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Down through European art history, beautiful lady painters, such as Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun and Angelika Kauffman, have tended to be more renown in their own time than afterward.

Russia’s Zinaida Serebriakova invented the contemporary Instagram selfie as Disney Princess around 1909.

She eventually had to flee Bolshevism to Paris, but made a triumphant return to Moscow in 1966 when she was finally allowed to reunite with her two eldest children.

 
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  1. Female attention whoring is nothing new.

    Read More
    • Agree: L Woods
    • Replies: @L Woods
    A society utterly permissive of and indeed accommodating to (attention) whoring is, however.
    , @Alden
    Why don’t you just set up a website for you and other women haters?

    Call it wehatewomen.org
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  2. Wow, that is atypical beauty for 1909: It almost looks like it could be much more contemporary, if she wasn’t wearing so much clothing.

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  3. Random observation: Apparently few if any people objected to this painting in Russia, but I have a vague sense that she would have been derided as a slut in the Anglosphere in 1909. Her choice of attire seems quite risqué by Edwardian standards.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Andrew, Don't know. She has a blouse or under garment on and it has slipped from her left shoulder, but nothing is exposed. Lots of pictures from the Edwardian period show women in what I call push up bras, or I think they are called bustiers (sic). And occasionally more than a little flesh overflows the top. I like her treatment of light and the shadow her hair casts across her shoulder.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    Technically she is in her bedroom in her underwear. She wouldn't leave the house in that.
    , @Alden
    You don’t know much about the Edwardian era do you? Just check out the paintings of the era. And then check out the person for whom the era is named.
    , @Alden
    Check out Maxfield Parrish the most popular American artist of the Edwardian era and early 20 th century. He specialized in pretty naked ladies in classical fantasy settings

    Better have your caretaker and oxygen and heart medicine with you because if you’re offended by her you’ll have a heart attack when you see the Parrish pictures

    Any way to market the site to get men who aren’t misogynist 90 year old virgins as commenters?

    Affirmative action, unchecked non White immigration, destruction of our great cities by blacks, vicious hatred spewed at Whites by the media and academia and the 90 year old male virgins think a woman’s neck, arms and shoulders are obscene.

    Move to Saudi Arabia if the sight of a woman’s arms neck and shoulders offends you so much.

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  4. Yes, there probably is a tendency to soft focus enhancement in female self portraiture. Aren’t the really great painters guys like Rembrandt who did paint themselves warts and all.

    That said, I have a lot of admiration for the very lovely Frida…

    https://www.frida-kahlo-foundation.org

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  5. There is a large market for a model level lovely painter to make millions. She has to be very talented. Paintings cannot be weird and abstract. And under no circumstances can she have those artsy, edgy short bangs aka fringes in the UK.
    Paintings must be as realistic as Zinaida Serebriakova’s.

    She must be emotionally secure because the conventional art world will dump on her like there is no tomorrow.

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  6. Lorraine Schleter is very attractive (she’s sort of a female Frank Frazetta, with comparable talent.)

    This looks like a self-portrait:

    Her great comic strip “A Tale of Two Rulers” can be seen here (149 weekly episodes so far):

    http://figmentforms.tumblr.com/post/139806271367/a-tale-of-two-rulers-archive-post

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Julie Bell, the fantasy artist, creates fine pictures and she looks good, too.

    https://twitter.com/IX_Arts/status/877906396032978945

    Julie Bell bulked up when she was younger and she retained her curves and her husband, Boris Vallejo, used her as a model in his fantasy art.

    https://twitter.com/xman30/status/458079944963133440
    , @Buffalo Joe
    the one, I have a collection of Frank Frazetta trading cards. He over exaggerates muscle mass, in men and women, but I like his style. His parents let him paint from nudes when he was just 12 or 13.
    , @Alden
    Is it possible to remove Lorraine Schleter’s paintings? One shows a woman’s legs the other shows her neck and collarbone. We don’t want to Andrew, L Woods and NickG heart attack’s do we.?

    If the sight of a woman disturbs them so much, they should move to Saudi Arabia or get some meds to deal with their problems.

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  7. Rosie O’Donnell is now pretending to be an artist, but she’s no lady:

    http://www.independentsentinel.com/rosie-odonnell-sells-hate-trump-art-creates-phone/

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  8. Some of us who were living in the American Southwest fell for Georgia O’Keeffe but grew out of our infatuation.

    C’mon though, how could a young man not be drawn to paintings like this?

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    • Replies: @Bill
    What was the value-added of Georgia O'Keeffe over Hustler? That you could hang the former in your living room?
    , @Inquiring Mind
    You mean like this young man?

    https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=jXKEWlM%2b&id=F36E27EED39DA6A0E7FEF16FB7462A7FE8D65330&thid=OIP.jXKEWlM-TmQJs2yc_9DpUwHaFj&mediaurl=http%3a%2f%2fimg.youtube.com%2fvi%2fHvRSpUWgvn8%2f0.jpg&exph=360&expw=480&q=everybody+loves+raymond+marie+barone%27s+sculpture&simid=607994086486312485&selectedIndex=4&ajaxhist=0
    , @Dieter Kief
    Joni Mitchell was pretty much grwon up, when she visited O'Keeffe at her Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, in the desert of New Mexico. She knew about O'Keeffe's eroticism - and didn't shy away at all - she admired her - ehe - deeply.

    Maria Angelica Catherina Kauffmann was pretty much a product of a liberal father and friend of the arts in Chur at the Alpine Rhine. She was good, but not great. Goethe and Herder liked her a lot. She knew her ways in the (art)-society of London, Venice and Rome, and she could make a good living of her art. - She was the second after Maria Sibylla Merian to chieve this goal, I assume.

    The even greater miracle at the upper Rhine was a predecessor of Kaufmann - Maria Sybilla Merian (1647 - 1717) from Basel, who did great watercoulours of plants - flowers especially. She even travelled to (and in) South-America. A descendent of her published Robert Crumbs latest book in Europe - and in a really perfect way. Such is Basel, one of the European miracles, situated at the rhine-knee, where the Rhine changes direction and flows then to the north.

    , @J. Sailerite
    Jesse Pinkman?
    , @Dan Hayes
    Buzz Mohawk:

    Some time ago the late Joan Rivers sneeringly reported that Hillary Clinton and her feminine entourage were busily enrapturing themselves viewing O'Keefe's orchard paintings.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Buzz, I have a cocktail table book of O'Keefe's paintings. I did not know VaJayJays came in so many shades of pastel. However, my research ended 40 years ago when I married my wife.
    , @Alden
    Never liked her paintings. But the idiot intellectuals sure did for the same reason they fell for Dr Fraud’s therapy.
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  9. The Russian artist left her children behind?

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Everything you ever were taught about a certain other genocide was preceded in severity and often in specifics by Bolshevism. Human Guinea pigs, human vivisection, deliberate starvation, death work, scientific torture, desperate and confused attempts at escape, turning in your own family members, splitting up families. Hollywood favors one over the other because of budgetary constraints.
    , @Jack D
    In the mid 1920's (things were slightly better then than they would be later) she was allowed to go to Paris for a show. She decided to stay and they allowed her to take her 2 younger children. Her 2 older children were young adults and they didn't let them go.

    If she had stayed she probably would have been purged later so leaving saved her life. Maybe even that of her children - children of a purged individual were also in danger.
    , @Alden
    She didn’t leave any children behind. She took her 2 children with her.

    Her 2 adult grown children were not allowed to leave by the Soviet authorities.

    This was during the height of the soviet horror show when Russia was surrounded by barbed wire armed guards with orders to shoot to kill, guard dogs watch towers no mans lands covered by machine guns in the towers

    These measures were necessary to keep the Russians from fleeing their soviet paradise. Only a very, very few were ever allowed to leave.

    Maybe Ron could set up a misogynists corner before every woman who reads the site is driven away by comments such as yours and others who have done nothing but sneer at her art because she’s a woman.
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  10. Beautiful!

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  11. “renowned”, not renown. Or “have”, not be.

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  12. There’s a conspicuous absence of pubic hair in Bath-House, 1913. Were the Russians ahead of the curve on that, ahem, front?

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    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    "There’s a conspicuous absence of pubic hair in Bath-House, 1913"

    Few artists painted pubic hair that I can think of until maybe Modigliani. Titian, Rubens, Botticelli tended to veil or otherwise hide female pudenda.

    Iris Tree, one of Modgliani's nudes, lived long enough to act in Fellini's La Dolce Vita.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iris_Tree
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  13. There’s a small potatoes lady painter in Florida who makes a decent living painting pictures of pretty, young women, doing mundane things with slightly puzzled expressions on their faces. I forgot her name otherwise I’d link.

    She has decent chops as a draftsman and can certainly paint, but the appeal is her talent at voyeuristically catching young women doing stuff. If she painted young men doing stuff the paintings wouldn’t be nearly as interesting.

    Food for thought.

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    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Hmmm, sounds intriguing. What were the scenes / what was depicted? Contemporary or old-timey vibe? What town is the painter from? Maybe I could guess at titles.
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  14. Le Brun’s work is genuinely moving- perhaps not top tier, but as good as all but a handful of artists from her time.

    Serebriakova was a looker.

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  15. @Buzz Mohawk
    Some of us who were living in the American Southwest fell for Georgia O'Keeffe but grew out of our infatuation.

    C'mon though, how could a young man not be drawn to paintings like this?

    http://assets2.bigthink.com/system/idea_thumbnails/18931/primary/11_Music_Pink_and_Blue_No._2--edited.jpg?1267762023

    What was the value-added of Georgia O’Keeffe over Hustler? That you could hang the former in your living room?

    Read More
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  16. Please, Steve, “renowned”, not “renown”. Keep barbarism at bay.

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  17. This is another type of Serebriakova’s selfie: a self-portrait with two daughters, 1921. (Large.)

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  18. @Buzz Mohawk
    Some of us who were living in the American Southwest fell for Georgia O'Keeffe but grew out of our infatuation.

    C'mon though, how could a young man not be drawn to paintings like this?

    http://assets2.bigthink.com/system/idea_thumbnails/18931/primary/11_Music_Pink_and_Blue_No._2--edited.jpg?1267762023
    Read More
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  19. That “selfie” portrait does not do her justice as an artist. It’s kind of uniquely awful compared to much of her other work, which is often quite good. But she’s no Vigée Le Brun.

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    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    I agree. It is so inferior to her other work and so anachronistic-looking that I wonder if it is a fake.
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  20. @Buzz Mohawk
    Some of us who were living in the American Southwest fell for Georgia O'Keeffe but grew out of our infatuation.

    C'mon though, how could a young man not be drawn to paintings like this?

    http://assets2.bigthink.com/system/idea_thumbnails/18931/primary/11_Music_Pink_and_Blue_No._2--edited.jpg?1267762023

    Joni Mitchell was pretty much grwon up, when she visited O’Keeffe at her Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, in the desert of New Mexico. She knew about O’Keeffe’s eroticism – and didn’t shy away at all – she admired her – ehe – deeply.

    Maria Angelica Catherina Kauffmann was pretty much a product of a liberal father and friend of the arts in Chur at the Alpine Rhine. She was good, but not great. Goethe and Herder liked her a lot. She knew her ways in the (art)-society of London, Venice and Rome, and she could make a good living of her art. – She was the second after Maria Sibylla Merian to chieve this goal, I assume.

    The even greater miracle at the upper Rhine was a predecessor of Kaufmann – Maria Sybilla Merian (1647 – 1717) from Basel, who did great watercoulours of plants – flowers especially. She even travelled to (and in) South-America. A descendent of her published Robert Crumbs latest book in Europe – and in a really perfect way. Such is Basel, one of the European miracles, situated at the rhine-knee, where the Rhine changes direction and flows then to the north.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    One summer I took a college girlfriend camping in Abiquiu. She was transferring to the Rhode Island School of Design, and it was our last time together. O'Keeffe was still alive then, and we rented a horse from her neighbor.

    That area of the United States has wide-open beauty with interesting shapes and colors. It's no wonder it inspired a painter.

    This O'Keeffe landscape is pretty much the same view we had from our sleeping bags on our first night there:

    http://www.christies.com/media-library/images/features/articles/2016/05/03/georgia-o-keeffe/georgia-okeeffe-red-hills-with-pedernal-whit.jpg?w=780
    , @Alden
    Didn’t Maria Angelica Kaufman do a lot of ceiling murals? Maybe I’m wrong
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  21. Not a beautiful lady painter but check out another Russian emigre painter, Nikolai Fechin. Probably the best portraitist of the 20th century, he lived in New Mexico.

    https://gallerix.ru/storeroom/2114439537/

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    • Replies: @Obsessive Contrarian
    What a coincidence, I only just heard of Fechin a few days ago - he was excellent.

    BTW, I think that Le Brun and Gentileschi were both first-class painters. The latter's Judith makes Wiley's look like a childish scribble. OK, anyone could, but her Judith Slaying Holofernes is a marvelous painting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_Slaying_Holofernes_(Artemisia_Gentileschi)
    , @Alden
    That’s a beautiful picture. She’s very appealing
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  22. @Buzz Mohawk
    Some of us who were living in the American Southwest fell for Georgia O'Keeffe but grew out of our infatuation.

    C'mon though, how could a young man not be drawn to paintings like this?

    http://assets2.bigthink.com/system/idea_thumbnails/18931/primary/11_Music_Pink_and_Blue_No._2--edited.jpg?1267762023

    Jesse Pinkman?

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    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
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  23. @NickG
    Female attention whoring is nothing new.

    A society utterly permissive of and indeed accommodating to (attention) whoring is, however.

    Read More
    • Agree: Antlitz Grollheim
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  24. “…have tended to be more renowned…”

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  25. I just read the Wikipedia bio for Zinaida Serebriakova and looked at her paintings. I like them. Thanks for the link. She was separated from her two oldest children for more than three decades.

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  26. @Buzz Mohawk
    Some of us who were living in the American Southwest fell for Georgia O'Keeffe but grew out of our infatuation.

    C'mon though, how could a young man not be drawn to paintings like this?

    http://assets2.bigthink.com/system/idea_thumbnails/18931/primary/11_Music_Pink_and_Blue_No._2--edited.jpg?1267762023

    Buzz Mohawk:

    Some time ago the late Joan Rivers sneeringly reported that Hillary Clinton and her feminine entourage were busily enrapturing themselves viewing O’Keefe’s orchard paintings.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    You mean orchid paintings?

    Have to hand it to the late Ms. Rivers, she may have had a dirty mind and a potty mouth, but she didn't dumb any of it down.
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  27. I know two lady artists. One paints creepy pictures very much like the Obama portraits. The other creates these really creepy elf dolls.

    True artistic talent is very rare, I’m afraid. If I’m honest, I think it is even much rarer in women. People are probably a lot less likely to be honest to a young woman than a young man. Especially, if she has any looks at all.

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  28. @Dieter Kief
    Joni Mitchell was pretty much grwon up, when she visited O'Keeffe at her Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, in the desert of New Mexico. She knew about O'Keeffe's eroticism - and didn't shy away at all - she admired her - ehe - deeply.

    Maria Angelica Catherina Kauffmann was pretty much a product of a liberal father and friend of the arts in Chur at the Alpine Rhine. She was good, but not great. Goethe and Herder liked her a lot. She knew her ways in the (art)-society of London, Venice and Rome, and she could make a good living of her art. - She was the second after Maria Sibylla Merian to chieve this goal, I assume.

    The even greater miracle at the upper Rhine was a predecessor of Kaufmann - Maria Sybilla Merian (1647 - 1717) from Basel, who did great watercoulours of plants - flowers especially. She even travelled to (and in) South-America. A descendent of her published Robert Crumbs latest book in Europe - and in a really perfect way. Such is Basel, one of the European miracles, situated at the rhine-knee, where the Rhine changes direction and flows then to the north.

    One summer I took a college girlfriend camping in Abiquiu. She was transferring to the Rhode Island School of Design, and it was our last time together. O’Keeffe was still alive then, and we rented a horse from her neighbor.

    That area of the United States has wide-open beauty with interesting shapes and colors. It’s no wonder it inspired a painter.

    This O’Keeffe landscape is pretty much the same view we had from our sleeping bags on our first night there:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Buzz, maybe that's a painting of you and your GF in your sleeping bags or was it just one sleeping bag.
    , @Dieter Kief
    "Wake Up -There Are Snakes"

    One summer I took a college girlfriend camping in Abiquiu
     
    I did the by and large the same in other places of the US and wish, I'd have done it near or at the Ghost Ranch, too. -But I was was more than once freightened - by the possibility even, - that there'd be snakes around when stolling through high gras - barefoot at night, hippie-style... - I know, that's pretty much a sexual thing too, but anyways, I might as well - you know: Be open about my (inner, ehe) constraints, -
    - - at least now, that I could think of better solutions to my problems - - such as carrying a big torchlight at night, and solid boots, too.

    Old O'Keeffe collected rattle-snake bones...on her daily walks in the desert; she must have been fairly good sighted (and humored) up until her last days.
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  29. …tended to be more renown in their own time than afterward.

    It’s not that Serebriakova was a lady painter. She was a realistic painter in the early-middle 20th century, a time when, unless you drip paint on canvass or something, you get no respect. But I like to think that realistic painters of that period will eventually get the last laugh.

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  30. Can you imagine what the reaction was when the first mirror was shown to a womyn???

    I’d never heard the phrase ‘attention whore’ until the mid ’90s, wish I’d known it 30 years earlier when it would of done some good dealing with womyn….

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  31. @Anonymous
    Not a beautiful lady painter but check out another Russian emigre painter, Nikolai Fechin. Probably the best portraitist of the 20th century, he lived in New Mexico.

    http://www.artfixdaily.com/images/pr/july26_fechin.jpg

    https://gallerix.ru/storeroom/2114439537/

    What a coincidence, I only just heard of Fechin a few days ago – he was excellent.

    BTW, I think that Le Brun and Gentileschi were both first-class painters. The latter’s Judith makes Wiley’s look like a childish scribble. OK, anyone could, but her Judith Slaying Holofernes is a marvelous painting.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_Slaying_Holofernes_(Artemisia_Gentileschi)

    Read More
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  32. I love the logic here. Because the early communism experience was so bad, you had to support the people who wanted to recapture Russia in order to repeat it. And then they did repeat it in the 1990s, just like they promised. With the same results. But you’re still not sorry for supporting them. Because the first time they did it was so bad.

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    • Replies: @Glossy
    I'll give you some credit, Steve. You're kind of lukewarm about the plans for a third time. Not becuase you understood anything about the first or the second, but becuase the people trying to pull off a third revolution in Russia pissed you off at home, in America. And you're right to be pissed off by them. They're bad people. But if you don't understand what happened in the recent past, how can you understand what's happening now or what might happen in the future?
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  33. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    The problem with female painters is that they don’t think big enough. They don’t tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that’s not good enough. That’s not where important Art lies.

    Female painters lack ambition.

    Look at Mary Cassatt. She wasn’t painting the Raft of the Medusa by Gericault, or Napoleon Crossing the Alps by David, or The Third of May, 1814 by Goya. That’s the problem in a nutshell.

    Zinaida Serebriakova’s self-portrait is simply an attempt to paint an average, typical male-gazing-at-a-woman-portrait, which is exactly the problem. There are umpteen zillion portraits like this out there, because men have been painting women with come-hither looks in a state of semi- or complete undress since the Renaissance. The subject matter is trite, and it doesn’t become a great artistic innovation or a great portrait just because Serebriakova did it to herself. She’s still not thinking big enough. It’s an okay self-portrait, but it’s not a great portrait like the Mona Lisa, or Ingres’ Portrait of Comtesse d’Haussonville.

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    • Disagree: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Obama's portraitist Kehinde Wiley will never rip off a Serebriakova painting the way he rips off JL David's propaganda paintings of Napoleon.

    Serebriakova's most famous painting, House of Cards, was of her four children shortly after their father had died in a Bolshevik prison. That was probably an important subject to her.

    , @Jack D
    House of Cards is a "big" painting:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/62/Serebryakova_CardHause.jpg

    The grim faced children (her own after their father dies at the hands of the Bolsheviks) are all of the people of the Soviet Union and the house of cards is the USSR. This is no selfie portrait.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    "They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that’s not good enough."

    Elizabeth Thompson, Lady Butler, was the foremost painter of military scenes in the Victorian age.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b2/Elizabeth_Thompson_-_The_28th_Regiment_at_Quatre_Bras_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg/1280px-Elizabeth_Thompson_-_The_28th_Regiment_at_Quatre_Bras_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

    Tamara de Lempicka was pretty too.

    , @Whoever
    https://i.imgur.com/7ESJgsY.jpg
    , @Anon
    First-rate artists always paint the most important thing that happened. They go straight for it. I cannot emphasize this enough. Second-rate artists always portray something that's a step or two removed from the most important thing that happened. They flinch. They have an instinct for being a bore, which is why people ignore their work.
    , @Anon
    Women prefer mirrors to canvases.

    And they wanted to be painted than paint.

    I'll bet women are far more selfie crazy than men are.
    , @Alden
    I could never see what’s so great about the Mona Lisa. That’s just me.
    , @Anonymous
    How about Dorothea Tanning's Birthday?
    http://philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/93232.html

    I saw this in person and was mesmerized. I am not certain how to interpret that fact.
    , @Anon
    The problem with female painters is that they don’t think big enough. They don’t tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that’s not good enough.

    You gotta be trolling. So, a marching band music is better than a beautiful aria?

    Van Gogh wasn't important because he painted farms and flowers instead of war?

    Subject counts for less in art. Some of the greatest novels are about life looked at closely. Something like GONE WITH THE WIND is big and romantic and has lots of fans, but it's not serious literature.

    I personally like smaller subjects in painting unless its landscape. I never much cared for paintings of battles and overtly lively stuff. Why? It's just the nature of the form. In paintings of battles and big events, artists wanted to create the impression of motion. They were reaching for cinema before cinema. Except it never quite works because a painting is a still image, and so the action and excitement seem unreal and forced.

    This is why most photography is about still subjects. It's about clarity or tones.

    With the advent of cinema, there was no more need for big exciting paintings.

    Paintings are best at symbolism, suggestion, shapes and shades, and colors. Before the rise of color photography, that was one huge advantage painting had. And even now, paintings can do things with colors that don't work in photography.
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  34. @the one they call Desanex
    Lorraine Schleter is very attractive (she’s sort of a female Frank Frazetta, with comparable talent.)
    https://www.metal-archives.com/images/4/4/8/9/448931_artist.jpg?1113
    This looks like a self-portrait:
    https://img00.deviantart.net/5051/i/2013/109/f/9/aeons__gun_slinger_by_lorraine_schleter-d62a5ob.jpg
    Her great comic strip “A Tale of Two Rulers” can be seen here (149 weekly episodes so far):
    http://figmentforms.tumblr.com/post/139806271367/a-tale-of-two-rulers-archive-post

    Julie Bell, the fantasy artist, creates fine pictures and she looks good, too.

    Julie Bell bulked up when she was younger and she retained her curves and her husband, Boris Vallejo, used her as a model in his fantasy art.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Charles, throw a dick on that body and I would proudly walk the beach looking like that.
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  35. @Glossy
    I love the logic here. Because the early communism experience was so bad, you had to support the people who wanted to recapture Russia in order to repeat it. And then they did repeat it in the 1990s, just like they promised. With the same results. But you're still not sorry for supporting them. Because the first time they did it was so bad.

    I’ll give you some credit, Steve. You’re kind of lukewarm about the plans for a third time. Not becuase you understood anything about the first or the second, but becuase the people trying to pull off a third revolution in Russia pissed you off at home, in America. And you’re right to be pissed off by them. They’re bad people. But if you don’t understand what happened in the recent past, how can you understand what’s happening now or what might happen in the future?

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    • Replies: @IHTG
    wat
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  36. Let me add my voice to the others: “renowned,” for God’s sake, not “renown.” You can’t fix it?

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  37. Did you take a look at the portrait she painted of her sister, Steve? Contrast it with her self portrait for a very sharp illustration of Sailerian intrasexual competition noticings.

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  38. Read More
    • Replies: @Kylie
    Excellent article, thanks.
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  39. @Dwright
    The Russian artist left her children behind?

    Everything you ever were taught about a certain other genocide was preceded in severity and often in specifics by Bolshevism. Human Guinea pigs, human vivisection, deliberate starvation, death work, scientific torture, desperate and confused attempts at escape, turning in your own family members, splitting up families. Hollywood favors one over the other because of budgetary constraints.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Hollywood favors one over the other because of budgetary constraints.
     
    He who pays the budget calls the constraints.

    https://incharge.net.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Cherub-flute.jpg
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  40. @Glossy
    I'll give you some credit, Steve. You're kind of lukewarm about the plans for a third time. Not becuase you understood anything about the first or the second, but becuase the people trying to pull off a third revolution in Russia pissed you off at home, in America. And you're right to be pissed off by them. They're bad people. But if you don't understand what happened in the recent past, how can you understand what's happening now or what might happen in the future?

    wat

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  41. @Anon
    The problem with female painters is that they don't think big enough. They don't tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that's not good enough. That's not where important Art lies.

    Female painters lack ambition.

    Look at Mary Cassatt. She wasn't painting the Raft of the Medusa by Gericault, or Napoleon Crossing the Alps by David, or The Third of May, 1814 by Goya. That's the problem in a nutshell.

    Zinaida Serebriakova's self-portrait is simply an attempt to paint an average, typical male-gazing-at-a-woman-portrait, which is exactly the problem. There are umpteen zillion portraits like this out there, because men have been painting women with come-hither looks in a state of semi- or complete undress since the Renaissance. The subject matter is trite, and it doesn't become a great artistic innovation or a great portrait just because Serebriakova did it to herself. She's still not thinking big enough. It's an okay self-portrait, but it's not a great portrait like the Mona Lisa, or Ingres' Portrait of Comtesse d'Haussonville.

    Obama’s portraitist Kehinde Wiley will never rip off a Serebriakova painting the way he rips off JL David’s propaganda paintings of Napoleon.

    Serebriakova’s most famous painting, House of Cards, was of her four children shortly after their father had died in a Bolshevik prison. That was probably an important subject to her.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Did she portray her husband actually dying in a prison cell? No. She portrayed children playing cards. If you knew nothing about the scene, you'd assume it was just a rather boring and someone inept painting of kids playing cards. It's emotionally distanced from its subject matter. That's my point. It's a polite, ladylike way of talking about her husband's death that's 'safe' and won't rock the boat. That's why the painting is not considered to be a great painting except by SJW critics trying to gin up the importance of any female artist they've heard of.

    Here's something to contrast it with. One of the most well-known paintings to ever come out of Russia is Repin's Ivan the Terrible and His Young Son Ivan. Ivan has just mortally wounded his own son and you see him clutching his dying son. You're riveted by Ivan's staring eyes, which are both insane and horrified. It delivers an emotional punch directly to the viewer that is absolutely blunt about what happened and why what happened is important.

    Serebriakova never portrays the actual scene that's the most important thing here, her husband's death. That is what she should have done. Second-rate painters have this unconscious impulse to dodge the most important point. They paint around it. By refusing to paint it, she took the moral coward's way out. She has distanced herself emotionally from what's happened, and she makes the viewer feel emotionally distant, too. That's why she's not considered to be a great artist. But Repin punches you in the gut, and that's why everyone remembers his painting. Serebriakova's work is the sort of image you forget about once it's away from your eyes.
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  42. @AndrewR
    Random observation: Apparently few if any people objected to this painting in Russia, but I have a vague sense that she would have been derided as a slut in the Anglosphere in 1909. Her choice of attire seems quite risqué by Edwardian standards.

    Andrew, Don’t know. She has a blouse or under garment on and it has slipped from her left shoulder, but nothing is exposed. Lots of pictures from the Edwardian period show women in what I call push up bras, or I think they are called bustiers (sic). And occasionally more than a little flesh overflows the top. I like her treatment of light and the shadow her hair casts across her shoulder.

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    • Replies: @Alden
    Andrew has never seen many Edwardian or 19th century paintings . He’d Probably faint if he saw Alma Tameda’ girls in Ancient Greek outfits.
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  43. @the one they call Desanex
    Lorraine Schleter is very attractive (she’s sort of a female Frank Frazetta, with comparable talent.)
    https://www.metal-archives.com/images/4/4/8/9/448931_artist.jpg?1113
    This looks like a self-portrait:
    https://img00.deviantart.net/5051/i/2013/109/f/9/aeons__gun_slinger_by_lorraine_schleter-d62a5ob.jpg
    Her great comic strip “A Tale of Two Rulers” can be seen here (149 weekly episodes so far):
    http://figmentforms.tumblr.com/post/139806271367/a-tale-of-two-rulers-archive-post

    the one, I have a collection of Frank Frazetta trading cards. He over exaggerates muscle mass, in men and women, but I like his style. His parents let him paint from nudes when he was just 12 or 13.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    His parents let him paint from nudes when he was just 12 or 13.
     
    That's like the Winters letting Johnny and Edgar play in black blues clubs at that age. So that's the secret of prodigies.

    Which vice should I introduce my kids to? My son was fascinated at age five or six by John Cleese's wine video. He'll enter his teens around the next time the Electoral College meets, and œnology and viticulture seem a mild enough pursuit to trust your young to, and can pay off in time.

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5167XSMR3ZL._SY445_.jpg

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  44. @Dwright
    The Russian artist left her children behind?

    In the mid 1920′s (things were slightly better then than they would be later) she was allowed to go to Paris for a show. She decided to stay and they allowed her to take her 2 younger children. Her 2 older children were young adults and they didn’t let them go.

    If she had stayed she probably would have been purged later so leaving saved her life. Maybe even that of her children – children of a purged individual were also in danger.

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  45. @Buzz Mohawk
    Some of us who were living in the American Southwest fell for Georgia O'Keeffe but grew out of our infatuation.

    C'mon though, how could a young man not be drawn to paintings like this?

    http://assets2.bigthink.com/system/idea_thumbnails/18931/primary/11_Music_Pink_and_Blue_No._2--edited.jpg?1267762023

    Buzz, I have a cocktail table book of O’Keefe’s paintings. I did not know VaJayJays came in so many shades of pastel. However, my research ended 40 years ago when I married my wife.

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    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
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  46. @AndrewR
    Random observation: Apparently few if any people objected to this painting in Russia, but I have a vague sense that she would have been derided as a slut in the Anglosphere in 1909. Her choice of attire seems quite risqué by Edwardian standards.

    Technically she is in her bedroom in her underwear. She wouldn’t leave the house in that.

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    But she painted it and presented it publicly. That's a distinction without a difference.
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  47. @Buzz Mohawk
    One summer I took a college girlfriend camping in Abiquiu. She was transferring to the Rhode Island School of Design, and it was our last time together. O'Keeffe was still alive then, and we rented a horse from her neighbor.

    That area of the United States has wide-open beauty with interesting shapes and colors. It's no wonder it inspired a painter.

    This O'Keeffe landscape is pretty much the same view we had from our sleeping bags on our first night there:

    http://www.christies.com/media-library/images/features/articles/2016/05/03/georgia-o-keeffe/georgia-okeeffe-red-hills-with-pedernal-whit.jpg?w=780

    Buzz, maybe that’s a painting of you and your GF in your sleeping bags or was it just one sleeping bag.

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  48. @Anon
    The problem with female painters is that they don't think big enough. They don't tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that's not good enough. That's not where important Art lies.

    Female painters lack ambition.

    Look at Mary Cassatt. She wasn't painting the Raft of the Medusa by Gericault, or Napoleon Crossing the Alps by David, or The Third of May, 1814 by Goya. That's the problem in a nutshell.

    Zinaida Serebriakova's self-portrait is simply an attempt to paint an average, typical male-gazing-at-a-woman-portrait, which is exactly the problem. There are umpteen zillion portraits like this out there, because men have been painting women with come-hither looks in a state of semi- or complete undress since the Renaissance. The subject matter is trite, and it doesn't become a great artistic innovation or a great portrait just because Serebriakova did it to herself. She's still not thinking big enough. It's an okay self-portrait, but it's not a great portrait like the Mona Lisa, or Ingres' Portrait of Comtesse d'Haussonville.

    House of Cards is a “big” painting:

    The grim faced children (her own after their father dies at the hands of the Bolsheviks) are all of the people of the Soviet Union and the house of cards is the USSR. This is no selfie portrait.

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  49. @Charles Pewitt
    Julie Bell, the fantasy artist, creates fine pictures and she looks good, too.

    https://twitter.com/IX_Arts/status/877906396032978945

    Julie Bell bulked up when she was younger and she retained her curves and her husband, Boris Vallejo, used her as a model in his fantasy art.

    https://twitter.com/xman30/status/458079944963133440

    Charles, throw a dick on that body and I would proudly walk the beach looking like that.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    I wouldn't have given Julie Bell too much art criticism back when she was throwing around the big iron, she might not have taken it too kindly. She says she was always natural and didn't use any juice, I believe her.
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  50. @Dan Hayes
    Buzz Mohawk:

    Some time ago the late Joan Rivers sneeringly reported that Hillary Clinton and her feminine entourage were busily enrapturing themselves viewing O'Keefe's orchard paintings.

    You mean orchid paintings?

    Have to hand it to the late Ms. Rivers, she may have had a dirty mind and a potty mouth, but she didn’t dumb any of it down.

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    • Agree: Dan Hayes
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  51. Zinaida Serebriakova

    Speaking of IQ (IQ is never OT here), Victor Serebriakoff was a founder of British Mensa.

    That 1909 portrait could have been from 2009. So could this 1942 shot of Ida Lupino, a Camberwell native like Serebriakoff:

    https://goo.gl/images/twioBP

    Why did I just learn of Paula Modersohn-Becker? Her birthday is Feb 8, so she muast have been a Google Doodle. She was the first female artist (essentially; there is a technical exception or two) to do her self-portrait in the nude.

    A notable gift to art, of course, but she’s too far from realism for that to pay off. Did Zinaida do the same? Inquiring libidos want to know!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Here is one of her self portraits with her clothes on (this is a PG rated blog):

    https://www.moma.org/collection/works/216210

    This proves that:

    1. The definition of "artist" is somewhat loose.

    2. Not all female self-portraits are self-flattering (although who knows, maybe the real Paula was even uglier).
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  52. @Buffalo Joe
    Charles, throw a dick on that body and I would proudly walk the beach looking like that.

    I wouldn’t have given Julie Bell too much art criticism back when she was throwing around the big iron, she might not have taken it too kindly. She says she was always natural and didn’t use any juice, I believe her.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Is it really possible for a woman to build biceps like that without hormones? I am skeptical. The # of people who SAY they don't juice and the # of people who ACTUALLY don't juice is not the same number.
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  53. @Anon
    The problem with female painters is that they don't think big enough. They don't tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that's not good enough. That's not where important Art lies.

    Female painters lack ambition.

    Look at Mary Cassatt. She wasn't painting the Raft of the Medusa by Gericault, or Napoleon Crossing the Alps by David, or The Third of May, 1814 by Goya. That's the problem in a nutshell.

    Zinaida Serebriakova's self-portrait is simply an attempt to paint an average, typical male-gazing-at-a-woman-portrait, which is exactly the problem. There are umpteen zillion portraits like this out there, because men have been painting women with come-hither looks in a state of semi- or complete undress since the Renaissance. The subject matter is trite, and it doesn't become a great artistic innovation or a great portrait just because Serebriakova did it to herself. She's still not thinking big enough. It's an okay self-portrait, but it's not a great portrait like the Mona Lisa, or Ingres' Portrait of Comtesse d'Haussonville.

    “They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that’s not good enough.”

    Elizabeth Thompson, Lady Butler, was the foremost painter of military scenes in the Victorian age.

    Tamara de Lempicka was pretty too.

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    • Replies: @Alden
    I was going to mention Lady Butler.you got there first. I love her paintings
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  54. @Reg Cæsar

    Zinaida Serebriakova
     
    Speaking of IQ (IQ is never OT here), Victor Serebriakoff was a founder of British Mensa.

    That 1909 portrait could have been from 2009. So could this 1942 shot of Ida Lupino, a Camberwell native like Serebriakoff:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ida_Lupino_still.jpg

    https://goo.gl/images/twioBP

    Why did I just learn of Paula Modersohn-Becker? Her birthday is Feb 8, so she muast have been a Google Doodle. She was the first female artist (essentially; there is a technical exception or two) to do her self-portrait in the nude.

    A notable gift to art, of course, but she's too far from realism for that to pay off. Did Zinaida do the same? Inquiring libidos want to know!

    Here is one of her self portraits with her clothes on (this is a PG rated blog):

    https://www.moma.org/collection/works/216210

    This proves that:

    1. The definition of “artist” is somewhat loose.

    2. Not all female self-portraits are self-flattering (although who knows, maybe the real Paula was even uglier).

    Read More
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  55. @Anon
    The problem with female painters is that they don't think big enough. They don't tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that's not good enough. That's not where important Art lies.

    Female painters lack ambition.

    Look at Mary Cassatt. She wasn't painting the Raft of the Medusa by Gericault, or Napoleon Crossing the Alps by David, or The Third of May, 1814 by Goya. That's the problem in a nutshell.

    Zinaida Serebriakova's self-portrait is simply an attempt to paint an average, typical male-gazing-at-a-woman-portrait, which is exactly the problem. There are umpteen zillion portraits like this out there, because men have been painting women with come-hither looks in a state of semi- or complete undress since the Renaissance. The subject matter is trite, and it doesn't become a great artistic innovation or a great portrait just because Serebriakova did it to herself. She's still not thinking big enough. It's an okay self-portrait, but it's not a great portrait like the Mona Lisa, or Ingres' Portrait of Comtesse d'Haussonville.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I miss Calvin and Hobbes. The Far Side too.
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  56. @Buzz Mohawk
    One summer I took a college girlfriend camping in Abiquiu. She was transferring to the Rhode Island School of Design, and it was our last time together. O'Keeffe was still alive then, and we rented a horse from her neighbor.

    That area of the United States has wide-open beauty with interesting shapes and colors. It's no wonder it inspired a painter.

    This O'Keeffe landscape is pretty much the same view we had from our sleeping bags on our first night there:

    http://www.christies.com/media-library/images/features/articles/2016/05/03/georgia-o-keeffe/georgia-okeeffe-red-hills-with-pedernal-whit.jpg?w=780

    “Wake Up -There Are Snakes”

    One summer I took a college girlfriend camping in Abiquiu

    I did the by and large the same in other places of the US and wish, I’d have done it near or at the Ghost Ranch, too. -But I was was more than once freightened – by the possibility even, – that there’d be snakes around when stolling through high gras – barefoot at night, hippie-style… – I know, that’s pretty much a sexual thing too, but anyways, I might as well – you know: Be open about my (inner, ehe) constraints, -
    – – at least now, that I could think of better solutions to my problems – – such as carrying a big torchlight at night, and solid boots, too.

    Old O’Keeffe collected rattle-snake bones…on her daily walks in the desert; she must have been fairly good sighted (and humored) up until her last days.

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    High grass? What you think this is the Schwarzwald?

    http://internet.cybermesa.com/~kempter/photomosaic_images/Abiquiu%20III/Fault1a.jpg

    There is about as much high grass there as there is on Mars.

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  57. @Charles Pewitt
    I wouldn't have given Julie Bell too much art criticism back when she was throwing around the big iron, she might not have taken it too kindly. She says she was always natural and didn't use any juice, I believe her.

    Is it really possible for a woman to build biceps like that without hormones? I am skeptical. The # of people who SAY they don’t juice and the # of people who ACTUALLY don’t juice is not the same number.

    Read More
    • Agree: Buffalo Joe
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  58. @peterike
    That "selfie" portrait does not do her justice as an artist. It's kind of uniquely awful compared to much of her other work, which is often quite good. But she's no Vigée Le Brun.

    I agree. It is so inferior to her other work and so anachronistic-looking that I wonder if it is a fake.

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  59. @Dieter Kief
    "Wake Up -There Are Snakes"

    One summer I took a college girlfriend camping in Abiquiu
     
    I did the by and large the same in other places of the US and wish, I'd have done it near or at the Ghost Ranch, too. -But I was was more than once freightened - by the possibility even, - that there'd be snakes around when stolling through high gras - barefoot at night, hippie-style... - I know, that's pretty much a sexual thing too, but anyways, I might as well - you know: Be open about my (inner, ehe) constraints, -
    - - at least now, that I could think of better solutions to my problems - - such as carrying a big torchlight at night, and solid boots, too.

    Old O'Keeffe collected rattle-snake bones...on her daily walks in the desert; she must have been fairly good sighted (and humored) up until her last days.

    High grass? What you think this is the Schwarzwald?

    There is about as much high grass there as there is on Mars.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    High grass? What you think this is the Schwarzwald?
     
    As I said, it was not there, where we were - out camping and all. The only real threat we encountered while travelling thousands of miles criss cross the US and a little bit of Canada was a pretty exited skunk in the arly morning dawn at lake Michigan; but my (well experienced in such things) girlfriend knew what to do right away: Stop me from doing anything at all.
    (Great photo!)
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  60. Russia’s Zinaida Serebriakova invented the contemporary Instagram selfie as Disney Princess around 1909.

    “For there was never yet fair woman but she made mouths in a glass.”
    ― William Shakespeare, King Lear

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  61. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Obama's portraitist Kehinde Wiley will never rip off a Serebriakova painting the way he rips off JL David's propaganda paintings of Napoleon.

    Serebriakova's most famous painting, House of Cards, was of her four children shortly after their father had died in a Bolshevik prison. That was probably an important subject to her.

    Did she portray her husband actually dying in a prison cell? No. She portrayed children playing cards. If you knew nothing about the scene, you’d assume it was just a rather boring and someone inept painting of kids playing cards. It’s emotionally distanced from its subject matter. That’s my point. It’s a polite, ladylike way of talking about her husband’s death that’s ‘safe’ and won’t rock the boat. That’s why the painting is not considered to be a great painting except by SJW critics trying to gin up the importance of any female artist they’ve heard of.

    Here’s something to contrast it with. One of the most well-known paintings to ever come out of Russia is Repin’s Ivan the Terrible and His Young Son Ivan. Ivan has just mortally wounded his own son and you see him clutching his dying son. You’re riveted by Ivan’s staring eyes, which are both insane and horrified. It delivers an emotional punch directly to the viewer that is absolutely blunt about what happened and why what happened is important.

    Serebriakova never portrays the actual scene that’s the most important thing here, her husband’s death. That is what she should have done. Second-rate painters have this unconscious impulse to dodge the most important point. They paint around it. By refusing to paint it, she took the moral coward’s way out. She has distanced herself emotionally from what’s happened, and she makes the viewer feel emotionally distant, too. That’s why she’s not considered to be a great artist. But Repin punches you in the gut, and that’s why everyone remembers his painting. Serebriakova’s work is the sort of image you forget about once it’s away from your eyes.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Here's the lady painter's mentor Repin's "They Were Not Expecting Him" in which a 19th Century father suddenly arrives home after a difficult Siberian internal exile:

    https://myweb.rollins.edu/aboguslawski/Ruspaint/repdidnt.html

    , @inertial
    Any woman will tell you that she did paint the most important thing here.

    Four fatherless children, without any income, in the middle of a civil war.
    , @Alden
    I’d rather look at a standard pretty girl at her dressing table than Ivan the Terrible beating his son to death. As I remember Ivan didn’t regret the murder at all. Maybe he did but that’s not in most biographies of him.
    , @Alden
    You got me interested so I looked at Repin’s Ivan and some other Russian artists. I liked an artist named Nikolas Ge. Thanks
    , @Alden
    If the viewer didn’t know Ivan killed his son the viewer would think that Ivan had just discovered the body and was mourning the son instead of having killed the son.

    It’s actually kind of poster art, like an illustration in a book or a poster for a play or movie.

    There were lots of book illustrations like that in 19th century gothic and horror novels.
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  62. @Whoever
    https://i.imgur.com/7ESJgsY.jpg

    I miss Calvin and Hobbes. The Far Side too.

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  63. @J.Ross
    Everything you ever were taught about a certain other genocide was preceded in severity and often in specifics by Bolshevism. Human Guinea pigs, human vivisection, deliberate starvation, death work, scientific torture, desperate and confused attempts at escape, turning in your own family members, splitting up families. Hollywood favors one over the other because of budgetary constraints.

    Hollywood favors one over the other because of budgetary constraints.

    He who pays the budget calls the constraints.

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  64. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    The problem with female painters is that they don't think big enough. They don't tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that's not good enough. That's not where important Art lies.

    Female painters lack ambition.

    Look at Mary Cassatt. She wasn't painting the Raft of the Medusa by Gericault, or Napoleon Crossing the Alps by David, or The Third of May, 1814 by Goya. That's the problem in a nutshell.

    Zinaida Serebriakova's self-portrait is simply an attempt to paint an average, typical male-gazing-at-a-woman-portrait, which is exactly the problem. There are umpteen zillion portraits like this out there, because men have been painting women with come-hither looks in a state of semi- or complete undress since the Renaissance. The subject matter is trite, and it doesn't become a great artistic innovation or a great portrait just because Serebriakova did it to herself. She's still not thinking big enough. It's an okay self-portrait, but it's not a great portrait like the Mona Lisa, or Ingres' Portrait of Comtesse d'Haussonville.

    First-rate artists always paint the most important thing that happened. They go straight for it. I cannot emphasize this enough. Second-rate artists always portray something that’s a step or two removed from the most important thing that happened. They flinch. They have an instinct for being a bore, which is why people ignore their work.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    First-rate artists always paint the most important thing that happened. They go straight for it.

    That's called journalism, not art. Journalists cover the most important events and most powerful figures.
    Art can deal with power and eventfulness, but it can just as much meaning in a nobody taxi driver in the mid 70s.
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  65. @Anon
    Did she portray her husband actually dying in a prison cell? No. She portrayed children playing cards. If you knew nothing about the scene, you'd assume it was just a rather boring and someone inept painting of kids playing cards. It's emotionally distanced from its subject matter. That's my point. It's a polite, ladylike way of talking about her husband's death that's 'safe' and won't rock the boat. That's why the painting is not considered to be a great painting except by SJW critics trying to gin up the importance of any female artist they've heard of.

    Here's something to contrast it with. One of the most well-known paintings to ever come out of Russia is Repin's Ivan the Terrible and His Young Son Ivan. Ivan has just mortally wounded his own son and you see him clutching his dying son. You're riveted by Ivan's staring eyes, which are both insane and horrified. It delivers an emotional punch directly to the viewer that is absolutely blunt about what happened and why what happened is important.

    Serebriakova never portrays the actual scene that's the most important thing here, her husband's death. That is what she should have done. Second-rate painters have this unconscious impulse to dodge the most important point. They paint around it. By refusing to paint it, she took the moral coward's way out. She has distanced herself emotionally from what's happened, and she makes the viewer feel emotionally distant, too. That's why she's not considered to be a great artist. But Repin punches you in the gut, and that's why everyone remembers his painting. Serebriakova's work is the sort of image you forget about once it's away from your eyes.

    Here’s the lady painter’s mentor Repin’s “They Were Not Expecting Him” in which a 19th Century father suddenly arrives home after a difficult Siberian internal exile:

    https://myweb.rollins.edu/aboguslawski/Ruspaint/repdidnt.html

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  66. @Buffalo Joe
    the one, I have a collection of Frank Frazetta trading cards. He over exaggerates muscle mass, in men and women, but I like his style. His parents let him paint from nudes when he was just 12 or 13.

    His parents let him paint from nudes when he was just 12 or 13.

    That’s like the Winters letting Johnny and Edgar play in black blues clubs at that age. So that’s the secret of prodigies.

    Which vice should I introduce my kids to? My son was fascinated at age five or six by John Cleese’s wine video. He’ll enter his teens around the next time the Electoral College meets, and œnology and viticulture seem a mild enough pursuit to trust your young to, and can pay off in time.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Reg, buy some paints, paper and brushes and hire the nude models, female of course. If he shows no interest buy yourself a beret and an easel.
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  67. @Anon
    Did she portray her husband actually dying in a prison cell? No. She portrayed children playing cards. If you knew nothing about the scene, you'd assume it was just a rather boring and someone inept painting of kids playing cards. It's emotionally distanced from its subject matter. That's my point. It's a polite, ladylike way of talking about her husband's death that's 'safe' and won't rock the boat. That's why the painting is not considered to be a great painting except by SJW critics trying to gin up the importance of any female artist they've heard of.

    Here's something to contrast it with. One of the most well-known paintings to ever come out of Russia is Repin's Ivan the Terrible and His Young Son Ivan. Ivan has just mortally wounded his own son and you see him clutching his dying son. You're riveted by Ivan's staring eyes, which are both insane and horrified. It delivers an emotional punch directly to the viewer that is absolutely blunt about what happened and why what happened is important.

    Serebriakova never portrays the actual scene that's the most important thing here, her husband's death. That is what she should have done. Second-rate painters have this unconscious impulse to dodge the most important point. They paint around it. By refusing to paint it, she took the moral coward's way out. She has distanced herself emotionally from what's happened, and she makes the viewer feel emotionally distant, too. That's why she's not considered to be a great artist. But Repin punches you in the gut, and that's why everyone remembers his painting. Serebriakova's work is the sort of image you forget about once it's away from your eyes.

    Any woman will tell you that she did paint the most important thing here.

    Four fatherless children, without any income, in the middle of a civil war.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Inertial's comment was to the point. Mr. Unz, please fix the comments protocol. And thank you.
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  68. @Reg Cæsar

    His parents let him paint from nudes when he was just 12 or 13.
     
    That's like the Winters letting Johnny and Edgar play in black blues clubs at that age. So that's the secret of prodigies.

    Which vice should I introduce my kids to? My son was fascinated at age five or six by John Cleese's wine video. He'll enter his teens around the next time the Electoral College meets, and œnology and viticulture seem a mild enough pursuit to trust your young to, and can pay off in time.

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5167XSMR3ZL._SY445_.jpg

    Reg, buy some paints, paper and brushes and hire the nude models, female of course. If he shows no interest buy yourself a beret and an easel.

    Read More
    • LOL: Kylie
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  69. Zinaida Serebriakova has a young Jane Seymour thing going on….

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  70. I watched a travelogue the other night called Aerial Ireland. What a beautiful country, but one city, Ulster IIRC, is divided by a high wall topped with a fence. A relic of the “troubles” as they called it.

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  71. @inertial
    Any woman will tell you that she did paint the most important thing here.

    Four fatherless children, without any income, in the middle of a civil war.

    Inertial’s comment was to the point. Mr. Unz, please fix the comments protocol. And thank you.

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  72. @Anon
    The problem with female painters is that they don't think big enough. They don't tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that's not good enough. That's not where important Art lies.

    Female painters lack ambition.

    Look at Mary Cassatt. She wasn't painting the Raft of the Medusa by Gericault, or Napoleon Crossing the Alps by David, or The Third of May, 1814 by Goya. That's the problem in a nutshell.

    Zinaida Serebriakova's self-portrait is simply an attempt to paint an average, typical male-gazing-at-a-woman-portrait, which is exactly the problem. There are umpteen zillion portraits like this out there, because men have been painting women with come-hither looks in a state of semi- or complete undress since the Renaissance. The subject matter is trite, and it doesn't become a great artistic innovation or a great portrait just because Serebriakova did it to herself. She's still not thinking big enough. It's an okay self-portrait, but it's not a great portrait like the Mona Lisa, or Ingres' Portrait of Comtesse d'Haussonville.

    Women prefer mirrors to canvases.

    And they wanted to be painted than paint.

    I’ll bet women are far more selfie crazy than men are.

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  73. @Anon
    http://www.spiked-online.com/spiked-review/article/the-revolt-against-the-masses/20943#.Wo8iLdQrK4Q

    Excellent article, thanks.

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  74. @AndrewR
    Random observation: Apparently few if any people objected to this painting in Russia, but I have a vague sense that she would have been derided as a slut in the Anglosphere in 1909. Her choice of attire seems quite risqué by Edwardian standards.

    You don’t know much about the Edwardian era do you? Just check out the paintings of the era. And then check out the person for whom the era is named.

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I know he was a total degenerate. But my impression is that exposure of non-hand skin below the neck remained quite taboo until after the war.
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  75. @YetAnotherAnon
    "They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that’s not good enough."

    Elizabeth Thompson, Lady Butler, was the foremost painter of military scenes in the Victorian age.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b2/Elizabeth_Thompson_-_The_28th_Regiment_at_Quatre_Bras_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg/1280px-Elizabeth_Thompson_-_The_28th_Regiment_at_Quatre_Bras_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

    Tamara de Lempicka was pretty too.

    I was going to mention Lady Butler.you got there first. I love her paintings

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  76. @Buffalo Joe
    Andrew, Don't know. She has a blouse or under garment on and it has slipped from her left shoulder, but nothing is exposed. Lots of pictures from the Edwardian period show women in what I call push up bras, or I think they are called bustiers (sic). And occasionally more than a little flesh overflows the top. I like her treatment of light and the shadow her hair casts across her shoulder.

    Andrew has never seen many Edwardian or 19th century paintings . He’d Probably faint if he saw Alma Tameda’ girls in Ancient Greek outfits.

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  77. @Anon
    The problem with female painters is that they don't think big enough. They don't tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that's not good enough. That's not where important Art lies.

    Female painters lack ambition.

    Look at Mary Cassatt. She wasn't painting the Raft of the Medusa by Gericault, or Napoleon Crossing the Alps by David, or The Third of May, 1814 by Goya. That's the problem in a nutshell.

    Zinaida Serebriakova's self-portrait is simply an attempt to paint an average, typical male-gazing-at-a-woman-portrait, which is exactly the problem. There are umpteen zillion portraits like this out there, because men have been painting women with come-hither looks in a state of semi- or complete undress since the Renaissance. The subject matter is trite, and it doesn't become a great artistic innovation or a great portrait just because Serebriakova did it to herself. She's still not thinking big enough. It's an okay self-portrait, but it's not a great portrait like the Mona Lisa, or Ingres' Portrait of Comtesse d'Haussonville.

    I could never see what’s so great about the Mona Lisa. That’s just me.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    I could never see what’s so great about the Mona Lisa. That’s just me.

    Mood and tonality, sense of mystery in the Gioconda smile in that dusky haze.

    Sheejus, look at this:

    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=mona+lisa&FORM=HDRSC2

    Photoshopping has turned everyone into a pomo comedian pomodian. Never mind 50 genders. Mona has attained 500 identities.

    This...

    http://www.freakingnews.com/pictures/122000/Chewbacca-as-the-Mona-Lisa--122313.jpg

    Did this inspire the Obama painting:

    http://www.risasinmas.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/La-parte-oculta-de-La-Mona-Lisa-600x813.jpg

    Some say Mona Lisa became a famous painting due to accident of history, but there is something there that is captivating in some strange way.

    In terms of pleasantness, Lady with Ermine wins hands down.

    https://www.leonardodavinci.net/images/gallery/lady-with-an-ermine.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/f3/e0/2f/f3e02f849bdee66242ec47ff44875ce1.jpg

    The woman is clearly prettier, it is brighter, details are clearer against a stark black background.

    Mona Lisa, in contrast, looks like something seen in a dream. Is it dusk, is it cloudy, did age stain the painting? It has some of the somber colors of religious paintings, but it's not religious. It is a real-life portrait but has an otherworldly air. Something of the Madonna, even Jesus, about her, which makes it even stranger. Eyes are those of Jesus, fixing an eternal all-knowing gaze. The impish mouth is like that of Cupid or hooker. The lack of eyebrows make her look ghostly or incomplete, which also provokes our imagination.

    If a face is very pretty or very ugly, our responses would be simpler, but with Mona Lisa, we can't never make up our mind if she is beautiful(in a way yes), plain-faced(like Charlie Brown or George Washington), feminine, masculine, mature, youngish, etc. It's a face of a thousand faces. On the one hand, it's very placid, whole, and harmonious. But we can't help feeling something isn't right about the face or the 'weather'(real or dream). There's a lot of muted clamor within the calmness.

    It's like wine vs juice. Juice is nicer but wine lingers.

    But when it comes to the greatest painting ever, nothing comes close to Primavera.

    https://www.wga.hu/art/b/botticel/5allegor/10primav.jpg
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  78. @Anon
    Did she portray her husband actually dying in a prison cell? No. She portrayed children playing cards. If you knew nothing about the scene, you'd assume it was just a rather boring and someone inept painting of kids playing cards. It's emotionally distanced from its subject matter. That's my point. It's a polite, ladylike way of talking about her husband's death that's 'safe' and won't rock the boat. That's why the painting is not considered to be a great painting except by SJW critics trying to gin up the importance of any female artist they've heard of.

    Here's something to contrast it with. One of the most well-known paintings to ever come out of Russia is Repin's Ivan the Terrible and His Young Son Ivan. Ivan has just mortally wounded his own son and you see him clutching his dying son. You're riveted by Ivan's staring eyes, which are both insane and horrified. It delivers an emotional punch directly to the viewer that is absolutely blunt about what happened and why what happened is important.

    Serebriakova never portrays the actual scene that's the most important thing here, her husband's death. That is what she should have done. Second-rate painters have this unconscious impulse to dodge the most important point. They paint around it. By refusing to paint it, she took the moral coward's way out. She has distanced herself emotionally from what's happened, and she makes the viewer feel emotionally distant, too. That's why she's not considered to be a great artist. But Repin punches you in the gut, and that's why everyone remembers his painting. Serebriakova's work is the sort of image you forget about once it's away from your eyes.

    I’d rather look at a standard pretty girl at her dressing table than Ivan the Terrible beating his son to death. As I remember Ivan didn’t regret the murder at all. Maybe he did but that’s not in most biographies of him.

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    • Replies: @inertial

    As I remember Ivan didn’t regret the murder at all.
     
    He didn't regret it because he most likely didn't do it. It's one of the many black legends about Ivan and there is no historical evidence for it.
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  79. @Anon
    Did she portray her husband actually dying in a prison cell? No. She portrayed children playing cards. If you knew nothing about the scene, you'd assume it was just a rather boring and someone inept painting of kids playing cards. It's emotionally distanced from its subject matter. That's my point. It's a polite, ladylike way of talking about her husband's death that's 'safe' and won't rock the boat. That's why the painting is not considered to be a great painting except by SJW critics trying to gin up the importance of any female artist they've heard of.

    Here's something to contrast it with. One of the most well-known paintings to ever come out of Russia is Repin's Ivan the Terrible and His Young Son Ivan. Ivan has just mortally wounded his own son and you see him clutching his dying son. You're riveted by Ivan's staring eyes, which are both insane and horrified. It delivers an emotional punch directly to the viewer that is absolutely blunt about what happened and why what happened is important.

    Serebriakova never portrays the actual scene that's the most important thing here, her husband's death. That is what she should have done. Second-rate painters have this unconscious impulse to dodge the most important point. They paint around it. By refusing to paint it, she took the moral coward's way out. She has distanced herself emotionally from what's happened, and she makes the viewer feel emotionally distant, too. That's why she's not considered to be a great artist. But Repin punches you in the gut, and that's why everyone remembers his painting. Serebriakova's work is the sort of image you forget about once it's away from your eyes.

    You got me interested so I looked at Repin’s Ivan and some other Russian artists. I liked an artist named Nikolas Ge. Thanks

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  80. @Buzz Mohawk
    Some of us who were living in the American Southwest fell for Georgia O'Keeffe but grew out of our infatuation.

    C'mon though, how could a young man not be drawn to paintings like this?

    http://assets2.bigthink.com/system/idea_thumbnails/18931/primary/11_Music_Pink_and_Blue_No._2--edited.jpg?1267762023

    Never liked her paintings. But the idiot intellectuals sure did for the same reason they fell for Dr Fraud’s therapy.

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  81. @Dwright
    The Russian artist left her children behind?

    She didn’t leave any children behind. She took her 2 children with her.

    Her 2 adult grown children were not allowed to leave by the Soviet authorities.

    This was during the height of the soviet horror show when Russia was surrounded by barbed wire armed guards with orders to shoot to kill, guard dogs watch towers no mans lands covered by machine guns in the towers

    These measures were necessary to keep the Russians from fleeing their soviet paradise. Only a very, very few were ever allowed to leave.

    Maybe Ron could set up a misogynists corner before every woman who reads the site is driven away by comments such as yours and others who have done nothing but sneer at her art because she’s a woman.

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    • Replies: @Obsessive Contrarian
    "Maybe Ron could set up a misogynists corner before every woman who reads the site is driven away by comments such as yours and others who have done nothing but sneer at her art because she’s a woman."

    I thought that's what Unz.com is!
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  82. @Anon
    Did she portray her husband actually dying in a prison cell? No. She portrayed children playing cards. If you knew nothing about the scene, you'd assume it was just a rather boring and someone inept painting of kids playing cards. It's emotionally distanced from its subject matter. That's my point. It's a polite, ladylike way of talking about her husband's death that's 'safe' and won't rock the boat. That's why the painting is not considered to be a great painting except by SJW critics trying to gin up the importance of any female artist they've heard of.

    Here's something to contrast it with. One of the most well-known paintings to ever come out of Russia is Repin's Ivan the Terrible and His Young Son Ivan. Ivan has just mortally wounded his own son and you see him clutching his dying son. You're riveted by Ivan's staring eyes, which are both insane and horrified. It delivers an emotional punch directly to the viewer that is absolutely blunt about what happened and why what happened is important.

    Serebriakova never portrays the actual scene that's the most important thing here, her husband's death. That is what she should have done. Second-rate painters have this unconscious impulse to dodge the most important point. They paint around it. By refusing to paint it, she took the moral coward's way out. She has distanced herself emotionally from what's happened, and she makes the viewer feel emotionally distant, too. That's why she's not considered to be a great artist. But Repin punches you in the gut, and that's why everyone remembers his painting. Serebriakova's work is the sort of image you forget about once it's away from your eyes.

    If the viewer didn’t know Ivan killed his son the viewer would think that Ivan had just discovered the body and was mourning the son instead of having killed the son.

    It’s actually kind of poster art, like an illustration in a book or a poster for a play or movie.

    There were lots of book illustrations like that in 19th century gothic and horror novels.

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  83. @Anon
    The problem with female painters is that they don't think big enough. They don't tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that's not good enough. That's not where important Art lies.

    Female painters lack ambition.

    Look at Mary Cassatt. She wasn't painting the Raft of the Medusa by Gericault, or Napoleon Crossing the Alps by David, or The Third of May, 1814 by Goya. That's the problem in a nutshell.

    Zinaida Serebriakova's self-portrait is simply an attempt to paint an average, typical male-gazing-at-a-woman-portrait, which is exactly the problem. There are umpteen zillion portraits like this out there, because men have been painting women with come-hither looks in a state of semi- or complete undress since the Renaissance. The subject matter is trite, and it doesn't become a great artistic innovation or a great portrait just because Serebriakova did it to herself. She's still not thinking big enough. It's an okay self-portrait, but it's not a great portrait like the Mona Lisa, or Ingres' Portrait of Comtesse d'Haussonville.

    How about Dorothea Tanning’s Birthday?

    http://philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/93232.html

    I saw this in person and was mesmerized. I am not certain how to interpret that fact.

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    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    "I saw this in person and was mesmerized"

    Max Ernst, then married to Peggy Guggenheim, was mesmerised by it (or them) too, although Wiki prefers "enchanted". At any event, he left his wife for her and they lived happily ever after until his death.
    , @Alden
    Wow!!!!!!!!!! Loved the painting. The innocuous title just adds to the impact.
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  84. @Obsessive Contrarian
    There's a small potatoes lady painter in Florida who makes a decent living painting pictures of pretty, young women, doing mundane things with slightly puzzled expressions on their faces. I forgot her name otherwise I'd link.

    She has decent chops as a draftsman and can certainly paint, but the appeal is her talent at voyeuristically catching young women doing stuff. If she painted young men doing stuff the paintings wouldn't be nearly as interesting.

    Food for thought.

    Hmmm, sounds intriguing. What were the scenes / what was depicted? Contemporary or old-timey vibe? What town is the painter from? Maybe I could guess at titles.

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    • Replies: @Obsessive Contrarian
    I'd rather not say her name due to excessive concerns about Homeland Security coming to arrest her because of her being mentioned on a crimethink site. But to answer your questions, the scenes are 100% contemporary, in fact, that's their appeal.

    Imagine any of the Sex & the City sluts, but in their 20s and genuinely pretty, the morning after, thinking it over. That's the look she captures, and her paintings are (I think) quite haunting, even if they aren't exactly Le Brun quality. They're better than the gal who did Michelle Obama, I've already forgotten her name.

    So here's a key to success as a fine artist: get some portrait drawing chops, and paint lots of pictures of quizzical looking pretty young women who look as if they've done something they regret.

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  85. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    The problem with female painters is that they don't think big enough. They don't tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that's not good enough. That's not where important Art lies.

    Female painters lack ambition.

    Look at Mary Cassatt. She wasn't painting the Raft of the Medusa by Gericault, or Napoleon Crossing the Alps by David, or The Third of May, 1814 by Goya. That's the problem in a nutshell.

    Zinaida Serebriakova's self-portrait is simply an attempt to paint an average, typical male-gazing-at-a-woman-portrait, which is exactly the problem. There are umpteen zillion portraits like this out there, because men have been painting women with come-hither looks in a state of semi- or complete undress since the Renaissance. The subject matter is trite, and it doesn't become a great artistic innovation or a great portrait just because Serebriakova did it to herself. She's still not thinking big enough. It's an okay self-portrait, but it's not a great portrait like the Mona Lisa, or Ingres' Portrait of Comtesse d'Haussonville.

    The problem with female painters is that they don’t think big enough. They don’t tackle major subjects or do paintings with major impact. They do polite, little, ladylike paintings, and that’s not good enough.

    You gotta be trolling. So, a marching band music is better than a beautiful aria?

    Van Gogh wasn’t important because he painted farms and flowers instead of war?

    Subject counts for less in art. Some of the greatest novels are about life looked at closely. Something like GONE WITH THE WIND is big and romantic and has lots of fans, but it’s not serious literature.

    I personally like smaller subjects in painting unless its landscape. I never much cared for paintings of battles and overtly lively stuff. Why? It’s just the nature of the form. In paintings of battles and big events, artists wanted to create the impression of motion. They were reaching for cinema before cinema. Except it never quite works because a painting is a still image, and so the action and excitement seem unreal and forced.

    This is why most photography is about still subjects. It’s about clarity or tones.

    With the advent of cinema, there was no more need for big exciting paintings.

    Paintings are best at symbolism, suggestion, shapes and shades, and colors. Before the rise of color photography, that was one huge advantage painting had. And even now, paintings can do things with colors that don’t work in photography.

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  86. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    First-rate artists always paint the most important thing that happened. They go straight for it. I cannot emphasize this enough. Second-rate artists always portray something that's a step or two removed from the most important thing that happened. They flinch. They have an instinct for being a bore, which is why people ignore their work.

    First-rate artists always paint the most important thing that happened. They go straight for it.

    That’s called journalism, not art. Journalists cover the most important events and most powerful figures.
    Art can deal with power and eventfulness, but it can just as much meaning in a nobody taxi driver in the mid 70s.

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  87. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden
    I could never see what’s so great about the Mona Lisa. That’s just me.

    I could never see what’s so great about the Mona Lisa. That’s just me.

    Mood and tonality, sense of mystery in the Gioconda smile in that dusky haze.

    Sheejus, look at this:

    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=mona+lisa&FORM=HDRSC2

    Photoshopping has turned everyone into a pomo comedian pomodian. Never mind 50 genders. Mona has attained 500 identities.

    This…

    Did this inspire the Obama painting:

    Some say Mona Lisa became a famous painting due to accident of history, but there is something there that is captivating in some strange way.

    In terms of pleasantness, Lady with Ermine wins hands down.

    The woman is clearly prettier, it is brighter, details are clearer against a stark black background.

    Mona Lisa, in contrast, looks like something seen in a dream. Is it dusk, is it cloudy, did age stain the painting? It has some of the somber colors of religious paintings, but it’s not religious. It is a real-life portrait but has an otherworldly air. Something of the Madonna, even Jesus, about her, which makes it even stranger. Eyes are those of Jesus, fixing an eternal all-knowing gaze. The impish mouth is like that of Cupid or hooker. The lack of eyebrows make her look ghostly or incomplete, which also provokes our imagination.

    If a face is very pretty or very ugly, our responses would be simpler, but with Mona Lisa, we can’t never make up our mind if she is beautiful(in a way yes), plain-faced(like Charlie Brown or George Washington), feminine, masculine, mature, youngish, etc. It’s a face of a thousand faces. On the one hand, it’s very placid, whole, and harmonious. But we can’t help feeling something isn’t right about the face or the ‘weather’(real or dream). There’s a lot of muted clamor within the calmness.

    It’s like wine vs juice. Juice is nicer but wine lingers.

    But when it comes to the greatest painting ever, nothing comes close to Primavera.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Lisa’s eyebrows were the fashion of the time. But to me, it’s just a portrait. I’ve loved the Botticelli girls since I first saw his paintings. The most beautiful of all is Fra Lippi’s wife & model for all his madonnas.

    I like all art except for some of Picasso’s really ugly stuff. Land and naval battles, medieval religious art, Botticelli, the French artist who did all those housewives setting the table, fruit and flowers, I love it all.

    One of the grand sons just got grown up bedroom furniture. So I gave him a reproduction of Picasso’s Caballos. It’s a beige horse and a man against a caramel background. Looks great with the black furniture ocher walls and the bedspread he picked.

    I wonder how much the ugly abstract Picassos and the rest of the ugly 20 th century art will be worth 200 years from now?
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  88. @Matthew Kelly
    There's a conspicuous absence of pubic hair in Bath-House, 1913. Were the Russians ahead of the curve on that, ahem, front?

    “There’s a conspicuous absence of pubic hair in Bath-House, 1913″

    Few artists painted pubic hair that I can think of until maybe Modigliani. Titian, Rubens, Botticelli tended to veil or otherwise hide female pudenda.

    Iris Tree, one of Modgliani’s nudes, lived long enough to act in Fellini’s La Dolce Vita.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iris_Tree

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  89. @Alden
    I’d rather look at a standard pretty girl at her dressing table than Ivan the Terrible beating his son to death. As I remember Ivan didn’t regret the murder at all. Maybe he did but that’s not in most biographies of him.

    As I remember Ivan didn’t regret the murder at all.

    He didn’t regret it because he most likely didn’t do it. It’s one of the many black legends about Ivan and there is no historical evidence for it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Really? All the biographies claim he did it. Supposedly it was because Ivan objected to the Prince’s wife wearing a maternity dress instead of the court robes that didn’t fit her at 8 months.

    Very interesting, thanks for the info.
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  90. @Anonymous
    How about Dorothea Tanning's Birthday?
    http://philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/93232.html

    I saw this in person and was mesmerized. I am not certain how to interpret that fact.

    “I saw this in person and was mesmerized”

    Max Ernst, then married to Peggy Guggenheim, was mesmerised by it (or them) too, although Wiki prefers “enchanted”. At any event, he left his wife for her and they lived happily ever after until his death.

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  91. @Alden
    You don’t know much about the Edwardian era do you? Just check out the paintings of the era. And then check out the person for whom the era is named.

    I know he was a total degenerate. But my impression is that exposure of non-hand skin below the neck remained quite taboo until after the war.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    That comment shows total ignorance of 19th and early 20 th century women’s fashion and art.

    Have you ever seen photos of Mrs Lincoln? She wore the fashion of the day and her ball gowns and a daytime dresses showed as much of her arms, neck and shoulders as the painting does

    Same with Mrs Madison who was First Lady around 1815?

    Just ask Mr google to show women’s fashions 3,000BC to 2,000 AD. You are ignorant of medieval and early modern catholic religious art aren’t you? Ask Mr google to show you a variety of Madonnas and catholic women saints
    Many of them show necks, collar bones and even a bit of cleavage.

    Is there a public library within 50 miles of your hermit’s cabin? Every library in the country has books of art and wonen’s Fashions through the ages.

    That is, if you live in America and not Saudi Arabia or Afghanistan where they don’t have libraries.
    , @Alden
    Check out pictures of Queen Victoria when she was young. She wore the standard women’s clothes of the 1840’s and 50’s. Her pictures before 1860 showed neck, arms shoulders and a bit of cleavage, just like every other woman in England.

    How is it possible you have never seen pictures of famous 19th early 20th century women wearing the common fashions of the day that showed arms necks shoulders and cleavage?

    Check out pictures of 19th century American presidents wives. You obviously have internet.
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  92. @Hippopotamusdrome
    Technically she is in her bedroom in her underwear. She wouldn't leave the house in that.

    But she painted it and presented it publicly. That’s a distinction without a difference.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    You don’t have to look do you? What’s wrong? Does the sight of arms and neck get you all twitterpated?

    Never been to a beach or park or went to the prom or anywhere you saw the sinful sight of arms necks and shoulders have you? What do you do in summer, lock yourself in the house so to avoid the sinful sight of women’s arms and necks?

    One must assume you are a Muslim if the full burka and face veil variety. Or you got sexually fixated on a 1930’s catholic nun who taught in your school wearing the long black robes with only the face exposed .

    Oh well, the world is full of perverts and weirdos.
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  93. @AndrewR
    Random observation: Apparently few if any people objected to this painting in Russia, but I have a vague sense that she would have been derided as a slut in the Anglosphere in 1909. Her choice of attire seems quite risqué by Edwardian standards.

    Check out Maxfield Parrish the most popular American artist of the Edwardian era and early 20 th century. He specialized in pretty naked ladies in classical fantasy settings

    Better have your caretaker and oxygen and heart medicine with you because if you’re offended by her you’ll have a heart attack when you see the Parrish pictures

    Any way to market the site to get men who aren’t misogynist 90 year old virgins as commenters?

    Affirmative action, unchecked non White immigration, destruction of our great cities by blacks, vicious hatred spewed at Whites by the media and academia and the 90 year old male virgins think a woman’s neck, arms and shoulders are obscene.

    Move to Saudi Arabia if the sight of a woman’s arms neck and shoulders offends you so much.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Not gonna lie. This comment had me crying laughing. Well done, you funny ass nutjob troll.
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  94. @the one they call Desanex
    Lorraine Schleter is very attractive (she’s sort of a female Frank Frazetta, with comparable talent.)
    https://www.metal-archives.com/images/4/4/8/9/448931_artist.jpg?1113
    This looks like a self-portrait:
    https://img00.deviantart.net/5051/i/2013/109/f/9/aeons__gun_slinger_by_lorraine_schleter-d62a5ob.jpg
    Her great comic strip “A Tale of Two Rulers” can be seen here (149 weekly episodes so far):
    http://figmentforms.tumblr.com/post/139806271367/a-tale-of-two-rulers-archive-post

    Is it possible to remove Lorraine Schleter’s paintings? One shows a woman’s legs the other shows her neck and collarbone. We don’t want to Andrew, L Woods and NickG heart attack’s do we.?

    If the sight of a woman disturbs them so much, they should move to Saudi Arabia or get some meds to deal with their problems.

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  95. @AndrewR
    But she painted it and presented it publicly. That's a distinction without a difference.

    You don’t have to look do you? What’s wrong? Does the sight of arms and neck get you all twitterpated?

    Never been to a beach or park or went to the prom or anywhere you saw the sinful sight of arms necks and shoulders have you? What do you do in summer, lock yourself in the house so to avoid the sinful sight of women’s arms and necks?

    One must assume you are a Muslim if the full burka and face veil variety. Or you got sexually fixated on a 1930’s catholic nun who taught in your school wearing the long black robes with only the face exposed .

    Oh well, the world is full of perverts and weirdos.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Shitty trolling, champ
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  96. @AndrewR
    I know he was a total degenerate. But my impression is that exposure of non-hand skin below the neck remained quite taboo until after the war.

    That comment shows total ignorance of 19th and early 20 th century women’s fashion and art.

    Have you ever seen photos of Mrs Lincoln? She wore the fashion of the day and her ball gowns and a daytime dresses showed as much of her arms, neck and shoulders as the painting does

    Same with Mrs Madison who was First Lady around 1815?

    Just ask Mr google to show women’s fashions 3,000BC to 2,000 AD. You are ignorant of medieval and early modern catholic religious art aren’t you? Ask Mr google to show you a variety of Madonnas and catholic women saints
    Many of them show necks, collar bones and even a bit of cleavage.

    Is there a public library within 50 miles of your hermit’s cabin? Every library in the country has books of art and wonen’s Fashions through the ages.

    That is, if you live in America and not Saudi Arabia or Afghanistan where they don’t have libraries.

    Read More
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  97. @AndrewR
    I know he was a total degenerate. But my impression is that exposure of non-hand skin below the neck remained quite taboo until after the war.

    Check out pictures of Queen Victoria when she was young. She wore the standard women’s clothes of the 1840’s and 50’s. Her pictures before 1860 showed neck, arms shoulders and a bit of cleavage, just like every other woman in England.

    How is it possible you have never seen pictures of famous 19th early 20th century women wearing the common fashions of the day that showed arms necks shoulders and cleavage?

    Check out pictures of 19th century American presidents wives. You obviously have internet.

    Read More
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  98. @inertial

    As I remember Ivan didn’t regret the murder at all.
     
    He didn't regret it because he most likely didn't do it. It's one of the many black legends about Ivan and there is no historical evidence for it.

    Really? All the biographies claim he did it. Supposedly it was because Ivan objected to the Prince’s wife wearing a maternity dress instead of the court robes that didn’t fit her at 8 months.

    Very interesting, thanks for the info.

    Read More
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  99. @Jack D
    High grass? What you think this is the Schwarzwald?

    http://internet.cybermesa.com/~kempter/photomosaic_images/Abiquiu%20III/Fault1a.jpg

    There is about as much high grass there as there is on Mars.

    High grass? What you think this is the Schwarzwald?

    As I said, it was not there, where we were – out camping and all. The only real threat we encountered while travelling thousands of miles criss cross the US and a little bit of Canada was a pretty exited skunk in the arly morning dawn at lake Michigan; but my (well experienced in such things) girlfriend knew what to do right away: Stop me from doing anything at all.
    (Great photo!)

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  100. @Anon
    I could never see what’s so great about the Mona Lisa. That’s just me.

    Mood and tonality, sense of mystery in the Gioconda smile in that dusky haze.

    Sheejus, look at this:

    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=mona+lisa&FORM=HDRSC2

    Photoshopping has turned everyone into a pomo comedian pomodian. Never mind 50 genders. Mona has attained 500 identities.

    This...

    http://www.freakingnews.com/pictures/122000/Chewbacca-as-the-Mona-Lisa--122313.jpg

    Did this inspire the Obama painting:

    http://www.risasinmas.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/La-parte-oculta-de-La-Mona-Lisa-600x813.jpg

    Some say Mona Lisa became a famous painting due to accident of history, but there is something there that is captivating in some strange way.

    In terms of pleasantness, Lady with Ermine wins hands down.

    https://www.leonardodavinci.net/images/gallery/lady-with-an-ermine.jpg

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/f3/e0/2f/f3e02f849bdee66242ec47ff44875ce1.jpg

    The woman is clearly prettier, it is brighter, details are clearer against a stark black background.

    Mona Lisa, in contrast, looks like something seen in a dream. Is it dusk, is it cloudy, did age stain the painting? It has some of the somber colors of religious paintings, but it's not religious. It is a real-life portrait but has an otherworldly air. Something of the Madonna, even Jesus, about her, which makes it even stranger. Eyes are those of Jesus, fixing an eternal all-knowing gaze. The impish mouth is like that of Cupid or hooker. The lack of eyebrows make her look ghostly or incomplete, which also provokes our imagination.

    If a face is very pretty or very ugly, our responses would be simpler, but with Mona Lisa, we can't never make up our mind if she is beautiful(in a way yes), plain-faced(like Charlie Brown or George Washington), feminine, masculine, mature, youngish, etc. It's a face of a thousand faces. On the one hand, it's very placid, whole, and harmonious. But we can't help feeling something isn't right about the face or the 'weather'(real or dream). There's a lot of muted clamor within the calmness.

    It's like wine vs juice. Juice is nicer but wine lingers.

    But when it comes to the greatest painting ever, nothing comes close to Primavera.

    https://www.wga.hu/art/b/botticel/5allegor/10primav.jpg

    Lisa’s eyebrows were the fashion of the time. But to me, it’s just a portrait. I’ve loved the Botticelli girls since I first saw his paintings. The most beautiful of all is Fra Lippi’s wife & model for all his madonnas.

    I like all art except for some of Picasso’s really ugly stuff. Land and naval battles, medieval religious art, Botticelli, the French artist who did all those housewives setting the table, fruit and flowers, I love it all.

    One of the grand sons just got grown up bedroom furniture. So I gave him a reproduction of Picasso’s Caballos. It’s a beige horse and a man against a caramel background. Looks great with the black furniture ocher walls and the bedspread he picked.

    I wonder how much the ugly abstract Picassos and the rest of the ugly 20 th century art will be worth 200 years from now?

    Read More
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  101. @Anonymous
    How about Dorothea Tanning's Birthday?
    http://philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/93232.html

    I saw this in person and was mesmerized. I am not certain how to interpret that fact.

    Wow!!!!!!!!!! Loved the painting. The innocuous title just adds to the impact.

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  102. @Anonymous
    Not a beautiful lady painter but check out another Russian emigre painter, Nikolai Fechin. Probably the best portraitist of the 20th century, he lived in New Mexico.

    http://www.artfixdaily.com/images/pr/july26_fechin.jpg

    https://gallerix.ru/storeroom/2114439537/

    That’s a beautiful picture. She’s very appealing

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  103. @Dieter Kief
    Joni Mitchell was pretty much grwon up, when she visited O'Keeffe at her Ghost Ranch in Abiquiu, in the desert of New Mexico. She knew about O'Keeffe's eroticism - and didn't shy away at all - she admired her - ehe - deeply.

    Maria Angelica Catherina Kauffmann was pretty much a product of a liberal father and friend of the arts in Chur at the Alpine Rhine. She was good, but not great. Goethe and Herder liked her a lot. She knew her ways in the (art)-society of London, Venice and Rome, and she could make a good living of her art. - She was the second after Maria Sibylla Merian to chieve this goal, I assume.

    The even greater miracle at the upper Rhine was a predecessor of Kaufmann - Maria Sybilla Merian (1647 - 1717) from Basel, who did great watercoulours of plants - flowers especially. She even travelled to (and in) South-America. A descendent of her published Robert Crumbs latest book in Europe - and in a really perfect way. Such is Basel, one of the European miracles, situated at the rhine-knee, where the Rhine changes direction and flows then to the north.

    Didn’t Maria Angelica Kaufman do a lot of ceiling murals? Maybe I’m wrong

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  104. @NickG
    Female attention whoring is nothing new.

    Why don’t you just set up a website for you and other women haters?

    Call it wehatewomen.org

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  105. @Alden
    You don’t have to look do you? What’s wrong? Does the sight of arms and neck get you all twitterpated?

    Never been to a beach or park or went to the prom or anywhere you saw the sinful sight of arms necks and shoulders have you? What do you do in summer, lock yourself in the house so to avoid the sinful sight of women’s arms and necks?

    One must assume you are a Muslim if the full burka and face veil variety. Or you got sexually fixated on a 1930’s catholic nun who taught in your school wearing the long black robes with only the face exposed .

    Oh well, the world is full of perverts and weirdos.

    Shitty trolling, champ

    Read More
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  106. @Alden
    Check out Maxfield Parrish the most popular American artist of the Edwardian era and early 20 th century. He specialized in pretty naked ladies in classical fantasy settings

    Better have your caretaker and oxygen and heart medicine with you because if you’re offended by her you’ll have a heart attack when you see the Parrish pictures

    Any way to market the site to get men who aren’t misogynist 90 year old virgins as commenters?

    Affirmative action, unchecked non White immigration, destruction of our great cities by blacks, vicious hatred spewed at Whites by the media and academia and the 90 year old male virgins think a woman’s neck, arms and shoulders are obscene.

    Move to Saudi Arabia if the sight of a woman’s arms neck and shoulders offends you so much.

    Not gonna lie. This comment had me crying laughing. Well done, you funny ass nutjob troll.

    Read More
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  107. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Hmmm, sounds intriguing. What were the scenes / what was depicted? Contemporary or old-timey vibe? What town is the painter from? Maybe I could guess at titles.

    I’d rather not say her name due to excessive concerns about Homeland Security coming to arrest her because of her being mentioned on a crimethink site. But to answer your questions, the scenes are 100% contemporary, in fact, that’s their appeal.

    Imagine any of the Sex & the City sluts, but in their 20s and genuinely pretty, the morning after, thinking it over. That’s the look she captures, and her paintings are (I think) quite haunting, even if they aren’t exactly Le Brun quality. They’re better than the gal who did Michelle Obama, I’ve already forgotten her name.

    So here’s a key to success as a fine artist: get some portrait drawing chops, and paint lots of pictures of quizzical looking pretty young women who look as if they’ve done something they regret.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I’d rather not say her name due to excessive concerns about Homeland Security coming to arrest her because of her being mentioned on a crimethink site.
     
    Well I highly doubt that’s going to happen. :) Though if you perhaps have a personal connection with the artist, I can see why you’re a bit cagey. Ah, c’est la vie.

    Thanks anyway for responding.

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  108. @Alden
    She didn’t leave any children behind. She took her 2 children with her.

    Her 2 adult grown children were not allowed to leave by the Soviet authorities.

    This was during the height of the soviet horror show when Russia was surrounded by barbed wire armed guards with orders to shoot to kill, guard dogs watch towers no mans lands covered by machine guns in the towers

    These measures were necessary to keep the Russians from fleeing their soviet paradise. Only a very, very few were ever allowed to leave.

    Maybe Ron could set up a misogynists corner before every woman who reads the site is driven away by comments such as yours and others who have done nothing but sneer at her art because she’s a woman.

    “Maybe Ron could set up a misogynists corner before every woman who reads the site is driven away by comments such as yours and others who have done nothing but sneer at her art because she’s a woman.”

    I thought that’s what Unz.com is!

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  109. @Obsessive Contrarian
    I'd rather not say her name due to excessive concerns about Homeland Security coming to arrest her because of her being mentioned on a crimethink site. But to answer your questions, the scenes are 100% contemporary, in fact, that's their appeal.

    Imagine any of the Sex & the City sluts, but in their 20s and genuinely pretty, the morning after, thinking it over. That's the look she captures, and her paintings are (I think) quite haunting, even if they aren't exactly Le Brun quality. They're better than the gal who did Michelle Obama, I've already forgotten her name.

    So here's a key to success as a fine artist: get some portrait drawing chops, and paint lots of pictures of quizzical looking pretty young women who look as if they've done something they regret.

    I’d rather not say her name due to excessive concerns about Homeland Security coming to arrest her because of her being mentioned on a crimethink site.

    Well I highly doubt that’s going to happen. :) Though if you perhaps have a personal connection with the artist, I can see why you’re a bit cagey. Ah, c’est la vie.

    Thanks anyway for responding.

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  110. No personal connection, just a genuine concern for someone who would probably be horrified to be mentioned here. LOL.

    OK, you dragged it out of me.

    [email protected] Ruggiero

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