The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Peter Beinart Exposes Marty Peretz's Bias at TNR for Grooming His Fellow Straight White Men
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From The Atlantic:

Reflections of an Affirmative-Action Baby

White men from fancy schools advanced quickly at the New Republic. Asking how much of their success was due to race, gender, and class would have meant asking the same of myself.

PETER BEINART 11:38 AM ET CULTURE

In 1991, the African American Yale Law School professor Stephen Carter wrote a book called Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby. I remember reading part of it at the time. Little did I realize that the book’s title applied to me.

Two years after Carter published his book, I joined the New Republic as a summer intern. I was thrilled. I had been reading the magazine since high school, and idolized its most prominent writers: Michael Kinsley, Hendrik Hertzberg, Andrew Sullivan, Michael Lewis, Michael Kelly, and, yes, Leon Wieseltier, who last month was accused of sexual misconduct by more than a dozen of his former colleagues. If someone had made TNR writers into baseball cards, by age 15 I would have had a complete set.

I considered myself qualified. Because I’d spent years mimicking TNR’s writing style, I had the right sort of clips. But as a white man graduating from an Ivy League school, I also had the right sort of identity. It was difficult to disentangle the two. And I didn’t really try.

… Asking how much of their success was due to race, gender, and class—as opposed to merit—would have meant asking the same of myself.

At some level, I knew the answer. White men from fancy schools advanced quickly at the New Republic because that’s who the owner and editor in chief, Marty Peretz, liked surrounding himself with. He ignored women almost entirely. There were barely any African Americans on staff, which is hardly surprising given that in 1994—after my internship and before I returned to the magazine as managing editor—TNR published an excerpt of Charles Murray and Richard Herrnstein’s book, The Bell Curve (along with a series of critical responses). Marty felt a particular hostility to affirmative action. The irony—which I didn’t dwell on at the time—was that the magazine was itself a hothouse of racial and sexual preference.

Mr. Beinart is reticent about spelling out what sexual preference of Marty Peretz’s made TNR into a sexual hothouse. Granted, Marty married a couple of heiresses. The second one’s money allowed him to buy The New Republic. But Peretz took a profound, almost what you’d call Ancient Athenian interest in mentoring bright young men, presumably platonically.

Also, it really helped Marty’s enthusiasm level if the bright young men loved Israel almost as ardently as Marty did, which put a bit of an ethnic tilt on things. As I reported in 2008:

It all started in 1965 when Al [Gore] was a 17-year-old [Harvard] freshman and Marty his 26-year-old political science professor. Bob Zelnick, Gore’s biographer, wrote:

“Perhaps the most significant friendship Gore formed at Harvard was with his resident instructor, Martin Peretz …”

Of course, the depths of Peretz’s passion can be exaggerated. After all, as late as 1968, Gore didn’t make Peretz’s all time Top Three list, according to radical muckraker Alexander Cockburn’s book Al Gore: A User’s Manual:

“By 1968 Peretz was telling the late Blair Clark that ‘I have been in love only three times in my life. I was in love with my college roommate. I am in love with the state of Israel and I love Gene McCarthy.’”

Beinart continues:

Those racial and sexual preferences were never stated formally. But to a significant degree, they determined who felt comfortable at TNR and who won the favor of the people who ran it. To borrow Ta-Nehisi Coates’s metaphor, my race, gender, and class provided me a “tailwind.” I was running hard. But without that tailwind, it’s unlikely I would have become the magazine’s editor at age 28.

Okay, but besides “racial” and the vaguely stated “sexual preferences,” did Marty have any “ethnic” biases as well? Or was Peretz simply a White Nationalist using TNR to promote the interests of the white race as a whole? My recollection from reading TNR was that Marty had a different bias, but why bring up old news in an article about an old magazine?

Like Carter, I was a beneficiary of affirmative action. Except that his version remedied historic injustices. Mine perpetuated them.

The New Republic’s affirmative action enabled Leon Wieseltier’s sexual harassment, and Leon’s sexual harassment reinforced the magazine’s affirmative action. Men ran the magazine, and Leon’s behavior helped keep it that way. To ascend at TNR, you had to be a protégé of either Marty or Leon’s, or, at the very least, you had to be on decent terms with them. For men, that meant writing things they considered smart. For women, by contrast, mentorship was far trickier. Marty wasn’t an option.

Would it be possible for Mr. Beinart to expand on the sentence “Marty wasn’t an option”? Why not? What if you were a young straight man who found Marty’s mentorship creepy?

In this regard, I suspect, I have something in common with the supporters of Donald Trump. It’s not pleasant to realize that the bygone age you romanticize—the age when America was still great—was great for you, or people like you, because others were denied a fair shot. In the America of the 1950s, or even the 1980s, white, straight, native-born American men didn’t worry as much about competing with Salvadoran immigrants and Chinese factory workers and professional women and Joshua-generation African Americans.

It’s time to reveal that Marty Peretz at TNR was biased in favor of mentoring his Fellow Straight White Men.

Thus, when last heard from in 2010, Marty had retired to Tel Aviv where he was raving about the brilliant young people he was mentoring.

By the way, word counts from Beinart’s article say a lot about whom you are supposed to blame for the behavior of Peretz and Wieseltier:

White – Six

Jewish – Zero

Straight – One

Bisexual – Zero

PETER BEINART is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and an associate professor of journalism and political science at the City University of New York.

More broadly, TNR’s vaguely Ancient Athens vibe of an older man mentoring bright young men was so noticeable in part because it was fairly rare. Since I started writing for the Opinion Industry around 1990, my experience has been that most of my editors have been women. When I was sending out a lot of op-eds to American newspapers in the first half of the 1990s, most of the local op-ed editors who picked my submissions were women.

In general in the Opinion Business, men come up with ideas and women choose which ideas get published.

On a related 20th Century magazine owner topic, what’s the story behind all the rumors you used to hear about the late Malcolm Forbes and young men (young men other than his six sons)?

I found a 1990 column on the subject by … Donald Trump:

Sometimes journalistic attacks have little to do with the pursuit of truth. They are personal vendettas disguised as objective reporting. The cover story that Forbes magazine did on me in its May 14, 1990, issue is a case in point. ”How Much Is Donald Trump Worth?” the headline asked. The answer, according to Forbes, was about $500 million – or much less than the $1.7 billion the magazine had said I was worth a year before. The story painted a portrait of me as a besieged businessman who was getting by mostly on chutzpah.

I do have plenty of chutzpah, and there was no question that my business interests, like those of almost everyone else in a bad economy, were going through a period of strain, but beyond that, the article was willfully wrong. …

It has always amazed me that people pay so much attention to Forbes magazine. Every year the ”Forbes 400” comes out, and people talk about it as if it were a rigorously researched compilation of America’s wealthiest people instead of what it really is: a sloppy, highly arbitrary estimate of certain people’s net worth. Often, how well you fared on that list depended greatly on the state of your personal relationship with the editor, the late Malcolm Forbes. …

I also saw a double standard in the way he lived openly as a homosexual – which he had every right to do – but expected the media and his famous friends to cover for him. Malcolm and the Forbes family no doubt sensed my coolness toward them, and for that reason and also because I never advertised much in Forbes magazine, they were not great admirers of Donald Trump.

Trump relates some Celebrity Yacht Porn about how Forbes was jealous of him because the yacht he bought from international arms dealer Adnan Kashoggi made Forbes’ celebrated yacht look like a rowboat. (Celebrity Yacht Porn gossip is an underexploited genre.)

What really ruined our relationship, though, was an incident, only a short time before Forbes died, involving a couple of his young male companions. I was working in my office late one afternoon when I got a call from one of my people at the Plaza Hotel. The man said that Malcolm wanted to bring two young men who appeared to be well under the legal drinking age into the Oak Room Bar. Normally, my staff would ask anyone who appeared to be under age to take a seat at a table if he wanted to have a club soda or a Coke. But because my executive had recognized Malcolm and knew that he and I were acquaintances, he hesitated and decided to call me for further instructions.

I didn’t have to think about the matter for very long.

”Please nicely convince Mr. Forbes that it would be better for him to go to another room, such as the Palm Court,” I said. There was not much reason for debate, as I saw it, because we were talking about compliance with the state liquor laws. Malcolm, however, was outraged that he hadn’t received special treatment. The next day he called and screamed at me, saying that I’d treated him shabbily, embarrassed him publicly – and that he would get even with me.

 
Hide 91 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. The Z Blog says: • Website

    Granted, Marty, the owner, liked to marry heiresses. But he took a profound, almost what you’d call Ancient Athenian interest in mentoring bright young men, presumably platonic. Also, it really helped if the bright young men loved Israel almost as ardently as Marty did, which put a bit of an ethnic tilt on things.

    In one of my podcasts, I made the point that most of the famous guys in the commentariat had to look down at the pillow, and make a decision.

    I was being a smart ass, but, well, we live in a funny age.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/beinart-marty-peretzs-bias-at-tnr-for-his-fellow-straight-white-men/#comment-2078611
    More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  2. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Beinart was disappointing in this one–he’s usually a little more honest about things, especially with respect to his concern that younger Jews aren’t able to abide with the hypocrisy of their parents’ generation with respect to Israel, i.e., supporting a reactionary and nationalistic Israel while being at the vanguard of multiculturalism and “progress” in the U.S. Younger Jews will abandon Israel before they abandon their SJW status.

    Of course, Peretz’s blind adherence to all things Israel was blatant and public and became an embarrassment even to many Israeli-firsters, so Beinart is being disingenuous to the nth degree by not spelling that out in this piece. The business of Peretz’s homosexuality probably was a lot less important. Peretz was perfectly fine compromising his love of young men when it suited him–Israel, never.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  3. OT 1

    http://www.tabletmag.com/scroll/249414/hatreon-a-crowdfunding-site-for-bigots-is-exhibit-a-for-why-kicking-them-off-social-platforms-doesnt-solve-the-problem

    In August, when Hatreon first went live but before it fully launched, alt-right luminary Richard Spencer began pulling in a modest $85 per month. Today, just a few short months later, he clocks in at $918 per month and counting. Back in August, Andrew Anglin, proprietor of the neo-Nazi Daily Stormer, was taking in $700 a month from fans. Today, he is raking in $7,739 a month, or a whopping $92,868 a year.

    The success of Hatreon offers a cautionary corrective to those who argue that the solution to online hate is simply to censor it. Setting aside the free speech concerns raised by such an approach—who decides what is hateful?—it is not actually adequate on today’s internet.

    Much like European bans of Holocaust denial have utterly failed to eradicate Holocaust denial and anti-Semitism, social media bans of bigots will not succeed in silencing their sentiments. Ultimately, there is no shortcut to beating back bad ideas; they must be overcome with better ideas.

    Yair Rosenberg is a senior writer at Tablet and the editor of the English-language blog of the Israeli National Archives.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  4. syonredux says:

    Mr. Beinart is reticent about spelling out what sexual preference of Marty Peretz’s made TNR into a sexual hothouse. Granted, Marty, the owner, liked to marry heiresses. But he took a profound, almost what you’d call Ancient Athenian interest in mentoring bright young men, presumably platonic. Also, it really helped if the bright young men loved Israel almost as ardently as Marty did, which put a bit of an ethnic tilt on things.

    Yeah, I noticed the curious incident of the dog in the night-time myself. But I imagine that bringing-up Gay favoritism would mean going against the narrative (“Gays are an oppressed class, struggling under the weight of cis-het privilege”). I guess that even Kevin Spacey hasn’t changed that…

    In this regard, I suspect, I have something in common with the supporters of Donald Trump. It’s not pleasant to realize that the bygone age you romanticize—the age when America was still great—was great for you, or people like you, because others were denied a fair shot.

    Or maybe it was great because of you….You know White guys like the Wright Bros, John Bardeen, Claude Shannon, Jack Kilby….Of course, I’m sure that they owe their achievements to their White Skin privilege….I mean, we all know that Black STEM genius has been cruelly suppressed by the White Cis-Het Patriarchy…

    Except for among the ultra-rich, the American pie is not expanding all that much. And so a lot of white American men look at Barack Obama, and Hillary Clinton, and mass immigration, and the global competition for jobs, and the taking down of Confederate monuments, and even the revolt against sexual harassment, and fear all this means there will be less left for them. And they experience these attacks on their privilege as a desecration of the natural order, an attack on institutions that benefited them and to which they felt deep loyalty in return.

    Gosh, Beinert old boy, I wonder who actually built those institutions in the first place…..I suppose that they just emerged out of the the magic dirt on which they stand….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes

    so a lot of white American men look at Barack Obama, and Hillary Clinton, and mass immigration, and the global competition for jobs, and the taking down of Confederate monuments, and even the revolt against sexual harassment, and fear all this means there will be less left for them. And they experience these attacks on their privilege as a desecration of the natural order, an attack on institutions that benefited them and to which they felt deep loyalty in return.
     
    A victim of mass immigration and the global competition for jobs--that's quite the privilege!

    Personally, I don't find Barack and Hillary to be a part of white, male privilege--your results may vary.

    The revolt against sexual harassment appears to occurring amongst Jewish males in Hollywood--not exactly a flyover America phenomena.

    For a whip-smart writer, he's wildly off the mark. But must keep up The Narrative.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. So when men are given an illegitimate avenue to promotion and opportunity they’re privileged and the victims are all the poor women left out but when women are allowed to exchange sex for advancement they’re victims and men are privileged to be left out?

    Do I have that straight?

    Is there any chance whatsover of coming out of all these scandals with a commitment to a meritocracy completely neutral with regards to race, sex, ethnicity, religion, age, etc. and performed in a the most transparent rational way possible? Or is it just going to be more conservatives turned feminist because it gives them an opportunity to attack liberals and jews.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    "Is there any chance whatsover of coming out of all these scandals with a commitment to a meritocracy completely neutral with regards to race, sex, ethnicity, religion, age, etc. and performed in a the most transparent rational way possible?"

    IMHO no. Because many if not most of the measures of merit are contested and not transparent, people are tribal, and Civilization is hard. Maybe if we lived for 1000 years we'd have more concern over the conditions 100 years hence. Instead we live for 80, maybe, and so are concerned about the next 7 0r 8. Humans have more foresight than most animals, but it is limited.
    , @guest
    Are we ever going to meritocratic? No. That's like asking if society will ever be colorblind.

    Would we want pure meritocracy even if it were achievable? I don't think so. Why can't their be an exclusive, Ivy League, D.C., homo, liberal rag? Let them write to the .0001% of the population that cares.

    About conservatives turning feminist when it hurts lefties, that's just good tactics. They do it all the time.

    More importantly, on some level conservatives and feminists believe the same thing, though both are loathe to say it out loud. Public lives and femininity don't mix. Women need protection (like we all do in some circumstances), and a lot of them would be better off not trying to be men.

    Of course, the feminine solution, which is to either drive men out or make them bend the knee, is bad. And we're not going back to having them barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen. But it would be nice to acknowledge that they need patriarchy.
    , @Kevin C.

    Is there any chance whatsover of coming out of all these scandals with a commitment to a meritocracy completely neutral with regards to race, sex, ethnicity, religion, age, etc. and performed in a the most transparent rational way possible?
     
    No. Next question.
    , @SimplePseudonymicHandle
    I'll disagree with the others who replied.
    It is possible - for awhile. Surely not forever, but as a natural recoil force, yes, it's possible, but it isn't inevitable either.
    Here's how it's possible.
    Men of good will need to be able to withdraw from current institutions and form their own. In the past we've had geographies to wall ourselves behind - that may not be possible, or necessary, this time.

    Men would need to swear off the coin of the realm - create their own. They'd have to swear off existing institutions and form their own. That means paying more for goods and services for the privilege of being a part of a fair system that honors your dignity and others who participate. It means doing with less.

    People say it isn't possible but the awfulness of the current system is what makes it possible - that awfulness is the impetus for men to join forces and combine will to create something new and that has integrity. Such a community of institutions, possibly with its own coin - based on integrity - will sap productive energy from the current corrupt system while providing a strong alternative as the corrupt system grows weak.

    The biggest threat to this coming to pass is, well, one: lack of imagination and naysayers - but those can be overcome because there's plenty of historical precedent, but two: the government acts against this ... all the restrictions we have on freedom of association are already steps government has taken in advance to stymie this kind of project.

    But you should be encouraged by that: the government wouldn't put so many factors in the way of preventing the rise of independent institutions in a competing social-economic system ... if the government didn't recognize it as a threat, and it wouldn't be a threat ... if it were not possible.

    At day end - if we live in a society where men, as a group, are not permitted to withdraw and bond together and form their own new, better, high integrity organizations ... if the attempt proves that this is truly not to be allowed, then we will know something and we should confront our society and government with it: we no longer live in a free society.

    A society where only automatons can withdraw, isn't free.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    By the way, word counts from Beinart’s article that say a lot about whom you are supposed to walk away from reading and blame:

    What does it say about the intelligence of Americans that most of them are not going to see through this transparent rhetorical sleight of hand?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Ah, but no one is telling white America that they are watching a magic show, which makes it far harder to notice.

    Stupid and gullible are not always the same thing.
    , @anon
    What does it say about the intelligence of Americans that most of them are not going to see through this transparent rhetorical sleight of hand?

    Look at it this way. Almost nobody in America is going to read this article, because almost nobody reads the Atlantic. So whatever you want to say about Americans, it's more important to think that nobody allegedly in the smart set is going to see through it. Either Americans are even dumber than you thought, or the "smart" ones aren't the ones really in the know.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. prosa123 says: • Website

    One of these stories that just doesn’t surprise me.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  8. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Mr. Beinart is reticent about spelling out what sexual preference of Marty Peretz’s made TNR into a sexual hothouse. Granted, Marty, the owner, liked to marry heiresses. But he took a profound, almost what you’d call Ancient Athenian interest in mentoring bright young men, presumably platonic. Also, it really helped if the bright young men loved Israel almost as ardently as Marty did, which put a bit of an ethnic tilt on things. As I reported in 2008:

    So he’s basically saying that it was like if Richard Spencer owned and edited TNR, except with Israel rather than Russia as the country of devotion?

    Read More
    • LOL: IHTG
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  9. JohnnyD says:

    Obviously, being black has done nothing for Ta-Nehisi Coates’s career…

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  10. Ghg says:

    Steve Sailer, sometimes I love you, you sarcastic basted.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  11. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    Unless you got in to the Ivy League because your father made a 7-figure donation to the school (as alleged about Jared Kushner), being a white Ivy League alumnus signals merit, which makes this essay a humble brag by Beinart (because he said “Ivy League” and not “Harvard”, I’m assuming Beinart didn’t go to Harvard).

    Re the Marty Peretz business: you’ve been hinting about some gayness between him and his protégés for years, including here. It sounds plausible. But now that the dam has broken after Weinstein, Spacey, Wieseltier and the rest, why hasn’t Peretz been fingered yet? What’s the more likely reason: that he didn’t molest or demand sexual favors from his protégés, or that they’re too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    that they’re too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    Would you admit that? I mean, you can imagine what some starlet would say if someone asked her why she went along with Weinstein's advances (not that anyone would, of course). She could just say that she figured that's how business was done in Hollywood, and if she wanted a career in Hollywood, she'd have to give it up to some other producer, if not Weinstein.

    I think if you were a male magazine writer, you'd have a much harder time convincing people that the entire industry is run by gay men who are into younger guys, and there just wasn't any other publisher you could have gone to.

    Plus, nobody really expects a woman to be able to fight off a man, if he's determined enough. If a man comes on to another man, and the "victim" doesn't give him a black eye at the very least, everyone's going to assume he wanted it. If they were kids, it'd be different. But these were adult men.

    , @kaganovitch
    "(because he said “Ivy League” and not “Harvard”, I’m assuming Beinart didn’t go to Harvard). "

    Yale and Oxford, poor chap.
    , @PiltdownMan

    ...which makes this essay a humble brag by Beinart (because he said “Ivy League” and not “Harvard”, I’m assuming Beinart didn’t go to Harvard).
     
    He went to Yale and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford.

    From Wikipedia:


    Beinart was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States, in 1971. His parents were Jewish immigrants from South Africa (his maternal grandfather was from Russia, and his maternal grandmother, who was Sephardic, was from Egypt). His father's parents were from Lithuania. His mother, Doreen (née Pienaar), is former director of the Harvard's Human Rights film series at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and his father, Julian Beinart, is a former professor of architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His stepfather is theatre critic and playwright Robert Brustein. Beinart attended Buckingham Browne and Nichols School in Cambridge. He then studied history and political science at Yale University, where he was a member of the Yale Political Union, and graduated in 1993. He was a Rhodes Scholar at University College, Oxford University, where he earned an M.Phil. in international relations in 1995.
     
    Also, from the Weekly Standard just a few hours ago...

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/peter-beinart-must-resign/article/2010475

    , @ic1000
    #11. Perceptive, amusing, and on topic. +1
    , @Art Deco
    or that they’re too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    Richard Just and Andrew Sullivan are very explicit about their homosexuality. The rest of Peretz one time deputies were all married with children bar Michael Kinsley, whose wife was 45 when they were married.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. It’s not pleasant to realize that the bygone age you romanticize—the age when America was still great—was great for you, or people like you, because others were denied a fair shot.

    First, that’s mostly BS.

    Second, the obvious cure for such blatant racism is to have ethnostates. Granted that doesn’t get rid of sexism or classism, but you have to start somewhere – and, at least, you’re discriminating against your own, which, according to Beinart and his ilk, is better than discriminating against others, except in the case of Jews who are more than free to discriminate against goys.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  13. @Anonymous

    By the way, word counts from Beinart’s article that say a lot about whom you are supposed to walk away from reading and blame:
     
    What does it say about the intelligence of Americans that most of them are not going to see through this transparent rhetorical sleight of hand?

    Ah, but no one is telling white America that they are watching a magic show, which makes it far harder to notice.

    Stupid and gullible are not always the same thing.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Anonymouse says: • Website

    I met Marty Peretz in 1959 when I was a graduate student in Classics at Harvard. He cultivated me as a friend and took me, for example, one time to an exotic locale, a Boston bar, after hours, frequented by politicians and mobsters, where red wine was served in club soda bottles. I was an immature 25 year old, Marty then with a teaching position of some sort at Brandeis about the same age. I backed away from our inchoate friendship because he had the habit of denigrating from time to time our mutual New York City jewish background in a neurotic spirit of self-hate. It is hard to recall precisely the way I found it unbearable. I vaguely remember thinking that I did not come up to Harvard to be thrust back into the self-hating neuroticism of the New York City jewish sensibility. I don’t remember any sexual overtones to the relationship.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    I vaguely remember thinking that I did not come up to Harvard to be thrust back into the self-hating neuroticism of the New York City jewish sensibility.

    Man. Wouldn't it be neat if they still hated themselves?

    where red wine was served in club soda bottles.

    That's weird. Was that some kind of fad, or what? Were you pretending it was Prohibition?

    , @Art Deco
    Martin Peretz was 20 years old in 1959.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. But as a white man graduating from an Ivy League school, I also had the right sort of identity. It was difficult to disentangle the two. And I didn’t really try.

    Oy Vey!!!

    Dear Fellow White Man indeed!!!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  16. So which of these characters is homosexual? All of them?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  17. If Jews won’t stand up for their prior actions and take their just deserts then they will be kicked around forever. You can like that or lump it. It’s the nature of the Universe.

    If they’re too cowardly to own their faults then they’re too cowardly to stick up for themselves. That is The Law.

    A person cannot run from or deny who he is and then come back and expect to be given back his lost integrity and identity through the recognition of others.

    “A coward dies a thousand deaths but the brave man dies but once.”

    How can we trust someone who is willing to abandon and forsake himself?

    Before you censor me for saying something “nasty” about Jews, just stop and think about what I have said.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  18. Have to say, sometimes Trump’s observations about competitors, rivals, even NY society people are well reasoned, lucid, and always quite candid.

    If there was one person who could write about Celebrity Yacht Porn, it would have to be a person who tends to take ironic noticing to the next level.

    Also, why is it that oftentimes academics, intellectuals, etc whenever they tend to complain about things such as race, affirmative action, etc seem to nearly always focus the subject on bad, evil, straight white men? The tone of these humorless diatribes tend to sound effeminate, and less than alpha in all things. One gets this image of all things African-American being defended by intellectuals who haven’t had a drop of genuine testosterone flowing through their veins in decades.

    But Celebrity Yacht Porn stories would be the twenty-first’s century version of Noel Coward: Always interesting as well as revealing about the class it notices.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  19. Why is it that, in this day and age of political correctness and ultra-tolerance, no one ever points out that these “White Heterosexual Males” were either not actually heterosexual, not “white” (ethnically speaking; meaning either Jewish, Arab, etc.), or sometimes both? If anything, this should be shouted and displayed loudly, showing off how diverse these workplaces actually were in spite of homophobia and/or anti-Semitism!

    Interesting to note is that the opposite seems to happen with black folks. Poorly educated criminal in life, but after death a hero and honor student with a bright future ahead. Half-white, half-Kenyan, straight man before presidency; (heavily rumored) gay African American possibly married to a transgender woman after presidency!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  20. Phil says:

    OT: the Roy Moore yearbook note seems fishy

    http://xoxohth.com/thread.php?thread_id=3797048&mc=103&forum_id=2

    Among other things, the 7′s and the Y’s aren’t consistent through the note

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Among other things, the 7′s and the Y’s aren’t consistent through the note
     
    Are there superscripts, too?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. I don’t quite understand Trump’s anecdote. What’s the significance of the Palm Court?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Presumably, it was a restaurant. I don't recall ever going to it, but I did go to the Oak Room a few times in the late '90s for work. That was a bar where they'd also let you smoke cigars, IIRC.
    , @Forbes
    It was a restaurant in the hotel lobby, adjacent to the Oak Room Bar.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymouse
    I met Marty Peretz in 1959 when I was a graduate student in Classics at Harvard. He cultivated me as a friend and took me, for example, one time to an exotic locale, a Boston bar, after hours, frequented by politicians and mobsters, where red wine was served in club soda bottles. I was an immature 25 year old, Marty then with a teaching position of some sort at Brandeis about the same age. I backed away from our inchoate friendship because he had the habit of denigrating from time to time our mutual New York City jewish background in a neurotic spirit of self-hate. It is hard to recall precisely the way I found it unbearable. I vaguely remember thinking that I did not come up to Harvard to be thrust back into the self-hating neuroticism of the New York City jewish sensibility. I don't remember any sexual overtones to the relationship.

    I vaguely remember thinking that I did not come up to Harvard to be thrust back into the self-hating neuroticism of the New York City jewish sensibility.

    Man. Wouldn’t it be neat if they still hated themselves?

    where red wine was served in club soda bottles.

    That’s weird. Was that some kind of fad, or what? Were you pretending it was Prohibition?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    That’s weird. Was that some kind of fad, or what? Were you pretending it was Prohibition?
     
    Prohibition may have been repealed but it is New England after all. They have to be wary of attack by mobs of blue nosed puritans if they imbibe too publicly.
    , @Jack D
    In those days, Italian-Americans drank mostly "jug wine" - cheap California wine that was sold in gallon bottles (you can still get this stuff). Or else they made their own from grapes shipped in each year at harvest time from California. A gallon bottle is a little unwieldy to pour from at the table so you decant it into smaller bottles such as soda bottles. Homemade wine gets bottled in whatever bottles are available. At that time, most Americans didn't drink dry table wine at all. The past is a different country.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous

    By the way, word counts from Beinart’s article that say a lot about whom you are supposed to walk away from reading and blame:
     
    What does it say about the intelligence of Americans that most of them are not going to see through this transparent rhetorical sleight of hand?

    What does it say about the intelligence of Americans that most of them are not going to see through this transparent rhetorical sleight of hand?

    Look at it this way. Almost nobody in America is going to read this article, because almost nobody reads the Atlantic. So whatever you want to say about Americans, it’s more important to think that nobody allegedly in the smart set is going to see through it. Either Americans are even dumber than you thought, or the “smart” ones aren’t the ones really in the know.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux
    Well, here's a more palatable piece from the Atlantic:

    Yet let us not forget the sex crimes of which the younger, stronger Bill Clinton was very credibly accused in the 1990s. Juanita Broaddrick reported that when she was a volunteer on one of his gubernatorial campaigns, she had arranged to meet him in a hotel coffee shop. At the last minute, he had changed the location to her room in the hotel, where she says he very violently raped her. She said that she fought against Clinton throughout a rape that left her bloodied. At a different Arkansas hotel, he caught sight of a minor state employee named Paula Jones, and, Jones said, he sent a couple of state troopers to invite her to his suite, where he exposed his penis to her and told her to kiss it. Kathleen Willey said that she met him in the Oval Office for personal and professional advice and that he groped her, rubbed his erect penis on her, and pushed her hand to his crotch.

    It was a pattern of behavior; it included an alleged violent assault; the women involved had far more credible evidence than many of the most notorious accusations that have come to light in the past five weeks. But Clinton was not left to the swift and pitiless justice that today’s accused men have experienced. Rather, he was rescued by a surprising force: machine feminism. The movement had by then ossified into a partisan operation, and it was willing—eager—to let this friend of the sisterhood enjoy a little droit de seigneur.
     

    The notorious 1998 New York Times op-ed by Gloria Steinem must surely stand as one of the most regretted public actions of her life. It slut-shamed, victim-blamed, and age-shamed; it urged compassion for and gratitude to the man the women accused. Moreover (never write an op-ed in a hurry; you’ll accidentally say what you really believe), it characterized contemporary feminism as a weaponized auxiliary of the Democratic Party.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/11/reckoning-with-bill-clintons-sex-crimes/545729/?utm_source=feed#article-comments
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. benjaminl says:
    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's quite possible that Peretz kept his hands off the help and just admired their youthful energy and quest for knowledge, the way Socrates enjoyed having young Alcibiades around.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    That was great. Thanks for sharing.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. There were barely any African Americans on staff, which is hardly surprising…
    a hothouse of racial and sexual preference

    Plenty of Freudian fertilizer in Beinart as well.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  26. @benjaminl
    Ferguson's Beinart profile;


    https://www.commentarymagazine.com/articles/press-man-pundit-declined/

    It’s quite possible that Peretz kept his hands off the help and just admired their youthful energy and quest for knowledge, the way Socrates enjoyed having young Alcibiades around.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    "possible that Peretz kept his hands off the help"

    Agree. He was in a position to advance their careers but that doesn't mean that he coerced them in any way.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  27. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Dave Pinsen
    Unless you got in to the Ivy League because your father made a 7-figure donation to the school (as alleged about Jared Kushner), being a white Ivy League alumnus signals merit, which makes this essay a humble brag by Beinart (because he said "Ivy League" and not "Harvard", I'm assuming Beinart didn't go to Harvard).

    Re the Marty Peretz business: you've been hinting about some gayness between him and his protégés for years, including here. It sounds plausible. But now that the dam has broken after Weinstein, Spacey, Wieseltier and the rest, why hasn't Peretz been fingered yet? What's the more likely reason: that he didn't molest or demand sexual favors from his protégés, or that they're too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    that they’re too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    Would you admit that? I mean, you can imagine what some starlet would say if someone asked her why she went along with Weinstein’s advances (not that anyone would, of course). She could just say that she figured that’s how business was done in Hollywood, and if she wanted a career in Hollywood, she’d have to give it up to some other producer, if not Weinstein.

    I think if you were a male magazine writer, you’d have a much harder time convincing people that the entire industry is run by gay men who are into younger guys, and there just wasn’t any other publisher you could have gone to.

    Plus, nobody really expects a woman to be able to fight off a man, if he’s determined enough. If a man comes on to another man, and the “victim” doesn’t give him a black eye at the very least, everyone’s going to assume he wanted it. If they were kids, it’d be different. But these were adult men.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Well, not exactly the same thing, but Terry Crewes, President Camacho himself, recently admitted to having been groped by a male Hollywood exec and not giving him a black eye.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  28. Luke Lea says:

    Isn’t Beinhart the one who recently came out against Western civilization, in the wake of Trump’s speech in Poland? Or am I getting him mixed up with someone else?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  29. @Phil
    OT: the Roy Moore yearbook note seems fishy

    http://xoxohth.com/thread.php?thread_id=3797048&mc=103&forum_id=2

    Among other things, the 7's and the Y's aren't consistent through the note

    Among other things, the 7′s and the Y’s aren’t consistent through the note

    Are there superscripts, too?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  30. @Guy de Champlagne
    So when men are given an illegitimate avenue to promotion and opportunity they're privileged and the victims are all the poor women left out but when women are allowed to exchange sex for advancement they're victims and men are privileged to be left out?

    Do I have that straight?

    Is there any chance whatsover of coming out of all these scandals with a commitment to a meritocracy completely neutral with regards to race, sex, ethnicity, religion, age, etc. and performed in a the most transparent rational way possible? Or is it just going to be more conservatives turned feminist because it gives them an opportunity to attack liberals and jews.

    “Is there any chance whatsover of coming out of all these scandals with a commitment to a meritocracy completely neutral with regards to race, sex, ethnicity, religion, age, etc. and performed in a the most transparent rational way possible?”

    IMHO no. Because many if not most of the measures of merit are contested and not transparent, people are tribal, and Civilization is hard. Maybe if we lived for 1000 years we’d have more concern over the conditions 100 years hence. Instead we live for 80, maybe, and so are concerned about the next 7 0r 8. Humans have more foresight than most animals, but it is limited.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    "Civilization is hard"

    Indeed it is, but you speak as if there's some essential connection between civilization and the relatively new, never actually implemented impersonate, meritocratic liberal order. But civilization has been sustained longer, and better, by favoritism, nepotism, and all manner of non-meritocratic associations.

    I, for one, could not care less that some sort of Our Crowd runs the New Republic. It sucks, but it would likely also suck if they hired applicants with the highest GPA, SATs, journalism awards, or whatever
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. @Dave Pinsen
    Unless you got in to the Ivy League because your father made a 7-figure donation to the school (as alleged about Jared Kushner), being a white Ivy League alumnus signals merit, which makes this essay a humble brag by Beinart (because he said "Ivy League" and not "Harvard", I'm assuming Beinart didn't go to Harvard).

    Re the Marty Peretz business: you've been hinting about some gayness between him and his protégés for years, including here. It sounds plausible. But now that the dam has broken after Weinstein, Spacey, Wieseltier and the rest, why hasn't Peretz been fingered yet? What's the more likely reason: that he didn't molest or demand sexual favors from his protégés, or that they're too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    “(because he said “Ivy League” and not “Harvard”, I’m assuming Beinart didn’t go to Harvard). ”

    Yale and Oxford, poor chap.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  32. Ben H says:

    Its nice to see Peter working in a place like the Atlantic where we can be sure that Dave Frum and Jeff Goldberg can vouch that there’s no ethnic favoritism of any kind going on.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  33. syonredux says:
    @anon
    What does it say about the intelligence of Americans that most of them are not going to see through this transparent rhetorical sleight of hand?

    Look at it this way. Almost nobody in America is going to read this article, because almost nobody reads the Atlantic. So whatever you want to say about Americans, it's more important to think that nobody allegedly in the smart set is going to see through it. Either Americans are even dumber than you thought, or the "smart" ones aren't the ones really in the know.

    Well, here’s a more palatable piece from the Atlantic:

    Yet let us not forget the sex crimes of which the younger, stronger Bill Clinton was very credibly accused in the 1990s. Juanita Broaddrick reported that when she was a volunteer on one of his gubernatorial campaigns, she had arranged to meet him in a hotel coffee shop. At the last minute, he had changed the location to her room in the hotel, where she says he very violently raped her. She said that she fought against Clinton throughout a rape that left her bloodied. At a different Arkansas hotel, he caught sight of a minor state employee named Paula Jones, and, Jones said, he sent a couple of state troopers to invite her to his suite, where he exposed his penis to her and told her to kiss it. Kathleen Willey said that she met him in the Oval Office for personal and professional advice and that he groped her, rubbed his erect penis on her, and pushed her hand to his crotch.

    It was a pattern of behavior; it included an alleged violent assault; the women involved had far more credible evidence than many of the most notorious accusations that have come to light in the past five weeks. But Clinton was not left to the swift and pitiless justice that today’s accused men have experienced. Rather, he was rescued by a surprising force: machine feminism. The movement had by then ossified into a partisan operation, and it was willing—eager—to let this friend of the sisterhood enjoy a little droit de seigneur.

    The notorious 1998 New York Times op-ed by Gloria Steinem must surely stand as one of the most regretted public actions of her life. It slut-shamed, victim-blamed, and age-shamed; it urged compassion for and gratitude to the man the women accused. Moreover (never write an op-ed in a hurry; you’ll accidentally say what you really believe), it characterized contemporary feminism as a weaponized auxiliary of the Democratic Party.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/11/reckoning-with-bill-clintons-sex-crimes/545729/?utm_source=feed#article-comments

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    Isn't 20 years later just a bit late for a reckoning? What possible distraction does it serve, except to push the Clintons to the sidelines as no longer useful...

    It's not as if this reckoning was to happen were Hillary elected a year ago.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. @Dave Pinsen
    Unless you got in to the Ivy League because your father made a 7-figure donation to the school (as alleged about Jared Kushner), being a white Ivy League alumnus signals merit, which makes this essay a humble brag by Beinart (because he said "Ivy League" and not "Harvard", I'm assuming Beinart didn't go to Harvard).

    Re the Marty Peretz business: you've been hinting about some gayness between him and his protégés for years, including here. It sounds plausible. But now that the dam has broken after Weinstein, Spacey, Wieseltier and the rest, why hasn't Peretz been fingered yet? What's the more likely reason: that he didn't molest or demand sexual favors from his protégés, or that they're too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    …which makes this essay a humble brag by Beinart (because he said “Ivy League” and not “Harvard”, I’m assuming Beinart didn’t go to Harvard).

    He went to Yale and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford.

    From Wikipedia:

    Beinart was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States, in 1971. His parents were Jewish immigrants from South Africa (his maternal grandfather was from Russia, and his maternal grandmother, who was Sephardic, was from Egypt). His father’s parents were from Lithuania. His mother, Doreen (née Pienaar), is former director of the Harvard’s Human Rights film series at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and his father, Julian Beinart, is a former professor of architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His stepfather is theatre critic and playwright Robert Brustein. Beinart attended Buckingham Browne and Nichols School in Cambridge. He then studied history and political science at Yale University, where he was a member of the Yale Political Union, and graduated in 1993. He was a Rhodes Scholar at University College, Oxford University, where he earned an M.Phil. in international relations in 1995.

    Also, from the Weekly Standard just a few hours ago…

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/peter-beinart-must-resign/article/2010475

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I was at Yale when Beinart was there. I doubt that I ever met him, but I knew of him since I was at that time an assiduous reader of a vast swath of Yale student publications, and Beinart was very active. For all I know he might have just done either the Daily News or the Herald, but he was definitely one of the most prominent opinion writers during my time. I might be mixing things up entirely, but I do recall him rebuking Dean Donald Kagan of the Kagan-Nulands, but that was when Kagan was "right wing" and Beinart maybe did not yet see himself as representing the global ruling party. I would usually read Beinart's articles. He struck me as a bit of a prick, but as someone striving to be slightly "rational". It never struck me as at all surprising when Beinart went straight to all the ruling class publications.
    , @Dan Hayes
    Anonymous:

    I have remarkable little (if any) respect for the Weekly Standard but its suggestion that Beinart surrender his ill-deserved and ill-begotten privileges to someone from the sexual or not-connected downtrodden are spot-on!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  35. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @PiltdownMan

    ...which makes this essay a humble brag by Beinart (because he said “Ivy League” and not “Harvard”, I’m assuming Beinart didn’t go to Harvard).
     
    He went to Yale and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford.

    From Wikipedia:


    Beinart was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States, in 1971. His parents were Jewish immigrants from South Africa (his maternal grandfather was from Russia, and his maternal grandmother, who was Sephardic, was from Egypt). His father's parents were from Lithuania. His mother, Doreen (née Pienaar), is former director of the Harvard's Human Rights film series at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and his father, Julian Beinart, is a former professor of architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His stepfather is theatre critic and playwright Robert Brustein. Beinart attended Buckingham Browne and Nichols School in Cambridge. He then studied history and political science at Yale University, where he was a member of the Yale Political Union, and graduated in 1993. He was a Rhodes Scholar at University College, Oxford University, where he earned an M.Phil. in international relations in 1995.
     
    Also, from the Weekly Standard just a few hours ago...

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/peter-beinart-must-resign/article/2010475

    I was at Yale when Beinart was there. I doubt that I ever met him, but I knew of him since I was at that time an assiduous reader of a vast swath of Yale student publications, and Beinart was very active. For all I know he might have just done either the Daily News or the Herald, but he was definitely one of the most prominent opinion writers during my time. I might be mixing things up entirely, but I do recall him rebuking Dean Donald Kagan of the Kagan-Nulands, but that was when Kagan was “right wing” and Beinart maybe did not yet see himself as representing the global ruling party. I would usually read Beinart’s articles. He struck me as a bit of a prick, but as someone striving to be slightly “rational”. It never struck me as at all surprising when Beinart went straight to all the ruling class publications.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  36. “… what you’d call Ancient Athenian interest…”

    Oh man, that made my day.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Abe

    “… what you’d call Ancient Athenian interest…”

    Oh man, that made my day.
     
    I've called the same thing 'Hellenistic vaporing'. And it IS a thing, and not always sexual. Hetero men can be drawn-to and admire male beauty without wishing to necessarily consummate with it. That's why modern America, so very different from classical Athens, still has its own Adonis/Alcibiades cult in the continued worship (saw a LIFE MAGAZINE special issue devoted to him just the other month) of JFK.

    On a funnier note, now that SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE is big again thanks to its outsized mental health role in the lives of so many easily-triggered snowflakes, remember Adam Sandler's "opera man" character? He used that role to declare to the entire world his love for the (-then) hot new band PEARL JAM and its handsome lead singer, Eddie Vedder (who along with Kurt Cobain has unusually good-looking for a rock star if you consider how objectively funny-looking even the most glamorous ones- i.e. Mick Jagger- really are). In one of these "opera man" skits Sandler even voiced his consternation at Vedder having a girlfriend; it was played as a goof on himself and the character, yet years later I happened to see a YOUTUBE clip of behind-the-scenes footage from the episode where PEARL JAM was the musical guest (stuff like the cast posing for publicity photos) and Sandler is literally man-stalking Vedder and devouring him with his eyes; pretty funny stuff considering Sandler is a pretty meat-n-potatoes, regular-guy schlub now (probably also a Republican-leaning neocon from what I've read).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. Lagertha says:

    That last part of Trump suggesting Forbes dispatch himself with the underage boys to the Palm Court is vintage, priceless, puckish Trump. Palm Court is for 5th Avenue grandmothers taking the kids for tea.

    So, it seems Trump 1; Forbes 0. It’s very sweet that Trump was looking out for those teen boys: Moore could have used that kind of muscular, alpha male attitude to steer him away from jail-bait….of course, that is assuming Moore is lying right now…not sure if jail bait infatuation is gonna be radioactive like Harvey-style creepiness. Anyway, Moore is on his own.

    I stayed at The Plaza in the early 90′s when Trump owned it, and, despite his overreach with that hotel, he did make it great again!…even the Palm Court was hotter. Oak Room is still super cool.

    And, Yacht Porn is a thing – some of the best work for interior designers is redoing yacht interiors every year! Yachts do get passed around a lot, believe it or not, and all the owners want to out-do the last owner. Vintage yachts, finally, are great again, too. Here’s the truth: after about 2-4 years, owners tire of their yachts..and realize it’s nicer to just deal with yachts like an airbnb – boats drive people mad and broke.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    haha, I should add: people who did not grow up around boats, yet, lust after owning the ultimate yacht, have inadvertently provided hundreds of thousands of jobs for people who really love boats and need to work around boats! So, Yacht Porn is a very large tent. There is even : Below Deck (very pornish title for a TV show) for the yacht-obsessed, rich or not.

    As a wasp (more or less) I have always been amused by wealthy men's obsession with yachts and race horses - Saudis love both - so funny since they have the toughest time with the sea, and jittery animals - so not nature guys.

    As a sailor, I always wanted to sail at the end of my life (or last 20 years), all over the world. However, my "sailing mate" died a long time ago. I'm a "land" girl now.

    , @Stan Adams
    Macaulay Culkin stayed in the Plaza in Home Alone 2. Trump had a small cameo in that movie:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0sVDR22bEY

    He was lucky he didn't run into Malcolm Forbes while he was wandering around NuYawk*.

    Knowing what we all know about Hollywood, I don't even want to think about Culkin's experiences in Tinseltown. I mean, the kid used to hang out with Michael Jackson.

    *I don't know if I've ever told anyone here my NuYawk tourist sob story, but here you go: In the summer of 2001, as a high-school graduation present, my grandmother took me to the Big Apple. (She traveled frequently, and never alone, so I went on a number of trips with her over the years. After my grandfather died, I spent more time with her than anyone else in my family.) We were there over the Fourth of July.

    On our last day, we were in Lower Manhattan, and I mentioned that we were near the World Trade Center. I'd always wanted to see it.

    My grandmother, who had already offered to take me on a return visit the following year, said that she was exhausted and asked me to accompany her back to the hotel. (Even in the Giuliani era, she didn't want to tackle the big, bad city all by her lonesome.)

    "We can always see it next year," she said.

    When I saw her on 9/11, she immediately apologized.

    We went back during my spring-break week in 2002. We saw Ground Zero, complete with the twin blue lights.

    The bottom line: If you really want to do something, do it today.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  38. guest says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    So when men are given an illegitimate avenue to promotion and opportunity they're privileged and the victims are all the poor women left out but when women are allowed to exchange sex for advancement they're victims and men are privileged to be left out?

    Do I have that straight?

    Is there any chance whatsover of coming out of all these scandals with a commitment to a meritocracy completely neutral with regards to race, sex, ethnicity, religion, age, etc. and performed in a the most transparent rational way possible? Or is it just going to be more conservatives turned feminist because it gives them an opportunity to attack liberals and jews.

    Are we ever going to meritocratic? No. That’s like asking if society will ever be colorblind.

    Would we want pure meritocracy even if it were achievable? I don’t think so. Why can’t their be an exclusive, Ivy League, D.C., homo, liberal rag? Let them write to the .0001% of the population that cares.

    About conservatives turning feminist when it hurts lefties, that’s just good tactics. They do it all the time.

    More importantly, on some level conservatives and feminists believe the same thing, though both are loathe to say it out loud. Public lives and femininity don’t mix. Women need protection (like we all do in some circumstances), and a lot of them would be better off not trying to be men.

    Of course, the feminine solution, which is to either drive men out or make them bend the knee, is bad. And we’re not going back to having them barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen. But it would be nice to acknowledge that they need patriarchy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Guy de Champlagne

    About conservatives turning feminist when it hurts lefties, that’s just good tactics. They do it all the time.
     
    What are some examples of the left abandoning core principles and their major constituency to score cheap political points against their opponents? Why not just be skeptical of, for instance, these actresses claims and suggest that they whored themselves to advance their careers. That way you have two liberals to attack and you're fighting the good fight against feminism, not deluding yourself that people are actually taking home some fringe feminist anti feminist interpretation that only you know about and doesn't make any sense.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  39. guest says:
    @Neil Templeton
    "Is there any chance whatsover of coming out of all these scandals with a commitment to a meritocracy completely neutral with regards to race, sex, ethnicity, religion, age, etc. and performed in a the most transparent rational way possible?"

    IMHO no. Because many if not most of the measures of merit are contested and not transparent, people are tribal, and Civilization is hard. Maybe if we lived for 1000 years we'd have more concern over the conditions 100 years hence. Instead we live for 80, maybe, and so are concerned about the next 7 0r 8. Humans have more foresight than most animals, but it is limited.

    “Civilization is hard”

    Indeed it is, but you speak as if there’s some essential connection between civilization and the relatively new, never actually implemented impersonate, meritocratic liberal order. But civilization has been sustained longer, and better, by favoritism, nepotism, and all manner of non-meritocratic associations.

    I, for one, could not care less that some sort of Our Crowd runs the New Republic. It sucks, but it would likely also suck if they hired applicants with the highest GPA, SATs, journalism awards, or whatever

    Read More
    • Replies: @Guy de Champlagne

    . But civilization has been sustained longer, and better, by favoritism, nepotism, and all manner of non-meritocratic associations.
     
    This is a general argument against change of any kind. And it's already illegal to discriminate against all sorts of liberal voting groups this just about extending those protections to conservatives.


    What we have now is a system where liberal constituencies get employment protection but men, whites, and Christians get nothing because they're completely cucked and it's more important to them to limit the regulatory burden on businesses than to protect their own interests.


    It sucks, but it would likely also suck if they hired applicants with the highest GPA, SATs, journalism awards, or whatever
     
    That's a straw man. They would have some goal about the magazine they want to publish and be forced to have an employment policy that they could prove actually did the best to reach that goal. They could use any standard they wanted as long as it worked it would just be subject to rational scrutiny.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  40. guest says:

    My only knowledge of Peretz comes from how he’s portrayed in Shattered Glass. They have him not getting along with Michael Kelly, forcing his staff to circle all the commas in an issue because it was “rife with comma errors,” and throwing hissy fits.

    Sounds strictly hetero to me.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  41. Old Left says:

    It’s not pleasant to realize that the bygone age you romanticize—the age when America was still great—was great for you, or people like you, because others were denied a fair shot. In the America of the 1950s, or even the 1980s, white, straight, native-born American men didn’t worry as much about competing with Salvadoran immigrants and Chinese factory workers and professional women and Joshua-generation African Americans.

    Facts say otherwise:

    “In 1947—seven years before the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, sixteen years before the publication of Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique—the top fifth of American wage-earners made 43 per cent of the money earned in the US. Today that same quintile gets 50.5 per cent. In 1947, the bottom fifth of wage-earners got 5 per cent of total income; today it gets 3.4 per cent. After half a century of anti-racism and feminism, the U.S. today [2008] is a less equal society than was the racist, sexist society of Jim Crow. Furthermore, virtually all the growth in inequality has taken place since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1965—which means not only that the successes of the struggle against discrimination have failed to alleviate inequality, but that they have been compatible with a radical expansion of it. Indeed, they have helped to enable the increasing gulf between rich and poor.” Source: https://newleftreview.org/II/52/walter-benn-michaels-against-diversity

    But what does that matter to a preening, virtue-signaling liberal? Also typical of a liberal is that others are expected to make amends for his own self-confessed unfair elevation.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  42. Lagertha says:
    @Lagertha
    That last part of Trump suggesting Forbes dispatch himself with the underage boys to the Palm Court is vintage, priceless, puckish Trump. Palm Court is for 5th Avenue grandmothers taking the kids for tea.

    So, it seems Trump 1; Forbes 0. It's very sweet that Trump was looking out for those teen boys: Moore could have used that kind of muscular, alpha male attitude to steer him away from jail-bait....of course, that is assuming Moore is lying right now...not sure if jail bait infatuation is gonna be radioactive like Harvey-style creepiness. Anyway, Moore is on his own.

    I stayed at The Plaza in the early 90's when Trump owned it, and, despite his overreach with that hotel, he did make it great again!...even the Palm Court was hotter. Oak Room is still super cool.

    And, Yacht Porn is a thing - some of the best work for interior designers is redoing yacht interiors every year! Yachts do get passed around a lot, believe it or not, and all the owners want to out-do the last owner. Vintage yachts, finally, are great again, too. Here's the truth: after about 2-4 years, owners tire of their yachts..and realize it's nicer to just deal with yachts like an airbnb - boats drive people mad and broke.

    haha, I should add: people who did not grow up around boats, yet, lust after owning the ultimate yacht, have inadvertently provided hundreds of thousands of jobs for people who really love boats and need to work around boats! So, Yacht Porn is a very large tent. There is even : Below Deck (very pornish title for a TV show) for the yacht-obsessed, rich or not.

    As a wasp (more or less) I have always been amused by wealthy men’s obsession with yachts and race horses – Saudis love both – so funny since they have the toughest time with the sea, and jittery animals – so not nature guys.

    As a sailor, I always wanted to sail at the end of my life (or last 20 years), all over the world. However, my “sailing mate” died a long time ago. I’m a “land” girl now.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  43. Kirt says:

    Same sex preference affirmative action gives whole new meaning to Beinart’s “tailwind”.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  44. Being an Ivy Leaguer always puts one ahead of the pack, who is Beinhart kidding? The Nation and the left in NYC are Jewish outfits, so he had another advantage. If he feels so guilty renounce it and become a mendicant friar. What is galling is that Beinhart and those like him want to make working class whites who went to cow college pay for their guilt. Stow it Beinhart.

    Read More
    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Olorin
    Bearing in mind, of course, that the Ivy League has its own cow college: Cornell.

    (My teacher, a Penn man of 1930s Ph.D. vintage, called it Ezra A&M.)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  45. Dan Hayes says:
    @PiltdownMan

    ...which makes this essay a humble brag by Beinart (because he said “Ivy League” and not “Harvard”, I’m assuming Beinart didn’t go to Harvard).
     
    He went to Yale and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford.

    From Wikipedia:


    Beinart was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States, in 1971. His parents were Jewish immigrants from South Africa (his maternal grandfather was from Russia, and his maternal grandmother, who was Sephardic, was from Egypt). His father's parents were from Lithuania. His mother, Doreen (née Pienaar), is former director of the Harvard's Human Rights film series at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and his father, Julian Beinart, is a former professor of architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His stepfather is theatre critic and playwright Robert Brustein. Beinart attended Buckingham Browne and Nichols School in Cambridge. He then studied history and political science at Yale University, where he was a member of the Yale Political Union, and graduated in 1993. He was a Rhodes Scholar at University College, Oxford University, where he earned an M.Phil. in international relations in 1995.
     
    Also, from the Weekly Standard just a few hours ago...

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/peter-beinart-must-resign/article/2010475

    Anonymous:

    I have remarkable little (if any) respect for the Weekly Standard but its suggestion that Beinart surrender his ill-deserved and ill-begotten privileges to someone from the sexual or not-connected downtrodden are spot-on!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Moses

    I have remarkable little (if any) respect for the Weekly Standard but its suggestion that Beinart surrender his ill-deserved and ill-begotten privileges to someone from the sexual or not-connected downtrodden are spot-on!

     

    Yes. Whenever I see some sanctimonious arse like this bemoaning his or her own "privilege" and spending column inches wailing over those "oppressed and less fortunate" I always wonder why they don't immediately resign their privileged (and no doubt unearned) position to make way for a black or other marginalized body. They never do though.

    Similar to how I feel when people like Warren Buffett (whom I otherwise admire) complaining that his tax rates are "too low." Nothing is stopping you from writing an additional check to the IRS, Warren, and salving your poor conscience.

    In both cases it's all cost-free virtue-signalling. Neither party puts their money where their mouth is.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  46. @guest
    Are we ever going to meritocratic? No. That's like asking if society will ever be colorblind.

    Would we want pure meritocracy even if it were achievable? I don't think so. Why can't their be an exclusive, Ivy League, D.C., homo, liberal rag? Let them write to the .0001% of the population that cares.

    About conservatives turning feminist when it hurts lefties, that's just good tactics. They do it all the time.

    More importantly, on some level conservatives and feminists believe the same thing, though both are loathe to say it out loud. Public lives and femininity don't mix. Women need protection (like we all do in some circumstances), and a lot of them would be better off not trying to be men.

    Of course, the feminine solution, which is to either drive men out or make them bend the knee, is bad. And we're not going back to having them barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen. But it would be nice to acknowledge that they need patriarchy.

    About conservatives turning feminist when it hurts lefties, that’s just good tactics. They do it all the time.

    What are some examples of the left abandoning core principles and their major constituency to score cheap political points against their opponents? Why not just be skeptical of, for instance, these actresses claims and suggest that they whored themselves to advance their careers. That way you have two liberals to attack and you’re fighting the good fight against feminism, not deluding yourself that people are actually taking home some fringe feminist anti feminist interpretation that only you know about and doesn’t make any sense.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  47. @guest
    "Civilization is hard"

    Indeed it is, but you speak as if there's some essential connection between civilization and the relatively new, never actually implemented impersonate, meritocratic liberal order. But civilization has been sustained longer, and better, by favoritism, nepotism, and all manner of non-meritocratic associations.

    I, for one, could not care less that some sort of Our Crowd runs the New Republic. It sucks, but it would likely also suck if they hired applicants with the highest GPA, SATs, journalism awards, or whatever

    . But civilization has been sustained longer, and better, by favoritism, nepotism, and all manner of non-meritocratic associations.

    This is a general argument against change of any kind. And it’s already illegal to discriminate against all sorts of liberal voting groups this just about extending those protections to conservatives.

    What we have now is a system where liberal constituencies get employment protection but men, whites, and Christians get nothing because they’re completely cucked and it’s more important to them to limit the regulatory burden on businesses than to protect their own interests.

    It sucks, but it would likely also suck if they hired applicants with the highest GPA, SATs, journalism awards, or whatever

    That’s a straw man. They would have some goal about the magazine they want to publish and be forced to have an employment policy that they could prove actually did the best to reach that goal. They could use any standard they wanted as long as it worked it would just be subject to rational scrutiny.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  48. So is Al Gore gay?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  49. Whiskey says: • Website

    The Ivy League is not what it used to be. Now, it seems it is mostly: A. “Diverse” AA admits who hate Whitey, like our pal from South Asia the other day who wants power; B. various NE Asian grinds with the personality of a dinner plate working for President Xi; C. various “legacy” admits meaning both the Bush and Obama families now. Diversity!

    Anyone coming out of the Ivies now would be assumed (and this has been true at least since the late 1980s) to be either an incompetent Whitey-hating NAM, a grind/spy for China, or Overlord hereditary princeling.

    None of these indicate the ability find one’s rear end in the dark even with a map and a flashlight.

    REAL competence will be found among grads of Carnegie Mellon, Georgia Tech, Cal Tech, Case Western, and a few others. No place “kewl” and no place with any of the above idiots. Whatever the Ivies were, they are now about mostly A. Vibrants wanting “power” at intersections or something.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    "The Ivy League is not what it used to be."

    No, it isn't. Perhaps in a generation things will be looking up.

    It's a shame that their libraries are only available to their heavily indoctrinated student body. Going to school is a joy for people who are interested in ideas; this lot comes across as joyless and humorless.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  50. Abe says: • Website

    Since the early 90′s, about the time Beinart began interning at THE NEW REPUBLIC, the elite sociology of race in America has budged about as much as the Korean DMZ. Blacks and Hispanics attend elite universities at levels below what their proportion of the population would have you expect, yet well above what their standardized test scores and grades would have you believe. Yet going to the same ‘fancy’ colleges and living in the same ‘fancy’ dorms as all of those privileged white males is apparently not enough of a baseline reset, as these same Blacks and Hispanics then lag well behind their white Ivy peers when it comes to passing their professional exams (MCAT, LSAT, bar, etc.), and pretty much stink when it comes to doing something substantial in the real world that does not involve riding on the coattails of an already-successful concern.

    Anyway, all of this was pretty much the same in 1994 as it is in 2017. So why is Beinart speaking out against his privilege only now? Did he not understand the unjust system he benefited from? Then he is stupid and witless. Did he understand, but refuse to speak out lest he endanger his own position? Then he is craven and untrustworthy, so why should we believe anything he says now?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  51. Every time I see the name of Peter Beinart, I remember how he has served his country, by giving Trump his winning slogan, “Make America Great Again”.

    https://www.amazon.com/Good-Fight-Liberals-Liberals-Can-America/dp/0060841605

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  52. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Matthew McConnagay
    I don't quite understand Trump's anecdote. What's the significance of the Palm Court?

    Presumably, it was a restaurant. I don’t recall ever going to it, but I did go to the Oak Room a few times in the late ’90s for work. That was a bar where they’d also let you smoke cigars, IIRC.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  53. Abe says: • Website
    @Logical Meme
    “… what you’d call Ancient Athenian interest…”

    Oh man, that made my day.

    “… what you’d call Ancient Athenian interest…”

    Oh man, that made my day.

    I’ve called the same thing ‘Hellenistic vaporing’. And it IS a thing, and not always sexual. Hetero men can be drawn-to and admire male beauty without wishing to necessarily consummate with it. That’s why modern America, so very different from classical Athens, still has its own Adonis/Alcibiades cult in the continued worship (saw a LIFE MAGAZINE special issue devoted to him just the other month) of JFK.

    On a funnier note, now that SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE is big again thanks to its outsized mental health role in the lives of so many easily-triggered snowflakes, remember Adam Sandler’s “opera man” character? He used that role to declare to the entire world his love for the (-then) hot new band PEARL JAM and its handsome lead singer, Eddie Vedder (who along with Kurt Cobain has unusually good-looking for a rock star if you consider how objectively funny-looking even the most glamorous ones- i.e. Mick Jagger- really are). In one of these “opera man” skits Sandler even voiced his consternation at Vedder having a girlfriend; it was played as a goof on himself and the character, yet years later I happened to see a YOUTUBE clip of behind-the-scenes footage from the episode where PEARL JAM was the musical guest (stuff like the cast posing for publicity photos) and Sandler is literally man-stalking Vedder and devouring him with his eyes; pretty funny stuff considering Sandler is a pretty meat-n-potatoes, regular-guy schlub now (probably also a Republican-leaning neocon from what I’ve read).

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Cobain was handsome. I don't know about Vedder so much. Both existed during the MTV-era, when most rockstars were unusually attractive. Of course, Mick lived in the tv era, and there were singers with matinee-idol looks then, too. But there's no comparison to 1981 through whenever people stopped watching videos regularly. (They still do on YouTube, I realize. But it's different. You can tell they're not as important. The videos look surprisingly cheap these days.)

    The best evidence for this is the plethora of homely groups from the 70s who survived into the MTV-era, like Journey. Because it didn't matter so much in the 70s, unless you were David Cassidy or something .

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  54. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @benjaminl
    Ferguson's Beinart profile;


    https://www.commentarymagazine.com/articles/press-man-pundit-declined/

    That was great. Thanks for sharing.

    Read More
    • Agree: ic1000
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  55. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @anon
    that they’re too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    Would you admit that? I mean, you can imagine what some starlet would say if someone asked her why she went along with Weinstein's advances (not that anyone would, of course). She could just say that she figured that's how business was done in Hollywood, and if she wanted a career in Hollywood, she'd have to give it up to some other producer, if not Weinstein.

    I think if you were a male magazine writer, you'd have a much harder time convincing people that the entire industry is run by gay men who are into younger guys, and there just wasn't any other publisher you could have gone to.

    Plus, nobody really expects a woman to be able to fight off a man, if he's determined enough. If a man comes on to another man, and the "victim" doesn't give him a black eye at the very least, everyone's going to assume he wanted it. If they were kids, it'd be different. But these were adult men.

    Well, not exactly the same thing, but Terry Crewes, President Camacho himself, recently admitted to having been groped by a male Hollywood exec and not giving him a black eye.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  56. There have been a few fairly decent articles at The Atlantic just recently. One by Kill All Normies author Angela Nagel on the alt right was reasonable and accurate, as these things go. And a couple of others by Kurt Andersen and Adrienne Lafrance critiquing leftist intolerance and delusion offer a glimmer of hope that SJWs and related lunatics can be kept in check. (I haven’t read the article about the dangerous new American Nazi Andrew Anglin yet. The way it begins, by making the Jewish real estate agent who attempted to intimidate Richard Spencer’s mother into selling look like the victim, turned me off.)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  57. My impression in academia is that gay men mentor young men, straight men mentor young women, and women don’t seem to mentor anyone. Among the lower IQ corporate services staff, older gay men employ young gay men and straight women, excluding straight men.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  58. Bill B. says:

    I considered myself qualified. Because I’d spent years mimicking TNR’s writing style, I had the right sort of clips.

    Isn’t this the sign of a mediocre mind? A smug, supremely confident hack?

    Isn’t Beinart again now merely mimicking postures that he thinks will advance his status?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer

    I considered myself qualified. Because I’d spent years mimicking TNR’s writing style, I had the right sort of clips.

    Isn’t this the sign of a mediocre mind? A smug, supremely confident hack?
     

    Not at a young age. In your early 20s, your job is to learn to produce professional work competently. After that's it's good to develop your own style.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  59. @Bill B.

    I considered myself qualified. Because I’d spent years mimicking TNR’s writing style, I had the right sort of clips.
     
    Isn't this the sign of a mediocre mind? A smug, supremely confident hack?

    Isn't Beinart again now merely mimicking postures that he thinks will advance his status?

    I considered myself qualified. Because I’d spent years mimicking TNR’s writing style, I had the right sort of clips.

    Isn’t this the sign of a mediocre mind? A smug, supremely confident hack?

    Not at a young age. In your early 20s, your job is to learn to produce professional work competently. After that’s it’s good to develop your own style.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    "mimicking TNR's writing style"

    Yes, following a model is good for learners. It would do Tennessee Coates a world of good to try to rewrite a piece or two in Orwell's style.
    , @Reg Cæsar



    I considered myself qualified. Because I’d spent years mimicking TNR’s writing style, I had the right sort of clips.
     
    Isn’t this the sign of a mediocre mind? A smug, supremely confident hack?
     
    Not at a young age. In your early 20s, your job is to learn to produce professional work competently. After that’s it’s good to develop your own style.
     
    Exactly.

    I recently attended the funeral of a woman who had been comatose for decades after an accident in her junior-high years. The family was mightily proud of her youthful drawing ability, and rightfully so. They displayed some examples in the back of the church.

    They were eerily good for a 12-year-old, and quite varied-- and the various styles looked familiar. One was reminiscent of James Thurber. It may have been a direct copy, though I haven't yet found it in a search through Thurber; it's a dreamy dowager strolling with eyes closed and holding a flower above her head. (Anyone recognize it?)

    Another was of a square-headed boy character which rang a bell, but I couldn't quite place. Almost an American Tintin. Others looked like clip art. She was at the library, checking out the same midcentury books and magazines I was!

    She was clearly copying earlier artists, whether just their style, or particular drawings. And I thought, should I tell people? Because that's nothing to be embarrassed about, rather, it's the sign of a very serious artist.

    Originality is for losers, at least at that age. I suspect someone wise was guiding her.

    She would have been a pro, at a very young age. Tragic story.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  60. guest says:
    @Abe

    “… what you’d call Ancient Athenian interest…”

    Oh man, that made my day.
     
    I've called the same thing 'Hellenistic vaporing'. And it IS a thing, and not always sexual. Hetero men can be drawn-to and admire male beauty without wishing to necessarily consummate with it. That's why modern America, so very different from classical Athens, still has its own Adonis/Alcibiades cult in the continued worship (saw a LIFE MAGAZINE special issue devoted to him just the other month) of JFK.

    On a funnier note, now that SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE is big again thanks to its outsized mental health role in the lives of so many easily-triggered snowflakes, remember Adam Sandler's "opera man" character? He used that role to declare to the entire world his love for the (-then) hot new band PEARL JAM and its handsome lead singer, Eddie Vedder (who along with Kurt Cobain has unusually good-looking for a rock star if you consider how objectively funny-looking even the most glamorous ones- i.e. Mick Jagger- really are). In one of these "opera man" skits Sandler even voiced his consternation at Vedder having a girlfriend; it was played as a goof on himself and the character, yet years later I happened to see a YOUTUBE clip of behind-the-scenes footage from the episode where PEARL JAM was the musical guest (stuff like the cast posing for publicity photos) and Sandler is literally man-stalking Vedder and devouring him with his eyes; pretty funny stuff considering Sandler is a pretty meat-n-potatoes, regular-guy schlub now (probably also a Republican-leaning neocon from what I've read).

    Cobain was handsome. I don’t know about Vedder so much. Both existed during the MTV-era, when most rockstars were unusually attractive. Of course, Mick lived in the tv era, and there were singers with matinee-idol looks then, too. But there’s no comparison to 1981 through whenever people stopped watching videos regularly. (They still do on YouTube, I realize. But it’s different. You can tell they’re not as important. The videos look surprisingly cheap these days.)

    The best evidence for this is the plethora of homely groups from the 70s who survived into the MTV-era, like Journey. Because it didn’t matter so much in the 70s, unless you were David Cassidy or something .

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  61. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    It's quite possible that Peretz kept his hands off the help and just admired their youthful energy and quest for knowledge, the way Socrates enjoyed having young Alcibiades around.

    “possible that Peretz kept his hands off the help”

    Agree. He was in a position to advance their careers but that doesn’t mean that he coerced them in any way.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  62. ic1000 says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Unless you got in to the Ivy League because your father made a 7-figure donation to the school (as alleged about Jared Kushner), being a white Ivy League alumnus signals merit, which makes this essay a humble brag by Beinart (because he said "Ivy League" and not "Harvard", I'm assuming Beinart didn't go to Harvard).

    Re the Marty Peretz business: you've been hinting about some gayness between him and his protégés for years, including here. It sounds plausible. But now that the dam has broken after Weinstein, Spacey, Wieseltier and the rest, why hasn't Peretz been fingered yet? What's the more likely reason: that he didn't molest or demand sexual favors from his protégés, or that they're too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    #11. Perceptive, amusing, and on topic. +1

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  63. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Whiskey
    The Ivy League is not what it used to be. Now, it seems it is mostly: A. "Diverse" AA admits who hate Whitey, like our pal from South Asia the other day who wants power; B. various NE Asian grinds with the personality of a dinner plate working for President Xi; C. various "legacy" admits meaning both the Bush and Obama families now. Diversity!

    Anyone coming out of the Ivies now would be assumed (and this has been true at least since the late 1980s) to be either an incompetent Whitey-hating NAM, a grind/spy for China, or Overlord hereditary princeling.

    None of these indicate the ability find one's rear end in the dark even with a map and a flashlight.

    REAL competence will be found among grads of Carnegie Mellon, Georgia Tech, Cal Tech, Case Western, and a few others. No place "kewl" and no place with any of the above idiots. Whatever the Ivies were, they are now about mostly A. Vibrants wanting "power" at intersections or something.

    “The Ivy League is not what it used to be.”

    No, it isn’t. Perhaps in a generation things will be looking up.

    It’s a shame that their libraries are only available to their heavily indoctrinated student body. Going to school is a joy for people who are interested in ideas; this lot comes across as joyless and humorless.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  64. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer

    I considered myself qualified. Because I’d spent years mimicking TNR’s writing style, I had the right sort of clips.

    Isn’t this the sign of a mediocre mind? A smug, supremely confident hack?
     

    Not at a young age. In your early 20s, your job is to learn to produce professional work competently. After that's it's good to develop your own style.

    “mimicking TNR’s writing style”

    Yes, following a model is good for learners. It would do Tennessee Coates a world of good to try to rewrite a piece or two in Orwell’s style.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  65. Moses says:
    @Dan Hayes
    Anonymous:

    I have remarkable little (if any) respect for the Weekly Standard but its suggestion that Beinart surrender his ill-deserved and ill-begotten privileges to someone from the sexual or not-connected downtrodden are spot-on!

    I have remarkable little (if any) respect for the Weekly Standard but its suggestion that Beinart surrender his ill-deserved and ill-begotten privileges to someone from the sexual or not-connected downtrodden are spot-on!

    Yes. Whenever I see some sanctimonious arse like this bemoaning his or her own “privilege” and spending column inches wailing over those “oppressed and less fortunate” I always wonder why they don’t immediately resign their privileged (and no doubt unearned) position to make way for a black or other marginalized body. They never do though.

    Similar to how I feel when people like Warren Buffett (whom I otherwise admire) complaining that his tax rates are “too low.” Nothing is stopping you from writing an additional check to the IRS, Warren, and salving your poor conscience.

    In both cases it’s all cost-free virtue-signalling. Neither party puts their money where their mouth is.

    Read More
    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  66. jack ryan says: • Website

    I remember when Marty Peretz and the New Republic led the vicious smear of Ron Paul during the 2008 presidential campaign (or was it 2012? Ron and Rand Paul are always running for President).

    Marty Peretz had uncovered the “shocking” secret that the Rand Paul newsletter in the early 1990s had criticized:

    Black criminality, the Black Rodney King rioters/looters/murderers.
    Martin Luther King Jr (plagerism, sexual immorality, Leftist Communist associations)
    AIPAC – the Israeli Lobby, Neo Conservatives.

    Instead of doing what Donald Trump or any man with a set of bal** would do (shout “go to Hell” to this flaming queer with treasonous loyalty to a foreign country, or just a Lib Leftist Democrat trying to dictate Conservative GOP politics) Ron Paul backed down and stated that he never wrote or even read those terrible racist things in his own newsletter and Martin Luther King Jr and Rosa Parks were two of his greatest heroes because they represented true Libertarian Constitutionalist activism, blah, blah, blah.

    The best thing about Donald Trump is that he doesn’t care what the fake news, lugenpresse says about him.

    Jesus Christ once said “All men will hate you because of me, but he who stands firm will be saved” (something like that).

    I have to go with the idea that any healthy, principled White American man and other honest men of other races should welcome the hatred and personal attacks of the lying press. Do you really want the likes of Marty Peretz and Harvey Weinstein, George Clooney or Neo Conservative, fake conservatives to like and flatter you?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    It wasn't a smear. The content of the newsletters was what it was. By some accounts, his revenue from the newsletters in 1993 was in 7 digits. He claimed he did know who wrote the copy in an office which employed 4 people. Not a great advertisement for his administrative talent.
    , @Dan Hayes
    jack ryan:

    I have long held Ron Paul in high regard and continue to do so. Unfortunately your assessment of Paul in this instance is correct where his actions were unprincipled.

    Scuttlebutt has it that Paul's newsletter was authored by Lew Rockwell.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  67. @Steve Sailer

    I considered myself qualified. Because I’d spent years mimicking TNR’s writing style, I had the right sort of clips.

    Isn’t this the sign of a mediocre mind? A smug, supremely confident hack?
     

    Not at a young age. In your early 20s, your job is to learn to produce professional work competently. After that's it's good to develop your own style.

    I considered myself qualified. Because I’d spent years mimicking TNR’s writing style, I had the right sort of clips.

    Isn’t this the sign of a mediocre mind? A smug, supremely confident hack?

    Not at a young age. In your early 20s, your job is to learn to produce professional work competently. After that’s it’s good to develop your own style.

    Exactly.

    I recently attended the funeral of a woman who had been comatose for decades after an accident in her junior-high years. The family was mightily proud of her youthful drawing ability, and rightfully so. They displayed some examples in the back of the church.

    They were eerily good for a 12-year-old, and quite varied– and the various styles looked familiar. One was reminiscent of James Thurber. It may have been a direct copy, though I haven’t yet found it in a search through Thurber; it’s a dreamy dowager strolling with eyes closed and holding a flower above her head. (Anyone recognize it?)

    Another was of a square-headed boy character which rang a bell, but I couldn’t quite place. Almost an American Tintin. Others looked like clip art. She was at the library, checking out the same midcentury books and magazines I was!

    She was clearly copying earlier artists, whether just their style, or particular drawings. And I thought, should I tell people? Because that’s nothing to be embarrassed about, rather, it’s the sign of a very serious artist.

    Originality is for losers, at least at that age. I suspect someone wise was guiding her.

    She would have been a pro, at a very young age. Tragic story.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    So I should be proud of my pastiches of Pope?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  68. Art Deco says:

    What if you were a young straight man who found Marty’s mentorship creepy?

    All of Peretz’ deputies have been married men bar Andrew Sullivan and Richard Just.

    Granted, Marty married a couple of heiresses.

    His 1st marriage (in 1962) was childless and might have lasted a year. His second lasted 40-odd years. Peretz was wealthy in his own name from investing in a limited company which was able to wangle a broadcast license and also from successful securities trading.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  69. Art Deco says:
    @Anonymouse
    I met Marty Peretz in 1959 when I was a graduate student in Classics at Harvard. He cultivated me as a friend and took me, for example, one time to an exotic locale, a Boston bar, after hours, frequented by politicians and mobsters, where red wine was served in club soda bottles. I was an immature 25 year old, Marty then with a teaching position of some sort at Brandeis about the same age. I backed away from our inchoate friendship because he had the habit of denigrating from time to time our mutual New York City jewish background in a neurotic spirit of self-hate. It is hard to recall precisely the way I found it unbearable. I vaguely remember thinking that I did not come up to Harvard to be thrust back into the self-hating neuroticism of the New York City jewish sensibility. I don't remember any sexual overtones to the relationship.

    Martin Peretz was 20 years old in 1959.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  70. Art Deco says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Unless you got in to the Ivy League because your father made a 7-figure donation to the school (as alleged about Jared Kushner), being a white Ivy League alumnus signals merit, which makes this essay a humble brag by Beinart (because he said "Ivy League" and not "Harvard", I'm assuming Beinart didn't go to Harvard).

    Re the Marty Peretz business: you've been hinting about some gayness between him and his protégés for years, including here. It sounds plausible. But now that the dam has broken after Weinstein, Spacey, Wieseltier and the rest, why hasn't Peretz been fingered yet? What's the more likely reason: that he didn't molest or demand sexual favors from his protégés, or that they're too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    or that they’re too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    Richard Just and Andrew Sullivan are very explicit about their homosexuality. The rest of Peretz one time deputies were all married with children bar Michael Kinsley, whose wife was 45 when they were married.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Somehow it's unlikely that Kinsley was a closeted gay, hitting on Pat Buchanan during their time on CNN's Crossfire. Even Pat would've picked up on it. Although Mike Royko wrote a column that denigrated Kinsley, even calling him a weenie.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  71. @Art Deco
    or that they’re too humiliated to admit they gay-slept their way into the middlebrow intelligentsia?

    Richard Just and Andrew Sullivan are very explicit about their homosexuality. The rest of Peretz one time deputies were all married with children bar Michael Kinsley, whose wife was 45 when they were married.

    Somehow it’s unlikely that Kinsley was a closeted gay, hitting on Pat Buchanan during their time on CNN’s Crossfire. Even Pat would’ve picked up on it. Although Mike Royko wrote a column that denigrated Kinsley, even calling him a weenie.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Although Mike Royko wrote a column that denigrated Kinsley, even calling him a weenie.

    The rap on Kinsley was that he was a shallow class cut up who never quite acquired an adult outlook. Clever, but never wise. Not sure what effect two decades of disability has had on him. You can see here the man's not well.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4iMPO63c7iE
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  72. Kevin C. says:
    @Guy de Champlagne
    So when men are given an illegitimate avenue to promotion and opportunity they're privileged and the victims are all the poor women left out but when women are allowed to exchange sex for advancement they're victims and men are privileged to be left out?

    Do I have that straight?

    Is there any chance whatsover of coming out of all these scandals with a commitment to a meritocracy completely neutral with regards to race, sex, ethnicity, religion, age, etc. and performed in a the most transparent rational way possible? Or is it just going to be more conservatives turned feminist because it gives them an opportunity to attack liberals and jews.

    Is there any chance whatsover of coming out of all these scandals with a commitment to a meritocracy completely neutral with regards to race, sex, ethnicity, religion, age, etc. and performed in a the most transparent rational way possible?

    No. Next question.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  73. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Was there anyone at TNR who DIDN’T go to an Ivy school? Reading this it’s safe to assume that if you were a Jewish male graduate of Penn applying for a job at TNR you already had a leg up, whereas if you were, say, a Jewish male graduate of Penn STATE you were shown the door.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    From the period running from 1980 to 1993, John Osborne, Jack Beatty, Steve Wasserman, Fred Barnes. Osborne is notable also for being just about the only Southerner employed there. Pretty strong bias, and you could say exceptions prove the rule. Osborne was actually hired by Peretz' predecessor. Wasserman was the editor of their book imprint and wrote almost nothing for the magazine. Michael Kelly, who was the editor at one point, also had no Ivy League connection. Peretz fired him after 7 months.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  74. Jack D says:

    In the America of the 1950s, or even the 1980s, white, straight, native-born American men didn’t worry as much about competing with Salvadoran immigrants and Chinese factory workers and professional women and Joshua-generation African Americans.

    The only thing that native-born American men have to worry about competing with Salvadorans and Chinese is that they will work for peanuts. There are some women who are competent at their professions but even at a place like MIT they are doing AA for women (the female acceptance rate at MIT is twice the male rate – they reject 15 out of 16 male applicants but “only” 7 out of 8 females). And “Joshua-generation” blacks as competition – well maybe in pro-sports and rapping. Otherwise, don’t make me laugh. (“Joshua-generation” is a reference to a typical self praising Obama speech. MLK was Moses so BHO is Joshua.)

    As someone else said, Beinart is humble-bragging. He didn’t get where he was as a result of any sort of AA – he was a typical product of America’s post WWII meritocracy. Even at the time that he came up, if he, with the same level of talent, had been female or black he would have still been considered a prize, if perhaps not by Marty but by plenty of others, but there really aren’t that many females or blacks (let alone black females) with Rhodes scholar level of academic chops and writing talent.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  75. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @anon
    I vaguely remember thinking that I did not come up to Harvard to be thrust back into the self-hating neuroticism of the New York City jewish sensibility.

    Man. Wouldn't it be neat if they still hated themselves?

    where red wine was served in club soda bottles.

    That's weird. Was that some kind of fad, or what? Were you pretending it was Prohibition?

    That’s weird. Was that some kind of fad, or what? Were you pretending it was Prohibition?

    Prohibition may have been repealed but it is New England after all. They have to be wary of attack by mobs of blue nosed puritans if they imbibe too publicly.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  76. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Reg Cæsar



    I considered myself qualified. Because I’d spent years mimicking TNR’s writing style, I had the right sort of clips.
     
    Isn’t this the sign of a mediocre mind? A smug, supremely confident hack?
     
    Not at a young age. In your early 20s, your job is to learn to produce professional work competently. After that’s it’s good to develop your own style.
     
    Exactly.

    I recently attended the funeral of a woman who had been comatose for decades after an accident in her junior-high years. The family was mightily proud of her youthful drawing ability, and rightfully so. They displayed some examples in the back of the church.

    They were eerily good for a 12-year-old, and quite varied-- and the various styles looked familiar. One was reminiscent of James Thurber. It may have been a direct copy, though I haven't yet found it in a search through Thurber; it's a dreamy dowager strolling with eyes closed and holding a flower above her head. (Anyone recognize it?)

    Another was of a square-headed boy character which rang a bell, but I couldn't quite place. Almost an American Tintin. Others looked like clip art. She was at the library, checking out the same midcentury books and magazines I was!

    She was clearly copying earlier artists, whether just their style, or particular drawings. And I thought, should I tell people? Because that's nothing to be embarrassed about, rather, it's the sign of a very serious artist.

    Originality is for losers, at least at that age. I suspect someone wise was guiding her.

    She would have been a pro, at a very young age. Tragic story.

    So I should be proud of my pastiches of Pope?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  77. @Lagertha
    That last part of Trump suggesting Forbes dispatch himself with the underage boys to the Palm Court is vintage, priceless, puckish Trump. Palm Court is for 5th Avenue grandmothers taking the kids for tea.

    So, it seems Trump 1; Forbes 0. It's very sweet that Trump was looking out for those teen boys: Moore could have used that kind of muscular, alpha male attitude to steer him away from jail-bait....of course, that is assuming Moore is lying right now...not sure if jail bait infatuation is gonna be radioactive like Harvey-style creepiness. Anyway, Moore is on his own.

    I stayed at The Plaza in the early 90's when Trump owned it, and, despite his overreach with that hotel, he did make it great again!...even the Palm Court was hotter. Oak Room is still super cool.

    And, Yacht Porn is a thing - some of the best work for interior designers is redoing yacht interiors every year! Yachts do get passed around a lot, believe it or not, and all the owners want to out-do the last owner. Vintage yachts, finally, are great again, too. Here's the truth: after about 2-4 years, owners tire of their yachts..and realize it's nicer to just deal with yachts like an airbnb - boats drive people mad and broke.

    Macaulay Culkin stayed in the Plaza in Home Alone 2. Trump had a small cameo in that movie:

    He was lucky he didn’t run into Malcolm Forbes while he was wandering around NuYawk*.

    Knowing what we all know about Hollywood, I don’t even want to think about Culkin’s experiences in Tinseltown. I mean, the kid used to hang out with Michael Jackson.

    *I don’t know if I’ve ever told anyone here my NuYawk tourist sob story, but here you go: In the summer of 2001, as a high-school graduation present, my grandmother took me to the Big Apple. (She traveled frequently, and never alone, so I went on a number of trips with her over the years. After my grandfather died, I spent more time with her than anyone else in my family.) We were there over the Fourth of July.

    On our last day, we were in Lower Manhattan, and I mentioned that we were near the World Trade Center. I’d always wanted to see it.

    My grandmother, who had already offered to take me on a return visit the following year, said that she was exhausted and asked me to accompany her back to the hotel. (Even in the Giuliani era, she didn’t want to tackle the big, bad city all by her lonesome.)

    “We can always see it next year,” she said.

    When I saw her on 9/11, she immediately apologized.

    We went back during my spring-break week in 2002. We saw Ground Zero, complete with the twin blue lights.

    The bottom line: If you really want to do something, do it today.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    you are a lucky grandson! I still won't go to Ground Zero land when in the City - too many friends died in The Towers. However, I think it is wonderful that you and she could see those lights back in 2002. I hope to be the grandmother you have in 10 years or so :) .
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  78. Art Deco says:
    @anonymous
    Was there anyone at TNR who DIDN'T go to an Ivy school? Reading this it's safe to assume that if you were a Jewish male graduate of Penn applying for a job at TNR you already had a leg up, whereas if you were, say, a Jewish male graduate of Penn STATE you were shown the door.

    From the period running from 1980 to 1993, John Osborne, Jack Beatty, Steve Wasserman, Fred Barnes. Osborne is notable also for being just about the only Southerner employed there. Pretty strong bias, and you could say exceptions prove the rule. Osborne was actually hired by Peretz’ predecessor. Wasserman was the editor of their book imprint and wrote almost nothing for the magazine. Michael Kelly, who was the editor at one point, also had no Ivy League connection. Peretz fired him after 7 months.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  79. Art Deco says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Somehow it's unlikely that Kinsley was a closeted gay, hitting on Pat Buchanan during their time on CNN's Crossfire. Even Pat would've picked up on it. Although Mike Royko wrote a column that denigrated Kinsley, even calling him a weenie.

    Although Mike Royko wrote a column that denigrated Kinsley, even calling him a weenie.

    The rap on Kinsley was that he was a shallow class cut up who never quite acquired an adult outlook. Clever, but never wise. Not sure what effect two decades of disability has had on him. You can see here the man’s not well.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  80. Art Deco says:
    @jack ryan
    I remember when Marty Peretz and the New Republic led the vicious smear of Ron Paul during the 2008 presidential campaign (or was it 2012? Ron and Rand Paul are always running for President).

    Marty Peretz had uncovered the "shocking" secret that the Rand Paul newsletter in the early 1990s had criticized:

    Black criminality, the Black Rodney King rioters/looters/murderers.
    Martin Luther King Jr (plagerism, sexual immorality, Leftist Communist associations)
    AIPAC - the Israeli Lobby, Neo Conservatives.

    Instead of doing what Donald Trump or any man with a set of bal** would do (shout "go to Hell" to this flaming queer with treasonous loyalty to a foreign country, or just a Lib Leftist Democrat trying to dictate Conservative GOP politics) Ron Paul backed down and stated that he never wrote or even read those terrible racist things in his own newsletter and Martin Luther King Jr and Rosa Parks were two of his greatest heroes because they represented true Libertarian Constitutionalist activism, blah, blah, blah.

    The best thing about Donald Trump is that he doesn't care what the fake news, lugenpresse says about him.

    Jesus Christ once said "All men will hate you because of me, but he who stands firm will be saved" (something like that).

    I have to go with the idea that any healthy, principled White American man and other honest men of other races should welcome the hatred and personal attacks of the lying press. Do you really want the likes of Marty Peretz and Harvey Weinstein, George Clooney or Neo Conservative, fake conservatives to like and flatter you?

    It wasn’t a smear. The content of the newsletters was what it was. By some accounts, his revenue from the newsletters in 1993 was in 7 digits. He claimed he did know who wrote the copy in an office which employed 4 people. Not a great advertisement for his administrative talent.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  81. Forbes says:
    @syonredux

    Mr. Beinart is reticent about spelling out what sexual preference of Marty Peretz’s made TNR into a sexual hothouse. Granted, Marty, the owner, liked to marry heiresses. But he took a profound, almost what you’d call Ancient Athenian interest in mentoring bright young men, presumably platonic. Also, it really helped if the bright young men loved Israel almost as ardently as Marty did, which put a bit of an ethnic tilt on things.
     
    Yeah, I noticed the curious incident of the dog in the night-time myself. But I imagine that bringing-up Gay favoritism would mean going against the narrative ("Gays are an oppressed class, struggling under the weight of cis-het privilege"). I guess that even Kevin Spacey hasn't changed that...

    In this regard, I suspect, I have something in common with the supporters of Donald Trump. It’s not pleasant to realize that the bygone age you romanticize—the age when America was still great—was great for you, or people like you, because others were denied a fair shot.
     
    Or maybe it was great because of you....You know White guys like the Wright Bros, John Bardeen, Claude Shannon, Jack Kilby....Of course, I'm sure that they owe their achievements to their White Skin privilege....I mean, we all know that Black STEM genius has been cruelly suppressed by the White Cis-Het Patriarchy...

    Except for among the ultra-rich, the American pie is not expanding all that much. And so a lot of white American men look at Barack Obama, and Hillary Clinton, and mass immigration, and the global competition for jobs, and the taking down of Confederate monuments, and even the revolt against sexual harassment, and fear all this means there will be less left for them. And they experience these attacks on their privilege as a desecration of the natural order, an attack on institutions that benefited them and to which they felt deep loyalty in return.
     
    Gosh, Beinert old boy, I wonder who actually built those institutions in the first place.....I suppose that they just emerged out of the the magic dirt on which they stand....

    so a lot of white American men look at Barack Obama, and Hillary Clinton, and mass immigration, and the global competition for jobs, and the taking down of Confederate monuments, and even the revolt against sexual harassment, and fear all this means there will be less left for them. And they experience these attacks on their privilege as a desecration of the natural order, an attack on institutions that benefited them and to which they felt deep loyalty in return.

    A victim of mass immigration and the global competition for jobs–that’s quite the privilege!

    Personally, I don’t find Barack and Hillary to be a part of white, male privilege–your results may vary.

    The revolt against sexual harassment appears to occurring amongst Jewish males in Hollywood–not exactly a flyover America phenomena.

    For a whip-smart writer, he’s wildly off the mark. But must keep up The Narrative.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  82. Forbes says:
    @Matthew McConnagay
    I don't quite understand Trump's anecdote. What's the significance of the Palm Court?

    It was a restaurant in the hotel lobby, adjacent to the Oak Room Bar.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  83. Forbes says:
    @syonredux
    Well, here's a more palatable piece from the Atlantic:

    Yet let us not forget the sex crimes of which the younger, stronger Bill Clinton was very credibly accused in the 1990s. Juanita Broaddrick reported that when she was a volunteer on one of his gubernatorial campaigns, she had arranged to meet him in a hotel coffee shop. At the last minute, he had changed the location to her room in the hotel, where she says he very violently raped her. She said that she fought against Clinton throughout a rape that left her bloodied. At a different Arkansas hotel, he caught sight of a minor state employee named Paula Jones, and, Jones said, he sent a couple of state troopers to invite her to his suite, where he exposed his penis to her and told her to kiss it. Kathleen Willey said that she met him in the Oval Office for personal and professional advice and that he groped her, rubbed his erect penis on her, and pushed her hand to his crotch.

    It was a pattern of behavior; it included an alleged violent assault; the women involved had far more credible evidence than many of the most notorious accusations that have come to light in the past five weeks. But Clinton was not left to the swift and pitiless justice that today’s accused men have experienced. Rather, he was rescued by a surprising force: machine feminism. The movement had by then ossified into a partisan operation, and it was willing—eager—to let this friend of the sisterhood enjoy a little droit de seigneur.
     

    The notorious 1998 New York Times op-ed by Gloria Steinem must surely stand as one of the most regretted public actions of her life. It slut-shamed, victim-blamed, and age-shamed; it urged compassion for and gratitude to the man the women accused. Moreover (never write an op-ed in a hurry; you’ll accidentally say what you really believe), it characterized contemporary feminism as a weaponized auxiliary of the Democratic Party.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/11/reckoning-with-bill-clintons-sex-crimes/545729/?utm_source=feed#article-comments

    Isn’t 20 years later just a bit late for a reckoning? What possible distraction does it serve, except to push the Clintons to the sidelines as no longer useful…

    It’s not as if this reckoning was to happen were Hillary elected a year ago.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  84. Dan Hayes says:
    @jack ryan
    I remember when Marty Peretz and the New Republic led the vicious smear of Ron Paul during the 2008 presidential campaign (or was it 2012? Ron and Rand Paul are always running for President).

    Marty Peretz had uncovered the "shocking" secret that the Rand Paul newsletter in the early 1990s had criticized:

    Black criminality, the Black Rodney King rioters/looters/murderers.
    Martin Luther King Jr (plagerism, sexual immorality, Leftist Communist associations)
    AIPAC - the Israeli Lobby, Neo Conservatives.

    Instead of doing what Donald Trump or any man with a set of bal** would do (shout "go to Hell" to this flaming queer with treasonous loyalty to a foreign country, or just a Lib Leftist Democrat trying to dictate Conservative GOP politics) Ron Paul backed down and stated that he never wrote or even read those terrible racist things in his own newsletter and Martin Luther King Jr and Rosa Parks were two of his greatest heroes because they represented true Libertarian Constitutionalist activism, blah, blah, blah.

    The best thing about Donald Trump is that he doesn't care what the fake news, lugenpresse says about him.

    Jesus Christ once said "All men will hate you because of me, but he who stands firm will be saved" (something like that).

    I have to go with the idea that any healthy, principled White American man and other honest men of other races should welcome the hatred and personal attacks of the lying press. Do you really want the likes of Marty Peretz and Harvey Weinstein, George Clooney or Neo Conservative, fake conservatives to like and flatter you?

    jack ryan:

    I have long held Ron Paul in high regard and continue to do so. Unfortunately your assessment of Paul in this instance is correct where his actions were unprincipled.

    Scuttlebutt has it that Paul’s newsletter was authored by Lew Rockwell.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  85. Forbes says:

    Isn’t this really just Beinart’s preemptive groveling apology before his CUNY students discover his “unwokeness” in the Current Year.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  86. Jack D says:
    @anon
    I vaguely remember thinking that I did not come up to Harvard to be thrust back into the self-hating neuroticism of the New York City jewish sensibility.

    Man. Wouldn't it be neat if they still hated themselves?

    where red wine was served in club soda bottles.

    That's weird. Was that some kind of fad, or what? Were you pretending it was Prohibition?

    In those days, Italian-Americans drank mostly “jug wine” – cheap California wine that was sold in gallon bottles (you can still get this stuff). Or else they made their own from grapes shipped in each year at harvest time from California. A gallon bottle is a little unwieldy to pour from at the table so you decant it into smaller bottles such as soda bottles. Homemade wine gets bottled in whatever bottles are available. At that time, most Americans didn’t drink dry table wine at all. The past is a different country.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    In those days, Italian-Americans drank mostly “jug wine” – cheap California wine that was sold in gallon bottles (you can still get this stuff).
     

    Not just Italian-Americans in earlier decades, but lots of poor students like me in the 1970s. A gallon of Carlo Rossi red wine in a jug was about $4.

    http://www.brutalhammer.com/the-king-of-the-jug-wines/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYXskJmGLow

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  87. Lagertha says:
    @Stan Adams
    Macaulay Culkin stayed in the Plaza in Home Alone 2. Trump had a small cameo in that movie:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0sVDR22bEY

    He was lucky he didn't run into Malcolm Forbes while he was wandering around NuYawk*.

    Knowing what we all know about Hollywood, I don't even want to think about Culkin's experiences in Tinseltown. I mean, the kid used to hang out with Michael Jackson.

    *I don't know if I've ever told anyone here my NuYawk tourist sob story, but here you go: In the summer of 2001, as a high-school graduation present, my grandmother took me to the Big Apple. (She traveled frequently, and never alone, so I went on a number of trips with her over the years. After my grandfather died, I spent more time with her than anyone else in my family.) We were there over the Fourth of July.

    On our last day, we were in Lower Manhattan, and I mentioned that we were near the World Trade Center. I'd always wanted to see it.

    My grandmother, who had already offered to take me on a return visit the following year, said that she was exhausted and asked me to accompany her back to the hotel. (Even in the Giuliani era, she didn't want to tackle the big, bad city all by her lonesome.)

    "We can always see it next year," she said.

    When I saw her on 9/11, she immediately apologized.

    We went back during my spring-break week in 2002. We saw Ground Zero, complete with the twin blue lights.

    The bottom line: If you really want to do something, do it today.

    you are a lucky grandson! I still won’t go to Ground Zero land when in the City – too many friends died in The Towers. However, I think it is wonderful that you and she could see those lights back in 2002. I hope to be the grandmother you have in 10 years or so :) .

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  88. @Guy de Champlagne
    So when men are given an illegitimate avenue to promotion and opportunity they're privileged and the victims are all the poor women left out but when women are allowed to exchange sex for advancement they're victims and men are privileged to be left out?

    Do I have that straight?

    Is there any chance whatsover of coming out of all these scandals with a commitment to a meritocracy completely neutral with regards to race, sex, ethnicity, religion, age, etc. and performed in a the most transparent rational way possible? Or is it just going to be more conservatives turned feminist because it gives them an opportunity to attack liberals and jews.

    I’ll disagree with the others who replied.
    It is possible – for awhile. Surely not forever, but as a natural recoil force, yes, it’s possible, but it isn’t inevitable either.
    Here’s how it’s possible.
    Men of good will need to be able to withdraw from current institutions and form their own. In the past we’ve had geographies to wall ourselves behind – that may not be possible, or necessary, this time.

    Men would need to swear off the coin of the realm – create their own. They’d have to swear off existing institutions and form their own. That means paying more for goods and services for the privilege of being a part of a fair system that honors your dignity and others who participate. It means doing with less.

    People say it isn’t possible but the awfulness of the current system is what makes it possible – that awfulness is the impetus for men to join forces and combine will to create something new and that has integrity. Such a community of institutions, possibly with its own coin – based on integrity – will sap productive energy from the current corrupt system while providing a strong alternative as the corrupt system grows weak.

    The biggest threat to this coming to pass is, well, one: lack of imagination and naysayers – but those can be overcome because there’s plenty of historical precedent, but two: the government acts against this … all the restrictions we have on freedom of association are already steps government has taken in advance to stymie this kind of project.

    But you should be encouraged by that: the government wouldn’t put so many factors in the way of preventing the rise of independent institutions in a competing social-economic system … if the government didn’t recognize it as a threat, and it wouldn’t be a threat … if it were not possible.

    At day end – if we live in a society where men, as a group, are not permitted to withdraw and bond together and form their own new, better, high integrity organizations … if the attempt proves that this is truly not to be allowed, then we will know something and we should confront our society and government with it: we no longer live in a free society.

    A society where only automatons can withdraw, isn’t free.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  89. @Jack D
    In those days, Italian-Americans drank mostly "jug wine" - cheap California wine that was sold in gallon bottles (you can still get this stuff). Or else they made their own from grapes shipped in each year at harvest time from California. A gallon bottle is a little unwieldy to pour from at the table so you decant it into smaller bottles such as soda bottles. Homemade wine gets bottled in whatever bottles are available. At that time, most Americans didn't drink dry table wine at all. The past is a different country.

    In those days, Italian-Americans drank mostly “jug wine” – cheap California wine that was sold in gallon bottles (you can still get this stuff).

    Not just Italian-Americans in earlier decades, but lots of poor students like me in the 1970s. A gallon of Carlo Rossi red wine in a jug was about $4.

    http://www.brutalhammer.com/the-king-of-the-jug-wines/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    That stuff is remarkably good.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  90. Olorin says:
    @Spirit of the Fighting 69th
    Being an Ivy Leaguer always puts one ahead of the pack, who is Beinhart kidding? The Nation and the left in NYC are Jewish outfits, so he had another advantage. If he feels so guilty renounce it and become a mendicant friar. What is galling is that Beinhart and those like him want to make working class whites who went to cow college pay for their guilt. Stow it Beinhart.

    Bearing in mind, of course, that the Ivy League has its own cow college: Cornell.

    (My teacher, a Penn man of 1930s Ph.D. vintage, called it Ezra A&M.)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  91. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @PiltdownMan

    In those days, Italian-Americans drank mostly “jug wine” – cheap California wine that was sold in gallon bottles (you can still get this stuff).
     

    Not just Italian-Americans in earlier decades, but lots of poor students like me in the 1970s. A gallon of Carlo Rossi red wine in a jug was about $4.

    http://www.brutalhammer.com/the-king-of-the-jug-wines/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYXskJmGLow

    That stuff is remarkably good.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
Current Commenter says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
A simple remedy for income stagnation