Blacks I knew were ecstatic. The above video matches what I saw from people.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NH-VuP_5cA4
  63. @syonredux

    Missing the best one, The Eagle.
     
    Do you mean Night of the Eagle, the 1962 adaptation of Fritz Leiber's classic Conjure Wife? Never saw it, but the book is great, one of Leiber's best.

    That’s the one, it explored the same idea but placed witchcraft (really, wife politicking, such as made up several subplots of Mad Men) in direct confrontation with science in the context of academia. It was a kind of acknowledgment that nominally meritocratic institutions cared less about scientific aptitude than they professed.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    That’s the one, it explored the same idea but placed witchcraft (really, wife politicking, such as made up several subplots of Mad Men) in direct confrontation with science in the context of academia. It was a kind of acknowledgment that nominally meritocratic institutions cared less about scientific aptitude than they professed.
     
    I'll give it a shot. As I mentioned upthread, I really like the novel upon which it was based. The academic infighting stuff was based on Leiber's experiences teaching speech and drama at Occidental College.

    Leiber has my vote as perhaps the most multi-talented genre author of the 20th century, equally adept at horror (Our Lady of Darkness, You're All Alone), science fiction (The Big Time, "Coming Attraction," "Poor Superman"), and fantasy (the Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser series). Heck, he wrote a good novelization of a movie (Tarzan and the Valley of Gold )

  64. @Steve Sailer
    I think it was maybe Ben Shapiro who wrote a book about the history of the television industry in which he pointed out that a major underlying theme of many television shows of the 1960-70s was how it was normal that I divorced my Jewish first wife and married a younger shiksa.

    Could also be because most of the TV writers of the era were Jewish.

  65. @Flip
    Gilligan's Island was the primo after school show for my grade school crowd.

    I still love “Gilligan’s Island” and “Green Acres”. Staging “Hamlet” to the music from “Carmen”, climbing a telephone pole to talk on the telephone, farming in a suit and tie, a pig who’s feelings are hurt when he’s told he’s watching a front-loading washing machine instead of a television.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    Easily the best episode of "Gilligan's Island"-- and co-directed by the great Ida Lupino, no less!

    http://gilligan.wikia.com/wiki/The_Producer

    ***

    Harold Hecuba - "You call yourselves actors!?"

    Gilligan - "I don't call myself an actor."

    Harold Hecuba - "If I say you're an actor you're an actor!"

    Gilligan - "Ok! I'm an actor!"

    Harold Hecuba - "Believe me, you are no actor!"

    ***
    , @Steve Sailer
    Green Acres was insane. An amazing show.
    , @JimB
    The Munsters was the jewel in the crown of 60s fantasy sitcoms although it lasted only two seasons. Al Lewis and Fred Gwyne are the greatest comedy duo of all time, with a wise guy Jewish vampire playing foil to a naive, gentle hearted WASPy Frankenstein monster. The original concept was formulated by Alan Burns and Chris Hayward, the creators of the Rocky and Bullwinkle show. It was supposed to be Leave it to Beaver as civil rights allegory with classic Universal Film Studios monsters. The Munsters are a permanent item in the family film night rotation.
  66. @J.Ross
    That's the one, it explored the same idea but placed witchcraft (really, wife politicking, such as made up several subplots of Mad Men) in direct confrontation with science in the context of academia. It was a kind of acknowledgment that nominally meritocratic institutions cared less about scientific aptitude than they professed.

    That’s the one, it explored the same idea but placed witchcraft (really, wife politicking, such as made up several subplots of Mad Men) in direct confrontation with science in the context of academia. It was a kind of acknowledgment that nominally meritocratic institutions cared less about scientific aptitude than they professed.

    I’ll give it a shot. As I mentioned upthread, I really like the novel upon which it was based. The academic infighting stuff was based on Leiber’s experiences teaching speech and drama at Occidental College.

    Leiber has my vote as perhaps the most multi-talented genre author of the 20th century, equally adept at horror (Our Lady of Darkness, You’re All Alone), science fiction (The Big Time, “Coming Attraction,” “Poor Superman”), and fantasy (the Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser series). Heck, he wrote a good novelization of a movie (Tarzan and the Valley of Gold )

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    Hear him!
  67. @Steve Sailer
    Maybe in the new show the black people will have explicit White Magic, while all white people have implicit Black Magic?

    They could have the Black witch married to a white silicon valley technologist. He is late in getting a feature added to one of his gizmos. Running late his wife uses her black magic to provide the feature at a demonstration in front of his bosses. Having sold the idea to venture capitalists the fun begins when he has to actually add the feature in reality using his white magic.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The white male could have claimed to have invented a blood-testing gizmo but was really just his black wife's white magic.
  68. @TGGP
    The idea that those shows were about marrying a shiksa is news to me (are gentiles magical?), but I'm young enough that I didn't watch very much of those. I know there was a more explicit attempt at that in "Bridget Loves Bernie", but that was controversial enough to get cancelled. Another 60s domestic comedy pairing a normal man with a fantastical woman was "My Living Doll", although that was inspired by Pygmalion.

    Speaking of that set, a few years ago it was noted that there were a lot of procedurals pairing a relatively ordinary female cop with an extraordinary man. Limitless, Minority Report, Sleepy Hollow & The Blacklist all used that formula in 2015, Forever had tried & failed at that the previous year (fitting, as it was a copy of the one-season show New Amsterdam from 2008). Elementary was close to that, although their female Watson wasn't actually a cop, while Blindspot flips the genders of each role. The French import Taxi Brooklyn was also sort of a version of that. Straussians are welcome to conjecture about what that trend was "really" about.

    I have always thought that Bewitched was about marrying up and I Dream of Genie was about marrying down.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Interesting.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    Samantha's mom and relatives would always complain about how simple Darren Stevens was inadequate.

    Almost like a Jewish mother-in-law berating her daughter that she should've married a "nice Jewish doctor."

    Remember Goodfellas?

    Karen's mom told her that she should've married a Jew, not the Irish/Italian Henry Hill.

    "He's not Jewish. Do you know how these people live?"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n16uBK71miQ

    It's been a while since I watched Bewitched, but the dynamic seemed sort of similar.
  69. @James Speaks
    I have always thought that Bewitched was about marrying up and I Dream of Genie was about marrying down.

    Interesting.

  70. @George
    They could have the Black witch married to a white silicon valley technologist. He is late in getting a feature added to one of his gizmos. Running late his wife uses her black magic to provide the feature at a demonstration in front of his bosses. Having sold the idea to venture capitalists the fun begins when he has to actually add the feature in reality using his white magic.

    The white male could have claimed to have invented a blood-testing gizmo but was really just his black wife’s white magic.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Is Bad Blood worth reading? You never really rated it as a book in the Taki review. Of course, I realize that book review as Consumer Reports article is an outdated concept, and the proper modern conception of a book review is as a launch pad to whatever is on the mind of the reviewer. Otherwise reviewers would have to actually read the books they review closely, even twice, and they'd already be in the red, considering what publishers pay for reviews.
    For reviews
  71. @Anon
    Shouldn't it be called 'Bewiatched'?

    Besmirched.

    I Dream of Je’annie. Or Jihadi.

    We will be spared NOTHING.

  72. Was never a gnostic, so figuring out the inside meanings of those old shows never occurred to me. I just remember as a kid disliking most of those them with the exception of the Munsters and the Flintstones.

    The fact that Hollywood is rebooting “BeWitched” is amusing and pathetic. I really can’t think of a sitcom that isn’t boorish, annoying, idiotic, in your face, stuffed with laugh tracks because the director knows the sitcom sucks and has to tell the audience when to laugh.

    Still it should last a season.

  73. @Kylie
    I still love "Gilligan's Island" and "Green Acres". Staging "Hamlet" to the music from "Carmen", climbing a telephone pole to talk on the telephone, farming in a suit and tie, a pig who's feelings are hurt when he's told he's watching a front-loading washing machine instead of a television.

    Easily the best episode of “Gilligan’s Island”– and co-directed by the great Ida Lupino, no less!

    http://gilligan.wikia.com/wiki/The_Producer

    ***

    Harold Hecuba – “You call yourselves actors!?”

    Gilligan – “I don’t call myself an actor.”

    Harold Hecuba – “If I say you’re an actor you’re an actor!”

    Gilligan – “Ok! I’m an actor!”

    Harold Hecuba – “Believe me, you are no actor!”

    ***

    • LOL: Kylie
    • Replies: @Ganderson
    I loved Gilligan, not to mention Mary Ann! That particular episode was among my faves- “Harold’s Hecuba”, indeed!

    I’m a big fan of Hogan’s Heroes, Bob Crane’s peccadilloes notwithstanding... great ensemble comedy.
    , @anonymous
    I think a Gilligan re-boot with a Spike Lee - Gilligan, Samuel L. Jackson - Professor and Jennifer Lopez - Ginger would be a hoot.
    , @Kylie
    Oops, sorry, D.K., not laughing at you, laughing at the exchange between Harold and Gilligan.

    Back when silly was fun. And back when fun was to be had without any hipster irony.
  74. @Anon
    Somehow I knew Steve would be writing about this.

    I hope the show explains all the mysterious African witchcraft aspects of modern American society, like how implicit bias and structural racism work, and how the servile condition of your great great great great great grandparents manages to travel through time and cause your IQ to drop 15 points and your credit rating to tank.

    “I hope the show explains all the mysterious African witchcraft aspects of modern American society…”

    According to the Hollywood trade winds, the storyline will also include the next door gay neighbors, the Androphagi’s, who engage in cannibalism while growing cannabis and making their own brand of malt liquor. Steve Buscemi and Forest Whitaker are already signed on as part of an ensemble cast. Apparently Buscemi’s part was offered to Luis Guzman, who declined for unknown reasons.

  75. @syonredux

    In Bewitched, written by Barris and Taylor, Samantha, a hardworking black single mom who happens to be a witch, marries Darren, a white mortal who happens to be a bit of a slacker. They struggle to navigate their differences as she discovers that even when a black girl is literally magic, she’s still not as powerful as a decently tall white man with a full head of hair in America.
     
    Interesting to see that they're going in the White man-Black woman direction, but I suppose that that is the safe option, as it both placates the fears of Black women (no White she-devil stealing one of their men) and strokes their egos.....


    Rather doubt that they will be able to find a Black woman who is as alluring as '60s Elizabeth Montgomery, though....

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/56/25/83/5625835fddb644e99f30f125f761fa50.jpg

    A local channel has lately re-running Bewitched every weeknight. The charms of Elizabeth Montgomery were lost on me as a kid, now I think she’s the most alluring women to ever grace the TV screen. Her sex appeal is off the charts.

    The same channel also shows the Mary Tyler Moore Show, and poor Mary is simply not in the same league as the stunning Samantha Stevens.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    A local channel has lately re-running Bewitched every weeknight. The charms of Elizabeth Montgomery were lost on me as a kid, now I think she’s the most alluring women to ever grace the TV screen. Her sex appeal is off the charts.

     

    Hmmmmm, yes. I had no interest whatsoever in either Jeanie or Bewitched throughout my childhood; when they came on, it was time to read or go outside and play. But then somewhere around age 12 or so I started to detect some previously-overlooked merit in these shows.

    Must have been some sort of gnostic revelation.

  76. @syonredux

    (I was a big fan of Johnny Quest, though.)
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gNBFmlNUfM

    The opening themes to “Jonny Quest” and “Mannix” represent the high point of Western civilization. It’s no surprise that it’s been all downhill from there.

  77. I was a big fan of Jonny Quest, though.

    I’ve daydreamed before about a Jonny Quest reboot which would employ Gregory Cochran as a script consultant- they’d need a list of unproved-but-plausible cutting-edge scientific theories that would give Dr. Benton Quest a credible excuse to travel to exotic locales. (Sadly, we’re a couple decades past the time when Tim Matheson could have played Dr. Quest in a live-action version. Maybe now a cameo as grandpa Quest).

    I have the full series on DVD; it definitely seems to reflect the Cold War-era interest in exotic anthropology that Mr. Sailer has discussed before, which is why it’s now denounced as hopelessly racist by any SJWs who bother to take notice of it. Some of the foreign accents and cultural references sound a little comical to ears living in the multicultural 21st century, but otherwise the show holds up extremely well- much better than most programs from a half-century ago.

    • Replies: @Toddy Cat
    I would definitely watch a Cochran-inspired Jonny Quest. Maybe we could get Dinesh D'Souza to play Hadji.
  78. Uncle Arthur (Paul Lynde — I was surprised to see the memorable Lynde only appeared in 10 of the 254 episodes).

    Uncle Arthur was the Ernest T. Bass of Bewitched.
    He only appeared in a handful of episodes, yet everyone who watched that show remembers him.

  79. @syonredux

    (I was a big fan of Johnny Quest, though.)
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gNBFmlNUfM

  80. Anonymous[332] • Disclaimer says:

    The original Darren was awesome, the replacement Darren was too awful to watch. I recently looked up what happened to Dick York and why he was replaced. It’s a really sad story, and a bit touching too.

    I’m not a fan of most of that 60s tv cheese, but I do remember liking Dobie Gillis when it ran on Nick at Nite. Maynard > Gilligan.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    I’m not a fan of most of that 60s tv cheese, but I do remember liking Dobie Gillis when it ran on Nick at Nite. Maynard > Gilligan.

    Bob Denver retired in his forties because he said his type of character wouldn't work after that.
    , @Father O'Hara
    Maynard G. Krebs was in the vanguard of the anti-globalist tyrants. Remember,when anyone said the word'work',his eyes would bug out, his face would turn to a mask of fear ,and he'd loudly cry "Work??!!"
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    Dick York stayed married to his first wife and had five children with her. Despite the sad injury that so damaged him, his was a successful life.

    And being remembered for one role is one role more than most actors get.
    , @Ganderson
    WORK!!
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The original Darren was awesome, the replacement Darren was too awful to watch.
     
    He started out as Dick Cox, not the best name for an actor. Especially one who took advantage of National Coming-Out Day.

    Dick Sargent was two years younger than Dick York, and died two years afterward. Emphysema and prostate cancer killed them, respectively.
  81. @Cagey Beast
    They should make the Black wife's magical practices genuinely African. Have her kill the occasional albino, for example.

    Darrin is watching tv news. We hear the reporter talk about finding the body of a black man with albinism with his hands missing.

    Close up of Darrin as he yells “Samantha!” Cue laugh track.

  82. @Steve Sailer
    That wasn't bad the couple of times I saw it.

    Dharma and Greg were the least interesting characters on the show. The parents and the friends were funnier.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Dharma and Greg were the least interesting characters on the show. The parents and the friends were funnier.
     
    So how is that different from Bewitched? Or the Andy Griffith Show or Happy Days, for that matter?

    Bob Newhart made a career out of being the dull guy surrounded by entertaining nuts. I believe it's called the "straight man".

    The real reason to watch Dh&G was Jenna Elfman's smile. Good Dalmatian genes paid off.
  83. @njguy73
    And there was this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kwe1sFgUTTU

    Montgomery and Eden were both hot pieces of ass. Just sayin, I’m sure that had something to do with their success.

  84. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Daniel H
    I never liked Bewitched, but I loved I dream of Jeannie. Larry Hagman and Barbara Eden had great chemistry.

    Eden was a magnificent physical specimen. Her stand-in was Evelyn Moriarty, who had been the stand-in previously for Marilyn Monroe-e.g., she fit the costumes almost perfectly. I’d say MM had the prettier face but Eden if anything had a slightly better figure-better breasts and bottom, for sure.

    Eden was not the actress Monroe was (Marilyn was better than people gave her credit for at the time, though admittedly she was no Meryl Streep) but she looked good on the small screen and played the role of Jeannie the genie as well as anyone probably could have.

    Either one would have looked really good in the female Starfleet uniform of Star Trek TOS.

    Just saying.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Eden was not the actress Monroe was (Marilyn was better than people gave her credit for at the time,"

    No she wasn't. To be fair, Barbara Eden attended SF conservatory of music and a theatre school. She was on her way to becoming a legitimate versatile actress/comedienne before Jeannie made her a superstar. Not a name per se, but a more or less respectable actress.

    Perhaps legendary producer David Brown made the best observation "Marilyn, like Elvis, seems to have gotten bigger in death than she ever was during her lifetime." Most of the films she made that made money was when she was part of an ensemble cast, where the credit was equally spread around, and not when she had to carry the picture on her own (e.g. like a superstar such as John Wayne could easily do for 25 consecutive years, 1949-73).

    Whenever people say this type of thing "The greatest director you've never heard of"; "The person was a greater actress than most gave them credit for at the time." etc. It's like, whatever. If they weren't honored during their own lifetime when people saw their work firsthand, but have to wait til after their death for revision, that's not saying much. Gladwell's Blink "Don't trust your own first impression" type of thing.

    What was Monroe known for during her career while she was alive? There's a reason why she was. For example, Katharine Hepburn was never accused of having any sex appeal but had to rely on mere acting talent to keep her career going.

    Not saying that Eden was great, just that she had actual talent and unlike Marilyn, could more than competently act. But then, Barbara Eden has had a much saner, stable life than Marilyn ever did.

    , @Truth

    Eden was a magnificent physical specimen.
     
    (...WRETCH!...)
    , @Toddy Cat
    Aside from being cute and sexy, Eden also had (has, I guess, she's still around, and has held up pretty well) a reputation for having a sweet personality and being fairly easy to work with, and that really showed through. No less a guy than Chuck Yeager is a fan (he's on twitter, by the way, and is hilarious at age 93!)
  85. Gilligan’s Island, Get Smart, Adams Family, Munsters, Green Acres, I Dream of Jeannie, and Bewitched.

    It’s not clear if it really was a halcyon era or if all six year olds look back fondly on the TV shows when they were six.

    They had theme songs that stuck in your head. If your nostalgia stage show is flagging, you could always work in a medley.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Why were TV theme songs so much more catchy in 1965? I remember reading a review of the Broadway musical version of The Adams Family ten years ago. The reviewer said the show was terrible, but it was making money because it had Nathan Lane as Gomez Adams and the clap-along theme song from the TV show to get the audience in the mood.

    I can recall somebody employed as a warm-up comedian for a recorded-live-before-a-studio-audience sitcom saying that if he ever felt he was losing the audience, he just led them in a Brady Bunch theme song singalong.

  86. @njguy73
    Dharma and Greg were the least interesting characters on the show. The parents and the friends were funnier.

    Dharma and Greg were the least interesting characters on the show. The parents and the friends were funnier.

    So how is that different from Bewitched? Or the Andy Griffith Show or Happy Days, for that matter?

    Bob Newhart made a career out of being the dull guy surrounded by entertaining nuts. I believe it’s called the “straight man”.

    The real reason to watch Dh&G was Jenna Elfman’s smile. Good Dalmatian genes paid off.

  87. @Anonymous
    The original Darren was awesome, the replacement Darren was too awful to watch. I recently looked up what happened to Dick York and why he was replaced. It's a really sad story, and a bit touching too.

    I'm not a fan of most of that 60s tv cheese, but I do remember liking Dobie Gillis when it ran on Nick at Nite. Maynard > Gilligan.

    I’m not a fan of most of that 60s tv cheese, but I do remember liking Dobie Gillis when it ran on Nick at Nite. Maynard > Gilligan.

    Bob Denver retired in his forties because he said his type of character wouldn’t work after that.

  88. @Anonymous
    Eden was a magnificent physical specimen. Her stand-in was Evelyn Moriarty, who had been the stand-in previously for Marilyn Monroe-e.g., she fit the costumes almost perfectly. I'd say MM had the prettier face but Eden if anything had a slightly better figure-better breasts and bottom, for sure.

    Eden was not the actress Monroe was (Marilyn was better than people gave her credit for at the time, though admittedly she was no Meryl Streep) but she looked good on the small screen and played the role of Jeannie the genie as well as anyone probably could have.

    Either one would have looked really good in the female Starfleet uniform of Star Trek TOS.

    Just saying.

    “Eden was not the actress Monroe was (Marilyn was better than people gave her credit for at the time,”

    No she wasn’t. To be fair, Barbara Eden attended SF conservatory of music and a theatre school. She was on her way to becoming a legitimate versatile actress/comedienne before Jeannie made her a superstar. Not a name per se, but a more or less respectable actress.

    Perhaps legendary producer David Brown made the best observation “Marilyn, like Elvis, seems to have gotten bigger in death than she ever was during her lifetime.” Most of the films she made that made money was when she was part of an ensemble cast, where the credit was equally spread around, and not when she had to carry the picture on her own (e.g. like a superstar such as John Wayne could easily do for 25 consecutive years, 1949-73).

    Whenever people say this type of thing “The greatest director you’ve never heard of”; “The person was a greater actress than most gave them credit for at the time.” etc. It’s like, whatever. If they weren’t honored during their own lifetime when people saw their work firsthand, but have to wait til after their death for revision, that’s not saying much. Gladwell’s Blink “Don’t trust your own first impression” type of thing.

    What was Monroe known for during her career while she was alive? There’s a reason why she was. For example, Katharine Hepburn was never accused of having any sex appeal but had to rely on mere acting talent to keep her career going.

    Not saying that Eden was great, just that she had actual talent and unlike Marilyn, could more than competently act. But then, Barbara Eden has had a much saner, stable life than Marilyn ever did.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Elvis had more biological talent than Frank Sinatra. He could have been as good an actor and singer or better than Sinatra, but he never was, because biological talent was all he had. No development at all. The Colonel didn't want him developing. Elvis, as mediocre a pure actor as he actually was, put asses in the seats in almost all the Elvis movies , most of which viewed today are regarded as unwatchably bad. Had he been properly trained and developed, he would have been much bigger internationally in music and had a much longer film career.

    Monroe, on the other hand, was an odd case as an actress because she was already pretty well established, albeit in what were considered fluff roles, when she got pulled into the Method Acting game. People who are 'trained' in this school can be very effective but usually taking it up after some success means the end of one's career. It put a huge amount of psychological stress on her and together with bad psychiatry was her undoing. But she turned out some undeniably fine roles on both ends of it.

    You are right that Katharine Hepburn was never accused of having sex appeal, because she sure didn't. I always thought she was a turnoff and generally avoid her in old films.

    However, saying that Eden had more acting talent than Monroe-sorry, but there is a reason that Eden's film career ended completely after TV success. Obviously she was very stereotyped after IDOJ, but that's like saying that Tina Louise would have had a big film career if not for Gilligan. What did in Tina Louise was Tina Louise. Eden had a better work ethic and personality, but at the end of the day she had average acting skills and a very hourglass-shaped body that was big in the fifties but after the mid-60s not what Hollywood was looking for, plus she has a face that works better on the small rather than the big screen.
  89. @Flip
    Gilligan's Island was the primo after school show for my grade school crowd.

    Gilligan’s Island was the primo after school show for my grade school crowd.

    I know it isn’t a sitcom, but Dark Shadows (on UHF!) had a pretty good run of things.

  90. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @theMann
    As a kid, Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie were the two TV shows that I absolutely loathed. Unfortunately my parents loved both of them so I didn't have much chance to escape them. At the time, I thought it was because they were incredibly insulting to Whites, Christians, Husbands, and Air Force Officers, as well as being spectacularly unfunny. Now.....oh wait, even as a kid I had good judgement.


    Given the entertainment industry's determination to remake every piece of crap, film and television, from the past, one has to wonder what the point is. There have actually been a large number of genuinely good tv shows made the last few years, so what is the point of remaking crap? What, it is going to be better crap? On the other hand, is there any point to remaking the good shows? I might actually watch a remake of Combat if it was good, but really, what is the point - I could just rewatch Combat.


    I really wonder about these people who copy the work of others, there is almost no chance of being as good, let alone better, than the originals, and as "artists" they are the moral equivalent of Xerox machines.

    IDOJ bettered reality one way-one of the astronauts in IDOJ was an Army officer, whereas in reality the Army had no astronauts until mid-Shuttle era. The demand of NASA that astronauts be “jet test pilots” was both arbitrary and ridiculous. Helo pilots would have made better LM pilots and submariners, divers and UDT/SEAL/EOD guys probably as good or better mission commanders. A Mercury, Gemini or Apollo CSM/LM spacecraft operated by principles as different from a fixed wing aircraft as a blimp or a submarine.

    The Army got screwed, as did the nonaviation branches of the Navy, in the astronaut game.

  91. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Eden was not the actress Monroe was (Marilyn was better than people gave her credit for at the time,"

    No she wasn't. To be fair, Barbara Eden attended SF conservatory of music and a theatre school. She was on her way to becoming a legitimate versatile actress/comedienne before Jeannie made her a superstar. Not a name per se, but a more or less respectable actress.

    Perhaps legendary producer David Brown made the best observation "Marilyn, like Elvis, seems to have gotten bigger in death than she ever was during her lifetime." Most of the films she made that made money was when she was part of an ensemble cast, where the credit was equally spread around, and not when she had to carry the picture on her own (e.g. like a superstar such as John Wayne could easily do for 25 consecutive years, 1949-73).

    Whenever people say this type of thing "The greatest director you've never heard of"; "The person was a greater actress than most gave them credit for at the time." etc. It's like, whatever. If they weren't honored during their own lifetime when people saw their work firsthand, but have to wait til after their death for revision, that's not saying much. Gladwell's Blink "Don't trust your own first impression" type of thing.

    What was Monroe known for during her career while she was alive? There's a reason why she was. For example, Katharine Hepburn was never accused of having any sex appeal but had to rely on mere acting talent to keep her career going.

    Not saying that Eden was great, just that she had actual talent and unlike Marilyn, could more than competently act. But then, Barbara Eden has had a much saner, stable life than Marilyn ever did.

    Elvis had more biological talent than Frank Sinatra. He could have been as good an actor and singer or better than Sinatra, but he never was, because biological talent was all he had. No development at all. The Colonel didn’t want him developing. Elvis, as mediocre a pure actor as he actually was, put asses in the seats in almost all the Elvis movies , most of which viewed today are regarded as unwatchably bad. Had he been properly trained and developed, he would have been much bigger internationally in music and had a much longer film career.

    Monroe, on the other hand, was an odd case as an actress because she was already pretty well established, albeit in what were considered fluff roles, when she got pulled into the Method Acting game. People who are ‘trained’ in this school can be very effective but usually taking it up after some success means the end of one’s career. It put a huge amount of psychological stress on her and together with bad psychiatry was her undoing. But she turned out some undeniably fine roles on both ends of it.

    You are right that Katharine Hepburn was never accused of having sex appeal, because she sure didn’t. I always thought she was a turnoff and generally avoid her in old films.

    However, saying that Eden had more acting talent than Monroe-sorry, but there is a reason that Eden’s film career ended completely after TV success. Obviously she was very stereotyped after IDOJ, but that’s like saying that Tina Louise would have had a big film career if not for Gilligan. What did in Tina Louise was Tina Louise. Eden had a better work ethic and personality, but at the end of the day she had average acting skills and a very hourglass-shaped body that was big in the fifties but after the mid-60s not what Hollywood was looking for, plus she has a face that works better on the small rather than the big screen.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    ...he would have been much bigger internationally in music...
     
    He was pretty big, as it was.

    My family used to lived in Germany in the 1950s, for a few years. My mom said that Elvis 45s flew off the shelves there whenever a new single of his was released.

    From Europe to Asia, Elvis was huge, internationally.

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Elvis had more biological talent than Frank Sinatra."

    Nope. Not at all. As a pure singer, Sinatra wins hands down. Unlike Sinatra, who made sure he hit the right notes every single time, if you listen carefully to Elvis as a singer, he often would go flat, fail to hit the right notes (not that he couldn't, it was more laziness than anything else). And unlike Sinatra, who took voice lessons so that he didn't sing with a Hoboken accent, Elvis never lost his Southern brogue. Fine enough for Country Music, not so good when singing other genres.


    "He could have been as good an actor and singer or better than Sinatra, but he never was, because biological talent was all he had."

    Could've, should've, but didn't. He never would've come close to Sinatra as a pure singer, because he never did during his lifetime.If you want a purely "biological" talented singer, who also developed into an actor (and won an Academy Award and was nominated for two others), try Bing Crosby. Crosby sang in a wide variety of genres: Jazz, swing, sacred, country-western, Americana (Steven Foster songs), etc. In point of fact, the most commercially successful recording artist in the English language of the twentieth century isn't Elvis. It's Bing Crosby, who was always more talented than Elvis as a singer.

    "The Colonel didn’t want him developing."

    The Colonel didn't want his boy to take risks that might affect the bottom line. After all, Flaming Star and Wild in the Country (non-singing roles) were massive flops. Unlike Elvis, Sinatra made damn sure to always get the best songwriters possible for his material. Aside from Lieber-Stoller's Jailhouse Rock, Elvis never showed much interest in getting the best songwriters in rock and roll. His movies could've been a lot better (at least the songs could've been better), had he bothered to get better songwriters. But he didn't. Which shows a lack of interest and laziness on his part (this goes to the part of no development. One has to be interested in developing and Elvis simply wasn't).
    Parker fought tooth and nail to keep him from doing the '68 Comeback Special. When it became a massive hit, he went in the other direction, and had him tour indefinitely during the '70's and make better albums than he had during the '60's with his abysmal soundtracks. The Colonel could at least see the writing on the wall, and went with whatever worked to make money.


    "However, saying that Eden had more acting talent than Monroe-sorry, but there is a reason that Eden’s film career ended completely after TV success."

    She did have more talent. But what film exactly made Monroe a superstar? The Seven Year Itch. And that's for one main scene, where she has nothing to say, except to hike her skirt up while standing over the grate. Amazing great acting job. To be fair, post-IDOJ, Eden did well in Harper Valley PTA. Barbara Eden was more suited to the small screen, as she was of the generation, unlike Marilyn, who broke into Hollywood thru TV.


    "Eden...at the end of the day she had average acting skills and a very hourglass-shaped body that was big in the fifties but after the mid-60s not what Hollywood was looking for"

    IDOJ ran from '65-'69, perhaps you mean the '70's. Same with Monroe. If she had lived, (and remember, her mental health was breaking down by the early '60's due to heavy amounts of pills) she would've been pushing 40, and with her '50's figure having to compete vs. Welch, Fonda, Andress, Montgomery, Linda Evans, etc. all of them younger than 30, she wouldn't have had a chance. Hollywood would've dumped her so fast or regulated her to second and third leads (which is what she was best at, not at being the star of the show), she wouldn't have handled failure very well.

    A case can be made that Eden was a far better accomplished actor than ever Marilyn, but in the right medium. TV made Barbara Eden. Marilyn Monroe has lasted longer in death than she ever should have, but that's mainly to how her estate has successfully marketed her. She is now an icon of the '50's, along with James Dean, tail fins on the cars, drive-thru movies, etc. but as to her actual talent, that's not what people recall about her today. Hint: if it's va-va-VROOM! that people remember about Marilyn, then it ain't about her acting skills. It's about her bending over the manhole cover.

    IDOJ made Barbara Eden, but she was a good actress in the role. She was the star and made it a ratings winner. When people remember her today, they recall the TV show, so at least that's a compliment to her competent acting abilities.

  92. @Lot
    Children of boomers watched all those shows in the 80s and 90s. Perfect television for tweens who graduated past cartoons but are not worldy enough for 80s/90s sitcoms.

    Get Smart I only remember from Nick at Nite, the others were on TV every day in syndication.

    The cartoon version of Get Smart, voiced by Don Adams, Inspector Gadget, was also very big.

    The Munsters and Addams Family were really bad the few times I attempted to watch, though the 90s Addams Family movie was great.

    I remember Uncle Arthur quite well, did not realize he was Paul Lynde, who I also watched as a kid in syndicated reruns of 1970s episodes of Hollywood Squares.

    I dont know if Paul Lynde was a comic genius,( let Dear Leader and other wise men judge him) but I will say his work on Hollywood Squares was first rate comedy!
    Being gay couldn’t really be acknowledged,or one could get away away w/o acknowledging it,so when Lynde was asked these sleazy,leering questions he would answer in a way that is as perceived as nongay,but everyone,who was wise,knew to be EXTREMELY GAY! The implicit subtext of monstrously sexual depredations,which we were pretending didn’t exist,was sick humor at its best!

    • Replies: @Ling Chow
    I read that among Lynde's Hollywood Squares fans back then, among other luminaries, were no less than Katherine Hepburn as well as famously reclusive star Greta Garbo, who watch the show every day, and actually wrote Lynde a fan letter.

    Peter Marshall has even said that he found out that former President Harry Truman was such a fan of Lynde on H'wd Squares that Truman arranged his morning routine to be sure to catch the show.
    , @Lyov Myshkin
    "Paul, you are the world's biggest fruit. What are you?"

    "Humbled."

    Genius.
  93. @Anonymous
    The original Darren was awesome, the replacement Darren was too awful to watch. I recently looked up what happened to Dick York and why he was replaced. It's a really sad story, and a bit touching too.

    I'm not a fan of most of that 60s tv cheese, but I do remember liking Dobie Gillis when it ran on Nick at Nite. Maynard > Gilligan.

    Maynard G. Krebs was in the vanguard of the anti-globalist tyrants. Remember,when anyone said the word’work’,his eyes would bug out, his face would turn to a mask of fear ,and he’d loudly cry “Work??!!”

  94. Is nothing sacred???!!! I enjoyed watching “Bewitched” when I was growing up (and I was not a Boomer, but early Gen Xer).

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    NO.
    , @Truth
    OK Bobby (Jindal) Brady.
  95. @Steve Sailer
    That's one way to look at it. Another is that the dark haired Darren(s) in the New York ad business marries a blonde who in real life was the daughter of President Eisenhower's advisor on appearing on camera, Robert Montgomery.

    The people who put these shows together weren't dumb and they knew that having multiple interpretations made for a richer show and gave them more options.

    As it was, Bewitched ran for so long (250+ episodes) that toward the end they were reduced to reusing old plots and/or lifting from previous shows they had worked on, such as the I Love Lucy assembly line show.

    Well Jews ran TV,so I guess it’s a Jewish theme. Had the show arrived earlier it might’ve been seen as a WASP marries an Irish girl.

    Note: Her father,Robert,made furniture as a hobby. Off his daughters fame,he got a commercial for Pledge on shining your wood furniture. (Respect the wood!)
    The comics had a great time lampooning the ad. It was begging for parody.

    And yes,the show went on way too long. Losing Darren? Huge. Losing Darren AND Gladys Kravitz? You don’t come back from that.

  96. Anon[544] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    The white male could have claimed to have invented a blood-testing gizmo but was really just his black wife's white magic.

    Is Bad Blood worth reading? You never really rated it as a book in the Taki review. Of course, I realize that book review as Consumer Reports article is an outdated concept, and the proper modern conception of a book review is as a launch pad to whatever is on the mind of the reviewer. Otherwise reviewers would have to actually read the books they review closely, even twice, and they’d already be in the red, considering what publishers pay for reviews.
    For reviews

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    My review is obviously based on a close reading of "Bad Blood," with several quotes and many details from the book.

    http://takimag.com/article/blood_simple_steve_sailer/#axzz5Hy3u9NjA

    In general, in reviews I don't spend a lot of verbiage telling you my opinion of how much I liked the book or movie. You can pick up my opinion if you read carefully, but everybody's got an opinion. For opinions, you are better off looking at aggregation sites to get the average of multiple ratings.

  97. @jcd1974
    A local channel has lately re-running Bewitched every weeknight. The charms of Elizabeth Montgomery were lost on me as a kid, now I think she's the most alluring women to ever grace the TV screen. Her sex appeal is off the charts.

    The same channel also shows the Mary Tyler Moore Show, and poor Mary is simply not in the same league as the stunning Samantha Stevens.

    A local channel has lately re-running Bewitched every weeknight. The charms of Elizabeth Montgomery were lost on me as a kid, now I think she’s the most alluring women to ever grace the TV screen. Her sex appeal is off the charts.

    Hmmmmm, yes. I had no interest whatsoever in either Jeanie or Bewitched throughout my childhood; when they came on, it was time to read or go outside and play. But then somewhere around age 12 or so I started to detect some previously-overlooked merit in these shows.

    Must have been some sort of gnostic revelation.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    It's interesting that throughout the show, the scantily clad Jeanie constantly referred to Major Nelson as "Master" and was wildly eager to serve him. Jeanie was also portrayed as exasperating and a bit dimwitted, while Major Nelson was shown as being the mature adult who put up with Jeanie's antics.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRNwv8opJT0

    If you made a show like that these days, the whole premise would be seen as sexist.
  98. @Anon
    Is Bad Blood worth reading? You never really rated it as a book in the Taki review. Of course, I realize that book review as Consumer Reports article is an outdated concept, and the proper modern conception of a book review is as a launch pad to whatever is on the mind of the reviewer. Otherwise reviewers would have to actually read the books they review closely, even twice, and they'd already be in the red, considering what publishers pay for reviews.
    For reviews

    My review is obviously based on a close reading of “Bad Blood,” with several quotes and many details from the book.

    http://takimag.com/article/blood_simple_steve_sailer/#axzz5Hy3u9NjA

    In general, in reviews I don’t spend a lot of verbiage telling you my opinion of how much I liked the book or movie. You can pick up my opinion if you read carefully, but everybody’s got an opinion. For opinions, you are better off looking at aggregation sites to get the average of multiple ratings.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Apologies, I wasn't attacking your review.

    There is one important piece of information that I want to know about a book like this: Is it fair, accurate, and balanced? The tendancy for writers in doing books about sensational scandals is to go for the lurid, since that sells books.

    In this particular case, the author interview a couple of hundred people, all of whom were somehow connected to a startup that looked to be worth several billion dollars in an IPO. They were planning their retirements and taking private flying lessons; "Is the Cirrus good enough, or should I wait for the new Honda Jet?" Theranos went down, Holmes became the target of their seething hatred. They have to start all over with their Silicon Valley exit strategy planning. They want her dead. No, they want her living but in the burn ward.

    Dealing with sources like this is a very difficult job for a writer. It's like a historian of the ancient world writing about Carthage, Spartacus, or Cleopatra: All the sources are severely biased against these subjects, and the truth has to be teased out very carefully.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "I don’t spend a lot of verbiage telling you my opinion of how much I liked the book or movie. You can pick up my opinion if you read carefully, but everybody’s got an opinion."

    This seems to be a trait associated with the Midwest. CA having received migrants from mostly the Midwest, as opposed to receiving immigrants from New England or NY regions. Like the Midwest it's understated, subtle. And there's very little subtlety to NYers in general.
    , @Clyde

    For opinions, you are better off looking at aggregation sites to get the average of multiple ratings.
     
    I was going to see "Jurassic World" but when it could only score 50% at aggregation site Rotten Tomatoes, I decided to skip it. I have seen all the other Jurassic movies and read the first book. That's one thing we did not have before the www, movie aggregation sites. And if you can't figure out a modern movie's incoherent plot, you can go to wiki or a movie spoiler site.
  99. @Twinkie
    Is nothing sacred???!!! I enjoyed watching “Bewitched” when I was growing up (and I was not a Boomer, but early Gen Xer).

    NO.

  100. @Anonymous
    Elvis had more biological talent than Frank Sinatra. He could have been as good an actor and singer or better than Sinatra, but he never was, because biological talent was all he had. No development at all. The Colonel didn't want him developing. Elvis, as mediocre a pure actor as he actually was, put asses in the seats in almost all the Elvis movies , most of which viewed today are regarded as unwatchably bad. Had he been properly trained and developed, he would have been much bigger internationally in music and had a much longer film career.

    Monroe, on the other hand, was an odd case as an actress because she was already pretty well established, albeit in what were considered fluff roles, when she got pulled into the Method Acting game. People who are 'trained' in this school can be very effective but usually taking it up after some success means the end of one's career. It put a huge amount of psychological stress on her and together with bad psychiatry was her undoing. But she turned out some undeniably fine roles on both ends of it.

    You are right that Katharine Hepburn was never accused of having sex appeal, because she sure didn't. I always thought she was a turnoff and generally avoid her in old films.

    However, saying that Eden had more acting talent than Monroe-sorry, but there is a reason that Eden's film career ended completely after TV success. Obviously she was very stereotyped after IDOJ, but that's like saying that Tina Louise would have had a big film career if not for Gilligan. What did in Tina Louise was Tina Louise. Eden had a better work ethic and personality, but at the end of the day she had average acting skills and a very hourglass-shaped body that was big in the fifties but after the mid-60s not what Hollywood was looking for, plus she has a face that works better on the small rather than the big screen.

    …he would have been much bigger internationally in music…

    He was pretty big, as it was.

    My family used to lived in Germany in the 1950s, for a few years. My mom said that Elvis 45s flew off the shelves there whenever a new single of his was released.

    From Europe to Asia, Elvis was huge, internationally.

  101. If you are a mid-Baby Boomer born in the late 1950s, you probably have a memory of the mid-1960s as a Golden Era of live-action sitcoms for six-year olds, such as Gilligan’s Island, Get Smart, Adams Family, Munsters, Green Acres, I Dream of Jeannie, and Bewitched.

    Why do you hate F Troop, Steve Sailer?

  102. @Half Canadian
    It will suck. But when it is canceled it will be because we are racist.

    Dude ,it’s almost like you have a crystal ball…….spooky

  103. @Colin Wright
    Well, a black/white 'I Dream of Jeannie' would fit. For decades, while every other form of racial integration was pumped at us, black-white couples were streng verboten. It really was striking. You could have your interracial threesome on billboards, and your black supervisors on TV shows, and the wise black woman in ads promoting household cleaners -- but no inter-racial couples. Never.

    Then of a sudden, starting a year or two ago, we started being bombarded with black-white couples, usually in ads, but now, evidently, to appear on TV as well. There was some series Netflix was promoting the other night as well...

    It's curious. I'm not sure precisely what either the motive or the mechanism is for this sudden, rather choreographed onslaught.

    The funny thing is, studies have shown people find black/white couples viscerally disgusting -- whatever they may consciously pretend to themselves. So from a commercial point of view, this innovation obviously makes no sense at all. After all, if you're trying to sell a sandwich, going for an ad that conveys the subliminal message 'tastes like shit!' is not a good marketing strategy.

    So what's up?

    The funny thing is, studies have shown people find black/white couples viscerally disgusting — whatever they may consciously pretend to themselves. So from a commercial point of view, this innovation obviously makes no sense at all. After all, if you’re trying to sell a sandwich, going for an ad that conveys the subliminal message ‘tastes like shit!’ is not a good marketing strategy.

    It’s the miscegenation that is the product they are trying to sell.

  104. Anon[214] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    A blast from the past, it's like lightning striking again.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C9SiRNibD14

    This video of the #ScienceMustFall meeting is initially hilarious, but I wonder if it’s just another thing like transgenderism that seems ridiculous now, but will come to haunt us in the future.

    I don’t mean in the sense that science will stop being used, but more in the way like in Canada they must pay obeisance to First Nations in all kinds of silly ways, and teach alternative ways of thought as though they were in some way anything other than folklore.

    Also, the cultural revolutionesque struggle session nature of the meeting is scary. “Apologize to the panel for your saying that witchcraft is not true!”

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Transgenderists are perfectly intelligent if mentally ill white people who are going through what Buddy Cole assures us is just a very long phase. Here you look into the shadows of the jungle. There is no reason to expect these people to "grow out of it." They've maintained it longer than people have worshipped Christ and see nothing in modernity to make them change their minds.
  105. Anon[214] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    My review is obviously based on a close reading of "Bad Blood," with several quotes and many details from the book.

    http://takimag.com/article/blood_simple_steve_sailer/#axzz5Hy3u9NjA

    In general, in reviews I don't spend a lot of verbiage telling you my opinion of how much I liked the book or movie. You can pick up my opinion if you read carefully, but everybody's got an opinion. For opinions, you are better off looking at aggregation sites to get the average of multiple ratings.

    Apologies, I wasn’t attacking your review.

    There is one important piece of information that I want to know about a book like this: Is it fair, accurate, and balanced? The tendancy for writers in doing books about sensational scandals is to go for the lurid, since that sells books.

    In this particular case, the author interview a couple of hundred people, all of whom were somehow connected to a startup that looked to be worth several billion dollars in an IPO. They were planning their retirements and taking private flying lessons; “Is the Cirrus good enough, or should I wait for the new Honda Jet?” Theranos went down, Holmes became the target of their seething hatred. They have to start all over with their Silicon Valley exit strategy planning. They want her dead. No, they want her living but in the burn ward.

    Dealing with sources like this is a very difficult job for a writer. It’s like a historian of the ancient world writing about Carthage, Spartacus, or Cleopatra: All the sources are severely biased against these subjects, and the truth has to be teased out very carefully.

  106. @JimB

    Marrying a shiksa was a huge theme looming just below the surface in 1960s TV, although in Bewitched the allegory is kept ambiguous.
     
    Bewitched would be the situation of a WASP marrying a yenta, not a mensch marrying a shiksa. Remember that Darren’s family are old founding stock Yankees while Samantha has all the eccentric relatives from the old country — fairly analogous to Jewish inlaws.

    The mother from Bewitched had Jewish personality characteristics.

    Darren Stevens was definitely a WASP.

    Hard to say about Samantha Stevens.

    The neighbors (Mr. and Mrs. Kravitz) were Jewish.

    If you watch the first minute of the first episode of Bewitched, you’ll see that both Darren and Samantha are portrayed as all-American, typical WASPs.

    • Replies: @JimB
    Bewitched had a hybrid WASP-Jewish sensibility. Witches are the persecuted in-group with extraordinary abilities. Darren is WASPy but neurotic. Darren’s father is a remarkably straight laced good natured goyim while Darren’s mother is a neurotic and close minded Yiddishe Momme. Samantha’s doting father is a good natured, open minded WASP while the mother is overbearing, opinionated, critical, and pleased with undermining mortals (goyim) whenever possible. Larry Tate is WASPy looking and alcoholic but sycophantic and money hungry — a mixture of WASP and Jewish stereotypes. On and on the comparison goes. As Steve comments, American sitcoms were designed to give mixed signals.
  107. @The Last Real Calvinist

    A local channel has lately re-running Bewitched every weeknight. The charms of Elizabeth Montgomery were lost on me as a kid, now I think she’s the most alluring women to ever grace the TV screen. Her sex appeal is off the charts.

     

    Hmmmmm, yes. I had no interest whatsoever in either Jeanie or Bewitched throughout my childhood; when they came on, it was time to read or go outside and play. But then somewhere around age 12 or so I started to detect some previously-overlooked merit in these shows.

    Must have been some sort of gnostic revelation.

    It’s interesting that throughout the show, the scantily clad Jeanie constantly referred to Major Nelson as “Master” and was wildly eager to serve him. Jeanie was also portrayed as exasperating and a bit dimwitted, while Major Nelson was shown as being the mature adult who put up with Jeanie’s antics.

    If you made a show like that these days, the whole premise would be seen as sexist.

    • Replies: @Corn
    If I Dream of Jeannie was remade today, it would be I Dream of Johnny, and a 30 something cat lady would have a male genie.
    , @JimB

    It’s interesting that throughout the show, the scantily clad Jeanie constantly referred to Major Nelson as “Master” and was wildly eager to serve him.
     
    The irony being that Major Nelson is an unwilling master, and Jeannie’s magic always has disastrous unintended consequences.
  108. @syonredux

    Bewitched would be the situation of a WASP marrying a yenta, not a mensch marrying a shiksa. Remember that Darren’s family are old founding stock Yankees while Samantha has all the eccentric relatives from the old country — fairly analogous to Jewish inlaws.
     
    Dunno. Elizabeth Montgomery, Agnes Moorehead, and Maurice Evans are some of the least Jewish looking/acting people to ever appear on TV.....

    When I lived in Hollywood in the late Eighties I would often take long walks around the then-ratty neighborhood. It was on one of these that I discovered that if you stopped at Agnes Moorhead’s star on the Walk of Fame and turned to look due west, you would see across the vast waste of parking lots, spray-painted on the wall of the Pantages Theater in letters that must have been like ten feet tall: “AGNES MOORHEAD IS GOD.” It was glorious.

  109. @James Speaks
    I have always thought that Bewitched was about marrying up and I Dream of Genie was about marrying down.

    Samantha’s mom and relatives would always complain about how simple Darren Stevens was inadequate.

    Almost like a Jewish mother-in-law berating her daughter that she should’ve married a “nice Jewish doctor.”

    Remember Goodfellas?

    Karen’s mom told her that she should’ve married a Jew, not the Irish/Italian Henry Hill.

    “He’s not Jewish. Do you know how these people live?”

    It’s been a while since I watched Bewitched, but the dynamic seemed sort of similar.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Samantha’s mom and relatives would always complain about how simple Darren Stevens was inadequate.

    Almost like a Jewish mother-in-law berating her daughter that she should’ve married a “nice Jewish doctor.”
     
    You can also read it as a haute-WASP mother lamenting that her daughter married a man who was beneath her station...
  110. @Anonymous
    The original Darren was awesome, the replacement Darren was too awful to watch. I recently looked up what happened to Dick York and why he was replaced. It's a really sad story, and a bit touching too.

    I'm not a fan of most of that 60s tv cheese, but I do remember liking Dobie Gillis when it ran on Nick at Nite. Maynard > Gilligan.

    Dick York stayed married to his first wife and had five children with her. Despite the sad injury that so damaged him, his was a successful life.

    And being remembered for one role is one role more than most actors get.

  111. @Steve Sailer
    I think it was maybe Ben Shapiro who wrote a book about the history of the television industry in which he pointed out that a major underlying theme of many television shows of the 1960-70s was how it was normal that I divorced my Jewish first wife and married a younger shiksa.

    OJ did that to his Black first wife. He then remarried super Shiksa-looking Nicole. His wife then left him and later started hanging out with Ron Goldman.

    Blacks were overjoyed when OJ was found innocent. Watch this video below.

    As I recall, at the time, the large majority of Whites seemed taken aback by the verdict. The few Blacks I knew were ecstatic. The above video matches what I saw from people.

    • Replies: @Truth
    All theatre, Sherlock; nobody died.
  112. @Anon
    Shouldn't it be called 'Bewiatched'?

    Unwatched?

  113. @syonredux

    (I was a big fan of Johnny Quest, though.)
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gNBFmlNUfM

    The new Johnny Quest had a pretty cool opening too.

    The 1993 Johnny Quest movie had a villain who vaguely reminded me of “Ming the Merciless.”

  114. @syonredux

    (I was a big fan of Johnny Quest, though.)
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gNBFmlNUfM

    I wonder what Steve thinks of the later Johnny Quest reboots. I grew up on those, like The Real Adventures of Johnny Quest.

  115. About a dozen years ago there was a “Bewitched” movie starring Nicole Kidman and all her co-stars were white actors too. So this interracial couples craze now all over the media from commercials to rebooted classic sitcoms is something that seems to have emerged in the waning days of Obama and accelerated under Trump.

  116. @D. K.
    Easily the best episode of "Gilligan's Island"-- and co-directed by the great Ida Lupino, no less!

    http://gilligan.wikia.com/wiki/The_Producer

    ***

    Harold Hecuba - "You call yourselves actors!?"

    Gilligan - "I don't call myself an actor."

    Harold Hecuba - "If I say you're an actor you're an actor!"

    Gilligan - "Ok! I'm an actor!"

    Harold Hecuba - "Believe me, you are no actor!"

    ***

    I loved Gilligan, not to mention Mary Ann! That particular episode was among my faves- “Harold’s Hecuba”, indeed!

    I’m a big fan of Hogan’s Heroes, Bob Crane’s peccadilloes notwithstanding… great ensemble comedy.

  117. @Anonymous
    The original Darren was awesome, the replacement Darren was too awful to watch. I recently looked up what happened to Dick York and why he was replaced. It's a really sad story, and a bit touching too.

    I'm not a fan of most of that 60s tv cheese, but I do remember liking Dobie Gillis when it ran on Nick at Nite. Maynard > Gilligan.

    WORK!!

  118. @syonredux

    In Bewitched, written by Barris and Taylor, Samantha, a hardworking black single mom who happens to be a witch, marries Darren, a white mortal who happens to be a bit of a slacker. They struggle to navigate their differences as she discovers that even when a black girl is literally magic, she’s still not as powerful as a decently tall white man with a full head of hair in America.
     
    Interesting to see that they're going in the White man-Black woman direction, but I suppose that that is the safe option, as it both placates the fears of Black women (no White she-devil stealing one of their men) and strokes their egos.....


    Rather doubt that they will be able to find a Black woman who is as alluring as '60s Elizabeth Montgomery, though....

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/56/25/83/5625835fddb644e99f30f125f761fa50.jpg

    One good thing about this, it made me google Elizabeth Montgomery,
    As a kid after school I watched these shows, but wow, I never realized how hot she was.. her character had waspy name Samantha (High Society, Philadelphia story) and she’s actually anglo-scots-irish…

    like all around

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    She struck me as a bitch even as a kid.
  119. A lot of these shows ran until the early 70s, so I remember them initially for the color episodes of later years. Only in reruns did I realize some had started out in black and white. when I was a kid black and white seemed like ancient history. In the reboot the white guy should see everything in color, the black witch just black and white.

    The shiksa angle is plausible. The creators, writers etc were Jewish men. For Bewitched Sol Saks, Danny Arnold (born Arnold Natahanson). Upwardly mobile dark-haired nebbish marries more powerful blonde, whose mother disapproves her marrying beneath her. Although as pointed out that can cut both ways. WASP relatives can be eccentric, too (You Can’t Take it With You, Arsenic and Old Lace).

    All made more explicit in Bridget Loves Bernie.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    Apparently, You Can’t Take It With You also may have the eccentric less well off girl’s family (Jimmy Stewart is the banker son of munitions monopolist Edward Arnold) being coded Jews, although her name is Alice Sycamore. Written by George Kaufman (who looks like Turturro in Barton Fink, although he rocked Mary Astor’s boat) and Moss Hart.
  120. Johnny Quest is ably and enjoyably spoofed by Cartoon Network’s The Venture Brothers, which just started its seventh season this month:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Venture_Bros.

    • Replies: @Mike Street Station

    Johnny Quest is ably and enjoyably spoofed by Cartoon Network’s The Venture Brothers, which just started its seventh season this month:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Venture_Bros.
     
    The Venture Brothers makes a pretty good post-modern parody of Jonny Quest (with the adult Jonny Quest, a drug addict, occasionally appearing on the show). It's now in season seven which I think is a minor miracle considering the amount of people who would even remember Jonny Quest and would enjoy a knock off must be extremely small.
  121. @hhsiii
    A lot of these shows ran until the early 70s, so I remember them initially for the color episodes of later years. Only in reruns did I realize some had started out in black and white. when I was a kid black and white seemed like ancient history. In the reboot the white guy should see everything in color, the black witch just black and white.

    The shiksa angle is plausible. The creators, writers etc were Jewish men. For Bewitched Sol Saks, Danny Arnold (born Arnold Natahanson). Upwardly mobile dark-haired nebbish marries more powerful blonde, whose mother disapproves her marrying beneath her. Although as pointed out that can cut both ways. WASP relatives can be eccentric, too (You Can’t Take it With You, Arsenic and Old Lace).

    All made more explicit in Bridget Loves Bernie.

    Apparently, You Can’t Take It With You also may have the eccentric less well off girl’s family (Jimmy Stewart is the banker son of munitions monopolist Edward Arnold) being coded Jews, although her name is Alice Sycamore. Written by George Kaufman (who looks like Turturro in Barton Fink, although he rocked Mary Astor’s boat) and Moss Hart.

  122. @syonredux

    (I was a big fan of Johnny Quest, though.)
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gNBFmlNUfM

    We always made fun of the way they dealt with Bandit the dog, who was always comic relief.

    Hadji: Johnny, Bandit’s caught in those pile drivers.

    Race Bannon: Don’t worry boys, Bandit can take care of himself.

    • Replies: @Rapparee
    Bandit was much better-used when they actually gave him something to do, but that was rare. Comic relief is nice, but he really could have been cut out of many episodes entirely without affecting the storyline.
  123. @mikeInThe716
    Bewitched was part of my after school fare in the Eighties - although more for my sisters. It left a mark - my college buddies and I still refer to a common friend, Darren, as Derrwood.

    Will the new slacker Derrwood be in advertising? That wouldn't be a bad choice, given the possible virtue signaling plot themes.

    Will the new slacker Derrwood be in advertising? That wouldn’t be a bad choice, given the possible virtue signaling plot themes.

    Based on what we’ve seen on Blackish, this is a very safe bet.

  124. @J.Ross
    It could be truly hilarious and satirical if they had a family with magic powers in the ghetto, using their magic to settle grievances or reserve parking spaces, but never to escape the ghetto and improve their lives. Obviously they will never go near that.

    That would essentially be the Harry Potter franchise, but for TV. No-one ever seems to dare to address the implications of a book series, written by a woman, in which wizards and witches have godlike powers to warp reality, but primarily use them to perform simple household chores.

    Race Bannon: Don’t worry boys, Bandit can take care of himself.

    Isn’t that a good message for children, though? All the time I hear of people getting themselves killed to “rescue” a dog which turned out to be perfectly capable of escaping from the situation itself.

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    Happened just last week. A woman in Hilton Head area killed by an alligator trying to save her dog. The dog came out of it unscathed.
  125. The show always emphasized Darren Stevens as an all-American type of guy. In many respects, an American Everyman who happened to have handsome looks, suburban prosperity, and a beautiful wife. He really didn’t have any type of eccentricity or uniqueness.

    Jewish characters are usually portrayed as being different in some type of important way. Often smarter or odder than everyone around them, with a tendency to be a bit socially maladjusted. That really doesn’t sound like the character from Bewitched.

    The characters below are more behaviorally and culturally Jewish.

    “Mike” from All in the Family.

    “Paul” from Wonder Years.

    “Screech” from Save by the Bell.

    To be fair, “Mike” is Polish and “Screech” is WASP, but they were portrayed with Jewish personas. Also, both actors (Reiner and Diamond) are of Jewish origin.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Steven Pinker identifies with Screech from "Saved by the Bell."
    , @syonredux

    To be fair, “Mike” is Polish and “Screech” is WASP, but they were portrayed with Jewish personas. Also, both actors (Reiner and Diamond) are of Jewish origin.
     
    In contrast, the actors who portrayed Samantha and her parents were extremely non-Jewish.....

    The show always emphasized Darren Stevens as an all-American type of guy. In many respects, an American Everyman who happened to have handsome looks,
     
    Not really.....

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/42/74/b8/4274b8af3a13037375341d936dd34d21.jpg
  126. Born in the early 1950s, I remember all these shows fondly. But I wonder sometimes if they weren’t part of what made my generation what it was, that is, spoiled beyond measure and not terribly fecund. In any case, in adult life, it has often seemed that sitcom theme songs and cartoons are, with teen pop music, the one thing that members of my generation have in common. We can all sing the theme songs to The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Flipper, Green Acres and The Beverly Hillbillies, but I find it hard to think that that’s as good as it could have been.

  127. Anon[115] • Disclaimer says:

    Some history about magical beliefs by American slaves in an article about slave rebellions. I wonder to what extent these live on, culturally, at least.

    Nicholas Wade holds that social tendancies even have a genetic basis, on a group average level, at least. Perhaps the tendency to easily fall for supernatural explanations is something that can be genetically encouraged. Perhaps it even was selected for in certain environments because it kept people out of trouble, kept groups together, and made men susceptible to organization under a leader and better able to defend the group.

    And now in the 20th century it gives us implicit bias.

    Slave rebellions in the New World

    Slaves who were believed to have magic powers also played important roles in various rebellions.

    Every plantation and some cities in the Americas had a conjurer or obeah man (or woman). Obeah is the practice of harnessing supernatural forces and spirits to either harm or help the living. Obeah possessed the power of life and death: on the one hand the obeah man or woman could cure diseases (or even resuscitate the dead), but on the other hand, he or she could poison and kill.

    Because of these powers, such conjurers were greatly admired while simultaneously feared. It is no surprise that these powerful individuals could easily lead others in a number of uprisings.

    Rebellions in the US

    The first serious rebellion in what is today the United States took place in New York in 1712. Twenty-eight slaves united and killed 10 people and injured 12 others. They were led by Peter the Doctor, who used incantations and gave his fellow rebels a magical powder that, once rubbed on their clothes, would make them invulnerable.

    A rebellion in 1822, in Charleston, South Carolina, involved three conjurers. One of them, Gullah Jack Pritchard was reputedly so powerful that he could not be killed. Pritchard made the rebels follow a magical ritual and he then gave them charms (crab claws) that were supposed to make them invulnerable. Philip, another one of the conjurers, had the ability to foresee the future and (accurately) predicted the failure of the revolt, but this dismal prediction did not stop the rebels from following Gullah Jack and Denmark Vesey.

    So was it magic?

    Other well-known conjurers in the Americas used various amulets that allegedly gave protection to slaves. These often involved the use of a certain root or powder and a certain ritual. Whenever an amulet “failed,” its users did not blame the conjurer but rather themselves, and typically went back to the same conjurer for a new form of protection. The same can be said about the failure of the resistance movements. The slaves apparently never blamed the obeah men when their movements were unsuccessful.

    http://ultimatehistoryproject.com/slave-rebellions-and-the-supernatural.html

  128. One of my all-time favorite shows is The Venture Brothers which, at least for the first few seasons, is basically a parody of Johnny Quest (it just started it’s seventh season). Basically it’s Johnny Quest as a grown-up, pill-popping failure of a super scientist living in the shadow of his dead brilliant father and dealing with the PTSD of his childhood “adventures.” His two kids are sweet but also mildly retarded. There is also a sociopathic body guard. Not the kind of show you can jump around, but if you start from the beginning, it’s one of the funniest shows of all time. And the music by JG Thirwell is fabulous.

    Opening theme:

    • Agree: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://www.adultswim.com/videos/the-venture-bros/
    , @MEH 0910
    Season 7 Starts Aug 5th | The Venture Bros. S7 | Adult Swim
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnCWXGYeGfs
  129. @JohnnyWalker123
    It's interesting that throughout the show, the scantily clad Jeanie constantly referred to Major Nelson as "Master" and was wildly eager to serve him. Jeanie was also portrayed as exasperating and a bit dimwitted, while Major Nelson was shown as being the mature adult who put up with Jeanie's antics.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRNwv8opJT0

    If you made a show like that these days, the whole premise would be seen as sexist.

    If I Dream of Jeannie was remade today, it would be I Dream of Johnny, and a 30 something cat lady would have a male genie.

  130. @J.Ross
    It could be truly hilarious and satirical if they had a family with magic powers in the ghetto, using their magic to settle grievances or reserve parking spaces, but never to escape the ghetto and improve their lives. Obviously they will never go near that.

    Isn’t there a show called “Black Jesus” based on this premise?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Possibly, sorry, don't know. But there are several black personalities who have shown a willingness to talk about this sort of thing as long as it doesn't come off looking anti-black.
  131. @Anon
    They are probably trying to play up the family not liking the guy aspect; which would be realistic if the witch is black and the guy is white. If they went really politically incorrect and portrayed the black family as kind of ghetto with magic powers and the white guy as a normal person, I might give it a shot. But we all know they don't have the balls for that.

    The new Bewitched family: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpUb8TS4bHM

    And: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crichton_Leprechaun

    ‘…If they went really politically incorrect and portrayed the black family as kind of ghetto with magic powers and the white guy as a normal person, I might give it a shot. But we all know they don’t have the balls for that…’

    You’re still at the stage of hoping for arriving at some kind of amicable racial harmony…like the husband who’s still trying to make his marriage work after twenty years.

    Sometimes, it’s time to realize it just isn’t going to get better. Unpleasant as the prospect may be, one has to decide what comes next.

    There are some that rejoice at this realization. I don’t. However, I think it’s time to consider what Plan B might be.

  132. Obviously, if they were going to remake a 60’s ‘magic spouse’ show it would have to be Bewitched. How in the hell could they remake I Dream of Genie wherein a scantily clad black woman calls a white astronaut ‘MASTER!’

  133. @Half Canadian
    It will suck. But when it is canceled it will be because we are racist.

    No, it will probably be because you chose to watch some other CIA-created, Tavistock, mind-control piece of shit, that you found more to your liking.

  134. @Cagey Beast
    They could do a remake of “Hogan’s Heroes" as a tribute to John McCain.

    Or John Kerry…

  135. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Now THAT is a picture worthy of the era. You will notice that the make-up from the mid. '60's is less garrish (less Aunt Jemimah batter, as compared to the smutty pictures of the mid. '40's).

    The '60's were the era when Hollywood women were finally, FINALLY, becoming more smoldering, sizzling, and earthy in their sexuality, due in no small part, because women were finally letting their hair down. No more of that '50's butch puppy Poodle cut. Actual tresses, long and loose, past the shoulders, goodness it is amazing to behold.

    Montgomery. Welch. Fonda. Natalie Wood. Andress. Bardot. The lead Italian redhead chick in 007's Thunderball. And Emma Peel.

    Yes, yes, yes! This is how a woman should look (at least a Hollywood Alister).

    There is a word for Lizzy, and she definitely has got it. More natural looking makeup, not piles of goop poured upon the face.

    Here the beauty of the ages is to be found; there the wonderment, Aphrodite, forever lies.

    Amazing Lizzy. Simply and totally amazing.

    Montgomery. Welch. Fonda. Natalie Wood. Andress. Bardot. The lead Italian redhead chick in 007′s Thunderball. And Emma Peel.

    Yes, yes, yes! This is how a woman should look (at least a Hollywood Alister).

    (…cough…cough…)

  136. @Anonymous
    Eden was a magnificent physical specimen. Her stand-in was Evelyn Moriarty, who had been the stand-in previously for Marilyn Monroe-e.g., she fit the costumes almost perfectly. I'd say MM had the prettier face but Eden if anything had a slightly better figure-better breasts and bottom, for sure.

    Eden was not the actress Monroe was (Marilyn was better than people gave her credit for at the time, though admittedly she was no Meryl Streep) but she looked good on the small screen and played the role of Jeannie the genie as well as anyone probably could have.

    Either one would have looked really good in the female Starfleet uniform of Star Trek TOS.

    Just saying.

    Eden was a magnificent physical specimen.

    (…WRETCH!…)

    • Replies: @anon
    There’s talk that Roseanne Barr might guest star as Darren’s Mom. A way for ABC to monetize the controversy and appear magnanimous to a crazy old whitish lady.
  137. @Twinkie
    Is nothing sacred???!!! I enjoyed watching “Bewitched” when I was growing up (and I was not a Boomer, but early Gen Xer).

    OK Bobby (Jindal) Brady.

  138. @JohnnyWalker123
    OJ did that to his Black first wife. He then remarried super Shiksa-looking Nicole. His wife then left him and later started hanging out with Ron Goldman.

    Blacks were overjoyed when OJ was found innocent. Watch this video below.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nsnuhz-Kb7k

    As I recall, at the time, the large majority of Whites seemed taken aback by the verdict. The few Blacks I knew were ecstatic. The above video matches what I saw from people.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NH-VuP_5cA4

    All theatre, Sherlock; nobody died.

  139. @Rapparee

    I was a big fan of Jonny Quest, though.
     
    I've daydreamed before about a Jonny Quest reboot which would employ Gregory Cochran as a script consultant- they'd need a list of unproved-but-plausible cutting-edge scientific theories that would give Dr. Benton Quest a credible excuse to travel to exotic locales. (Sadly, we're a couple decades past the time when Tim Matheson could have played Dr. Quest in a live-action version. Maybe now a cameo as grandpa Quest).

    I have the full series on DVD; it definitely seems to reflect the Cold War-era interest in exotic anthropology that Mr. Sailer has discussed before, which is why it's now denounced as hopelessly racist by any SJWs who bother to take notice of it. Some of the foreign accents and cultural references sound a little comical to ears living in the multicultural 21st century, but otherwise the show holds up extremely well- much better than most programs from a half-century ago.

    I would definitely watch a Cochran-inspired Jonny Quest. Maybe we could get Dinesh D’Souza to play Hadji.

  140. @Anonymous
    Eden was a magnificent physical specimen. Her stand-in was Evelyn Moriarty, who had been the stand-in previously for Marilyn Monroe-e.g., she fit the costumes almost perfectly. I'd say MM had the prettier face but Eden if anything had a slightly better figure-better breasts and bottom, for sure.

    Eden was not the actress Monroe was (Marilyn was better than people gave her credit for at the time, though admittedly she was no Meryl Streep) but she looked good on the small screen and played the role of Jeannie the genie as well as anyone probably could have.

    Either one would have looked really good in the female Starfleet uniform of Star Trek TOS.

    Just saying.

    Aside from being cute and sexy, Eden also had (has, I guess, she’s still around, and has held up pretty well) a reputation for having a sweet personality and being fairly easy to work with, and that really showed through. No less a guy than Chuck Yeager is a fan (he’s on twitter, by the way, and is hilarious at age 93!)

  141. It’s not clear if it really was a halcyon era or if all six year olds look back fondly on the TV shows when they were six.

    It’s the all-six-year-olds theory, I’m afraid (though I had remarkably good taste as a wee lad, greatly preferring THE ADDAMS FAMILY to THE MUNSTERS, and JEANNIE to BEWITCHED. Though Samantha was plenty gorgeous in her own right).

    Elizabeth Montgomery were lost on me as a kid, now I think she’s the most alluring women to ever grace the TV screen. Her sex appeal is off the charts.

    If you want to drink in Elizabeth Montgomery at her hands-down most effable, keep your eyes peeled for an underrated little gangster classic from 1963 called JOHNNY COOL. (TCM shows it every so often.)

    • Replies: @hhsiii
    She was married to Gig Young, who won the Oscar for his role in They Shoot Horses, Don’t They. He later did a murder suicide with another wife. She was good friends with Dominick Dunne, who discussed her tumultuous marriage to Young in his book The Way We Lived Then. Steve would like that one. A lot of imagery of early ‘60s Hollywood.
  142. @TGGP
    The idea that those shows were about marrying a shiksa is news to me (are gentiles magical?), but I'm young enough that I didn't watch very much of those. I know there was a more explicit attempt at that in "Bridget Loves Bernie", but that was controversial enough to get cancelled. Another 60s domestic comedy pairing a normal man with a fantastical woman was "My Living Doll", although that was inspired by Pygmalion.

    Speaking of that set, a few years ago it was noted that there were a lot of procedurals pairing a relatively ordinary female cop with an extraordinary man. Limitless, Minority Report, Sleepy Hollow & The Blacklist all used that formula in 2015, Forever had tried & failed at that the previous year (fitting, as it was a copy of the one-season show New Amsterdam from 2008). Elementary was close to that, although their female Watson wasn't actually a cop, while Blindspot flips the genders of each role. The French import Taxi Brooklyn was also sort of a version of that. Straussians are welcome to conjecture about what that trend was "really" about.

    What about Medium, where the wife solves crimes with her magic powers, her three daughters have her magic, but her husband is a useless British Muggle?

  143. @Father O'Hara
    I dont know if Paul Lynde was a comic genius,( let Dear Leader and other wise men judge him) but I will say his work on Hollywood Squares was first rate comedy!
    Being gay couldn't really be acknowledged,or one could get away away w/o acknowledging it,so when Lynde was asked these sleazy,leering questions he would answer in a way that is as perceived as nongay,but everyone,who was wise,knew to be EXTREMELY GAY! The implicit subtext of monstrously sexual depredations,which we were pretending didn't exist,was sick humor at its best!

    I read that among Lynde’s Hollywood Squares fans back then, among other luminaries, were no less than Katherine Hepburn as well as famously reclusive star Greta Garbo, who watch the show every day, and actually wrote Lynde a fan letter.

    Peter Marshall has even said that he found out that former President Harry Truman was such a fan of Lynde on H’wd Squares that Truman arranged his morning routine to be sure to catch the show.

  144. @Anonymous
    Elvis had more biological talent than Frank Sinatra. He could have been as good an actor and singer or better than Sinatra, but he never was, because biological talent was all he had. No development at all. The Colonel didn't want him developing. Elvis, as mediocre a pure actor as he actually was, put asses in the seats in almost all the Elvis movies , most of which viewed today are regarded as unwatchably bad. Had he been properly trained and developed, he would have been much bigger internationally in music and had a much longer film career.

    Monroe, on the other hand, was an odd case as an actress because she was already pretty well established, albeit in what were considered fluff roles, when she got pulled into the Method Acting game. People who are 'trained' in this school can be very effective but usually taking it up after some success means the end of one's career. It put a huge amount of psychological stress on her and together with bad psychiatry was her undoing. But she turned out some undeniably fine roles on both ends of it.

    You are right that Katharine Hepburn was never accused of having sex appeal, because she sure didn't. I always thought she was a turnoff and generally avoid her in old films.

    However, saying that Eden had more acting talent than Monroe-sorry, but there is a reason that Eden's film career ended completely after TV success. Obviously she was very stereotyped after IDOJ, but that's like saying that Tina Louise would have had a big film career if not for Gilligan. What did in Tina Louise was Tina Louise. Eden had a better work ethic and personality, but at the end of the day she had average acting skills and a very hourglass-shaped body that was big in the fifties but after the mid-60s not what Hollywood was looking for, plus she has a face that works better on the small rather than the big screen.

    “Elvis had more biological talent than Frank Sinatra.”

    Nope. Not at all. As a pure singer, Sinatra wins hands down. Unlike Sinatra, who made sure he hit the right notes every single time, if you listen carefully to Elvis as a singer, he often would go flat, fail to hit the right notes (not that he couldn’t, it was more laziness than anything else). And unlike Sinatra, who took voice lessons so that he didn’t sing with a Hoboken accent, Elvis never lost his Southern brogue. Fine enough for Country Music, not so good when singing other genres.

    “He could have been as good an actor and singer or better than Sinatra, but he never was, because biological talent was all he had.”

    Could’ve, should’ve, but didn’t. He never would’ve come close to Sinatra as a pure singer, because he never did during his lifetime.If you want a purely “biological” talented singer, who also developed into an actor (and won an Academy Award and was nominated for two others), try Bing Crosby. Crosby sang in a wide variety of genres: Jazz, swing, sacred, country-western, Americana (Steven Foster songs), etc. In point of fact, the most commercially successful recording artist in the English language of the twentieth century isn’t Elvis. It’s Bing Crosby, who was always more talented than Elvis as a singer.

    “The Colonel didn’t want him developing.”

    The Colonel didn’t want his boy to take risks that might affect the bottom line. After all, Flaming Star and Wild in the Country (non-singing roles) were massive flops. Unlike Elvis, Sinatra made damn sure to always get the best songwriters possible for his material. Aside from Lieber-Stoller’s Jailhouse Rock, Elvis never showed much interest in getting the best songwriters in rock and roll. His movies could’ve been a lot better (at least the songs could’ve been better), had he bothered to get better songwriters. But he didn’t. Which shows a lack of interest and laziness on his part (this goes to the part of no development. One has to be interested in developing and Elvis simply wasn’t).
    Parker fought tooth and nail to keep him from doing the ’68 Comeback Special. When it became a massive hit, he went in the other direction, and had him tour indefinitely during the ’70’s and make better albums than he had during the ’60’s with his abysmal soundtracks. The Colonel could at least see the writing on the wall, and went with whatever worked to make money.

    “However, saying that Eden had more acting talent than Monroe-sorry, but there is a reason that Eden’s film career ended completely after TV success.”

    She did have more talent. But what film exactly made Monroe a superstar? The Seven Year Itch. And that’s for one main scene, where she has nothing to say, except to hike her skirt up while standing over the grate. Amazing great acting job. To be fair, post-IDOJ, Eden did well in Harper Valley PTA. Barbara Eden was more suited to the small screen, as she was of the generation, unlike Marilyn, who broke into Hollywood thru TV.

    “Eden…at the end of the day she had average acting skills and a very hourglass-shaped body that was big in the fifties but after the mid-60s not what Hollywood was looking for”

    IDOJ ran from ’65-’69, perhaps you mean the ’70’s. Same with Monroe. If she had lived, (and remember, her mental health was breaking down by the early ’60’s due to heavy amounts of pills) she would’ve been pushing 40, and with her ’50’s figure having to compete vs. Welch, Fonda, Andress, Montgomery, Linda Evans, etc. all of them younger than 30, she wouldn’t have had a chance. Hollywood would’ve dumped her so fast or regulated her to second and third leads (which is what she was best at, not at being the star of the show), she wouldn’t have handled failure very well.

    A case can be made that Eden was a far better accomplished actor than ever Marilyn, but in the right medium. TV made Barbara Eden. Marilyn Monroe has lasted longer in death than she ever should have, but that’s mainly to how her estate has successfully marketed her. She is now an icon of the ’50’s, along with James Dean, tail fins on the cars, drive-thru movies, etc. but as to her actual talent, that’s not what people recall about her today. Hint: if it’s va-va-VROOM! that people remember about Marilyn, then it ain’t about her acting skills. It’s about her bending over the manhole cover.

    IDOJ made Barbara Eden, but she was a good actress in the role. She was the star and made it a ratings winner. When people remember her today, they recall the TV show, so at least that’s a compliment to her competent acting abilities.

  145. Seems like Jews surrendered Hollywood without a shot to Black women. Interesting.

  146. @Steve Sailer
    My review is obviously based on a close reading of "Bad Blood," with several quotes and many details from the book.

    http://takimag.com/article/blood_simple_steve_sailer/#axzz5Hy3u9NjA

    In general, in reviews I don't spend a lot of verbiage telling you my opinion of how much I liked the book or movie. You can pick up my opinion if you read carefully, but everybody's got an opinion. For opinions, you are better off looking at aggregation sites to get the average of multiple ratings.

    “I don’t spend a lot of verbiage telling you my opinion of how much I liked the book or movie. You can pick up my opinion if you read carefully, but everybody’s got an opinion.”

    This seems to be a trait associated with the Midwest. CA having received migrants from mostly the Midwest, as opposed to receiving immigrants from New England or NY regions. Like the Midwest it’s understated, subtle. And there’s very little subtlety to NYers in general.

  147. @40 Acres and A Kardashian
    Remember the "Sisters at Heart" Bewitched? The Christmas episode where Samantha turned herself, her husband, and her husband's boss black in order to shame a racist? (Go to 21:24 in the video.) This may well have been the very first "very special" episode of a sitcom. Back then, when Elizabeth Montgomery put on blackface it made her a Goodwhite. I don't think the episode would be quite as well received today.

    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2q5030

    Yeah, I could imagine the uproar and we could wonder the same question about the “All in the Family” episode “Lionel’s Engagement”.

  148. @syonredux

    In Bewitched, written by Barris and Taylor, Samantha, a hardworking black single mom who happens to be a witch, marries Darren, a white mortal who happens to be a bit of a slacker. They struggle to navigate their differences as she discovers that even when a black girl is literally magic, she’s still not as powerful as a decently tall white man with a full head of hair in America.
     
    Interesting to see that they're going in the White man-Black woman direction, but I suppose that that is the safe option, as it both placates the fears of Black women (no White she-devil stealing one of their men) and strokes their egos.....


    Rather doubt that they will be able to find a Black woman who is as alluring as '60s Elizabeth Montgomery, though....

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/56/25/83/5625835fddb644e99f30f125f761fa50.jpg

    I was going to post another photo of Miss Montgomery to compliment the one you posted, but I couldn’t make up my mind which one to choose. Apparently it was impossible to take a bad photo of the girl. She is someone to whom I can sincerely wish RIP.

  149. @Flip
    Gilligan's Island was the primo after school show for my grade school crowd.

    Gilligan’s Island, McHale’s Navy, Hogan’s Heroes and Get Smart got me laughing or at least got me watching them. Jeanie and Bewitched…did not watch. McHale’s Navy was number one for me. Sanford and Son came later and was good.

  150. @Steve Sailer
    How about an out of the closet "Gomer Pyle?"

    Roseann Barr does a bit about how when you are an adult going back to watch an old show, it's hard to overlook how gay the Gomer Pyle character is.

    Geez, Steve don’t give them any ideas. Especially since it isn’t like they are going to bring you into the development team so you can get some of the schmundo and stop blegging for donations.

  151. @Steve Sailer
    My review is obviously based on a close reading of "Bad Blood," with several quotes and many details from the book.

    http://takimag.com/article/blood_simple_steve_sailer/#axzz5Hy3u9NjA

    In general, in reviews I don't spend a lot of verbiage telling you my opinion of how much I liked the book or movie. You can pick up my opinion if you read carefully, but everybody's got an opinion. For opinions, you are better off looking at aggregation sites to get the average of multiple ratings.

    For opinions, you are better off looking at aggregation sites to get the average of multiple ratings.

    I was going to see “Jurassic World” but when it could only score 50% at aggregation site Rotten Tomatoes, I decided to skip it. I have seen all the other Jurassic movies and read the first book. That’s one thing we did not have before the www, movie aggregation sites. And if you can’t figure out a modern movie’s incoherent plot, you can go to wiki or a movie spoiler site.

  152. @Colin Wright
    Well, a black/white 'I Dream of Jeannie' would fit. For decades, while every other form of racial integration was pumped at us, black-white couples were streng verboten. It really was striking. You could have your interracial threesome on billboards, and your black supervisors on TV shows, and the wise black woman in ads promoting household cleaners -- but no inter-racial couples. Never.

    Then of a sudden, starting a year or two ago, we started being bombarded with black-white couples, usually in ads, but now, evidently, to appear on TV as well. There was some series Netflix was promoting the other night as well...

    It's curious. I'm not sure precisely what either the motive or the mechanism is for this sudden, rather choreographed onslaught.

    The funny thing is, studies have shown people find black/white couples viscerally disgusting -- whatever they may consciously pretend to themselves. So from a commercial point of view, this innovation obviously makes no sense at all. After all, if you're trying to sell a sandwich, going for an ad that conveys the subliminal message 'tastes like shit!' is not a good marketing strategy.

    So what's up?

    What’s up is that they have realized they have total power and command of the high ground of our civilization, therefore it doesn’t matter what we like or don’t like. They’ll cram whatever they want down our throats and we won’t have any alternatives. It’s like the political censorship on internet social channels and payment providers. They’ll say if you don’t like it, just develop your own channels, and as soon as you do they’ll shut them down. If White people just turn off the tube they don’t care, there are now hordes of low IQ new Americans who will still watch this dreck and justify the ad income.

  153. @syonredux

    That’s the one, it explored the same idea but placed witchcraft (really, wife politicking, such as made up several subplots of Mad Men) in direct confrontation with science in the context of academia. It was a kind of acknowledgment that nominally meritocratic institutions cared less about scientific aptitude than they professed.
     
    I'll give it a shot. As I mentioned upthread, I really like the novel upon which it was based. The academic infighting stuff was based on Leiber's experiences teaching speech and drama at Occidental College.

    Leiber has my vote as perhaps the most multi-talented genre author of the 20th century, equally adept at horror (Our Lady of Darkness, You're All Alone), science fiction (The Big Time, "Coming Attraction," "Poor Superman"), and fantasy (the Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser series). Heck, he wrote a good novelization of a movie (Tarzan and the Valley of Gold )

    Hear him!

  154. @theMann
    As a kid, Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie were the two TV shows that I absolutely loathed. Unfortunately my parents loved both of them so I didn't have much chance to escape them. At the time, I thought it was because they were incredibly insulting to Whites, Christians, Husbands, and Air Force Officers, as well as being spectacularly unfunny. Now.....oh wait, even as a kid I had good judgement.


    Given the entertainment industry's determination to remake every piece of crap, film and television, from the past, one has to wonder what the point is. There have actually been a large number of genuinely good tv shows made the last few years, so what is the point of remaking crap? What, it is going to be better crap? On the other hand, is there any point to remaking the good shows? I might actually watch a remake of Combat if it was good, but really, what is the point - I could just rewatch Combat.


    I really wonder about these people who copy the work of others, there is almost no chance of being as good, let alone better, than the originals, and as "artists" they are the moral equivalent of Xerox machines.

    I only saw a few episodes of Bewitched, and it was pretty bad, but looking back on it I realize the show was ahead of it’s time in depicting a surreal version of reality. This was a universe in which a race of god-like beings with almost unlimited power, instead of ruling the planet, somehow had to hide themselves, and in which everybody in the country drove the same brand of car, a Chevrolet. David Lynch could not have come up with something this bizarre.

    • Replies: @anonymous

    This was a universe in which a race of god-like beings with almost unlimited power, instead of ruling the planet, somehow had to hide themselves,
     
    A bit like White Privilege.
  155. @kimchilover
    One of my all-time favorite shows is The Venture Brothers which, at least for the first few seasons, is basically a parody of Johnny Quest (it just started it's seventh season). Basically it's Johnny Quest as a grown-up, pill-popping failure of a super scientist living in the shadow of his dead brilliant father and dealing with the PTSD of his childhood "adventures." His two kids are sweet but also mildly retarded. There is also a sociopathic body guard. Not the kind of show you can jump around, but if you start from the beginning, it's one of the funniest shows of all time. And the music by JG Thirwell is fabulous.

    Opening theme:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQddCqZy6tQ
    • Replies: @CCZ
    With an exceptional female villainess!

    http://venturebrothers.wikia.com/wiki/Dr._Mrs._The_Monarch
  156. Like many others I only saw the shows you mentioned as reruns years after their original showings.

    One of the ones you didn’t mention was Hogan’s Heroes. My mother was a bookkeeper for a family-run construction company where one of the brothers had been a WWII POW and he was not at all amused by the premise of the show. My mother was told in no uncertain terms to never, ever mention the show in his presence. I later found out from some of my Uncles who while not POWs themselves knew guys who were and they weren’t too happy about the show either. Looking back on it, it’s pretty clear the show was just Jews rubbing Goy’s noses in their servitude and sacrifice while making war seem fun for the Boomers so that they would be happy to send their own kids to war for the Jews.

    I enjoyed what I saw of Johnny Quest as well. I figured I must have missed a lot of the episodes but only recently found out it had only been on for one season (26 episodes). It’s had a lot of impact nonetheless. When President Trump chose Mike Pence for VP, I was amazed how many young guys recognized and memed Pence as Race Bannon.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    Looking back on it, it’s pretty clear the show was just Jews rubbing Goy’s noses in their servitude and sacrifice while making war seem fun for the Boomers so that they would be happy to send their own kids to war for the Jews.

    Even by the standard of Steve's more excitable commenters, this is entirely deranged. Whatever you think of the present day Holocaust "industry", I assure you, no Jew thinks of WW2 as "fun". The idea that one of the most popular shows in America in 1965,when a substantial portion of the audience consisted of WW2 vets and their families, was dedicated to "rubbing Goy's noses in their servitude" is demented.
  157. @JohnnyWalker123
    The mother from Bewitched had Jewish personality characteristics.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzbCoecfdow

    Darren Stevens was definitely a WASP.

    Hard to say about Samantha Stevens.

    The neighbors (Mr. and Mrs. Kravitz) were Jewish.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLC1b8nUF74

    If you watch the first minute of the first episode of Bewitched, you'll see that both Darren and Samantha are portrayed as all-American, typical WASPs.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0H5kDCEH-2Q

    Bewitched had a hybrid WASP-Jewish sensibility. Witches are the persecuted in-group with extraordinary abilities. Darren is WASPy but neurotic. Darren’s father is a remarkably straight laced good natured goyim while Darren’s mother is a neurotic and close minded Yiddishe Momme. Samantha’s doting father is a good natured, open minded WASP while the mother is overbearing, opinionated, critical, and pleased with undermining mortals (goyim) whenever possible. Larry Tate is WASPy looking and alcoholic but sycophantic and money hungry — a mixture of WASP and Jewish stereotypes. On and on the comparison goes. As Steve comments, American sitcoms were designed to give mixed signals.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Bewitched had a hybrid WASP-Jewish sensibility. Witches are the persecuted in-group with extraordinary abilities.
     

    On and on the comparison goes. As Steve comments, American sitcoms were designed to give mixed signals.
     
    Along those lines, you can also interpret the closed-off society of witches as a metaphor for the Jewish fascination with elite WASPs. What do they do behind the walls of the Porcellian club.....
    , @Tyrion 2
    Basically if a character is heavily flawed you claim they are a Jewish analogy and if perfect you claim they are a WASP analogy.

    Considering that they are fictional characters in what you likely suppose to be a Jewish dominated media, and you likely suppose that Jews are relentlessly self-aggrandising, you are obviously an idiot.
  158. @kimchilover
    One of my all-time favorite shows is The Venture Brothers which, at least for the first few seasons, is basically a parody of Johnny Quest (it just started it's seventh season). Basically it's Johnny Quest as a grown-up, pill-popping failure of a super scientist living in the shadow of his dead brilliant father and dealing with the PTSD of his childhood "adventures." His two kids are sweet but also mildly retarded. There is also a sociopathic body guard. Not the kind of show you can jump around, but if you start from the beginning, it's one of the funniest shows of all time. And the music by JG Thirwell is fabulous.

    Opening theme:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQddCqZy6tQ

    Season 7 Starts Aug 5th | The Venture Bros. S7 | Adult Swim

    • Replies: @kimchilover
    I can't believe this show has been on for 15 years and still manages to be hilariously clever and strangely endearing...hard to imagine anyone under the age of 38 catching half the references. Last week's Ven-Data/Blue Morpho twist was pretty brilliant; how they're able to believably mine throw-off references from their earliest episodes is a testament to Publick & Hammer's unique writing relationship.
    , @MEH 0910
    [ad] Carvel Cakes Giveaway | The Venture Bros. | Adult Swim

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2seXWeEnkY
  159. @JohnnyWalker123
    Samantha's mom and relatives would always complain about how simple Darren Stevens was inadequate.

    Almost like a Jewish mother-in-law berating her daughter that she should've married a "nice Jewish doctor."

    Remember Goodfellas?

    Karen's mom told her that she should've married a Jew, not the Irish/Italian Henry Hill.

    "He's not Jewish. Do you know how these people live?"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n16uBK71miQ

    It's been a while since I watched Bewitched, but the dynamic seemed sort of similar.

    Samantha’s mom and relatives would always complain about how simple Darren Stevens was inadequate.

    Almost like a Jewish mother-in-law berating her daughter that she should’ve married a “nice Jewish doctor.”

    You can also read it as a haute-WASP mother lamenting that her daughter married a man who was beneath her station…

  160. @MEH 0910
    https://www.adultswim.com/videos/the-venture-bros/

    With an exceptional female villainess!

    http://venturebrothers.wikia.com/wiki/Dr._Mrs._The_Monarch

  161. @JimB
    Bewitched had a hybrid WASP-Jewish sensibility. Witches are the persecuted in-group with extraordinary abilities. Darren is WASPy but neurotic. Darren’s father is a remarkably straight laced good natured goyim while Darren’s mother is a neurotic and close minded Yiddishe Momme. Samantha’s doting father is a good natured, open minded WASP while the mother is overbearing, opinionated, critical, and pleased with undermining mortals (goyim) whenever possible. Larry Tate is WASPy looking and alcoholic but sycophantic and money hungry — a mixture of WASP and Jewish stereotypes. On and on the comparison goes. As Steve comments, American sitcoms were designed to give mixed signals.

    Bewitched had a hybrid WASP-Jewish sensibility. Witches are the persecuted in-group with extraordinary abilities.

    On and on the comparison goes. As Steve comments, American sitcoms were designed to give mixed signals.

    Along those lines, you can also interpret the closed-off society of witches as a metaphor for the Jewish fascination with elite WASPs. What do they do behind the walls of the Porcellian club…..

  162. @syonredux

    In Bewitched, written by Barris and Taylor, Samantha, a hardworking black single mom who happens to be a witch, marries Darren, a white mortal who happens to be a bit of a slacker. They struggle to navigate their differences as she discovers that even when a black girl is literally magic, she’s still not as powerful as a decently tall white man with a full head of hair in America.
     
    Interesting to see that they're going in the White man-Black woman direction, but I suppose that that is the safe option, as it both placates the fears of Black women (no White she-devil stealing one of their men) and strokes their egos.....


    Rather doubt that they will be able to find a Black woman who is as alluring as '60s Elizabeth Montgomery, though....

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/56/25/83/5625835fddb644e99f30f125f761fa50.jpg

    She has really good hair.

  163. @Truth

    Eden was a magnificent physical specimen.
     
    (...WRETCH!...)

    There’s talk that Roseanne Barr might guest star as Darren’s Mom. A way for ABC to monetize the controversy and appear magnanimous to a crazy old whitish lady.

  164. @MEH 0910

    And why do I care?

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    Because Steve might write about it?
  165. @Johan Schmidt
    That would essentially be the Harry Potter franchise, but for TV. No-one ever seems to dare to address the implications of a book series, written by a woman, in which wizards and witches have godlike powers to warp reality, but primarily use them to perform simple household chores.


    @hhsiii

    Race Bannon: Don’t worry boys, Bandit can take care of himself.
     
    Isn't that a good message for children, though? All the time I hear of people getting themselves killed to "rescue" a dog which turned out to be perfectly capable of escaping from the situation itself.

    Happened just last week. A woman in Hilton Head area killed by an alligator trying to save her dog. The dog came out of it unscathed.

  166. @Steve Sailer
    How about an out of the closet "Gomer Pyle?"

    Roseann Barr does a bit about how when you are an adult going back to watch an old show, it's hard to overlook how gay the Gomer Pyle character is.

    Isn’t a mixed race Brady Bunch an obvious winner?

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Isn’t a mixed race Brady Bunch an obvious winner?
     
    The boys are black, the girls are white, and unwanted pregnancy is the topic of the first show.
  167. @D. K.
    Easily the best episode of "Gilligan's Island"-- and co-directed by the great Ida Lupino, no less!

    http://gilligan.wikia.com/wiki/The_Producer

    ***

    Harold Hecuba - "You call yourselves actors!?"

    Gilligan - "I don't call myself an actor."

    Harold Hecuba - "If I say you're an actor you're an actor!"

    Gilligan - "Ok! I'm an actor!"

    Harold Hecuba - "Believe me, you are no actor!"

    ***

    I think a Gilligan re-boot with a Spike Lee – Gilligan, Samuel L. Jackson – Professor and Jennifer Lopez – Ginger would be a hoot.

  168. @Daniel H
    I never liked Bewitched, but I loved I dream of Jeannie. Larry Hagman and Barbara Eden had great chemistry.

    You beat me to it – I was going to say exactly that.

    “Great chemistry” You either have it or you don’t, and those two definitely did, while the other two (who were they now?) definitely did not.

    On the other hand, given that my memories go back further than those of most of you here, I confess that my all time favourite couple was Anne Jeffreys and Robert Sterling in Topper.
    Sophistication as well as great chemistry – that’s the ticket.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    I confess that my all time favourite couple was Anne Jeffreys and Robert Sterling in Topper.
    Sophistication as well as great chemistry – that’s the ticket.
     
    Thorne Smith provides great source material.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Sophistication as well as great chemistry – that’s the ticket.
     
    It's painful to watch two talented "sophisticates" who don't mesh on stage, screen, or record, even though they may get along perfectly well and even worship each other. Notable instances are Judy Garland singing Cole Porter songs in The Pirate, and Ella Fitzgerald's tribute album to Antonio Carlos Jobim.
  169. @anon
    And why do I care?

    Because Steve might write about it?

    • Replies: @anonymous
    You’re a prophet.
  170. @MEH 0910
    Season 7 Starts Aug 5th | The Venture Bros. S7 | Adult Swim
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnCWXGYeGfs

    I can’t believe this show has been on for 15 years and still manages to be hilariously clever and strangely endearing…hard to imagine anyone under the age of 38 catching half the references. Last week’s Ven-Data/Blue Morpho twist was pretty brilliant; how they’re able to believably mine throw-off references from their earliest episodes is a testament to Publick & Hammer’s unique writing relationship.

  171. @JohnnyWalker123
    The show always emphasized Darren Stevens as an all-American type of guy. In many respects, an American Everyman who happened to have handsome looks, suburban prosperity, and a beautiful wife. He really didn't have any type of eccentricity or uniqueness.

    Jewish characters are usually portrayed as being different in some type of important way. Often smarter or odder than everyone around them, with a tendency to be a bit socially maladjusted. That really doesn't sound like the character from Bewitched.

    The characters below are more behaviorally and culturally Jewish.

    "Mike" from All in the Family.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZ5_Prde6xU

    "Paul" from Wonder Years.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egYjNqOX9bk

    "Screech" from Save by the Bell.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvAN85fJLrI

    To be fair, "Mike" is Polish and "Screech" is WASP, but they were portrayed with Jewish personas. Also, both actors (Reiner and Diamond) are of Jewish origin.

    Steven Pinker identifies with Screech from “Saved by the Bell.”

  172. @Ragno

    It’s not clear if it really was a halcyon era or if all six year olds look back fondly on the TV shows when they were six.
     
    It's the all-six-year-olds theory, I'm afraid (though I had remarkably good taste as a wee lad, greatly preferring THE ADDAMS FAMILY to THE MUNSTERS, and JEANNIE to BEWITCHED. Though Samantha was plenty gorgeous in her own right).

    Elizabeth Montgomery were lost on me as a kid, now I think she’s the most alluring women to ever grace the TV screen. Her sex appeal is off the charts.
     
    If you want to drink in Elizabeth Montgomery at her hands-down most effable, keep your eyes peeled for an underrated little gangster classic from 1963 called JOHNNY COOL. (TCM shows it every so often.)

    She was married to Gig Young, who won the Oscar for his role in They Shoot Horses, Don’t They. He later did a murder suicide with another wife. She was good friends with Dominick Dunne, who discussed her tumultuous marriage to Young in his book The Way We Lived Then. Steve would like that one. A lot of imagery of early ‘60s Hollywood.

  173. @Reg Cæsar

    Gilligan’s Island, Get Smart, Adams Family, Munsters, Green Acres, I Dream of Jeannie, and Bewitched.

    It’s not clear if it really was a halcyon era or if all six year olds look back fondly on the TV shows when they were six.
     
    They had theme songs that stuck in your head. If your nostalgia stage show is flagging, you could always work in a medley.

    Why were TV theme songs so much more catchy in 1965? I remember reading a review of the Broadway musical version of The Adams Family ten years ago. The reviewer said the show was terrible, but it was making money because it had Nathan Lane as Gomez Adams and the clap-along theme song from the TV show to get the audience in the mood.

    I can recall somebody employed as a warm-up comedian for a recorded-live-before-a-studio-audience sitcom saying that if he ever felt he was losing the audience, he just led them in a Brady Bunch theme song singalong.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    For that matter, what happened to great TV show intros?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tO0Vq4fj3ho

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qbim6I51G4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kP5wonZRJKA
    , @Rapparee
    For a long time I wondered if the tour-bus TV theme-show sing-along was just a recurring movie gag dreamed up in some comic's imagination, but some seasoned travellers assure me that, at least at one time, it was definitely a real thing- especially with multiple nationalities on board, who might not know any songs in common other than "Gilligan's Island" or "Mr. Ed".

    Old theme songs often hold up much better than the shows they introduced (who still remembers "The Greatest American Hero"?). The '60s and '70s had a lot of instrumental themes that still make great party music, even if you never saw a single episdode of the show- heavy on Lalo Schifrin, Edwin Astley, and Laurie Johnson.
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Wasn't the Adams Family Theme Song a snap-along?
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Why were TV theme songs so much more catchy in 1965?
     
    Standards were high in Hollywood and Broadway, and even in Tin Pan Alley before them. Add in the fact that the theme had to say something, everything, in less than a minute, and the pros in NY and LA were forced to think and write tightly. (Even the great classical composers were cranking it out like at a patisserie.)

    Plus, you couldn't get away with cutting corners much before your colleagues ribbed you unmercifully.

    Even then, these themes don't always hold up to their predecessors standard; they just look highly professional compared with what came in the decades following.

    Incidentally, non-musicians Jackie Gleason and Johnny Carson were credited, or co-credited, with their themes, and Merv Griffin composed the theme for Jeopardy, a show he produced. Griffin was a singer, so in his case it's not just amateur luck.

    Charlie Chaplin wrote the score for at least one of his films, which didn't impress anyone, but part of that score was reworked at a different tempo, and became the evergreen "Smile", in the way that a Hoagy Carmichael rag turned into "Stardust".
  174. @Kylie
    I still love "Gilligan's Island" and "Green Acres". Staging "Hamlet" to the music from "Carmen", climbing a telephone pole to talk on the telephone, farming in a suit and tie, a pig who's feelings are hurt when he's told he's watching a front-loading washing machine instead of a television.

    Green Acres was insane. An amazing show.

  175. @ACommenter
    One good thing about this, it made me google Elizabeth Montgomery,
    As a kid after school I watched these shows, but wow, I never realized how hot she was.. her character had waspy name Samantha (High Society, Philadelphia story) and she's actually anglo-scots-irish...

    like all around
    https://www.phactual.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Montgomery-1900x1357_c.jpg

    She struck me as a bitch even as a kid.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    She struck me as a bitch even as a kid.
     
    She was from LA, her father was an actor, her granddad was rich, and he jumped off the Brooklyn Bridge. What did you expect?
  176. Watch old clips of Mr. Ed sometime. Pretty funny. There is even one with Clint Eastwood as a guest star.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I've seen a little of Mr Ed recently. It's not bad.

    Most of these old kid oriented shows hold up better than "All In the Family," which was #1 for five straight years.

  177. @hhsiii
    We always made fun of the way they dealt with Bandit the dog, who was always comic relief.

    Hadji: Johnny, Bandit’s caught in those pile drivers.

    Race Bannon: Don’t worry boys, Bandit can take care of himself.

    Bandit was much better-used when they actually gave him something to do, but that was rare. Comic relief is nice, but he really could have been cut out of many episodes entirely without affecting the storyline.

  178. @JohnnyWalker123
    The show always emphasized Darren Stevens as an all-American type of guy. In many respects, an American Everyman who happened to have handsome looks, suburban prosperity, and a beautiful wife. He really didn't have any type of eccentricity or uniqueness.

    Jewish characters are usually portrayed as being different in some type of important way. Often smarter or odder than everyone around them, with a tendency to be a bit socially maladjusted. That really doesn't sound like the character from Bewitched.

    The characters below are more behaviorally and culturally Jewish.

    "Mike" from All in the Family.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZ5_Prde6xU

    "Paul" from Wonder Years.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egYjNqOX9bk

    "Screech" from Save by the Bell.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvAN85fJLrI

    To be fair, "Mike" is Polish and "Screech" is WASP, but they were portrayed with Jewish personas. Also, both actors (Reiner and Diamond) are of Jewish origin.

    To be fair, “Mike” is Polish and “Screech” is WASP, but they were portrayed with Jewish personas. Also, both actors (Reiner and Diamond) are of Jewish origin.

    In contrast, the actors who portrayed Samantha and her parents were extremely non-Jewish…..

    The show always emphasized Darren Stevens as an all-American type of guy. In many respects, an American Everyman who happened to have handsome looks,

    Not really…..

  179. @Old Palo Altan
    You beat me to it - I was going to say exactly that.

    "Great chemistry" You either have it or you don't, and those two definitely did, while the other two (who were they now?) definitely did not.

    On the other hand, given that my memories go back further than those of most of you here, I confess that my all time favourite couple was Anne Jeffreys and Robert Sterling in Topper.
    Sophistication as well as great chemistry - that's the ticket.

    I confess that my all time favourite couple was Anne Jeffreys and Robert Sterling in Topper.
    Sophistication as well as great chemistry – that’s the ticket.

    Thorne Smith provides great source material.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    The man (from the evidence of his wiki biography) seems to have stepped over the bounds from sophistication into drunkenness and sexual excess with nary a backward glance.

    Remarkable though that his last book was an inspiration for Bewitched, rather elegantly closing this particular circle.
  180. @Jim Don Bob
    Watch old clips of Mr. Ed sometime. Pretty funny. There is even one with Clint Eastwood as a guest star.

    I’ve seen a little of Mr Ed recently. It’s not bad.

    Most of these old kid oriented shows hold up better than “All In the Family,” which was #1 for five straight years.

    • Replies: @JimB

    I’ve seen a little of Mr Ed recently. It’s not bad.
     
    Connie Hines was a total knockout. Why would Wilbur want to spend so much time in a barn with a goddam talking horse?
    , @Jim Don Bob
    I watched All In the Family a few times because everyone said how great it was. I thought it was preachy and cartoonish even back then. Social commentary does not age well. Who remembers Lenny Bruce?
  181. @Steve Sailer
    Why were TV theme songs so much more catchy in 1965? I remember reading a review of the Broadway musical version of The Adams Family ten years ago. The reviewer said the show was terrible, but it was making money because it had Nathan Lane as Gomez Adams and the clap-along theme song from the TV show to get the audience in the mood.

    I can recall somebody employed as a warm-up comedian for a recorded-live-before-a-studio-audience sitcom saying that if he ever felt he was losing the audience, he just led them in a Brady Bunch theme song singalong.

    For that matter, what happened to great TV show intros?

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    What, Seinfeld's nondescript bass doesn't rank up there for the ages?

    Just kidding of course.
  182. @Steve Sailer
    Why were TV theme songs so much more catchy in 1965? I remember reading a review of the Broadway musical version of The Adams Family ten years ago. The reviewer said the show was terrible, but it was making money because it had Nathan Lane as Gomez Adams and the clap-along theme song from the TV show to get the audience in the mood.

    I can recall somebody employed as a warm-up comedian for a recorded-live-before-a-studio-audience sitcom saying that if he ever felt he was losing the audience, he just led them in a Brady Bunch theme song singalong.

    For a long time I wondered if the tour-bus TV theme-show sing-along was just a recurring movie gag dreamed up in some comic’s imagination, but some seasoned travellers assure me that, at least at one time, it was definitely a real thing- especially with multiple nationalities on board, who might not know any songs in common other than “Gilligan’s Island” or “Mr. Ed“.

    Old theme songs often hold up much better than the shows they introduced (who still remembers “The Greatest American Hero“?). The ’60s and ’70s had a lot of instrumental themes that still make great party music, even if you never saw a single episdode of the show- heavy on Lalo Schifrin, Edwin Astley, and Laurie Johnson.

  183. @Steve Sailer
    Why were TV theme songs so much more catchy in 1965? I remember reading a review of the Broadway musical version of The Adams Family ten years ago. The reviewer said the show was terrible, but it was making money because it had Nathan Lane as Gomez Adams and the clap-along theme song from the TV show to get the audience in the mood.

    I can recall somebody employed as a warm-up comedian for a recorded-live-before-a-studio-audience sitcom saying that if he ever felt he was losing the audience, he just led them in a Brady Bunch theme song singalong.

    Wasn’t the Adams Family Theme Song a snap-along?

  184. @anon
    Isn’t a mixed race Brady Bunch an obvious winner?

    Isn’t a mixed race Brady Bunch an obvious winner?

    The boys are black, the girls are white, and unwanted pregnancy is the topic of the first show.

  185. @Steve Sailer
    I've seen a little of Mr Ed recently. It's not bad.

    Most of these old kid oriented shows hold up better than "All In the Family," which was #1 for five straight years.

    I’ve seen a little of Mr Ed recently. It’s not bad.

    Connie Hines was a total knockout. Why would Wilbur want to spend so much time in a barn with a goddam talking horse?

  186. @Kylie
    I still love "Gilligan's Island" and "Green Acres". Staging "Hamlet" to the music from "Carmen", climbing a telephone pole to talk on the telephone, farming in a suit and tie, a pig who's feelings are hurt when he's told he's watching a front-loading washing machine instead of a television.

    The Munsters was the jewel in the crown of 60s fantasy sitcoms although it lasted only two seasons. Al Lewis and Fred Gwyne are the greatest comedy duo of all time, with a wise guy Jewish vampire playing foil to a naive, gentle hearted WASPy Frankenstein monster. The original concept was formulated by Alan Burns and Chris Hayward, the creators of the Rocky and Bullwinkle show. It was supposed to be Leave it to Beaver as civil rights allegory with classic Universal Film Studios monsters. The Munsters are a permanent item in the family film night rotation.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    How about Fred Gwynne and Joe E. Ross, in Car 54, Where are You? I can still sing the theme song.
  187. @JohnnyWalker123
    It's interesting that throughout the show, the scantily clad Jeanie constantly referred to Major Nelson as "Master" and was wildly eager to serve him. Jeanie was also portrayed as exasperating and a bit dimwitted, while Major Nelson was shown as being the mature adult who put up with Jeanie's antics.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRNwv8opJT0

    If you made a show like that these days, the whole premise would be seen as sexist.

    It’s interesting that throughout the show, the scantily clad Jeanie constantly referred to Major Nelson as “Master” and was wildly eager to serve him.

    The irony being that Major Nelson is an unwilling master, and Jeannie’s magic always has disastrous unintended consequences.

  188. @Steve Sailer
    Why were TV theme songs so much more catchy in 1965? I remember reading a review of the Broadway musical version of The Adams Family ten years ago. The reviewer said the show was terrible, but it was making money because it had Nathan Lane as Gomez Adams and the clap-along theme song from the TV show to get the audience in the mood.

    I can recall somebody employed as a warm-up comedian for a recorded-live-before-a-studio-audience sitcom saying that if he ever felt he was losing the audience, he just led them in a Brady Bunch theme song singalong.

    Why were TV theme songs so much more catchy in 1965?

    Standards were high in Hollywood and Broadway, and even in Tin Pan Alley before them. Add in the fact that the theme had to say something, everything, in less than a minute, and the pros in NY and LA were forced to think and write tightly. (Even the great classical composers were cranking it out like at a patisserie.)

    Plus, you couldn’t get away with cutting corners much before your colleagues ribbed you unmercifully.

    Even then, these themes don’t always hold up to their predecessors standard; they just look highly professional compared with what came in the decades following.

    Incidentally, non-musicians Jackie Gleason and Johnny Carson were credited, or co-credited, with their themes, and Merv Griffin composed the theme for Jeopardy, a show he produced. Griffin was a singer, so in his case it’s not just amateur luck.

    Charlie Chaplin wrote the score for at least one of his films, which didn’t impress anyone, but part of that score was reworked at a different tempo, and became the evergreen “Smile”, in the way that a Hoagy Carmichael rag turned into “Stardust”.

  189. @Anonymous
    The original Darren was awesome, the replacement Darren was too awful to watch. I recently looked up what happened to Dick York and why he was replaced. It's a really sad story, and a bit touching too.

    I'm not a fan of most of that 60s tv cheese, but I do remember liking Dobie Gillis when it ran on Nick at Nite. Maynard > Gilligan.

    The original Darren was awesome, the replacement Darren was too awful to watch.

    He started out as Dick Cox, not the best name for an actor. Especially one who took advantage of National Coming-Out Day.

    Dick Sargent was two years younger than Dick York, and died two years afterward. Emphysema and prostate cancer killed them, respectively.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Replacing Dick with Dick gave Howard Stern the opportunity to get away with the following:

    "They pulled out the old Dick and stuck in the new Dick, and Samantha never noticed"


    "They never do", commented Robin Quivers.
  190. @Reg Cæsar

    The original Darren was awesome, the replacement Darren was too awful to watch.
     
    He started out as Dick Cox, not the best name for an actor. Especially one who took advantage of National Coming-Out Day.

    Dick Sargent was two years younger than Dick York, and died two years afterward. Emphysema and prostate cancer killed them, respectively.

    Replacing Dick with Dick gave Howard Stern the opportunity to get away with the following:

    “They pulled out the old Dick and stuck in the new Dick, and Samantha never noticed”

    “They never do”, commented Robin Quivers.

  191. @MEH 0910
    Because Steve might write about it?

    You’re a prophet.

  192. @Alfa158
    I only saw a few episodes of Bewitched, and it was pretty bad, but looking back on it I realize the show was ahead of it’s time in depicting a surreal version of reality. This was a universe in which a race of god-like beings with almost unlimited power, instead of ruling the planet, somehow had to hide themselves, and in which everybody in the country drove the same brand of car, a Chevrolet. David Lynch could not have come up with something this bizarre.

    This was a universe in which a race of god-like beings with almost unlimited power, instead of ruling the planet, somehow had to hide themselves,

    A bit like White Privilege.

  193. @Tuber
    Yes! Finally, short balding men can flee from white. The idea that the short and balding are beneficiaries of a genetic lottery because we are white was preposterous. Now we can rightfully reconstitute our identity to highlight our underappreciated victim status. Emmet Till meet George Costanza!

    Intelligent, good-looking people of all races with courteous manners and quicks wits tend to be likeable.

    Anyone who does not possess one of those traits or a component of one of those traits (i.e full head of hair) are disadvantaged.

    Onbviously, something must be done. There ate three possiblr solutions.

    1. Create big money government programmes to help the disadvatanged and give equity minded zealots jobs.

    2. Actively try to punish the privileged through workplace discrimination or, hopefully one day, facial scarring for the good looking or something.

    3. Sophistically ask “what is intelligence” or “what is beauty” and attack and destroy anybody noticing or categorising anything and undermine the very foundations of knowledge. The utterly ignorant know nothing.

    Which of those three aren’t already happening and at an already (minorly) dystopian scale?

  194. @Whiskey
    Tell me again how Hollywood is really conservative?

    And for all her magic the single Black mother couldn't get baby daddy to stay.

    They will cast the really gay dude from the Big Bang Theory.

    If you’ve seen Kenya Baris’ other stuff you would see that she is a huge fan of Wax’s “white bourgoise values” but that she also likes to (understandably) build up a mild fantasy of black authenticity and realness.

    I’ve found her stuff fairly enjoyable whereas the perfectly reviewed Boot Riley movie is unwatchable garbage.

  195. @JimB
    Bewitched had a hybrid WASP-Jewish sensibility. Witches are the persecuted in-group with extraordinary abilities. Darren is WASPy but neurotic. Darren’s father is a remarkably straight laced good natured goyim while Darren’s mother is a neurotic and close minded Yiddishe Momme. Samantha’s doting father is a good natured, open minded WASP while the mother is overbearing, opinionated, critical, and pleased with undermining mortals (goyim) whenever possible. Larry Tate is WASPy looking and alcoholic but sycophantic and money hungry — a mixture of WASP and Jewish stereotypes. On and on the comparison goes. As Steve comments, American sitcoms were designed to give mixed signals.

    Basically if a character is heavily flawed you claim they are a Jewish analogy and if perfect you claim they are a WASP analogy.

    Considering that they are fictional characters in what you likely suppose to be a Jewish dominated media, and you likely suppose that Jews are relentlessly self-aggrandising, you are obviously an idiot.

    • Replies: @JimB
    Didn’t I call the WASPs alcoholics (Larry Tate) and naive (Herman Munster). Didn’t I call the negative Jewish characteristics stereotypes? Haven’t countless Jewish writers and comedians made countless jokes about those negative stereotypes.

    Get a grip.

  196. @syonredux

    I confess that my all time favourite couple was Anne Jeffreys and Robert Sterling in Topper.
    Sophistication as well as great chemistry – that’s the ticket.
     
    Thorne Smith provides great source material.

    The man (from the evidence of his wiki biography) seems to have stepped over the bounds from sophistication into drunkenness and sexual excess with nary a backward glance.

    Remarkable though that his last book was an inspiration for Bewitched, rather elegantly closing this particular circle.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    The man (from the evidence of his wiki biography) seems to have stepped over the bounds from sophistication into drunkenness and sexual excess with nary a backward glance.
     
    That's a pretty good summary of the 1920s......
  197. @Steve Sailer
    I've seen a little of Mr Ed recently. It's not bad.

    Most of these old kid oriented shows hold up better than "All In the Family," which was #1 for five straight years.

    I watched All In the Family a few times because everyone said how great it was. I thought it was preachy and cartoonish even back then. Social commentary does not age well. Who remembers Lenny Bruce?

  198. @JimB
    The Munsters was the jewel in the crown of 60s fantasy sitcoms although it lasted only two seasons. Al Lewis and Fred Gwyne are the greatest comedy duo of all time, with a wise guy Jewish vampire playing foil to a naive, gentle hearted WASPy Frankenstein monster. The original concept was formulated by Alan Burns and Chris Hayward, the creators of the Rocky and Bullwinkle show. It was supposed to be Leave it to Beaver as civil rights allegory with classic Universal Film Studios monsters. The Munsters are a permanent item in the family film night rotation.

    How about Fred Gwynne and Joe E. Ross, in Car 54, Where are You? I can still sing the theme song.

    • Replies: @JimB

    How about Fred Gwynne and Joe E. Ross, in Car 54, Where are You? I can still sing the theme song.
     
    Alas, the first time I saw the Munsters they had been in syndication for quite a while. Car 54, Where Are You? never made it into syndication on the local TV station, and TV Land was a few years off.

    It’s hard not to marvel at the writing quality of these shows.

    , @Reg Cæsar
    I could never keep Joe E Ross, Joe E Lewis, and Joe E Brown straight. It was hard enough keeping George E Jessel distinct.

    Do E Michael Jones and E Christian Kopff share the same E? I once stood between the two, but was afraid to ask.

  199. @Fred Boynton
    Like many others I only saw the shows you mentioned as reruns years after their original showings.

    One of the ones you didn't mention was Hogan's Heroes. My mother was a bookkeeper for a family-run construction company where one of the brothers had been a WWII POW and he was not at all amused by the premise of the show. My mother was told in no uncertain terms to never, ever mention the show in his presence. I later found out from some of my Uncles who while not POWs themselves knew guys who were and they weren't too happy about the show either. Looking back on it, it's pretty clear the show was just Jews rubbing Goy's noses in their servitude and sacrifice while making war seem fun for the Boomers so that they would be happy to send their own kids to war for the Jews.

    I enjoyed what I saw of Johnny Quest as well. I figured I must have missed a lot of the episodes but only recently found out it had only been on for one season (26 episodes). It's had a lot of impact nonetheless. When President Trump chose Mike Pence for VP, I was amazed how many young guys recognized and memed Pence as Race Bannon.

    Looking back on it, it’s pretty clear the show was just Jews rubbing Goy’s noses in their servitude and sacrifice while making war seem fun for the Boomers so that they would be happy to send their own kids to war for the Jews.

    Even by the standard of Steve’s more excitable commenters, this is entirely deranged. Whatever you think of the present day Holocaust “industry”, I assure you, no Jew thinks of WW2 as “fun”. The idea that one of the most popular shows in America in 1965,when a substantial portion of the audience consisted of WW2 vets and their families, was dedicated to “rubbing Goy’s noses in their servitude” is demented.

  200. @Jim Don Bob
    How about Fred Gwynne and Joe E. Ross, in Car 54, Where are You? I can still sing the theme song.

    How about Fred Gwynne and Joe E. Ross, in Car 54, Where are You? I can still sing the theme song.

    Alas, the first time I saw the Munsters they had been in syndication for quite a while. Car 54, Where Are You? never made it into syndication on the local TV station, and TV Land was a few years off.

    It’s hard not to marvel at the writing quality of these shows.

  201. @Tyrion 2
    Basically if a character is heavily flawed you claim they are a Jewish analogy and if perfect you claim they are a WASP analogy.

    Considering that they are fictional characters in what you likely suppose to be a Jewish dominated media, and you likely suppose that Jews are relentlessly self-aggrandising, you are obviously an idiot.

    Didn’t I call the WASPs alcoholics (Larry Tate) and naive (Herman Munster). Didn’t I call the negative Jewish characteristics stereotypes? Haven’t countless Jewish writers and comedians made countless jokes about those negative stereotypes.

    Get a grip.

  202. @Old Palo Altan
    The man (from the evidence of his wiki biography) seems to have stepped over the bounds from sophistication into drunkenness and sexual excess with nary a backward glance.

    Remarkable though that his last book was an inspiration for Bewitched, rather elegantly closing this particular circle.

    The man (from the evidence of his wiki biography) seems to have stepped over the bounds from sophistication into drunkenness and sexual excess with nary a backward glance.

    That’s a pretty good summary of the 1920s……

  203. @Jim Don Bob
    She struck me as a bitch even as a kid.

    She struck me as a bitch even as a kid.

    She was from LA, her father was an actor, her granddad was rich, and he jumped off the Brooklyn Bridge. What did you expect?

  204. @Old Palo Altan
    You beat me to it - I was going to say exactly that.

    "Great chemistry" You either have it or you don't, and those two definitely did, while the other two (who were they now?) definitely did not.

    On the other hand, given that my memories go back further than those of most of you here, I confess that my all time favourite couple was Anne Jeffreys and Robert Sterling in Topper.
    Sophistication as well as great chemistry - that's the ticket.

    Sophistication as well as great chemistry – that’s the ticket.

    It’s painful to watch two talented “sophisticates” who don’t mesh on stage, screen, or record, even though they may get along perfectly well and even worship each other. Notable instances are Judy Garland singing Cole Porter songs in The Pirate, and Ella Fitzgerald’s tribute album to Antonio Carlos Jobim.

  205. @Jim Don Bob
    How about Fred Gwynne and Joe E. Ross, in Car 54, Where are You? I can still sing the theme song.

    I could never keep Joe E Ross, Joe E Lewis, and Joe E Brown straight. It was hard enough keeping George E Jessel distinct.

    Do E Michael Jones and E Christian Kopff share the same E? I once stood between the two, but was afraid to ask.

  206. @D. K.
    Easily the best episode of "Gilligan's Island"-- and co-directed by the great Ida Lupino, no less!

    http://gilligan.wikia.com/wiki/The_Producer

    ***

    Harold Hecuba - "You call yourselves actors!?"

    Gilligan - "I don't call myself an actor."

    Harold Hecuba - "If I say you're an actor you're an actor!"

    Gilligan - "Ok! I'm an actor!"

    Harold Hecuba - "Believe me, you are no actor!"

    ***

    Oops, sorry, D.K., not laughing at you, laughing at the exchange between Harold and Gilligan.

    Back when silly was fun. And back when fun was to be had without any hipster irony.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    I always have remembered that exchange, which was first broadcast a week before my tenth birthday, "long ago and far away." The reason, though, that I loved that particular episode was, of course, the musical version of "Hamlet" that they staged.
  207. @Kylie
    Oops, sorry, D.K., not laughing at you, laughing at the exchange between Harold and Gilligan.

    Back when silly was fun. And back when fun was to be had without any hipster irony.

    I always have remembered that exchange, which was first broadcast a week before my tenth birthday, “long ago and far away.” The reason, though, that I loved that particular episode was, of course, the musical version of “Hamlet” that they staged.

  208. @syonredux
    For that matter, what happened to great TV show intros?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tO0Vq4fj3ho

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qbim6I51G4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kP5wonZRJKA

    What, Seinfeld’s nondescript bass doesn’t rank up there for the ages?

    Just kidding of course.

  209. @Seth
    Isn’t there a show called “Black Jesus” based on this premise?

    Possibly, sorry, don’t know. But there are several black personalities who have shown a willingness to talk about this sort of thing as long as it doesn’t come off looking anti-black.

  210. @Steve Sailer
    How about an out of the closet "Gomer Pyle?"

    Roseann Barr does a bit about how when you are an adult going back to watch an old show, it's hard to overlook how gay the Gomer Pyle character is.

    Please, I knew he was gay even before I knew what gay was.

  211. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "In the defense of the former view, I don’t recall that many animated shows from the same era."

    What do you mean?

    The Flintstones; the Jetsons; Abbott and Costello; Top Hat; the Chan Clan; even Hong Kong Fooey. Speed Racer (a Trans-LUX global distribution) was '66-'67. Trans-LUX also distributed Hercules as well. '65 was I think, the first animated special of Peanuts (It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown).

    Tobor, the 8 Man; Astro Boy; Prince Planet…. shown on the same UHF station that showed Speed Racer years after they were acquired from Japan and badly dubbed.

  212. @Father O'Hara
    I dont know if Paul Lynde was a comic genius,( let Dear Leader and other wise men judge him) but I will say his work on Hollywood Squares was first rate comedy!
    Being gay couldn't really be acknowledged,or one could get away away w/o acknowledging it,so when Lynde was asked these sleazy,leering questions he would answer in a way that is as perceived as nongay,but everyone,who was wise,knew to be EXTREMELY GAY! The implicit subtext of monstrously sexual depredations,which we were pretending didn't exist,was sick humor at its best!

    “Paul, you are the world’s biggest fruit. What are you?”

    “Humbled.”

    Genius.

  213. @Anon
    This video of the #ScienceMustFall meeting is initially hilarious, but I wonder if it's just another thing like transgenderism that seems ridiculous now, but will come to haunt us in the future.

    I don't mean in the sense that science will stop being used, but more in the way like in Canada they must pay obeisance to First Nations in all kinds of silly ways, and teach alternative ways of thought as though they were in some way anything other than folklore.

    Also, the cultural revolutionesque struggle session nature of the meeting is scary. "Apologize to the panel for your saying that witchcraft is not true!"

    Transgenderists are perfectly intelligent if mentally ill white people who are going through what Buddy Cole assures us is just a very long phase. Here you look into the shadows of the jungle. There is no reason to expect these people to “grow out of it.” They’ve maintained it longer than people have worshipped Christ and see nothing in modernity to make them change their minds.

  214. @SonOfStrom
    Johnny Quest is ably and enjoyably spoofed by Cartoon Network’s The Venture Brothers, which just started its seventh season this month:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Venture_Bros.

    Johnny Quest is ably and enjoyably spoofed by Cartoon Network’s The Venture Brothers, which just started its seventh season this month:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Venture_Bros.

    The Venture Brothers makes a pretty good post-modern parody of Jonny Quest (with the adult Jonny Quest, a drug addict, occasionally appearing on the show). It’s now in season seven which I think is a minor miracle considering the amount of people who would even remember Jonny Quest and would enjoy a knock off must be extremely small.

  215. @MEH 0910
    Season 7 Starts Aug 5th | The Venture Bros. S7 | Adult Swim
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnCWXGYeGfs

    [ad] Carvel Cakes Giveaway | The Venture Bros. | Adult Swim

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